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Sample records for population outcomes biological

  1. The role of population inertia in predicting the outcome of stage-structured biological invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiver, Chris; Dreiwi, Hanan; Filannino, Donna-Maria; Hodgson, Dave; Lloyd, Stephanie; Townley, Stuart

    2015-07-01

    Deterministic dynamic models for coupled resident and invader populations are considered with the purpose of finding quantities that are effective at predicting when the invasive population will become established asymptotically. A key feature of the models considered is the stage-structure, meaning that the populations are described by vectors of discrete developmental stage- or age-classes. The vector structure permits exotic transient behaviour-phenomena not encountered in scalar models. Analysis using a linear Lyapunov function demonstrates that for the class of population models considered, a large so-called population inertia is indicative of successful invasion. Population inertia is an indicator of transient growth or decline. Furthermore, for the class of models considered, we find that the so-called invasion exponent, an existing index used in models for invasion, is not always a reliable comparative indicator of successful invasion. We highlight these findings through numerical examples and a biological interpretation of why this might be the case is discussed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Anticholinergic drugs and negative outcomes in the older population: from biological plausibility to clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collamati, Agnese; Martone, Anna Maria; Poscia, Andrea; Brandi, Vincenzo; Celi, Michela; Marzetti, Emanuele; Cherubini, Antonio; Landi, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The use of medication with anticholinergic properties is widespread among older subjects. Many drugs of common use such as antispasmodics, bronchodilators, antiarrhythmics, antihistamines, anti-hypertensive drugs, antiparkinson agents, skeletal muscle relaxants, and psychotropic drugs have been demonstrated to have an anticholinergic activity. The most frequent adverse effects are dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, constipation, abdominal pain, urinary retention, blurred vision, tachycardia and neurologic impairment such as confusion, agitation and coma. A growing evidence from experimental studies and clinical observations suggests that drugs with anticholinergic properties can cause physical and mental impairment in the elderly population. However, the morbidity and management issues associated with unwanted anticholinergic activity are underestimated and frequently overlooked. Moreover, their possible relation with specific negative outcome in the elderly population is still not firmly established. The aim of the present review was to evaluate the relationship between the use of drugs with anticholinergic activity and negative outcomes in older persons. We searched PubMed and Cochrane combining the search terms "anticholinergic", "delirium", "cognitive impairment", "falls", "mortality" and "discontinuation". Medicines with anticholinergic properties may increase the risks of functional and cognitive decline, morbidity, institutionalization and mortality in older people. However, such evidences are still not conclusive probably due to possible confounding factors. In particular, more studies are needed to investigate the effects of discontinuation of drug with anticholinergic properties. Overall, minimizing anticholinergic burden should always be encouraged in clinical practice to improve short-term memory, confusion and delirium, quality of life and daily functioning.

  3. Strategic Grassland Bird Conservation throughout the annual cycle: Linking policy alternatives, landowner decisions, and biological population outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Ryan G.; Ribic, Christine; Koch, Katie; Lonsdorf, Eric V.; Grant, Edward C.; Ahlering, Marissa; Barnhill, Laurel; Dailey, Thomas; Lor, Socheata; Mueller, Connie; Pavlacky, D.C.; Rideout, Catherine; Sample, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Grassland bird habitat has declined substantially in the United States. Remaining grasslands are increasingly fragmented, mostly privately owned, and vary greatly in terms of habitat quality and protection status. A coordinated strategic response for grassland bird conservation is difficult, largely due to the scope and complexity of the problem, further compounded by biological, sociological, and economic uncertainties. We describe the results from a collaborative Structured Decision Making (SDM) workshop focused on linking social and economic drivers of landscape change to grassland bird population outcomes. We identified and evaluated alternative strategies for grassland bird conservation using a series of rapid prototype models. We modeled change in grassland and agriculture cover in hypothetical landscapes resulting from different landowner decisions in response to alternative socio-economic conservation policy decisions. Resulting changes in land cover at all three stages of the annual cycle (breeding, wintering, and migration) were used to estimate changes in grassland bird populations. Our results suggest that successful grassland bird conservation may depend upon linkages with ecosystem services on working agricultural lands and grassland-based marketing campaigns to engage the public. With further development, spatial models that link landowner decisions with biological outcomes can be essential tools for making conservation policy decisions. A coordinated non-traditional partnership will likely be necessary to clearly understand and systematically respond to the many conservation challenges facing grassland birds.

  4. Strategic Grassland Bird Conservation throughout the Annual Cycle: Linking Policy Alternatives, Landowner Decisions, and Biological Population Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan G Drum

    Full Text Available Grassland bird habitat has declined substantially in the United States. Remaining grasslands are increasingly fragmented, mostly privately owned, and vary greatly in terms of habitat quality and protection status. A coordinated strategic response for grassland bird conservation is difficult, largely due to the scope and complexity of the problem, further compounded by biological, sociological, and economic uncertainties. We describe the results from a collaborative Structured Decision Making (SDM workshop focused on linking social and economic drivers of landscape change to grassland bird population outcomes. We identified and evaluated alternative strategies for grassland bird conservation using a series of rapid prototype models. We modeled change in grassland and agriculture cover in hypothetical landscapes resulting from different landowner decisions in response to alternative socio-economic conservation policy decisions. Resulting changes in land cover at all three stages of the annual cycle (breeding, wintering, and migration were used to estimate changes in grassland bird populations. Our results suggest that successful grassland bird conservation may depend upon linkages with ecosystem services on working agricultural lands and grassland-based marketing campaigns to engage the public. With further development, spatial models that link landowner decisions with biological outcomes can be essential tools for making conservation policy decisions. A coordinated non-traditional partnership will likely be necessary to clearly understand and systematically respond to the many conservation challenges facing grassland birds.

  5. Measuring Population Health Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Parrish, R. Gibson

    2010-01-01

    An ideal population health outcome metric should reflect a population's dynamic state of physical, mental, and social well-being. Positive health outcomes include being alive; functioning well mentally, physically, and socially; and having a sense of well-being. Negative outcomes include death, loss of function, and lack of well-being. In contrast to these health outcomes, diseases and injuries are intermediate factors that influence the likelihood of achieving a state of health. On the basis...

  6. Combining biological and psychosocial baseline variables did not improve prediction of outcome of a very-low-energy diet in a clinic referral population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumithran, P; Purcell, K; Kuyruk, S; Proietto, J; Prendergast, L A

    2018-02-01

    Consistent, strong predictors of obesity treatment outcomes have not been identified. It has been suggested that broadening the range of predictor variables examined may be valuable. We explored methods to predict outcomes of a very-low-energy diet (VLED)-based programme in a clinically comparable setting, using a wide array of pre-intervention biological and psychosocial participant data. A total of 61 women and 39 men (mean ± standard deviation [SD] body mass index: 39.8 ± 7.3 kg/m 2 ) underwent an 8-week VLED and 12-month follow-up. At baseline, participants underwent a blood test and assessment of psychological, social and behavioural factors previously associated with treatment outcomes. Logistic regression, linear discriminant analysis, decision trees and random forests were used to model outcomes from baseline variables. Of the 100 participants, 88 completed the VLED and 42 attended the Week 60 visit. Overall prediction rates for weight loss of ≥10% at weeks 8 and 60, and attrition at Week 60, using combined data were between 77.8 and 87.6% for logistic regression, and lower for other methods. When logistic regression analyses included only baseline demographic and anthropometric variables, prediction rates were 76.2-86.1%. In this population, considering a wide range of biological and psychosocial data did not improve outcome prediction compared to simply-obtained baseline characteristics. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  7. Dynamical systems in population biology

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    This research monograph provides an introduction to the theory of nonautonomous semiflows with applications to population dynamics. It develops dynamical system approaches to various evolutionary equations such as difference, ordinary, functional, and partial differential equations, and pays more attention to periodic and almost periodic phenomena. The presentation includes persistence theory, monotone dynamics, periodic and almost periodic semiflows, basic reproduction ratios, traveling waves, and global analysis of prototypical population models in ecology and epidemiology. Research mathematicians working with nonlinear dynamics, particularly those interested in applications to biology, will find this book useful. It may also be used as a textbook or as supplementary reading for a graduate special topics course on the theory and applications of dynamical systems. Dr. Xiao-Qiang Zhao is a University Research Professor at Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. His main research interests involve applied...

  8. Adventures in human population biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, P T

    1996-01-01

    This article is a memoir of anthropologist Paul Baker's professional life. The introduction notes that the field of anthropology was altered by the impact of World War II when physical anthropologists provided vital information to the military. After the war, the GI bill supported the undergraduate and graduate studies of veterans, including Baker. After describing his academic training at the University of New Mexico and Harvard, Baker details his research training and field work in the desert for the US Climatic Research Laboratory and his work identifying the dead in Japan for the Quartermaster unit. Baker then traces his academic career at the Pennsylvania State University during which he directed two multidisciplinary research efforts for the International Biological Programme, one that sought to understand human adaptability at high altitude in Peru and another that studied migration and modernization in Samoa. Baker's last administrative positions were as staff consultant to the Man and the Biosphere (MAB) program and as chair of the US MAB committee. Baker retired from academic life at age 60 in 1987 and has devoted his time to reading and to helping organize professional associations in anthropology, especially those devoted to furthering internationally organized scientific efforts. Baker concludes this memoir by acknowledging the growth and development of the discipline of human population biology.

  9. Structured population models in biology and epidemiology

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Shigui

    2008-01-01

    This book consists of six chapters written by leading researchers in mathematical biology. These chapters present recent and important developments in the study of structured population models in biology and epidemiology. Topics include population models structured by age, size, and spatial position; size-structured models for metapopulations, macroparasitc diseases, and prion proliferation; models for transmission of microparasites between host populations living on non-coincident spatial domains; spatiotemporal patterns of disease spread; method of aggregation of variables in population dynamics; and biofilm models. It is suitable as a textbook for a mathematical biology course or a summer school at the advanced undergraduate and graduate level. It can also serve as a reference book for researchers looking for either interesting and specific problems to work on or useful techniques and discussions of some particular problems.

  10. Informatics approaches in the Biological Characterization of Adverse Outcome Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) are a conceptual framework to characterize toxicity pathways by a series of mechanistic steps from a molecular initiating event to population outcomes. This framework helps to direct risk assessment research, for example by aiding in computational ...

  11. Populations and outcome measures used in ongoing research in sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Ordóñez, Gloria Gabriela; Bustamante Montes, Lilia Patricia; Ramírez Duran, Ninfa; Sánchez Castellano, Carmen; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2017-08-01

    Sarcopenia research may be hampered by the heterogeneity of populations and outcome measures used in clinical studies. The aim of this study was to describe the inclusion/exclusion criteria and outcome measures used in ongoing research in sarcopenia. All active intervention studies registered in the World Health Organization with the keyword sarcopenia were included. Study design, type of intervention, inclusion/exclusion criteria and outcome measures were registered and classified. In April 2014, 151 studies on sarcopenia were registered in the WHO database. One hundred twenty-three were intervention studies. Most trials (94.3 %) were single centre and randomized (93.5 %), 51.2 % were double blind. Nutritional interventions (36.6 %), physical exercise (12.2 %) or both (19.5 %) were the most common interventions tested. Only 54.4 % included subjects of both genders, and 46.3 % had an upper age limit. Definition of the target populations was heterogeneous, with 57.7 % including healthy subjects and none using recent definitions of sarcopenia. Lifestyle and the degree of physical activity of subjects were not described or considered in most cases (79.7 %). Subjects with cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric or metabolic disorders and those with physical disability were usually excluded. Muscle mass and muscle strength were the primary outcome variables in 28.5 and 29.5 % of studies and physical performance in 19.5 %, but only 4.1 % used the three variables used the three of them. An additional 26.8 % used biological outcome variables. Little information and agreement existed in the way muscle and physical performance parameters were measured. We found a large heterogeneity in trial design, definition of populations and outcome measures in present research.

  12. Cooperation, cheating, and collapse in biological populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    Natural populations can collapse suddenly in response to small changes in environmental conditions, and recovery from such a collapse can be difficult. We have used laboratory microbial ecosystems to directly measure theoretically proposed early warning signals of impending population collapse. Yeast cooperatively break down the sugar sucrose, meaning that below a critical size the population cannot sustain itself. We have demonstrated experimentally that changes in the fluctuations of the population size can serve as an early warning signal that the population is close to collapse. The cooperative nature of yeast growth on sucrose suggests that the population may be susceptible to ``cheater'' cells, which do not contribute to the public good and instead merely take advantage of the cooperative cells. We confirm this possibility experimentally and find that such social parasitism decreases the resilience of the population.

  13. Concise Review: Stem Cell Population Biology: Insights from Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Adam L; Lo Celso, Cristina; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are fundamental to human life and offer great therapeutic potential, yet their biology remains incompletely-or in cases even poorly-understood. The field of stem cell biology has grown substantially in recent years due to a combination of experimental and theoretical contributions: the experimental branch of this work provides data in an ever-increasing number of dimensions, while the theoretical branch seeks to determine suitable models of the fundamental stem cell processes that these data describe. The application of population dynamics to biology is amongst the oldest applications of mathematics to biology, and the population dynamics perspective continues to offer much today. Here we describe the impact that such a perspective has made in the field of stem cell biology. Using hematopoietic stem cells as our model system, we discuss the approaches that have been used to study their key properties, such as capacity for self-renewal, differentiation, and cell fate lineage choice. We will also discuss the relevance of population dynamics in models of stem cells and cancer, where competition naturally emerges as an influential factor on the temporal evolution of cell populations. Stem Cells 2017;35:80-88. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  14. Development of Forest Population Biology and Biogeocenology in the Urals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Sannikov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The priority directions, concepts, approaches, methods and results of half a century investigations of forest genetics, ecology, geography and biogeocenology in the Ural school of population biology of woody plants are briefly discussed. The results of quantitative genetic-ecologic-geographical studies of the forests based on population approaches as well as main theoretic generalizations are presented, to assist possible interpretation and development of future investigations.

  15. 2007 Microbial Population Biology (July 22-26, 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony M. Dean

    2008-04-01

    Microbial Population Biology covers a diverse range of cutting edge issues in the microbial sciences and beyond. Firmly founded in evolutionary biology and with a strongly integrative approach, past meetings have covered topics ranging from the dynamics and genetics of adaptation to the evolution of mutation rate, community ecology, evolutionary genomics, altruism, and epidemiology. This meeting is never dull: some of the most significant and contentious issues in biology have been thrashed out here. We anticipate the 2007 meeting being no exception. The final form of the 2007 meeting is yet to be decided, but the following topics are likely to be included: evolutionary emergence of infectious disease and antibiotic resistance, genetic architecture and implications for the evolution of microbial populations, ageing in bacteria, biogeography, evolution of symbioses, the role of microbes in ecosystem function, and ecological genomics.

  16. Measuring management success for protected species: Looking beyond biological outcomes

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    Kathryn D Bisack

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the ocean ecosystem, including the human component, is such that a single fishery may require multiple policy instruments to support recovery and conservation of protected species, in addition to those for fisheries management. As regulations multiply, the need for retrospective analysis and evaluation grows in order to inform future policy. To accurately evaluate policy instruments, clear objectives and their link to outcomes are necessary, as well as identifying criteria to evaluate outcomes. The Northeast United States sink gillnet groundfish fishery provides a case study of the complexity of regulations and policy instruments implemented under the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Endangered Species Act to address bycatch of marine mammals. The case study illustrates a range of possible objectives for the policy instruments including biological, economic, social-normative and longevity factors. We highlight links between possible objectives, outcomes and criteria for the four factors, as well as areas for consideration when undertaking ex-post analyses. To support learning from past actions, we call for a coordinated effort involving multiple disciplines and jurisdictions to undertake retrospective analyses and evaluations of key groups of policy instruments used for protected species.

  17. Towards a Population Dynamics Theory for Evolutionary Computing: Learning from Biological Population Dynamics in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhanshan (Sam)

    In evolutionary computing (EC), population size is one of the critical parameters that a researcher has to deal with. Hence, it was no surprise that the pioneers of EC, such as De Jong (1975) and Holland (1975), had already studied the population sizing from the very beginning of EC. What is perhaps surprising is that more than three decades later, we still largely depend on the experience or ad-hoc trial-and-error approach to set the population size. For example, in a recent monograph, Eiben and Smith (2003) indicated: "In almost all EC applications, the population size is constant and does not change during the evolutionary search." Despite enormous research on this issue in recent years, we still lack a well accepted theory for population sizing. In this paper, I propose to develop a population dynamics theory forEC with the inspiration from the population dynamics theory of biological populations in nature. Essentially, the EC population is considered as a dynamic system over time (generations) and space (search space or fitness landscape), similar to the spatial and temporal dynamics of biological populations in nature. With this conceptual mapping, I propose to 'transplant' the biological population dynamics theory to EC via three steps: (i) experimentally test the feasibility—whether or not emulating natural population dynamics improves the EC performance; (ii) comparatively study the underlying mechanisms—why there are improvements, primarily via statistical modeling analysis; (iii) conduct theoretical analysis with theoretical models such as percolation theory and extended evolutionary game theory that are generally applicable to both EC and natural populations. This article is a summary of a series of studies we have performed to achieve the general goal [27][30]-[32]. In the following, I start with an extremely brief introduction on the theory and models of natural population dynamics (Sections 1 & 2). In Sections 4 to 6, I briefly discuss three

  18. Antibiotic resistance shaping multi-level population biology of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero, Fernando; Tedim, Ana P; Coque, Teresa M

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics have natural functions, mostly involving cell-to-cell signaling networks. The anthropogenic production of antibiotics, and its release in the microbiosphere results in a disturbance of these networks, antibiotic resistance tending to preserve its integrity. The cost of such adaptation is the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes, and of all genetic and cellular vehicles in which these genes are located. Selection of the combinations of the different evolutionary units (genes, integrons, transposons, plasmids, cells, communities and microbiomes, hosts) is highly asymmetrical. Each unit of selection is a self-interested entity, exploiting the higher hierarchical unit for its own benefit, but in doing so the higher hierarchical unit might acquire critical traits for its spread because of the exploitation of the lower hierarchical unit. This interactive trade-off shapes the population biology of antibiotic resistance, a composed-complex array of the independent "population biologies." Antibiotics modify the abundance and the interactive field of each of these units. Antibiotics increase the number and evolvability of "clinical" antibiotic resistance genes, but probably also many other genes with different primary functions but with a resistance phenotype present in the environmental resistome. Antibiotics influence the abundance, modularity, and spread of integrons, transposons, and plasmids, mostly acting on structures present before the antibiotic era. Antibiotics enrich particular bacterial lineages and clones and contribute to local clonalization processes. Antibiotics amplify particular genetic exchange communities sharing antibiotic resistance genes and platforms within microbiomes. In particular human or animal hosts, the microbiomic composition might facilitate the interactions between evolutionary units involved in antibiotic resistance. The understanding of antibiotic resistance implies expanding our knowledge on multi

  19. Biology as population dynamics: heuristics for transmission risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keebler, Daniel; Walwyn, David; Welte, Alex

    2013-02-01

    Population-type models, accounting for phenomena such as population lifetimes, mixing patterns, recruitment patterns, genetic evolution and environmental conditions, can be usefully applied to the biology of HIV infection and viral replication. A simple dynamic model can explore the effect of a vaccine-like stimulus on the mortality and infectiousness, which formally looks like fertility, of invading virions; the mortality of freshly infected cells; and the availability of target cells, all of which impact on the probability of infection. Variations on this model could capture the importance of the timing and duration of different key events in viral transmission, and hence be applied to questions of mucosal immunology. The dynamical insights and assumptions of such models are compatible with the continuum of between- and within-individual risks in sexual violence and may be helpful in making sense of the sparse data available on the association between HIV transmission and sexual violence. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Redefining Perineural Invasion: Integration of Biology With Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitd, Ligia B; Beesley, Lauren J; Russo, Nickole; Bellile, Emily L; Inglehart, Ronald C; Liu, Min; Romanowicz, Genevieve; Wolf, Gregory T; Taylor, Jeremy M G; D'Silva, Nisha J

    2018-05-22

    A diagnosis of perineural invasion (PNI), defined as cancer within or surrounding at least 33% of the nerve, leads to selection of aggressive treatment in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recent mechanistic studies show that cancer and nerves interact prior to physical contact. The purpose of this study was to explore cancer-nerve interactions relative to clinical outcome. Biopsy specimens from 71 patients with oral cavity SCC were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical (IHC; cytokeratin, S100, GAP43, Tuj1) stains. Using current criteria, PNI detection was increased with IHC. Overall survival (OS) tended to be poor for patients with PNI (P = .098). OS was significantly lower for patients with minimum tumor-nerve distance smaller than 5 μm (P = .011). The estimated relative death rate decreased as the nerve-tumor distance increased; there was a gradual drop off in death rate from distance equal to zero that stabilized around 500 μm. In PNI-negative patients, nerve diameter was significantly related to OS (HR 2.88, 95%CI[1.11,7.49]). Among PNI-negative nerves, larger nerve-tumor distance and smaller nerve diameter were significantly related to better OS, even when adjusting for T-stage and age (HR 0.82, 95% CI[0.72,0.92]; HR 1.27, 95% CI[1.00,1.62], respectively). GAP43, a marker for neuronal outgrowth, stained less than Tuj1 in nerves at greater distances from tumor (OR 0.76, 95% CI[0.73,0.79]); more GAP43 staining was associated with PNI. Findings from a small group of patients suggest that nerve parameters other than presence of PNI can influence outcome and that current criteria of PNI need to be re-evaluated to integrate recent biological discoveries. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of proteomics to ecology and population biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, T L

    2008-02-01

    Proteomics is a relatively new scientific discipline that merges protein biochemistry, genome biology and bioinformatics to determine the spatial and temporal expression of proteins in cells, tissues and whole organisms. There has been very little application of proteomics to the fields of behavioral genetics, evolution, ecology and population dynamics, and has only recently been effectively applied to the closely allied fields of molecular evolution and genetics. However, there exists considerable potential for proteomics to impact in areas related to functional ecology; this review will introduce the general concepts and methodologies that define the field of proteomics and compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages with other methods. Examples of how proteomics can aid, complement and indeed extend the study of functional ecology will be discussed including the main tool of ecological studies, population genetics with an emphasis on metapopulation structure analysis. Because proteomic analyses provide a direct measure of gene expression, it obviates some of the limitations associated with other genomic approaches, such as microarray and EST analyses. Likewise, in conjunction with associated bioinformatics and molecular evolutionary tools, proteomics can provide the foundation of a systems-level integration approach that can enhance ecological studies. It can be envisioned that proteomics will provide important new information on issues specific to metapopulation biology and adaptive processes in nature. A specific example of the application of proteomics to sperm ageing is provided to illustrate the potential utility of the approach.

  2. A Model of Biological Attacks on a Realistic Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Kathleen M.; Fridsma, Douglas; Casman, Elizabeth; Altman, Neal; Chen, Li-Chiou; Kaminsky, Boris; Nave, Demian; Yahja, Alex

    The capability to assess the impacts of large-scale biological attacks and the efficacy of containment policies is critical and requires knowledge-intensive reasoning about social response and disease transmission within a complex social system. There is a close linkage among social networks, transportation networks, disease spread, and early detection. Spatial dimensions related to public gathering places such as hospitals, nursing homes, and restaurants, can play a major role in epidemics [Klovdahl et. al. 2001]. Like natural epidemics, bioterrorist attacks unfold within spatially defined, complex social systems, and the societal and networked response can have profound effects on their outcome. This paper focuses on bioterrorist attacks, but the model has been applied to emergent and familiar diseases as well.

  3. Nutrients, Recycling, and Biological Populations in Upwelling Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitledge, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    Nutrient recycling has been studied in the upwelling areas of Baja California, Northwest Africa, and Peru. Regeneration by biological populations in these areas contributes significant quantities of recycled nitrogen which is utilized in productivity processes. Each area has a different combination of organisms which leads to differences in the relative contributions of zooplankton, nekton, or benthos to the nutrient cycles. Comparisons of ammonium regeneration rates of zooplankton and nekton-micronekton populations in the three upwelling areas show that zooplankton recycle relatively less nitrogen in the Baja California and Peru systems than nekton. In the Northwest Africa upwelling region, however, zooplankton, fish, and benthic inputs are all substantial. In recent years the Peruvian upwelling system has been altered with the decline of the anchoveta population and an increase in the importance of zooplankton in nutrient recycling. The distribution of recycled nitrogen (ammonium and urea) in transects across the shelf at 10°S and 15°S indicates that regeneration is relatively more important at 10°S in the region of the wide shelf. In both areas the distribution of ammonium and urea are not entirely coincident thereby indicating differences in their production and/or utilization.

  4. Antibiotic resistance shaping multilevel population biology of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando eBaquero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics have natural functions, mostly involving cell-to-cell signalling networks. The anthropogenic production of antibiotics, and its release in the microbiosphere results in a disturbance of these networks, antibiotic resistance tending to preserve its integrity. The cost of such adaptation is the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes, and of all genetic and cellular vehicles in which these genes are located. Selection of the combinations of the different evolutionary units (genes, integrons, transposons, plasmids, cells, communities and microbiomes, hosts is highly asymmetrical. Each unit of selection is a self-interested entity, exploiting the higher hierarchical unit for its own benefit, but in doing so the higher hierarchical unit might acquire critical traits for its spread because of the exploitation of the lower hierarchical unit. This interactive trade-off shapes the population biology of antibiotic resistance, a composed-complex array of the independent population biologies. Antibiotics modify the abundance and the interactive field of each of these units. Antibiotics increase the number and evolvability of clinical antibiotic resistance genes, but probably also many other genes with different primary functions but with a resistance phenotype present in the environmental resistome. Antibiotics influence the abundance, modularity, and spread of integrons, transposons and plasmids, mostly acting on structures present before the antibiotic era. Antibiotics enrich particular bacterial lineages and clones and contribute to local clonalization processes. Antibiotics amplify particular genetic exchange communities sharing antibiotic resistance genes and platforms within microbiomes. In particular human or animal hosts, the microbiomic composition might facilitate the interactions between evolutionary units involved in antibiotic resistance. The understanding of antibiotic resistance implies expanding our knowledge

  5. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belmonte-Beitia, J.

    2013-10-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belmonte-Beitia, J.; Woolley, T.E.; Scott, J.G.; Maini, P.K.; Gaffney, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Survival outcome of malignant minor salivary tumors in Pakistani population

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    Hassan Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Malignant tumors of minor salivary glands (MSG are rare. Survival outcome in Pakistani population with malignant MSG tumors remains to be defined. The objective of this study was to report the clinical presentation, treatment modalities, and survival outcome of radically treated malignant tumors of MSG in Pakistani population. Materials and Methods: Between April 2003 and March 2011, 45 patients with malignant tumors of MSG were treated at Shaukat Khanum Cancer Hospital and included in the study. Patient characteristics and treatment modalities were assessed and local, regional, and distant failures determined. Relapse-free (RFS and overall survival (OS was calculated using Kaplan-Meier curves, and log-rank test was used to determine significance. Results: Median age was 40 (17-83 years. Male to female ratio was 1.25:1. Most common site was hard palate in 31 (69% patients. Adenoid cystic carcinoma (51% was the most common histological diagnosis. Nine patients (20% underwent surgery as the only treatment modality, six patients received (13% radiotherapy alone, and 30 patients (67% had surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. Eight patients developed recurrence (four local, two regional, one locoregional, and one distant. The 5-year actuarial overall OS and RFS was 77 and 66%, respectively. Age, T-stage, and treatment modality were significant for RFS, whereas T-stage and treatment modality were significant factors for OS. Conclusion: Surgery as single modality or combined with radiation therapy resulted in acceptable survival in Pakistani population with malignant minor salivary tumors.

  8. Obesity and outcomes following burns in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Evan; Burris, Agnes; Murphy, Joseph T

    2014-03-01

    While obesity is associated with increased mortality and decreased functional outcomes in adult burn patients, the ramifications of larger than average body size in the pediatric burn population are less well understood. The present study examines whether obesity was associated with poor outcomes following pediatric burn injuries. Thermal injury data for patients ≤ 18 years of age admitted to a Level III burn center over ten years (n=536) was analyzed. Obesity was defined as ≥ 95 th percentile of weight for height according to the WHO growth charts (obese (n=154) and non-obese (n=382) children. All data was collected in accordance with IRB regulations. Obese and non-obese thermally-injured children did not differ in TBSA, percentage of full thickness burn, or overall mortality. However, these groups were significantly different with respect to age (obese=7.16 ± 0.46 years, non-obese=9.38 ± 0.32 years, pobese=4.89 ± 1.3 days, non-obese=2.67 ± 0.49 days, pobese (n=46) and non-obese (n=129) did not differ significantly with respect to age, TBSA, percentage of full thickness burn or other outcome measures. However, significant differences between these groups were noted for ICU LOS (obese=18.59 ± 5.18 days, non-obese=9.51 ± 1.82 days, pobese=11.65 ± 3.91 days, non-obese=3.92 ± 0.85 days, pobese pediatric patients required longer and more intensive medical support in the form of BICU care and respiratory intervention. Counter to findings in adult populations, differences in mortality were not observed. Collectively, these findings suggest obesity as a risk factor for increased morbidity in the pediatric burn population. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Biological control agents elevate hantavirus by subsidizing deer mouse populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean E. Pearson; Ragan M. Callaway

    2006-01-01

    Biological control of exotic invasive plants using exotic insects is practiced under the assumption that biological control agents are safe if they do not directly attack non-target species. We tested this assumption by evaluating the potential for two host-specific biological control agents (Urophora spp.), widely established in North America for spotted...

  10. Outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies: a nationwide, population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte; Damm, Peter; Moelsted-Pedersen, Lars

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies with the background population.......The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies with the background population....

  11. Study populations and casemix: influence on analysis of postoperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbister, W H

    2000-04-01

    outcome differences observed reached statistical significance except postoperative atelectasis and intraabdominal abscess. Although not statistically significant, the results of the present study suggest that when the same surgeon operates using the same technique in different communities, the outcomes may be different. Care should thus be taken when comparing different populations with different casemixes before definitive conclusions are made in comparative studies.

  12. Breeding biology of the eastern population of the Short-clawed Lark ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breeding biology of the eastern population of the Short-clawed Lark in South Africa. ... courtship and copulation behaviour, the incubation period, description of the ... In contrast with the single-brooded western population, the eastern ...

  13. Population-based differences in treatment outcome following anticancer drug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Brigette By; Hui, Edwin P; Mok, Tony Sk

    2010-01-01

    Population-based differences in toxicity and clinical outcome following treatment with anticancer drugs have an important effect on oncology practice and drug development. These differences arise from complex interactions between biological and environmental factors, which include genetic diversity affecting drug metabolism and the expression of drug targets, variations in tumour biology and host physiology, socioeconomic disparities, and regional preferences in treatment standards. Some well-known examples include the high prevalence of activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in pulmonary adenocarcinoma among northeast (China, Japan, Korea) and parts of southeast Asia (excluding India) non-smokers, which predict sensitivity to EGFR kinase inhibitors, and the sharp contrast between Japan and the west in the management and survival outcome of gastric cancer. This review is a critical overview of population-based differences in the four most prevalent cancers in the world: lung, breast, colorectal, and stomach cancer. Particular attention is given to the clinical relevance of such knowledge in terms of the individualisation of drug therapy and in the design of clinical trials. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimal management of non-Markovian biological populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.K.

    2007-01-01

    Wildlife populations typically are described by Markovian models, with population dynamics influenced at each point in time by current but not previous population levels. Considerable work has been done on identifying optimal management strategies under the Markovian assumption. In this paper we generalize this work to non-Markovian systems, for which population responses to management are influenced by lagged as well as current status and/or controls. We use the maximum principle of optimal control theory to derive conditions for the optimal management such a system, and illustrate the effects of lags on the structure of optimal habitat strategies for a predator-prey system.

  15. Variability and connectivity of plaice populations from the Eastern North Sea to the Baltic Sea, part II. Biological evidence of population mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Clara; Hansen, Jakob Hemmer; Boje, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    in parallel. Genetic markers suggested the existence of different genetic populations in the transition area. Growth backcalculation with otoliths resulted in significant although limited differences in growth rates between North Sea and Skagerrak, indicating weak differentiation or important mixing......A multi-disciplinary study was conducted to clarify stock identity and connectivity patterns in the populations of European plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) in the Skagerrak-Kattegat transition area between the Eastern North Sea and the Baltic Sea. Five independent biological studies were carried out...... constitute a large share of the catches in this area. The mixing of different populations within a management area has implications for stock assessment and management. Choice must be made to either lump or split the populations, and the feasibility and constraints of both options are discussed. The outcomes...

  16. Eradication of tephritid fruit fly pest populations: outcomes and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, David Maxwell; Kean, John M; Stringer, Lloyd D; Cáceres-Barrios, Carlos; Hendrichs, Jorge; Reyes-Flores, Jesus; Dominiak, Bernard C

    2016-03-01

    The number of insect eradication programmes is rising in response to globalisation. A database of arthropod and plant pathogen eradications covers 1050 incursion responses, with 928 eradication programmes on 299 pest and disease taxa in 104 countries (global eradication database b3.net.nz/gerda). A subset of the database was assembled with 211 eradication or response programmes against 17 species of fruit flies (Tephritidae) in 31 countries, in order to investigate factors affecting the outcome. The failure rate for fruit fly eradication programmes was about 7%, with 0% for Ceratitis capitata (n = 85 programmes) and 0% for two Anastrepha species (n = 12 programmes), but 12% for 13 Bactrocera species (n = 108 programmes). A number of intended eradication programmes against long-established populations were not initiated because of cost and other considerations, or evolved during the planning phase into suppression programmes. Cost was dependent on area, ranged from $US 0.1 million to $US 240 million and averaged about $US 12 million (normalised to $US in 2012). In addition to the routine use of surveillance networks, quarantine and fruit destruction, the key tactics used in eradication programmes were male annihilation, protein bait sprays (which can attract both sexes), fruit destruction and the sterile insect technique. Eradication success generally required the combination of several tactics applied on an area-wide basis. Because the likelihood of eradication declines with an increase in the area infested, it pays to invest in effective surveillance networks that allow early detection and delimitation while invading populations are small, thereby greatly favouring eradication success. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Eradication of tephritid fruit fly pest populations: outcomes and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckling, David Maxwell; Kean, John M.; Stringer, Lloyd D.; Cáceres-Barrios, Carlos; Hendrichs, Jorge; Reyes-Flores, Jesus; Dominiak, Bernard C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of insect eradication programmes is rising in response to globalisation. A database of arthropod and plant pathogen eradications covers 1050 incursion responses, with 928 eradication programmes on 299 pest and disease taxa in 104 countries (global eradication database b3.net.nz/gerda). METHODS: A subset of the database was assembled with 211 eradication or response programmes against 17 species of fruit flies (Tephritidae) in 31 countries, in order to investigate factors affecting the outcome. RESULTS: The failure rate for fruit fly eradication programmes was about 7%, with 0% for Ceratitis capitata (n=85 programmes) and 0% for two Anastrepha species (n=12 programmes), but 12% for 13 Bactrocera species (n=108 programmes). A number of intended eradication programmesagainst long-established populations were not initiated because of cost and other considerations, or evolved during the planning phase into suppression programmes. Cost was dependent on area, ranged from $US 0.1 million to $US 240 million and averaged about $US 12 million (normalised to $US in 2012). In addition to the routine use of surveillance networks, quarantine and fruit destruction, the key tactics used in eradication programmes were male annihilation, protein bait sprays (which can attract both sexes), fruit destruction and the sterile insect technique. CONCLUSIONS: Eradication success generally required the combination of several tactics applied on an area-wide basis. Because the likelihood of eradication declines with an increase in the area infested, it pays to invest in effective surveillance networks that allow early detection and delimitation while invading populations are small, thereby greatly favouring eradication success. (author)

  18. Wireless-accessible sensor populations for monitoring biological variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzu, Marco; Scalvini, Simonetta; Giordano, A.; Frumento, E.; Wells, Hannah; Lokhorst, C.; Glisenti, Fulvio

    2008-01-01

    The current health-care infrastructure is generally considered to be inadequate to meet the needs of an increasingly older population. We have investigated the feasibility of a passive in-home monitoring system based on wireless accessible sensor populations (WASP). In an EU-funded project we have

  19. Reproductive biology and body condition of exploited populations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A substantial proportion (in terms of value and quantity) of the Pomacanthus imperator catch on the Kenyan coast are traded, and the species is also harvested as food in the artisanal fishery. However information on their reproductive biology is scanty. The overall sex ratio differed significantly from 1:1 according to ...

  20. Increasing population and declining biological resources in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Biodiversity; global change; globalization; population and land use; sustainable ... School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, India .... Ghat region to meet international market demands is an example ...

  1. Biological rhythms for rehabilitation of radiation damage of population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, T.G.; Vasil'eva, G.S.; Efimov, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Considerable disturbances in biological eurhythmycal structure of redoracu were discovered for people living in Borodulikha area of the Semipalatinsk test site. The deep desynchronise may result in a development of the cardiovascular, bronco-pulmonary, endocrine, oncologic, neuro psychic diseases. A method to correct the biological eurhythmycal structure was developed. Homeopathic doses of melatonin ('rhythm driver' managing the most regenerating and immune systems) and uthynol (promoting production of dehydroepiandrosterone of maternal prehormone of 27 hormones) were used to provide the general correction. The endocrine diseases are not practically subjected to the homeopathic correction. The sub correction was sometimes carried out after 5 months. The developed methods of rehabilitation of the radiation damages are unique, since they allow performing the homeopathic correction using the acupuncture monitoring

  2. Increasing population and declining biological resources in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Biodiversity; global change; globalization; population and land use; sustainable landscape management; traditional ecological management ... biodiversity on which they are dependant for their livelihood, there is an urgent need to explore additional pathways for ...... the upland central region of Mexico, as a response to.

  3. Chaotic population dynamics and biology of the top-predator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Vikas; Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar

    2004-01-01

    We study how the dynamics of a food chain depends on the biology of the top-predator. We consider two model food chains with specialist and generalist top-predators. Both types of food chains display same type of chaotic behavior, short-term recurrent chaos; but the generating mechanisms are drastically different. Food chains with specialist top-predators are dictated by exogenous stochastic factors. On the contrary, the dynamics of those with the generalist top-predator is governed by deterministic changes in system parameters. The study also suggests that robust chaos would be a rarity

  4. Mathematical Topics in Population Biology, Morphogenesis and Neurosciences

    CERN Document Server

    Yumaguti, Masaya

    1987-01-01

    This volume represents the edited proceedings of the International Symposium on Mathematical Biology held in Kyoto, November 10-15, 1985. The symposium was or­ ganized by an international committee whose members are: E. Teramoto, M. Yamaguti, S. Amari, S.A. Levin, H. Matsuda, A. Okubo, L.M. Ricciardi, R. Rosen, and L.A. Segel. The symposium included technical sessions with a total of 11 invited papers, 49 contributed papers and a poster session where 40 papers were displayed. These Proceedings consist of selected papers from this symposium. This symposium was the second Kyoto meeting on mathematical topics in biology. The first was held in conjunction with the Sixth International Biophysics Congress in 1978. Since then this field of science has grown enormously, and the number of scientists in the field has rapidly increased. This is also the case in Japan. About 80 young japanese scientists and graduate students participated this time. . The sessions were divided into 4 ; , categories: 1) Mathematical Ecolo...

  5. THE ADVERSE OUTCOME PATHWAY (AOP) FRAMEWORK: A FRAMEWORK FOR ORGANIZING BIOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE LEADING TO HEALTH RISKS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) represents the organization of current and newly acquired knowledge of biological pathways. These pathways contain a series of nodes (Key Events, KEs) that when sufficiently altered influence the next node on the pathway, beginning from an Molecul...

  6. Wildlife reserves, populations, and hunting outcome with smart wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Strange, Niels

    2014-01-01

    We consider a hunting area and a wildlife reserve and answer the question: How does clever migration decision affect the social optimal and the private optimal hunting levels and population stocks? We analyze this in a model allowing for two-way migration between hunting and reserve areas, where...... the populations’ migration decisions depend on both hunting pressure and relative population densities. In the social optimum a pure stress effect on the behavior of smart wildlife exists. This implies that the population level in the wildlife reserve tends to increase and the population level in the hunting area...... and hunting levels tend to decrease. On the other hand, the effect on stock tends to reduce the population in the wildlife reserve and increase the population in the hunting area and thereby also increase hunting. In the case of the private optimum, open-access is assumed and we find that the same qualitative...

  7. Biological effects of alpha radiation on a human population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorleifson, E.M.; Marro, L.; Tracy, B.L.; Wilkinson, D.; Segura, T.M.; Prud'homme-Lalonde, L.; Leach, K.; Ford, B.N.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In the environment, natural and man-made sources of radioactive material can become integrated into the food chain. Polonium-210 is a significant source of radiation exposure to caribou and to northern human populations who are dependent on caribou for a major portion of their meat supply. Previous work has shown that humans consuming caribou meat containing measurable quantities of polonium-210 can incorporate a substantial fraction of the radionuclide (Thomas et. al.). Conventional chromosome aberration analysis of blood samples collected from 40 individuals who routinely consumed caribou meat was performed to measure genetic damage from the ingested radioactive material. At least 500 metaphase spreads were analysed for each of 39 individuals. Radiation-specific chromosomal aberrations such as dicentrics and rings were scored and their frequencies were compared to the range of aberrations observed in non-caribou consuming populations. This study was designed to address the possible impact of environmental polonium-210 on background radiation health effects in humans

  8. Wildlife reserves, populations and hunting outcome with smart wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2014-01-01

    reach ambiguous results when comparing a situation with and without stress effects. A pure stress effect implies that the population level in a wildlife reserve increase and the population level in the hunting area decrease in optimum. However, this change in optimal population levels increase migration...... from the wildlife reserve to the hunting area in the social optimum. The total effect is, therefore, ambiguous. For the private optimum open-access is assumed and exactly the same results arise as in the social optimum when comparing a situation with and without stress effects....

  9. Student perceptions of their biology teacher's interpersonal teaching behaviors and student achievement and affective learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wade Clay, Jr.

    The primary goals of this dissertation were to determine the relationships between interpersonal teaching behaviors and student achievement and affective learning outcomes. The instrument used to collect student perceptions of teacher interpersonal teaching behaviors was the Questionnaire on Teacher Interactions (QTI). The instrument used to assess student affective learning outcomes was the Biology Student Affective Instrument (BSAI). The interpersonal teaching behavior data were collected using students as the observers. 111 students in an urban influenced, rural high school answered the QTI and BSAI in September 1997 and again in April 1998. At the same time students were pre and post tested using the Biology End of Course Examination (BECE). The QTI has been used primarily in European and Oceanic areas. The instrument was also primarily used in educational stratified environment. This was the first time the BSAI was used to assess student affective learning outcomes. The BECE is a Texas normed cognitive assessment test and it is used by Texas schools districts as the end of course examination in biology. The interpersonal teaching behaviors model was tested to ascertain if predictive power in the USA and in a non-stratified educational environment. Findings indicate that the QTI is an adequate predictor of student achievement in biology. The results were not congruent with the non-USA data and results, this indicates that the QTI is a society/culturally sensitive instrument and the instrument needs to be normed to a particular society/culture before it is used to affect teachers' and students' educational environments.

  10. Approaches to monitoring biological outcomes for HPV vaccination: challenges of early adopter countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Charlene A; Saraiya, Mona; Hariri, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we describe plans to monitor the impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on biologic outcomes in selected international areas (Australia, Canada, Mexico, the Nordic countries, Scotland, and the United States) that have adopted this vaccine. This summary of monitoring plans...... provides a background for discussing the challenges of vaccine monitoring in settings where resources and capacity may vary. A variety of approaches that depend on existing infrastructure and resources are planned or underway for monitoring HPV vaccine impact. Monitoring HPV vaccine impact on biologic...

  11. Subclinical thyrotoxicosis in an outpatient population - predictors of outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Belinda J; Brownlie, Bevan E W; Frampton, Chris M; Turner, John G

    2011-02-01

    Individuals with endogenous subclinical thyrotoxicosis (SCT) may subsequently require treatment for overt disease. We aimed to evaluate the frequency of progression to hyperthyroidism and factors influencing this outcome. This is a retrospective analysis of outcome in 96 consecutive patients (aged 16-91 years) diagnosed with SCT over a 6-year period. Individuals with secondary causes of TSH suppression were excluded. Mean follow-up was 3·8 years. The significance of age, gender, family history of thyrotoxicosis, symptoms at presentation, thyroid nodule(s) on clinical examination, entry TSH level, antithyroid antibody status and (99m) Tc pertechnetate thyroid imaging results on subsequent development of overt thyrotoxicosis was assessed. Progression to overt thyrotoxicosis was seen in 8% at 1 year, 16% at 2 years, 21% at 3 years and 26% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis determined that diagnosis as determined by scintiscan to be the only independent predictor of outcome (P = 0·003) with the cumulative percentage requiring therapy at 5 years being 9% for subclinical Graves' disease, 21% for multinodular goitre and 61% for the autonomous nodule subgroup. Progression of SCT to overt hyperthyroidism occurred at a rate of 5-8% per year with disease aetiology, as determined by thyroid scintigraphy, significantly influencing risk of progression. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. 525 Population Growth, Hysteresis and Development Outcomes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    technique of analysis is the Auto-Regressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) Bound test for long-run ..... Where; y is the actual income; λ is the adjustment factor and gy is output per ... income per capita if population growth leaves the ratio of workers to total ..... 0.00 and 0.01 probability values are not normally distributed around the.

  13. Ozone dosing alters the biological potential and therapeutic outcomes of plasma rich in growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, E; Zalduendo, M M; Troya, M; Orive, G

    2015-04-01

    Until now, ozone has been used in a rather empirical way. This in-vitro study investigates, for the first time, whether different ozone treatments of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) alter the biological properties and outcomes of this autologous platelet-rich plasma. Human plasma rich in growth factors was treated with ozone using one of the following protocols: a continuous-flow method; or a syringe method in which constant volumes of ozone and PRGF were mixed. In both cases, ozone was added before, during and after the addition of calcium chloride. Three ozone concentrations, of the therapeutic range 20, 40 and 80 μg/mL, were tested. Fibrin clot properties, growth factor content and the proliferative effect on primary osteoblasts and gingival fibroblasts were evaluated. Ozone treatment of PRGF using the continuous flow protocol impaired formation of the fibrin scaffold, drastically reduced the levels of growth factors and significantly decreased the proliferative potential of PRGF on primary osteoblasts and gingival fibroblasts. In contrast, treatment of PRGF with ozone using the syringe method, before, during and after the coagulation process, did not alter the biological outcomes of the autologous therapy. These findings suggest that ozone dose and the way that ozone combines with PRGF may alter the biological potential and therapeutic outcomes of PRGF. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Health Outcomes of Exposure to Biological and Chemical Components of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morakinyo, Oyewale Mayowa; Mokgobu, Matlou Ingrid; Mukhola, Murembiwa Stanley; Hunter, Raymond Paul

    2016-06-14

    Particulate matter (PM) is a key indicator of air pollution and a significant risk factor for adverse health outcomes in humans. PM is not a self-contained pollutant but a mixture of different compounds including chemical and biological fractions. While several reviews have focused on the chemical components of PM and associated health effects, there is a dearth of review studies that holistically examine the role of biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM in disease causation. A literature search using various search engines and (or) keywords was done. Articles selected for review were chosen following predefined criteria, to extract and analyze data. The results show that the biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM play a significant role in the burden of health effects attributed to PM. These health outcomes include low birth weight, emergency room visit, hospital admission, respiratory and pulmonary diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancer, non-communicable diseases, and premature death, among others. This review justifies the importance of each or synergistic effects of the biological and chemical constituents of PM on health. It also provides information that informs policy on the establishment of exposure limits for PM composition metrics rather than the existing exposure limits of the total mass of PM. This will allow for more effective management strategies for improving outdoor air quality.

  15. Health Outcomes of Exposure to Biological and Chemical Components of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyewale Mayowa Morakinyo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter (PM is a key indicator of air pollution and a significant risk factor for adverse health outcomes in humans. PM is not a self-contained pollutant but a mixture of different compounds including chemical and biological fractions. While several reviews have focused on the chemical components of PM and associated health effects, there is a dearth of review studies that holistically examine the role of biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM in disease causation. A literature search using various search engines and (or keywords was done. Articles selected for review were chosen following predefined criteria, to extract and analyze data. The results show that the biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM play a significant role in the burden of health effects attributed to PM. These health outcomes include low birth weight, emergency room visit, hospital admission, respiratory and pulmonary diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancer, non-communicable diseases, and premature death, among others. This review justifies the importance of each or synergistic effects of the biological and chemical constituents of PM on health. It also provides information that informs policy on the establishment of exposure limits for PM composition metrics rather than the existing exposure limits of the total mass of PM. This will allow for more effective management strategies for improving outdoor air quality.

  16. Biological annihilation via the ongoing sixth mass extinction signaled by vertebrate population losses and declines

    OpenAIRE

    Ceballos, Gerardo; Ehrlich, Paul R.; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    The strong focus on species extinctions, a critical aspect of the contemporary pulse of biological extinction, leads to a common misimpression that Earth’s biota is not immediately threatened, just slowly entering an episode of major biodiversity loss. This view overlooks the current trends of population declines and extinctions. Using a sample of 27,600 terrestrial vertebrate species, and a more detailed analysis of 177 mammal species, we show the extremely high degree of population decay in...

  17. Aspects of the population biology of Octopus vulgaris in False Bay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... gonadal somatic indices of 0.52 and 0.46 found in spring and summer respectively (periods of warmer water in False Bay) may indicate peak spawning during those seasons. Keywords: maturation, morphometrics, Octopus vulgaris, population biology, sex ratio, spawning season. African Journal of Marine Science 2002, ...

  18. Using matrix population models to inform biological control management of the wheat stem sawfly, Cephus cinctus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demographic models are a powerful means of identifying vulnerable life stages of pest species and assessing the potential effectiveness of various management approaches in reducing pest population growth and spread. In a biological control context, such models can be used to focus foreign explorati...

  19. Population-based treatment and outcomes of Stage I uterine serous carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, L.J.M. van der; Hoskins, P.; Tinker, A.; Lim, P.; Aquino-Parsons, C.; Kwon, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is a rare type of endometrial cancer that often recurs in patients with Stage I disease. Our objective was to evaluate treatment and outcomes in Stage I USC in the context of a population-based study. METHODS: This was a population-based retrospective cohort

  20. Does mating interfere in the biological characteristics of a population of Trichogramma pretiosum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIRCEU PRATISSOLI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Trichogramma spp. are parasitoids used in the regulation of insect populations that can cause economic damage. In order to ensure good performance, understanding some of their biological characteristics is essential. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether mating interferes with the biological characteristics of a population of Trichogramma pretiosum collected in the field. In all experiments, groups of mated and unmated females were used. We also verified any interference from mating on the biological characteristics of the offspring. We found that mating can alter the parasitism and longevity of genitor females, in addition to changing longevity among the descendants, but once parasitized, the eggs develop normally, showing similar emergence percentage and number of offspring as those from unmated females. In addition, we verified that the population of T. pretiosum collected in the field presented individuals with reproductive thelytokous and arrhenotokous characteristics. This fact highlights the importance of careful investigation on the reproduction mode of populations collected in the field, thus avoiding problems in the effective management of insect populations.

  1. Trends in mortality and biological stress in a medieval polish urban population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsinger, Tracy K; DeWitte, Sharon

    2017-12-01

    Urbanization in pre-modern populations may have had a variety of consequences related to population crowding. However, research on the effects of urbanization have provided inconsistent results regarding the biological impact of this transition on human populations. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that urbanization caused an increase in overall biological stress in a medieval (10th-13th centuries AD) Polish population. A human skeletal sample (n=164) was examined for the presence of porotic hyperostosis, cribra orbitalia, linear enamel hypoplasia, periosteal reaction, and specific infectious diseases. Prevalence rates were compared among three temporal samples: initial urbanization, early urbanization, and later urbanization. Results indicate no significant trends for any of the pathological conditions. Cox proportional hazards analyses, however, revealed a significant increase in the risk of death over time, which supports the hypothesis. These results reflect the necessity of using multiple analyses to address bioarchaeological questions. The lack of significant results from skeletal indicators may be due to an earlier urbanization trend in the population. This study illustrates that the association of urbanization with elevated biological stress is complicated and dependent on various factors, including culture and time period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Low-molecular-weight cyclin E: the missing link between biology and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akli, Said; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2004-01-01

    Cyclin E, a key mediator of transition during the G 1 /S cellular division phase, is deregulated in a wide variety of human cancers. Our group recently reported that overexpression and generation of low-molecular-weight (LMW) isoforms of cyclin E were associated with poor clinical outcome among breast cancer patients. However, the link between LMW cyclin E biology in mediating a tumorigenic phenotype and clinical outcome is unknown. To address this gap in knowledge, we assessed the role of LMW isoforms in breast cancer cells; we found that these forms of cyclin E induced genomic instability and resistance to p21, p27, and antiestrogens in breast cancer. These findings suggest that high levels of LMW isoforms of cyclin E not only can predict failure to endocrine therapy but also are true prognostic indicators because of their influence on cell proliferation and genetic instability

  3. Biological annihilation via the ongoing sixth mass extinction signaled by vertebrate population losses and declines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Gerardo; Ehrlich, Paul R; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2017-07-25

    The population extinction pulse we describe here shows, from a quantitative viewpoint, that Earth's sixth mass extinction is more severe than perceived when looking exclusively at species extinctions. Therefore, humanity needs to address anthropogenic population extirpation and decimation immediately. That conclusion is based on analyses of the numbers and degrees of range contraction (indicative of population shrinkage and/or population extinctions according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature) using a sample of 27,600 vertebrate species, and on a more detailed analysis documenting the population extinctions between 1900 and 2015 in 177 mammal species. We find that the rate of population loss in terrestrial vertebrates is extremely high-even in "species of low concern." In our sample, comprising nearly half of known vertebrate species, 32% (8,851/27,600) are decreasing; that is, they have decreased in population size and range. In the 177 mammals for which we have detailed data, all have lost 30% or more of their geographic ranges and more than 40% of the species have experienced severe population declines (>80% range shrinkage). Our data indicate that beyond global species extinctions Earth is experiencing a huge episode of population declines and extirpations, which will have negative cascading consequences on ecosystem functioning and services vital to sustaining civilization. We describe this as a "biological annihilation" to highlight the current magnitude of Earth's ongoing sixth major extinction event.

  4. Barents Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus: population biology and anthropogenic threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Andersen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how anthropogenic threats, such as disturbance, pollution and climate change, are linked to polar bear (Ursus maritimus population biology in the Svalbard and Barents Sea area, with the aim to increase our understanding of how human activity may impact the population. Overharvesting drastically reduced the population of polar bears in the Barents Sea region from about 1870 to 1970. After harvesting was stopped—in 1956 in Russia and 1973 in Norway—the population grew to an estimated 2650 individuals (95% confidence interval 1900–3600 in 2004, and maternity denning in the Svalbard Archipelago became more widely distributed. During recent decades, the population has faced challenges from a variety of new anthropogenic impacts: a range of pollutants, an increasing level of human presence and activity as well as changes in ice conditions. Contaminants bioaccumulate up through the marine food web, culminating in this top predator that consumes ringed, bearded and harp seals. Females with small cubs use land-fast sea ice for hunting and are therefore vulnerable to disturbance by snowmobile drivers. Sea-ice diminution, associated with climate change, reduces polar bears’ access to denning areas and could negatively affect the survival of cubs. There are clear linkages between population biology and current anthropogenic threats, and we suggest that future research and management should focus on and take into consideration the combined effects of several stressors on polar bears.

  5. Gender and Bladder Cancer: A Collaborative Review of Etiology, Biology, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobruch, Jakub; Daneshmand, Siamak; Fisch, Margit; Lotan, Yair; Noon, Aidan P; Resnick, Matthew J; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Boorjian, Stephen A

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of bladder cancer is three to four times greater in men than in women. However, women are diagnosed with more advanced disease at presentation and have less favorable outcomes after treatment. To review the literature on potential biologic mechanisms underlying differential gender risk for bladder cancer, and evidence regarding gender disparities in bladder cancer presentation, management, and outcomes. A literature search of English-language publications that included an analysis of the association of gender with bladder cancer was performed using Pubmed. Ninety-seven articles were selected for analysis with the consensus of all authors. It has been shown that the gender difference in bladder cancer incidence is independent of differences in exposure risk, including smoking status. Potential molecular mechanisms include disparate metabolism of carcinogens by hepatic enzymes between men and women, resulting in differential exposure of the urothelium to carcinogens. In addition, the activity of the sex steroid hormone pathway may play a role in bladder cancer development, with demonstration that both androgens and estrogens have biologic effects in bladder cancer in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, gender differences exist in the timeliness and completeness of hematuria evaluation, with women experiencing a significantly greater delay in urologic referral and undergoing guideline-concordant imaging less frequently. Correspondingly, women have more advanced tumors at the time of bladder cancer diagnosis. Interestingly, higher cancer-specific mortality has been noted among women even after adjusting for tumor stage and treatment modality. Numerous potential biologic and epidemiologic factors probably underlie the gender differences observed for bladder cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, and outcomes. Continued evaluation to define clinical applications for manipulation of the sex steroid pathway and to improve the standardization of hematuria

  6. Impact of obesity on pregnancy outcome in different ethnic groups: calculating population attributable fractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Oteng-Ntim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To quantify the proportion of adverse pregnancy outcome attributable to maternal obesity. DESIGN: Cross sectional analysis of routine obstetric dataset. SETTING: Guy's and St Thomas's NHS Foundation Trust (GSTFT. POPULATION: 23,668 women who had singleton deliveries at GSTFT between 2004 and 2008. METHODS: Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between BMI and outcome in different ethnic groups. Adjusted odds ratios, and the proportions of obese women, were used to calculate population attributable risk fractions (PAFs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (I MATERNAL OUTCOMES: diabetes, type of delivery, post-partum haemorrhage, and preterm delivery. (ii Perinatal outcomes: macrosomia, low birth weight, admission to neonatal intensive care/special care baby unit, and perinatal death. RESULTS: The prevalence of maternal obesity was 14%. Increasing BMI was independently associated with increasing risk of adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome. At the individual level, the effect of obesity on diabetes was highest in Asian women compared to white women (p for interaction = 0.03. Calculation of population attributable risk fractions demonstrated that one third of diabetes cases and one in six Caesarean sections could be avoided in this population if all obese women were of normal BMI. At the population level, the contribution of obesity to diabetes was highest for Black women (42%, and lowest for oriental women (8%. Seven percent of neonatal macrosomia in all the population, and 13% in Black mothers, were attributable to obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Preventing obesity prior to pregnancy will substantially reduce the burden of obstetric and neonatal morbidity in this population. This reduction will be higher in Black women.

  7. Visual Literacy Skills of Students in College-Level Biology: Learning Outcomes Following Digital or Hand-Drawing Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Justine C.

    2014-01-01

    To test the claim that digital learning tools enhance the acquisition of visual literacy in this generation of biology students, a learning intervention was carried out with 33 students enrolled in an introductory college biology course. This study compared learning outcomes following two types of learning tools: a traditional drawing activity, or…

  8. Variation of Body Size in Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Its Associations with Population Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yunshan; Ao, Yan; Jiang, Mingxing; Way, Michael O

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Life history characteristics help us to determine the ability of invasive species to establish and thrive in an exotic environment. However, so far, there have been very few reports concerning geographic variation in the body size of invasive insects and the associations between body size variation and population biology. In this study, we surveyed the geographic variation in body size of an invasive agricultural pest, the rice water weevil Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel (Coleopte...

  9. Predicting Salmonella Populations from Biological, Chemical, and Physical Indicators in Florida Surface Waters

    OpenAIRE

    McEgan, Rachel; Mootian, Gabriel; Goodridge, Lawrence D.; Schaffner, Donald W.; Danyluk, Michelle D.

    2013-01-01

    Coliforms, Escherichia coli, and various physicochemical water characteristics have been suggested as indicators of microbial water quality or index organisms for pathogen populations. The relationship between the presence and/or concentration of Salmonella and biological, physical, or chemical indicators in Central Florida surface water samples over 12 consecutive months was explored. Samples were taken monthly for 12 months from 18 locations throughout Central Florida (n = 202). Air and wat...

  10. A mechanistic approach to link biological effects of radioactive substances from molecules to populations in wildlife species - A mechanistic approach to link biological effects of radionuclides from molecules to populations in wildlife species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo, Frederic; Parisot, Florian; Plaire, Delphine; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Garnier- Laplace, Jacqueline [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV, SERIS, LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul- Lez-Durance, 13115 (France)

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how toxic contaminants affect wildlife species at various levels of biological organisation (sub-cellular, histological, physiological, organism, population levels) is a major research goal in both ecotoxicology and radioecology. A mechanistic understanding of the links between the different observed perturbations is necessary to predict consequences for survival, growth and reproduction which are critical for population dynamics. However, time scales at which such links are established in the laboratory are rarely relevant for natural populations. With a small size and short life cycle, the cladoceran micro-crustacean Daphnia magna is a particularly suitable biological model for studying effects of radioactive contaminants over several generations. Multi-generational exposures are much more representative of the environmental context of field populations for which contaminations can last for durations which largely exceed individual longevity and involve exposure of many successive generations. Over the last decade, multi-generational investigations of toxic effects were conducted under controlled conditions in D. magna exposed to various radionuclides including depleted uranium, americium-241 and cesium-137, representing respectively a dominantly chemo-toxic metal, an alpha internal contamination and a gamma external radiation. Results showed in all cases that toxic effects on physiology and life history (survival, body size, fecundity) increased in severity across generations. These observations demonstrated that measured effects in one generation might not be representative of toxicity in the following offspring generations, and ultimately of the population response. Reduction in somatic growth and reproduction induced by uranium were analysed using the mechanistic modelling approach known as DEBtox (model of dynamic energy budget applied to toxicology). Modelling results suggested that uranium primarily affects assimilation. This metabolic mode

  11. BSim: an agent-based tool for modeling bacterial populations in systems and synthetic biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Gorochowski

    Full Text Available Large-scale collective behaviors such as synchronization and coordination spontaneously arise in many bacterial populations. With systems biology attempting to understand these phenomena, and synthetic biology opening up the possibility of engineering them for our own benefit, there is growing interest in how bacterial populations are best modeled. Here we introduce BSim, a highly flexible agent-based computational tool for analyzing the relationships between single-cell dynamics and population level features. BSim includes reference implementations of many bacterial traits to enable the quick development of new models partially built from existing ones. Unlike existing modeling tools, BSim fully considers spatial aspects of a model allowing for the description of intricate micro-scale structures, enabling the modeling of bacterial behavior in more realistic three-dimensional, complex environments. The new opportunities that BSim opens are illustrated through several diverse examples covering: spatial multicellular computing, modeling complex environments, population dynamics of the lac operon, and the synchronization of genetic oscillators. BSim is open source software that is freely available from http://bsim-bccs.sf.net and distributed under the Open Source Initiative (OSI recognized MIT license. Developer documentation and a wide range of example simulations are also available from the website. BSim requires Java version 1.6 or higher.

  12. Are there biologic differences between male and female breast cancer explaining inferior outcome of men despite equal stage and treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.C.; Gani, C.; Rehm, H.M.E.; Eckert, F.; Bamberg, M.; Weinmann, M.; Hehr, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reasons for inferior outcome of male compared to female breast cancer are still under debate. Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed male breast cancer cases to figure out possible treatment- and gender-related differences. Patients and methods: A total of 40 men (median age 62 years) were curatively treated with mastectomy and postoperative radiotherapy from 1982-2007. They presented predominantly in stages II and IIIb. Postoperative radiotherapy was applied with doses of 1.8-2.5 Gy to a median of 50 Gy including regional lymphatics in 22 patients. Adjuvant systemic treatment consisted of chemotherapy (22.5%) and antihormonal treatment (55%). For reasons of comparison, we estimated outcome of a virtual female matched cohort for no/equal to men/optimal adjuvant treatment with the Adjuvant.Online registered 8.0 algorithm. Results: After a median follow-up of 47 months, the estimated 5-year local control rate was 97%, disease-free and distant metastasis-free survival rates reached 79% and 82%, respectively. With update of survival data by tumor registry, mean overall survival reached 120 months with 5- and 10-year overall survival rates of 66% and 43%, respectively. Predominant prognostic factor was T-stage for overall survival (T1/2 vs. T4: > 80% vs. 30%). The generated virtual matched cohorts of women with equal characteristics reached superior 10-year-overall survival for no/equal to men/optimal adjuvant treatment with 55/59/68%. Conclusion: Compared to historical and virtual matched cohorts of women, male breast cancer patients had inferior outcome despite of equal stage and treatment which indicates that biological differences (of tumor or population) may contribute to worse prognosis. (orig.)

  13. Are there biologic differences between male and female breast cancer explaining inferior outcome of men despite equal stage and treatment?.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, A.C.; Gani, C.; Rehm, H.M.E.; Eckert, F.; Bamberg, M.; Weinmann, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology; Hehr, T. [Marienhospital Stuttgart (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2012-09-15

    Background: Reasons for inferior outcome of male compared to female breast cancer are still under debate. Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed male breast cancer cases to figure out possible treatment- and gender-related differences. Patients and methods: A total of 40 men (median age 62 years) were curatively treated with mastectomy and postoperative radiotherapy from 1982-2007. They presented predominantly in stages II and IIIb. Postoperative radiotherapy was applied with doses of 1.8-2.5 Gy to a median of 50 Gy including regional lymphatics in 22 patients. Adjuvant systemic treatment consisted of chemotherapy (22.5%) and antihormonal treatment (55%). For reasons of comparison, we estimated outcome of a virtual female matched cohort for no/equal to men/optimal adjuvant treatment with the Adjuvant.Online {sup registered} 8.0 algorithm. Results: After a median follow-up of 47 months, the estimated 5-year local control rate was 97%, disease-free and distant metastasis-free survival rates reached 79% and 82%, respectively. With update of survival data by tumor registry, mean overall survival reached 120 months with 5- and 10-year overall survival rates of 66% and 43%, respectively. Predominant prognostic factor was T-stage for overall survival (T1/2 vs. T4: > 80% vs. 30%). The generated virtual matched cohorts of women with equal characteristics reached superior 10-year-overall survival for no/equal to men/optimal adjuvant treatment with 55/59/68%. Conclusion: Compared to historical and virtual matched cohorts of women, male breast cancer patients had inferior outcome despite of equal stage and treatment which indicates that biological differences (of tumor or population) may contribute to worse prognosis. (orig.)

  14. Integrating population genetics and conservation biology in the era of genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouborg, N Joop

    2010-02-23

    As one of the final activities of the ESF-CONGEN Networking programme, a conference entitled 'Integrating Population Genetics and Conservation Biology' was held at Trondheim, Norway, from 23 to 26 May 2009. Conference speakers and poster presenters gave a display of the state-of-the-art developments in the field of conservation genetics. Over the five-year running period of the successful ESF-CONGEN Networking programme, much progress has been made in theoretical approaches, basic research on inbreeding depression and other genetic processes associated with habitat fragmentation and conservation issues, and with applying principles of conservation genetics in the conservation of many species. Future perspectives were also discussed in the conference, and it was concluded that conservation genetics is evolving into conservation genomics, while at the same time basic and applied research on threatened species and populations from a population genetic point of view continues to be emphasized.

  15. Attitudinal, behavioral, and biological outcomes of a community popular opinion leader intervention in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Li, Li; Liang, Li-Jung; Wen, Yi; Wu, Zunyou

    2011-10-01

    The effects of a community popular opinion leader (CPOL) intervention were examined among market vendors in a city on the eastern coast of China. Employees of 40 food markets were enrolled in a study that provided HIV-related education and tests, and treatment for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Twenty markets were randomly assigned to a CPOL intervention (N = 1,695) and 20 markets to a control condition (N = 1,616). Market employees in the intervention condition reported positive attitudes regarding STD/HIV prevention and more frequent discussions about safe sex than those in the control condition. Compared with baseline, the prevalence of unprotected sexual acts and new STDs were significantly lower within each study condition 24 months later. Although the CPOL intervention achieved its goal of shifting attitudes within food markets, the gains did not lead to the expected behavioral and biological outcomes.

  16. Population attributable risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes related to smoking in adolescents and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delpisheh, A.; Kelly, Y.; Rizwan, S.; Attia, E.; Drammond, S.; Brabin, B. J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about how population-attributable risks (PAR) for adverse birth outcomes due to smoking differ in adolescent and adult pregnancies. METHODS: An analysis of community and hospital-based cross-sectional studies in Liverpool was undertaken to estimate the PAR values of low

  17. The population health perspective as a framework for studying child maltreatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonmyr, L; MacMillan, H L; Jamieson, E; Kelly, K

    2002-01-01

    The population health perspective (PHP) is commonly used in addressing a wide range of health issues. This article examines the strengths and limitations of the perspective. The determinants of health that are an integral part of the PHP are used as a framework in considering the range of outcomes associated with exposure to child maltreatment. Directions for further research are outlined.

  18. Association between acute statin therapy, survival, and improved functional outcome after ischemic stroke: the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-04-01

    Statins improve infarct volume and neurological outcome in animal stroke models. We investigated the relationship between statin therapy and ischemic stroke outcome in the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

  19. Preoperative biological therapy and short-term outcomes of abdominal surgery in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Matti; Xu, Wei; Dinani, Amreen; Steinhart, A Hillary; Croitoru, Kenneth; Nguyen, Geoffrey C; McLeod, Robin S; Greenberg, Gordon R; Cohen, Zane; Silverberg, Mark S

    2013-03-01

    Previous investigations of short-term outcomes after preoperative exposure to biological therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were conflicting. The authors aimed to assess postoperative outcomes in patients who underwent abdominal surgery with recent exposure to anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy. A retrospective case-control study with detailed matching was performed for subjects with IBD with and without exposure to biologics within 180 days of abdominal surgery. Postoperative outcomes were compared between the groups. 473 procedures were reviewed consisting of 195 patients with exposure to biologics and 278 matched controls. There were no significant differences in most postoperative outcomes such as: length of stay, fever (≥ 38.5°C), urinary tract infection, pneumonia, bacteraemia, readmission, reoperations and mortality. On univariate analysis, procedures on biologics had more wound infections compared with controls (19% vs 11%; p=0.008), but this was not significant in multivariate analysis. Concomitant therapy with biologics and thiopurines was associated with increased frequencies of urinary tract infections (p=0.0007) and wound infections (p=0.0045). Operations performed ≤ 14 days from last biologic dose had similar rates of infections and other outcomes when compared with those performed within 15-30 days or 31-180 days. Patients with detectable preoperative infliximab levels had similar rates of wound infection compared with those with undetectable levels (3/10 vs 0/9; p=0.21). Preoperative treatment with TNF-α antagonists in patients with IBD is not associated with most early postoperative complications. A shorter time interval from last biological dose is not associated with increased postoperative complications. In most cases, surgery should not be delayed, and appropriate biological therapy may be continued perioperatively.

  20. Gender Inequality in Biology Classes in China and Its Effects on Students' Short-Term Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Neuhaus, Birgit

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated gender inequality in biology lessons and analysed the effects of the observed inequality on students' short-term knowledge achievement, situational interest and students' evaluation of teaching (SET). Twenty-two biology teachers and 803 7th-grade students from rural and urban classrooms in China participated in the study. Each teacher was videotaped for 1 lesson on the topic blood and circulatory system. Before and after the lessons, the students completed tests and questionnaires. Chi-square analysis was conducted to compare the boys' and girls' participation rates of answering teachers' questions in the lessons. The findings revealed that in the urban classrooms the boys had a significantly higher rate of participation than did the girls, and hence also a higher situational interest. However, no such gender inequity was found among the rural students. The study also revealed that urban students answered more complicated questions compared with the rural students in general. The findings of this study suggest that the teachers should try to balance boys' and girls' participation and involve more students in answering questions in their lessons. The study also raises questions about long-term effects of students' participation in answering teachers' questions on their outcomes-knowledge achievement, situational interest and SET.

  1. Students’ Use of Optional Online Reviews and Its Relationship to Summative Assessment Outcomes in Introductory Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Shana K.; Rahman, Shuhebur; Lund, Terry J. S.; Armstrong, Patrick I.; Lamm, Monica H.; Reason, Robert D.; Coffman, Clark R.

    2017-01-01

    Retrieval practice has been shown to produce significant enhancements in student learning of course information, but the extent to which students make use of retrieval to learn information on their own is unclear. In the current study, students in a large introductory biology course were provided with optional online review questions that could be accessed as Test questions (requiring students to answer the questions before receiving feedback) or as Read questions (providing students with the question and correct answer up-front). Students more often chose to access the questions as Test compared with Read, and students who used the Test questions scored significantly higher on subsequent exams compared with students who used Read questions or did not access the questions at all. Following an in-class presentation of superior exam performance following use of the Test questions, student use of Test questions increased significantly for the remainder of the term. These results suggest that practice questions can be an effective tool for enhancing student achievement in biology and that informing students about performance-based outcomes coincides with increased use of retrieval practice. PMID:28408408

  2. Stochastic noncooperative and cooperative evolutionary game strategies of a population of biological networks under natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Yeh, Chin-Hsun

    2017-12-01

    We review current static and dynamic evolutionary game strategies of biological networks and discuss the lack of random genetic variations and stochastic environmental disturbances in these models. To include these factors, a population of evolving biological networks is modeled as a nonlinear stochastic biological system with Poisson-driven genetic variations and random environmental fluctuations (stimuli). To gain insight into the evolutionary game theory of stochastic biological networks under natural selection, the phenotypic robustness and network evolvability of noncooperative and cooperative evolutionary game strategies are discussed from a stochastic Nash game perspective. The noncooperative strategy can be transformed into an equivalent multi-objective optimization problem and is shown to display significantly improved network robustness to tolerate genetic variations and buffer environmental disturbances, maintaining phenotypic traits for longer than the cooperative strategy. However, the noncooperative case requires greater effort and more compromises between partly conflicting players. Global linearization is used to simplify the problem of solving nonlinear stochastic evolutionary games. Finally, a simple stochastic evolutionary model of a metabolic pathway is simulated to illustrate the procedure of solving for two evolutionary game strategies and to confirm and compare their respective characteristics in the evolutionary process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of artificial neural networks to predict biological outcomes for patients receiving radical radiotherapy of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Webb, Steve; Rowbottom, Carl G.; Corne, David W.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: This paper discusses the application of artificial neural networks (ANN) in predicting biological outcomes following prostate radiotherapy. A number of model-based methods have been developed to correlate the dose distributions calculated for a patient receiving radiotherapy and the radiobiological effect this will produce. Most widely used are the normal tissue complication probability and tumour control probability models. An alternative method for predicting specific examples of tumour control and normal tissue complications is to use an ANN. One of the advantages of this method is that there is no need for a priori information regarding the relationship between the data being correlated. Patients and methods: A set of retrospective clinical data from patients who received radical prostate radiotherapy was used to train ANNs to predict specific biological outcomes by learning the relationship between the treatment plan prescription, dose distribution and the corresponding biological effect. The dose and volume were included as a differential dose-volume histogram in order to provide a holistic description of the available data. Results: It was shown that the ANNs were able to predict biochemical control and specific bladder and rectum complications with sensitivity and specificity of above 55% when the outcomes were dichotomised. It was also possible to analyse information from the ANNs to investigate the effect of individual treatment parameters on the outcome. Conclusion: ANNs have been shown to learn something of the complex relationship between treatment parameters and outcome which, if developed further, may prove to be a useful tool in predicting biological outcomes

  4. Efficient Analysis of Systems Biology Markup Language Models of Cellular Populations Using Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Leandro; Myers, Chris J

    2016-08-19

    The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) has been widely used for modeling biological systems. Although SBML has been successful in representing a wide variety of biochemical models, the core standard lacks the structure for representing large complex regular systems in a standard way, such as whole-cell and cellular population models. These models require a large number of variables to represent certain aspects of these types of models, such as the chromosome in the whole-cell model and the many identical cell models in a cellular population. While SBML core is not designed to handle these types of models efficiently, the proposed SBML arrays package can represent such regular structures more easily. However, in order to take full advantage of the package, analysis needs to be aware of the arrays structure. When expanding the array constructs within a model, some of the advantages of using arrays are lost. This paper describes a more efficient way to simulate arrayed models. To illustrate the proposed method, this paper uses a population of repressilator and genetic toggle switch circuits as examples. Results show that there are memory benefits using this approach with a modest cost in runtime.

  5. Cultural inter-population differences do not reflect biological distances: an example of interdisciplinary analysis of populations from Eastern Adriatic coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bašić, Željana; Fox, Ayano R; Anterić, Ivana; Jerković, Ivan; Polašek, Ozren; Anđelinović, Šimun; Holland, Mitchell M; Primorac, Dragan

    2015-06-01

    To compare the population group from the Šopot graveyard with population groups from traditional Croatian medieval graveyards by using anthropological, craniometrics, and mitochondrial (mtDNA) analysis and to examine if the cultural differences between population groups reflect biological differences. We determined sex, age at death, pathological, and traumatic changes of skeletal remains from the Šopot graveyard and compared them with a cumulative medieval sample from the same region. We also performed principal component analysis to compare skeletal remains from Šopot with those from Ostrovica and other Central European samples according to 8 cranial measurements. Finally, we compared 46 skeletons from Šopot with medieval (Ostrovica) and contemporary populations using mDNA haplogroup profiling. The remains from Šopot were similar to the cumulative sample in lifestyle and quality of life markers. Principal component analysis showed that they were closely related to Eastern Adriatic coast sites (including Ostrovica and Šopot) in terms of cranial morphology, indicating similar biological makeup. According to mDNA testing, Šopot population showed no significant differences in the haplogroup prevalence from either medieval or contemporary populations. This study shows that the Šopot population does not significantly differ from other medieval populations from this area. Besides similar quality of life markers, these populations also had similar biological markers. Substantial archeological differences can therefore be attributed to apparent cultural influences, which in this case do not reflect biological differences.

  6. Predicting Salmonella populations from biological, chemical, and physical indicators in Florida surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEgan, Rachel; Mootian, Gabriel; Goodridge, Lawrence D; Schaffner, Donald W; Danyluk, Michelle D

    2013-07-01

    Coliforms, Escherichia coli, and various physicochemical water characteristics have been suggested as indicators of microbial water quality or index organisms for pathogen populations. The relationship between the presence and/or concentration of Salmonella and biological, physical, or chemical indicators in Central Florida surface water samples over 12 consecutive months was explored. Samples were taken monthly for 12 months from 18 locations throughout Central Florida (n = 202). Air and water temperature, pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), turbidity, and conductivity were measured. Weather data were obtained from nearby weather stations. Aerobic plate counts and most probable numbers (MPN) for Salmonella, E. coli, and coliforms were performed. Weak linear relationships existed between biological indicators (E. coli/coliforms) and Salmonella levels (R(2) Florida surface water through logistic regression.

  7. Population based outcomes of cataract surgery in three tribal areas of Andhra Pradesh, India: risk factors for poor outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit C Khanna

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report visual outcomes and risk factors for poor outcomes of cataract surgery in three Integrated Tribal Development Agency (ITDA areas of Andhra Pradesh, India. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using validated Rapid Assessment of Avoidable Blindness (RAAB methodology, a population based cross-sectional study, was conducted in three ITDA areas. A two-stage sampling procedure was used to select 7281 participants aged 50 years and above. Vision assessment using a tumbling E chart and standard ocular examinations were completed. Visual outcomes and risk factors for poor outcomes were assessed among subjects undergoing cataract surgery (1548 eyes of 1124 subjects. Mean age at surgery was 67±8 years; Among the operated eyes, presenting visual acuity (PVA and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA worse than 6/18 was seen in 492 (31.8%; 95% CI, 29.5-34.2% and 298 eyes (19.3%; 95% CI, 17.3-21.3%, respectively. Similarly, PVA and BCVA worse than 6/60 was seen in 219 (14.1%; 95% CI, 12.4-16% and 147 eyes (9.5%; 95% CI, 8.1-11.1%, respectively. When either eye was taken into consideration, the PVA and BCVA worse than 6/18 was seen in 323 (20.1%; 95% CI, 18.9-23% and 144 subjects (9.3%; 95% CI, 7.9-10.9%, respectively. PVA and BCVA worse than 6/60 was seen in 74 (4.8%; 95% CI, 3.8-6% and 49 subjects (3.2%; 95% CI, 2.4-4.2%, respectively. Posterior capsular opacification was seen in 51 of 1316 pseudophakic eyes (3.9%; 95% CI, 2.9-5.1%. In multivariable analysis among pseudophakic subjects with PVA worse than 6/18, increasing age (p = 0.002 and undergoing free surgery (p = 0.05 were independent risk factors. Undergoing surgery before 2005 (p = 0.05 and being illiterate (p = 0.05 were independent risk factors for BCVA worse than 6/18. CONCLUSIONS: There are changing trends with improved outcomes in cataract surgery among these tribal populations of India. However, post-operative refractive error correction remains an issue, especially for those

  8. Mississippian subadults from the Middle Cumberland and Eastern regions of Tennessee: Biological indicators of population interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopa Kelso, Rebecca

    2018-02-23

    Human subadult skeletal remains can provide a unique perspective into biosocial aspects of Mississippian period population interactions within and between the Middle Cumberland (MCR) and Eastern Tennessee Regions (ETR). The majority of previous studies have concentrated on adult skeletal remains, leaving out a large and extremely important population segment. Skeletal indicators of disease, growth, body proportions, and metabolic stress were collected from subadult remains from five archaeological sites over several temporal periods. Crucial to overcoming limitations associated with the osteological paradox, the biological results were placed into an archaeological context based on prior studies as well as paleoclimatological data. Results reveal homogeneity both within and between regions for most skeletal indicators. However, MCR individuals exhibit a higher frequency of pathology than those from ETC, while stature is significantly lower in younger subadults from the MCR. Within the ETR, there is no evidence for biological differences between Early Dallas and subsequent Late Dallas and Mouse Creek cultural phases. Despite presumed signs of increased conflict at the Dallas site, frequencies and types of skeletal pathology and growth disruptions are comparable to other regional sites. These findings suggest that despite cultural differences between the ETR and MCR, there was no large-scale intrusion from an outside population into the ETR during the Late Mississippian Period, or if one occurred, it is biologically invisible. Combined with climatic and archaeobotanical data, results suggest the MCR subadults were under increased stress in their earlier years. This may have been associated with increased interpersonal violence and dependence on few food sources occurring with greater scarcity. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Fertility rates and perinatal outcomes of adolescent pregnancies: a retrospective population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Maria de Lourdes de; Lynn, Fiona Ann; Johnston, Linda; Tavares, Eduardo Cardoso Teixeira; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Botelho, Lúcio José

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: analyze trends in fertility rates and associations with perinatal outcomes for adolescents in Santa Catarina, Brazil. Methods: a population-based study covering 2006 to 2013 was carried out to evaluate associations between perinatal outcomes and age groups, using odds ratios, and Chi-squared tests. Results: differences in the fertility rate among female adolescents across regions and time period were observed, ranging from 40.9 to 72.0 per 1,000 in mothers aged 15-19 ye...

  10. Diagnostic and correction of chronic-biological mis-balances of population at radiation injuries in regions with increased radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, T.G.; Vasil'eva, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    It was shown the possibility of bio-indication of population irradiation and its rehabilitation by estimation of chronic biological mis-balances and correction realization. Investigation were accomplished on people contingent living at the former Semipalatinsk test site

  11. Trends in adverse maternal outcomes during childbirth: a population-based study of severe maternal morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christine L; Ford, Jane B; Algert, Charles S; Bell, Jane C; Simpson, Judy M; Morris, Jonathan M

    2009-02-25

    Maternal mortality is too rare in high income countries to be used as a marker of the quality of maternity care. Consequently severe maternal morbidity has been suggested as a better indicator. Using the maternal morbidity outcome indicator (MMOI) developed and validated for use in routinely collected population health data, we aimed to determine trends in severe adverse maternal outcomes during the birth admission and in particular to examine the contribution of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). We applied the MMOI to the linked birth-hospital discharge records for all women who gave birth in New South Wales, Australia from 1999 to 2004 and determined rates of severe adverse maternal outcomes. We used frequency distributions and contingency table analyses to examine the association between adverse outcomes and maternal, pregnancy and birth characteristics, among all women and among only those with PPH. Using logistic regression, we modelled the effects of these characteristics on adverse maternal outcomes. The impact of adverse outcomes on duration of hospital admission was also examined. Of 500,603 women with linked birth and hospital records, 6242 (12.5 per 1,000) suffered an adverse outcome, including 22 who died. The rate of adverse maternal outcomes increased from 11.5 in 1999 to 13.8 per 1000 deliveries in 2004, an annual increase of 3.8% (95%CI 2.3-5.3%). This increase occurred almost entirely among women with a PPH. Changes in pregnancy and birth factors during the study period did not account for increases in adverse outcomes either overall, or among the subgroup of women with PPH. Among women with severe adverse outcomes there was a 12% decrease in hospital days over the study period, whereas women with no severe adverse outcome occupied 23% fewer hospital days in 2004 than in 1999. Severe adverse maternal outcomes associated with childbirth have increased in Australia and the increase was entirely among women who experienced a PPH. Reducing or stabilising

  12. Trends in adverse maternal outcomes during childbirth: a population-based study of severe maternal morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algert Charles S

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal mortality is too rare in high income countries to be used as a marker of the quality of maternity care. Consequently severe maternal morbidity has been suggested as a better indicator. Using the maternal morbidity outcome indicator (MMOI developed and validated for use in routinely collected population health data, we aimed to determine trends in severe adverse maternal outcomes during the birth admission and in particular to examine the contribution of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH. Methods We applied the MMOI to the linked birth-hospital discharge records for all women who gave birth in New South Wales, Australia from 1999 to 2004 and determined rates of severe adverse maternal outcomes. We used frequency distributions and contingency table analyses to examine the association between adverse outcomes and maternal, pregnancy and birth characteristics, among all women and among only those with PPH. Using logistic regression, we modelled the effects of these characteristics on adverse maternal outcomes. The impact of adverse outcomes on duration of hospital admission was also examined. Results Of 500,603 women with linked birth and hospital records, 6242 (12.5 per 1,000 suffered an adverse outcome, including 22 who died. The rate of adverse maternal outcomes increased from 11.5 in 1999 to 13.8 per 1000 deliveries in 2004, an annual increase of 3.8% (95%CI 2.3–5.3%. This increase occurred almost entirely among women with a PPH. Changes in pregnancy and birth factors during the study period did not account for increases in adverse outcomes either overall, or among the subgroup of women with PPH. Among women with severe adverse outcomes there was a 12% decrease in hospital days over the study period, whereas women with no severe adverse outcome occupied 23% fewer hospital days in 2004 than in 1999. Conclusion Severe adverse maternal outcomes associated with childbirth have increased in Australia and the increase was

  13. Disorganization at the stage of schizophrenia clinical outcome: Clinical-biological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestsiarovich, A; Obyedkov, V; Kandratsenka, H; Siniauskaya, M; Goloenko, I; Waszkiewicz, N

    2017-05-01

    According to the multidimensional model of schizophrenia, three basic psychopathological dimensions constitute its clinical structure: positive symptoms, negative symptoms and disorganization. The latter one is the newest and the least studied. Our aim was to discriminate disorganization in schizophrenia clinical picture and to identify its distinctive biological and socio-psychological particularities and associated genetic and environmental factors. We used SAPS/SANS psychometrical scales, scales for the assessment of patient's compliance, insight, social functioning, life quality. Neuropsychological tests included Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Color-Word test. Neurophysiological examination included registration of P300 wave of the evoked cognitive auditory potentials. Environmental factors related to patient's education, family, surrounding and nicotine use, as well as subjectively significant traumatic events in childhood and adolescence were assessed. Using PCR we detected SNP of genes related to the systems of neurotransmission (COMT, SLC6A4 and DRD2), inflammatory response (IL6, TNF), cellular detoxification (GSTM1, GSTT1), DNA methylation (MTHFR, DNMT3b, DNMT1). Disorganization is associated with early schizophrenia onset and history of psychosis in family, low level of insight and compliance, high risk of committing delicts, distraction errors in WCST, lengthened P300 latency of evoked cognitive auditory potentials, low-functional alleles of genes MTHFR (rs1801133) and DNMT3b (rs2424913), high level of urbanicity and psychotraumatic events at early age. Severe disorganization at the stage of schizophrenia clinical outcome is associated with the set of specific biological and social-psychological characteristics that indicate its epigenetic nature and maladaptive social significance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. 2009 MICROBIAL POPULATION BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCES JULY 19-24,2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANTHONY DEAN

    2009-07-24

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Microbial Population Biology will cover a diverse range of cutting edge issues in the microbial sciences and beyond. Firmly founded in evolutionary biology and with a strongly integrative approach, past Conferences have covered a range of topics from the dynamics and genetics of adaptation to the evolution of mutation rate, community ecology, evolutionary genomics, altruism, and epidemiology. The 2009 Conference is no exception, and will include sessions on the evolution of infectious diseases, social evolution, the evolution of symbioses, experimental evolution, adaptive landscapes, community dynamics, and the evolution of protein structure and function. While genomic approaches continue to make inroads, broadening our knowledge and encompassing new questions, the conference will also emphasize the use of experimental approaches to test hypotheses decisively. As in the past, this Conference provides young scientists and graduate students opportunities to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leading investigators from a broad spectrum of disciplines. This meeting is never dull: some of the most significant and contentious issues in biology have been thrashed out here. The 2009 meeting will be no exception.

  15. [The biomonitoring of toxic substances in biological samples of general population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarluzea, Jesús; Aurrekoetxea, Juan José; Porta, Miquel; Sunyer, Jordi; Ballester, Ferran

    2016-11-01

    Many of the world's most developed countries have adopted biomonitoring of toxic substances in order to ascertain their levels in biological samples. These substances get into the body through different environmental exposures. Monitoring toxic substances in biological samples should allow us to ascertain their levels in vulnerable groups, assess their evolution over time, make comparisons with levels observed in other countries, identify groups at risk or with high toxic levels and promote research. The main objective of biomonitoring is to act as a policy design tool to facilitate the implementation of particular measures in various sectors: health, environmental, agricultural and livestock or food industry sectors. In Spain, information on levels of toxic substances of environmental origin is provided by specific studies on health effects from environmental sources, such as the INMA project (INfancia y Medio Ambiente [childhood and environment]). In addition, biomonitoring projects have been implemented in Catalonia and the Canary Islands, together with a national biomonitoring programme in the adult working population. However, further progress is needed to develop a system that covers the general population as well as subgroups at risk, which relies on the collaboration of the involved authorities and the participation of professionals from different sectors and citizen organisations interested in the relationship between health and the environment. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Utility rate equations of group population dynamics in biological and social systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav I Yukalov

    Full Text Available We present a novel system of equations to describe the evolution of self-organized structured societies (biological or human composed of several trait groups. The suggested approach is based on the combination of ideas employed in the theory of biological populations, system theory, and utility theory. The evolution equations are defined as utility rate equations, whose parameters are characterized by the utility of each group with respect to the society as a whole and by the mutual utilities of groups with respect to each other. We analyze in detail the cases of two groups (cooperators and defectors and of three groups (cooperators, defectors, and regulators and find that, in a self-organized society, neither defectors nor regulators can overpass the maximal fractions of about [Formula: see text] each. This is in agreement with the data for bee and ant colonies. The classification of societies by their distance from equilibrium is proposed. We apply the formalism to rank the countries according to the introduced metric quantifying their relative stability, which depends on the cost of defectors and regulators as well as their respective population fractions. We find a remarkable concordance with more standard economic ranking based, for instance, on GDP per capita.

  17. Utility Rate Equations of Group Population Dynamics in Biological and Social Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukalov, Vyacheslav I.; Yukalova, Elizaveta P.; Sornette, Didier

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel system of equations to describe the evolution of self-organized structured societies (biological or human) composed of several trait groups. The suggested approach is based on the combination of ideas employed in the theory of biological populations, system theory, and utility theory. The evolution equations are defined as utility rate equations, whose parameters are characterized by the utility of each group with respect to the society as a whole and by the mutual utilities of groups with respect to each other. We analyze in detail the cases of two groups (cooperators and defectors) and of three groups (cooperators, defectors, and regulators) and find that, in a self-organized society, neither defectors nor regulators can overpass the maximal fractions of about each. This is in agreement with the data for bee and ant colonies. The classification of societies by their distance from equilibrium is proposed. We apply the formalism to rank the countries according to the introduced metric quantifying their relative stability, which depends on the cost of defectors and regulators as well as their respective population fractions. We find a remarkable concordance with more standard economic ranking based, for instance, on GDP per capita. PMID:24386163

  18. Association between environmental contaminants and health outcomes in indigenous populations of the Circumpolar North

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Kavita; Bjerregaard, Peter; Chan, Hing Man

    2014-01-01

    populations. DESIGN: A literature search was conducted in OVID Medline (1946-January 2014) using search terms that combined concepts of contaminant and indigenous populations in the Arctic. No language or date restrictions were applied. The reference lists of review articles were hand-searched. RESULTS...... and health outcomes. The following research gaps should be addressed in future studies: association of contaminants and health in other Arctic regions (i.e. Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Nunavut, Nunatsiavut, Alaska, European North and Russian North); assessment of contaminants on chronic diseases; inclusion...

  19. High Homocysteine and Blood Pressure Related to Poor Outcome of Acute Ischemia Stroke in Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changjiang; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Mo; Sun, Wenjie; Xu, Tan; Tong, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between plasma homocysteine (Hcy), blood pressure (BP) and poor outcome at hospital discharge among acute ischemic stroke patients, and if high Hcy increases the risk of poor outcome based on high BP status in a northern Chinese population. Methods Between June 1, 2009 and May 31, 2013, a total of 3695 acute ischemic stroke patients were recruited from three hospitals in northern Chinese cities. Demographic characteristics, lifestyle risk factors, medical history, and other clinical characteristics were recorded for all subjects. Poor outcome was defined as a discharge modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≥3 or death. The association between homocysteine concentration, admission blood pressure, and risk of poor outcome following acute ischemic stroke was analyzed by using multivariate non-conditional logistic regression models. Results Compared with those in the lowest quartile of Hcy concentration in a multivariate-adjusted model, those in the highest quartile of Hcy concentration had increased risk of poor outcome after acute ischemic stroke, (OR = 1.33, P<0.05). The dose-response relationship between Hcy concentration and risk of poor outcome was statistically significant (p-value for trend  = 0.027). High BP was significantly associated with poor outcome following acute ischemic stroke (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95%CI, 1.19–1.74). Compared with non-high BP with nhHcy, in a multivariate-adjusted model, the ORs (95% CI) of non-high BP with hHcy, high BP with nhHcy, and high BP with hHcy to poor outcome were 1.14 (0.85–1.53), 1.37 (1.03–1.84) and 1.70 (1.29–2.34), respectively. Conclusion The present study suggested that high plasma Hcy and blood pressure were independent risk factors for prognosis of acute ischemic stroke, and hHcy may further increase the risk of poor outcome among patients with high blood pressure. Additionally, the results indicate that high Hcy with high BP may cause increased susceptibility

  20. Three year outcomes in an early intervention service for psychosis in a multicultural and multiethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Mark; Shah, Samir; Ramkisson, Roshelle; Persaud, Albert; Murphy, Suzanne; Zaman, Rashid

    2008-12-01

    Concern has been expressed that it may be difficult to provide certain interventions to some ethnic groups in an Early Intervention Service for Psychosis, and that as a consequence, three-year outcomes for the different Ethnic Groups may be different in different groups. To test whether there are differences between the three year outcomes of different ethnic groups represented in the patient population of an Early Intervention service for Psychosis. The three-year outcomes for the first group of 62 Patients to receive three years treatment in the Early Intervention Service in Luton, Bedfordshire were examined. This group well represented the ethnic mix of the population of Luton. It does not appear that there are major differences between the three-year outcomes of any one of the three groups studied. However the South Asian Patients appear to present earlier, with shorter DUPs, seemed more likely to marry, live with their families, and seem more likely to return to higher education after a first psychotic episode of psychosis compared to the Caucasians. Afro-Carribeans and South Asians were more likely to be unemployed, but many South Asians were employed, as were Caucasians. The fewest persons employed were in the Afro-Caribbean group. While slightly more South Asians and Afro-Carribeans were admitted compulsorily under the mental health act over the three years, 60% of each of the two non-white groups were never admitted compulsorily. This is different from the reported national trends of the Mental Health act being used excessively with the Afro-Caribbean population. No previous study has looked at the outcomes of Early Intervention Services for First Psychotic Episodes according to the Ethnic Origin of the Clients. The better outcomes seen with South Asians are probably due to cultural factors among the South Asians born in this country, rather than to issues related to the Psychotic Illness itself. These findings are important in planning services in areas

  1. [The incidence and distribution of accidents with biological fluids among health personnel and the general population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaz Iglesia, I; Gómez López, L I; Fernández Martínez, J A; Mareca Doñate, R; Sangrador Arenas, L A

    1996-01-01

    To assess the informative usefulness of the Registry, to calculate the incidence rates of accident with biological fluids among health care workers and in the community, to know about the postaccident rate of seroconversion to HIV and to identify risk groups. A descriptive study of the HIV records file of the Registry of Accidental Contacts to Biological Fluids in the Clinic Hospital of Zaragoza was conducted, between January 1987 and September 1993. The registry includes the reports of health care workers and the general population of Health Area III in Aragón (Spain), except for the Calatayud's Hospital. Incidence rates, rate ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated. A total number of 595 accidents were reported, in none of them and HIV infection occurred subsequently. The incidence rate in health care workers was of 1.7 reports per 100 workers per year, while in the community it was of 8.1 per 100,000 people. The housekeeping staff was the group with a higher incidence (rate = 6.7; 95% IC: 3-14.8) and the type of accident more frequently described was needlestick injury. The incidence of reported accidents has increased in the community and in health care workers, which may be due to the increase in the reporting. In health care workers, the incidence in 1993 was within the range reported from other countries. The perception of risk is universal after accidents with unknown biological fluids. The correct disposal of material with biological contamination should be the more important preventive action.

  2. Short- and Long-Term Outcomes of Student Field Research Experiences in Special Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Amr S; Chamberlain, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    Global health education and training of biomedical students in international and minority health research is expending through U.S. academic institutions. This study addresses the short- and long-term outcomes of an NCI-funded R25 short-term summer field research training program. This program is designed for MPH and Ph.D. students in cancer epidemiology and related disciplines, in international and minority settings (special populations) in a recent 7-year period. Positive short-term outcome of 73 students was measured as publishing a manuscript from the field research data and having a job in special populations. Positive long-term outcome was measured as having a post-doc position, being in a doctoral program, and/or employment in special populations at least 3 years from finishing the program. Significant factors associated with both short- and long-term success included resourcefulness of the student and compatibility of personalities and interests between the student and the on-campus and off-campus mentors. Short-term-success of students who conducted international filed research was associated with visits of the on-campus mentor to the field site. Short-term success was also associated with extent of mentorship in the field site and with long-term success. Future studies should investigate how field research sites could enhance careers of students, appropriateness of the sites for specific training competencies, and how to maximize the learning experience of students in international and minority research sites.

  3. Population changes, racial/ethnic disparities, and birth outcomes in Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harville, Emily W; Tran, Tri; Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre

    2010-09-01

    To examine how the demographic and other population changes affected birth and obstetric outcomes in Louisiana, and the effect of the hurricane on racial disparities in these outcomes. Vital statistics data were used to compare the incidence of low birth weight (LBW) (birth (PTB) (37 weeks' gestation), cesarean section, and inadequate prenatal care (as measured by the Kotelchuck index), in the 2 years after Katrina compared to the 2 years before, for the state as a whole, region 1 (the area around New Orleans), and Orleans Parish (New Orleans). Logistic models were used to adjust for covariates. After adjustment, rates of LBW rose for the state, but preterm birth did not. In region 1 and Orleans Parish, rates of LBW and PTB remained constant or fell. These patterns were all strongest in African American women. Rates of cesarean section and inadequate prenatal care rose. Racial disparities in birth outcomes remained constant or were reduced. Although risk of LBW/PTB remained higher in African Americans, the storm does not appear to have exacerbated health disparities, nor did population shifts explain the changes in birth and obstetric outcomes.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA mapping of social-biological interactions in Brazilian Amazonian African-descendant populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Maia Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the Brazilian Amazonian population has historically involved three main ethnic groups, Amerindian, African and European. This has resulted in genetic investigations having been carried out using classical polymorphisms and molecular markers. To better understand the genetic variability and the micro-evolutionary processes acting in human groups in the Brazilian Amazon region we used mitochondrial DNA to investigate 159 maternally unrelated individuals from five Amazonian African-descendant communities. The mitochondrial lineage distribution indicated a contribution of 50.2% from Africans (L0, L1, L2, and L3, 46.6% from Amerindians (haplogroups A, B, C and D and a small European contribution of 1.3%. These results indicated high genetic diversity in the Amerindian and African lineage groups, suggesting that the Brazilian Amazonian African-descendant populations reflect a possible population amalgamation of Amerindian women from different Amazonian indigenous tribes and African women from different geographic regions of Africa who had been brought to Brazil as slaves. The present study partially mapped the historical biological and social interactions that had occurred during the formation and expansion of Amazonian African-descendant communities.

  5. Biomarkers in natural fish populations indicate adverse biological effects of offshore oil production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Balk

    Full Text Available Despite the growing awareness of the necessity of a sustainable development, the global economy continues to depend largely on the consumption of non-renewable energy resources. One such energy resource is fossil oil extracted from the seabed at offshore oil platforms. This type of oil production causes continuous environmental pollution from drilling waste, discharge of large amounts of produced water, and accidental spills.Samples from natural populations of haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua in two North Sea areas with extensive oil production were investigated. Exposure to and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were demonstrated, and biomarker analyses revealed adverse biological effects, including induction of biotransformation enzymes, oxidative stress, altered fatty acid composition, and genotoxicity. Genotoxicity was reflected by a hepatic DNA adduct pattern typical for exposure to a mixture of PAHs. Control material was collected from a North Sea area without oil production and from remote Icelandic waters. The difference between the two control areas indicates significant background pollution in the North Sea.It is most remarkable to obtain biomarker responses in natural fish populations in the open sea that are similar to the biomarker responses in fish from highly polluted areas close to a point source. Risk assessment of various threats to the marine fish populations in the North Sea, such as overfishing, global warming, and eutrophication, should also take into account the ecologically relevant impact of offshore oil production.

  6. Investigating Biological Control Agents for Controlling Invasive Populations of the Mealybug Pseudococcus comstocki in France.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaut Malausa

    Full Text Available Pseudococcus comstocki (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae is a mealybug species native to Eastern Asia and present as an invasive pest in northern Italy and southern France since the start of the century. It infests apple and pear trees, grapevines and some ornamental trees. Biocontrol programmes against this pest proved successful in central Asia and North America in the second half of the 20th century. In this study, we investigated possible biocontrol agents against P. comstocki, with the aim of developing a biocontrol programme in France. We carried out systematic DNA-barcoding at each step in the search for a specialist parasitoid. First we characterised the French target populations of P. comstocki. We then identified the parasitoids attacking P. comstocki in France. Finally, we searched for foreign mealybug populations identified a priori as P. comstocki and surveyed their hymenopteran parasitoids. Three mealybug species (P. comstocki, P. viburni and P. cryptus were identified during the survey, together with at least 16 different parasitoid taxa. We selected candidate biological control agent populations for use against P. comstocki in France, from the species Allotropa burrelli (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae and Acerophagus malinus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae. The coupling of molecular and morphological characterisation for both pests and natural enemies facilitated the programme development and the rejection of unsuitable or generalist parasitoids.

  7. And So It Grows: Using a Computer-Based Simulation of a Population Growth Model to Integrate Biology & Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Garrett M.; Laubach, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    We provide a 5E structured-inquiry lesson so that students can learn more of the mathematics behind the logistic model of population biology. By using models and mathematics, students understand how population dynamics can be influenced by relatively simple changes in the environment.

  8. Contribution of brain or biological reserve and cognitive or neural reserve to outcome after TBI: A meta-analysis (prior to 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Jane L; Wheaton, Patricia

    2015-08-01

    Brain/biological (BR) and cognitive/neural reserve (CR) have increasingly been used to explain some of the variability that occurs as a consequence of normal ageing and neurological injuries or disease. However, research evaluating the impact of reserve on outcomes after adult traumatic brain injury (TBI) has yet to be quantitatively reviewed. This meta-analysis consolidated data from 90 studies (published prior to 2015) that either examined the relationship between measures of BR (genetics, age, sex) or CR (education, premorbid IQ) and outcomes after TBI or compared the outcomes of groups with high and low reserve. The evidence for genetic sources of reserve was limited and often contrary to prediction. APOE ∈4 status has been studied most, but did not have a consistent or sizeable impact on outcomes. The majority of studies found that younger age was associated with better outcomes, however most failed to adjust for normal age-related changes in cognitive performance that are independent of a TBI. This finding was reversed (older adults had better outcomes) in the small number of studies that provided age-adjusted scores; although it remains unclear whether differences in the cause and severity of injuries that are sustained by younger and older adults contributed to this finding. Despite being more likely to sustain a TBI, males have comparable outcomes to females. Overall, as is the case in the general population, higher levels of education and pre-morbid IQ are both associated with better outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fertility rates and perinatal outcomes of adolescent pregnancies: a retrospective population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: analyze trends in fertility rates and associations with perinatal outcomes for adolescents in Santa Catarina, Brazil. Methods: a population-based study covering 2006 to 2013 was carried out to evaluate associations between perinatal outcomes and age groups, using odds ratios, and Chi-squared tests. Results: differences in the fertility rate among female adolescents across regions and time period were observed, ranging from 40.9 to 72.0 per 1,000 in mothers aged 15-19 years. Adolescents had fewer prenatal care appointments than mothers ≥20 years, and a higher proportion had no partner. Mothers aged 15-19 years were more likely to experience preterm birth (OR:1.1; CI:1.08-1.13; p<0.001, have an infant with low birthweight (OR:1.1; CI:1.10-1.15; p<0.001 and low Apgar score at 5 minutes (OR:1.4; CI:1.34-1.45; p<0.001 than mothers ≥20 years, with the odds for adverse outcomes greater for those aged 10-14 years. Conclusion: this study provides evidence of fertility rates among adolescents remaining higher in regions of social and economic deprivation. Adolescent mothers and their infants more likely to experience adverse perinatal outcomes. Nurses, public health practitioners, health and social care professionals and educators need to work collaboratively to better target strategies for adolescents at greater risk; to help reduce fertility rates and improve outcomes.

  10. Corruption and population health outcomes: an analysis of data from 133 countries using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Roni; Kang, Minah

    2015-09-01

    The current study aims to develop a theoretical framework for understanding the antecedents of corruption and the effects of corruption on various health indicators. Using structural equation models, we analyzed a multinational dataset of 133 countries that included three main groups of variables--antecedents of corruption, corruption measures, and health indicators. Controlling for various factors, our results suggest that corruption rises as GDP per capita falls and as the regime becomes more autocratic. Higher corruption is associated with lower levels of health expenditure as a percentage of GDP per capita, and with poorer health outcomes. Countries with higher GDP per capita and better education for women have better health outcomes regardless of health expenditures and regime type. Our results suggest that there is no direct relationship between health expenditures and health outcomes after controlling for the other factors in the model. Our study enhances our understanding of the conceptual and theoretical links between corruption and health outcomes in a population, including factors that may mediate how corruption can affect health outcomes.

  11. Depressive symptoms, satisfaction with health care, and 2-year work outcomes in an employed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druss, B G; Schlesinger, M; Allen, H M

    2001-05-01

    The relationship of depressive symptoms, satisfaction with health care, and 2-year work outcomes was examined in a national cohort of employees. A total of 6,239 employees of three corporations completed surveys on health and satisfaction with health care in 1993 and 1995. This study used bivariate and multivariate analyses to examine the relationships of depressive symptoms (a score below 43 on the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey mental component summary), satisfaction with a variety of dimensions of health care in 1993, and work outcomes (sick days and decreased effectiveness in the workplace) in 1995. The odds of missed work due to health problems in 1995 were twice as high for employees with depressive symptoms in both 1993 and 1995 as for those without depressive symptoms in either year. The odds of decreased effectiveness at work in 1995 was seven times as high. Among individuals with depressive symptoms in 1993, a report of one or more problems with clinical care in 1993 predicted a 34% increase in the odds of persistent depressive symptoms and a 66% increased odds of decreased effectiveness at work in 1995. There was a weaker association between problems with plan administration and outcomes. Depressive disorders in the workplace persist over time and have a major effect on work performance, most notably on "presenteeism," or reduced effectiveness in the workplace. The study's findings suggest a potentially important link between consumers' perceptions of clinical care and work outcomes in this population.

  12. Optimising radiation outcomes, scheduling patient waiting lists for maximum population tumour control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, M.A.; Jennings, L.; Kearvell, R.; Bydder, S.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Delays in the commencement of radiotherapy, possibly due to resource constraints, are known to impact on control-related outcomes. We sought an objective solution for patient prioritisation based on tumour control probability (TCP). With a utilitarian objective for maximising TCP in a population of M patients, with patient i waiting a time between diagnosis and treatment of Ti and a mean wait time of TMean, the optimisation problem is as shown. A linear-quadratic/Poissonian model for cell survival/TCP was considered including cell doubling during the wait time. Solutions to several distributions of patient population characteristics were examined together with the expected change in TCP for the population and individuals. An analytical solution to the optimisation problem was found which gives the optimal wait time for each patient as a function of the distribution of radiobiological characteristics in the population. This solution does not allow a negativity constraint on an individual's optimised waiting time so a waiting list simulation was developed to enforce that. Optimal wait time distributions were calculated for situations where patients are allocated distinct diagnostic groups (sharing radiobiological parameters) and for a (log-normal) distribution of doubling times in the population. In order to meet the utilitarian objective, the optimal solutions require patients with rapid cell doubling times to be accelerated up the waiting list at the expense of those with slowly proliferating tumours. The net population benefit however is comparable to or greater then the expected benefit from beam intensity modulation or dose escalation.

  13. The biological model of postradiation restoration of plants on the organismic and population levels of organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanishvili, N.I.; Gogebashvili, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : When studying postradiating restoration of plants, the question of working out of biological models for testing of biosystems' reliability has become rather urgent. It is known that each organization level of a live organism is characterized by certain mechanisms of postradiating restoration at the formation of various radiobiological reactions. For example, the basic processes at cellular, tissue and organism levels are reparation and regeneration whereas at cenosis level the leading processes are often the forms of population restoration. Besides, in spite of the fact that the population restoration at cenosis level is continuously inked with restoration at the lower organization levels, at this level the specific forms of restoration characterized for only this level are seen. It is natural that studying of the mechanisms of response to the influence of damaging factors needs new methodological approaches on various forms of population restoration with the use of adequate test systems. For this purpose the species of duckweed was used. It was seen that this test-system is characterized by the two levels of response to radiation influence. The first one - at a rather low level of radiation influence (up to 50Gy) when decrease in intensity of leaf growth as well as in colony formation was observed and the second one - at a high level of radiation influence (up to 200Gy) when a crushing of colonies took place and an increase in quantity of undeveloped plant leaves was seen. Thus, thanks to the step character of response of culture duckweed it becomes possible to definite quantity indicators for the investigated populations, not only at the influence of concrete physical and chemical factors but also at multifactorial influences that is often difficult to be calculated. It can be concluded that at the first level of damage an increase of plant resistance to unfavorable factors takes place that is due to the inhibition of growth processes

  14. Evolutionary game theory for physical and biological scientists. I. Training and validating population dynamics equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, David; Tlsty, Thea D

    2014-08-06

    Failure to understand evolutionary dynamics has been hypothesized as limiting our ability to control biological systems. An increasing awareness of similarities between macroscopic ecosystems and cellular tissues has inspired optimism that game theory will provide insights into the progression and control of cancer. To realize this potential, the ability to compare game theoretic models and experimental measurements of population dynamics should be broadly disseminated. In this tutorial, we present an analysis method that can be used to train parameters in game theoretic dynamics equations, used to validate the resulting equations, and used to make predictions to challenge these equations and to design treatment strategies. The data analysis techniques in this tutorial are adapted from the analysis of reaction kinetics using the method of initial rates taught in undergraduate general chemistry courses. Reliance on computer programming is avoided to encourage the adoption of these methods as routine bench activities.

  15. Paramytha ossicola sp. nov. (Polychaeta, Ampharetidae) from mammal bones: Reproductive biology and population structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirós, José Pedro; Ravara, Ascensão; Eilertsen, Mari H.; Kongsrud, Jon A.; Hilário, Ana

    2017-03-01

    Sunken whale carcasses, known as "whale falls", deliver large, but relatively ephemeral pulses of organic material to the seafloor and serve as habitat for unique assemblages of deep-sea fauna that include generalist-scavenging species, chemosynthetic fauna and bone-specialist species. Despite the great deal of interest that fauna associated with whale falls have attracted, very little is known about this fauna in the deep Atlantic Ocean. Here we describe a new species of Ampharetidae that was found in an experiment using cow carcasses in the Setúbal Canyon (NE Atlantic), as a surrogate of a whale fall. Further, we analyse the size and structure of the population at two different times and use histological analyses to investigate the reproductive biology of this new species. We propose that Paramytha ossicola sp. nov. is a bone-specialist adapted for life in ephemeral habitats. Reproductive traits include rapid maturation, continuous and non-synchronous gametogenesis. Recruitment seems to be controlled by habitat availability and biological interactions that result in post-settlement mortality.

  16. Detection of thallium and uranium in well water and biological specimens of an eastern Croatian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curković, Mario; Sipos, Laszlo; Puntarić, Dinko; Dodig-Ćurković, Katarina; Pivac, Nela; Kralik, Kristina

    2013-09-01

    Abstract Using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), we measured the concentrations of thallium and uranium in local water resources from three villages (Ćelije, Draž, and Potnjani) in eastern Croatia, with the aim to determine if they were associated with the levels of these same elements in the serum, urine, and hair collected from the residents of this area. The exposure of the local population to thallium and uranium through drinking water was generally low. ICP-MS was capable of measuring the levels of both of the elements in almost all of the analysed samples. Although there were differences in the concentrations of both elements in water samples and biological specimens taken from the residents, they did not reach the maximum contaminant level in any of the four sample types studied. Although hair was previously reported as an excellent indicator of occupational and environmental exposure to various elements, our study did not confirm it as a reliable biological material for tracing thallium and uranium levels, mainly due to the very low concentrations of these elements, often well below the detection limit. However, our results have shown that the concentration of thallium and uranium in drinking water can be effectively traced in urine samples.

  17. Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Women Practicing Poor Sanitation in Rural India: A Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijaya K Padhi

    2015-07-01

    possibility of residual confounding should not be ruled out. We did not identify specific exposure pathways that led to the outcomes.This study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that poor sanitation is associated with a higher risk of APOs. Additional studies are required to elucidate the socio-behavioural and/or biological basis of this association so that appropriate targeted interventions might be designed to support improved birth outcomes in vulnerable populations. While it is intuitive to expect that caste and poverty are associated with poor sanitation practice driving APOs, and we cannot rule out additional confounders, our results demonstrate that the association of poor sanitation practices (open defecation with these outcomes is independent of poverty. Our results support the need to assess the mechanisms, both biological and behavioural, by which limited access to improved sanitation leads to APOs.

  18. Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Women Practicing Poor Sanitation in Rural India: A Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Bijaya K; Baker, Kelly K; Dutta, Ambarish; Cumming, Oliver; Freeman, Matthew C; Satpathy, Radhanatha; Das, Bhabani S; Panigrahi, Pinaki

    2015-07-01

    of residual confounding should not be ruled out. We did not identify specific exposure pathways that led to the outcomes. This study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that poor sanitation is associated with a higher risk of APOs. Additional studies are required to elucidate the socio-behavioural and/or biological basis of this association so that appropriate targeted interventions might be designed to support improved birth outcomes in vulnerable populations. While it is intuitive to expect that caste and poverty are associated with poor sanitation practice driving APOs, and we cannot rule out additional confounders, our results demonstrate that the association of poor sanitation practices (open defecation) with these outcomes is independent of poverty. Our results support the need to assess the mechanisms, both biological and behavioural, by which limited access to improved sanitation leads to APOs.

  19. Positive and negative volume-outcome relationships in the geriatric trauma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Schaefer, Eric W; Won, Eugene J; Armen, Scott B; Indeck, Matthew C; Soybel, David I

    2014-04-01

    In trauma populations, improvements in outcome are documented in institutions with higher case volumes. However, it is not known whether improved outcomes are attributable to the case volume within specific higher-risk groups, such as the elderly, or to the case volume among all trauma patients treated by an institution. To test the hypothesis that outcomes of trauma care for geriatric patients are affected differently by the volume of geriatric cases and nongeriatric cases of an institution. This retrospective cohort study using a statewide trauma registry was set in state-designated levels 1 and 2 trauma centers in Pennsylvania. It included 39 431 eligible geriatric trauma patients (aged >65 years) in the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcomes Study. In-hospital mortality, major complications, and mortality after major complications (failure to rescue). Between 2001 and 2010, 39 431 geriatric trauma patients and 105 046 nongeriatric patients were captured in a review of outcomes in 20 state-designated levels 1 and 2 trauma centers. Larger volumes of geriatric trauma patients were significantly associated with lower odds of in-hospital mortality, major complications, and failure to rescue. In contrast, larger nongeriatric trauma volumes were significantly associated with higher odds of major complications in geriatric patients. Higher rates of in-hospital mortality, major complications, and failure to rescue were associated with lower volumes of geriatric trauma care and paradoxically with higher volumes of trauma care for younger patients. These findings offer the possibility that outcomes might be improved with differentiated pathways of care for geriatric trauma patients.

  20. Implementing a Childhood Cancer Outcomes Surveillance System Within a Population-Based Cancer Registry

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    Oscar Ramirez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Approximately 80% of cases of childhood cancer occur in low- and middle-income countries and are associated with high mortality rates. Assessing outcomes is essential for designing effective strategies to improve outcomes equally worldwide. We implemented a real-time surveillance system, VIGICANCER, embedded in a population-based cancer registry (PBCR to assess childhood cancer outcomes. Methods: VIGICANCER was established in 2009 as an integral part of Cali’s PBCR to collect real-time data on outcomes of patients (age < 19 years with a new diagnosis of cancer treated in pediatric oncology units in Cali, Colombia. Baseline and follow-up data (death, relapse, treatment abandonment, second neoplasms were collected from medical records, hospital discharge logs, pathology reports, death certificates, and the National Public Health Insurance database. A quality assurance process was implemented for the system. Results: From 2009 to 2013, data from 1,242 patients were included in VIGICANCER: 32% of patients were younger than 5 years, 55% were male, and 15% were Afro-descendants. International Classification of Childhood Cancer group I diagnoses predominated in all age groups except children younger than 1 year old, in whom CNS tumors predominated. Five-year overall survival for all cancers was 51.7% (95% CI, 47.9% to 55.4% for children (< 15 years, and 39.4% (95% CI, 29.8% to 50.5% for adolescents (15 to 18.9 years. Five-year overall survival for acute lymphoblastic leukemia was 55.6% (95% CI, 48.5% to 62.2%. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates the feasibility of implementing a real-time childhood cancer outcomes surveillance system embedded in a PBCR that can guide interventions to improve clinical outcomes in low- and middle-income countries.

  1. Invasive rats on tropical islands: Their population biology and impacts on native species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A. Harper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The three most invasive rat species, black or ship rat Rattus rattus, brown or Norway rats, R. norvegicus and Pacific rat, R. exulans have been incrementally introduced to islands as humans have explored the world’s oceans. They have caused serious deleterious effects through predation and competition, and extinction of many species on tropical islands, many of which are biodiversity hotspots. All three rat species are found in virtually all habitat types, including mangrove and arid shrub land. Black rats tend to dominate the literature but despite this the population biology of invasive rats, particularly Norway rats, is poorly researched on tropical islands. Pacific rats can often exceed population densities of well over 100 rats ha−1 and black rats can attain densities of 119 rats ha−1, which is much higher than recorded on most temperate islands. High densities are possibly due to high recruitment of young although the data to support this are limited. The generally aseasonally warm climate can lead to year-round breeding but can be restricted by either density-dependent effects interacting with resource constraints often due to aridity. Apparent adverse impacts on birds have been well recorded and almost all tropical seabirds and land birds can be affected by rats. On the Pacific islands, black rats have added to declines and extinctions of land birds caused initially by Pacific rats. Rats have likely caused unrecorded extinctions of native species on tropical islands. Further research required on invasive rats on tropical islands includes the drivers of population growth and carrying capacities that result in high densities and how these differ to temperate islands, habitat use of rats in tropical vegetation types and interactions with other tropical species, particularly the reptiles and invertebrates, including crustaceans.

  2. Paths and patterns: the biology and physics of swimming bacterial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, J. O.; Strittmatter, R. P.; Swartz, D. L.; Wiseley, D. A.; Wojciechowski, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    The velocity distribution of swimming micro-organisms depends on directional cues supplied by the environment. Directional swimming within a bounded space results in the accumulation of organisms near one or more surfaces. Gravity, gradients of chemical concentration and illumination affect the motile behaviour of individual swimmers. Concentrated populations of organisms scatter and absorb light or consume molecules, such as oxygen. When supply is one-sided, consumption creates gradients; the presence of the population alters the intensity and the symmetry of the environmental cues. Patterns of cues interact dynamically with patterns of the consumer population. In suspensions, spatial variations in the concentration of organisms are equivalent to variations of mean mass density of the fluid. When organisms accumulate in one region whilst moving away from another region, the force of gravity causes convection that translocates both organisms and dissolved substances. The geometry of the resulting concentration-convection patterns has features that are remarkably reproducible. Of interest for biology are (1) the long-range organisation achieved by organisms that do not communicate, and (2) that the entire system, consisting of fluid, cells, directional supply of consumables, boundaries and gravity, generates a dynamic that improves the organisms' habitat by enhancing transport and mixing. Velocity distributions of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis have been measured within the milieu of the spatially and temporally varying oxygen concentration which they themselves create. These distributions of swimming speed and direction are the fundamental ingredients required for a quantitative mathematical treatment of the patterns. The quantitative measurement of swimming behaviour also contributes to our understanding of aerotaxis of individual cells.

  3. Real world heart failure epidemiology and outcome: A population-based analysis of 88,195 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Núria; Vela, Emili; Clèries, Montse; Bustins, Montse; Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Enjuanes, Cristina; Moliner, Pedro; Ruiz, Sonia; Verdú-Rotellar, José María; Comín-Colet, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is frequent and its prevalence is increasing. We aimed to evaluate the epidemiologic features of HF patients, the 1-year follow-up outcomes and the independent predictors of those outcomes at a population level. Population-based longitudinal study including all prevalent HF cases in Catalonia (Spain) on December 31st, 2012. Patients were divided in 3 groups: patients without a previous HF hospitalization, patients with a remote (>1 year) HF hospitalization and patients with a recent (population studied. Some comorbidity, an all-cause hospitalization or emergency department visit the previous year were associated with a worse outcome.

  4. Association between environmental contaminants and health outcomes in indigenous populations of the Circumpolar North.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kavita; Bjerregaard, Peter; Chan, Hing Man

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, research has been carried out to monitor environmental contaminants and their effects on human health in the Arctic. Although evidence shows that Arctic indigenous peoples are exposed to higher levels of contaminants and do worse on several dimensions of health compared with other populations, the contribution of such exposures on adverse outcomes is unclear. The purpose of this review is to provide a synopsis of the published epidemiological literature that has examined association between environmental contaminants and health outcomes in Arctic indigenous populations. A literature search was conducted in OVID Medline (1946-January 2014) using search terms that combined concepts of contaminant and indigenous populations in the Arctic. No language or date restrictions were applied. The reference lists of review articles were hand-searched. Of 559 citations, 60 studies were relevant. The studies fell under the following categories: paediatric (n=18), reproductive health (n=18), obstetrics and gynaecology (n=9), cardiology (n=7), bone health (n=2), oncology (n=2), endocrinology (n=2) and other (n=2). All studies, except one from Arctic Finland, were either from Nunavik or Greenland. Most studies assessed polychlorinated biphenyls (n=43) and organochlorine pesticides (n=29). Fewer studies examined heavy metals, perfluorinated compounds, or polybrominated diphenyl ethers. Details of study results for each health category are provided. It is difficult to make conclusive statements about the effects of environmental contaminants on health due to mixed results, small number of studies and studies being restricted to a small number of regions. Meta-analytical synthesis of the evidence should be considered for priority contaminants and health outcomes. The following research gaps should be addressed in future studies: association of contaminants and health in other Arctic regions (i.e. Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Nunavut, Nunatsiavut, Alaska, European

  5. Acculturation and Adverse Birth Outcomes in a Predominantly Puerto Rican Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelona de Mendoza, Veronica; Harville, Emily; Theall, Katherine; Buekens, Pierre; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Latinas in the United States on average have poorer birth outcomes than Whites, yet considerable heterogeneity exists within Latinas. Puerto Ricans have some of the highest rates of adverse outcomes and are understudied. The goal of this study was to determine if acculturation was associated with adverse birth outcomes in a predominantly Puerto Rican population. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of Proyecto Buena Salud, a prospective cohort study conducted from 2006 to 2011. A convenience sample of pregnant Latina women were recruited from a tertiary care hospital in Massachusetts. Acculturation was measured in early pregnancy; directly via the Psychological Acculturation Scale, and via proxies of language preference and generation in the United States. Birth outcomes (gestational age and birthweight) were abstracted from medical records (n = 1362). Results After adjustment, psychological acculturation, language preference, and generation was not associated with odds of preterm birth. However, every unit increase in psychological acculturation score was associated with an increase in gestational age of 0.22 weeks (SE = 0.1, p = 0.04) among all births. Women who preferred to speak Spanish (β = -0.39, SE = 0.2, p = 0.02) and who were first generation in the US (β = -0.33, SE = 0.1, p = 0.02) had significantly lower gestational ages than women who preferred English or who were later generation, respectively. Similarly, women who were first generation had babies who weighed 76.11 g less (SE = 35.2, p = 0.03) than women who were later generation. Discussion We observed a small, but statistically significant adverse impact of low acculturation on gestational age and birthweight in this predominantly Puerto Rican population.

  6. Two-Year Outcomes of a Population-Based Intervention for Preschool Language Delay: An RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Melissa; Levickis, Penny; Tobin, Sherryn; Gold, Lisa; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Goldfeld, Sharon; Zens, Naomi; Le, Ha N D; Law, James; Reilly, Sheena

    2015-10-01

    We have previously shown short-term benefits to phonology, letter knowledge, and possibly expressive language from systematically ascertaining language delay at age 4 years followed by the Language for Learning intervention. Here, we report the trial's definitive 6-year outcomes. Randomized trial nested in a population-based ascertainment. Children with language scores >1.25 SD below the mean at age 4 were randomized, with intervention children receiving 18 1-hour home-based therapy sessions. Primary outcome was receptive/expressive language. Secondary outcomes were phonological, receptive vocabulary, literacy, and narrative skills; parent-reported pragmatic language, behavior, and health-related quality of life; costs of intervention; and health service use. For intention-to-treat analyses, trial arms were compared using linear regression models. Of 1464 children assessed at age 4, 266 were eligible and 200 randomized; 90% and 82% of intervention and control children were retained respectively. By age 6, mean language scores had normalized, but there was little evidence of a treatment effect for receptive (adjusted mean difference 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.2 to 5.7; P = .20) or expressive (0.8; 95% CI -1.6 to 3.2; P = .49) language. Of the secondary outcomes, only phonological awareness skills (effect size 0.36; 95% CI 0.08-0.65; P = .01) showed benefit. Costs were higher for intervention families (mean difference AU$4276; 95% CI: $3424 to $5128). Population-based intervention targeting 4-year-old language delay was feasible but did not have lasting impacts on language, possibly reflecting resolution in both groups. Long-term literacy benefits remain possible but must be weighed against its cost. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Posterior shoulder instability in the athletic population: Variations in assessment, clinical outcomes, and return to sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Jeffrey M; Bradley, James P

    2015-12-18

    Posterior instability of the shoulder is becoming an increasingly recognized shoulder injury in the athletic population. Diagnostic elements, such as etiology, directionality, and degree of instability are essential factors to assess in the unstable athletic shoulder. Concomitant injuries and associated pathologic lesions continue to be a significant challenge in the surgical management of posterior shoulder instability. Return to sport and previous level of play is ultimately the goal for every committed athlete and surgeon, thus subpopulations of athletes should be recognized as distinct entities requiring unique diagnostic, functional outcome measures, and surgical approaches.

  8. Outcome-driven thresholds for ambulatory pulse pressure in 9938 participants recruited from 11 populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Yu-Mei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based thresholds for risk stratification based on pulse pressure (PP) are currently unavailable. To derive outcome-driven thresholds for the 24-hour ambulatory PP, we analyzed 9938 participants randomly recruited from 11 populations (47.3% women). After age stratification (... interval of the HRs associated with stepwise increasing PP levels crossed unity at 64 mm Hg. While accounting for all covariables, the top tenth of PP contributed less than 0.3% (generalized R(2) statistic) to the overall risk among the elderly. Thus, in randomly recruited people, ambulatory PP does...

  9. Population Genomics and the Statistical Values of Race:An Interdisciplinary Perspective on the Biological Classification of Human Populations and Implications for Clinical Genetic Epidemiological Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koffi N. Maglo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The biological status and biomedical significance of the concept of race as applied to humans continue to be contentious issues despite the use of advanced statistical and clustering methods to determine continental ancestry. It is thus imperative for researchers to understand the limitations as well as potential uses of the concept of race in biology and biomedicine. This paper deals with the theoretical assumptions behind cluster analysis in human population genomics. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach, it demonstrates that the hypothesis that attributes the clustering of human populations to frictional effects of landform barriers at continental boundaries is empirically incoherent. It then contrasts the scientific status of the cluster and cline constructs in human population genomics, and shows how cluster may be instrumentally produced. It also shows how statistical values of race vindicate Darwin’s argument that race is evolutionarily meaningless. Finally, the paper explains why, due to spatiotemporal parameters, evolutionary forces and socio-cultural factors influencing population structure, continental ancestry may be pragmatically relevant to global and public health genomics. Overall, this work demonstrates that, from a biological systematic and evolutionary taxonomical perspective, human races/continental groups or clusters have no natural meaning or objective biological reality. In fact, the utility of racial categorizations in research and in clinics can be explained by spatiotemporal parameters, socio-cultural factors and evolutionary forces affecting disease causation and treatment response.

  10. Long-term outcome of refractory status epilepticus in adults: A retrospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Reinikainen, Matti; Parviainen, Ilkka; Kälviäinen, Reetta

    2017-07-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is a neurological emergency with significant morbidity and mortality. We aimed to analyze the long-term outcome of intensive care unit (ICU)-treated RSE and super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE) patients in a population based cohort. A retrospective study of ICU- and anesthesia-treated RSE patients in Kuopio University Hospital's (KUH) special responsibility area hospitals in the central and eastern part of Finland from Jan. 1, 2010 to Dec. 31, 2012 was conducted. KUH's catchment area consists of five hospitals-one university hospital and four central hospitals-and covers a population of 840 000. We included all consecutive adult (16 years or older) RSE patients admitted in the participating ICUs during the 3-year period and excluded patients with postanoxic etiologies. We used a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) as a long-term (1-year) outcome measure: good (mRS 0-3, recovered to baseline function) or poor (mRS 4-6, major functional deficit or death). We identified 75 patients with ICU- and anesthesia-treated RSE, corresponding to an annual incidence of 3.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.4-3.8). 21% of the patients were classified as SRSE, with the annual incidence being 0.6/100 000 (95% CI 0.4-1.0). For RSE, the ICU mortality was 0%, hospital mortality was 7% (95% CI 1.2%-12.8%) (n=5), and one-year mortality was 23% (CI 95% 13.4%-32.5%) (n=17). 48% (n=36) of RSE patients recovered to baseline, and 29% (n=22) showed neurological deficit at 1year. Poor outcome (mRS 4-6) was recorded for 52% (n=39) of the patients. Older age was associated with poorer outcome at 1year (p=0.03). For SRSE, hospital mortality was 6% (n=1) and 1-year mortality was 19% (n=3) (95%CI 0%-38.2%). During 1-year follow-up, nearly 50% of the ICU-treated RSE patients recovered to baseline function, whereas 30% showed new functional defects and 20% died. SRSE does not have a necessarily poorer outcome. The outcome is worse in older patients and in patients with

  11. Influence of number of topics, topic duration, and curricular focus on biology achievement of Population 3 TIMSS countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Eddie Louis

    The purposes of this study were to determine if a relationship exists between biology achievement and (1) number of topics, (2) topic duration, (3) curricular focus, and (4) science achievement using TIMSS data from Population 3---the final year of secondary school. Students included in this study were subsets of the 55,675 students from 22 countries who participated in the science literacy portion of TIMSS at the Population 3 level (IEA, 1997). The sample included in this study for the four research questions were comprised of between (1) 17,769 and 37,794 students from 15 countries, (2) 17,769 and 37,794 students from 15 countries, (3) 21,715 and 46,458 students from 18 countries, and (4) 19,518 and 46,458 students from 18 countries, respectively. A Pearson's product moment correlation was used to determine whether a relationship exists between the number of biology topics addressed by intended national science curricula and mean student achievement on selected items by country. No statistically significant correlation was found by country between biology achievement and number of topics. To determine whether a relationship exists between the topic duration of biology topics addressed by released, biology-oriented, Population 3 Science Literacy items and student achievement on those items, a Pearson's product moment correlation was also used. A statistically significant correlation between biology achievement and topic duration for only one topic (Interdependence of Life) was found at the .05 level of significance. A possible relationship between the degree of curricular focus of Population 3 TIMSS countries and student achievement on selected items by country was evaluated using a Pearson's product moment correlation. No statistically significant correlation by country between biology achievement and degree of curricular focus was found. A Pearson's product moment correlation was used to determine whether a relationship exists between science literacy

  12. Epidemiology, Characteristics, and Outcomes of ICU-Managed Homeless Patients: A Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavi Oud

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The population-level demand for critical care services among the homeless (H remains unknown, with only sparse data on the characteristics and outcomes of those managed in the ICU. Methods. The Texas Inpatient Public Use Data File and annual federal reports were used to identify H hospitalizations and annual estimates of the H population between 2007 and 2014. The incidence of ICU admissions in the H population, the characteristics of ICU-managed H, and factors associated with their short-term mortality were examined. Results. Among 52,206 H hospitalizations 15,553 (29.8% were admitted to ICU. The incidence of ICU admission among state H population rose between 2007 and 2014 from 28.0 to 96.6/1,000 (p<0.0001, respectively. Adults aged ≥ 45 years and minorities accounted for 70.2% and 57.6%, respectively, of the growth in volume of ICU admissions. Short-term mortality was 3.2%, with odds of death increased with age, comorbidity burden, and number of failing organs. Conclusions. The demand for critical care services was increasingly high among the H and was contrasted by low short-term mortality among ICU admissions. These findings, coupled with the persistent health disparities among minority H, underscore the need to effectively address homelessness and reduce barriers to longitudinal appropriate prehospital care among the H.

  13. Knee complaints vary with age and gender in the adult population. Population-based reference data for the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, Przemyslaw T; Bergman, Stefan; Sundén-Lundius, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Self-reported knee complaints may vary with age and gender. Reference data from the adult population would help to better interpret the outcome of interventions due to knee complaints. The objectives of the present study were to describe the variation of self-reported knee pain, function and qual......Self-reported knee complaints may vary with age and gender. Reference data from the adult population would help to better interpret the outcome of interventions due to knee complaints. The objectives of the present study were to describe the variation of self-reported knee pain, function...... and quality of life with age and gender in the adult population and to establish population-based reference data for the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)....

  14. Gender Inequality in Biology Classes in China and Its Effects on Students' Short-Term Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Neuhaus, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated gender inequality in biology lessons and analysed the effects of the observed inequality on students' short-term knowledge achievement, situational interest and students' evaluation of teaching (SET). Twenty-two biology teachers and 803 7th-grade students from rural and urban classrooms in China participated in the study.…

  15. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of antenatal anemia in a Scottish population: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukuni, Ruramayi; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Murphy, Michael F; Roberts, David; Stanworth, Simon J; Knight, Marian

    2016-05-01

    Antenatal anemia is a major public health problem in the UK, yet there is limited high quality evidence for associated poor clinical outcomes. The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and clinical outcomes of antenatal anemia in a Scottish population. A retrospective cohort study of 80 422 singleton pregnancies was conducted using data from the Aberdeen Maternal and Neonatal Databank between 1995 and 2012. Antenatal anemia was defined as haemoglobin ≤ 10 g/dl during pregnancy. Incidence was calculated with 95% confidence intervals and compared over time using a chi-squared test for trend. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for confounding variables. Results are presented as adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence interval. The overall incidence of antenatal anemia was 9.3 cases/100 singleton pregnancies (95% confidence interval 9.1-9.5), decreasing from 16.9/100 to 4.1/100 singleton pregnancies between 1995 and 2012 (p Scottish population. However, given that anemia is a readily correctable risk factor for major causes of morbidity and mortality in the UK, further work is required to investigate appropriate preventive measures. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  16. Improving work outcomes of dysthymia (persistent depressive disorder) in an employed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, David A; Lerner, Debra; Visco, Zachary L; Greenhill, Annabel; Chang, Hong; Cymerman, Elina; Azocar, Francisca; Rogers, William H

    2015-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of a work-focused intervention (WFI) on the work outcomes of employed adults with dysthymia. This subgroup analysis from a randomized controlled trial compares an initial sample of 167 employees (age: ≥45 years), screened for dysthymia using the PC-SAD without current major depressive disorder randomized to WFI (n=85) or usual care (UC) (n=82). Study sites included 19 employers and five additional organizations. Telephone-based WFI counseling (eight, twice monthly 50-min sessions) provided work coaching and modification, care coordination and cognitive behavioral therapy. Adjusted mixed effects models compared the WFI vs. UC group preintervention to 4-month postintervention change in at-work limitations measured by the Work Limitations Questionnaire. Secondary outcome analysis compared the change in self-reported absences and depression symptom severity (Patient Health Questionnaire PHQ-9 scores). Work productivity loss scores improved 43.0% in the WFI group vs. 4.8% in UC (difference in change: P<.001). Absence days declined by 58.3% in WFI vs. 0.0% in UC (difference in change: P=.09). Mean PHQ-9 depression symptom severity declined 44.2% in WFI vs. 5.3% in UC (difference in change: P<.001). At 4 months, the WFI was more effective than UC on two of the three outcomes. It could be an important mental and functional health improvement resource for the employed dysthymic population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Missing paternal demographics: A novel indicator for identifying high risk population of adverse pregnancy outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Shi

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of every 6 United Status birth certificates contains no information on fathers. There might be important differences in the pregnancy outcomes between mothers with versus those without partner information. The object of this study was to assess whether and to what extent outcomes in pregnant women who did not have partner information differ from those who had. Methods We carried out a population-based retrospective cohort study based on the registry data in the United States for the period of 1995–1997, which was a matched multiple birth file (only twins were included in the current analysis. We divided the study subjects into three groups according to the availability of partner information: available, partly missing, and totally missing. We compared the distribution of maternal characteristics, maternal morbidity, labor and delivery complications, obstetric interventions, preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, low birth weight, congenital anomalies, fetal death, neonatal death, post-neonatal death, and neonatal morbidity among three study groups. Results There were 304466 twins included in our study. Mothers whose partner's information was partly missing and (especially totally missing tended to be younger, of black race, unmarried, with less education, smoking cigarette during pregnancy, and with inadequate prenatal care. The rates of preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, low birth weight, Apgar score Conclusions Mothers whose partner's information was partly and (especially totally missing are at higher risk of adverse pregnant outcomes, and clinicians and public health workers should be alerted to this important social factor.

  18. Population dynamics of bacteria involved in enhanced biological phosphorus removal in Danish wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielczarek, Artur Tomasz; Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2013-03-15

    The enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is increasingly popular as a sustainable method for removal of phosphorus (P) from wastewater. This study consisted of a comprehensive three-year investigation of the identity and population dynamics of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) in 28 Danish municipal wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to quantify ten probe-defined populations of PAO and GAO that in total constituted a large fraction (30% on average) of the entire microbial community targeted by the EUBmix probes. Two PAO genera, Accumulibacter and Tetrasphaera, were very abundant in all EBPR plants (average of 3.7% and 27% of all bacteria, respectively), and their abundance was relatively stable in the Danish full-scale plants without clear temporal variations. GAOs were occasionally present in some plants (Competibacter in 11 plants, Defluviicoccus in 6 plants) and were consistent in only a few plants. This shows that these were not core species in the EBPR communities. The total GAO abundance was always lower than that of Accumulibacter. In plants without EBPR design, the abundance of PAO and GAO was significantly lower. Competibacter correlated in general with high fraction of industrial wastewater. In specific plants Accumulibacter correlated with high C/P ratio of the wastewater and Tetrasphaera with high organic loading. Interestingly, the relative microbial composition of the PAO/GAO species was unique to each plant over time, which gives a characteristic plant-specific "fingerprint". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Population-level differences in revascularization treatment and outcomes among various United States subpopulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Garth Graham; Yang-Yu Karen Xiao; Dan Rappoport; Saima Siddiqi

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent general improvements in health care, significant disparities persist in the cardiovascular care of women and racial/ethnic minorities. This is true even when income, education level, and site of care are taken into consideration. Possible explanations for these disparities include socioeconomic considerations, elements of discrimination and racism that affect socioeconomic status, and access to adequate medical care. Coronary revascularization has become the accepted and recommended treatment for myocardial infarction(MI) today and is one of the most common major medical interventions in the United States, with more than 1 million procedures each year. This review discusses recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms, care and access to medical resources, and outcomes in revascularization as treatment for acute coronary syndrome, looking especially at women and minority populations in the United States. The data show that revascularization is used less in both female and minority patients. We summarize recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms related to MI; access to care, medical resources, and treatments; and outcomes in women, blacks, and Hispanics. The picture is complicated among the last group by the many Hispanic/Latino subgroups in the United States. Some differences in outcomes are partially explained by presentation symptoms and co-morbidities and external conditions such as local hospital capacity. Of particular note is the striking differential in both presentation co-morbidities and mortality rates seen in women, compared to men, especially in women ≤ 55 years of age. Surveillance data on other groups in the United States such as American Indians/Alaska Natives and the many Asian subpopulations show disparities in risk factors and co-morbidities, but revascularization as treatment for MI in these populations has not been adequately studied. Significant research is required to

  20. Population Genetic Structure of Glycyrrhiza inflata B. (Fabaceae) Is Shaped by Habitat Fragmentation, Water Resources and Biological Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lulu; Chen, Jianjun; Hu, Weiming; Yang, Tianshun; Zhang, Yanjun; Yukiyoshi, Tamura; Zhou, Yanyang; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation, water resources and biological characteristics are important factors that shape the genetic structure and geographical distribution of desert plants. Analysis of the relationships between these factors and population genetic variation should help to determine the evolutionary potential and conservation strategies for genetic resources for desert plant populations. As a traditional Chinese herb, Glycyrrhiza inflata B. (Fabaceae) is restricted to the fragmented desert habitat in China and has undergone a dramatic decline due to long-term over-excavation. Determining the genetic structure of the G. inflata population and identifying a core collection could help with the development of strategies to conserve this species. We investigated the genetic variation of 25 G. inflata populations based on microsatellite markers. A high level of population genetic divergence (FST = 0.257), population bottlenecks, reduced gene flow and moderate genetic variation (HE = 0.383) were detected. The genetic distances between the populations significantly correlated with the geographical distances, and this suggests that habitat fragmentation has driven a special genetic structure of G. inflata in China through isolation by distance. STRUCTURE analysis showed that G. inflata populations were structured into three clusters and that the populations belonged to multiple water systems, which suggests that water resources were related to the genetic structure of G. inflata. In addition, the biological characteristics of the perennial species G. inflata, such as its long-lived seeds, asexual reproduction, and oasis ecology, may be related to its resistance to habitat fragmentation. A core collection of G. inflata, that included 57 accessions was further identified, which captured the main allelic diversity of G. inflata. Recent habitat fragmentation has accelerated genetic divergence. The population genetic structure of G. inflata has been shaped by habitat

  1. The relationship between unhealthy snacking at school and academic outcomes: a population study in Chilean schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Burrows, Paulina; Burrows, Raquel; Orellana, Yasna; Ivanovic, Daniza

    2015-08-01

    We examined the association between unhealthy snacking at school and academic outcomes in students from the Santiago Metropolitan Region (Chile). Cross-sectional population-based study. We measured the nutritional quality of snacks at school using an FFQ, and accounting for the amounts of saturated fat, fibre, sugar and salt in the foods, and academic outcomes using national standardized test scores in Language and Mathematics. Multivariate regression analyses modelled the relationship between unhealthy snacking at school (exposure), potential confounders and performance in Mathematics and Language (outcomes). Random sample of 1073 students (13.1 (SD 2.3) years old) attending public, partially subsidized and private schools. Fifty-six per cent of students ate items at snack time that were high in fat, sugar, salt and energy, and thus were considered to have unhealthy snaking. Thirty-six per cent and 8% were considered to have poor-to-fair and healthy snacking, respectively. Unhealthy snacking significantly lowered the odds of good academic performance in both domains. Students having unhealthy snacks were 56% less likely to pass in Language (fully adjusted OR = 0.44; 95% CI 0.23, 0.85) and 66% less likely to pass in Mathematics (fully adjusted OR = 0.34; 95% CI 0.19, 0.64) compared with students having healthy snack items. Schoolchildren eating unhealthy foods at snack time had worse academic performance in Language and Mathematics, as measured by a standardized test. Although association does not imply causation, these findings support the notion that academic and health-related behaviours are linked. More research is needed on the effect of school health programmes on educational outcomes.

  2. Childhood Health and Educational Outcomes Associated With Maternal Sleep Apnea: A Population Record-Linkage Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Yu Sun; Cistulli, Peter A; Roberts, Christine L; Ford, Jane B

    2017-11-01

    Sleep apnea in pregnancy is known to adversely affect birth outcomes. Whether in utero exposure to maternal sleep apnea is associated with long-term childhood consequences is unclear. Population-based longitudinal study of singleton infants born during 2002-2012 was conducted using linked birth, hospital, death, developmental, and educational records from New South Wales, Australia. Maternal sleep apnea during pregnancy was identified from hospital records. Outcomes were mortality and hospitalizations up to age 6, developmental vulnerability in the first year of school (aged 5-6 years), and performance on standardized tests in the third year of school (aged 7-9 years). Cox proportional hazards and modified Poisson regression models were used to calculate hazard and risk ratios for outcomes in children exposed to maternal apnea compared with those not exposed. Two hundred nine of 626188 singleton infants were exposed to maternal sleep apnea. Maternal apnea was not significantly associated with mortality (Fisher's exact p = .48), developmental vulnerability (adjusted RR 1.29; 95% CI 0.75-2.21), special needs status (1.58; 0.61-4.07), or low numeracy test scores (1.03; 0.63-1.67) but was associated with low reading test scores (1.55; 1.08-2.23). Maternal apnea significantly increased hospitalizations in the first year of life (adjusted HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.40-2.34) and between the first and sixth birthdays (1.41; 1.14-1.75). This is partly due to admissions for suspected pediatric sleep apnea. Maternal sleep apnea during pregnancy is associated with poorer childhood health. Its impact on developmental and cognitive outcomes warrants further investigation. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Varied Student Perception of E-Text Use among Student Populations in Biology Courses

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    McDaniel, Kerrie; Daday, Jerry

    2018-01-01

    The faculty in a biology department at a four-year public comprehensive university adopted e-texts for all 100 and 200 level biology courses with the primary motivation of reducing textbook costs to students. This study examines the students' perceptions of the e-texts adopted for these 100 and 200 level biology courses. An online questionnaire…

  4. ADAPTATION OF DASH OUTCOME MEASURES TO SLOVENIAN POPULATION - FUNCTIONALITY OF ARM, SHOULDER AND HAND

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    Katja Semprimožnik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACT BackgroundIn Slovenia, there is no test for upper limb function, which would be uniform for all institutions and would allow comparison of results of the therapy and upper limb rehabilitation with medical centers. MethodsAfter reviewing the existing hand function tests and current literature we decided to translate the DASH test - Disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand. Adaptation was tested on patient population in outpatient hand clinic, General hospital Celje and showed good validity, reliability and responsiveness. Results and discussionAdaptation of DASH test to Slovene population is a procedure, where language and cultural differences must be considered. Testing the adapted DASH in the general population shows good validity, reliability and responsiveness of adapted test. ConclusionTranslations DASH test, QuickDASH test and instructions for scoring the DASH outcome measures are approved by the Institute for Work and Health. Translations are published on their site and available for use.

  5. Lessons learned from practical approaches to reconcile mismatches between biological population structure and stock units of marine fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerr, Lisa A.; Hintzen, Niels T.; Cadrin, Steven X.; Clausen, Lotte Worsøe; Dickey-Collas, Mark; Goethel, Daniel R.; Hatfield, Emma M.C.; Kritzer, Jacob P.; Nash, Richard D.M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of stock identification methods have revealed inconsistencies between the spatial structure of biological populations and the definition of stock units used in assessment and management. From a fisheries management perspective, stocks are typically assumed to be

  6. Neutral Evolution in a Biological Population as Diffusion in Phenotype Space: Reproduction with Local Mutation but without Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Daniel John; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    2007-03-01

    The process of “evolutionary diffusion,” i.e., reproduction with local mutation but without selection in a biological population, resembles standard diffusion in many ways. However, evolutionary diffusion allows the formation of localized peaks that undergo drift, even in the infinite population limit. We relate a microscopic evolution model to a stochastic model which we solve fully. This allows us to understand the large population limit, relates evolution to diffusion, and shows that independent local mutations act as a diffusion of interacting particles taking larger steps.

  7. Cross-cultural adaptation, validation, and reliability of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire among Persian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Birjandinejad, Ali; Kachooei, Amir Reza

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to validate a cross-culturally adapted version of the Persian Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHOQ). We followed the Beaton's guideline to translate the questionnaire to Persian. We administered the final version to 223 patients among which 79 patients returned 3 days later to respond to the Persian MHOQ for the second time. In the first visit, respondents also filled the Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and rated the pain based on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Cronbach's alpha for the total MHOQ was 0.79 which showed good internal consistency. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the total MHOQ was 0.84 which demonstrated good reliability between test and retest. The absolute correlation coefficient between total MHOQ and the DASH was as high as 0.74. Persian version of the MHOQ proved to be a reliable and valid instrument to be implemented among Persian population with the hand and wrist disorders.

  8. Validation of the DRAGON Score in a Chinese Population to Predict Functional Outcome of Intravenous Thrombolysis-Treated Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinmiao; Liao, Xiaoling; Wang, Chunjuan; Liu, Liping; Wang, Chunxue; Zhao, Xingquan; Pan, Yuesong; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2015-08-01

    The DRAGON score predicts functional outcome of ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis. Our aim was to evaluate its utility in a Chinese stroke population. Patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis were prospectively registered in the Thrombolysis Implementation and Monitor of acute ischemic Stroke in China. We excluded patients with basilar artery occlusion and missing data, leaving 970 eligible patients. We calculated the DRAGON score, and the clinical outcome was measured by the modified Rankin Scale at 3 months. Model discrimination was quantified by calculating the C statistic. Calibration was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient. The C statistic was .73 (.70-.76) for good outcome and .75 (.70-.79) for miserable outcome. Proportions of patients with good outcome were 94%, 83%, 70%, and 0% for 0 to 1, 2, 3, and 8 to 10 score points, respectively. Proportions of patients with miserable outcome were 0%, 3%, 9%, and 50% for 0 to 1, 2, 3, and 8 to 10 points, respectively. There was high correlation between predicted and observed probability of 3-month favorable and miserable outcome in the external validation cohort (Pearson correlation coefficient, .98 and .98, respectively, both P DRAGON score showed good performance to predict functional outcome after tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment in the Chinese population. This study demonstrated the accuracy and usability of the DRAGON score in the Chinese population in daily practice. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of socioeconomic inequalities on cholecystectomy outcomes: a 10-year population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Yang, Nan-Ping; Chang, Nien-Tzu; Lai, K Robert; Lin, Kai-Biao; Chan, Chien-Lung

    2018-02-13

    Although numerous epidemiological studies on cholecystectomy have been conducted worldwide, only a few have considered the effect of socioeconomic inequalities on cholecystectomy outcomes. Specifically, few studies have focused on the low-income population (LIP). A nationwide prospective study based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance dataset was conducted during 2003-2012. The International Classification of ICD-9-CM procedure codes 51.2 and 51.21-51.24 were identified as the inclusion criteria for cholecystectomy. Temporal trends were analyzed using a joinpoint regression, and the hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) method was used as an analytical strategy to evaluate the group-level and individual-level factors. Interactions between age, gender and SES were also tested in HLM model. Analyses were conducted on 225,558 patients. The incidence rates were 167.81 (95% CI: 159.78-175.83) per 100,000 individuals per year for the LIP and 123.24 (95% CI: 116.37-130.12) per 100,000 individuals per year for the general population (GP). After cholecystectomy, LIP patients showed higher rates of 30-day mortality, in-hospital complications, and readmission for complications, but a lower rate of routine discharge than GP patients. The hospital costs and length of stay for LIP patients were higher than those for GP patients. The multilevel analysis using HLM revealed that adverse socioeconomic status significantly negatively affects the outcomes of patients undergoing cholecystectomy. Additionally, male sex, advanced age, and high Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) scores were associated with higher rates of in-hospital complications and 30-day mortality. We also observed that the 30-day mortality rates for patients who underwent cholecystectomy in regional hospitals and district hospitals were significantly higher than those of patients receiving care in a medical center. Patients with a disadvantaged finance status appeared to be more vulnerable to cholecystectomy surgery

  10. Population biology and diet of Pomadasys corvinaeformis Perciformes: Pomadasyidae in Caraguatatuba Bay, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Regina Denadai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pomadasys corvinaeformis inhabits sandy and rocky bottoms in coastal waters, and is common in trawl samples taken from beaches. The species is very abundant on the Brazilian coast, and is of high economic and ecological importance. This study examined the spatio-temporal distribution, population biology and diet of P. corvinaeformis in Southeastern Brazil. Samples were taken by trawling monthly from August 2003 to October 2004, in two previously selected areas. The Northern area is more exposed to wave activity and is influenced by a river, functioning as a small estuary. In contrast, the Southern area is relatively sheltered from wave energy and influenced to a lesser degree by smaller rivers. The length of the specimens was measured, and the sex and gonadal stage were macroscopically identified. The abundance of this species was compared between areas and among months. The diet was analyzed seasonally by the frequency of occurrence, the percent volume, and the index of alimentary importance. P. corvinaeformis occurred in unequal proportions in the two study areas 86 in the Northern area and 14 in the Southern area and was found most abundant in May 2004, followed by June 2004. The proportion of mature and in-maturation individuals increased gradually from autumn to summer. Nine major groups of food items were recorded in the diet of P. corvinaeformis, and crustaceans comprised five of the categories: unidentified crustacean fragments, zoea larvae, amphipods, copepods and shrimps. In both, fish stomach and intestine, crustacean fragments were the most frequent item. The second most frequent items were shrimp in the stomach, and amphipods in the intestine mainly represented by their tubes. These results demonstrate that P. corvinaeformis can be considered a carnivore, with a preference on benthic organisms.

  11. Fertility rates and perinatal outcomes of adolescent pregnancies: a retrospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Maria de Lourdes de; Lynn, Fiona Ann; Johnston, Linda; Tavares, Eduardo Cardoso Teixeira; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Botelho, Lúcio José

    2017-04-06

    analyze trends in fertility rates and associations with perinatal outcomes for adolescents in Santa Catarina, Brazil. a population-based study covering 2006 to 2013 was carried out to evaluate associations between perinatal outcomes and age groups, using odds ratios, and Chi-squared tests. differences in the fertility rate among female adolescents across regions and time period were observed, ranging from 40.9 to 72.0 per 1,000 in mothers aged 15-19 years. Adolescents had fewer prenatal care appointments than mothers ≥20 years, and a higher proportion had no partner. Mothers aged 15-19 years were more likely to experience preterm birth (OR:1.1; CI:1.08-1.13; ppobreza social y económica. Madres adolescentes y sus bebés tienen mayor probabilidad de efectos perinatales adversos. Enfermeros, trabajadores de salud pública, profesionales de salud y asistencia social y educadores deben colaborar para mejor dirigir estrategias a adolescentes con riesgo superior; para fines de ayudar a reducir las tasas de fertilidad y mejorar los resultados.

  12. Father absence and reproduction-related outcomes in Malaysia, a transitional fertility population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Paula; Snopkowski, Kristin; Sear, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    Father absence is consistently associated with children's reproductive outcomes in industrialized countries. It has been suggested that father absence acts as a cue to particular environmental conditions that influence life history strategies. Much less is known, however, about the effects of father absence on such outcomes in lower-income countries. Using data from the 1988 Malaysian Family Life Survey (n = 567), we tested the effect of father absence on daughters' age at menarche, first marriage, and first birth; parity progression rates; and desired completed family size in Malaysia, a country undergoing an economic and fertility transition. Father absence during later childhood (ages 8 to 15), although not during earlier childhood, was associated with earlier progressions to first marriage and first birth, after controlling for other confounders. Father absence does not affect age at menarche, desired family size, or progression from first to second birth. The patterns found in this transitional population partly mirror those in developed societies, where father absence accelerates reproductive events. There is, however, a notable contrast between the acceleration in menarche for father-absent girls consistently found in developed societies and the lack of any association in our findings. The mechanisms through which father absence affects reproduction may differ in different ecological contexts. In lower-income contexts, direct paternal investment or influence may be of more importance in determining reproductive behavior than whether fathers act as a cue to environmental conditions.

  13. Anaemia of pregnancy, perinatal outcomes and children's developmental vulnerability: a whole-of-population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithers, Lisa G; Gialamas, Angela; Scheil, Wendy; Brinkman, Sally; Lynch, John W

    2014-09-01

    There is limited longitudinal data from high-income countries on the sequelae of anaemia during pregnancy. The aim of this study is to examine whether anaemia of pregnancy is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes and with children's developmental vulnerability. We conducted a population-based study to link routinely collected government administrative data that involved all live births in the state of South Australia 1999-2005 (n = 124 061) and a subset for whom developmental data were collected during a national census of children attending their first year of school in 2009 (n = 13 654). Perinatal outcomes were recorded by midwives using a validated, standardised form. Development was recorded by schoolteachers using the Australian Early Development Index (AEDI). Children in the lowest 10% of AEDI scores are indicative of developmental vulnerability. There were 8764/124 061 (7.1%) cases of anaemia. After adjustment for a range of potentially confounding factors, anaemia of pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of fetal distress [incident rate ratio (IRR) 1.20 [95% CI 1.13, 1.27

  14. Comparative Effectiveness of Surgical Treatments for Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Analysis of Postoperative Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T.; Elkin, Elena B.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; Yee, David S.; Jang, Thomas L.; Laudone, Vincent P.; Guillonneau, Bertrand D.; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Enthusiasm for laparoscopic surgical approaches to prostate cancer treatment has grown, despite limited evidence of improved outcomes compared with open radical prostatectomy. We compared laparoscopic (with or without robotic assistance) versus open radical prostatectomy in terms of postoperative outcomes and subsequent cancer-directed therapy. Materials and Methods Using a population-based cancer registry linked with Medicare claims, we identified men age 66 or older with localized prostate cancer who received a radical prostatectomy from 2003-2005. Outcome measures were general medical/surgical complications and mortality within 90 days following surgery; genitourinary/bowel complications within 365 days; receipt of radiation therapy, androgen deprivation therapy or both within 365 days; length of hospital stay. Results Of the 5,923 men,18% received a laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Adjusting for patient and tumor characteristics, there were no differences in rates of general medical/surgical complications (OR 0.93; 95% CI: 0.77-1.14) or genitourinary/bowel complications (OR 0.96; 95% CI: 0.76-1.22) or in the use of postoperative radiation, androgen deprivation or both (OR 0.80; 95% CI: 0.60-1.08). Laparoscopic prostatectomy was associated with a 35% shorter hospital stay (p<0.0001) and a lower rate of bladder neck/urethral obstruction (OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.58-0.94). In laparoscopic patients, surgeon volume was inversely associated with length of hospital stay and the odds of any genitourinary/bowel complication. Conclusions Laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy have similar rates of postoperative morbidity and use of additional treatment. Men considering prostate cancer surgery should understand the expected benefits and risks of each technique to facilitate decision-making and to set realistic expectations. PMID:20188381

  15. Comparative effectiveness of prostate cancer surgical treatments: a population based analysis of postoperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T; Elkin, Elena B; Jacks, Lindsay M; Yee, David S; Jang, Thomas L; Laudone, Vincent P; Guillonneau, Bertrand D; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2010-04-01

    Enthusiasm for laparoscopic surgical approaches to prostate cancer treatment has grown despite limited evidence of improved outcomes compared with open radical prostatectomy. We compared laparoscopic prostatectomy with or without robotic assistance vs open radical prostatectomy in terms of postoperative outcomes and subsequent cancer directed therapy. Using a population based cancer registry linked with Medicare claims we identified men 66 years old or older with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 2003 to 2005. Outcome measures were general medical/surgical complications and mortality within 90 days after surgery, genitourinary/bowel complications within 365 days, radiation therapy and/or androgen deprivation therapy within 365 days and length of hospital stay. Of the 5,923 men 18% underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Adjusting for patient and tumor characteristics, there were no differences in the rate of general medical/surgical complications (OR 0.93 95% CI 0.77-1.14) or genitourinary/bowel complications (OR 0.96 95% CI 0.76-1.22), or in postoperative radiation and/or androgen deprivation (OR 0.80 95% CI 0.60-1.08). Laparoscopic prostatectomy was associated with a 35% shorter hospital stay (p <0.0001) and a lower bladder neck/urethral obstruction rate (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58-0.94). In laparoscopic cases surgeon volume was inversely associated with hospital stay and the odds of any genitourinary/bowel complication. Laparoscopic prostatectomy and open radical prostatectomy have similar rates of postoperative morbidity and additional treatment. Men considering prostate cancer surgery should understand the expected benefits and risks of each technique to facilitate decision making and set realistic expectations. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Athletic Population with Spondylolysis: Review of Outcomes following Surgical Repair or Conservative Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteliadis, Pavlos; Nagra, Navraj S.; Edwards, Kimberley L.; Behrbalk, Eyal; Boszczyk, Bronek

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Narrative review. Objective  The study aims to critically review the outcomes associated with the surgical repair or conservative management of spondylolysis in athletes. Methods  The English literature listed in MEDLINE/PubMed was reviewed to identify related articles using the term “spondylolysis AND athlete.” The criteria for studies to be included were management of spondylolysis in athletes, English text, and no year, follow-up, or study design restrictions. The references of the retrieved articles were also evaluated. The primary outcome was time to return to sport. This search yielded 180 citations, and 25 publications were included in the review. Results  Treatment methods were dichotomized as operative and nonoperative. In the nonoperative group, 390 athletes were included. A combination of bracing with physical therapy and restriction of activities was used. Conservative measures allowed athletes to return to sport in 3.7 months (weighted mean). One hundred seventy-four patients were treated surgically. The most common technique was Buck's, using a compression screw (91/174). All authors reported satisfactory outcomes. Time to return to play was 7.9 months (weighted mean). There were insufficient studies with suitably homogenous subgroups to conduct a meta-analysis. Conclusion  There is no gold standard approach for the management of spondylolysis in the athletic population. The existing literature suggests initial therapy should be a course of conservative management with thoracolumbosacral orthosis brace, physiotherapy, and activity modification. If conservative management fails, surgical intervention should be considered. Two-sided clinical studies are needed to determine an optimal pathway for the management of athletes with spondylolysis. PMID:27556003

  17. Does geography influence the treatment and outcomes of colorectal cancer? A population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helewa, Ramzi M; Turner, Donna; Wirtzfeld, Debrah; Park, Jason; Hochman, David; Czaykowski, Piotr; Singh, Harminder; Shu, Emma; Xue, Lin; McKay, Andrew

    2013-06-17

    The Canadian province of Manitoba covers a large geographical area but only has one major urban center, Winnipeg. We sought to determine if regional differences existed in the quality of colorectal cancer care in a publicly funded health care system. This was a population-based historical cohort analysis of the treatment and outcomes of Manitobans diagnosed with colorectal cancer between 2004 and 2006. Administrative databases were utilized to assess quality of care using published quality indicators. A total of 2,086 patients were diagnosed with stage I to IV colorectal cancer and 42.2% lived outside of Winnipeg. Patients from North Manitoba had a lower odds of undergoing major surgery after controlling for other confounders (odds ratio (OR): 0.48, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.26 to 0.90). No geographic differences existed in the quality measures of 30-day operative mortality, consultations with oncologists, surveillance colonoscopy, and 5-year survival. However, there was a trend towards lower survival in North Manitoba. We found minimal differences by geography. However, overall compliance with quality measures is low and there are concerning trends in North Manitoba. This study is one of the few to evaluate population-based benchmarks for colorectal cancer therapy in Canada.

  18. An investigation of outcome expectancies as a predictor of treatment response for combat veterans with PTSD: comparison of clinician, self-report, and biological measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; Maples, Jessica L; Jovanovic, Tanja; Norrholm, Seth D; Heekin, Mary; Rothbaum, Barbara O

    2015-06-01

    Outcome expectancy, or the degree to which a client believes that therapy will result in improvement, is related to improved treatment outcomes for multiple disorders. There is a paucity of research investigating this relation in regards to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Additionally, the bulk of the research on outcome expectancy and treatment outcomes has relied mostly on self-report outcome measures. The relation between outcome expectancy on self-report measures, clinician-rated measures, and two biological indices (fear-potentiated startle and cortisol reactivity) of PTSD symptoms was explored. The sample included combat veterans (N = 116) treated with virtual reality exposure therapy for PTSD. Results supported a negative association between outcome expectancy and both self-report and clinician-rated symptoms at the conclusion of treatment, but outcome expectancy was related to the magnitude of change during treatment for self-report measures only. Outcome expectancy was unrelated to biological measures of treatment response. These findings suggest that outcome expectancy may be related to patient and clinician perceptions of outcomes, but not biological indices of outcome for PTSD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Students' Use of Optional Online Reviews and Its Relationship to Summative Assessment Outcomes in Introductory Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Shana K.; Rahman, Shuhebur; Lund, Terry J. S.; Armstrong, Patrick I.; Lamm, Monica H.; Reason, Robert D.; Coffman, Clark R.

    2017-01-01

    Retrieval practice has been shown to produce significant enhancements in student learning of course information, but the extent to which students make use of retrieval to learn information on their own is unclear. In the current study, students in a large introductory biology course were provided with optional online review questions that could be…

  20. Outcomes of cataract surgery in a rural and urban south Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Lingam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the visual outcome after cataract surgery in a south Indian population. Materials and Methods: Population-based cross-sectional study of subjects aged 40 years or more. Three thousand nine hundred and twenty-four rural subjects from 27 contiguous villages and 3850 urban subjects from five randomly selected divisions were studied. All subjects underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination that included visual acuity, refraction, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, and dilated retinal examination. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test, t test and multivariate analysis were used. Results: Five hundred and twenty-eight (216 males, 312 females, 781 eyes rural subjects (13.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI 12.4% to 14.6% and 406 (197 males, 209 females, 604 eyes urban subjects (10.5%, 95% CI 9.6-11.5% had undergone cataract surgery. Outcome of cataract surgery was defined based on visual acuity. Using best-corrected visual acuity for classification, the single most important cause for visual impairment was cystoid macular edema in the aphakic group and posterior capsule opacification in the pseudophakic group. Aphakia (visual acuity of < 20/60 to ≤ 20/400 - odds ratio (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.3 to 2.6%, visual acuity of < 20/400 - OR 6.2; 95% 4.0 to 9.8%, rural residence (visual acuity of < 20/60 to ≤ 20/400 - OR 3.2; 95% CI 2.2 to 4.5% and visual acuity of < 20/400 - OR OR 3.5; 95% CI 2.3 to 5.5% were associated with visual impairment. The urban cataract-operated population had significantly more pseudophakics ( P < 0.001, men ( P = 0.02 and literates ( P < 0.001. In the rural group the prevalence of cataract surgery (13.5% vs. 10.5%, P < 0.001 and number of people that had undergone cataract surgery within three years prior to examination ( P < 0.001 were significantly greater. In 30% of rural and 16% of urban subjects uncorrected refraction was the cause of visual impairment. Conclusions: Surgery

  1. Retrospective analysis of outcomes following inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement in a managed care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Damian; Vaccaro, Jamieson; Worley, Karen; Rogstad, Teresa L; Seleznick, Mitchel

    2017-08-01

    The role of inferior vena cava filter (IVC) filters for prevention of pulmonary embolism (PE) is controversial. This study evaluated outcomes of IVC filter placement in a managed care population. This retrospective cohort study evaluated data for individuals with Humana healthcare coverage 2013-2014. The study population included 435 recipients of prophylactic IVC filters, 4376 recipients of therapeutic filters, and two control groups, each matched to filter recipients. Patients were followed for up to 2 years. Post-index anticoagulant use, mortality, filter removal, device-related complications, and all-cause utilization. Adjusted regression analyses showed a positive association between filter placement and anticoagulant use at 3 months: odds ratio (ORs) 3.403 (95% CI 1.912-6.059), prophylactic; OR, 1.356 (95% CI 1.164-1.58), therapeutic. Filters were removed in 15.67% of prophylactic and 5.69% of therapeutic filter cases. Complication rates were higher with prophylactic procedures than with therapeutic procedures and typically exceeded 2% in the prophylactic group. Each form of filter placement was associated with increases in all-cause hospitalization (regression coefficient 0.295 [95% CI 0.093-0.498], prophylactic; 0.673 [95% CI 0.547-0.798], therapeutic) and readmissions (OR 2.444 [95% CI 1.298-4.602], prophylactic; 2.074 [95% CI 1.644-2.616], therapeutic). IVC filter placement in this managed care population was associated with increased use of anticoagulants and greater healthcare utilization compared to controls, low rates of retrieval, and notable rates of device-related complications, with effects especially pronounced in assessments of prophylactic filters. These findings underscore the need for appropriate use of IVC filters.

  2. POPULATION BIOLOGY OF MUD CRAB Scylla serrata - Forsskal, 1775 IN MANGROVE ECOSYSTEM OF SUBANG DISTRICT, WEST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Annisa Kumalah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of population biology of mud crab Scylla serrata is necessary to analyse the population dynamics, such as growth of crabs, size distribution, mortality and exploitation rates of S. serrata. Population biology data collection was carried out from March to June 2016 at estuary and silvofishery areas of three stations (Mayangan, Tanjung Tiga and Blanakan villages. Data  were analyzed using analytical methods of FISAT-II (FAO-ICLARM Stock Assessment Toool IIinstruments. The results showed the growth of S. serrata male in Subang distric was positive allometric and the female was negative allometric. Growth coefficient (K ranged from 0.21 to 0.43 in the estuary and from 0.28 to 0.89 in silvofishery area. Exploitation rate in the silvofishery area has been above the maximum exploitation rate. The size distribution of S. serrata in Subang district has the highest frequency at class interval of 106-110 mm (male and of 101-105 mm. The highest abundance of mature female crabs is in May.Keywords : population biology, Scylla serrata, Subang District

  3. Radiation dozes reconstruction of Semipalatinsk region Beskaragai area's population by the method of biological measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigaliev, A.; Kundakbaeva, G.; Bigalieva, R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The study of radiation situation (on the position of May 1989) in Beskaragai area of Semipalatinsk region showed that the level of γ-radiation on it's territory reached 13-20 μR/hour, which was determined by the traces of long living radionuclides. In the inhabited regions of Dolon, Kanonerka, Buras, Ramadan villages the effect of deepening was noticed, α-particle's density level has reached maximum on the depth of approximately 10 cm, and further it decreases up to the 30 cm depth, This circumstance witnesses about the fact that we are talking about radioactive traces of many years ago happening with a time going to the depth from the upper coverage of soil. We've made the evaluation of radiation influence's genetic effects on the man's population. Cytogenetic analysis (with the use of G-method of chromosome's coloring) at whole in Beskaragai region shows that the frequency of aberrations for the cell among the inhabitants of the region is obviously higher 3.3 times at average in the region than among the population of the controlled area. During the study of the cytogenetic effects of increased radiation level's influence it is important first of all to determine the frequency of chromosome type aberrations - dicentric chromosomes, centric circles, acentric pair fragments. As it is known, the level of chromosome type aberrations is sufficiently well correlated with the doze, We have determined accumulative doze of radiation using the formula (D.C. Lloyd at all. 1992) for the calculation of dicentrics under the chronical influence of the small dozes of ionized radiation. According to the made calculations the oriented reconstruction of radiation dozes in Beskaragai region made 11 ber = 0.11 Sv, for the Dolon village - 14 ber, Kanonerka village - 13 ber, Buras village - 6 ber, Ramadan - 9.5 ber. Presented data allows to ask the question about the more spread use of cytogenetic method of research among the different population's categories living at

  4. Preparing linked population data for research: cohort study of prisoner perinatal health outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Hilder

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A study of pregnancy outcomes related to pregnancy in prison in New South Wales, Australia, designed a two stage linkage to add maternal history of incarceration and serious mental health morbidity, neonatal hospital admission and infant congenital anomaly diagnosis to birth data. Linkage was performed by a dedicated state-wide data linkage authority. This paper describes use of the linked data to determine pregnancy prison exposure pregnancy for a representative population of mothers. Methods Researchers assessed the quality of linked records; resolved multiple-matched identities; transformed event-based incarceration records into person-based prisoner records and birth records into maternity records. Inconsistent or incomplete records were censored. Interrogation of the temporal relationships of all incarceration periods from the prisoner record with pregnancies from birth records identified prisoner maternities. Interrogation of maternities for each mother distinguished prisoner mothers who were incarcerated during pregnancy, from prisoner control mothers with pregnancies wholly in the community and a subset of prisoner mothers with maternities both types of maternity. Standard descriptive statistics are used to provide population prevalence of exposures and compare data quality across study populations stratified by mental health morbidity. Results Women incarcerated between 1998 and 2006 accounted for less than 1 % of the 404,000 women who gave birth in NSW between 2000 and 2006, while women with serious mental health morbidity accounted for 7 % overall and 68 % of prisoners. Rates of false positive linkage were within the predicted limits set by the linkage authority for non-prisoners, but were tenfold higher among prisoners (RR 9.9; 95%CI 8.2, 11.9 and twice as high for women with serious mental health morbidity (RR 2.2; 95%CI 1.9, 2.6. This case series of 597 maternities for 558 prisoners pregnant while in prison

  5. Preparing linked population data for research: cohort study of prisoner perinatal health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Lisa; Walker, Jane R; Levy, Michael H; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-16

    A study of pregnancy outcomes related to pregnancy in prison in New South Wales, Australia, designed a two stage linkage to add maternal history of incarceration and serious mental health morbidity, neonatal hospital admission and infant congenital anomaly diagnosis to birth data. Linkage was performed by a dedicated state-wide data linkage authority. This paper describes use of the linked data to determine pregnancy prison exposure pregnancy for a representative population of mothers. Researchers assessed the quality of linked records; resolved multiple-matched identities; transformed event-based incarceration records into person-based prisoner records and birth records into maternity records. Inconsistent or incomplete records were censored. Interrogation of the temporal relationships of all incarceration periods from the prisoner record with pregnancies from birth records identified prisoner maternities. Interrogation of maternities for each mother distinguished prisoner mothers who were incarcerated during pregnancy, from prisoner control mothers with pregnancies wholly in the community and a subset of prisoner mothers with maternities both types of maternity. Standard descriptive statistics are used to provide population prevalence of exposures and compare data quality across study populations stratified by mental health morbidity. Women incarcerated between 1998 and 2006 accounted for less than 1 % of the 404,000 women who gave birth in NSW between 2000 and 2006, while women with serious mental health morbidity accounted for 7 % overall and 68 % of prisoners. Rates of false positive linkage were within the predicted limits set by the linkage authority for non-prisoners, but were tenfold higher among prisoners (RR 9.9; 95%CI 8.2, 11.9) and twice as high for women with serious mental health morbidity (RR 2.2; 95%CI 1.9, 2.6). This case series of 597 maternities for 558 prisoners pregnant while in prison (of whom 128 gave birth in prison); and 2

  6. Risk of adverse birth outcomes in populations living near landfill sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Paul; Briggs, David; Morris, Sara; de Hoogh, Cornelis; Hurt, Christopher; Jensen, Tina Kold; Maitland, Ian; Richardson, Sylvia; Wakefield, Jon; Jarup, Lars

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of adverse birth outcomes associated with residence near landfill sites in Great Britain. Design Geographical study of risks of adverse birth outcomes in populations living within 2 km of 9565 landfill sites operational at some time between 1982 and 1997 (from a total of 19 196 sites) compared with those living further away. Setting Great Britain. Subjects Over 8.2 million live births, 43 471 stillbirths, and 124 597 congenital anomalies (including terminations). Main outcome measures All congenital anomalies combined, some specific anomalies, and prevalence of low and very low birth weight (<2500 g and <1500 g). Results For all anomalies combined, relative risk of residence near landfill sites (all waste types) was 0.92 (99% confidence interval 0.907 to 0.923) unadjusted, and 1.01 (1.005 to 1.023) adjusted for confounders. Adjusted risks were 1.05 (1.01 to 1.10) for neural tube defects, 0.96 (0.93 to 0.99) for cardiovascular defects, 1.07 (1.04 to 1.10) for hypospadias and epispadias (with no excess of surgical correction), 1.08 (1.01 to 1.15) for abdominal wall defects, 1.19 (1.05 to 1.34) for surgical correction of gastroschisis and exomphalos, and 1.05 (1.047 to 1.055) and 1.04 (1.03 to 1.05) for low and very low birth weight respectively. There was no excess risk of stillbirth. Findings for special (hazardous) waste sites did not differ systematically from those for non-special sites. For some specific anomalies, higher risks were found in the period before opening compared with after opening of a landfill site, especially hospital admissions for abdominal wall defects. Conclusions We found small excess risks of congenital anomalies and low and very low birth weight in populations living near landfill sites. No causal mechanisms are available to explain these findings, and alternative explanations include data artefacts and residual confounding. Further studies are needed to help differentiate between the various

  7. The impact of Telephonic Health Coaching on Health Outcomes in a High-risk Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Karen L; Jonk, Yvonne; O'Connor, Heidi; Riise, Kirsten Sundgaard; Eisenberg, David M; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2013-05-01

    Health coaching is a client-centric process to increase motivation and self-efficacy that supports sustainable lifestyle behavior changes and active management of health conditions. This study describes an intervention offered as a benefit to health plan members and examines health and behavioral outcomes of participants. High-risk health plan enrollees were invited to participate in a telephonic health coaching intervention addressing the whole person and focusing on motivating health behavior changes. Outcomes of self-reported lifestyle behaviors, perceived health, stress levels, quality of life, readiness to make changes, and patient activation levels were reported at baseline and upon program completion. Retrospectively, these data were extracted from administrative and health coaching records of participants during the first 2 full years of the program. Less than 7% of the 114 615 potential candidates self-selected to actively participate in health coaching, those with the highest chronic disease load being the most likely to participate. Of 6940 active participants, 1082 fully completed health inventories, with 570 completing Patient Activation Measure (PAM). The conditions most often represented in the active participants were depression, congestive heart failure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, osteoporosis, asthma, and low back pain. In 6 months or less, 89% of participants met at least one goal. Significant improvements occurred in stress levels, healthy eating, exercise levels, and physical and emotional health, as well as in readiness to make change and PAM scores. The types of client-selected goals most often met were physical activity, eating habits, stress management, emotional health, sleep, and pain management, resulting in improved overall quality of life regardless of condition. Positive shifts in activation levels and readiness to change suggest that health coaching is an intervention deserving of future prospective research studies to

  8. Oral health literacy and oral health outcomes in an adult population in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Marília Jesus; Lawrence, Herenia Procopio; Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário de

    2017-07-26

    To investigate the association between critical and communicative oral health literacy (OHL) and oral health outcomes (status, oral health-related quality of life and practices) in adults. This cross-sectional study examined a household probability sample of 248 adults, representing 149,635 residents (20-64 years old) in Piracicaba-SP, Brazil. Clinical oral health and socioeconomic and demographic data, as well as data on oral health-related quality of life (OHIP-14) and health practices were collected. The oral examinations were carried out in the participants' homes, using the World Health Organization criteria for oral diseases. The critical and communicative OHL instrument was the primary independent variable, and it was measured using five Likert items that were dichotomized as 'high' ('agree' and 'strongly agree' responses for the 5 items) and 'low' OHL. Binary and multinomial logistic regressions were performed on each outcome (oral health status and practices), controlling for age, sex and socioeconomic status (SES). Approximately 71.5% presented low OHL. When adjusted for age and sex (first model) low OHL was associated with untreated caries (Odds Ratio = 1.92, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.07-3.45), tooth brushing oral health impact on quality of life (OR = 2.06, 1.15-3.69). Adjusting for age, sex and SES, OHL is related to a risk factor (biofilm) and a consequence of poor oral health (emergency dental visits) and can interfere with the impact of oral diseases on quality of life. As low OHL can be modified, the results support oral health promotion strategies directed at improving critical and communicative oral health literacy in adult populations.

  9. An Integrated Workflow To Assess Technical and Biological Variability of Cell Population Frequencies in Human Peripheral Blood by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Julie G; Qian, Yu; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Zapardiel-Gonzalo, Jose; Taplitz, Randy; Gilman, Robert H; Saito, Mayuko; de Silva, Aruna D; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2017-02-15

    In the context of large-scale human system immunology studies, controlling for technical and biological variability is crucial to ensure that experimental data support research conclusions. In this study, we report on a universal workflow to evaluate both technical and biological variation in multiparameter flow cytometry, applied to the development of a 10-color panel to identify all major cell populations and T cell subsets in cryopreserved PBMC. Replicate runs from a control donation and comparison of different gating strategies assessed the technical variability associated with each cell population and permitted the calculation of a quality control score. Applying our panel to a large collection of PBMC samples, we found that most cell populations showed low intraindividual variability over time. In contrast, certain subpopulations such as CD56 T cells and Temra CD4 T cells were associated with high interindividual variability. Age but not gender had a significant effect on the frequency of several populations, with a drastic decrease in naive T cells observed in older donors. Ethnicity also influenced a significant proportion of immune cell population frequencies, emphasizing the need to account for these covariates in immune profiling studies. We also exemplify the usefulness of our workflow by identifying a novel cell-subset signature of latent tuberculosis infection. Thus, our study provides a universal workflow to establish and evaluate any flow cytometry panel in systems immunology studies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Baseline peripheral blood leukocytosis: Biological marker predicts outcome in oropharyngeal cancer, regardless of HPV-status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouw, Zeno A R; Paul de Boer, Jan; Navran, Arash; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim

    2018-03-01

    To study the prognostic value of abnormalities in baseline complete blood count in patients with oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) treated with (chemo) radiation. The prognostic value of baseline complete blood count on outcome in 234 patients with OPC treated between 2010 and 2015 was examined in multivariate analysis together with other conventional prognostic variables including HPV-status, tumor stage, tumor and nodal size. The 3-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant control (DC) of the whole group were 74%, 64%, 79%, and 88%, respectively. Leukocytosis and HPV-status were the only significant prognosticators for OS and DFS at the multivariate analysis. Patients without leukocytosis had a significantly better DC compared to those with leukocytosis (92% and 70%, respectively, p HPV-negative OPC had significantly worse LRC compared to HPV-positive patients (67% and 90%, respectively, p HPV-positive group with leukocytosis compared to those without leukocytosis were 69% and 95%, respectively (p HPV-negative patients were 41% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.010). This is the first study to date reporting the independent impact of leukocytosis and HPV-status on outcome of patients with OPC. The poor outcome of patients with leukocytosis is mainly caused by the worse DC. The significant impact of leukocytosis on outcome was even more pronounced in HPV-positive patients. These biomarkers could help identifying patients with poor prognosis at baseline requiring intensification of local and/or systemic treatment while treatment de-intensification might be offered to the low-risk group. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measuring the Outcome of At-Risk Students on Biology Standardized Tests When Using Different Instructional Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Dana

    Over the last two decades, online education has become a popular concept in universities as well as K-12 education. This generation of students has grown up using technology and has shown interest in incorporating technology into their learning. The idea of using technology in the classroom to enhance student learning and create higher achievement has become necessary for administrators, teachers, and policymakers. Although online education is a popular topic, there has been minimal research on the effectiveness of online and blended learning strategies compared to the student learning in a traditional K-12 classroom setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in standardized test scores from the Biology End of Course exam when at-risk students completed the course using three different educational models: online format, blended learning, and traditional face-to-face learning. Data was collected from over 1,000 students over a five year time period. Correlation analyzed data from standardized tests scores of eighth grade students was used to define students as "at-risk" for failing high school courses. The results indicated a high correlation between eighth grade standardized test scores and Biology End of Course exam scores. These students were deemed "at-risk" for failing high school courses. Standardized test scores were measured for the at-risk students when those students completed Biology in the different models of learning. Results indicated significant differences existed among the learning models. Students had the highest test scores when completing Biology in the traditional face-to-face model. Further evaluation of subgroup populations indicated statistical differences in learning models for African-American populations, female students, and for male students.

  12. Oral health literacy and oral health outcomes in an adult population in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Jesus Batista

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the association between critical and communicative oral health literacy (OHL and oral health outcomes (status, oral health-related quality of life and practices in adults. Methods This cross-sectional study examined a household probability sample of 248 adults, representing 149,635 residents (20–64 years old in Piracicaba-SP, Brazil. Clinical oral health and socioeconomic and demographic data, as well as data on oral health-related quality of life (OHIP-14 and health practices were collected. The oral examinations were carried out in the participants’ homes, using the World Health Organization criteria for oral diseases. The critical and communicative OHL instrument was the primary independent variable, and it was measured using five Likert items that were dichotomized as ‘high’ (‘agree’ and ‘strongly agree’ responses for the 5 items and ‘low’ OHL. Binary and multinomial logistic regressions were performed on each outcome (oral health status and practices, controlling for age, sex and socioeconomic status (SES. Results Approximately 71.5% presented low OHL. When adjusted for age and sex (first model low OHL was associated with untreated caries (Odds Ratio = 1.92, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.07–3.45, tooth brushing <3 times a day (OR = 2.00, 1.11–3.62 and irregular tooth flossing (OR = 2.17, 1.24–3.80. After SES inclusion in the first model, significant associations were found for low OHL when the outcomes were: presence of biofilm (OR = 1.83, 1.08–3.33, dental care for emergency only (OR = 2.24, 1.24–4.04 and prevalence of oral health impact on quality of life (OR = 2.06, 1.15–3.69. Conclusion Adjusting for age, sex and SES, OHL is related to a risk factor (biofilm and a consequence of poor oral health (emergency dental visits and can interfere with the impact of oral diseases on quality of life. As low OHL can be modified, the results support oral health promotion

  13. MIBG avidity correlates with clinical features, tumor biology, and outcomes in neuroblastoma: A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Steven G; Mody, Rajen; Naranjo, Arlene; Van Ryn, Collin; Russ, Douglas; Oldridge, Derek; Kreissman, Susan; Baker, David L; Parisi, Marguerite; Shulkin, Barry L; Bai, Harrison; Diskin, Sharon J; Batra, Vandana; Maris, John M; Park, Julie R; Matthay, Katherine K; Yanik, Gregory

    2017-11-01

    Prior studies suggest that neuroblastomas that do not accumulate metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) on diagnostic imaging (MIBG non-avid) may have more favorable features compared with MIBG avid tumors. We compared clinical features, biologic features, and clinical outcomes between patients with MIBG nonavid and MIBG avid neuroblastoma. Patients had metastatic high- or intermediate-risk neuroblastoma and were treated on Children's Oncology Group protocols A3973 or A3961. Comparisons of clinical and biologic features according to MIBG avidity were made with chi-squared or Fisher exact tests. Event-free (EFS) and overall (OS) survival compared using log-rank tests and modeled using Cox models. Thirty of 343 patients (8.7%) had MIBG nonavid disease. Patients with nonavid tumors were less likely to have adrenal primary tumors (34.5 vs. 57.2%; P = 0.019), bone metastases (36.7 vs. 61.7%; P = 0.008), or positive urine catecholamines (66.7 vs. 91.0%; P neuroblastoma have lower rates of adrenal primary tumors, bone metastasis, and catecholamine secretion. Despite being more likely to have MYCN-amplified tumors, these patients have superior outcomes compared with patients with MIBG avid disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Can Family Planning Service Statistics Be Used to Track Population-Level Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Robert J; Ross, John; Williamson, Jessica; Weinberger, Michelle

    2018-03-21

    The need for annual family planning program tracking data under the Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) initiative has contributed to renewed interest in family planning service statistics as a potential data source for annual estimates of the modern contraceptive prevalence rate (mCPR). We sought to assess (1) how well a set of commonly recorded data elements in routine service statistics systems could, with some fairly simple adjustments, track key population-level outcome indicators, and (2) whether some data elements performed better than others. We used data from 22 countries in Africa and Asia to analyze 3 data elements collected from service statistics: (1) number of contraceptive commodities distributed to clients, (2) number of family planning service visits, and (3) number of current contraceptive users. Data quality was assessed via analysis of mean square errors, using the United Nations Population Division World Contraceptive Use annual mCPR estimates as the "gold standard." We also examined the magnitude of several components of measurement error: (1) variance, (2) level bias, and (3) slope (or trend) bias. Our results indicate modest levels of tracking error for data on commodities to clients (7%) and service visits (10%), and somewhat higher error rates for data on current users (19%). Variance and slope bias were relatively small for all data elements. Level bias was by far the largest contributor to tracking error. Paired comparisons of data elements in countries that collected at least 2 of the 3 data elements indicated a modest advantage of data on commodities to clients. None of the data elements considered was sufficiently accurate to be used to produce reliable stand-alone annual estimates of mCPR. However, the relatively low levels of variance and slope bias indicate that trends calculated from these 3 data elements can be productively used in conjunction with the Family Planning Estimation Tool (FPET) currently used to produce annual m

  15. Outcomes of emergent embolisation of ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma in a western population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monroe, E.J.; Kogut, M.J.; Ingraham, C.R.; Kwan, S.W.; Hippe, D.S.; Padia, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the authors' experience with interventional radiological management of tumour rupture in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Western population. Materials and methods: A retrospective review was performed of all consecutive patients treated at a single institution with transcatheter embolisation for ruptured HCC between 2000 and 2013. Patient age, sex, aetiology of liver disease, degree of underlying liver dysfunction, and clinical presentation were assessed. Embolisation was performed in a selective fashion when possible. Success, complications, and survival were assessed. Results: Twenty-three patients were treated with embolisation for ruptured HCC. Of these patients, nine, nine, and five patients were Child–Pugh Class A, B, and C respectively. Embolisation was successful in 22 patients; one patient remained haemodynamically unstable and transfusion dependent despite embolisation. No major complications occurred. Median survival time was 260 days and the 30 day and 1 year survival rates were 83% and 45%, respectively. Child–Pugh class B or C (p = 0.04), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score greater than 10 (p = 0.04), lobar embolisation (p = 0.04), and presence of portal vein thrombosis (p = 0.01) were significantly associated with worse prognosis. Conclusion: Transcatheter embolisation is effective at controlling haemorrhage in patients with ruptured HCC. Although major procedural complications are low, embolisation should proceed with an understanding of poor prognosis in patients with decompensated liver disease. Superselective embolisation is associated with improved prognosis and should be performed when feasible. -- Highlights: •We reviewed our outcomes after transcatheter embolization of ruptured HCC in a western population. •Overall survival in the setting of ruptured HCC remains poor despite successful embolization. •Worse liver function, portal vein thrombosis, and lobar embolization were all associated with

  16. Outcomes of nutritional interventions to treat dysphagia in esophageal cancer: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, R M; Mikhail, S; Ciombor, K; Perry, K A; Hinton, A; Stanich, P P; Zhang, C; Conwell, D L; Krishna, S G

    2017-11-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is increasing in prevalence due to rising incidence and improved treatment strategies. Dysphagia is a significant morbidity in patients with EC requiring nutritional intervention. We sought to evaluate outcomes of nutritional interventions for EC patients hospitalized with dysphagia at a population level. The National Inpatient Sample (2002-2012) was utilized to include all adult inpatients (≥18 years of age) with EC and presence of dysphagia and stricture that underwent nutritional interventions including feeding tube (FT) placement, esophageal stenting, or parenteral nutrition (PN). Temporal trends were examined with multivariate analysis performed for mortality, length of stay (LOS), and cost of hospitalization. A total of 509,593 EC patients had 12,205 hospitalizations related to dysphagia. The hospitalization rates doubled over the study period (1.52% vs. 3.28%, p esophageal stenting (13%), and PN (11%). PN was more frequently associated with a diagnosis of sepsis (6.1%, p = 0.023) compared to FT (2.5%) or esophageal stenting (1.8%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated FT and esophageal stenting had comparable mortality (OR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.49, 2.32); however, PN was associated with higher mortality (OR 2.37, 95% CI: 1.22, 4.63), cost of hospitalization ($5,510, 95% CI: 2,262, 8,759), and LOS (2.13 days, 95% CI: 0.72, 3.54). This study shows that hospitalizations for EC with dysphagia and related nutritional interventions are increasing. As a single modality, parenteral nutrition should be avoided. Among our esophageal stent and FT population, further studies are necessary to determine adequate interventions based on disease stage. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Population structure and reproductive biology of Mesopodopsis orientalis (Crustacea: Mysida) in a tropical mangrove ecosystem in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Biju, A.; Panampunnayil, S.U.

    to prevent excessive changes in their internal environment by maintain their blood hyper/ hypo-osmotic to the medium. As in many other mysid species, M. orientalis presented considerable fluctuation in its abundance. Principle factor of seasonal abundance... in the Malaysian sandy beach. These observations suggest that the intensity of breeding varies within different population of the same species. The water temperature significantly affects the periodicity and reproductive biology of mysids (Mauchline, 1980...

  18. An investigation into the population abundance distribution of mRNAs, proteins, and metabolites in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chuan; King, Ross D

    2009-08-15

    Distribution analysis is one of the most basic forms of statistical analysis. Thanks to improved analytical methods, accurate and extensive quantitative measurements can now be made of the mRNA, protein and metabolite from biological systems. Here, we report a large-scale analysis of the population abundance distributions of the transcriptomes, proteomes and metabolomes from varied biological systems. We compared the observed empirical distributions with a number of distributions: power law, lognormal, loglogistic, loggamma, right Pareto-lognormal (PLN) and double PLN (dPLN). The best-fit for mRNA, protein and metabolite population abundance distributions was found to be the dPLN. This distribution behaves like a lognormal distribution around the centre, and like a power law distribution in the tails. To better understand the cause of this observed distribution, we explored a simple stochastic model based on geometric Brownian motion. The distribution indicates that multiplicative effects are causally dominant in biological systems. We speculate that these effects arise from chemical reactions: the central-limit theorem then explains the central lognormal, and a number of possible mechanisms could explain the long tails: positive feedback, network topology, etc. Many of the components in the central lognormal parts of the empirical distributions are unidentified and/or have unknown function. This indicates that much more biology awaits discovery.

  19. Effects of economic crises on population health outcomes in Latin America, 1981–2010: an ecological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Callum; Gilbert, Barnabas James; Zeltner, Thomas; Watkins, Johnathan; Atun, Rifat; Maruthappu, Mahiben

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The relative health effects of changes in unemployment, inflation and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita on population health have not been assessed. We aimed to determine the effect of changes in these economic measures on mortality metrics across Latin America. Design Ecological study. Setting Latin America (21 countries), 1981–2010. Outcome measures Uses multivariate regression analysis to assess the effects of changes in unemployment, inflation and GDP per capita on 5 mortality indicators across 21 countries in Latin America, 1981–2010. Country-specific differences in healthcare infrastructure, population structure and population size were controlled for. Results Between 1981 and 2010, a 1% rise in unemployment was associated with statistically significant deteriorations (pinflation rate was associated with significant deteriorations (pinflation, significant deteriorations (pinflation. Conclusions Rises in unemployment and inflation are associated with long-lasting deteriorations in several population health outcomes. Unemployment exerted much larger effects on health than inflation. In contrast, changes in GDP per capita had almost no association with the explored health outcomes. Contrary to neoclassical development economics, policymakers should prioritise amelioration of unemployment if population health outcomes are to be optimised. PMID:26739715

  20. Non-target toxicity of synthetic insecticides on the biological performance and population growth of Bracon hebetor Say.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslim, Mohammad; Ansari, M Shafiq; Hasan, Fazil

    2018-05-24

    Bracon hebetor Say (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is an important biological control agent of various species of order Lepidoptera and extensively used in biological control program worldwide. Present study evaluated the lethal and sublethal effects of insecticides on B. hebetor using demographic and population growth parameters. Doses of all the tested insecticides were within a maximum range of their recommended field dosages and adults were treated using residual glass vials method. For control experiments adults were treated with distilled water. Among the tested insecticides, the survivorship of various stages of B. hebetor was considerably prolonged on cyantraniliprole followed by chlorantraniliprole and shortest on chlorpyrifos and profenofos treated group. Total immature development time was prolonged in chlorpyrifos and profenofos treated group. Population growth parameters like intrinsic rate of natural increase (r m ), net reproductive rate (R 0 ), finite rate of increase (λ) and mean generation time (T c ) were considerably reduced in B. hebetor groups treated with chlorpyrifos and profenofos. However, B. hebetor groups treated with chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole showed a little or no much difference in population growth parameters when compared with untreated group. It was also observed that chlorpyrifos and profenofos modified the sex ratio, thereby female emergence get reduced. On the basis of present findings it can be concluded that all tested insecticides caused considerable ecotoxic effects on B. hebetor compared to control. However, comparisons among the tested insecticides on the basis of IOBC criteria showed that chlorantraniliprol and cyntraniliprol was less toxic as compared to other insecticides tested on this biological control agent.

  1. Posttraumatic Growth in Populations with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-A Systematic Review on Growth-Related Psychological Constructs and Biological Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christine F; Schmidt, Ulrike; Rosner, Rita

    2016-11-01

    Posttraumatic growth (PTG) and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are possible consequences of trauma. PTG is supposed to emerge from cognitive processes and can have functional and dysfunctional aspects. This systematic review aims to identify and evaluate publications assessing PTG in adults diagnosed with PTSD in order to analyse the relationship between both constructs, how PTG is related to specific psychological variables and if there are biological variables linked to PTG. This extended review evaluates the quality of measures applied and is the first to study PTG only in populations meeting full PTSD criteria. In addition, the relationship between PTG and other relevant constructs, such as openness, optimism and social support, is explored. Our systematic literature search identified 140 studies of which 19 fulfilled our inclusion criteria; most of them used the Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory. Results indicate that trauma survivors with PTSD exhibit more PTG than those without PTSD and that PTG can be intensified during the therapeutic process whereat it is unclear whether PTG is a desirable outcome of PTSD therapy. Positive correlations between PTG and PTSD are reported. For diagnosed populations, we could not find strong evidence of a quadratic relationship between PTG and PTSD, although some studies support this hypothesis. Findings regarding the association of PTG with psychological variables are heterogeneous. Only one study focused on PTG as well as on biological variables (salivary cortisol) but did not discuss possible links between these two so far unconnected research fields in PTSD. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Trauma survivors with PTSD develop more PTG than those without PTSD, it remains unclear whether PTSD and PTG are curvilinearly related. PTG can be enhanced through PTSD therapy, nevertheless one must not assume that PTG is a favorable treatment outcome since we do not know if the development of PTG during therapy promotes

  2. Biological characteristics and clinical outcome of triple negative primary breast cancer in older women - comparison with their younger counterparts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binafsha M Syed

    Full Text Available Triple negative (ER, PgR and HER2 negative breast cancers (TNBCs are often considered as a poor prognostic phenotype. There is dearth of evidence showing the prevalence and biological behaviour of TNBCs in older women. This study aimed to analyse their biological characteristics in comparison with a well characterised younger series from a single centre with long term clinical follow-up. Over 37 years (1973-2010, 1,758 older (≥70 years women with early operable (<5 cm primary breast cancer were managed in a dedicated clinic and have complete clinical information available. Of these 813 patients underwent primary surgery and 575 had good quality tumour samples available for tissue microarray analysis using indirect immunohistochemistry. A total of 127 patients (22.1% had TNBCs and full biological analysis of 15 biomarkers was performed. The results were compared with those of their younger (<70 years counterparts 342 (18.9% from a previously characterised, consecutive series of primary breast cancer treated in the same unit (1986-1998. The 127 older patients with TNBCs showed lower rates of Ki67 and CK 7/8 positivity and high rates of bcl2 and CK18 positivity when compared with their younger counterparts (p<0.05. There was no significant difference in the long term clinical outcome between the two age groups, despite the fact that 47% of the younger patients had adjuvant chemotherapy, while none in the older cohort received such treatment. EGFR, axillary stage and pathological size showed prognostic significance in older women with TNBCs on univariate analysis. Despite not having received adjuvant chemotherapy, the older series had clinical outcome similar to the younger patients almost half of whom had chemotherapy. This appears to be related to other biomarkers (in addition to ER/PgR/HER2 eg Ki67, bcl2 and cytokeratins which have different expression patterns influencing prognosis.

  3. Biological effects of space radiation on human cells. History, advances and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maalouf, M.; Foray, N.; Durante, M.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to radiation is one of the main concerns for space exploration by humans. By focusing deliberately on the works performed on human cells, we endeavored to review, decade by decade, the technological developments and conceptual advances of space radiation biology. Despite considerable efforts, the cancer and the toxicity risks remain to be quantified: the nature and the frequency of secondary heavy ions need to be better characterized in order to estimate their contribution to the dose and to the final biological response; the diversity of radiation history of each astronaut and the impact of individual susceptibility make very difficult any epidemiological analysis for estimating hazards specifically due to space radiation exposure. Cytogenetic data undoubtedly revealed that space radiation exposure produce significant damage in cells. However, our knowledge of the basic mechanisms specific to low-dose, to repeated doses and to adaptive response is still poor. The application of new radiobiological techniques, like immunofluorescence, and the use of human tissue models different from blood, like skin fibroblasts, may help in clarifying all the above items. (author)

  4. Outcomes from a pilot study using computer-based rehabilitative tools in a military population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Katherine W; Quinn, Julia E; Pramuka, Michael; Sharkey, Laura A; French, Louis M

    2012-01-01

    Novel therapeutic approaches and outcome data are needed for cognitive rehabilitation for patients with a traumatic brain injury; computer-based programs may play a critical role in filling existing knowledge gaps. Brain-fitness computer programs can complement existing therapies, maximize neuroplasticity, provide treatment beyond the clinic, and deliver objective efficacy data. However, these approaches have not been extensively studied in the military and traumatic brain injury population. Walter Reed National Military Medical Center established its Brain Fitness Center (BFC) in 2008 as an adjunct to traditional cognitive therapies for wounded warriors. The BFC offers commercially available "brain-training" products for military Service Members to use in a supportive, structured environment. Over 250 Service Members have utilized this therapeutic intervention. Each patient receives subjective assessments pre and post BFC participation including the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 (MPAI-4), the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NBSI), and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). A review of the first 29 BFC participants, who finished initial and repeat measures, was completed to determine the effectiveness of the BFC program. Two of the three questionnaires of self-reported symptom change completed before and after participation in the BFC revealed a statistically significant reduction in symptom severity based on MPAI and NBSI total scores (p < .05). There were no significant differences in the SWLS score. Despite the typical limitations of a retrospective chart review, such as variation in treatment procedures, preliminary results reveal a trend towards improved self-reported cognitive and functional symptoms.

  5. Smoking, activity level and exercise test outcomes in a young population sample without cardiopulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozoris, N T; O'donnell, D E

    2015-01-01

    Whether reduced activity level and exercise intolerance precede the clinical diagnosis of cardiopulmonary disorders in smokers is not known. We examined activity level and exercise test outcomes in a young population-based sample without overt cardiopulmonary disease, differentiating by smoking history. This was a multiyear cross-sectional study using United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 1999-2004. Self-reported activity level and incremental exercise treadmill testing were obtained on survey participants ages 20-49 years, excluding individuals with cardio-pulmonary disease. Three thousand seven hundred and one individuals completed exercise testing. Compared to never smokers, current smokers with >10 pack years reported significantly higher odds of little or no recreation, sport, or physical activity (adjusted OR 1.62; 95% CI 1.12-2.35). Mean perceived exertion ratings (Borg 6-20) at an estimated standardized workload were significantly greater among current smokers (18.3-18.6) compared to never (17.3) and former smokers (17.9) (psmoking abstinence was associated with significantly lower likelihood of low estimated peak oxygen uptake categorization (psmoking cessation, these results set the stage for future studies that examine mechanisms of activity restriction in young smokers and the utility of measures of activity restriction in the earlier diagnosis of smoking-related diseases.

  6. Cyanobacterial populations in biological soil crusts of the northwest Negev Desert, Israel - effects of local conditions and disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Martin; Henneberg, Manja; Felde, Vincent J M N L; Berkowicz, Simon M; Raanan, Hagai; Pade, Nadin; Felix-Henningsen, Peter; Kaplan, Aaron

    2016-11-02

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) fulfill numerous ecological functions in arid and semiarid areas. Cyanobacteria are important BSC organisms, which are responsible for carbon fixation, N 2 -fixation, and binding of soil via extracellular polysaccharides. The cyanobacterial populations were characterized in different sampling plots established in three experimental stations along a rainfall gradient within NW Negev Desert, Israel. Cyanobacterial crust thickness and osmolyte accumulation therein decreased in plots with lower moisture. The cyanobacterial population structure also changed in different plots. We observed an increase of subsection III cyanobacteria such as Microcoleus spp. and Leptolyngbya sp. and a decreasing proportion of strains belonging to subsections I and IV in drier areas on the rainfall gradient. This population shift was also observed in the sampling plots, which were situated at various relief positions within the sand dune experimental sites. We also characterized the cyanobacterial populations within mechanically disturbed plots. After four years, they reached between 80 and 50% of the control populations in the northern-most and southern stations, respectively. Our results suggest that the cyanobacterial population is sensitive not only to macroscale factors but may also be subject to local climate variations and that four years were insufficient for complete recovery of the cyanobacterial population. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Biologics and dermatology life quality index (DLQI) in the Australasian psoriasis population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Diana; Photiou, Louise; Tacey, Mark; Dolianitis, Con; Varigos, George; Foley, Peter; Baker, Chris

    2017-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic condition that may require long-term treatment for disease control. This analysis utilizes data from the Australasian Psoriasis Registry with particular attention to the impact of biologic therapy on DLQI, and the differences between the biologics in terms of DLQI score change. A retrospective review of patients enrolled in the Australasian Psoriasis Registry from April 2008 to August 2016 was conducted. All subjects from the registry that had DLQI and Psoriasis Assessment Severity Index (PASI) scores recorded at a baseline time point of treatment commencement, in addition to week 12 and 24 post commencement were included in the study. A window of ±3 weeks was permitted at these time points. Multivariate linear regression analysis was undertaken to identify significant predictors associated with change in DLQI. Significant predictors of reduction in DLQI and PASI score from baseline to week 24 include use of adalimumab, infliximab, secukinumab and ustekinumab. Other therapies, including etanercept and oral systemic agents did not show significant change. Each class of biologic showed significant reductions in DLQI score, with IL-12/23 blockade showing the greatest reduction. Significant predictors of lack of reduction in DLQI score include a baseline PASI score psoriasis who are treated with biologics show the greatest reduction in DLQI score, compared with other treatments. Australian dermatologists are prescribing biologics when patients qualify for them in keeping with current guidelines.

  8. Dimensions of Socioeconomic Status and Childhood Asthma Outcomes: Evidence for Distinct Behavioral and Biological Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edith; Shalowitz, Madeleine U; Story, Rachel E; Ehrlich, Katherine B; Levine, Cynthia S; Hayen, Robin; Leigh, Adam K K; Miller, Gregory E

    The objective of this study was to investigate 2 key dimensions of socioeconomic status (SES)-prestige and resources-and their associations with immune, behavioral, and clinical outcomes in childhood asthma. Children ages 9 to 17 years with a physician's diagnosis of asthma (N = 150), and one of their parents participated in this study. Children and parents completed interviews and questionnaires about SES (prestige = parent education; resources = family assets), environmental exposures, and clinical asthma measures. Spirometry was conducted to assess children's pulmonary function, and blood was collected to measure cytokine production in response to nonspecific stimulation, allergen-specific stimulation, and microbial stimulation. Higher scores on both dimensions of childhood SES were associated with better clinical outcomes in children (β's from |.18 to .27|, p values childhood family environments have different implications for behavioral and immunological processes relevant to childhood asthma. They also suggest that childhood SES relates to multiple aspects of immunologic regulation of relevance to the pathophysiology of asthma.

  9. The effect of workshop groups on achievement goals and performance in biology: An outcome evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Wendi Kay

    This two-year quasi-experiment evaluated the effect of peer-led workshop groups on performance of minority and majority undergraduate biology students in a three-course series and investigated motivational explanations for performance differences. The workshop intervention used was modeled after a program pioneered by Treisman (1992) at the University of California. Majority volunteers randomly assigned to workshops (n = 61) performed between 1/2 and 1 standard deviation better than those assigned to the control group (n = 60; p challenge interventions can be highly beneficial for both majority and minority participants and that institutions can promote excellence by incorporating workshop programs like the one described here. These interventions have been shown to be more effective and cost less than remedial interventions.

  10. Population biology of establishment in New Zealand hedgehogs inferred from genetic and historical data: conflict or compromise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolfíková, Barbora; Konečný, Adam; Pfäffle, Miriam; Skuballa, Jasmin; Hulva, Pavel

    2013-07-01

    The crucial steps in biological invasions, related to the shaping of genetic architecture and the current evolution of adaptations to a novel environment, usually occur in small populations during the phases of introduction and establishment. However, these processes are difficult to track in nature due to invasion lag, large geographic and temporal scales compared with human observation capabilities, the frequent depletion of genetic variance, admixture and other phenomena. In this study, we compared genetic and historical evidence related to the invasion of the West European hedgehog to New Zealand to infer details about the introduction and establishment. Historical information indicates that the species was initially established on the South Island. A molecular assay of populations from Great Britain and New Zealand using mitochondrial sequences and nuclear microsatellite loci was performed based on a set of analyses including approximate Bayesian computation, a powerful approach for disentangling complex population demographies. According to these analyses, the population of the North Island was most similar to that of the native area and showed greatest reduction in genetic variation caused by founder demography and/or drift. This evidence indicated the location of the establishment phase. The hypothesis was corroborated by data on climate and urbanization. We discuss the contrasting results obtained by the molecular and historical approaches in the light of their different explanatory power and the possible biases influencing the description of particular aspects of invasions, and we advocate the integration of the two types of approaches in invasion biology. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Population admixture, biological invasions and the balance between local adaptation and inbreeding depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Macel, M.; Wolfe, L.M.; Biere, A.

    2011-01-01

    When previously isolated populations meet and mix, the resulting admixed population can benefit from several genetic advantages, including increased genetic variation, the creation of novel genotypes and the masking of deleterious mutations. These admixture benefits are thought to play an important

  12. Characteristics of pregnant illicit drug users and associations between cannabis use and perinatal outcome in a population-based study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, M.M.H.J. van; Reefhuis, J.; Caton, A.R.; Werler, M.M.; Druschel, C.M.; Roeleveld, N.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 4.6% of American women reported use of an illicit drug during pregnancy. Previous studies on illicit drug use during pregnancy and perinatal outcomes showed inconsistent results. METHODS: This population-based study included

  13. Parasites as biological tags of divergence in Central European gudgeon populations (Actinopterygii: Cyprinidae: Gobioninae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvach, Yuriy; Ondračková, Markéta; Bryjová, Anna; Jurajda, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 6 (2017), s. 671-679 ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Gobio * Romanogobio * sympatric species * parasite community * biological tags Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 0.759, year: 2016

  14. Effects of biological control agents and exotic plant invasion on deer mouse populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvette K. Ortega; Dean E. Pearson; Kevin S. McKelvey

    2004-01-01

    Exotic insects are commonly introduced as biological control agents to reduce densities of invasive exotic plants. Although current biocontrol programs for weeds take precautions to minimize ecological risks, little attention is paid to the potential nontarget effects of introduced food subsidies on native consumers. Previous research demonstrated that two gall flies (...

  15. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in the Elderly: Real World Outcomes of Immunochemotherapy in Asian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Ja Min; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kang, Beodeul; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Keun-Wook; Bang, Soo-Mee; Lee, Jong Seok

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the real-life treatment outcomes of elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma from a homogenous Asian population and defined the cutoff age for "elderly." The medical records of 192 DLBCL patients aged > 60 years who had received first-line immunochemotherapy were retrospectively evaluated. The treatment schedule, adverse events, and survival outcomes were analyzed overall and stratified by 4 age groups (> 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, and ≥ 75 years). Patient age of ≥ 75 years was associated with a significantly lower complete remission rate (86.5% vs. 81.4% vs. 82.0% vs. 51%; P population, 75 years seems to be a judicious cutoff for predicting treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro biological outcome of laser application for modification or processing of titanium dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindy, Ahmed; Farahmand, Farzam; Tabatabaei, Fahimeh Sadat

    2017-07-01

    There are numerous functions for laser in modern implant dentistry including surface treatment, surface coating, and implant manufacturing. As laser application may potentially improve osseointegration of dental implants, we systematically reviewed the literature for in vitro biological responses to laser-modified or processed titanium dental implants. The literature was searched in PubMed, ISI Web, and Scopus, using keywords "titanium dental implants," "laser," "biocompatibility," and their synonyms. After screening the 136 references obtained, 28 articles met the inclusion criteria. We found that Nd:YAG laser was the most commonly used lasers in the treatment or processing of titanium dental implants. Most of the experiments used cell attachment and cell proliferation to investigate bioresponses of the implants. The most commonly used cells in these assays were osteoblast-like cells. Only one study was conducted in stem cells. These in vitro studies reported higher biocompatibility in laser-modified titanium implants. It seems that laser radiation plays a vital role in cell response to dental implants; however, it is necessary to accomplish more studies using different laser types and parameters on various cells to offer a more conclusive result.

  17. Postoperative adverse outcomes in intellectually disabled surgical patients: a nationwide population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-An Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intellectually disabled patients have various comorbidities, but their risks of adverse surgical outcomes have not been examined. This study assesses pre-existing comorbidities, adjusted risks of postoperative major morbidities and mortality in intellectually disabled surgical patients. METHODS: A nationwide population-based study was conducted in patients who underwent inpatient major surgery in Taiwan between 2004 and 2007. Four controls for each patient were randomly selected from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Preoperative major comorbidities, postoperative major complications and 30-day in-hospital mortality were compared between patients with and without intellectual disability. Use of medical services also was analyzed. Adjusted odds ratios using multivariate logistic regression analyses with 95% confidence intervals were applied to verify intellectual disability's impact. RESULTS: Controls were compared with 3983 surgical patients with intellectual disability. Risks for postoperative major complications were increased in patients with intellectual disability, including acute renal failure (odds ratio 3.81, 95% confidence interval 2.28 to 6.37, pneumonia (odds ratio 2.01, 1.61 to 2.49, postoperative bleeding (odds ratio 1.35, 1.09 to 1.68 and septicemia (odds ratio 2.43, 1.85 to 3.21 without significant differences in overall mortality. Disability severity was positively correlated with postoperative septicemia risk. Medical service use was also significantly higher in surgical patients with intellectual disability. CONCLUSION: Intellectual disability significantly increases the risk of overall major complications after major surgery. Our findings show a need for integrated and revised protocols for postoperative management to improve care for intellectually disabled surgical patients.

  18. Injuries and outcomes associated with traumatic falls in the elderly population on oral anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Melissa M; Podany, Abigail B; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Armen, Scott B

    2015-09-01

    Fall risk for older adults is a multi-factorial public health problem as 90% of geriatric injuries are caused by traumatic falls. The CDC estimated 33% of adults >65 years incurred a fall in 2011, with 30% resulting in moderate injury. While much has been written about overall risk to trauma patients on oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy, less has been reported on outcomes in the elderly trauma population. We used data from the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) to identify the types of injury and complications incurred, length of stay, and mortality associated with OACs in elderly patients sustaining a fall. Using standard NTDB practices, data were collected on elderly patients (≥65 years) on OACs with diagnosis of fall as the primary mechanism of injury from 2007 to 2010. Univariate analysis was used to determine patient variables influencing risk of fall on OACs. Odds ratios were calculated for types of injury sustained and post-trauma complications. Logistic regression was used to determine mortality associated with type of injury incurred. Of 118,467 elderly patients sampled, OAC use was observed in 444. Predisposing risk factors for fall on OACs were >1 comorbidity (p3 complications (p<0.0001); the most significant being ARDS and ARF (p<0.0001). The mortality rate on OACs was 16%. Injuries to the GI tract, liver, spleen, and kidney (p<0.0002) were more likely to occur. However, if patients suffered a mortality, the most significant injuries were skull fractures and intracranial haemorrhage (p<0.0001). Risks of anticoagulation in elderly trauma patients are complex. While OAC use is a predictor of 30-day mortality after fall, the injuries sustained are markedly different between the elderly who die and those who do not. As a result there is a greater need for healthcare providers to identify preventable and non-preventable risks factors indicative of falls in the anti-coagulated elderly patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Incidence, predictors and outcomes of infective endocarditis in a contemporary adult congenital heart disease population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Benjamin; Cao, Jacob; Kotchetkova, Irina; Celermajer, David S

    2017-12-15

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) in the adult population is steadily increasing. A substrate of prosthetic material and residual lesions, constantly evolving as surgical techniques change over time, predispose these patients to the potentially devastating complication of infective endocarditis (IE). We retrospectively reviewed 2935 patients in our adult CHD database for all cases of endocarditis between 1991 and 2016. Incidence, clinical course and predictors of outcomes were analysed. We document 74 episodes in 62 patients, with an incidence of 0.9 cases/1000 patient years (py). IE was more common in complex CHD (1.4 cases/1000py) and ventricular septal defects (VSDs) (1.9 cases/1000py). Prosthetic material was involved in 47% and left-sided infection predominated (66%). The incidence in bicuspid aortic valves post aortic valve replacement (AVR) was significantly higher than in unoperated valves, being 1.8 and 1.1 cases/1000 patient years respectively. Streptococcus was the most frequently implicated causative organism (37%). Emboli occurred in 34% of cases with a cerebral predilection. 46% of patients required surgery during the admission for IE, most frequently to replace a severely regurgitant bicuspid aortic valve. Early endocarditis-related mortality was 15%, associated with cerebral emboli and acute renal failure. In a contemporary adult CHD cohort, those with complex underlying lesions, VSDs or an AVR were at higher risk for IE. Mortality remains substantial and is more likely in patients with cerebral emboli and/or acute renal failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Population biology of Parides anchises nephalion (Papilionidae in a coastal site in Southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. L. FREITAS

    Full Text Available A population of Parides anchises nephalion was studied during seven months in SE Brazil. The population size was about 10-20 individuals (with theoretic maximum near 60 individuals, with small variations in some months. Sex ratio was male biased, with males dominating in all months. The age structure was not stable, with an increase in new individuals before the population peak in December. The residence time was 14.1 ± 8.2 days for males and 9.0 ± 3.6 to females, with the maximum registered of 30 days. Males can travel distances of up to 400 m, but most individuals were always recaptured in the same site. The mean forewing length was greater in females. The population features agree with those found in other species of Parides in other neotropical sites.

  1. A Population Biology Perspective on the Stepwise Infection Process of the Bacterial Pathogen Pasteuria ramosa in Daphnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Dieter; Duneau, David; Hall, Matthew D; Luijckx, Pepijn; Andras, Jason P; Du Pasquier, Louis; Ben-Ami, Frida

    2016-01-01

    The infection process of many diseases can be divided into series of steps, each one required to successfully complete the parasite's life and transmission cycle. This approach often reveals that the complex phenomenon of infection is composed of a series of more simple mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that a population biology approach, which takes into consideration the natural genetic and environmental variation at each step, can greatly aid our understanding of the evolutionary processes shaping disease traits. We focus in this review on the biology of the bacterial parasite Pasteuria ramosa and its aquatic crustacean host Daphnia, a model system for the evolutionary ecology of infectious disease. Our analysis reveals tremendous differences in the degree to which the environment, host genetics, parasite genetics and their interactions contribute to the expression of disease traits at each of seven different steps. This allows us to predict which steps may respond most readily to selection and which steps are evolutionarily constrained by an absence of variation. We show that the ability of Pasteuria to attach to the host's cuticle (attachment step) stands out as being strongly influenced by the interaction of host and parasite genotypes, but not by environmental factors, making it the prime candidate for coevolutionary interactions. Furthermore, the stepwise approach helps us understanding the evolution of resistance, virulence and host ranges. The population biological approach introduced here is a versatile tool that can be easily transferred to other systems of infectious disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The biology of NK cells and their receptors affects clinical outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Bree; Felices, Martin; Cichocki, Frank; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were first identified for their capacity to reject bone marrow allografts in lethally irradiated mice without prior sensitization. Subsequently, human NK cells were detected and defined by their non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity toward transformed or virally infected target cells. Karre et al. later proposed 'the missing self hypothesis' to explain the mechanism by which self-tolerant cells could kill targets that had lost self MHC class I. Subsequently, the receptors that recognize MHC class I to mediate tolerance in the host were identified on NK cells. These class I-recognizing receptors contribute to the acquisition of function by a dynamic process known as NK cell education or licensing. In the past, NK cells were assumed to be short lived, but more recently NK cells have been shown to mediate immunologic memory to secondary exposures to cytomegalovirus infection. Because of their ability to lyse tumors with aberrant MHC class I expression and to produce cytokines and chemokines upon activation, NK cells may be primed by many stimuli, including viruses and inflammation, to contribute to a graft-versus-tumor effect. In addition, interactions with other immune cells support the therapeutic potential of NK cells to eradicate tumor and to enhance outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A Comparison of the Outcomes for Cartilage Defects of the Knee Treated With Biologic Resurfacing Versus Focal Metallic Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Daley, Erika; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    2017-02-01

    To compare the results of focal metallic resurfacing with biologic procedures in patients more than 35 years of age with isolated, full thickness defects of the femoral condyle. A total of 61 patients met the selection criteria resulting in 30 patients treated with biological procedures, including debridement, microfracture, osteochondral autograft transplantation, osteochondral allograft, and autologous chondrocyte implantation (BIO group), and 32 patients treated with focal metallic resurfacing (CAP group). The BIO and CAP groups were matched according to treatment location, defect grade and size, and age profile. Outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Short Form-12, and satisfaction. The primary combination endpoint was determined as a 20% improvement (minimum clinically important difference-20) on WOMAC pain and function at 2 years and no additional index lesion-related surgical intervention. Safety and effectiveness were also reported. Thirty patients in the BIO group (mean age of 44.6, range 35-64) had an average follow-up of 2.6 years and 32 patients in the CAP group (mean age 47.9, range 37-68) were followed for 2.0 years. Fifty-three percent in the BIO group and 75% in the CAP group achieved success per the endpoint definition. The mean total WOMAC score improved significantly for both groups (BIO: 57-78; P metal resurfacing procedures for the treatment of isolated focal chondral lesions of the femoral condyle in the knee. Focal metallic resurfacing results in similar clinical outcomes and provides excellent success rates at short-term follow-up. Level III comparative study. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Population biology of the burrowing crab Neohelice granulata, (Crustacea: Decapoda: Varunidae from a tropical mangrove in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Gregati

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The population biology of the burrowing crab Neohelice granulata (Dana, 1851 from a mangrove in Jabaquara Beach, Paraty, state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (23º13'04"S and 44º42'47"W, was studied with respect to the following traits: size-frequency distribution, recruitment, reproductive period, fecundity, and sex ratio. Specimens were sampled monthly from April, 2003 to March, 2004, at the river margins during low tide periods. Size, sex, presence of eggs, and stage of the female gonad were recorded. Ovigerous females had their eggs removed and counted. The reproductive period was continuous and the highest frequency of ovigerous females was recorded in the fall and winter. Mature gonads were found throughout the year and recruitment was continuous but more intense during the summer. The fecundity of N. granulata (30028.3 ± 10861.2 eggs was high in comparison to studies in other localities. In general, the proportion of males was similar to that of females (1:0.92; however, males were predominant in the fall (1:0.77 and winter (1:0.75. All the information available so far on the reproduction of N. granulata involves populations from subtropical salt marshes; therefore, comparative studies including other habitats, such as mangrove forests, are needed to further understand the environmental influences on the population and reproductive biology of semiterrestrial crabs.

  5. A CRISPR-based MLST Scheme for Understanding the Population Biology and Epidemiology of Salmonella Enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-26

    N. Shariat, R. E. Timme, J. B. Pettengill, R. Barrangou, E. G. Dudley. Characterization and evolution of Salmonella CRISPR - Cas systems...Barrangou, Edward G. Dudley. Characterization of CRISPR - Cas in Salmonella, 3rd European CRISPR meeting. 14-MAY-14, . : , Margaret K. Kirchner, Nikki... CRISPRs Beyond subtyping approaches, we were motivated to understand the biology of CRISPR - Cas systems in Salmonella. We performed in-depth sequence

  6. Clinical associations, biological risk factors and outcomes of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokal, Burcu Gokce; Guler, Selda Keskin; Yoldas, Tahir Kurtulus; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Demircan, Cemile Sencer; Yon, Mehmet Ilker; Yoldas, Zeynep; Gunes, Gursel; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare cerebrovascular disease affecting young adults. The majority of the patients are female. The aim of this study is to assess the clinical associations, risk factors and outcomes of the patients with CVST. Methods The data of 75 patients with CVST admitted to our hospital between 2006 and 2016 were reviewed. Demographic and clinical features and the thrombophilic risk factors of the patients were recorded. The localizations of the thrombi were determined and modified Rankin score at the time of onset and discharge were calculated. Results The majority of our patients (78.7%) were female. Median age was 35 years (16–76). The most common symptom was headache (86.7%). In 82.6% of our patients, inherited or acquired risk factors for thrombosis were detected. Transverse sinus was the most common site of thrombosis followed by sigmoid and superior sagittal sinuses. Two thirds of the patients had involvement of multiple sinuses. The patients with the involvement of sagittal sinus had better disability at the time of admittance (p = 0.013) while the number of involved sinuses was correlated worse disability (p = 0.015). The neurologic states in the majority of the patients were improved by the end of the hospitalization period (p = 0.001). There was no significant difference in disability score at discharge between men and women (p = 0.080). No patient with CVST died in the hospitalization period. Conclusions This study is one of the largest cohort studies on CVST in our region. The results of the study disclosed that CVST had wide range of clinical manifestations and non-specific symptoms at the beginning. For that reason, in especially high risk groups for thrombosis, the diagnosis of CVST should be kept in mind. PMID:28222615

  7. A biology-driven approach identifies the hypoxia gene signature as a predictor of the outcome of neuroblastoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Paolo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia is a condition of low oxygen tension occurring in the tumor microenvironment and it is related to poor prognosis in human cancer. To examine the relationship between hypoxia and neuroblastoma, we generated and tested an in vitro derived hypoxia gene signature for its ability to predict patients' outcome. Results We obtained the gene expression profile of 11 hypoxic neuroblastoma cell lines and we derived a robust 62 probesets signature (NB-hypo taking advantage of the strong discriminating power of the l1-l2 feature selection technique combined with the analysis of differential gene expression. We profiled gene expression of the tumors of 88 neuroblastoma patients and divided them according to the NB-hypo expression values by K-means clustering. The NB-hypo successfully stratifies the neuroblastoma patients into good and poor prognosis groups. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that the NB-hypo is a significant independent predictor after controlling for commonly used risk factors including the amplification of MYCN oncogene. NB-hypo increases the resolution of the MYCN stratification by dividing patients with MYCN not amplified tumors in good and poor outcome suggesting that hypoxia is associated with the aggressiveness of neuroblastoma tumor independently from MYCN amplification. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the NB-hypo is a novel and independent prognostic factor for neuroblastoma and support the view that hypoxia is negatively correlated with tumors' outcome. We show the power of the biology-driven approach in defining hypoxia as a critical molecular program in neuroblastoma and the potential for improvement in the current criteria for risk stratification.

  8. Population biology and feeding habits of the nephropid lobster Metanephrops thomsoni (Bate, 1888) in the East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Hwa; Kim, Jung Nyun; Kim, Mi Hyang; Chang, Dae Soo; Yoo, Joon Taek; Kim, Jin Koo

    2008-07-01

    Population biology and feeding habits of the nephropidlobsterMetanephrops thomsoni (Bate) was studied from a field survey sampled with bottom trawls in the East China Sea. The female/male ratio was 1.06:1. Three size-class groups were discriminated for both sexes, which may correspond to one to three year-old cohorts. The average stage fecundity was 471 in each brood. Larger than two-year-size-class females are multi broods during the breeding season. Gut analysis showed that this lobster is a common camivore and mainly consume crustaceans and fishes, regardless of sex and carapace length size.

  9. Lessons learned from practical approaches to reconcile mismatches between biological population structure and stock units of marine fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerr, Lisa A.; Hintzen, Niels T.; Cadrin, Steven X.

    2017-01-01

    for overexploitation of unique spawning components, which can lead to loss of productivity and reduced biodiversity along with destabilization of local and regional stock dynamics. Furthermore, ignoring complex population structure and stock connectivity can lead to misperception of the magnitude of fish productivity......, which can translate to suboptimal utilization of the resource. We describe approaches that are currently being applied to improve the assessment and management process for marine fish in situations where complex spatial structure has led to an observed mismatch between the scale of biological...... and resilience of fish species....

  10. Incidence and outcomes of bulimia nervosa : a nationwide population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keski-Rahkonen, A.; Hoek, H. W.; Linna, M. S.; Raevuori, A.; Sihvola, E.; Bulik, C. M.; Rissanen, A.; Kaprio, J.

    Background. Little is known about the epidemiology of bulimia nervosa outside clinical settings. We report the incidence, prevalence and outcomes of bulimia nervosa using for the first time a nationwide Study design. Method. To assess the incidence and natural course and outcomes of DSM-IV bulimia

  11. English Learners with Disabilities in High School: Population Characteristics, Transition Programs, and Postschool Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Audrey; Murray, Angela; Kim, Hye-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the characteristics, transition education, and postschool outcomes of English learners with disabilities (ELSWDs), despite that English learners are a rapidly growing group of U.S. students with consistently poor outcomes. This study examines a nationally representative sample of ELSWDs through a secondary analysis of the…

  12. Parental Cognitive Impairment, Mental Health, and Child Outcomes in a Child Protection Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Maurice; McConnell, David; Aunos, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    Parents with cognitive impairments (CI) are overrepresented in child custody cases and their children are at risk for adverse outcomes. Ecological-transactional researchers propose that child outcomes are a function of the interaction of multiple distal, intermediate, and proximal risk and resilience factors. This study tested the fit of, and…

  13. Navigating from the heights of technical rigour to the swampy reality: Lessons from New Zealand in population health outcomes monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wren

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: The objective of this paper is to describe and discuss two documents produced by the New Zealand Ministry of Health concerning the monitoring of outcomes of public health programs. The New Zealand Government is increasingly expecting planners and managers of publicly funded services to shift their focus from the delivery of ‘outputs’ towards achievement of ‘outcomes’. Intervention logic models and outcomes monitoring are promoted by central government agencies as suitable management methods for implementing the change. [1-3]

    Methods: To help managers design and implement comprehensive, effective and measurable population health programmes the Ministry of Health recently published two guidance documents. The first document provided guidance about how to plan programmes using a generic logic model approach.[4] The second set out in detail a process on how to monitor population health programmes.[5] The intent of the documents was to help managers navigate between the heights of technical rigour and the swamps of reality in the delivery of population health programmes.[6]

    Results: A number of issues and implications for how population health programmes are planned monitored and performance assessed have been identified by the guidance documents. Issues include the problem of small numbers, understanding the difference between outcomes monitoring and traditional forms of evaluation, and outcomes monitoring being seen as a tool for punitive performance management rather than ‘continuous programme improvement’. Implications include more time spent on the design of programmes. Planners will need to focus upon better sequencing of activities, setting more specific and time limited goals, and to be more informed about how to use research to inform the selection of interventions.

    Conclusions: The guidance documents promoted by

  14. Altered self-perception in adult survivors treated for a CNS tumor in childhood or adolescence: population-based outcomes compared with the general population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnquist, Lina; Rickardsson, Jenny; Lannering, Birgitta; Gustafsson, Göran; Boman, Krister K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors are at risk for persistent tumor/treatment-related morbidity, physical disability and social consequences that may alter self-perception, vital for self-identity, mental health and quality of survival. We studied the long-term impact of childhood CNS tumors and their treatment on the self-perception of adult survivors and compared outcomes with those of the general population. Methods The cohort included 697 Swedish survivors diagnosed with a primary CNS tumor during 1982–2001. Comparison data were randomly collected from a stratified general population sample. Survivors and general population individuals were compared as regards self-perception in 5 domains: body image, sports/physical activities, peers, work, and family, and with a global self-esteem index. Within the survivor group, determinants of impact on self-perception were identified. Results The final analyzed sample included 528 survivors, 75.8% of the entire national cohort. The control sample consisted of 995, 41% of 2500 addressed. Survivors had significantly poorer self-perception outcomes in domains of peers, work, body image, and sports/physical activities, and in the global self-perception measure, compared with those of the general population (all P type and a history of cranial radiation therapy were associated with outcomes. Conclusion An altered self-perception is a potential late effect in adult survivors of pediatric CNS tumors. Self-perception and self-esteem are significant elements of identity, mental health and quality of survival. Therefore, care and psychosocial follow-up of survivors should include measures for identifying disturbances and for assessing the need for psychosocial intervention. PMID:25332406

  15. Comparative Population Biology of Critically Endangered Dracocephalum austriacum (Lamiaceae) in Two Distant Regions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostálek, Tomáš; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2013), s. 75-93 ISSN 1211-9520 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/08/0706; GA MŠk 2B06178 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : life table response experiments * population dynamics * rare species Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.612, year: 2013

  16. Environmental and endogenous control of sexuality in a rotifer life cycle: developmental and population biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, John J

    2003-01-01

    Induction of mictic females, and hence initiation of sexuality, in the life cycle of some Brachionus requires an environmental stimulus associated with crowding. The inducing stimulus appears to be a taxonomically specific chemical released into the environment by the rotifers. Oocytes are induced to develop into mictic females before they are oviposited by their amictic mothers and begin cleavage divisions. Thus, the inducer affects the oocyte in the maternal body cavity either directly or indirectly by altering the physiology of its mother. The level of sexual reproduction expressed in populations of a Florida strain of B. calyciflorus is controlled by two types of endogenous factors and by the degree of crowding. First, some fraction of genetically identical oocytes in a clonal population fails to respond to even extreme crowding conditions, thus ensuring some potential for continued population growth by female parthenogenesis. Second, the propensity of amictic females to produce mictic daughters is extremely low when they hatch from fertilized resting eggs and then gradually increases to an asymptote after about 12 parthenogenetic generations. This multigenerational parental effect likely is due to a cytoplasmic factor in fertilized eggs that inhibits expression of the mictic-female phenotype and that is gradually diluted in successive parthenogenetic generations. The effect may increase a clone's genetic contribution to the resting-egg bank by increasing its population size through parthenogenetic generations before mictic females are induced.

  17. Translating crustacean biological responses from CO2 bubbling experiments into population-level predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many studies of animal responses to ocean acidification focus on uniformly conditioned age cohorts that lack complexities typically found in wild populations. These studies have become the primary data source for predicting higher level ecological effects, but the roles of intras...

  18. Population genetics and biological control of goldspotted oak borer, an invasive pest of California oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanessa Lopez; Paul F. Rugman-Jones; Tom W. Coleman; Richard Stouthamer; Mark Hoddle

    2015-01-01

    California’s oak woodlands are threatened by the recent introduction of goldspotted oak borer (Agrilus auroguttatus). This invasive wood-borer is indigenous to mountain ranges in southern Arizona where its low population densities may be due to the presence of co-evolved, host-specific natural enemies. Reuniting A. auroguttatus...

  19. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2013-05-22

    This report summarizes the results of a seven-year, DOE-funded research project, conducted by researchers from Kansas State University and the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative, to assess the effects of wind energy development in Kansas on the population and reproduction of greater prairie chickens.

  20. Population biology of intestinal Enterococcus Isolates from hospitalized and nonhospitalized individuals in different age groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tedim, Ana P.; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Corander, Jukka; Rodríguez, Concepción M.; Cantón, Rafael; Willems, Rob J.; Baquero, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M.

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of enterococcal populations from fecal samples from hospitalized (n=133) and nonhospitalized individuals (n= 173) of different age groups (group I, ages 0 to 19 years; group II, ages 20 to 59 years; group III, ages≥60 years) was analyzed. Enterococci were recovered at similar rates

  1. Population and genetic outcomes 20 years after reintroducing bobcats (Lynx rufus) to Cumberland Island, Georgia USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Duane R.; Hansen, Leslie A.; Bohling, Justin H.; Miller-Butterworth, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    In 1988–1989, 32 bobcats Lynx rufus were reintroduced to Cumberland Island (CUIS), Georgia, USA, from which they had previously been extirpated. They were monitored intensively for 3 years immediately post-reintroduction, but no estimation of the size or genetic diversity of the population had been conducted in over 20 years since reintroduction. We returned to CUIS in 2012 to estimate abundance and effective population size of the present-day population, as well as to quantify genetic diversity and inbreeding. We amplified 12 nuclear microsatellite loci from DNA isolated from scats to establish genetic profiles to identify individuals. We used spatially explicit capture–recapture population estimation to estimate abundance. From nine unique genetic profiles, we estimate a population size of 14.4 (SE = 3.052) bobcats, with an effective population size (Ne) of 5–8 breeding individuals. This is consistent with predictions of a population viability analysis conducted at the time of reintroduction, which estimated the population would average 12–13 bobcats after 10 years. We identified several pairs of related bobcats (parent-offspring and full siblings), but ~75% of the pairwise comparisons were typical of unrelated individuals, and only one individual appeared inbred. Despite the small population size and other indications that it has likely experienced a genetic bottleneck, levels of genetic diversity in the CUIS bobcat population remain high compared to other mammalian carnivores. The reintroduction of bobcats to CUIS provides an opportunity to study changes in genetic diversity in an insular population without risk to this common species. Opportunities for natural immigration to the island are limited; therefore, continued monitoring and supplemental bobcat reintroductions could be used to evaluate the effect of different management strategies to maintain genetic diversity and population viability. The successful reintroduction and maintenance of a

  2. Cardiovascular outcomes associated with canagliflozin versus other non-gliflozin antidiabetic drugs: population based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patorno, Elisabetta; Goldfine, Allison B; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Everett, Brendan M; Glynn, Robert J; Liu, Jun; Kim, Seoyoung C

    2018-02-06

    To evaluate the cardiovascular safety of canagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, in direct comparisons with DPP-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i), GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA), or sulfonylureas, as used in routine practice. Population based retrospective cohort study. Nationwide sample of patients with type 2 diabetes from a large de-identified US commercial healthcare database (Optum Clinformatics Datamart). Three pairwise 1:1 propensity score matched cohorts of patients with type 2 diabetes 18 years and older who initiated canagliflozin or a comparator non-gliflozin antidiabetic agent (ie, a DPP-4i, a GLP-1RA, or a sulfonylurea) between April 2013 and September 2015. The primary outcomes were heart failure admission to hospital and a composite cardiovascular endpoint (comprised of being admitted to hospital for acute myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or hemorrhagic stroke). Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated in each propensity score matched cohort controlling for more than 100 baseline characteristics. During a 30 month period, the hazard ratio for heart failure admission to hospital associated with canagliflozin was 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.54 to 0.92) versus a DPP-4i (n=17 667 pairs), 0.61 (0.47 to 0.78) versus a GLP-1RA (20 539), and 0.51 (0.38 to 0.67) versus a sulfonylurea (17 354 ). The hazard ratio for the composite cardiovascular endpoint associated with canagliflozin was 0.89 (0.68 to 1.17) versus a DPP-4i, 1.03 (0.79 to 1.35) versus a GLP-1RA, and 0.86 (0.65 to 1.13) versus a sulfonylurea. Results were similar in sensitivity analyses further adjusting for baseline hemoglobin A1c levels and in subgroups of patients with and without prior cardiovascular disease or heart failure. In this large cohort study, canagliflozin was associated with a lower risk of heart failure admission to hospital and with a similar risk of myocardial infarction or stroke in

  3. Does the applied polytrauma definition notably influence outcome and patient population? - a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Stephan; Krenn, Philipp; Heinz, Thomas; Negrin, Lukas Leopold

    2017-08-31

    Although the term "polytrauma" has been in use for decades, no generally accepted definition exists. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that different polytrauma definitions applied to a specific patient population result in diverse subgroups of individuals, who in turn present a varying outcome. All patients (≥18 years) treated at our level I trauma center within a time period of three years were classified according to 11 selected polytrauma definitions and included in our study, if they were rated "polytraumatized" by at least one of these definitions. All patients, who met the criteria of a certain definition, were combined to the relevant definition-positive group, thus resulting in 11 patient subgroups. Their demographic data (number of patients, mean patient age, mean Injury Severity Score value, median number of ventilator days, median length of stay at the intensive care unit and at the hospital, mortality rate and odds ratio) were statistically compared. Three hundred seventy-five patients (73% male) with a mean age of 47 years met the inclusion criteria and were allocated to the relevant subgroups; their patient number varied from 55 to 346 and their mean Injury Severity Score value ranged from 4 to 75. Not surprisingly, all examined parameters were subject to variations. Whereas most definition-positive groups showed a mortality rate of about 21% to 30%, 18% of the individuals, who met the criteria according to Blacker, and 40% of the polytrauma victims according to Schalamon died. The Pape 1-, Schalamon-, and Berlin-positive groups presented a significant odds ratio with regard to mortality that considerably exceeded 1. A polytrauma definition can only be a reliable tool in classifying trauma victims if it provides a significant odds ratio with regard to mortality that considerably exceeds 1 and if it succeeds in capturing patients with multiple severe injuries and a higher mortality rate without reducing the number of polytraumatized

  4. Outcomes of complex robot-assisted extravesical ureteral reimplantation in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, Angela M; Broderick, Kristin M; Travers, Curtis; Smith, Edwin A; Elmore, James M; Kirsch, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    While open ureteral reimplantation remains the gold standard for surgical treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), minimally invasive approaches offer potential benefits. This study evaluated the outcomes of children undergoing complex robot-assisted laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation (RALUR) for failed previous anti-reflux surgery, complex anatomy, or ureterovesical junction obstruction (UVJO), and compared them with patients undergoing open extravesical repair. Children undergoing complex RALUR or open extravesical ureteral reimplantation (OUR) were identified. Reimplantation was classified as complex if ureters: 1) had previous anti-reflux surgery, 2) required tapering and/or dismembering, or 3) had associated duplication or diverticulum. Seventeen children underwent complex RALUR during a 24-month period, compared with 41 OUR. The mean follow-up was 16.6 ± 6.5 months. The RALUR children were significantly older (9.3 ± 3.7 years) than the OUR patients (3.1 ± 2.7 years; P urinary tract infection compared with a single child (5.9%) undergoing RALUR (P = 1.00). There was no significant difference in complication rate between the two groups (12.2% OUR versus 11.8% RALUR; P = 1.00). A postoperative cystogram was performed in the majority of RALUR patients, with no persistent VUR detected, and one child (6.7%) was diagnosed with contralateral reflux. Reported VUR resolution rates following robot-assisted ureteral reimplantation are varied. In the present series, children undergoing RALUR following failed previous anti-reflux surgery, with complex anatomy, or UVJO experienced a shorter length of stay but had similar analgesic requirements to those undergoing open repair. Radiographic, clinical success rates and complication risk were comparable. This study had several limitations, aside from lack of randomization. Analgesic use was limited to an inpatient setting, and pain scores were not assessed. Not all children underwent a postoperative VCUG, so

  5. Outcomes of combined trabecular micro-bypass and phacoemulsification in a predominantly Hispanic patient population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallardo MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mark J Gallardo,1,2 Richard A Supnet,1 Jane Ellen Giamporcaro,3 Dana M Hornbeak3 1El Paso Eye Surgeons, PA, El Paso, 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 3Division of Clinical Research and Medical Affairs, Glaukos Corporation, Laguna Hills, CA, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate intraocular pressure (IOP and topical ocular hypotensive medication burden at 12 months postoperatively in a predominantly Hispanic patient population with primary open-angle glaucoma each implanted with one trabecular micro-bypass stent during cataract surgery.Methods: This was a retrospective, consecutive case series. The main objective was to assess reduction of IOP and/or medication burden in all eyes at the 12-month postoperative exam. A secondary objective was to assess outcomes in 3 subgroups, distinguished preoperatively by IOP control and by medication burden (suboptimal or maximum therapy and with different treatment goals. Group 1 had medication-controlled IOP and goal to reduce medications while maintaining IOP control (n=65; Group 2 had uncontrolled IOP on ≤2 medications and goal to reduce IOP and maintain/reduce medication burden (n=31; and Group 3 had uncontrolled IOP on ≥3 medications and goal to reduce IOP and avoid filtering surgery (n=38. Evaluations included IOP, medication use, cup-to-disc ratio, visual fields, complications, and interventions. One hundred subjects (134 eyes have been followed for 12 months.Results: Most patients (80% were Hispanic and had moderate or severe glaucoma (87%. At 12 months, mean IOP reduced to 12.9 mmHg vs 16.5 mmHg preoperatively; 92% had an IOP ≤15 mmHg at 12 months (99% had ≤18 mmHg. Mean medication burden had decreased to 0.9 vs 2.3 preoperatively. At the 12-month time point, 94% of all eyes achieved their predefined treatment goal of reduced IOP and/or medications. Reductions in medication burden for Group 1, and

  6. Effects of economic crises on population health outcomes in Latin America, 1981-2010: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Callum; Gilbert, Barnabas James; Zeltner, Thomas; Watkins, Johnathan; Atun, Rifat; Maruthappu, Mahiben

    2016-01-06

    The relative health effects of changes in unemployment, inflation and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita on population health have not been assessed. We aimed to determine the effect of changes in these economic measures on mortality metrics across Latin America. Ecological study. Latin America (21 countries), 1981-2010. Uses multivariate regression analysis to assess the effects of changes in unemployment, inflation and GDP per capita on 5 mortality indicators across 21 countries in Latin America, 1981-2010. Country-specific differences in healthcare infrastructure, population structure and population size were controlled for. Between 1981 and 2010, a 1% rise in unemployment was associated with statistically significant deteriorations (peconomics, policymakers should prioritise amelioration of unemployment if population health outcomes are to be optimised. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Effects of chronic exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation on the reproductive performance and outcome of an exposed population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannino, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that low doses of ionizing radiation (cumulative dose less than 5.0 rads/yr) effects the reproductive history and/or outcome of a human population. Medically-related personnel who were exposed to low doses of radiation in the course of their employment were compared with medically-related personnel who were not routinely exposed to ionizing radiation. Each population consisted of 3000 persons from the states of Michigan and Ohio. Reproductive performance, history, and outcome of each sample population was compared statistically. Nineteen congenital defects and 47 postnatal defects were recorded for conceptions of the non-exposed population and 50 congenital defects and 83 postnatal defects were recorded for the exposed group. These groups were further broken down as to whether conception took place before, during, or after exposure and the results statistically analyzed. It was found that the exposure population had greater than expected numbers of postnatal defects and less than expected numbers of normal conceptions

  8. Changes in Cryphonectria parasitica populations affects natural biological control of chestnut blight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ježić, Marin; Mlinarec, Jelena; Vuković, Rosemary; Katanić, Zorana; Krstin, Ljiljana; Nuskern, Lucija; Poljak, Igor; Idžojtić, Marilena; Tkalec, Mirta; Curkovic-Perica, Mirna

    2018-02-14

    Invasive species, especially plant pathogens have a potential to completely eradicate native plant species and remodel landscapes. Tripartite interaction among sweet chestnut, Castanea sativa, chestnut blight-causing invasive fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, and a hyperparasitic virus, Cryphonectria parasitica hypovirus 1 (CHV1) were studied in two populations. The number of different vegetative compatibility (vc) types of C. parasitica more than doubled over the ten years, while the hypovirulence incidence dropped in one population, and slightly increased in the other one. Over the course of our short term, three year monitoring experiment, the prevalence of hypovirulent isolates obtained from monitored cankers increased slowly, i.e. more hypovirulent isolates were being obtained from the same cankers over time. Within studied cankers considerable changes in vc type and CHV1 presence were observed, indicating a highly dynamic system in which virulent and hypovirulent mycelia, sometimes of discordant vc types, often appeared together. The increase in hypovirulence prevalence did not have any observable curative effect on the cankers, and occasionally reactivation of healed cankers by new, virulent C. parasitica isolates was observed. Both, short and long term observations and revalidation of the infected plant populations are necessary to accurately estimate disease progress and formulate an adequate disease management strategy.

  9. Population variability in biological adaptive responses to DNA damage and the shapes of carcinogen dose-response curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conolly, Rory B.; Gaylor, David W.; Lutz, Werner K.

    2005-01-01

    Carcinogen dose-response curves for both ionizing radiation and chemicals are typically assumed to be linear at environmentally relevant doses. This assumption is used to ensure protection of the public health in the absence of relevant dose-response data. A theoretical justification for the assumption has been provided by the argument that low dose linearity is expected when an exogenous agent adds to an ongoing endogenous process. Here, we use computational modeling to evaluate (1) how two biological adaptive processes, induction of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, may affect the shapes of dose-response curves for DNA-damaging carcinogens and (2) how the resulting dose-response behaviors may vary within a population. Each model incorporating an adaptive process was capable of generating not only monotonic dose-responses but also nonmonotonic (J-shaped) and threshold responses. Monte Carlo analysis suggested that all these dose-response behaviors could coexist within a population, as the spectrum of qualitative differences arose from quantitative changes in parameter values. While this analysis is largely theoretical, it suggests that (a) accurate prediction of the qualitative form of the dose-response requires a quantitative understanding of the mechanism (b) significant uncertainty is associated with human health risk prediction in the absence of such quantitative understanding and (c) a stronger experimental and regulatory focus on biological mechanisms and interindividual variability would allow flexibility in regulatory treatment of environmental carcinogens without compromising human health

  10. Population biology of alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, in Lake Michigan, 1949-70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Edward H.

    1972-01-01

    Alewives were unknown in Lake Michigan before 1949, but became extremely abundant in the 1960s and soon exceeded the carrying capacity of the lake. In 1967 they were decimated by a lakewide mass mortality, and have since been less abundant as 'adults' (a?Y 120 mm long), although numerous young were produced in 1969-70 and the adult population appeared to be gradually increasing. Alewives were studied intensively during 1962-70 on the basis of collections made primarily with bottom trawls. Principal considerations in the population study include effects of seasonal changes in distribution on length composition of young and adults, sex and maturity in relation to size and age at recruitment into adult stocks, and changes in age, growth, condition, and population structure that accompanied the drastic changes in abundance. A substantial increase in the age of adults in the bottom stocks and on the spawning grounds was among the important population changes after the 1967 die-off. Growth of older adults also increased appreciably immediately after the die-off, and a sharp increase in average weight (16-26%) over a standard range of lengths was maintained in 1968-70. Selective depletion of zooplankton by alewives was evidence that overabundance decreased the food supply, depressed growth, and caused the poor condition that made alewives vulnerable to excessive mortality in 1967. Although poor condition in fall undoubtedly increased winter and spring mortality in the mid-1960s, alewives apparently were stressed by below-average temperature in the winter of 1969-70, and experiences a light die-off through May 1970 despite their good condition and relatively low population density the preceding fall. The population upsurge that preceded the 1967 die-off was reflected by a fivefold increase of adults in the fall index catch (in trawls) from 1962 to 1965 and 1966. The index catch then dropped 70% in fall 1967. Mortality among the 1960-64 year-classes, as represented by

  11. Changes in number and function of the lymphocyte populations as a biological indicator for ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehos, A.; Hinz, G.; Schwarz, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    Siegal and Siegal reported that the number of immunoglobulin producing cells, especially after higher doses of ionizing radiation on isolated mononuclear cells decreases considerably. However, if non-irradiated B cells are cultivated with irradiated (16 Gy) T cells, a significant increase of immunoglobulin production due to the non-irradiated B cells can be observed. Siegal and Siegal described a similar result when they combined and cultivated non-irradiated with irradiated mononuclear cells. The immunoglobulin producing cells decreased in a lower and increased in a higher dose range. The two results can be explained by the fact that Tg cells which act as suppressor cells are relatively sensitive to radiation while Tm cells which are helper cells in this test are relatively resistant. According to these results, B lymphocytes are the most sensitive of the lymphocyte subpopulations. The aim of the project is to clarify whether the mentioned effects are suitable for 'biological dosimetry'. (orig./MG)

  12. The Association of Frailty With Outcomes and Resource Use After Emergency General Surgery: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, Daniel I; Moloo, Husein; Bryson, Gregory L; van Walraven, Carl

    2017-05-01

    Older patients undergoing emergency general surgery (EGS) experience high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Studies focused primarily on elective surgery indicate that frailty is an important predictor of adverse outcomes in older surgical patients. The population-level effect of frailty on EGS is poorly described. Therefore, our objective was to measure the association of preoperative frailty with outcomes in a population of older patients undergoing EGS. We created a population-based cohort study using linked administrative data in Ontario, Canada, that included community-dwelling individuals aged >65 years having EGS. Our main exposure was preoperative frailty, as defined by the Johns Hopkins Adjusted Clinical Groups frailty-defining diagnoses indicator. The Adjusted Clinical Groups frailty-defining diagnoses indicator is a binary variable that uses 12 clusters of frailty-defining diagnoses. Our main outcome measures were 1-year all-cause mortality (primary), intensive care unit admission, length of stay, institutional discharge, and costs of care (secondary). Of 77,184 patients, 19,779 (25.6%) were frail. Death within 1 year occurred in 6626 (33.5%) frail patients compared with 11,366 (19.8%) nonfrail patients. After adjustment for sociodemographic and surgical confounders, this resulted in a hazard ratio of 1.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25-1.33). The risk of death for frail patients varied significantly across the postoperative period and was particularly high immediately after surgery (hazard ratio on postoperative day 1 = 23.1, 95% CI 22.3-24.1). Frailty was adversely associated with all secondary outcomes, including a 5.82-fold increase in the adjusted odds of institutional discharge (95% CI 5.53-6.12). After EGS, frailty is associated with increased rates of mortality, institutional discharge, and resource use. Strategies that might improve perioperative outcomes in frail EGS patients need to be developed and tested.

  13. Population-based investigations to study the association of cardiovascular polymorphisms and adverse pregnancy outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Young, Bradford

    2007-01-01

    growth restriction, and placental abruption, requires rigorous epidemiological studies involving large cohorts of patients with sufficient numbers of the adverse pregnancy outcomes in question. Such is the case with the Denmark National Birth Cohort, which was initiated in 1996 and followed pregnant......Adverse pregnancy outcome refers to placenta-mediated complications that may share a common etiopathogenesis in some cases. Unraveling associations between prothrombotic genetic predispositions and these pregnancy disorders, namely recurrent fetal loss, stillbirth, severe preeclampsia, intrauterine...

  14. Population-based investigations to study the association of cardiovascular polymorphisms and adverse pregnancy outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Young, Bradford

    2007-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcome refers to placenta-mediated complications that may share a common etiopathogenesis in some cases. Unraveling associations between prothrombotic genetic predispositions and these pregnancy disorders, namely recurrent fetal loss, stillbirth, severe preeclampsia, intrauteri......-thrombotic and cardiovascular genetic polymorphisms. These studies are urgently needed to accurately assess the linkage between family history, presence of adverse pregnancy outcome, and long-term cardiovascular risk....

  15. Durations of second stage of labor and pushing, and adverse neonatal outcomes: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandström, A; Altman, M; Cnattingius, S; Johansson, S; Ahlberg, M; Stephansson, O

    2017-03-01

    The associations between duration of second stage of labor, pushing time and risk of adverse neonatal outcomes are not fully established. Therefore, we aimed to examine such relationships. A population-based cohort study including 42 539 nulliparous women with singleton infants born in cephalic presentation at ⩾37 gestational weeks, using the Stockholm-Gotland Obstetric Cohort, Sweden, and the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register, 2008 to 2013. Poisson regression was used to analyze estimated adjusted relative risks (RRs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Outcome measures were umbilical artery acidosis (pH pushing pushing ⩾60 min increased rates of acidosis from 0.57 to 1.69% (adjusted RR 2.55 (95% CI 1.51 to 4.30)). Prolonged durations of second stage of labor and pushing are associated with increased RRs of adverse neonatal outcomes. Clinical assessment of fetal well-being is essential when durations of second stage and pushing increases.

  16. Etiology and outcome determinants of intracerebral hemorrhage in a south Indian population, A hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is paucity of methodologically sound published studies on intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH from India, on pub med/embase search. Aims: To explore etiology of ICH and correlate the causes, location, and size of hemorrhage to clinical outcome. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based descriptive study from South Indian eastern coastal town of Puducherry; 60 consecutive subjects aged > 12 years, predominantly of inbred Tamil population, with head CT evidence of intracerebral hemorrhage not associated with trauma and brain tumors, were recruited. Outcome at three months was measured using Glasgow Outcome scale, NIHSS and mortality. SPSS v 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Commonest etiological factor was hypertension, followed by bleeding diathesis, thrombolysis for myocardial infarction, and cortical vein thrombosis. Most frequent locations of hematoma were basal ganglia, thalamus, internal capsule, and cerebral and cerebellar parenchyma. Hematoma volume correlated significantly with systolic and mean arterial pressure but not with diastolic blood pressure. Poor outcome was correlated to size (P < 0.05 and intraventricular extension of hematoma (P < 0.05, and to systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure, but not to age, gender, smoking, alcoholism, ischemic heart disease, and blood sugar level. Among diabetic patients with ICH, the size of hematoma (P = 0.04 and severity of coma (P = 0.01 at admission were significantly worse compared to the non-diabetic, but not the outcome at three months [Glasgow outcome scale or mortality (P = 0.94 and 0.14]. Conclusions: The location of hemorrhage and correlation with outcome agreed with the patterns described for the non-white races in prior reports. Independence of outcome to diabetic status despite a more severe initial presentation may indicate importance of good care, even in high risk groups.

  17. Classification of individual well-being scores for the determination of adverse health and productivity outcomes in employee populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuyan; Sears, Lindsay E; Coberley, Carter R; Pope, James E

    2013-04-01

    Adverse health and productivity outcomes have imposed a considerable economic burden on employers. To facilitate optimal worksite intervention designs tailored to differing employee risk levels, the authors established cutoff points for an Individual Well-Being Score (IWBS) based on a global measure of well-being. Cross-sectional associations between IWBS and adverse health and productivity outcomes, including high health care cost, emergency room visits, short-term disability days, absenteeism, presenteeism, low job performance ratings, and low intentions to stay with the employer, were studied in a sample of 11,702 employees from a large employer. Receiver operating characteristics curves were evaluated to detect a single optimal cutoff value of IWBS for predicting 2 or more adverse outcomes. More granular segmentation was achieved by computing relative risks of each adverse outcome from logistic regressions accounting for sociodemographic characteristics. Results showed strong and significant nonlinear associations between IWBS and health and productivity outcomes. An IWBS of 75 was found to be the optimal single cutoff point to discriminate 2 or more adverse outcomes. Logistic regression models found abrupt reductions of relative risk also clustered at IWBS cutoffs of 53, 66, and 88, in addition to 75, which segmented employees into high, high-medium, medium, low-medium, and low risk groups. To determine validity and generalizability, cutoff values were applied in a smaller employee population (N=1853) and confirmed significant differences between risk groups across health and productivity outcomes. The reported segmentation of IWBS into discrete cohorts based on risk of adverse health and productivity outcomes should facilitate well-being comparisons and worksite interventions.

  18. Multinational Population-Based Health Surveys Linked to Outcome Data: An Untapped Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Fisher

    2017-04-01

    This study provides initial support for the methodological feasibility of pooling linked population health surveys however, challenges introduced by dissimilarities will require the use of innovative methodologies, and discussions regarding how to manage jurisdictional data restrictions and privacy issues are needed. Pooled population health data has the potential to improve national and international health surveillance and public health.

  19. Population biology of the crab Armases angustipes (Crustacea, Decapoda, Sesarmidae at Brazilian tropical coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina de Sá Leitão C. de Araújo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The semi terrestrial crabs are important elements of the fauna of coastal regions. The aim of this study was to analyze the population structure of Armases angustipes (Dana, 1852 at estuaries of the Ariquindá River, considered a non impacted area, and Mamucabas River, considered a few impacted area, on the south coast of state of Pernambuco, Brazil. The species occurred in all months of the year. The number of individuals per month varied, being higher in the months of transition between the seasons. This is probably due to significant seasonal variations of air and burrow temperature and burrow salinity. There was no sexual dimorphism in size of A. angustipes in the mangrove of Ariquindá River, but males were larger than females in the mangrove of Mamucabas River. In both estuaries, the sex ratio did not differ from Mendelian proportion, but showed a deviation for females. The analysis of temporal variation in sex ratio showed significant differences in some months of the year. These variations are due to cyclical events that act distinctly on each sex. In both estuaries, size classes of carapace width were equally represented by both sexes. The ovigerous females of A. angustipes occurred only in some months of the year, especially in summer, in both estuaries. Probably the high phytoplankton productivity observed in summer favors the reproductive activity, since these algae serve as food for the larvae. Specimens of the population of Rio Ariquindá are largest and wider than those of Mamucabas River. This fact, associated with the low abundance of crabs and the lower frequency of ovigerous females observed in Mamucabas River, is an indication that this population may be influenced by the environmental impacts that this estuary has received.

  20. Biological citizenship: the science and politics of Chernobyl-exposed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryna, Adriana

    2004-01-01

    In the transition out of socialism to market capitalism, bodies, populations, and categories of citizenship have been reordered. The rational-technical management of group affected by the Chernobyl disaster in Ukraine is a window into this contested process. Chernobyl exemplifies a moment when scientific knowability collapsed and new maps and categories of entitlement emerged. Older models of welfare rely on precise definitions situating citizens and their attributes on a cross-mesh of known categories upon which claims rights are based. Here one observes how ambiguities related to categorizing suffering created a political field in which a state, forms of citizenship, and informal economies were remade.

  1. Biological, clinical and population relevance of 95 loci for blood lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teslovich, Tanya M; Musunuru, Kiran; Smith, Albert V

    2010-01-01

    polymorphisms (SNPs) near known lipid regulators (for example, CYP7A1, NPC1L1 and SCARB1) as well as in scores of loci not previously implicated in lipoprotein metabolism. The 95 loci contribute not only to normal variation in lipid traits but also to extreme lipid phenotypes and have an impact on lipid traits...... in three non-European populations (East Asians, South Asians and African Americans). Our results identify several novel loci associated with plasma lipids that are also associated with CAD. Finally, we validated three of the novel genes-GALNT2, PPP1R3B and TTC39B-with experiments in mouse models. Taken...

  2. Biological effects of high level natural background radiation on human population residing in Kerala coast, South West India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshadri, M.

    2010-01-01

    The populations residing in Kerala coast are exposed to elevated natural background radiation since many generations. Extensive studies conducted by Bio-Medical group, Bhabha Atomic Research Center have generated wealth of data from this area dealing with epidemiology, monitoring the newborns for malformations, Health Audit Survey, Dosimetry and biological studies using cytogenetic and molecular biology techniques. Our studies on congenital malformations and chromosomal anomalies in children born to parents residing in High Level Natural Radiation Areas in Kerala have not shown any significant difference from normal radiation areas. Screening of over 1,25,000 consecutively born children showed an incidence rate which is comparable in both areas. Other factors such as consanguinity, maternal age and gravida status are more significant contributors than radiation dose to the risk for having malformation in child. Radiation prevalent in the HLNRA is in the dose range of above 1.5 to about 50 mGy per year which translates to doses in the range of nGy per hour. This clearly indicate the number of cells exposed to radiations will be one in few thousand or ten thousands. This throws up challenges in our capability to investigate the effects of radiation on cells. It has become imperative to develop and exploit techniques which will detect responses in single cells and would be able screen large number of cells at a time. Developments in cell biology and molecular biology are now giving us these capabilities. Use of flowcytometer and next generation sequencing would enable us to address many of these questions and provide meaningful approaches to understand the effects of such low dose radiation

  3. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

    2013-05-22

    Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most

  4. Altered self-perception in adult survivors treated for a CNS tumor in childhood or adolescence: population-based outcomes compared with the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnquist, Lina; Rickardsson, Jenny; Lannering, Birgitta; Gustafsson, Göran; Boman, Krister K

    2015-05-01

    Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors are at risk for persistent tumor/treatment-related morbidity, physical disability and social consequences that may alter self-perception, vital for self-identity, mental health and quality of survival. We studied the long-term impact of childhood CNS tumors and their treatment on the self-perception of adult survivors and compared outcomes with those of the general population. The cohort included 697 Swedish survivors diagnosed with a primary CNS tumor during 1982-2001. Comparison data were randomly collected from a stratified general population sample. Survivors and general population individuals were compared as regards self-perception in 5 domains: body image, sports/physical activities, peers, work, and family, and with a global self-esteem index. Within the survivor group, determinants of impact on self-perception were identified. The final analyzed sample included 528 survivors, 75.8% of the entire national cohort. The control sample consisted of 995, 41% of 2500 addressed. Survivors had significantly poorer self-perception outcomes in domains of peers, work, body image, and sports/physical activities, and in the global self-perception measure, compared with those of the general population (all P self-perception is a potential late effect in adult survivors of pediatric CNS tumors. Self-perception and self-esteem are significant elements of identity, mental health and quality of survival. Therefore, care and psychosocial follow-up of survivors should include measures for identifying disturbances and for assessing the need for psychosocial intervention. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Biological effects of low-dose radiation on human population living in high-background radiation areas of Kerala coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Birajalaxmi

    2016-01-01

    High-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) of Kerala coast is densely populated and known for its wide variation in background radiation dose levels due to uneven distribution of monazite in the beach sand. The background radiation dose varies from 1 to 45 mGv/y. The areas with >1.5mGy/y is considered as HLNRA. Human population inhabiting in this area are exposed to low-dose chronic radiation since generations. Hence, this population provides an ideal situation to study dose response and adaptive response, if any, due to natural chronic low-dose exposure. It has been investigated extensively to study the biological and health effects of long-term low-dose/low-dose radiation exposure. So far over 150, 000 newborns monitored from hospital-based study did not reveal any significant difference in the incidence of any of the malformations and stillbirth between HLNRA and adjacent control areas. A case-control study on cleft lip/palate and mental retardation did not show any association with background radiation dose. Cytogenetic investigation of over 27,000 newborns did not show any significant increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations and karyotype anomalies. DNA damage endpoints, such as micronuclei, telomere length and DNA strand breaks, did not reveal any significant difference between control and exposed population. Studies on DNA damage and repair revealed efficient repair of DNA strand breaks in HLNRA individuals. Molecular studies using high throughput microarray analysis indicated a large number of genes involved in various molecular and cellular pathways. Indications of in vivo radioadaptive response due to natural chronic low-dose exposure in this population have important implications to human health. (author)

  6. A system dynamics modelling approach to assess the impact of launching a new nicotine product on population health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew; Camacho, Oscar M

    2017-06-01

    In 2012 the US FDA suggested the use of mathematical models to assess the impact of releasing new nicotine or tobacco products on population health outcomes. A model based on system dynamics methodology was developed to project the potential effects of a new nicotine product at a population level. A model representing traditional smoking populations (never, current and former smokers) and calibrated using historical data was extended to a two-product model by including electronic cigarettes use statuses. Smoking mechanisms, such as product initiation, switching, transition to dual use, and cessation, were represented as flows between smoking statuses (stocks) and the potential effect of smoking renormalisation through a feedback system. Mortality over a 50-year period (2000-2050) was the health outcome of interest, and was compared between two scenarios, with and without e-cigarettes being introduced. The results suggest that by 2050, smoking prevalence in adults was 12.4% in the core model and 9.7% (including dual users) in the counterfactual. Smoking-related mortality was 8.4% and 8.1%, respectively. The results suggested an overall beneficial effect from launching e-cigarettes and that system dynamics could be a useful approach to assess the potential population health effects of nicotine products when epidemiological data are not available. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nesting biology and phenology of a population of Halictus farinosus Smith (Hymenoptera, Halictidae in northern Utah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Albert

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nesting biology and phenology in an aggregation of the primitively eusocial ground-nesting bee Halictus farinosus were studied at Green Canyon, Utah from May to August, 2010. Nest architecture was typical of the genus. Nests were small with an average of 3.5 worker and 13.5 reproductive brood per colony. Most workers were mated (77.5% and had ovarian development (73.4%. The queen-worker size differential was moderate (8.8% for head width and 6.2% for wing length, indicating that sociality in this species is of intermediate strength compared to other social Halictus species. Results from 2010 were compared with those from 1977/1978 and 2002. Varying weather patterns in the years of study led to changes in phenological milestones: in the colder and wetter spring of 2010, nesting behavior was delayed by up to two weeks compared to the other years. While nest productivity was comparable among years, in 2010 the size difference between queens and workers was significantly larger than in 2002, indicating an effect of annual variation in weather conditions on social parameters in this species.

  8. Population Density Modulates Drug Inhibition and Gives Rise to Potential Bistability of Treatment Outcomes for Bacterial Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Karslake

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The inoculum effect (IE is an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of an antibiotic as a function of the initial size of a microbial population. The IE has been observed in a wide range of bacteria, implying that antibiotic efficacy may depend on population density. Such density dependence could have dramatic effects on bacterial population dynamics and potential treatment strategies, but explicit measures of per capita growth as a function of density are generally not available. Instead, the IE measures MIC as a function of initial population size, and population density changes by many orders of magnitude on the timescale of the experiment. Therefore, the functional relationship between population density and antibiotic inhibition is generally not known, leaving many questions about the impact of the IE on different treatment strategies unanswered. To address these questions, here we directly measured real-time per capita growth of Enterococcus faecalis populations exposed to antibiotic at fixed population densities using multiplexed computer-automated culture devices. We show that density-dependent growth inhibition is pervasive for commonly used antibiotics, with some drugs showing increased inhibition and others decreased inhibition at high densities. For several drugs, the density dependence is mediated by changes in extracellular pH, a community-level phenomenon not previously linked with the IE. Using a simple mathematical model, we demonstrate how this density dependence can modulate population dynamics in constant drug environments. Then, we illustrate how time-dependent dosing strategies can mitigate the negative effects of density-dependence. Finally, we show that these density effects lead to bistable treatment outcomes for a wide range of antibiotic concentrations in a pharmacological model of antibiotic treatment. As a result, infections exceeding a critical density often survive otherwise effective treatments.

  9. Age-associated impact on presentation and outcome for penetrating thoracic trauma in the adult and pediatric patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollberg, Nathan M; Tabachnick, Deborah; Lin, Fang-Ju; Merlotti, Gary J; Varghese, Thomas K; Arensman, Robert M; Massad, Malek G

    2014-02-01

    Studies reporting on penetrating thoracic trauma in the pediatric population have been limited by small numbers and implied differences with the adult population. Our objectives were to report on a large cohort of pediatric patients presenting with penetrating thoracic trauma and to determine age-related impacts on management and outcome through comparison with an adult cohort. A Level I trauma center registry was queried between 2006 and 2012. All patients presenting with penetrating thoracic trauma were identified. Patient demographics, injury mechanism, injury severity, admission physiology, and outcome were recorded. Patients were compared, and outcomes were analyzed based on age at presentation, with patients 17 years or younger defining our pediatric cohort. A total of 1,423 patients with penetrating thoracic trauma were admitted during the study period. Two hundred twenty patients (15.5%) were pediatric, with 205 being adolescents (13-17 years) and 15 being children (≤ 12 years). In terms of management for the pediatric population, tube thoracostomy alone was needed in 32.7% (72 of 220), whereas operative thoracic exploration was performed in 20.0% (44 of 220). Overall mortality was 13.6% (30 of 220). There was no significant difference between the pediatric and adult population with regard to injury mechanism or severity, need for therapeutic intervention, operative approach, use of emergency department thoracotomy, or outcome. Stepwise logistic regression failed to identify age as a predictor for the need for either therapeutic intervention or mortality between the two age groups as a whole. However, subgroup analysis revealed that being 12 years or younger (odds ratio, 3.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-11.4) was an independent predictor of mortality. Management of traumatic penetrating thoracic injuries in terms of the need for therapeutic intervention and operative approach was similar between the adult and pediatric populations. Mortality from

  10. Maternal veterinary occupation and adverse birth outcomes in Washington State, 1992-2014: a population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Julianne; Vora, Manali V; Fuller, Mackenzie S; Phipps, Amanda I; Rabinowitz, Peter M

    2018-05-01

    Women in veterinary occupations are routinely exposed to potential reproductive hazards, yet research into their birth outcomes is limited. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of the association between maternal veterinary occupation and adverse birth outcomes. Using Washington State birth certificate, fetal death certificate and hospital discharge data from 1992 to 2014, we compared birth outcomes of mothers in veterinary professions (n=2662) with those in mothers in dental professions (n=10 653) and other employed mothers (n=8082). Relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using log binomial regression. Outcomes studied were premature birth (veterinary support staff separately. While no statistically significant associations were found, we noted a trend for SGA births in all veterinary mothers compared with dental mothers (RR=1.16, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.36) and in veterinarians compared with other employed mothers (RR=1.37, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.96). Positive but non-significant association was found for malformations among children of veterinary support staff. These results support the need for further study of the association between veterinary occupation and adverse birth outcomes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. The Ontology of Biological Groups: Do Grasshoppers Form Assemblages, Communities, Guilds, Populations, or Something Else?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Lockwood

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acridologists have used a variety of terms to describe groups of grasshoppers, including assemblage, community, guild, and population. This terminological diversity has raised the question of whether one of these descriptors is the correct one. I take the position that these terms pick out different features of the natural world such that there is no unconditionally or uniquely correct term. By adopting the framework of constrained perspectivism—a form of philosophical pragmatism—it is argued that a term is correct if it accurately reflects the conceptual framework of the investigator and effectively communicates this perspective to others. Such an approach gives rise to terminological pluralism that avoids the problems of relativism (the subjectivist's view that any term can be used and absolutism (the objectivist's view that there is a single correct term. I describe the contexts in which the most common terms are appropriate.

  12. The Effectiveness of KNOS-KGS Learning Model to Improve Generic Science Skill and Biology Student Learning Outcomes SMA PGRI 1 Banjarmasin

    OpenAIRE

    Nefianthi, Rezky

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effectiveness of the model KNOS-KGS, to improve the learning outcomes of Biology at the ecosystem material in class X SMA PGRI 1 Banjarmasin. This research is a classroom action research, conducted in two cycles. Each cycle is done with two meetings. This study was conducted on 25 students in class X1. The research data is the result of student learning that consists of cognitive learning outcomes such as pretest and posttest. Affective learning outcomes such ...

  13. Effects of surgeon variability on oncologic and functional outcomes in a population-based setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Sigrid; Berglund, Anders; Sjoberg, Daniel; Khatami, Ali; Stranne, Johan; Bergdahl, Svante; Lodding, Pär; Aus, Gunnar; Vickers, Andrew; Hugosson, Jonas

    2014-03-06

    Oncologic and functional outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP) can vary between surgeons to a greater extent than is expected by chance. We sought to examine the effects of surgeon variation on functional and oncologic outcomes for patients undergoing RP for prostate cancer in a European center. The study comprised 1,280 men who underwent open retropubic RP performed by one of nine surgeons at an academic institution in Sweden between 2001 and 2008. Potency and continence outcomes were measured preoperatively and 18 months postoperatively by patient-administered questionnaires. Biochemical recurrence (BCR) was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value > 0.2 ng/mL with at least one confirmatory rise. Multivariable random effect models were used to evaluate heterogeneity between surgeons, adjusting for case mix (age, PSA, pathological stage and grade), year of surgery, and surgical experience. Of 679 men potent at baseline, 647 provided data at 18 months with 122 (19%) reporting potency. We found no evidence for heterogeneity of potency outcomes between surgeons (P = 1). The continence rate for patients at 18 months was 85%, with 836 of the 979 patients who provided data reporting continence. There was statistically significant heterogeneity between surgeons (P = 0.001). We did not find evidence of an association between surgeons' adjusted probabilities of functional recovery and 5-year probability of freedom from BCR. Our data support previous studies regarding a large heterogeneity among surgeons in continence outcomes for patients undergoing RP. This indicates that some patients are receiving sub-optimal care. Quality assurance measures involving performance feedback, should be considered. When surgeons are aware of their outcomes, they can improve them to provide better care to patients.

  14. Breeding biology and variable mating system of a population of introduced dunnocks (Prunella modularis in New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo S A Santos

    Full Text Available Species with variable mating systems provide a unique opportunity to investigate whether females receive direct fitness benefits from additional male partners. The direct benefits provide an obvious explanation for why females would breed polyandrously, in a situation where males clearly do not attain their optimal reproductive success. Evidence for these direct benefits is, however, mixed. Here, we present a detailed study of the breeding biology of the dunnock, Prunella modularis, which inform an investigation into the effects of the social mating system on the reproductive success in a population of dunnocks in Southern New Zealand. We studied 80 different social groups over the course of three breeding seasons. Dunnocks in our population presented a variable mating system, with socially monogamous (45%, socially polyandrous (54% and socially polygynandrous (1% groups being observed in the same breeding season. We did not observe any polygynous social units in our study period although polygyny exists in the population. We found little difference in the numbers of eggs laid, and egg volume between monogamous and polyandrous nests. However, polyandrous groups had better hatching and fledging success than monogamous groups (composite d = 0.385, 95% CI: 0.307 to 0.463. Overall our results support the notion that polyandry is beneficial for females.

  15. Awareness of the association between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcome among the general female population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouzia Tarannum

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Younger and educated females had better awareness of the association between periodontal diseases and PTLBW. Hence, efforts to educate the general female population on this association could contribute toward the reduction of the risk of PTLBW.

  16. Potentially inappropriate prescribing and cost outcomes for older people: a national population study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahir, Caitriona

    2010-05-01

    Optimization of drug prescribing in older populations is a priority due to the significant clinical and economic costs of drug-related illness. This study aimed to: (i) estimate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in a national Irish older population using European specific explicit prescribing criteria; (ii) investigate the association between PIP, number of drug classes, gender and age and; (iii) establish the total cost of PIP.

  17. Thermodynamic perspectives on genetic instructions, the laws of biology, diseased states and human population control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines in a broad perspective entropy and some examples of its relationship to evolution, genetic instructions and how we view diseases. Many knowledge gaps abound, hence our understanding is still fragmented and incomplete. Living organisms are programmed by functional genetic instructions (FGI), through cellular communication pathways, to grow and reproduce by maintaining a variety of hemistable, ordered structures (low entropy). Living organisms are far from equilibrium with their surrounding environmental systems, which tends towards increasing disorder (increasing entropy). Organisms must free themselves from high entropy (high disorder) to maintain their cellular structures for a period of time sufficient enough to allow reproduction and the resultant offspring to reach reproductive ages. This time interval varies for different species. Bacteria, for example need no sexual parents; dividing cells are nearly identical to the previous generation of cells, and can begin a new cell cycle without delay under appropriate conditions. By contrast, human infants require years of care before they can reproduce. Living organisms maintain order in spite of their changing surrounding environment, that decreases order according to the second law of thermodynamics. These events actually work together since living organisms create ordered biological structures by increasing local entropy. From a disease perspective, viruses and other disease agents interrupt the normal functioning of cells. The pressure for survival may result in mechanisms that allow organisms to resist attacks by viruses, other pathogens, destructive chemicals and physical agents such as radiation. However, when the attack is successful, the organism can be damaged until the cell, tissue, organ or entire organism is no longer functional and entropy increases. PMID:21262480

  18. Prevalence, Outcome, and Women's Experiences of External Cephalic Version in a Low-Risk Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnders, Marlies; Offerhaus, Pien; van Dommelen, Paula; Wiegers, Therese; Buitendijk, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Background: Until recently, external cephalic version to prevent breech presentation at birth was not widely accepted. The objective of our study was to assess the prevalence, outcomes, and women's experiences of external cephalic version to improve the implementation of the procedure in the

  19. Prevalence, outcome, and women's experiences of external cephalic version in a low-risk population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnders, M.; Offerhaus, P.; Dommelen, P. van; Wiegers, T.; Buitendijk, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Until recently, external cephalic version to prevent breech presentation at birth was not widely accepted. The objective of our study was to assess the prevalence, outcomes, and women's experiences of external cephalic version to improve the implementation of the procedure in the

  20. Biomedical Risk, Psychosocial Influences, and Developmental Outcomes: Lessons from the Pediatric HIV Population in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpell, Robert; Marfo, Kofi; Abubakar, Amina

    2014-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is home to millions of HIV-affected children. These children are likely to experience multiple developmental delays. In this chapter, I present data highlighting compromised neurobehavioral, mental health, and scholastic outcomes for children affected by HIV. Furthermore, I discuss biomedical factors (e.g., disease severity and…

  1. The Adverse Effect of Spasticity on 3-Month Poststroke Outcome Using a Population-Based Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Belagaje

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several devices and medications have been used to address poststroke spasticity. Yet, spasticity’s impact on outcomes remains controversial. Using data from a cohort of 460 ischemic stroke patients, we previously published a validated multivariable regression model for predicting 3-month modified Rankin Score (mRS as an indicator of functional outcome. Here, we tested whether including spasticity improved model fit and estimated the effect spasticity had on the outcome. Spasticity was defined by a positive response to the question “Did you have spasticity following your stroke?” on direct interview at 3 months from stroke onset. Patients who had expired by 90 days (n=30 or did not have spasticity data available (n=102 were excluded. Spasticity affected the 3-month functional status (β=0.420, 95 CI=0.194 to 0.645 after accounting for age, diabetes, leukoaraiosis, and retrospective NIHSS. Using spasticity as a covariable, the model’s R2 changed from 0.599 to 0.622. In our model, the presence of spasticity in the cohort was associated with a worsened 3-month mRS by an average of 0.4 after adjusting for known covariables. This significant adverse effect on functional outcomes adds predictive value beyond previously established factors.

  2. Biomedical risk, psychosocial influences, and developmental outcomes : Lessons from the pediatric HIV population in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is home to millions of HIV-affected children. These children are likely to experience multiple developmental delays. In this chapter, I present data highlighting compromised neurobehavioral, mental health, and scholastic outcomes for children affected by HIV. Furthermore, I

  3. The association of daily physical activity and birth outcome: A population-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.I. Both (Marieke); M.A. Overvest (Mathilde); M.F. Wildhagen (Mark); J. Golding (Jean); H.I.J. Wildschut (Hajo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe potential relationship between daily physical activity and pregnancy outcome remains unclear because of the wide variation in study designs and physical activity assessment measures. We sought to prospectively quantify the potential effects of the various domains of physical activity

  4. Effectiveness of the population health and environment approach in improving family planning outcomes in the Gurage, Zone South Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaga, Makeda; Mohammed, Ahmed; Teklu, Negash; Stelljes, Kristen; Belachew, Tefera

    2015-11-13

    Family planning is a strategy of balancing population growth with economic development for sustainable use of natural resources. A high population growth induces increased demand for resources and the rate at which these resources are exploited. Population, health and environment are connected inextricably. Population growth unbalanced with economic development leads to food insecurity which exposes households to the consumption of food with reduced quality and quantity leading to increased risk of malnutrition and poor health. Food insecurity again obliges people to encroach into the natural environment leading to a spiraling progress to destitution. A study in the Philippines provided concrete evidence that integrated development programming incorporating population, health, and the environment (PHE) can be more effective in lowering population growth rates and preserving critical coastal ecosystems than single-sector development interventions". Although the PHE approach has been implemented for 5 years (2008-2012) Guraghe Zone of South Ethiopia, its outcomes have not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PHE approach for achieving family planning (FP) outcomes in Gurage Zone. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in October, 2012. A total of 962 married women in the reproductive age group were included in the study. Data were collected using an interviewer administered Amharic version questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to compare the PHE and non-PHE Woredas (district) based on family planning parameters adopted from Measure Evaluation Manual. Comparison of non-new family panning acceptor women showed that PHE Woreda had a significantly high CPR compared to non-PHE (78% vs 52%, P health and environmental issues into the grassroots level interventions in the PHE Woreda through using students as a medium for reaching parents on family planning

  5. Biological characterization, habits, naturals enemy and populational fluctuation of Aconophora elongatiformis Dietrich in Tecoma Stans (L.) Juss. Ex Hbk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinzon F, Olga Patricia; Quintero C, Paola Fernanda

    2001-01-01

    The ornamental trees complete a very important environmental function for the quality of the inhabitants' life in the urban areas, when offering momentous benefits as the subduing of the climate, regulation of CO 2 in the atmosphere and the scenic beauty. Thanks to the interest of the District Administration, in Bogota, in the last four years, the urban plantation of trees acquired a preponderant paper that became apparent during the biggest plantation of trees program and maintenance of green areas that it has been carried out in the history of the capital; day by day they get more importance, and they are recognized by the citizenship like fundamental values of its environment. Previously to this program, the attention received were minimum or were remembered soon after the surprising devastating consequences of phyto sanitary problems: the grooved cochineal of the acacia, the louse plant of the cypress and the bedbug of the Urapan in whose cases the ignorance of basic aspects of the biology, natural control and the harmful populations' behavior, it has forced to generally apply measured of chemical type to try to reduce the high levels population. The importance that have, the green areas in the city, it favors a continuous pursuit that allows to deepen in the knowledge of the main risk factors, current problems and potentials of the species, types and consequences of the damages and the intra and inter relationships of the arthropofauna of the urban vegetation, their relationship with the plants, as well as the incidence of biotic and abiotic in the tree phonologic behavior and in the fluctuation of the populations of this individuals in order to coming closer to the understanding of the dynamics of the populations of arthropods harmful, in such a way that is possible to design kind handling strategies with the environment, having in consideration in integrated form the conditions under the attack of arthropods harmful

  6. The Mayo Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 outcome measure is superior to UK FIM+FAM in a British military population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilloway, Emer; Mitchell, James; Dharm-Datta, Shreshth; Roberts, Andrew; Tilley, Haydn; Etherington, John

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most appropriate rehabilitation outcome measure for use in a young adult population with acquired brain injury. A 2-year prospective study of patients admitted to a UK military neuro-rehabilitation unit with acquired brain injury to compare the appropriateness of the Functional Independence Measure/Functional Assessment Measure (FIM+FAM) vs the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory Version 4 (MPAI-4) in assessing outcomes. Patients were assessed at admission, discharge and at 4-month follow-up using FIM+FAM and MPAI-4. The FIM+FAM total motor score showed a marked ceiling affect, 42% of patients scored the maximum on admission rising to 80% at discharge. The MPAI-4 did not show significant ceiling effects. The other sub-scales of FIM+FAM and MPAI-4 were generally comparable, no more than 17% achieved ceiling at follow-up. This is the first comparative study of FIM+FAM and MPAI-4 in a young adult military population following acquired brain injury. All patients showed improvements in both outcome measures following intensive inpatient rehabilitation. However, the MPAI-4 did not show ceiling effects in motor scores. This measure was, therefore, found to be more appropriate in the cohort.

  7. Is demography destiny? Application of machine learning techniques to accurately predict population health outcomes from a minimal demographic dataset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Luo

    Full Text Available For years, we have relied on population surveys to keep track of regional public health statistics, including the prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Because of the cost and limitations of such surveys, we often do not have the up-to-date data on health outcomes of a region. In this paper, we examined the feasibility of inferring regional health outcomes from socio-demographic data that are widely available and timely updated through national censuses and community surveys. Using data for 50 American states (excluding Washington DC from 2007 to 2012, we constructed a machine-learning model to predict the prevalence of six non-communicable disease (NCD outcomes (four NCDs and two major clinical risk factors, based on population socio-demographic characteristics from the American Community Survey. We found that regional prevalence estimates for non-communicable diseases can be reasonably predicted. The predictions were highly correlated with the observed data, in both the states included in the derivation model (median correlation 0.88 and those excluded from the development for use as a completely separated validation sample (median correlation 0.85, demonstrating that the model had sufficient external validity to make good predictions, based on demographics alone, for areas not included in the model development. This highlights both the utility of this sophisticated approach to model development, and the vital importance of simple socio-demographic characteristics as both indicators and determinants of chronic disease.

  8. Cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube, and peritoneum: a population-based comparison of the prognostic factors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottmann, Miriam; Burges, A; Mahner, S; Anthuber, C; Beck, T; Grab, D; Schnelzer, A; Kiechle, M; Mayr, D; Pölcher, M; Schubert-Fritschle, G; Engel, J

    2017-09-01

    The objective was to compare the prognostic factors and outcomes among primary ovarian cancer (OC), fallopian tube cancer (FC), and peritoneal cancer (PC) patients in a population-based setting. We analysed 5399 OC, 327 FC, and 416 PC patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2014 in the catchment area of the Munich Cancer Registry (meanwhile 4.8 million inhabitants). Tumour site differences were examined by comparing prognostic factors, treatments, the time to progression, and survival. The effect of the tumour site was additionally analysed by a Cox regression model. The median age at diagnosis, histology, and FIGO stage significantly differed among the tumour sites (p < 0.001); PC patients were older, more often diagnosed with a serous subtype, and in FIGO stage III or IV. The time to progression and survival significantly differed among the tumour sites. When stratified by FIGO stage, the differences in time to progression disappeared, and the differences in survival considerably weakened. The differences in the multivariate survival analysis showed an almost identical outcome in PC patients (HR 1.07 [0.91-1.25]) and an improved survival of FC patients (HR 0.63 [0.49-0.81]) compared to that of OC patients. The comparison of OC, FC, and PC patients in this large-scale population-based study showed differences in the prognostic factors. These differences primarily account for the inferior outcome of PC patients, and for the improved survival of FC compared to OC patients.

  9. Is demography destiny? Application of machine learning techniques to accurately predict population health outcomes from a minimal demographic dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Nguyen, Thin; Nichols, Melanie; Tran, Truyen; Rana, Santu; Gupta, Sunil; Phung, Dinh; Venkatesh, Svetha; Allender, Steve

    2015-01-01

    For years, we have relied on population surveys to keep track of regional public health statistics, including the prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Because of the cost and limitations of such surveys, we often do not have the up-to-date data on health outcomes of a region. In this paper, we examined the feasibility of inferring regional health outcomes from socio-demographic data that are widely available and timely updated through national censuses and community surveys. Using data for 50 American states (excluding Washington DC) from 2007 to 2012, we constructed a machine-learning model to predict the prevalence of six non-communicable disease (NCD) outcomes (four NCDs and two major clinical risk factors), based on population socio-demographic characteristics from the American Community Survey. We found that regional prevalence estimates for non-communicable diseases can be reasonably predicted. The predictions were highly correlated with the observed data, in both the states included in the derivation model (median correlation 0.88) and those excluded from the development for use as a completely separated validation sample (median correlation 0.85), demonstrating that the model had sufficient external validity to make good predictions, based on demographics alone, for areas not included in the model development. This highlights both the utility of this sophisticated approach to model development, and the vital importance of simple socio-demographic characteristics as both indicators and determinants of chronic disease.

  10. Comparison of tumor biology of two distinct cell sub-populations in lung cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyu; Sun, Zhiwei; Liu, Yongli; Kong, Liangsheng; Zhou, Shixia; Tang, Junlin; Xing, Hongmei Rosie

    2017-11-14

    Characterization of the stem-like properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remain indirect and qualitative, especially the ability of CSCs to undergo asymmetric cell division for self renewal and differentiation, a unique property of cells of stem origin. It is partly due to the lack of stable cellular models of CSCs. In this study, we developed a new approach for CSC isolation and purification to derive a CSC-enriched cell line (LLC-SE). By conducting five consecutive rounds of single cell cloning using the LLC-SE cell line, we obtained two distinct sub-population of cells within the Lewis lung cancer CSCs that employed largely symmetric division for self-renewal (LLC-SD) or underwent asymmetric division for differentiation (LLC-ASD). LLC-SD and LLC-ASD cell lines could be stably passaged in culture and be distinguished by cell morphology, stem cell marker, spheroid formation and subcutaneous tumor initiation efficiency, as well as orthotopic lung tumor growth, progression and survival. The ability LLC-ASD cells to undergo asymmetric division was visualized and quantified by the asymmetric segregation of labeled BrdU and NUMB to one of the two daughter cells in anaphase cell division. The more stem-like LLC-SD cells exhibited higher capacity for tumorigenesis and progression and shorter survival. As few as 10 LLC-SD could initiate subcutaneous tumor growth when transplanted to the athymic mice. Collectively, these observations suggest that the SD-type of cells appear to be on the top of the hierarchical order of the CSCs. Furthermore, they have lead to generated cellular models of CSC self-renewal for future mechanistic investigations.

  11. Demographic trends and biological status of historic populations from Central Poland: the Ostrów Lednicki microregion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Alicja; Liczbińska, Grazyna; Gumna, Izabela

    2004-12-01

    The microregion of Ostrów Lednicki in the province of Wielkopolska was the center of the formation of the Polish State in Early Middle Ages. The analysis of skeletal remains and parish records from the region documented the biological status of inhabitants and its changes over a millennium. The study material comprised 424 human skeletons from an Early Medieval burial ground on Lake Lednica, records of 2,704 deaths from the registers of the Roman Catholic parish of Dziekanowice, made between 1818-1903, data on the deaths of 929,192 inhabitants of rural areas all over the province Wielkopolska obtained from Prussian statistical materials for the years 1865-1900, and comparative data from the literature. Assuming both a stationary population model and a stable population model with nonzero natural increase, parameters of life tables and measures of opportunity for natural selection (Crow's index I(m), potential gross reproductive rate R(pot), and the biological state index I(bs)) were calculated for the Early Middle Ages and for the two periods of the 19th century which were characterized by different laws of land ownership and thus different rural economies. In the first period, peasants were tenants, whereas in the second, they were given freehold of the land they cultivated. Causes of death were also analyzed. A distinct increase in longevity from the early Middle Ages to the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century was found. This was related to a higher level of demographic development in the parish of Dziekanowice during the 19th century, which was achieved earlier than in other areas of Poland. This was confirmed by genetic measures: coefficients of exogamy and coefficients of kinship. The reasons were related to the historical prominence of this region and to its proximity to the first two capitals of the Polish state, Gniezno and Poznań. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Population effect model identifies gene expression predictors of survival outcomes in lung adenocarcinoma for both Caucasian and Asian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoshuai Cai

    Full Text Available We analyzed and integrated transcriptome data from two large studies of lung adenocarcinomas on distinct populations. Our goal was to investigate the variable gene expression alterations between paired tumor-normal tissues and prospectively identify those alterations that can reliably predict lung disease related outcomes across populations.We developed a mixed model that combined the paired tumor-normal RNA-seq from two populations. Alterations in gene expression common to both populations were detected and validated in two independent DNA microarray datasets. A 10-gene prognosis signature was developed through a l1 penalized regression approach and its prognostic value was evaluated in a third independent microarray cohort.Deregulation of apoptosis pathways and increased expression of cell cycle pathways were identified in tumors of both Caucasian and Asian lung adenocarcinoma patients. We demonstrate that a 10-gene biomarker panel can predict prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma in both Caucasians and Asians. Compared to low risk groups, high risk groups showed significantly shorter overall survival time (Caucasian patients data: HR = 3.63, p-value = 0.007; Asian patients data: HR = 3.25, p-value = 0.001.This study uses a statistical framework to detect DEGs between paired tumor and normal tissues that considers variances among patients and ethnicities, which will aid in understanding the common genes and signalling pathways with the largest effect sizes in ethnically diverse cohorts. We propose multifunctional markers for distinguishing tumor from normal tissue and prognosis for both populations studied.

  13. Therapeutic preferences and outcomes in newly diagnosed patients with Crohn's diseases in the biological era in Hungary: a nationwide study based on the National Health Insurance Fund database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Ilias, Akos; Gonczi, Lorant; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Fadgyas-Freyler, Petra; Korponay, Gyula; Golovics, Petra A; Lovasz, Barbara D; Lakatos, Peter L

    2018-01-30

    Accelerated treatment strategy, including tight disease control and early aggressive therapy with immunosuppressives (IS) and biological agents have become increasingly common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of the present study was to estimate the early treatment strategy and outcomes in newly diagnosed patients with Crohn's disease (CD) between 2004 and 2008 and 2009-2015 in the whole IBD population in Hungary based on the administrative database of the National Health Insurance Fund (OEP). We used the administrative database of the OEP, the only nationwide state-owned health insurance provider in Hungary. Patients were identified through previously reported algorithms using the ICD-10 codes for CD in the out-, inpatient (medical, surgical) non-primary care records and drug prescription databases between 2004 and 2015. Patients were stratified according to the year of diagnosis and maximum treatment steps during the first 3 years after diagnosis. A total of 6173 (male/female: 46.12%/53.87%) newly diagnosed CD patients with physician-diagnosed IBD were found in the period of 2004-2015. The use of 5-ASA and steroids remained common in the biological era, while immunosuppressives and biologicals were started earlier and became more frequent among patients diagnosed after 2009. The probability of biological therapy was 2.9%/6.4% and 8.4%/13.7% after 1 and 3 years in patients diagnosed in 2004-2008/2009-2015. The probability of hospitalization in the first 3 years after diagnosis was different before and after 2009, according to the maximal treatment step (overall 55.7%vs. 47.4% (p = 0.001), anti-TNF: 73%vs. 66.7% (p = 0.103), IS: 64.6% vs. 56.1% (p = 0.001), steroid: 44.2%vs. 36.8% (p < 0.007), 5-ASA: 32.6% vs. 26.7% p = 0.157)). In contrast, surgery rates were not significantly different in patients diagnosed before and after 2009 according to the maximum treatment step (overall 16.0%vs.15.3%(p = 0.672) anti-TNF 26.7%vs.27

  14. Quality of life after multiple trauma: validation and population norm of the Polytrauma Outcome (POLO) chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefering, R; Tecic, T; Schmidt, Y; Pirente, N; Bouillon, B; Neugebauer, E

    2012-08-01

    Due to an increasing number of survivors after multiple injuries in Western countries, the health-related quality of life (QoL) is considered to be an important outcome parameter. Up to now, measuring instruments used in this field lacked validity and comparability. Within 6 years, our working group developed a new modular instrument, called the Polytrauma Outcome (POLO) chart. This study documents the validation of the trauma-specific module specifically designed for trauma patients, the Trauma Outcome Profile (TOP). A total of 172 multiply injured patients (mean Injury Severity Score [ISS] 26.7) recruited from eight trauma centres participating in the German Trauma Registry were compared with 166 marginally injured patients (mean ISS 3.9). The mean follow-up was 24.2 and 26.4 months, respectively. The validation questionnaires used were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), Social Support Questionnaire (F-SOZU-K-22), Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). The internal consistency of the different dimensions of QoL assessed with the TOP was good. Factor analysis provides evidence of the construct validity of the questionnaire. Correlation with external measures gives evidence of criterion validity for the various dimensions of QoL and similar exceedance of proposed cut-off points within TOP and external measures is verified. The TOP module is a reliable and valid instrument to assess health-related QoL in patients with multiple injuries. It can be used stand-alone or as part of the POLO chart together with the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), the EuroQoL and the SF-36 as a regular systematic follow-up instrument.

  15. Maternal low thyroxin levels are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    Full Text Available Although thyroid dysfunction in early pregnancy may have adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes, few studies have examined the relationship between maternal low free thyroxin (FT4 levels in both first and third trimesters of pregnancy and the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes. We hypothesized that low FT4 levels in either first or third trimesters of pregnancy may have different effects on pregnancy outcomes. The study included 6,031 mothers who provided both first and third pregnancy serum samples for analyses of thyroid function. Adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia, were diagnosed using the oral glucose tolerance test, blood pressure and urine protein test. Serum metabolites like adenosine and its analogues were identified using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS. The incidence of hypothyroidism in pregnant women tended to increase with age and pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI. The incidence of GDM was negatively correlated with maternal FT4 levels during early pregnancy while the incidence of preeclampsia was negatively correlated with maternal FT4 levels during late pregnancy. The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension was not significantly correlated with maternal FT4 levels. The women who had isolated maternal hypothyroxemia (IMH in the third trimester of pregnancy had an increased risk of developing preeclampsia. Some metabolites like adenosine and its analogues in the serum were significantly changed in pregnant mothers with IMH. In conclusion, low FT4 levels during pregnancy are a risk factor for GDM and preeclampsia. Adenosine and its analogues may be important bridges between IMH and preeclampsia.

  16. Science Teacher Efficacy and Outcome Expectancy as Predictors of Students' End-of-Instruction (EOI) Biology I Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, Julie; Moseley, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare teacher efficacy beliefs of secondary Biology I teachers whose students' mean scores on the statewide End-of-Instruction (EOI) Biology I test met or exceeded the state academic proficiency level (Proficient Group) to teacher efficacy beliefs of secondary Biology I teachers whose students' mean scores on the…

  17. Biologic characteristics of the side population of human small cell lung cancer cell line H446.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Huan; Huang, Yu-Zheng; Yan, Ru-Hong; Liu, Fen-Ju; Zhang, Jun-Ning

    2010-03-01

    Recently, the theory of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has presented new targets and orientations for tumor therapy. The major difficulties in researching CSCs include their isolation and purification. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize the side population (SP) cells in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line H446, which lays the foundation for the isolation and purification of CSCs. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to sort SP and non-SP (NSP) cells from H446. Both subgroups were cultivated to survey the capacity to form into suspended tumor cell spheres. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR were used to evaluate the expression levels of the mRNA of CD133, ABCG2, and nucleostemin in both subgroups. The capacity of proliferation and the differences in drug resistance of both subgroups and unsorted cells were tested by the MTT method. The differentiation ability of both subgroups was determined by FACS. Proliferation was determined by subcutaneous tumor formation in nude mice. The percent of Hoechst 33342 negative cells was about (5.1 +/- 0.2)% in H446 by fluorescence microscopy. The percent of SP cells was (6.3 +/- 0.1)% by flow cytometry. SP cells had a stronger capability of forming into tumor spheres than NSP cells. The mRNA expression levels of ABCG2, CD133, and nucleostemin in SP cells were 21.60 +/- 0.26, 7.10 +/- 0.14, and 1.02 +/- 0.08 folds higher than that in NSP cells (P 0.05, respectively). In vivo, SP cells showed better proliferative ability and tougher viability when treated with drugs. SP cells can differentiate into NSP cells, but NSP cells cannot differentiate into SP cells. SP cells had a greater ability to form tumors. The H446 cell line contained some SP cells with stem cell properties. CD133 and ABCG2 may be cancer stem cell markers of SCLC.

  18. Maternal and neonatal outcomes after induction of labor: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenzmaier, Christoph; Leitner, Hermann; Brezinka, Christoph; Oberaigner, Willi; König-Bachmann, Martina

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate maternal and neonatal outcomes at and beyond term associated with induction of labor compared to spontaneous onset of labor stratified by week of gestational age. In this retrospective cohort study, data form 402,960 singleton pregnancies from the Austria Perinatal Registry were used to estimate odds ratios of secondary cesarean delivery, operative vaginal delivery, epidural analgesia, fetal scalp blood testing, episiotomy, 3rd/4th-degree lacerations, retained placenta, 5-min APGAR neonatal intensive care unit. Multivariate logistic regression models based on deliveries with gestational age ≥37 + 0 were applied for adjustment for possible confounders. Induction of labor was associated with increased odds for cesarean delivery (adjusted OR; 99% confidence interval: 1.53; 1.45-1.60), operative vaginal delivery (1.21; 1.15-1.27), epidural analgesia (2.12; 2.03-2.22), fetal scalp blood testing (1.40; 1.28-1.52), retained placenta (1.32; 1.22-1.41), 5-min APGAR neonatal intensive care unit (1.41; 1.31-1.51). In a subgroup of induction of labor with the indication, "post-term pregnancy" induction was similarly associated with adverse outcomes. In Austria, induction of labor is associated with increased odds of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. However, due to residual confounding, currently, no recommendations for treatment can be derived.

  19. Awareness of the association between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcome among the general female population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarannum, Fouzia; Prasad, R K Shiva; Shobha, R; Kumar, B B Santosh; Ebenezer, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    Preterm low birth weight (PTLBW) is a public health issue which needs to be dealt with by educating the general female population. One of the major contributing factors is periodontal disease and treatment of the same could reduce the occurrence of PTLBW babies. Therefore, awareness of this among the female population is highly essential. Hence, this survey was planned with the aim to explore the awareness of the general female population regarding the association of periodontal disease and PTLBW. This survey consisted of nine close-ended questions answered by 1284 females. Younger individuals had higher knowledge scores as compared to the older individuals (r = -0.161) and the more educated group had a higher knowledge score as compared to the less educated groups (r = 0.322). Furthermore, married women seemed to be more aware of the relation of PTLBW to periodontal disease as compared to unmarried women. Younger and educated females had better awareness of the association between periodontal diseases and PTLBW. Hence, efforts to educate the general female population on this association could contribute toward the reduction of the risk of PTLBW.

  20. Monitoring HIV Prevention Programme Outcomes among Key Populations in Kenya: Findings from a National Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinita Bhattacharjee

    Full Text Available In preparation for the implementation of the Kenya AIDS Strategic Framework 2014/15-2018/19, the Kenya National AIDS and STI Control Programme facilitated a national polling booth survey as part of a baseline assessment of HIV-related risk behaviours among FSWs, MSM, and PWID, and their utilization of existing preventive interventions, as well as structural factors that may influence KPs' vulnerability to HIV. The survey was conducted among "key populations" (female sex workers, men who have sex with men, and people who inject drugs to understand current HIV risk and prevention behaviours, utilization of existing programmes and services, and experiences of violence. In total, 3,448 female sex workers, 1,308 men who have sex with men, and 690 people who inject drugs were randomly selected to participate in polling booth survey sessions from seven priority sites. Survey responses were aggregated and descriptive statistics derived. In general, reported condom use among all key populations was quite high with paying clients, and lower with regular, non-paying partners. Many participants reported unavailability of condoms or clean injecting equipment within the past month. Exposure to, and utilization of, existing HIV prevention services varied significantly among the groups, and was reported least commonly by female sex workers. Encouragingly, approximately three-quarters of all key population members reported receiving an HIV test in the past three months. All key population groups reported experiencing high levels of physical and sexual violence from partners/clients, and/or arrest and violence by law enforcement officials. Although some of the findings are encouraging, there is room for improvement in HIV prevention programmes and services for key populations across Kenya.

  1. Delivering colonoscopy screening for low-income populations in Suffolk County: strategies, outcomes, and benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Dorothy S; Messina, Catherine R; Cavanagh, Mary F; Anderson, Joseph C

    2013-08-01

    Current and pending legislation provides colorectal cancer screening reimbursement for previously uninsured populations. Colonoscopy is currently the screening method most frequently recommended by physicians for insured patients. The experience of the SCOPE (Suffolk County Preventive Endoscopy) demonstration project (Project SCOPE) at Stony Brook University Medical Center provides a model for delivering colonoscopy screening to low-income populations to meet anticipated increasing demands. Project SCOPE, based in the Department of Preventive Medicine, featured internal collaboration with the academic medical center's large gastroenterology practice and external collaboration with the Suffolk County Department of Health Services' network of community health centers. Colonoscopies were performed by faculty gastroenterologists or supervised fellows. Measures of colonoscopy performance were compared with quality indicators and differences between faculty and supervised fellows were identified. During a 40-month screening period, 800 initial colonoscopies were performed. Approximately 21% of women screened were found to have adenomatous polyps compared with 36% of men. Five cancers were detected. The majority of the population screened (70%) were members of minority populations. African American individuals had a higher percentage of proximally located adenomas (78%) compared with white individuals (65%) and Hispanics (49%), based on the location of the most advanced lesion. Hispanic individuals had a 36% lower risk of adenomas compared with white individuals. Performance measures including the percentage of procedures with adequate bowel preparation, cecum reached, scope withdrawal time, and adenoma detection rate met quality benchmarks when performed by either faculty or supervised fellows. Project SCOPE's operational strategies demonstrated a feasible method for an academic medical center to provide high-quality screening colonoscopy for low-income populations.

  2. Comparative biology and population mixing among local, coastal and offshore Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in the North Sea, Skagerrak, Kattegat and western Baltic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotte, Aril; Johannessen, Arne; Kvamme, Cecilie; Clausen, Lotte Worsøe; Nash, Richard D. M.

    2017-01-01

    The population structure of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) from 13 local, coastal and offshore areas of the North Sea, Skagerrak, Kattegat and western Baltic (northeast Atlantic) was studied using biological and environmental data from 1970–2015. The objective was to identify distinct populations by comparing variability in the temporal and spatial phenotypic characteristics and evaluate the potential for mixing of populations in time and space. The populations varied in biological characteristics such as mean vertebral counts (VS), growth and maturity ogives. Generalized additive models indicated temporally stable VS in the North Sea and western Baltic, whereas intra-annual temporal variation of VS occurred in other areas. High variability of VS within a population was not affected by environmental factors such as temperature and salinity. Consequently, seasonal VS variability can be explained by the presence or absence of herring populations as they migrate between areas. The three main populations identified in this paper correspond to the three managed stocks in this area: Norwegian spring spawners (NSS), western Baltic spring spawners (WBSS) and North Sea autumn spawners (NSAS). In addition, several local populations were identified in fjords or lakes along the coast, but our analyses could not detect direct mixing of local populations with the three main populations. Our results highlight the importance of recognizing herring dynamics and understanding the mixing of populations as a challenge for management of herring. PMID:29084258

  3. Trend analysis and outcome prediction in mechanically ventilated patients: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jang Lee

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between changes in patient attributes and hospital attributes over time and to explore predictors of medical utilization and mortality rates in mechanical ventilation (MV patients in Taiwan.Providing effective medical care for MV patients is challenging and requires good planning and effective clinical decision making policies. Most studies of MV, however, have only analyzed a single regional ventilator weaning center or respiratory care unit, high-quality population-based studies of MV trends and outcomes are scarce.This population-based cohort study retrospectively analyzed 213,945 MV patients treated during 2004-2009.During the study period, the percentages of MV patients with the following characteristics significantly increased: age ≦ 65 years, treatment at a medical center, and treatment by a high-volume physician. In contrast, the percentages of MV patients treated at local hospitals and by low-volume physicians significantly decreased (P<0.001. Age, gender, Deyo-Charlson co-morbidity index, teaching hospital, hospital level, hospital volume, and physician volume were significantly associated with MV outcome (P<0.001. Over the 6-year period analyzed in this study, the estimated mean hospital treatment cost increased 48.8% whereas mean length of stay decreased 13.9%. The estimated mean overall survival time for MV patients was 16.4 months (SD 0.4 months, and the overall in-hospital 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 61.0%, 36.7%, 17.3%, and 9.6%, respectively.These population-based data revealed increases in the percentages of MV patients treated at medical centers and by high-volume physicians, especially in younger patients. Notably, although LOS for MV patients decreased, hospital treatment costs increased. Healthcare providers and patients should recognize that attributes of both the patient and the hospital may affect outcomes.

  4. Incidence and outcome of epilepsy syndromes with onset in the first year of life: A retrospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaily, Eija; Lommi, Markus; Lapatto, Risto; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina

    2016-10-01

    Population-based studies on infantile epilepsy syndromes are scarce. Our aim was to provide syndrome-specific data on the incidence and outcome of epilepsy in a population-based cohort of infants with epilepsy onset in the first year. Included were all infants born in 1997 through 2006 whose epileptic seizures started before 12 months of age and who were residents of the Helsinki University Hospital district at the time of seizure onset. Patients were ascertained from hospital statistics, and all patient charts were reviewed. A reevaluation of the epilepsy syndromes, age at onset, etiology, and outcome at 24 months of age was based on data abstracted from the patient files. Inclusion criteria were fulfilled by 158 infants, of whom 92% were followed until age 24 months or death. The incidence of epilepsy in the first year was 124 of 100,000. An epilepsy syndrome recognized by the revised organization of epilepsies by ILAE was identified in 58% of the patients. The most common syndromes were West syndrome (41/100,000) and benign familial or nonfamilial infantile epilepsy (22/100,000). Etiology was structural-metabolic in 35%, genetic in 17%, and unknown in 48%. Early age at onset was associated with structural-metabolic etiology. Seven infants (4.4%) died before age 2 years. One infant with an SCN2A mutation died of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). At 24 months, 58% of all children included in the cohort were seizure-free, and 46% had both seizure freedom and age-appropriate cognitive development. Age at onset was not associated with outcome when etiology was controlled for. Benign familial and nonfamilial infantile epilepsy appears to be more common than previously suggested, second only to West syndrome. Early age at onset is not an independent risk factor for poor outcome. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Trastuzumab for metastatic breast cancer: Real world outcomes from an Australian whole-of-population cohort (2001-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Benjamin; Kiely, Belinda E; Lord, Sarah J; Houssami, Nehmat; Lu, Christine Y; Ward, Robyn L; Pearson, Sallie-Anne

    2018-04-01

    Outcomes for patients treated in clinical trials may not reflect the experience in routine clinical care. We aim to describe the real-world treatment patterns and overall survival (OS) for women receiving trastuzumab for metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Retrospective, whole-of-population cohort study using demographic, dispensing, and medical services data for women in the Herceptin Program for HER2+MBC. We estimated time on trastuzumab and OS from first dispensing of trastuzumab for MBC and rates of cardiac monitoring prior to and during treatment. We stratified outcomes by two groups based on year of initiation: 2001-2008 and 2009-2015. We benchmarked outcomes to two key trastuzumab clinical trials: H0648g (median OS 25 months) and CLEOPATRA (control group median OS 41 months). Median age of the 5899 women at first trastuzumab dispensing was 57 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 48-66). Median time on trastuzumab increased from 15 months (7-33) in Group One to 18 months (8-42) in Group Two. Median OS increased from 27 months (12-57) in Group One to 38 months (16-83) in Group Two. Rates of cardiac monitoring increased at baseline (52%-76%), and on-treatment (47%-67%), in Group One and Two, respectively. OS, duration of trastuzumab, and frequency of cardiac monitoring increased over the study period. Outcomes for trastuzumab in this heterogeneous real world population were reassuringly comparable to those from clinical trials, with the median OS > 3 years in Group Two and 25% of patients living 7 years or longer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploring ethical considerations for the use of biological and physiological markers in population-based surveys in less developed countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyder Adnan A

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health information needs of developing countries increasingly include population-based estimates determined by biological and physiological measures. Collection of data on these biomarkers requires careful reassessment of ethical standards and procedures related to issues of safety, informed consent, reporting, and referral policies. This paper reviews the survey practices of health examination surveys that have been conducted in developed nations and discusses their application to similar types of surveys proposed for developing countries. Discussion The paper contends that a unitary set of ethical principles should be followed for surveys around the world that precludes the danger of creating double standards (and implicitly lowers standards for work done in developing countries. Global ethical standards must, however, be interpreted in the context of the unique historical and cultural context of the country in which the work is being done. Factors that influence ethical considerations, such as the relationship between investigators in developed and developing countries are also discussed. Summary The paper provides a set of conclusions reached through this discussion and recommendations for the ethical use of biomarkers in populations-based surveys in developing countries.

  7. Trends in selected biological risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in the Danish MONICA population, 1982-1992

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, L U; Brønnum-Hansen, H; Madsen, Mette

    2000-01-01

    Data from 6695 men and women of ages 30, 40, 50, and 60 years, examined in the Danish WHO MONICA surveys in 1982-84, in 1986-87, and in 1991-92, were analyzed to estimate secular trends in body height and weight, blood pressure, and serum total, HDL-, and LDL-cholesterol, and triglyceride. Body...... height increased 0.1% per year, and body mass index increased 0.4% per year in women. Diastolic blood pressure increased 0.4% per year in women and 0.6% per year in 60-year-old men. HDL cholesterol declined 0.4% per year. Body mass indices in men, diastolic blood pressures in men age......, systolic blood pressures, total- and LDL cholesterol and triglyceride did not change. The levels of biological risk factors in the Danish WHO MONICA study population did not show trends during the 1980s that help explain the declining incidence of myocardial infarction in the population....

  8. Nicotine dose-concentration relationship and pregnancy outcomes in rat: Biologic plausibility and implications for future research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, Jabeen; Farkas, Svetlana; MacKinnon, Yolanda; Ariano, Robert E.; Sitar, Daniel S.; Hasan, Shabih U.

    2007-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure during pregnancy can lead to profound adverse effects on fetal development. Although CS contains several thousand chemicals, nicotine has been widely used as its surrogate as well as in its own right as a neuroteratogen. The justification for the route and dose of nicotine administration is largely based on inferential data suggesting that nicotine 6 mg/kg/day infused continuously via osmotic mini pumps (OMP) would mimic maternal CS exposure. We provide evidence that 6 mg/kg/day nicotine dose as commonly administered to pregnant rats leads to plasma nicotine concentrations that are 3-10-fold higher than those observed in moderate to heavy smokers and pregnant mothers, respectively. Furthermore, the cumulative daily nicotine dose exceeds by several hundred fold the amount consumed by human heavy smokers. Our study does not support the widely accepted notion that regardless of the nicotine dose, a linear nicotine dose-concentration relationship exists in a steady-state OMP model. We also show that total nicotine clearance increases with advancing pregnancy but no significant change is observed between the 2nd and 3rd trimester. Furthermore, nicotine infusion even at this extremely high dose has little effect on a number of maternal and fetal biologic variables and pregnancy outcome suggesting that CS constituents other than nicotine mediate the fetal growth restriction in infants born to smoking mothers. Our current study has major implications for translational research in developmental toxicology and pharmacotherapy using nicotine replacement treatment as an aid to cessation of cigarette smoking in pregnant mothers

  9. Evaluating legacy contaminants and emerging chemicals in marine environments using adverse outcome pathways and biological effects-directed analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, Thomas H.; Lyons, Brett P.; Thain, John E.; Law, Robin J.

    2013-01-01

    important scientific, economic and health challenges. In order to meet these challenges and pursue cost-effective scientific approaches that can provide evidence necessary to support policy needs (e.g. the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive), it is widely recognised that there is a need to (i) provide marine exposure assessments for priority contaminants using a range of validated models, passive samplers and biomarkers; (ii) integrate chemical monitoring data with biological effects data across spatial and temporal scales (including quality controls); and (iii) strengthen the evidence base to understand the relationship between exposure to complex chemical mixtures, biological and ecological impacts through integrated approaches and molecular data (e.g. genomics, proteomics and metabolomics). Additionally, we support the widely held view that (iv) that rather than increasing the analytical chemistry monitoring of large number of emerging contaminants, it will be important to target analytical chemistry towards key groups of chemicals of concern using effects-directed analysis. It is also important to evaluate to what extent existing biomarkers and bioassays can address various classes of emerging chemicals using the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) approach now being developed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with respect to human toxicology and ecotoxicology

  10. Evaluating legacy contaminants and emerging chemicals in marine environments using adverse outcome pathways and biological effects-directed analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Thomas H; Lyons, Brett P; Thain, John E; Law, Robin J

    2013-09-30

    important scientific, economic and health challenges. In order to meet these challenges and pursue cost-effective scientific approaches that can provide evidence necessary to support policy needs (e.g. the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive), it is widely recognised that there is a need to (i) provide marine exposure assessments for priority contaminants using a range of validated models, passive samplers and biomarkers; (ii) integrate chemical monitoring data with biological effects data across spatial and temporal scales (including quality controls); and (iii) strengthen the evidence base to understand the relationship between exposure to complex chemical mixtures, biological and ecological impacts through integrated approaches and molecular data (e.g. genomics, proteomics and metabolomics). Additionally, we support the widely held view that (iv) that rather than increasing the analytical chemistry monitoring of large number of emerging contaminants, it will be important to target analytical chemistry towards key groups of chemicals of concern using effects-directed analysis. It is also important to evaluate to what extent existing biomarkers and bioassays can address various classes of emerging chemicals using the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) approach now being developed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with respect to human toxicology and ecotoxicology. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Economic populism, partial deregulation of transport fuels and electoral outcomes in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Sunderasan

    2014-01-01

    The Indian political class is known to employ populist, albeit economically unsustainable, measures to replace intrinsic ‘valence’, especially shortly prior to election windows. Such measures include loan-waivers, interest rate concessions, provision of free electricity for agriculturists, etc. The union government’s leverage to maneuver and to micro-manage retail fuel prices within partially deregulated environments is hypothesized to provide incumbents with an advantage over rival contestants in the electoral process. This paper analyzes the evolution in the retail prices of diesel and petrol (gasoline), and the transfer of such evolution, into the inflation index of the ‘all commodity’ basket. It is observed that when international benchmark prices are relatively low and domestic inflation is moderate, the transfer occurs within about 42 weeks. During periods of high oil prices-frequently above USD 100 a barrel-and high inflation-higher than 5.00–5.50%-prices of petroleum distillates tend to feed into overall inflation more rapidly, within about 34–40 weeks. The study, covering a total of 82 elections for the central and state (provincial) governments during the period 2000 to 2013, concludes that even as patterns of manipulation of prices are apparent, ceteris paribus, such leverage does not necessarily seem to translate into favorable electoral outcomes. This conclusion reiterates observations that economic im/prudence may not necessarily determine electoral outcomes, and that the basis for electoral choices made by the Indian voter–consumer remains subjective. - Highlights: • Incumbent politicians’ influence on fuel pricing. • Fuel prices manipulated and increases delayed until after elections. • Price reductions brought forward. • ex ante Inflation expectations of voter–consumers. • Electoral outcomes. • Price manipulation found irrelevant to electoral performance

  12. Population-based study of smoking behaviour throughout pregnancy and adverse perinatal outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2013-09-01

    There has been limited research addressing whether behavioural change in relation to smoking is maintained throughout pregnancy and the effect on perinatal outcomes. A cohort study addressed lifestyle behaviours of 907 women who booked for antenatal care and delivered in a large urban teaching hospital in 2010-2011. Adverse perinatal outcomes were compared for "non-smokers", "ex-smokers" and "current smokers". Of the 907 women, 270 (30%) reported smoking in the six months prior to pregnancy, and of those 160 (59%) had stopped smoking and 110 (41%) continued to smoke at the time of the first antenatal visit. There was virtually no change in smoking behaviour between the first antenatal visit and the third trimester of pregnancy. Factors associated with continuing to smoke included unplanned pregnancy (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.3, 2.9), alcohol use (OR 3.4; 95% CI 2.1, 6.0) and previous illicit drug use (OR 3.6; 95% CI 2.1, 6.0). Ex-smokers had similar perinatal outcomes to non-smokers. Current smoking was associated with an average reduction in birth weight of 191 g (95% CI -294, -88) and an increased incidence of intrauterine growth restriction (24% versus 13%, adjusted OR 1.39 (95% CI 1.06, 1.84). Public Health campaigns emphasise the health benefits of quitting smoking in pregnancy. The greatest success appears to be pre-pregnancy and during the first trimester where women are largely self-motivated to quit.

  13. Midterm outcome after correction of hallux valgus deformity using scarf osteotomy in adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ibrahim Alolayan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Determining the efficacy of any surgical treatment is the key to achieve better practice and best outcomes for patients. Aims: This study is designed to address midterm outcome in adult patients with moderate-to-severe hallux valgus (HV, who underwent scarf osteotomy from 2012 to 2014. Settings and Design: This is a retrospective cohort study in which charts of all adult patients with moderate-to-severe HV who underwent scarf osteotomy from 2011 to 2014 were reviewed. Subjects and Methods: Between 2011 and 2014, 39 patients (41 feet who underwent scarf osteotomy for correction of HV deformity were retrospectively evaluated. Standard weight-bearing dorsoplantar radiographs were obtained pre- and postoperatively. HV angle (HVA, intermetatarsal angle (IMA and distal metatarsal articular angles (DMAA were measured pre- and postoperatively to evaluate the efficacy of the surgery. The complication rate was reported. The average follow-up was 13.5 months, and the patients' mean age was 37 years. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were compared using Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test whichever was appropriate. All tests were two-sided, and a P> 0.01 was considered statistically significant. Results: The average preoperative HVA and IMA were 32° and 14.3°, which improved to 11° and 7.9°, respectively. The changes were statistically significant (P 0.18. Conclusions: This study suggests that scarf osteotomy surgery is a very versatile osteotomy in correcting moderate-to-severe HV deformity. It offers a greater degree of correction and stability, lower rate of complications and good outcome. However, long-term follow-up studies are still needed.

  14. A comparison of acute hemorrhagic stroke outcomes in 2 populations: the Crete-Boston study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaganas, Ioannis; Halpin, Amy P; Oleinik, Alexandra; Alegakis, Athanasios; Kotzamani, Dimitra; Zafiris, Spiros; Chlapoutaki, Chryssanthi; Tsimoulis, Dimitris; Giannakoudakis, Emmanouil; Chochlidakis, Nikolaos; Ntailiani, Aikaterini; Valatsou, Christina; Papadaki, Efrosini; Vakis, Antonios; Furie, Karen L; Greenberg, Steven M; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Although corticosteroid use in acute hemorrhagic stroke is not widely adopted, management with intravenous dexamethasone has been standard of care at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete with observed outcomes superior to those reported in the literature. To explore this further, we conducted a retrospective, multivariable-adjusted 2-center study. We studied 391 acute hemorrhagic stroke cases admitted to the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete between January 1997 and July 2010 and compared them with 510 acute hemorrhagic stroke cases admitted to Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, from January 2003 to September 2009. Of the Cretan cases, 340 received a tapering scheme of intravenous dexamethasone, starting with 16 to 32 mg/day, whereas the Boston patients were managed without steroids. The 2 cohorts had comparable demographics and stroke severity on admission, although anticoagulation was more frequent in Boston. The in-hospital mortality was significantly lower on Crete (23.8%, n=340) than in Boston (38.0%, n=510; Pmortality (Crete: 25.4%, n=307; Boston: 39.4%, n=510; Pmortality: Crete 20.8%; n=259; Boston 37.0%; n=359; Phemorrhages. After adjusting for acute hemorrhagic stroke volume/location, Glasgow Coma Scale, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, coronary artery disease and statin, antiplatelet, and anticoagulant use, intravenous dexamethasone treatment was associated with better functional outcomes and significantly lower risk of death at 30 days (OR, 0.357; 95% CI, 0.174-0.732). This study suggests that intravenous dexamethasone improves outcome in acute hemorrhagic stroke and supports a randomized clinical trial using this approach.

  15. Population size, breeding biology and on-land threats of Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae) in Fogo Island, Cape Verde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militão, Teresa; Dinis, Herculano Andrade; Zango, Laura; Calabuig, Pascual; Stefan, Laura M; González-Solís, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae) is currently considered near threatened, but little is known about its population size, breeding biology and on land threats, jeopardizing its management and conservation. To improve this situation, we captured, marked and recaptured (CMR) birds using mist-nets over 10 years; measured and sexed them; monitored up to 14 burrows, deployed GPS devices on breeders and analyzed activity data of geolocators retrieved from breeders in Fogo (Cape Verde). We set cat traps over the colony and investigated their domestic/feral origin by marking domestic cats from a nearby village with transponders, by deploying GPS devices on domestic cats and by performing stable isotope analyses of fur of the trapped and domestic cats. The population of Fogo was estimated to be 293 birds, including immatures (95% CI: 233-254, CMR modelling). Based on geolocator activity data and nest monitoring we determined the breeding phenology of this species and we found biometric differences between sexes. While monitoring breeding performance, we verified a still ongoing cat predation and human harvesting. Overall, data gathered from trapped cats without transponder, cats GPS trips and the distinct isotopic values between domestic and trapped cats suggest cats visiting the colony are of feral origin. GPS tracks from breeders showed birds left and returned to the colony using the sector NE of the islands, where high level of public lights should be avoided specially during the fledging period. Main threats for the Cape Verde petrel in the remaining breeding islands are currently unknown but likely to be similar to Fogo, calling for an urgent assessment of population trends and the control of main threats in all Cape Verde Islands and uplisting its conservation status.

  16. Population size, breeding biology and on-land threats of Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae in Fogo Island, Cape Verde.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Militão

    Full Text Available Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae is currently considered near threatened, but little is known about its population size, breeding biology and on land threats, jeopardizing its management and conservation. To improve this situation, we captured, marked and recaptured (CMR birds using mist-nets over 10 years; measured and sexed them; monitored up to 14 burrows, deployed GPS devices on breeders and analyzed activity data of geolocators retrieved from breeders in Fogo (Cape Verde. We set cat traps over the colony and investigated their domestic/feral origin by marking domestic cats from a nearby village with transponders, by deploying GPS devices on domestic cats and by performing stable isotope analyses of fur of the trapped and domestic cats. The population of Fogo was estimated to be 293 birds, including immatures (95% CI: 233-254, CMR modelling. Based on geolocator activity data and nest monitoring we determined the breeding phenology of this species and we found biometric differences between sexes. While monitoring breeding performance, we verified a still ongoing cat predation and human harvesting. Overall, data gathered from trapped cats without transponder, cats GPS trips and the distinct isotopic values between domestic and trapped cats suggest cats visiting the colony are of feral origin. GPS tracks from breeders showed birds left and returned to the colony using the sector NE of the islands, where high level of public lights should be avoided specially during the fledging period. Main threats for the Cape Verde petrel in the remaining breeding islands are currently unknown but likely to be similar to Fogo, calling for an urgent assessment of population trends and the control of main threats in all Cape Verde Islands and uplisting its conservation status.

  17. Racial disparities in incidence and outcome in multiple myeloma: a population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Waxman, Adam J.; Mink, Pamela J.; Devesa, Susan S.; Anderson, William F.; Weiss, Brendan M.; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Landgren, Ola

    2010-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the most common hematologic malignancy in blacks. Some prior studies suggest inferior survival in blacks; others suggest similar survival. Using the original 9 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries, we conducted a large-scale population-based study including 5798 black and 28 939 white MM patients diagnosed 1973-2005, followed through 2006. Age-adjusted incidence rates, disease-specific survival, and relative survival rates were calculated by race, ag...

  18. The associations between bridal pregnancy and obstetric outcomes among live births in Korea: population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yun Lee

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In East Asia the recently increased number of marriages in response to pregnancy is an important social issue. This study evaluated the association of marriage preceded by pregnancy (bridal pregnancy with obstetric outcomes among live births in Korea. METHODS: In this population-based study, 1,152,593 first singleton births were evaluated from data registered in the national birth registration database from 2004 to 2008 in Korea. In the study population, the pregnancy outcomes among live births from the bridal pregnancy group (N = 62,590 were compared with the outcomes of the post-marital pregnancy group (N = 564,749, composed of women who gave birth after 10 months but before 24 months of marriage. The variables preterm birth (PTB; <37 weeks gestation and low birth weight (LBW; <2.5 kg were used to determine the primary outcome. The adjusted odds ratios (aORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated after controlling for socio-demographic factors. RESULTS: The socio-demographic factors among the bridal pregnancy group were associated with a social disadvantage and particular risk factors. In the subgroup analyses of maternal age, differences in adverse pregnancy outcomes from bridal pregnancy were identified between women in the following age group: (i ≤19, (ii 20-39, and (iii ≥40 years. After the multivariate analysis, the aORs for each age group were 1.47 (95% CI: 1.15-1.89, 1.76 (1.70-1.83, and 1.13 (0.77-1.66, respectively, for PTB and 0.92 (0.70-1.21, 1.60 (1.53-1.66, and 1.11 (0.71-1.74, respectively, for LBW. In the adjusted logistic regression models, bridal pregnancy was associated with PTB (1.76, 1.69-1.82 and LBW (1.53, 1.48-1.59. CONCLUSION: Pregnancy outcomes among live births from bridal pregnancies are associated with higher risks for PTB and LBW in Korea.

  19. Clinical and economic outcomes among hospitalized patients with acute coronary syndrome: an analysis of a national representative Medicare population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Yin; Crivera, Concetta; Stokes, Michael; Boulanger, Luke; Schein, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and economic burden of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a common cardiovascular illness, in the Medicare population. Data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey were analyzed. Patients with incident hospitalization for ACS without similar events during the 6 months prior were included. Outcomes evaluated included inpatient mortality, 30-day mortality and readmission, subsequent hospitalization events, and total direct health care costs. Sample population weights were applied, accounting for multistage sampling design to obtain nationally representative estimates for the US Medicare population. Between March 1, 2002 and December 31, 2006, we identified 795 incident ACS patients (mean age 76 years; 49% male) representing 2,542,211 Medicare beneficiaries. The inpatient mortality rate was 9.71% and the 30-day mortality ranged from 10.96% to 13.93%. The 30-day readmission rate for surviving patients was 18.56% for all causes and 17.90% for cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related diagnoses. The incidence of death since admission was 309 cases per 1000 person-years. Among patients discharged alive, the incidence was 197 for death, 847 for CVD-related admission, and 906 for all-cause admission. During the year when the ACS event occurred, mean annual total direct health care costs per person were US$50,458, with more than half attributable to inpatient hospitalization ($27,609). In this national representative Medicare population, we found a substantial clinical and economic burden for ACS. These findings suggest a continuing unmet medical need for more effective management of patients with ACS. The continuous burden underscores the importance of development of new interventions and/or strategies to improve long-term outcomes.

  20. Clinical and economic outcomes among hospitalized patients with acute coronary syndrome: an analysis of a national representative Medicare population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen SY

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Shih-Yin Chen,1 Concetta Crivera,2 Michael Stokes,1 Luke Boulanger,1 Jeffrey Schein2 1United BioSource Corporation, Lexington, MA, USA; 2Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Raritan, NJ, USA Objective: To evaluate the clinical and economic burden of acute coronary syndrome (ACS, a common cardiovascular illness, in the Medicare population. Methods: Data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey were analyzed. Patients with incident hospitalization for ACS without similar events during the 6 months prior were included. Outcomes evaluated included inpatient mortality, 30-day mortality and readmission, subsequent hospitalization events, and total direct health care costs. Sample population weights were applied, accounting for multistage sampling design to obtain nationally representative estimates for the US Medicare population. Results: Between March 1, 2002 and December 31, 2006, we identified 795 incident ACS patients (mean age 76 years; 49% male representing 2,542,211 Medicare beneficiaries. The inpatient mortality rate was 9.71% and the 30-day mortality ranged from 10.96% to 13.93%. The 30-day readmission rate for surviving patients was 18.56% for all causes and 17.90% for cardiovascular disease (CVD-related diagnoses. The incidence of death since admission was 309 cases per 1000 person–years. Among patients discharged alive, the incidence was 197 for death, 847 for CVD-related admission, and 906 for all-cause admission. During the year when the ACS event occurred, mean annual total direct health care costs per person were US$50,458, with more than half attributable to inpatient hospitalization ($27,609. Conclusion: In this national representative Medicare population, we found a substantial clinical and economic burden for ACS. These findings suggest a continuing unmet medical need for more effective management of patients with ACS. The continuous burden underscores the importance of development of new interventions and/or strategies to

  1. Birth outcomes of planned home births in Missouri: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jen Jen; Macones, George A

    2011-08-01

    We evaluated the birth outcomes of planned home births. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using Missouri vital records from 1989 to 2005 to compare the risk of newborn seizure and intrapartum fetal death in planned home births attended by physicians/certified nurse midwives (CNMs) or non-CNMs with hospitals/birthing center births. The study sample included singleton pregnancies between 36 and 44 weeks of gestation without major congenital anomalies or breech presentation ( N = 859,873). The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of newborn seizures in planned home births attended by non-CNMs was 5.11 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.52, 10.37) compared with deliveries by physicians/CNMs in hospitals/birthing centers. For intrapartum fetal death, aORs were 11.24 (95% CI: 1.43, 88.29), and 20.33 (95% CI: 4.98, 83.07) in planned home births attended by non-CNMs and by physicians/CNMs, respectively, compared with births in hospitals/birthing centers. Planned home births are associated with increased likelihood of adverse birth outcomes. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  2. The influence of maternal life stressors on breastfeeding outcomes: a US population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsantas, Panagiota; Gaffney, Kathleen F; Nirmalraj, Lavanya; Sari, Mehmet

    2018-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of maternal financial, emotional, traumatic, and partner-associated stressors on breastfeeding initiation and duration. Data (216,756 records) from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System surveys were used in the analysis. Logistic regressions were conducted to estimate the magnitude and direction of associations between maternal stressors occurring in the 12 months prior to infant birth and both breastfeeding initiation and duration up to 4 weeks infant age. A substantial proportion of mothers (42%) reported having experienced one or two major stressors during the 12 months prior to the birth of their infant. Mothers who reported at least one major life stressor in the year before their baby was born were less likely to initiate breastfeeding and more likely to cease by 4 weeks infant age. Emotional and traumatic stressors were found to have the greatest impact on breastfeeding outcomes. Findings support the design and implementation of screening protocols for major maternal life stressors during regularly scheduled prenatal and newborn visits. Screening for at-risk mothers may lead to more targeted anticipatory guidance and referral with positive effects on breastfeeding outcomes and overall well-being of the mothers and their families.

  3. Association of Hospital-level Neuraxial Anesthesia Use for Hip Fracture Surgery with Outcomes: A Population-based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, Daniel I; Wijeysundera, Duminda N; Huang, Allen; Bryson, Gregory L; van Walraven, Carl

    2018-03-01

    There is consistent and significant variation in neuraxial anesthesia use for hip fracture surgery across jurisdictions. We measured the association of hospital-level utilization of neuraxial anesthesia, independent of patient-level use, with 30-day survival (primary outcome) and length of stay and costs (secondary outcomes). We conducted a population-based cohort study using linked administrative data in Ontario, Canada. We identified all hip fracture patients more than 65 yr of age from 2002 to 2014. For each patient, we measured the proportion of hip fracture patients at their hospital who received neuraxial anesthesia in the year before their surgery. Multilevel, multivariable regression was used to measure the association of log-transformed hospital-level neuraxial anesthetic-use proportion with outcomes, controlling for patient-level anesthesia type and confounders. Of 107,317 patients, 57,080 (53.2%) had a neuraxial anesthetic; utilization varied from 0 to 100% between hospitals. In total, 9,122 (8.5%) of patients died within 30 days of surgery. Survival independently improved as hospital-level neuraxial use increased (P = 0.009). Primary and sensitivity analyses demonstrated that most of the survival benefit was realized with increase in hospital-level neuraxial use above 20 to 25%; there did not appear to be a substantial increase in survival above this point. No significant associations between hospital neuraxial anesthesia-use and other outcomes existed. Hip fracture surgery patients at hospitals that use more than 20 to 25% neuraxial anesthesia have improved survival independent of patient-level anesthesia type and other confounders. The underlying causal mechanism for this association requires a prospective study to guide improvements in perioperative care and outcomes of hip fracture patients. An online visual overview is available for this article at http://links.lww.com/ALN/B634.

  4. Periodontal Disease and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: A Prospective Study in a Low-Risk Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy-Giguère, Laurence; Tétu, Amélie; Gauthier, Simon; Morand, Marianne; Chandad, Fatiha; Giguère, Yves; Bujold, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with systemic inflammation and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preeclampsia and preterm birth. To examine the relationship between periodontal disease in early pregnancy and the risk of amniotic inflammation, preterm birth, and preeclampsia. We performed a prospective cohort study of women undergoing amniocentesis for fetal karyotype between 15 and 24 weeks' gestation. Participants underwent periodontal examination by a certified dentist, and a sample of amniotic fluid was collected. Periodontal disease was defined as the presence of one or more sites with probing depths ≥ 4 mm and ≥ 10% bleeding on probing. Matrix metalloproteinase-8 and interleukin-6 concentrations in the amniotic fluid were measured. Medical charts were reviewed for perinatal outcomes. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes. We recruited 273 women at a median gestational age of 16 weeks (range 15 to 24), and 258 (95%) agreed to undergo periodontal examination. Periodontal disease was observed in 117 of the participants (45%). We observed no significant association between periodontal disease and preterm birth (relative risk [RR] 2.27; 95% CI 0.74 to 6.96) or spontaneous preterm birth (RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.20 to 4.11). However, women with periodontal disease were more likely to develop preeclampsia, and this association remained significant after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted RR 5.89; 95% CI 1.24 to 28.05). Periodontal disease was not associated with significant differences in the intra-amniotic concentration of matrix metalloproteinase-8 (13.0 ± 46.6 vs 5.7 ± 10.4 ng/mL, P = 0.098) or interleukin-6 (3.3 ± 20.3 vs 1.0 ± 1.6 ng/mL, P = 0.23), although a non-significant trend was observed. Periodontal disease is associated with preeclampsia but not with spontaneous preterm birth. The current study cannot exclude an

  5. Helicobacter pylori dupA gene is not associated with clinical outcomes in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, L T; Uchida, T; Tsukamoto, Y; Kuroda, A; Okimoto, T; Kodama, M; Murakami, K; Fujioka, T; Moriyama, M

    2010-08-01

    The dupA gene of Helicobacter pylori was suggested to be a risk factor for duodenal ulcer but protective against gastric cancer. The present study aimed to re-examine the role of dupA in H. pylori-infected Japanese patients. We found that dupA status was not associated with any gastroduodenal disease, histological score of chronic gastritis or with the extent of interleukin-8 production from gastric cell lines. These results indicate that dupA is unlikely to be a virulence factor of H. pylori in the Japanese population.

  6. Active Learning Outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Siwicki, Kathleen K.

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students? engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker backgrounds in biology. Peer leaders with experience in biology courses and training in science pedagogy facilitate work on faculty-generated challenge prob...

  7. Addressing long-term physical healthcare needs in a forensic mental health inpatient population using the UK primary care Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF): an audit

    OpenAIRE

    Ivbijaro, GO; Kolkiewicz, LA; McGee, LSF; Gikunoo, M

    2008-01-01

    Objectives This audit aims to evaluate the effectiveness of delivering an equivalent primary care service to a long-term forensic psychiatric inpatient population, using the UK primary care national Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF).

  8. The Thai Anesthesia Incidents Study (THAI Study) of anesthetic outcomes: I. Description of methods and populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charuluxananan, Somrat; Suraseranivongse, Suwannee; Punjasawadwong, Yodying; Somboonviboon, Wanna; Nipitsukarn, Thana; Sothikarnmanee, Thepakorn; Vasinanukorn, Mayuree; Werawatganon, Thewarug; Tanudsintum, Surasak; Lekprasert, Varinee; Hintong, Thanoo

    2005-11-01

    Since anesthesia, unlike medical or surgical specialties, does not constitute treatment, The Royal College of Anesthesiologists of Thailand host the Thai Anesthesia Incidents Study (THAI Study) of anesthetic outcomes to determine factors related to anesthesia related adverse events. A prospective descriptive study of occurrence screening was conducted in 20 hospitals comprised of 7 university, 4 general and 4 district hospitals across Thailand. Anesthesia personnels were required to fill up patient-related, surgical-related, anesthesia-related variables and adverse outcomes on a strutured data entry form. The data included preanesthetic evaluation intraoperative period and 24 hr postoperative period. Adverse events specific form was recorded when adverse events occurred. All data were keyed in data management unit with double entry technique and descriptive statistics was used in the first phase of this study. A total of 163403 consecutive cases were recorded in one year. The mean (S.D.) of age, weight and height of patients were 38.6(2.3) yrs, 53.9(17.7) kgs and 153.4(22.7) cm respectively. There were more female (52.9%) than male (47. 1%) patients with ASA PS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 = 50.8%, 36.3%, 10.7%, 2.0%, 0.2% respectively. Hypertension (11.6%), anemia (7.7%) and diabetes melitus (6.8%) were the three most common abnormalities in preanesthetic history taking. Mallampati score of 111870 patients grade 1, 2, 3, 4 were 54.0%, 39.7%, 5.6%, 0.7% and laryngoscopic grade 1, 2, 3, 4 of 74888 patients were 81.0%, 15.5%, 3.0% and 0.5% respectively. The first phase of THAI study epidemiological project can represent both the anesthesia and surgical profiles in Thailand. The collected data available should be useful for the improvement of the quality of anesthesia, guidelines for clinical practices, medical education and for further research.

  9. A population-based study of rectal cancer: permanent colostomy as an outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszat, Lawrence F.; Brundage, Michael D.; Groome, Patti A.; Schulze, Karleen; Mackillop, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study are to describe the utilization of surgery and of radiotherapy in the treatment of newly diagnosed rectal cancer in Ontario between 1982 and 1994, and to describe the probability of permanent colostomy at any time after the diagnosis of rectal cancer, as an outcome of the treatment of newly diagnosed rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Electronic records of rectal cancer (International Classification of Diseases code 154) from the Ontario Cancer Registry (n = 18,695, excluding squamous, basaloid, cloacogenic, and carcinoid histology) were linked to surgical records from all Ontario hospitals, and radiotherapy (RT) records from Ontario cancer centers. Procedures occurring within 4 months of diagnosis, or within 4 months of another procedure for rectal cancer, were considered part of initial treatment. Multivariate analyses controlled for age, sex, and year of diagnosis. Results: Resection plus permanent colostomy was performed in 33.1% of cases, whereas local excision or resection without permanent colostomy was performed in 38.2%. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated higher odds ratios (OR) for resection plus permanent colostomy in all regions of Ontario relative to Toronto. The OR for postoperative RT following local excision or resection without permanent colostomy varied among the regions relative to Toronto (e.g., OR Ottawa = 0.59, OR Hamilton 0.76, OR London = 1.25). The relative risk (RR) of colostomy conditional upon survival within 5 years from diagnosis varied among regions relative to Toronto (e.g., RR Ottawa = 1.21, RR Hamilton = 1.20). Conclusions: There is regional variation in the utilization of resection with permanent colostomy, and in the utilization of postoperative RT among cases not undergoing permanent colostomy. Regions with higher initial rates of resection plus permanent colostomy continue to experience higher probability of permanent colostomy 5 years after diagnosis of rectal cancer. Higher

  10. Violence during pregnancy and newborn outcomes: a cohort study in a disadvantaged population in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Maria Angélica Antunes; Camey, Suzi; Ferri, Cleusa P; Manzolli, Patrícia; Manenti, Carlo Nunes; Schmidt, Maria Inês

    2011-02-01

    Violence against pregnant women is an increasing public health concern. The purpose of this study is to estimate the prevalence of violence during pregnancy, to identify characteristics associated and to assess the impact of violence on newborn outcomes. Prospective cohort study of 652 pregnant women attending primary care clinics in Southern Brazil, from June 2006 to September 2007. Women with gestational age ranging from 16th and 36th were enrolled and their exposure to violence and mental disorder was assessed. After the birth they were contacted by telephone when information on obstetric and neonatal outcomes was obtained. Any violence during current pregnancy was reported by 18.3% [95% confidence interval (CI) 15.3-21.4%] participants, 15.0% (95% CI 12.3-17.8%) psychological violence, 6% (95% CI 4.2-7.8%) physical violence and 3% (0-0.5%) sexual violence. These women were more often of low income, did not work or study and had inadequate prenatal care and pregnancy weight gain. There was a statistically significant crude association between exposure to physical and psychological violence [relative risk (RR) 3.21 (1.51-6.80)]. After adjustment for family income, number of prenatal visits, length of gestation and gestational weight gain, the effect size decreased, but remained statistically significant (RR 2.18; 95% CI 1.16-4.08%). In disadvantaged settings in Brazil, violence in pregnancy is frequent; it is associated with inadequate maternal weight gain during pregnancy and prenatal care, and increases risk of low birth-weight. Thus, violence in pregnancy imposes a challenge to effective prenatal care delivery with potential benefits to the mother and her baby.

  11. Residential proximity to methyl bromide use and birth outcomes in an agricultural population in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, Alison; Gunier, Robert B; Bradman, Asa; Eskenazi, Brenda; Harley, Kim G

    2013-06-01

    Methyl bromide, a fungicide often used in strawberry cultivation, is of concern for residents who live near agricultural applications because of its toxicity and potential for drift. Little is known about the effects of methyl bromide exposure during pregnancy. We investigated the relationship between residential proximity to methyl bromide use and birth outcomes. Participants were from the CHAMACOS (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas) study (n = 442), a longitudinal cohort study examining the health effects of environmental exposures on pregnant women and their children in an agricultural community in northern California. Using data from the California Pesticide Use Reporting system, we employed a geographic information system to estimate the amount of methyl bromide applied within 5 km of a woman's residence during pregnancy. Multiple linear regression models were used to estimate associations between trimester-specific proximity to use and birth weight, length, head circumference, and gestational age. High methyl bromide use (vs. no use) within 5 km of the home during the second trimester was negatively associated with birth weight (β = -113.1 g; CI: -218.1, -8.1), birth length (β = -0.85 cm; CI: -1.44, -0.27), and head circumference (β = -0.33 cm; CI: -0.67, 0.01). These outcomes were also associated with moderate methyl bromide use during the second trimester. Negative associations with fetal growth parameters were stronger when larger (5 km and 8 km) versus smaller (1 km and 3 km) buffer zones were used to estimate exposure. Residential proximity to methyl bromide use during the second trimester was associated with markers of restricted fetal growth in our study.

  12. Infratentorial posterior circulation stroke in a Nigerian population: Clinical characteristics, risk factors, and predictors of outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukman Femi Owolabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior circulation stroke (PCS, though less common, differs from stroke in anterior circulation in many aspects. Relatively, it portends a poorer prognosis. However, there is a paucity of data from African countries, in particular, where stroke is a menace. Objective: The study aimed to evaluate the etiology, clinical characteristics, outcome, and predictors of outcome in a cohort of patients with IPCS in Northwestern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Out of 595 patients with stroke, we prospectively analyzed 57 patients with PCS in a Tertiary Care Center in Kano, Northwestern Nigeria. Patients were analyzed for demographic data, risk factors, clinical characteristics, stroke subtypes, mortality, and predictors of mortality. Results: Posterior circulation ischemic stroke accounted for 57 (9.6% of 595 of all strokes seen in the study period. They comprised 44 males (mean age 47.8 ± 17.7 and 13 females (mean age 46.3 ± 13.7. Overall, their age ranged between 24 and 90 (mean age 47.4 ± 16.7. However, 52.7% of the patients were < 45 years of age. The most common site affected was the cerebellum seen in 33 (57.9% patients. Hypertension was the most common risk factor (86%. Headache and vertigo were the most common features accounting for 83.6% and 86.3%, respectively. Thirty-eight (66.7% patients had an ischemic stroke. Twenty-one (36.8% of the patients died during the 1-month period of follow-up. Independent predictors of death in the study were hyperglycemia on admission and hemorrhagic stroke. Conclusions: IPCS occurred in a relatively younger age group. Headache and vertigo were the most common symptoms. The independent predictors of death in the study were hyperglycemia at presentation and hemorrhagic stroke.

  13. Population dynamics and reproductive biology of Barilius bendelisis (Cyprinidae: Cypriniformes) from river Gaula of Central Indian Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Neha; Patiyal, Rabindar Singh; Dube, Kiran; Tiwari, Virendra K

    2016-09-01

    The Indian hill trout cyprinid, Barilius bendelisis is a member of family Cyprinidae that dwells in shallow, cold, and clear water. In this study, growth parameters and reproductive biology of Indian hill trout, Barilius bendelisis from river Gaula, Central Himalaya region, India, were studied. The length-frequency data were grouped sex wise and were analyzed to determine the growth and mortality parameters using the computer software programme, FAO-ICLARM Stock Assessment Tool (FISAT II). Altogether, 501 individuals were collected from river Gaula (November 2013-October 2014) and were preserved in formalin for further analysis. The results showed that the female outnumbered the male population. The minimum GSI of females was observed in the month of October (4.93 ± 0.26) and for males in the month of June and July (0.093 ± 0.12), whereas, the maximum value was in the month of April for both females (13.47 ± 0.52) and males (1.21 ± 0.12). Fluctuation in GSI values had a bimodal pattern showing two peaks during March-May and August-September in both the sexes, indicating the common spawning period of fish. The slope of regression showed the negative allometric growth for both males and females (b= 2.65 for male and b= 2.5 for female). A significant relationship between length and weight was observed in the present study (p < 0.05). The ELEFAN-I estimated L∞ and K of the von Bertalanffy growth factor for males (17.33 cm and 0.310 per year), females (17.33 cm and 0.3 per year) and pooled sexes (17.33 cm and 0.240 per year). The results indicated that Barilius bendelisis is a small sized fish having negative allometric growth that spawns twice a year. Thus, the present study on biological traits represents the baseline information for effective production, conservation and restoration planning.

  14. Appendicectomies in Albanians in Greece: outcomes in a highly mobile immigrant patient population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Background Albanian immigrants in Greece comprise a highly mobile population with unknown health care profile. We aimed to assess whether these immigrants were more or less likely to undergo laparotomy for suspected appendicitis with negative findings (negative appendicectomy), by performing a controlled study with individual (1:4) matching. We used data from 6 hospitals in the Greek prefecture of Epirus that is bordering Albania. Results Among a total of 2027 non-incidental appendicectomies for suspected appendicitis performed in 1994-1999, 30 patients with Albanian names were matched (for age, sex, time of operation and hospital) to 120 patients with Greek names. The odds for a negative appendicectomy were 3.4-fold higher (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-9.31, p = 0.02) in Albanian immigrants than in matched Greek-name subjects. The difference was most prominent in men (odds ratio 20.0, 95% CI, 1.41-285, p = 0.02) while it was not formally significant in women (odds ratio 1.56, 95% CI, 0.44-5.48). The odds for perforation were 1.25-fold higher in Albanian-name immigrants than in Greek-name patients (95% CI 0.44- 3.57). Conclusions Albanian immigrants in Greece are at high risk for negative appendicectomies. Socioeconomic, cultural and language parameters underlying health care inequalities in highly mobile immigrant populations need better study. PMID:11472640

  15. Foreign-body ingestion: characteristics and outcomes in a lower socioeconomic population with predominantly intentional ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Renee; Sahota, Amandeep; Bemarki, Ali; Salama, Paul; Simpson, Nicole; Laine, Loren

    2009-03-01

    Previous reports of foreign-body ingestions focused primarily on accidental ingestions. To describe the characteristics and management of foreign-body ingestions, with predominantly intentional ingestion, in a lower socioeconomic status population. A retrospective case series. An urban county hospital. Patients >/=17 years old, with foreign-body ingestions between 2000 and 2006. Characteristics of ingestion cases, endoscopic extraction, need for surgery, and complications. Among 262 cases, 92% were intentional, 85% involved psychiatric patients, and 84% occurred in patients with prior ingestions. The time from ingestion to presentation was >48 hours in 168 cases (64%). The overall success rate for endoscopic extraction was 90% (165/183 cases). Surgery was performed in 30 cases (11%) and was more common for objects beyond the pylorus versus objects above the pylorus (16/43 [37%] vs 10/151 [7%], respectively) and in cases with a greater delay from ingestion to presentation (25/168 [15%] if >48 hours vs 4/77 [5%] if 48 hours vs 14/165 [8%] if population.

  16. Temporal trends in management and outcomes of testicular cancer: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveridge, Michael J; Siemens, D Robert; Brennan, Kelly; Izard, Jason P; Karim, Safiya; An, Howard; Mackillop, William J; Booth, Christopher M

    2018-04-16

    Treatment guidelines for early-stage testicular cancer have increasingly recommended de-escalation of therapy with surveillance strategies. This study was designed to describe temporal trends in routine clinical practice and to determine whether de-escalation of therapy is associated with inferior survival in the general population. The Ontario Cancer Registry was linked to electronic records of treatment to identify all patients diagnosed with testicular cancer treated with orchiectomy in Ontario during 2000-2010. Treatment after orchiectomy was classified as radiotherapy (RT), retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), chemotherapy, or none. Surveillance was defined as no identified treatment within 90 days of orchiectomy. Overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were measured from the date of orchiectomy. The study population included 1564 and 1086 cases of seminomas and nonseminoma germ cell tumors (NSGCTs), respectively. Among patients with seminomas, there was a significant increase in the proportion of patients with no treatment within 90 days of orchiectomy (from 56% to 84%; P testicular cancer in routine practice since 2000. Long-term survival in routine practice is excellent and has not decreased with the uptake of surveillance strategies. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  17. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of meniscus surgery and future targets for biologic intervention: A review of data from the MOON Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Robert W; Jones, Morgan; Wasserstein, David; Spindler, Kurt P

    Meniscus injury and treatment occurred with the majority of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions (ACLR) in the multicenter orthopedic outcomes (MOON) cohort. We describe the patient-reported outcomes, radiographic outcomes, and predictors of pain from meniscus injuries and treatment in the setting of ACLR. Patient-reported outcomes improve significantly following meniscus repair with ACLR, but differences exist based on the meniscus injury laterally (medial or lateral). Patients undergoing medial meniscus repair have worse patient-reported outcomes and more pain compared to those with uninjured menisci. However, lateral meniscal tears can be repaired with similar outcomes as uninjured menisci. Medial meniscal treatment (meniscectomy or repair) results in a significant loss of joint space at 2 years compared to uninjured menisci. Menisci treated with excision had a greater degree of joint space loss compared to those treated with repair. Clinically significant knee pain is more common following injuries to the medial meniscus and increased in patients who undergo early re-operation after initial ACLR. Future research efforts aimed at improving outcomes after combined ACLR and meniscus treatment should focus on optimizing biologic and mechanical environments that promote healing of medial meniscal tears sustained during ACL injury.

  18. Contribution of prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain to adverse neonatal outcomes: population attributable fractions for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzakpasu, Susie; Fahey, John; Kirby, Russell S; Tough, Suzanne C; Chalmers, Beverley; Heaman, Maureen I; Bartholomew, Sharon; Biringer, Anne; Darling, Elizabeth K; Lee, Lily S; McDonald, Sarah D

    2015-02-05

    Low or high prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and inadequate or excess gestational weight gain (GWG) are associated with adverse neonatal outcomes. This study estimates the contribution of these risk factors to preterm births (PTBs), small-for-gestational age (SGA) and large-for-gestational age (LGA) births in Canada compared to the contribution of prenatal smoking, a recognized perinatal risk factor. We analyzed data from the Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey. A sample of 5,930 women who had a singleton live birth in 2005-2006 was weighted to a nationally representative population of 71,200 women. From adjusted odds ratios, we calculated population attributable fractions to estimate the contribution of BMI, GWG and prenatal smoking to PTB, SGA and LGA infants overall and across four obstetric groups. Overall, 6% of women were underweight (<18.5 kg/m(2)) and 34.4% were overweight or obese (≥25.0 kg/m(2)). More than half (59.4%) gained above the recommended weight for their BMI, 18.6% gained less than the recommended weight and 10.4% smoked prenatally. Excess GWG contributed more to adverse outcomes than BMI, contributing to 18.2% of PTB and 15.9% of LGA. Although the distribution of BMI and GWG was similar across obstetric groups, their impact was greater among primigravid women and multigravid women without a previous PTB or pregnancy loss. The contributions of BMI and GWG to PTB and SGA exceeded that of prenatal smoking. Maternal weight, and GWG in particular, contributes significantly to the occurrence of adverse neonatal outcomes in Canada. Indeed, this contribution exceeds that of prenatal smoking for PTB and SGA, highlighting its public health importance.

  19. Diabetes mellitus in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in an aging population in Shanghai, China: Prevalence, clinical characteristics and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zheyuan; Guo, Juntao; Huang, Ying; Cai, Enmao; Zhang, Xia; Pan, Qichao; Yuan, Zheng'an; Shen, Xin

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus among pulmonary tuberculosis patients and the difference of clinical characteristics and outcomes between pulmonary tuberculosis patients with and without diabetes mellitus in an aging population in Shanghai, China. This is a retrospective population-based study. 201 newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Changning District, Shanghai during 2007-2008 were included. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were collected. Determination of diabetes mellitus was based on the medical records before pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus among pulmonary tuberculosis patients was 19.9% (40/201). Pulmonary tuberculosis patients with diabetes mellitus were more likely to be old (≥50, OR=5.23, 95% CI=2.07-13.25), to have pulmonary cavities (OR=3.02, 95% CI=1.31-6.98), to be sputum smear positive (OR=2.90, 95% CI=1.12-7.51), and to have extension of anti-tuberculosis treatment duration (OR=2.68, 95% CI 1.17-6.14). Besides, they had a higher 2nd month sputum smear positive proportion (OR=2.97, 95% CI 1.22-7.22) and a higher 5-year recurrence rate (OR=5.87, 95% CI 1.26-27.40). High prevalence, severe clinical characteristics and poor outcomes of pulmonary tuberculosis patients with diabetes mellitus highlight the necessity of early bi-directional screening and co-management of these two diseases in Shanghai, China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Maternal health issues and cardio-metabolic outcomes in the offspring: a focus on Indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklow, Brandy A; Sellers, Elizabeth A C

    2015-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) including diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease are the leading causes of death worldwide. Indigenous populations are disproportionally affected. In an effort to halt the increasing disease burden, the mechanisms underlying the increasing rate of NCDs are an important area of study. Recent evidence has focused on the perinatal period as an influential period impacting the future cardio-metabolic health of the offspring. This concept has been defined as metabolic foetal programming and supports the importance of the developmental origins of health and disease in research and clinical practice, specifically in prevention efforts to protect future generations from NCDs. An understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved is not clear as of yet. However, an understanding of these mechanisms is imperative in order to plan effective intervention strategies. As much of the discussion below is gleaned from large epidemiological studies and animal studies, further research with prospective cohorts is necessary. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Tumor characteristics and the clinical outcome of invasive lobular carcinoma compared to infiltrating ductal carcinoma in a Chinese population

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    Cao A-Yong

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We sought to compare the baseline demographics, standard pathologic factors and long-term clinical outcomes between ILC and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC using a large database. Methods Clinicopathologic features, overall survival (OS, and recurrence/metastasis-free survival (RFS were compared between 2,202 patients with IDC and 215 patients with ILC. Results ILC was significantly more likely to be associated with a favorable phenotype, but the incidence of contralateral breast cancer was higher for ILC patients than for IDC patients (8.4% vs. 3.9%; P =0.001. The frequencies of recurrence/metastasis (P = 0.980 and death (P = 0.064 were similar among patients with IDC and patients with ILC after adjustment for tumor size and nodal status. The median follow-up was 42.8 months. Conclusions Chinese women with ILCs do not have better clinical outcomes than their counterparts with IDC. Management decisions should be based on individual patient and tumor biologic characteristics, and not on lobular histology.

  2. Intervillous macrophage migration inhibitory factor is associated with adverse birth outcomes in a study population in Central India.

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    Puspendra P Singh

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pluripotent factor produced by a variety of cells. It plays an important biological role in the regulation of pregnancy and has been shown to influence malaria pathogenesis. In this study, the levels of MIF in the peripheral, cord and placental intervillous blood (IVB plasma collected from women residing in a malaria endemic region of Central India was determined and its association with malaria in pregnancy and birth outcomes was investigated. MIF levels were significantly different in IVB, peripheral, and cord plasma, with IVB plasma having the highest MIF levels and peripheral plasma having the lowest. Placental malaria positive women had significantly higher IVB plasma MIF levels than placental malaria negative women, but this relationship was not seen in peripheral or cord plasma MIF levels. In addition, the odds of stillbirth and low birth weight deliveries for the uppermost placental MIF quartile (irrespective of placental malaria status was significantly higher than that of the lowest placental MIF quartile, supporting the hypothesis that elevated concentrations of placental MIF may be associated with an increased risk of adverse birth outcome.

  3. Improving coronary artery bypass grafting readmission outcomes from 2000 to 2012 in the Medicare population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Christian; Kwedar, Kathleen; Markwell, Stephen; Vassileva, Christina M

    2017-10-01

    The study objective was to examine trends in 30-day readmission after coronary artery bypass grafting in the Medicare population over 13 years. The study included isolated coronary artery bypass grafting procedures in the Medicare population from January 2000 to November 2012. Comorbidities and causes of readmission were determined using Internal Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnostic codes. The cohort included 1,116,991 patients. Readmission rates decreased from 19.5% in 2000 to 16.6% in 2012 (P = .0001). There was significant improvement across all categories of admission status, age, race, gender, and hospital annual coronary artery bypass grafting volume that were analyzed. Adjusted odds of readmission in 2000 compared with 2012 was 1.28 (95% confidence interval, 1.24-1.32). Median length of stay for the readmission episode was 5 days, which improved to 4 days by 2012. Hospital mortality during the readmission episode was 2.8% overall and declined to 2.4% in 2012 (P = .0001). The most common primary readmission diagnoses were heart failure (12.6%), postoperative wound infection/nonhealing wound (8.9%), arrhythmias (6.4%), and pleural effusions (3.7%). Readmission for wound infections/nonhealing wounds decreased significantly over time, from 9.8% to 6.5% (P = .0001). In a large cohort of Medicare patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting over 13 years, there was a significant decrease in 30-day readmission rates, a reduction in readmission for wound infections, and reduced mortality during the readmission episode, despite an increase in patient comorbidities. The improvement in readmission rates was seen regardless of patient variables examined. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. No excess risk of adverse birth outcomes in populations living near special waste landfill sites in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S E; Thomson, A O; Jarup, L; de Hoogh, C; Briggs, D J; Elliott, P

    2003-11-01

    A recent study showed small excess risks of low birth weight, very low birth weight and certain congenital anomalies in populations living near landfill sites in Great Britain. The objective of the current study was to investigate the risk of adverse birth outcomes associated with residence near special waste landfill sites in Scotland. We studied risks of adverse birth outcomes in populations living within 2 km of 61 Scottish special waste landfill sites operational at some time between 1982 and 1997 compared with those living further away. 324,167 live births, 1,849 stillbirths, and 11,138 congenital anomalies (including terminations) were included in the study. Relative risks were computed for all congenital anomalies combined, some specific anomalies and prevalence of stillbirth and low and very low birth weight (special waste landfill sites was 0.96 (99% confidence interval 0.89 to 1.02) adjusted for confounders. Adjusted risks were 0.71 (0.36 to 1.42) for neural tube defects, 1.03 (0.85 to 1.26) for cardiovascular defects, 0.84 (0.58 to 1.22) for hypospadias and epispadias (with no excess of surgical corrections), 0.78 (0.27 to 2.23) for abdominal wall defects (1.32 (0.42-4.17) for hospital admissions), 1.22 (0.28 to 5.38) for surgical correction of gastroschisis and exomphalos and 1.01 (0.96 to 1.07) and 1.01 (0.90 to 1.15) for low and very low birth weight respectively. There was no excess risk of stillbirth. In conclusion, we found no statistically significant excess risks of congenital anomalies or low birth weight in populations living near special waste landfill sites in Scotland.

  5. Metal(loid) levels in biological matrices from human populations exposed to mining contamination--Panasqueira Mine (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Patrícia; Costa, Solange; Silva, Susana; Walter, Alan; Ranville, James; Sousa, Ana C A; Costa, Carla; Coelho, Marta; García-Lestón, Julia; Pastorinho, M Ramiro; Laffon, Blanca; Pásaro, Eduardo; Harrington, Chris; Taylor, Andrew; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Mining activities may affect the health of miners and communities living near mining sites, and these health effects may persist even when the mine is abandoned. During mining processes various toxic wastes are produced and released into the surrounding environment, resulting in contamination of air, drinking water, rivers, plants, and soils. In a geochemical sampling campaign undertaken in the Panasqueira Mine area of central Portugal, an anomalous distribution of several metals and arsenic (As) was identified in various environmental media. Several potentially harmful elements, including As, cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and selenium (Se), were quantified in blood, urine, hair, and nails (toe and finger) from a group of individuals living near the Panasqueira Mine who were environmentally and occupationally exposed. A group with similar demographic characteristics without known exposure to mining activities was also compared. Genotoxicity was evaluated by means of T-cell receptor (TCR) mutation assay, and percentages of different lymphocyte subsets were selected as immunotoxicity biomarkers. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis showed elevated levels of As, Cd, Cr, Mn, and Pb in all biological samples taken from populations living close to the mine compared to controls. Genotoxic and immunotoxic differences were also observed. The results provide evidence of an elevated potential risk to the health of populations, with environmental and occupational exposures resulting from mining activities. Further, the results emphasize the need to implement preventive measures, remediation, and rehabilitation plans for the region.

  6. Epidemiology and Outcome of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in a Heterogeneous ICU Population in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Shabbir Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study is to collect data on epidemiology, microbiology, and outcome of VAP in our ICUs for reevaluation of the therapeutic strategies. Methods. This retrospective study involved all adult patients, 15 years of age or older, diagnosed with VAP in multidisciplinary ICUs at Hamad General Hospital between January 2010 and December 2012. Results. A total of 106 patients were enrolled. The mean incidence of VAP was 5.0 per 1000 ventilator-days. It was predominant among younger age group (<60 years, male patients (80.2%, and trauma ICU admissions (49.0%. The most common comorbidity was hypertension (34% and polytrauma (36.8% was the most frequent admission diagnosis. 30-day mortality was 23.6% and it was significantly higher in ≥60 years age group, female gender, patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic respiratory disease, ≥1 comorbidity, and poor functional status, smokers, medical and surgical ICU admissions, and patients with previous stay in medical/surgical wards, inappropriate empirical therapy, and admission diagnosis of respiratory failure. Gram-negative bacilli were the most frequent respiratory specimen isolates, Pseudomonas spp. being the most common. Majority of our Acinetobacter isolates were multidrug resistant. Conclusion. The incidence of VAP in our ICUs was low. Higher mortality rates were observed in certain subgroup of patients. Resistance to commonly used antimicrobials is likely to require reevaluation of the therapeutic strategies at our institution.

  7. Task oriented training improves the balance outcome & reducing fall risk in diabetic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazal, Javeria; Malik, Arshad Nawaz; Amjad, Imran

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine the balance impairments and to compare task oriented versus traditional balance training in fall reduction among diabetic patients. The randomized control trial with descriptive survey and 196 diabetic patients were recruited to assess balance impairments through purposive sampling technique. Eighteen patients were randomly allocated into two groups; task oriented balance training group TOB (n=8) and traditional balance training group TBT (n=10). The inclusion criteria were 30-50 years age bracket and diagnosed cases of Diabetes Mellitus with neuropathy. The demographics were taken through standardized & valid assessment tools include Berg Balance Scale and Functional Reach Test. The measurements were obtained at baseline, after 04 and 08 weeks of training. The mean age of the participants was 49 ±6.79. The result shows that 165(84%) were at moderate risk of fall and 31(15%) were at mild risk of fall among total 196 diabetic patients. There was significant improvement (p balance training group for dynamic balance, anticipatory balance and reactive balance after 8 weeks of training as compare to traditional balance training. Task oriented balance training is effective in improving the dynamic, anticipator and reactive balance. The task oriented training reduces the risk of falling through enhancing balance outcome.

  8. High hospital research participation and improved colorectal cancer survival outcomes: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Amy; Morris, Eva Ja; Corrigan, Neil; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Finan, Paul J; Thomas, James D; Chapman, Michael; Hamilton, Russell; Campbell, Helen; Cameron, David; Kaplan, Richard; Parmar, Mahesh; Stephens, Richard; Seymour, Matt; Gregory, Walter; Selby, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In 2001, the National Institute for Health Research Cancer Research Network (NCRN) was established, leading to a rapid increase in clinical research activity across the English NHS. Using colorectal cancer (CRC) as an example, we test the hypothesis that high, sustained hospital-level participation in interventional clinical trials improves outcomes for all patients with CRC managed in those research-intensive hospitals. Data for patients diagnosed with CRC in England in 2001-2008 (n=209 968) were linked with data on accrual to NCRN CRC studies (n=30 998). Hospital Trusts were categorised by the proportion of patients accrued to interventional studies annually. Multivariable models investigated the relationship between 30-day postoperative mortality and 5-year survival and the level and duration of study participation. Most of the Trusts achieving high participation were district general hospitals and the effects were not limited to cancer 'centres of excellence', although such centres do make substantial contributions. Patients treated in Trusts with high research participation (≥16%) in their year of diagnosis had lower postoperative mortality (presearch participation, with a reduction in postoperative mortality of 1.5% (6.5%-5%, pstudies for all patients with CRC treated in the hospital study participants. Improvement precedes and increases with the level and years of sustained participation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Effects of depression, anxiety, self-esteem, and health behaviour on neonatal outcomes in a population-based Hungarian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödecs, Tamás; Horváth, Boldizsár; Szilágyi, Eniko; Gonda, Xénia; Rihmer, Zoltán; Sándor, János

    2011-01-01

    To investigate possible associations of maternal antenatal depression, anxiety and self-esteem with negative neonatal outcomes controlling for the effects of demographic covariates and health behaviour in a Hungarian sample. A population-based monitoring system was established in 10 districts of health visitors in Szombathely, Hungary, covering every woman registered as pregnant between February 1, 2008 and February 1 2009. Three hundred and seven expectant women in the early stage of their pregnancy were surveyed using the Short Form of Beck Depression Inventory for the measurement of depression and the Spielberger Trait-Anxiety Inventory for the measurement of anxiety. Self-esteem was evaluated by the Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale. At the end of the follow-up period, data on 261 mothers and their singleton neonates were available. The relationship between the explanatory and outcome variables (birth weight, length, chest circumference, gestational age, and 1- and 5-min Apgar score) was tested in girls and boys separately by multiple linear regression analysis (Forward method). Categorical variables were used as "dummy variables". Maternal depression, anxiety and health behaviour did not show any association with neonatal outcomes. Higher level of maternal self-esteem was associated with higher birth weight and birth length in boys and higher birth length in girls. Maternal education positively correlated with birth length, gestational age and chest circumference in boys, and with birth length in girls. In girls, maternal socioeconomic status showed a positive association with birth weight and gestational age, while common law marriage had a negative effect on birth weight and chest circumference. Lower level of maternal self-esteem possibly leads to a higher level of maternal stress which may reduce fetal growth via physiologic changes. Gender differences in associations between demographic factors and neonatal outcome measures indicate differences in fetal

  10. Mother's education and the risk of several neonatal outcomes: an evidence from an Italian population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarutti, Anna; Franchi, Matteo; Monzio Compagnoni, Matteo; Merlino, Luca; Corrao, Giovanni

    2017-07-12

    Maternal socioeconomic disparities strongly affect child health, particularly in low and middle income countries. We assessed whether neonatal outcomes varied by maternal education in a setting where healthcare system provides universal coverage of health services to all women, irrespective of their socioeconomic status. A population-based study was performed on 383,103 singleton live births occurring from 2005 to 2010 in Lombardy, an Italian region with approximately 10 million inhabitants. The association between maternal education, birthplace and selected neonatal outcomes (preterm birth, low birth weight, small-for-gestational age, low 5-min Apgar score, severe congenital anomalies, cerebral distress and respiratory distress) was estimated by fitting logistic regression models. Model adjustments were applied for sociodemographic, reproductive and medical maternal traits. Compared with low-level educated mothers, those with high education had reduced odds of preterm birth (Odds Ratio; OR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.77-0.85), low birth weight (OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.70-0.81), small for gestational age (OR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.79-0.85), and respiratory distress (OR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.80-0.88). Mothers born in a foreign country had higher odds of preterm birth (OR = 1.16, 95% CI 1.11-1.20), low Apgar score (OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.07-1.30) and respiratory distress (OR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.15-1.24) than Italian-born mothers. The influence of maternal education on neonatal outcomes was confirmed among both, Italian-born and foreign-born mothers. Low levels of education and maternal birthplace are important factors associated with adverse neonatal outcomes in Italy. Future studies are encouraged to investigate factors mediating the effects of socioeconomic inequality for identifying the main target groups for interventions.

  11. Birth outcomes of cases with isolated atrial septal defect type II--a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereczkey, Attila; Kósa, Zsolt; Csáky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Urbán, Róbert; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2013-07-01

    In general, epidemiological studies have evaluated cases with congenital cardiovascular abnormalities together. The aim of this study is to describe the birth outcomes of cases with isolated/single atrial septal defect type II (ASD-II, i.e. only a fossa ovalis defect) after surgical correction or lethal outcome in the light of maternal sociodemographic data. Comparison of birth outcomes and maternal characteristics of cases with ASD-II and controls without defect. The population-based Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities. Hungarian newborn infants with or without ASD-II. Medically recorded birth outcomes, maternal age and birth order were evaluated. Marital and employment status was based on maternal information. The lifestyle factors were analyzed in a subsample of mothers visited at home based on a personal interview with mothers and their close relatives, and the family consensus was accepted. Mean gestational age at delivery and birthweight, rate of preterm birth and low birthweight, maternal age, birth order, marital and employment status. The evaluation of 471 cases with ASD-II and 38,151 controls without any defects showed a female excess in cases with ASD-II, having shorter gestational age and lower mean birthweight, and thus a higher rate of preterm births and low birthweight. Intrauterine growth restriction and shorter gestational age were found in cases with ASD-II, particularly in female children. These factors may have a general developmental process in which there was not closure of the foramen ovale, thus echocardiographic screening of these babies might be of value. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica © 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  12. Active Learning Outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A; Siwicki, Kathleen K

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students' engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker backgrounds in biology. Peer leaders with experience in biology courses and training in science pedagogy facilitate work on faculty-generated challenge problems. During the eight semesters assessed in this study, URM students and those with less preparation attended SGMs with equal or greater frequency than their counterparts. Most agreed that SGMs enhanced their comprehension of biology and ability to articulate solutions. The historical grade gap between URM and non-URM students narrowed slightly in Biology 2, but not in other biology and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses. Nonetheless, URM students taking introductory biology after program implementation have graduated with biology majors or minors at the same rates as non-URM students, and have enrolled in postcollege degree programs at equal or greater rates. These results suggest that improved performance as measured by science grade point average may not be necessary to improve the persistence of students from underrepresented groups as life sciences majors. © 2016 P. Kudish et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Strategies and opportunities to STOP colon cancer in priority populations: pragmatic pilot study design and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronado, Gloria D; Turner, Ann; Sanchez, Jennifer; Retecki, Sally; Nelson, Christine; Green, Beverly; Vollmer, William M; Petrik, Amanda; Aguirre, Josue; Kapka, Tanya; DeVoe, Jennifer; Puro, Jon; Miers, Tran; Lembach, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal-cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and Latinos have particularly low rates of screening. Strategies and Opportunities to STOP Colon Cancer in Priority Populations (STOP CRC) is a partnership among two research institutions and a network of safety net clinics to promote colorectal cancer screening among populations served by these clinics. This paper reports on results of a pilot study conducted in a safety net organization that serves primarily Latinos. The study assessed two clinic-based approaches to raise rates of colorectal-cancer screening among selected age-eligible patients not up-to-date with colorectal-cancer screening guidelines. One clinic each was assigned to: (1) an automated data-driven Electronic Health Record (EHR)-embedded program for mailing Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT) kits (Auto Intervention); or (2) a higher-intensity program consisting of a mailed FIT kit plus linguistically and culturally tailored interventions delivered at the clinic level (Auto Plus Intervention). A third clinic within the safety-net organization was selected to serve as a passive control (Usual Care). Two simple measurements of feasibility were: 1) ability to use real-time EHR data to identify patients eligible for each intervention step, and 2) ability to offer affordable testing and follow-up care for uninsured patients. The study was successful at both measurements of feasibility. A total of 112 patients in the Auto clinic and 101 in the Auto Plus clinic met study inclusion criteria and were mailed an introductory letter. Reach was high for the mailed component (92.5% of kits were successfully mailed), and moderate for the telephone component (53% of calls were successful completed). After exclusions for invalid address and other factors, 206 (109 in the Auto clinic and 97 in the Auto Plus clinic) were mailed a FIT kit. At 6 months, fecal test completion rates were higher in the Auto (39.3%) and Auto Plus (36.6%) clinics

  14. Biological Characteristics and Medical Treatment of Breast Cancer in Young Women—A Featured Population: Results from the NORA Study

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    P. Pronzato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The present paper described the biological characteristics and clinical behavior of young women in the cohort NORA study Patients and Methods. From 2000–2002, patients (>3500 were enrolled at 77 Italian hospitals. Women aged ≤50 years (=1013 were stratified into age groups (≤35, 36–40, 41–45, and 46–50 years. The relationship between age and patient characteristics, cancer presentation, and treatment was analyzed. Results. Younger women more frequently had tumors with ER/PgR-negative(2=7.07; =.008, HER2 amplification (2=5.76; =.01, and high (≥10% Ki67 labelling index (2=9.53; =.002. Positive nodal status, large tumors, and elevated Ki67 all associated with the choice for chemotherapy followed by endocrine therapy in hormone receptor-positive patients (40 versus ≤40, <.0001, resp.. At multivariate analysis, after adjustment for significant clinical and pathological factors, age remains a significant prognostic variable (HR=0.93, =.0021. Conclusion. This cohort study suggests that age per sè is an important prognostic factor. The restricted role of early diagnosis and the aggressive behavior of cancer in this population make necessary the application of targeted medical strategies crucial.

  15. Biological Characteristics and Medical Treatment of Breast Cancer in Young Women-A Featured Population: Results from the Nora Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronzato, P.; Mustacchi, G.; De Matteis, A.; Di Costanzo, F.; Rulli, E.; Floriani, I; Cazzaniga, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The present paper described the biological characteristics and clinical behavior of young women in the cohort NORA study Patients and Methods. From 2000-2002, patients (N>3500) were enrolled at 77 Italian hospitals. Women aged =50 years (N=1013) were stratified into age groups (=35, 36-40, 41-45, and 46-50 years). The relationship between age and patient characteristics, cancer presentation, and treatment was analyzed. Results. Younger women more frequently had tumors with ER/PgR-negative(x 2 =7.07; P=.008), HER2 amplification (x 2 =5.76; P=.01), and high (≤10%) Ki67 labelling index (x 2 =9.53; P=.002). Positive nodal status, large tumors, and elevated Ki67 all associated with the choice for chemotherapy followed by endocrine therapy in hormone receptor-positive patients (P 40 versus =40, P<.0001, resp.). At multivariate analysis, after adjustment for significant clinical and pathological factors, age remains a significant prognostic variable (HR=0.93, P=.0021). Conclusion. This cohort study suggests that age per se is an important prognostic factor. The restricted role of early diagnosis and the aggressive behavior of cancer in this population make necessary the application of targeted medical strategies crucial. human epidermal growth factor receptor

  16. Prevalence, outcome, and women's experiences of external cephalic version in a low-risk population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, Marlies; Offerhaus, Pien; van Dommelen, Paula; Wiegers, Therese; Buitendijk, Simone

    2010-06-01

    Until recently, external cephalic version to prevent breech presentation at birth was not widely accepted. The objective of our study was to assess the prevalence, outcomes, and women's experiences of external cephalic version to improve the implementation of the procedure in the Netherlands. A prospective cohort study was conducted of 167 women under the care of a midwife with confirmed breech presentation at a gestational age of 33 completed weeks or more. Between June 2007 and January 2008, 167 women with a confirmed breech presentation were offered an external cephalic version. Of this group, 123 women (73.7%, 95% CI: 65.5-80.5) subsequently received the version. These women had about a ninefold increased probability of a cephalic presentation at birth compared with women who did not undergo a version (relative risk [RR]: 8.8, 95% CI: 2.2-34.8). The chance of a vaginal birth after an external cephalic version was almost threefold (RR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-5.0). The success rate was 39 percent, although considerable differences existed associated with region and parity. Ninety-four percent of women with a successful version rated it as a good experience compared with 71 percent of women who had a failed version (p = 0.015). Significant pain during the version was experienced by 34 percent of women, of whom 18 percent also experienced fear during the version, compared with no women who reported little or no pain (p = 0.006). Women who reported significant pain or fear during the version experienced the version more negatively (OR: 6.0, 95% CI: 3.3-12.2 and OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.1-6.0, respectively). One in every four women with a breech presentation in independent midwifery care did not receive an external cephalic version. Of the women who received a version one third experienced significant pain during the procedure. Considerable regional variation in success rate existed.

  17. Pathology outcomes in patients with transurethral bladder tumour resection in a Turkish population: A retrospective analysis

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    Salih Budak

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Transurethral bladder tumour resection (TURBT is the common surgical method used in the diagnosis, staging and treatment of patients with bladder tumour. Most of the rare tumours other than the urothelial carcinomas of the bladder are in advanced stage on diagnosis and necessitate aggressive treatment. In our study, we aimed to the histologic types of bladder cancer and to determine the regional incidence of rare bladder cancer types in our region. Materials and methods: We retrospectively evaluated 815 patients who underwent TURBT surgery between January 2010 and March 2016 in our clinic with a diagnosis of bladder cancer and at least 1 year follow-up. Patients with tumour histopathological examination including histological tumour type, grade and were reported. Thirty-nine patients with an unclear pathology report (neighboring organ invasion, cautery artifact, etc and 17 patients whose data could not be accessed were excluded from the study. The patients who had received chemotherapy or radiotherapy due to any type of malignancy (23 were also excluded from the study. Results: The outcomes of 736 patients operated in our clinics due to bladder tumour were evaluated. The mean age was 65.2 ± 8.4; 135 were female and 601 were male. Among them 711 patients with urothelial carcinoma were reported (94.2%. According to TNM classification, stage Ta was observed in 270 patients (37.9%, stage T1 in 297 (41.7%, and stage T2 in 144 (20.3%. Non-urothelial cancers were reported in 25 cases (3.3%. Conclusion: The incidence of bladder carcinoma varies between regions. The results of our study are similar to those of the western countries. Increased smoking and exposure to environmental carcinogenetic agents may lead to altered incidences and histological types of bladder tumours. Revision of regional tumour records may be useful to develop and evaluate future treatment strategies.

  18. Gestational diabetes mellitus in an Iranian pregnant population using IADPSG criteria: Incidence, contributing factors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazian, Hajieh; Nouhjah, Sedigheh; Shahbazian, Nahid; Jahanfar, Shayesteh; Latifi, Seyed Mahmoud; Aleali, Armaghan; Shahbazian, Nasrin; Saadati, Najmieh

    Different approaches for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus(GDM) have great impact on all process of management of gestational diabetes and its future complications. The aims of this study were to evaluate rate, risk factors and outcomes of GDM based on International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups diagnostic criteria. In a prospective study pregnant women attended 5 clinics in Ahvaz, screened for gestational diabetes mellitus using IADPSG criteria and followed up delivery from August 2014 to February 2015. At the first prenatal visit women underwent the fasting blood sugar test. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed for 750 mothers between 24 and 32 weeks of gestation. Logistic regression test for calculating the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals was used. The mean age of participants was 28.43±5.52years. The overall rate of GDM in our study was 29.9% (224/750). Incidence of gestational diabetes was associated with age group≥35years [OR=1.92(95% CI, 1.19-3.09)], family history of diabetes [OR=2.47(95% CI, 1.33-4.59)], previous GDM [OR=3.12(1.35-7.19)], BMI≥25 [OR=1, 71(1.10-2.67)] Using logistic regression. The most common maternal complication in studied women was cesarean section followed by hypertension and preeclampsia. About one third of studied women diagnosed as GDM according to the IADPSG criteria. Risk factors of GDM were maternal age, family history of diabetes, Previous GDM, overweight and obesity before pregnancy, the same reported factors with 2 steps approach. Higher rate of GDM using this criterion may increase concern about healthcare costs and workloads. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Surgical outcomes for unilateral superior oblique palsy in Chinese population:a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Shing kin Yau

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the outcome after surgery for unilateral superior oblique (SO palsy in Chinese. METHODS: The medical records of 39 patients that underwent surgery for unilateral SO palsy between January 2003 and December 2012 at Caritas Medical Centre, Hong Kong, were retrospectively reviewed. All surgeries were performed by a single surgeon. Pre-operative assessments for vertical deviation, cyclo-deviation, and Knapp’s classification were obtained to determine the nature and degree of surgical correction. Vertical deviation was measured at 1wk; 1, 6mo and on last follow-up day post-operatively. Cyclo-deviation was measured on last follow-up day post-operatively. RESULTS: During the 10y period, 39 subjects were recruited. The most common etiology was congenital (94.9%. Knapp’s Type III (66.7% and Type I (12.8% classifications were the most common subtypes. To treat SO palsy, the most common surgical procedures were: isolated inferior oblique (IO anteriorization (41.0%, isolated IO myectomy (10.3%, and isolated IO recession (10.3%. At 3.5±2.1y post-operatively, the vertical deviation was significantly reduced (15.1±6.2 PD versus 0.5±1.4 PD, PCONCLUSION: The majority of subjects achieved corrected vertical deviation after a single surgery although there was no improvement in cyclo-deviation. Those with over-correction of primary position deviation had greater preoperative vertical deviation and it may be related to simultaneous multiple muscle surgery.

  20. Incidence and Clinical Outcomes of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in South Korea, 2011-2014: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon Suk; Han, Minkyung; Kim, Won Ho; Park, Sohee; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2017-08-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in East Asia; however, population-based data from this region are lacking. We conducted a nationwide, population-based study to examine the incidence and disease course of IBD in South Korea. Using the National Health Insurance claims data, we collected data on patients diagnosed with IBD [10,049 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 5595 with Crohn's disease (CD)] from 2011 to 2014. During the study period, the average annual incidence of UC was 5.0 per 10 5 , while that of CD was 2.8 per 10 5 . Among patients with UC, the cumulative rates of surgery 1 and 4 years after diagnosis were 1.0 and 2.0%; those among patients with CD were 9.0 and 13.9%, respectively. The 1- and 4-year cumulative rates of moderate- to high-dose corticosteroid use were, respectively, 26.6 and 45.2% among patients with UC, and 29.9 and 50.8% among those with CD. Similarly, the 1- and 4-year cumulative rates of immunomodulator use were 14.1 and 26.4% among patients with UC, and 58.3 and 76.1% among those with CD, respectively. With regard to biologic use, the 1- and 4-year cumulative rates were 3.0 and 9.0% among patients with UC, and 11.1 and 31.7% among those with CD, respectively. The recent incidence of IBD in South Korea has been the highest in East Asia. Patients who had been diagnosed recently with IBD showed lower rates of surgery and higher rates of immunomodulator and biologic use compared to those reported ever in South Korea.

  1. Hemodynamic variables predict outcome of emergency thoracotomy in the pediatric trauma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, Deidre L; Dassinger, Melvin S; Bozeman, Andrew P; Porter, Austin; Maxson, R Todd

    2014-09-01

    Limited data exist regarding indications for resuscitative emergency thoracotomy (ETR) in the pediatric population. We attempt to define the presenting hemodynamic parameters that predict survival for pediatric patients undergoing ETR. We reviewed all pediatric patients (age <18years), entered into the National Trauma Data Bank from 2007 to 2010, who underwent ETR within one hour of ED arrival. Mechanism of injury and hemodynamics were analyzed using Chi squared and Wilcoxon tests. 316 children (70 blunt, 240 penetrating) underwent ETR, 31% (98/316) survived to discharge. Less than 5% of patients survived when presenting SBP was ≤50mmHg or heart rate was ≤70bpm. For blunt injuries there were no survivors with a pulse ≤80bpm or SBP ≤60mmHg. When survivors were compared to nonsurvivors, blood pressure, pulse, and injury type were statistically significant when treated as independent variables and in a logistic regression model. When ETR was performed for SBP ≤50mmHg or for heart rate ≤70bpm less than 5% of patients survived. There were no survivors of blunt trauma when SBP was ≤60mmHg or pulse was ≤80bpm. This review suggests that ETR may have limited benefit in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Plant population structure and insect herbivory on Solanum mauritianum Scopoli (Solanaceae in southern Brazil: a support to biological control

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    Deise Mari Barboza

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Solanum mauritianum Scopoli (Solanaceae, a native Brazilian shrub, has become naturalized and invasive in several countries. In South Africa, where invasions are severe, herbivorous insects that attack S. mauritianum in its native area have been considered for introduction as biological control agents. To assess the action of such herbivores on the plant, studies were carried out on a population of S. mauritianum in an area undergoing regeneration in southern Brazil. An analysis of the structure of that population was performed, as well as of herbivory by insects, in particular of Anthonomus (Curculionidae. The population structure showed an "inverted J" pattern in diameter classes, but not in height classes. Individual plants showed an aggregate distribution. The damage caused by Anthonomus did not amount to the loss of a large leaf area, but since it was inflicted on young leaves and in a large proportion, could lead to the survival decrease.Solanum mauritianum Scopoli (Solanaceae, um arbusto endêmico do sul do Brasil, naturalizou-se e tornou-se invasor em vários países do mundo. Na África do Sul, onde as invasões são severas, insetos fitófagos associados à planta no país de origem têm sido considerados para introdução como agentes de controle biológico. Para avaliar a ação de tais insetos no ambiente natural, foram conduzidos estudos em uma população de S. mauritianum em uma área em regeneração no sul do Brasil. Foi realizada análise da estrutura populacional, bem como da herbivoria causada por insetos, em particular para uma espécie do gênero Anthonomus (Curculionidae, para subsidiar o trabalho sobre controle biológico. A estrutura da população mostrou um padrão "J invertido" nas classes de diâmetro, mas não nas classes de altura; a distribuição espacial dos indivíduos era agregada. O dano causado por Anthonomus sp. não refletiu na perda real de grande área foliar. No entanto, uma vez que foi detectada uma

  3. Biases in detection of apparent “weekend effect” on outcome with administrative coding data: population based study of stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linxin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the accuracy of coding of admissions for stroke on weekdays versus weekends and any impact on apparent outcome. Design Prospective population based stroke incidence study and a scoping review of previous studies of weekend effects in stroke. Setting Primary and secondary care of all individuals registered with nine general practices in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom (OXVASC, the Oxford Vascular Study). Participants All patients with clinically confirmed acute stroke in OXVASC identified with multiple overlapping methods of ascertainment in 2002-14 versus all acute stroke admissions identified by hospital diagnostic and mortality coding alone during the same period. Main outcomes measures Accuracy of administrative coding data for all patients with confirmed stroke admitted to hospital in OXVASC. Difference between rates of “false positive” or “false negative” coding for weekday and weekend admissions. Impact of inaccurate coding on apparent case fatality at 30 days in weekday versus weekend admissions. Weekend effects on outcomes in patients with confirmed stroke admitted to hospital in OXVASC and impacts of other potential biases compared with those in the scoping review. Results Among 92 728 study population, 2373 episodes of acute stroke were ascertained in OXVASC, of which 826 (34.8%) mainly minor events were managed without hospital admission, 60 (2.5%) occurred out of the area or abroad, and 195 (8.2%) occurred in hospital during an admission for a different reason. Of 1292 local hospital admissions for acute stroke, 973 (75.3%) were correctly identified by administrative coding. There was no bias in distribution of weekend versus weekday admission of the 319 strokes missed by coding. Of 1693 admissions for stroke identified by coding, 1055 (62.3%) were confirmed to be acute strokes after case adjudication. Among the 638 false positive coded cases, patients were more likely to be admitted on weekdays than at weekends (536

  4. Short and long term mortality rates associated with first pregnancy outcome: population register based study for Denmark 1980-2004.

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    Reardon, David C; Coleman, Priscilla K

    2012-09-01

    There is a growing interest in examining death rates associated with different pregnancy outcomes for time periods beyond one year. Previous population studies, however, have failed to control for complete reproductive histories. In this study we seek to eliminate the potential confounding effect of unknown prior pregnancy history by examining mortality rates associated specifically with first pregnancy outcome alone. We also examine differences in mortality rates associated with early abortion and late abortions (after 12 weeks). Medical records for the entire population of women born in Denmark between 1962 and 1991 and were alive in 1980, were linked to death certificates. Mortality rates associated with first pregnancy outcomes (delivery, miscarriage, abortion, and late abortion) were calculated. Odds ratios examining death rates based on reproductive outcomes, adjusted for age at first pregnancy and year of women's births, were also calculated. A total of 463,473 women had their first pregnancy between 1980 and 2004, of whom 2,238 died. In nearly all time periods examined, mortality rates associated with miscarriage or abortion of a first pregnancy were higher than those associated with birth. Compared to women who delivered, the age and birth year adjusted cumulative risk of death for women who had a first trimester abortion was significantly higher in all periods examined, from 180 days (OR=1.84; 1.11 <95% CI <3.71) through 10 years (1.39; 1.22 <95% CI <1.61), as was the risk for women who had abortions after 12 weeks from one year (OR=4.31; 2.18 <95% CI <8.54) through 10 years (OR=2.41; 1.56 <95% CI <2.41). For women who miscarried, the risk was significantly higher for cumulative deaths through 4 years (OR=1.75; 1.34 <95% CI <2.27) and at 10 years (OR=1.48; 1.18 <95% CI <1.85). Compared to women who delivered, women who had an early or late abortion had significantly higher mortality rates within 1 through 10 years. A lesser effect may also be present

  5. Biology and Population Dynamics of Mercetaspis halli (Green on Almond and Peach Trees in Saman Region, Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province

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    N. Kianpour

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pest and disease problem with the extension of fruit orchards, becomes a serious and restricted factor for orchard growers. Most of the scale insect of cold region fruit trees in Iran belongto family Diaspididae. One of the most important pests in the fruit orchards of Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province are scale insects. Hall scale, Mercetaspis halli (Green (Hemiptera: Diaspididae , which is armoured scale, is known as a primarily pest of stone fruits. They are the most prevalent pests on trees mostly on Almond and Nectarine . In Iran, this pest is reported in the regions such as Khorasan, Marcazi, Semnan on Cherry, Almond and Apricot trees . Rajabi also reported the pest in Tehran, Esfahan, Yazd, Kermanshah, Fars and Kerman province on apricot, peach, cherry trees . Moghaddam in 2004 reported the pest distribution in Fars, Isfahan, Kerman, Sistan and Baluchestan on almond, peach and pistacia. Monthly abundance monitoring of M. halli, which was conducted by Berlinger et al in 1996 , indicated that adult population had three generations per year. From the ecological and biological aspects, no enough information is available in Iran about M. halli scale. Thus, the aim of this research was to investigate aspects of the biology and ecology and seasonal changes of M. halli on Almond and peach trees to clarify the effectiveness of nonchemical management strategy. Materials and Methods: A field study carried out by weekly sampling of different growth stages of M. halli (egg, nymph, male and female on twigs in two the Almond and the Peach orchards in Saman restrict in Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province. Different growth stages of armoured scales (egg, nymph, male and female were counted and its population seasonal changes were studied. The population density was determined and compared on different twigs with different ages. The period for ovoviviparously and emergence of 1st and 2nd nymphal instars and matured insects were estimated

  6. The Effect of Obesity on Pregnancy and its Outcome in the Population of Oman, Seeb Province

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    Fatma M. Al-Hakmani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The World Health Organization estimated that in 2011 worldwide 1.6 billion adults were overweight, and 400 million were obese. The obesity epidemic is a documented phenomenon and Oman is no exception. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of obesity on pregnancy and its prenatal and neonatal outcomes. Methods: A prospective cohort study was carried out among pregnant Omani women attending antenatal clinics in their first trimester in the Seeb province of Muscat, Oman. Results: A total of 700 pregnant women were enrolled in the study and were categorized according to their body mass index: 245 (35% were normal weight, 217 (31% were overweight, and 238 (34% were obese. The relative risk (RR of cesarean section among obese women compared to women of normal weight was 2.1 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.2–3.2 and of overweight women was 1.4 (95% CI 0.9–2.3. The risk of elective cesarean section increased to 7.5 (95% CI 1.7–32.8 in obese women and was statistically significant in the obese group. In this study, 100 women (15.7% developed gestational diabetes (11.8% of normal weight women, 17.8% of overweight women, and 17.9% of obese women. Miscarriages were more common among obese women 11.9% (n = 27 compared to the normal weight and overweight groups (6.7% and 9.4%, respectively. There was a weak yet statistically significant correlation between birth weight and body mass index. The risk of macrosomia was significantly higher in obese women compared to normal weight women. To evaluate the sensitivity of the oral glucose challenge test (OGCT, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT was measured in 203 participants (29% who had a normal OGCT result. It was found that 14.5% of overweight women and 13.5% of normal weight women had an abnormal OGTT result even when their OGCT result was normal.  Conclusions: Obesity is associated with an increased risk of cesarean section (especially elective cesarean, gestational

  7. Pregnancy outcomes in liver transplant patients, a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Sarah; Czuzoj-Shulman, Nicholas; Spence, Andrea R; Mishkin, Daniel S; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2017-02-01

    To determine the incidence of pregnancy in liver transplant (LT) patients in a large population-based cohort and to determine the maternal and fetal risks associated with these pregnancies. We conducted an age-matched cohort study using the US Healthcare and Utilization project-Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2003-2011. We used unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for baseline characteristics, to estimate the likelihood of common obstetric complications in the LT group compared with age-matched nontransplant patients. There were 7 288 712 deliveries and an estimated incidence of 2.1 LTs/100 000 deliveries over the nine-year study period. LT patients had higher rates of maternal complications including hypertensive disorders (OR 6.5, 95% CI: 4.4-9.5), gestational diabetes (OR 1.9, 95% CI: 1.0-3.5), anemia (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 2.1-4.9), thrombocytopenia (OR 27.5, 95% CI: 12.7-59.8) and genitourinary tract infections (OR 4.2, 95% CI: 1.8-9.8). Deliveries among women with LT had higher risks of cesarean section (OR 2.9, 95% CI: 2.0-4.1), postpartum hemorrhage (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.7-6.2) and blood transfusion (OR 18.7, 95% CI: 8.5-41.0). Fetal complications in LT patients included preterm delivery (OR 4.7, 95% CI: 3.2-7.0), intrauterine growth restriction (OR 4.1, 95% CI: 2.1-7.7) and congenital anomalies (OR 6.0, 95% CI: 1.1-32.0). Although pregnancies in LT recipients are feasible, they are associated with a high rate of maternal and fetal morbidities. Close antenatal surveillance is recommended.

  8. Evaluation of a complex, population-based injury claims management intervention for improving injury outcomes: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, Alex; Gabbe, Belinda; Fitzharris, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Injuries resulting from road traffic crashes are a substantial cause of disability and death worldwide. Injured persons receiving compensation have poorer recovery and return to work than those with non-compensable injury. Case or claims management is a critical component of injury compensation systems, and there is now evidence that claims management can have powerful positive impacts on recovery, but can also impede recovery or exacerbate mental health concerns in some injured people. This study seeks to evaluate the impact of a population-based injury claims management intervention in the State of Victoria, Australia, on the health of those injured in motor vehicle crashes, their experience of the compensation process, and the financial viability of the compensation system. Methods and analysis Evaluation of this complex intervention involves a series of linked but stand-alone research projects to assess the anticipated process changes, impacts and outcomes of the intervention over a 5-year time frame. Linkage and analysis of routine administrative and health system data is supplemented with a series of primary studies collecting new information. Additionally, a series of ‘action’ research projects will be undertaken to inform the implementation of the intervention. A program logic model designed by the state government Transport Accident Commission in conjunction with the research team provides the evaluation framework. Ethics and dissemination Relatively few studies have comprehensively examined the impact of compensation system processes on the health of injured persons, their satisfaction with systems processes, and impacts on the financial performance of the compensation scheme itself. The wholesale, population-based transformation of an injury claims management model is a rare opportunity to document impacts of system-level policy change on outcomes of injured persons. Findings will contribute to the evidence base of information on the

  9. Patterns of care and outcomes in adolescent and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Lori; Alvarez, Elysia; Lichtensztajn, Daphne; Abrahão, Renata; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Keegan, Theresa

    2018-04-24

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs, 15-39 years) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represent a heterogeneous population who receive care in pediatric or adult cancer settings. Using the California Cancer Registry, we describe AYA ALL patterns of care and outcomes over the past decade. Sociodemographics, treatment location, and front-line therapies administered to AYAs diagnosed with ALL between 2004 and 2014 were obtained. Cox regression models evaluated associations between ALL setting and regimen and overall survival (OS) and leukemia-specific survival (LSS) for the entire cohort, younger AYA (<25 years), and AYAs treated in the adult cancer setting only. Of 1473 cases, 67.7% were treated in an adult setting; of these, 24.8% received a pediatric ALL regimen and 40.7% were treated at a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated center. In multivariable analyses, front-line treatment in a pediatric (vs adult) setting (OS HR = 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.76; LSS HR = 0.51, 95% CI, 0.35-0.74) and at an NCI/Children's Oncology Group (COG) center (OS HR = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.66-0.96; LSS HR = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.65-0.97) were associated with significantly superior survival. Results were similar when analyses were limited to younger AYAs. Outcomes for AYAs treated in an adult setting did not differ following front-line pediatric or adult ALL regimens. Our population-level findings demonstrate that two-thirds of AYAs with newly diagnosed ALL are treated in an adult cancer setting, with the majority receiving care in community settings. Given the potential survival benefits, front-line treatment of AYA ALL at pediatric and/or NCI/COG-designated cancer centers should be considered. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Clinical Characteristics, Risk Factors, and Outcomes Associated With Neonatal Hemorrhagic Stroke: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Lauran; Dewey, Deborah; Letourneau, Nicole; Kaplan, Bonnie J; Chaput, Kathleen; Gallagher, Clare; Hodge, Jacquie; Floer, Amalia; Kirton, Adam

    2017-03-01

    Hemorrhage into the brain of term newborns often results in major injury and lifelong disability. The clinical epidemiology of neonatal hemorrhagic stroke (NHS) remains undefined, hindering the development of strategies to improve outcomes. To characterize the incidence, types, presentations, associated factors, and outcomes of neonatal hemorrhagic stroke. Population-based, nested case-control study. The Alberta Perinatal Stroke Project, a provincial registry, ascertained NHS cases using exhaustive diagnostic code searching (1992-2010, >2500 medical record reviews). Prospective cases were captured through the Calgary Pediatric Stroke Program (2007-2014). Participants included term neonates with magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed NHS including primary and secondary intracerebral hemorrhage, hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic injury, and presumed perinatal hemorrhagic stroke. Control infants with common data were recruited from a population-based study (4 to 1 ratio). Infants with NHS underwent structured medical record review using data-capture forms and blinded scoring of neuroimaging. Clinical risk factor common data elements were explored using logistic regression. Provincial live births were obtained from Statistics Canada. Outcomes were extrapolated to the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure. We identified 86 cases: 51 infants (59%) with NHS, of which 32 (67%) were idiopathic, 30 (35%) were hemorrhagic transformation of primary ischemic injuries (14 with neonatal cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, 11 with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, and 5 with neonatal arterial ischemic stroke), and 5 were presumed perinatal hemorrhagic stroke. Sixty-two percent were male. Incidence of pure NHS was 1 in 9500 live births and 1 in 6300 for all forms. Most presented in the first week of life with seizures and encephalopathy. Acute neurosurgical intervention was rare (3 of 86 total cases; 3.5%). Temporal lobe was the most common NHS location (16 of 51 pure NHS cases; 31%). A

  11. Can Erythrocytes Transmit Oxidative Stress Beyond the Lungs? An Adverse Outcome Pathway for the Cardiovascular Effects of Air Pollution.

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    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are systems biology roadmaps with potential utility in xenobiotic exposure risk assessment. AOPs connect molecular initiating events (MIEs) to population-level adverse outcomes (AOs) via cellular, organ, and organism key events (KE) and KE relatio...

  12. Detecting Lung and Colorectal Cancer Recurrence Using Structured Clinical/Administrative Data to Enable Outcomes Research and Population Health Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Michael J; Uno, Hajime; Cronin, Angel M; Carroll, Nikki M; Hornbrook, Mark C; Ritzwoller, Debra

    2017-12-01

    Recurrent cancer is common, costly, and lethal, yet we know little about it in community-based populations. Electronic health records and tumor registries contain vast amounts of data regarding community-based patients, but usually lack recurrence status. Existing algorithms that use structured data to detect recurrence have limitations. We developed algorithms to detect the presence and timing of recurrence after definitive therapy for stages I-III lung and colorectal cancer using 2 data sources that contain a widely available type of structured data (claims or electronic health record encounters) linked to gold-standard recurrence status: Medicare claims linked to the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance study, and the Cancer Research Network Virtual Data Warehouse linked to registry data. Twelve potential indicators of recurrence were used to develop separate models for each cancer in each data source. Detection models maximized area under the ROC curve (AUC); timing models minimized average absolute error. Algorithms were compared by cancer type/data source, and contrasted with an existing binary detection rule. Detection model AUCs (>0.92) exceeded existing prediction rules. Timing models yielded absolute prediction errors that were small relative to follow-up time (differences by cancer type and dataset challenged efforts to create 1 common algorithm for all scenarios. Valid and reliable detection of recurrence using big data is feasible. These tools will enable extensive, novel research on quality, effectiveness, and outcomes for lung and colorectal cancer patients and those who develop recurrence.

  13. Early Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation after penetrating keratoplasty leads to better outcomes in an Asian population with preexisting glaucoma.

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    Ming-Cheng Tai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the efficacy of Ahmed Glaucoma Valve (AGV surgery and the optimal interval between penetrating keratoplasty (PKP and AGV implantation in a population of Asian patients with preexisting glaucoma who underwent PKP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In total, 45 eyes of 45 patients were included in this retrospective chart review. The final intraocular pressures (IOPs, graft survival rate, and changes in visual acuity were assessed to evaluate the outcomes of AGV implantations in eyes in which AGV implantation occurred within 1 month of post-PKP IOP elevation (Group 1 and in eyes in which AGV implantation took place more than 1 month after the post-PKP IOP evaluation (Group 2. Factors that were associated with graft failure were analyzed, and the overall patterns of complications were reviewed. By their final follow-up visits, 58% of the patients had been successfully treated for glaucoma. After the operation, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to graft survival (p = 0.98, but significant differences for IOP control (p = 0.049 and the maintenance of visual acuity (VA (p21 mm Hg. The most common surgical complication, aside from graft failure, was hyphema. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Early AGV implantation results in a higher probability of AGV survival and a better VA outcome without increasing the risk of corneal graft failure as a result of post-PKP glaucoma drainage tube implantation.

  14. Early Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implantation after Penetrating Keratoplasty Leads to Better Outcomes in an Asian Population with Preexisting Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yi-Hao; Cheng, Jen-Hao; Liang, Chang-Min; Chen, Jiann-Torng; Chen, Ching-Long; Lu, Da-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficacy of Ahmed Glaucoma Valve (AGV) surgery and the optimal interval between penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) and AGV implantation in a population of Asian patients with preexisting glaucoma who underwent PKP. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 45 eyes of 45 patients were included in this retrospective chart review. The final intraocular pressures (IOPs), graft survival rate, and changes in visual acuity were assessed to evaluate the outcomes of AGV implantations in eyes in which AGV implantation occurred within 1 month of post-PKP IOP elevation (Group 1) and in eyes in which AGV implantation took place more than 1 month after the post-PKP IOP evaluation (Group 2). Factors that were associated with graft failure were analyzed, and the overall patterns of complications were reviewed. By their final follow-up visits, 58% of the patients had been successfully treated for glaucoma. After the operation, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to graft survival (p = 0.98), but significant differences for IOP control (p = 0.049) and the maintenance of visual acuity (VA) (pglaucoma, a history of previous PKP, and a preoperative IOP that was >21 mm Hg. The most common surgical complication, aside from graft failure, was hyphema. Conclusions/Significance Early AGV implantation results in a higher probability of AGV survival and a better VA outcome without increasing the risk of corneal graft failure as a result of post-PKP glaucoma drainage tube implantation. PMID:22629464

  15. Does decreased access to emergency departments affect patient outcomes? Analysis of acute myocardial infarction population 1996-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Chu; Hsia, Renee Y

    2012-02-01

    We analyze whether decreased emergency department (ED) access results in adverse patient outcomes or changes in the patient health profile for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We merge Medicare claims, American Hospital Association annual surveys, Medicare hospital cost reports, and location information for 1995-2005. We define four ED access change categories and estimate a ZIP Code fixed-effects regression models on the following AMI outcomes: mortality rates, age, and probability of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) on day of admission. We find a small increase in 30-day to 1-year mortality rates among patients in communities that experience a 30-minute increases, we find a substantial increase in long-term mortality rates, a shift to younger ages (suggesting that older patients die en route), and a higher probability of immediate PTCA. Most of the adverse effects disappear after the transition years. Deterioration in geographic access to ED affects a small segment of the population, and most adverse effects are transitory. Policy planners can minimize the adverse effects by providing assistance to ensure adequate capacity of remaining EDs, and facilitating the realignment of health care resources during the critical transition periods. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  16. Genetic Variations of COL4A1 Gene and Intracerebral Hemorrhage Outcome: A Cohort Study in a Chinese Han Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chao; Lin, Sen; Yang, Jie; He, Sha; Li, Hao; Liu, Ming; You, Chao

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms or haplotypes of COL4A1 gene and the outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In our study, 181 patients with hypertensive ICH were enrolled and followed up at 3 and 6 months. Outcome data included any cause of death and disability. Genomic DNA was extracted by DNA extraction kit, and the 6 single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping of the COL4A1 gene was detected through MassARRAY Analyzer. Unphased 3.1.4 and SPSS 19.0 were used to analyze the association between alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes of the COL4A1 gene and the outcomes of ICH. Of the 181 patients with hypertensive ICH, 12 were lost in follow-up, which accounted for 6.6%. Our association analysis showed that the rs532625 AA genotype of the COL4A1 gene may increase risk of disability at 3 months; the rs532625 A allele and AA genotype were association factors of the risk of disability at 6 months; the rs532625 AA genotype was an association factor of the risk of death/disability at 6 months. After adjusting for gender, age, coma, and severe neurologic deficits, only the rs532625 AA genotype was independently associated with the risk of disability at 3 and 6 months and the risk of death/disability at 6 months. Our study found that the rs532625 AA genotype in the COL4A1 gene was independently associated with the risk of disability at 3 and 6 months and death/disability at 6 months in a Chinese Han population. These conclusions need to be verified in future studies with larger samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Somatization is associated with worse outcome in a chiropractic patient population with neck pain and low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailliet, L; Rubinstein, S M; Knol, D; van Tulder, M W; de Vet, H C W

    2016-02-01

    To determine if psychosocial factors are associated with outcome in patients with neck pain or low back pain. In a prospective, multi-center chiropractic practice-based cohort study in Belgium and The Netherlands, 917 patients, of which 326 with neck pain and 591 with low back pain, completed self-administered questionnaires at baseline, following the second visit, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Psychosocial factors assessed at baseline were: distress, depression, anxiety and somatization via the Four Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire, patient's beliefs regarding the effect of physical activity and work on their complaint via the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, and social support via the Feij social support scale. Primary outcome measures were perceived recovery, pain intensity, and functional status which was measured with the Neck Disability Index and Oswestry Disability Index. A univariable regression analysis to estimate the relation between each psychological variable and outcome was followed by a multivariable multilevel regression analysis. There were no differences in baseline patient characteristics between the patient population from Belgium and the Netherlands. Somatization scores are consistently associated with perceived recovery, functional status and pain for both neck pain and low-back pain. Depression was associated with poorer functioning in patients with LBP. There was a small association between fear and function and pain for patients with neck pain or low-back pain. Somatization was the only variable consistently found to be associated with diminished perceived recovery, higher degree of neck or low back disability, and increased neck or low back pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Lausanne cohort Lc65+: a population-based prospective study of the manifestations, determinants and outcomes of frailty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodondi Nicolas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frailty is a relatively new geriatric concept referring to an increased vulnerability to stressors. Various definitions have been proposed, as well as a range of multidimensional instruments for its measurement. More recently, a frailty phenotype that predicts a range of adverse outcomes has been described. Understanding frailty is a particular challenge both from a clinical and a public health perspective because it may be a reversible precursor of functional dependence. The Lausanne cohort Lc65+ is a longitudinal study specifically designed to investigate the manifestations of frailty from its first signs in the youngest old, identify medical and psychosocial determinants, and describe its evolution and related outcomes. Methods/Design The Lc65+ cohort was launched in 2004 with the random selection of 3054 eligible individuals aged 65 to 70 (birth year 1934–1938 in the non-institutionalized population of Lausanne (Switzerland. The baseline data collection was completed among 1422 participants in 2004–2005 through questionnaires, examination and performance tests. It comprised a wide range of medical and psychosocial dimensions, including a life course history of adverse events. Outcomes measures comprise subjective health, limitations in activities of daily living, mobility impairments, development of medical conditions or chronic health problems, falls, institutionalization, health services utilization, and death. Two additional random samples of 65–70 years old subjects will be surveyed in 2009 (birth year 1939–1943 and in 2014 (birth year 1944–1948. Discussion The Lc65+ study focuses on the sequence "Determinants → Components → Consequences" of frailty. It currently provides information on health in the youngest old and will allow comparisons to be made between the profiles of aging individuals born before, during and at the end of the Second World War.

  19. Juvenile myasthenia gravis in Norway: Clinical characteristics, treatment, and long-term outcome in a nationwide population-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popperud, T H; Boldingh, M I; Rasmussen, M; Kerty, E

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to characterize juvenile myasthenia gravis in a national population-based cohort in Norway, and to evaluate long-term outcome and potential differences correlated with prepubertal versus postpubertal disease onset. Patients with onset of myasthenia gravis aged ≤18 years were identified through multiple strategies. Retrospective clinical data were collected by means of medical charts. All patients had an updated clinical examination. Cases were divided into prepubertal and postpubertal onset using age 12 years as the cut off. In total, 75 patients were identified of whom 63 were included in the study: 21 in the prepubertal and 42 in the postpubertal onset group. There was a female preponderance in both groups. In total, 59% presented with ocular symptoms, but the great majority of patients in both groups generalized during the two first years of the disease. Myasthenic crisis was more frequent in the prepubertal onset group. All patients were initially treated with pyridostigmine, 26 with steroids, and 17 with other immunosuppressive treatment. The postpubertal cases were more often treated with immunosuppressive therapy. Fifty patients (79%) underwent thymectomy. The general outcome was favourable: 57% became asymptomatic and only four subjects failed to attain clinical improvement. One-third had at least one additional autoimmune disease. Despite frequent symptom generalization and a subgroup of prepubertal onset with severe disease, the long-term outcome was good, especially in the thymectomized prepubertal onset group. Polyautoimmunity occurred in both groups in one-third. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative chemistry and biological properties of the solid residues from hydrodistillation of Spanish populations of Rosmarinus officinalis L.

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    Sánchez-Vioque, R.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid residues from the hydrodistillation of selected Spanish populations of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. have been analyzed for their polyphenol composition, and antioxidant and bioplaguicide activities. The objective was to evaluate and select the most suitable plant materials as sources of natural antioxidants and crop protectants. Total polyphenol content and polyphenol composition of rosemary populations were very dependent on the growth location: populations from Aranjuez showed a higher content of total polyphenols and were richer in rosmarinic acid as compared with their equivalent populations from Cuenca, whereas these latter were characterized by an overall higher content in genkwanin and carnosol. Most of the antioxidant activities were highly correlated with the total content of polyphenols although some polyphenols like carnosic acid and carnosol seemed to favor such activities. The extracts from R. officinalis were strong antifeedants against Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say and moderate against Spodoptera littoralis Boisd and Myzus persicae Sulzer, according to their feeding ecologies. The biological effects of the active samples cannot be accounted by their chemical composition, suggesting additive or synergistic effects. Both the phytotoxic and stimulating effects on Lactuca sativa L., and Lolium perenne L. leaf and/or root growth were observed.Se ha analizado la composición en polifenoles y las actividades antioxidante y bioplaguicida de los residuos sólidos procedentes de la hidrodestilación de poblaciones seleccionadas de romero (Rosmarinus officinalis L.. El objetivo fue evaluar y seleccionar los materiales vegetales más adecuados como fuente de antioxidantes y bioplaguicidas naturales. El contenido total y la composición en polifenoles de las poblaciones de romero dependieron mucho de la localidad de cultivo: las poblaciones de Aranjuez mostraron un mayor contenido en polifenoles y fueron más ricas en

  1. Zonal Distribution and Population Biology of Ilyoplax frater (Brachyura: Ocypodoidea: Dotillidae in a Coastal Mudflat of Pakistan

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    Noor Us SAHER, Naureen Aziz QURESHI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Zonal distribution and population biology of Ilyoplax frater were studied in a mangrove mudflat area of Pakistan. The crabs were collected from Korangi creek through transect and quadrat method from low tide level to high tide level. Two transects were delimited in a mangrove area of Korangi creek (24o79’N/ 67o20’E. On each transect, three 0.25 m quadrats were sampled at three tidal levels on a monthly basis during low tide periods from March 2001 to February 2002. A total of 1124 crabs were obtained, of which 482 were males and 642 were females. Density of crabs varied between 0 and 90 /m2. The density and size distribution varied and showed significant differences from low to high tide level, and were positively correlated with the percent moisture, percent organic matter and sediment grain size. The carapace width (CW ranged from 2.5 to 11.5 mm for male and 2.5 to 11.0 mm for female and was not significantly different. The overall sex ratio did not differ significantly from the expected 1:1 throughout the year in small crabs but was significantly different in adult crabs (c2 = 49.73 with more male crabs. Size frequency distribution showed recruitment of juvenile crabs (< 4 mm nearly throughout the year except during June and July. Presence of ovigerous females in all months with seasonal peaks in September, October, December and May indicates seasonal continuous breeding. Weight of egg mass increases with weight of ovigerous females and show positive linear relationship. The estimated mean diameter of egg was 2.83+ 0.25 mm, and the average number of eggs was 3065+ 902 [Current Zoology 56(2: 244–251, 2010].

  2. Influence of arterial hypertension, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors on ALS outcome: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglia, Cristina; Calvo, Andrea; Canosa, Antonio; Bertuzzo, Davide; Cugnasco, Paolo; Solero, Luca; Grassano, Maurizio; Bersano, Enrica; Cammarosano, Stefania; Manera, Umberto; Pisano, Fabrizio; Mazzini, Letizia; Dalla Vecchia, Laura A; Mora, Gabriele; Chiò, Adriano

    2017-11-01

    To assess the prognostic influence of pre-morbid type 2 diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and cardiovascular (CV) risk profile on ALS phenotype and outcome in a population-based cohort of Italian patients. A total of 650 ALS patients from the Piemonte/Valle d'Aosta Register for ALS, incident in the 2007-2011 period, were recruited. Information about premorbid presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension was collected at the time of diagnosis. Patients' CV risk profile was calculated according to the Joint British Societies' guidelines on prevention of cardiovascular disease in clinical practice (JBS2). At the univariate analysis, the presence of pre-morbid arterial hypertension was associated with a higher age at onset of ALS and a shorter survival, and patients with a high CV risk profile had a worse prognosis than those with a low CV risk profile. The Cox multivariable analysis did not confirm such findings. Type 2 diabetes mellitus did not modify either the phenotype or the prognosis of ALS patients. This study performed on a large population-based cohort of ALS patients has demonstrated that arterial hypertension, type 2 diabetes and CV risk factors, calculated using the Framingham equation, do not influence ALS phenotype and prognosis.

  3. Biases in detection of apparent "weekend effect" on outcome with administrative coding data: population based study of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linxin; Rothwell, Peter M

    2016-05-16

     To determine the accuracy of coding of admissions for stroke on weekdays versus weekends and any impact on apparent outcome.  Prospective population based stroke incidence study and a scoping review of previous studies of weekend effects in stroke.  Primary and secondary care of all individuals registered with nine general practices in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom (OXVASC, the Oxford Vascular Study).  All patients with clinically confirmed acute stroke in OXVASC identified with multiple overlapping methods of ascertainment in 2002-14 versus all acute stroke admissions identified by hospital diagnostic and mortality coding alone during the same period.  Accuracy of administrative coding data for all patients with confirmed stroke admitted to hospital in OXVASC. Difference between rates of "false positive" or "false negative" coding for weekday and weekend admissions. Impact of inaccurate coding on apparent case fatality at 30 days in weekday versus weekend admissions. Weekend effects on outcomes in patients with confirmed stroke admitted to hospital in OXVASC and impacts of other potential biases compared with those in the scoping review.  Among 92 728 study population, 2373 episodes of acute stroke were ascertained in OXVASC, of which 826 (34.8%) mainly minor events were managed without hospital admission, 60 (2.5%) occurred out of the area or abroad, and 195 (8.2%) occurred in hospital during an admission for a different reason. Of 1292 local hospital admissions for acute stroke, 973 (75.3%) were correctly identified by administrative coding. There was no bias in distribution of weekend versus weekday admission of the 319 strokes missed by coding. Of 1693 admissions for stroke identified by coding, 1055 (62.3%) were confirmed to be acute strokes after case adjudication. Among the 638 false positive coded cases, patients were more likely to be admitted on weekdays than at weekends (536 (41.0%) v 102 (26.5%); Pcoded acute stroke admissions and false positive

  4. A population based eye survey of older adults in Tirunelveli district of south India: blindness, cataract surgery, and visual outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmalan, P K; Thulasiraj, R D; Maneksha, V; Rahmathullah, R; Ramakrishnan, R; Padmavathi, A; Munoz, S R; Ellwein, L B

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To assess the prevalence of vision impairment, blindness, and cataract surgery and to evaluate visual acuity outcomes after cataract surgery in a south Indian population. Methods: Cluster sampling was used to randomly select a cross sectional sample of people ≥50 years of age living in the Tirunelveli district of south India. Eligible subjects in 28 clusters were enumerated through a door to door household survey. Visual acuity measurements and ocular examinations were performed at a selected site within each of the clusters in early 2000. The principal cause of visual impairment was identified for eyes with presenting visual acuity India) was found in 11.0%, and in 4.6% with best correction. Presenting blindness was associated with older age, female sex, and illiteracy. Cataract was the principal cause of blindness in at least one eye in 70.6% of blind people. The prevalence of cataract surgery was 11.8%—with an estimated 56.5% of the cataract blind already operated on. Surgical coverage was inversely associated with illiteracy and with female sex in rural areas. Within the cataract operated sample, 31.7% had presenting visual acuity ≥6/18 in both eyes and 11.8% were <6/60; 40% were bilaterally operated on, with 63% pseudophakic. Presenting vision was <6/60 in 40.7% of aphakic eyes and in 5.1% of pseudophakic eyes; with best correction the percentages were 17.6% and 3.7%, respectively. Refractive error, including uncorrected aphakia, was the main cause of visual impairment in cataract operated eyes. Vision <6/18 was associated with cataract surgery in government, as opposed to that in non-governmental/private facilities. Age, sex, literacy, and area of residence were not predictors of visual outcomes. Conclusion: Treatable blindness, particularly that associated with cataract and refractive error, remains a significant problem among older adults in south Indian populations, especially in females, the illiterate, and those living in rural areas. Further

  5. Epidemiology of Toxoplasma and CMV serology and of GBS colonization in pregnancy and neonatal outcome in a Sicilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccio, Giuseppe; Cajozzo, Cinzia; Canduscio, Laura Antonella; Cino, Lucia; Romano, Amelia; Schimmenti, Maria Gabriella; Giuffrè, Mario; Corsello, Giovanni

    2014-02-22

    Aim of our study is to analyze the immunological status in pregnancy for two main TORCH agents, Toxoplasma and Cytomegalovirus (CMV), and the results of group B streptococcus (GBS) screening, assessing the risk for congenital infection in a population from Palermo, Italy. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of all inborn live newborns who were born in our division during 2012, gathering information about the mother, the pregnancy and neonatal hospitalization at birth. Whenever data were available, we categorized the serologic status of the mothers for Toxoplasma and CMV. We also considered the results of rectal and vaginal swabs for GBS. We compared the results in Italian and immigrant mothers. The neonatal outcome was evaluated in all cases at risk. Prevalence of anti-Toxo IgG antibodies was 17.97%, and was significantly higher in immigrant women (30% vs 16.4% in Italian women; p = 0.0008). Prevalence of anti-CMV IgG antibodies was 65.87%. Again, it was significantly higher in immigrant women (91.4% vs 62.5%, p = 3.31e-08). We compared those data with a previous study performed in our hospital in 2005-2006, and found that the prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma and anti-CMV antibodies in our population has remained stable, both in the immigrant and in the local population. Seroconversion rates and neonatal infections were rare: no seroconversions were observed for Toxoplasma, 4 seroconversions for CMV. One neonatal Toxoplasma infection and two neonatal CMV infections were documented. In some cases with dubious patterns or probable persistence of IgM, we performed additional tests and follow-up. Vaginal and rectal swabs were positive for GBS in 7.98% of cases, with no significant difference between the Italian and the immigrant population. No GBS neonatal sepsis was documented. The prevalence of Toxoplasma IgG antibodies in pregnant women was low in our population, if compared with European countries and with other parts of Italy, and is significantly

  6. Short-term influence of cataract surgery on circadian biological rhythm and related health outcomes (CLOCK-IOL trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Keigo; Obayashi, Kenji; Nishi, Tomo; Miyata, Kimie; Maruoka, Shinji; Ueda, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Taiji; Matsuura, Toyoaki; Tone, Nobuhiro; Ogata, Nahoko; Kurumatani, Norio

    2014-12-29

    Light information is the most important cue of circadian rhythm which synchronizes biological rhythm with external environment. Circadian misalignment of biological rhythm and external environment is associated with increased risk of depression, insomnia, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Increased light transmission by cataract surgery may improve circadian misalignment and related health outcomes. Although some observational studies have shown improvement of depression and insomnia after cataract surgery, randomized controlled trials are lacking. We will conduct a parallel-group, assessor-blinded, simple randomized controlled study comparing a cataract surgery group at three months after surgery with a control group to determine whether cataract surgery improves depressive symptoms, sleep quality, body mass regulation, and glucose and lipid metabolism. We will recruit patients who are aged 60 years and over, scheduled to receive their first cataract surgery, and have grade 2 or higher nuclear opacification as defined by the lens opacities classification system III. Exclusion criteria will be patients with major depression, severe corneal opacity, severe glaucoma, vitreous haemorrhage, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, macular oedema, age-related macular degeneration, and patients needing immediate or combined cataract surgery. After baseline participants will be randomized to two groups. Outcomes will be measured at three months after surgery among the intervention group, and three months after baseline among the control group. We will assess depressive symptoms as a primary outcome, using the short version geriatric depression scale (GDS-15). Secondary outcomes will be subjective and actigraph-measured sleep quality, sleepiness, glycated haemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose and triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, body mass index, abdominal circumference, circadian rhythms of physical

  7. Active Learning outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Siwicki, Kathleen K.

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students' engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker…

  8. The 2008-2009 recession and alcohol outcomes: differential exposure and vulnerability for Black and Latino populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemore, Sarah E; Mulia, Nina; Jones-Webb, Rhonda J; Liu, Huiguo; Schmidt, Laura

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether race/ethnicity was related to exposure to acute economic losses in the 2008-2009 recession, even accounting for individual-level and geographic variables, and whether it influenced associations between economic losses and drinking patterns and problems. Data were from the 2010 National Alcohol Survey (N = 5,382). Surveys assessed both severe losses (i.e., job and housing loss) and moderate losses (i.e., reduced hours/pay and trouble paying the rent/mortgage) attributed to the 2008-2009 recession. Alcohol outcomes included total annual volume, monthly drunkenness, drinking consequences, and alcohol dependence (based on criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition). Compared with Whites, Blacks reported significantly greater exposure to job loss and trouble paying the rent/mortgage, and Latinos reported greater exposure to all economic losses. However, only Black-White differences were robust in multivariate analyses. Interaction tests suggested that associations between exposure to economic loss and alcohol problems were stronger among Blacks than Whites. Given severe (vs. no) loss, Blacks had about 13 times the odds of both two or more drinking consequences and alcohol dependence, whereas the corresponding odds ratios for Whites were less than 3. Conversely, associations between economic loss and alcohol outcomes were weak and ambiguous among Latinos. Results suggest greater exposure to economic loss for both Blacks and Latinos (vs. Whites) and that the Black population may be particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of economic hardship on the development and/or maintenance of alcohol problems. Findings extend the economic literature and signal policy makers and service providers that Blacks and Latinos may be at special risk during economic downturns.

  9. Real-world data of 197 patients treated with ulipristal acetate for uterine fibroids: PREMYA study French population main outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, H; Descamps, P; Koskas, M; Lopès, P; Brun, J L; Darai, E; Agostini, A

    2017-09-01

    To characterize and describe treatment with ulipristal acetate (UPA) in a preoperative setting and to evaluate the safety, effectiveness, and Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) outcomes in a French population treated according to standard clinical practice. Multicentre, prospective, non-interventional study (PREMYA) of patients diagnosed with moderate to severe symptoms of uterine fibroids and undergoing a preoperative treatment with UPA 5mg (Esmya ® ). Patients were followed for a total of 15months (3months UPA treatment and 12months after). Data were collected approximatively every 3months according to centre usual visit schedule. A total of 206 women were enrolled in France, of whom 197 were found to be eligible for data analysis. Physicians' assessments of patients' overall symptomatic changes, as measured on the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale, indicated that 83.7% of patients were improved at end of treatment (month 3). On the patients' treatment benefit scale (PTBS), 94.7% of patients reported an improvement. These 2 measurements, pain and quality of life, remained improved after treatment cessation and during the entire period of follow-up. Only 58.4% of patients underwent surgery within the timeframe of the study follow-up of which the majority were of a conservative/minimal invasive nature. Many patients did not undergo surgery during the planned 12months follow-up period after treatment whereas all patients had an indication of surgery. All measurements of treatment outcome were markedly improved by 3 months of UPA 5mg treatment. NCT01635452. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes for hospitalisation of women with lupus during pregnancy: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-Y; Chen, Y-H; Lin, H-C; Chen, S-F; Lin, H-C

    2010-01-01

    Using a nationwide population-based dataset to examine the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with and without SLE hospitalisation during pregnancy. We identified 1,010 pregnant women who had SLE during 2001 2003 as the study cohort and 5,050 randomly selected pregnant women (five for every woman with SLE) as a comparison cohort. Conditional logistic regression analyses were performed to explore the relationship between women with and without SLE and the risk of low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, and babies small for gestational age (SGA), after adjusting for the characteristics of the infant, mother, and father. We found that there were significant differences in the risk of LBW (14.9% vs. 7.2%), preterm birth (14.4% vs. 8.5%), and SGA (28.5% vs. 17.5%) for women with SLE compared to women without. In addition, the adjusted odds of LBW, preterm birth, and SGA babies for women who had SLE during pregnancy were 6.15 (95% CI=4.15-9.13), 4.19 (95% CI=2.77-6.36), and 4.25 (95% CI=2.95-6.11) times, respectively, compared to women without any chronic illness. The adjusted odds of LBW, preterm birth, and SGA babies for women who had SLE but were not hospitalized during pregnancy were 1.80 (95% CI=1.43-2.26), 1.62 (95% CI=1.30-2.03), and 1.63 (95% CI=1.38-1.94) times, respectively, compared to unaffected mothers. We conclude that SLE can impact the pregnancy outcomes, especially if hospitalisation occurs during the pregnancy.

  11. The dynamic influence of human resources on evidence-based intervention sustainability and population outcomes: an agent-based modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Virginia R; Hoffer, Lee D; Combs, Todd B; Margaret Dolcini, M

    2018-06-05

    Sustaining evidence-based interventions (EBIs) is an ongoing challenge for dissemination and implementation science in public health and social services. Characterizing the relationship among human resource capacity within an agency and subsequent population outcomes is an important step to improving our understanding of how EBIs are sustained. Although human resource capacity and population outcomes are theoretically related, examining them over time within real-world experiments is difficult. Simulation approaches, especially agent-based models, offer advantages that complement existing methods. We used an agent-based model to examine the relationships among human resources, EBI delivery, and population outcomes by simulating provision of an EBI through a hypothetical agency and its staff. We used data from existing studies examining a widely implemented HIV prevention intervention to inform simulation design, calibration, and validity. Once we developed a baseline model, we used the model as a simulated laboratory by systematically varying three human resource variables: the number of staff positions, the staff turnover rate, and timing in training. We tracked the subsequent influence on EBI delivery and the level of population risk over time to describe the overall and dynamic relationships among these variables. Higher overall levels of human resource capacity at an agency (more positions) led to more extensive EBI delivery over time and lowered population risk earlier in time. In simulations representing the typical human resource investments, substantial influences on population risk were visible after approximately 2 years and peaked around 4 years. Human resources, especially staff positions, have an important impact on EBI sustainability and ultimately population health. A minimum level of human resources based on the context (e.g., size of the initial population and characteristics of the EBI) is likely needed for an EBI to have a meaningful impact on

  12. Uptake and outcomes of laparoscopically assisted resection for colon and rectal cancer in Australia: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Timothy A; Young, Jane M; Solomon, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials support the use of laparoscopically assisted resection for colon cancer. The evidence supporting its use in rectal cancer is weak. The purpose of this work was to investigate the uptake of laparoscopically assisted resection for colon and rectal cancer and to compare short- and long-term outcomes using population data. This was a retrospective cohort study using linked administrative health data. The study encompassed all of the public and private hospitals in New South Wales, Australia, between 2000 and 2008. A total of 27,947 patients with colon or rectal cancer undergoing surgery with curative intent were included in the study. We summarized the proportion of resections performed laparoscopically. Short-term outcomes were extended stay, 28-day readmission, 28-day emergency readmission, 30- and 90-day mortality, and 90-day readmission with pulmonary embolism or deep-vein thrombosis. Long-term outcomes were all-cause and cancer-specific death and admission with obstruction or incisional hernia repair. Laparoscopic procedures increased between 2000 and 2008 for colon (1.5%-20.7%) and rectal cancer (0.6%-15.5%). Laparoscopic procedures reduced rates of extended stay (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.49-0.72) and 28-day readmission (OR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.74-0.99) for colon cancer. For rectal cancer, laparoscopic procedures had lower rates of 28-day readmission (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.42-0.78) and 28-day emergency readmission (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.34-0.85). Laparoscopic procedures improved cancer-specific survival for rectal cancer (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.51-1.00). Survival benefits were observed for laparoscopically assisted colon resection in higher-caseload hospitals but not lower-caseload hospitals. It was not possible to identify laparoscopically assisted resections converted to open procedures because of the claims-based nature of the data. Despite increases in laparoscopically assisted resections for colon and rectal cancer, the majority

  13. Population biology and diet of the southern kingcroaker Menticirrhus americanus (Linnaeus, 1758 (Perciformes: Sciaenidae in Caraguatatuba Bay, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Turra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the spatio-temporal distribution, population biology and diet of Menticirrhus americanus in Caraguatatuba Bay. Samples were taken monthly between August 2003 and October 2004, by trawling in two previously selected areas. The northern area is more exposed to wave activity and is influenced by a river, functioning as a small estuary. In contrast, the southern area is relatively sheltered from wave energy and influenced to a lesser degree by smaller rivers. The fishes' length was measured, and the sex and gonadal stage macroscopically identified. The abundance of this species was compared between areas and among months. The diet was identified and quantified. M. americanus occurred in equal proportions in the two study areas, being most abundant in April 2004, followed by December 2003 and January 2004. The population was dominated by small immature individuals. The few individuals in maturation or mature that were captured showed no seasonal pattern of distribution. This species had a varied diet, feeding on worms (nemerteans, sipunculans and echiurans, mollusks (bivalves and cephalopods, polychaetes, crustaceans and fish. The presence of intact nematodes in the intestine suggests that these are parasites. The results demonstrated that M. americanus has a homogeneous spatial and temporal distribution in Caraguatatuba Bay, being uniformly distributed between the south and north areas as well as across the months. This species can be considered a carnivorous predator, showing a preference for consuming benthic sandy-beach species such as glycerids and other polychaetes, crustaceans, and bivalve siphons.Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a distribuição espaço-temporal, biologia populacional e dieta de Menticirrhus americanus da baía de Caraguatatuba. Foram realizadas coletas mensais entre agosto de 2003 a outubro de 2004, utilizando redes de arrasto em duas áreas previamente selecionadas. A área norte é mais expostas

  14. Establishing a National Maternal Morbidity Outcome Indicator in England: A Population-Based Study Using Routine Hospital Data.

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    Manisha Nair

    Full Text Available As maternal deaths become rarer, monitoring near-miss or severe maternal morbidity becomes important as a tool to measure changes in care quality. Many calls have been made to use routinely available hospital administration data to monitor the quality of maternity care. We investigated 1 the feasibility of developing an English Maternal Morbidity Outcome Indicator (EMMOI by reproducing an Australian indicator using routinely available hospital data, 2 the impact of modifications to the indicator to address potential data quality issues, 3 the reliability of the indicator.We used data from 6,389,066 women giving birth in England from April 2003 to March 2013 available in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES database of the Health and Social care Information centre (HSCIC. A composite indicator, EMMOI, was generated from the diagnoses and procedure codes. Rates of individual morbid events included in the EMMOI were compared with the rates in the UK reported by population-based studies.EMMOI included 26 morbid events (17 diagnosis and 9 procedures. Selection of the individual morbid events was guided by the Australian indicator and published literature for conditions associated with maternal morbidity and mortality in the UK, but was mainly driven by the quality of the routine hospital data. Comparing the rates of individual morbid events of the indicator with figures from population-based studies showed that the possibility of false positive and false negative cases cannot be ruled out.While routine English hospital data can be used to generate a composite indicator to monitor trends in maternal morbidity during childbirth, the quality and reliability of this monitoring indicator depends on the quality of the hospital data, which is currently inadequate.

  15. Understanding biological control of greenhouse whitefly with the parasitoid Encarsia formosa : from individual behaviour to population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roermund, van H.J.W.

    1995-01-01

    The greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Homoptera, Aleyrodidae), is a very common, highly polyphagous pest insect all over the world. Biological control of whiteflies with the parasitoid Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera, Aphelinidae) was already applied in the 1920s in

  16. Variations in Care Quality Outcomes of Dying People: Latent Class Analysis of an Adult National Register Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhlén, Joakim; Russell, Lara; Håkanson, Cecilia; Alvariza, Anette; Fürst, Carl Johan; Årestedt, Kristofer; Sawatzky, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Symptom relief is a key goal of palliative care. There is a need to consider complexities in symptom relief patterns for groups of people to understand and evaluate symptom relief as an indicator of quality of care at end of life. The aims of this study were to distinguish classes of patients who have different symptom relief patterns during the last week of life and to identify predictors of these classes in an adult register population. In a cross-sectional retrospective design, data were used from 87,026 decedents with expected deaths registered in the Swedish Register of Palliative Care in 2011 and 2012. Study variables were structured into patient characteristics, and processes and outcomes of quality of care. A latent class analysis was used to identify symptom relief patterns. Multivariate multinomial regression analyses were used to identify predictors of class membership. Five latent classes were generated: "relieved pain," "relieved pain and rattles," "relieved pain and anxiety," "partly relieved shortness of breath, rattles and anxiety," and "partly relieved pain, anxiety and confusion." Important predictors of class membership were age, sex, cause of death, and having someone present at death, individual prescriptions as needed (PRN) and expert consultations. Interindividual variability and complexity in symptom relief patterns may inform quality of care and its evaluation for dying people across care settings. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 59 eyes with endogenous endophthalmitis- causes, outcomes and mortality in a Danish population between 2000 and 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum, Søren Solborg; la Cour, Morten

    2017-10-01

    To study the epidemiology of patients with endogenous endophthalmitis in Denmark. Retrospective and prospective case series of 59 eyes in patients with endogenous endophthalmitis in Denmark between 2000 and 2016. The age of the patients ranged from 28 to 90 years with a median of 66 years. Sixty-two percent of the eyes had a final VA (visual acuity) ≤ 0.1 while 8% had a final VA ≥ 1.0. Positive cultures were obtained in 51% of the cases from the blood and in 43% from the vitreous. Streptococcus species and Staphylococcus aureus were the most commonly identified microorganisms. The sources of endogenous endophthalmitis were diverse and were not identified in 36% of the patients. Diabetes (36%) was the most predisposing medical illness. A total of 15% of the patients died within the first year after surgery for endophthalmitis and half of the patients died during follow up. The mortality of patients was 22.6 times higher compared to a Danish background population. Culture positive patients had a higher mortality compared to culture negative patients. Endogenous endophthalmitis is a heterogeneous condition which is reflected in the age, the visual outcome and the mortality of the patients. The epidemiology of the disease is very different in Scandinavia compared to Asia. The visual prognosis remains grave and the majority of the eyes lose useful vision.

  18. The management and outcomes of placenta accreta, increta, and percreta in the UK: a population-based descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, K E; Sellers, S; Spark, P; Kurinczuk, J J; Brocklehurst, P; Knight, M

    2014-01-01

    To describe the management and outcomes of placenta accreta, increta, and percreta in the UK. A population-based descriptive study using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS). All 221 UK hospitals with obstetrician-led maternity units. All women diagnosed with placenta accreta, increta, and percreta in the UK between May 2010 and April 2011. Prospective case identification through the monthly mailing of UKOSS. Median estimated blood loss, transfusion requirements. A cohort of 134 women were identified with placenta accreta, increta, or percreta: 50% (66/133) were suspected to have this condition antenatally. In women with a final diagnosis of placenta increta or percreta, antenatal diagnosis was associated with reduced levels of haemorrhage (median estimated blood loss 2750 versus 6100 ml, P = 0.008) and a reduced need for blood transfusion (59 versus 94%, P = 0.014), possibly because antenatally diagnosed women were more likely to have preventative therapies for haemorrhage (74 versus 52%, P = 0.007), and were less likely to have an attempt made to remove their placenta (59 versus 93%, P accreta, increta, or percreta who have no attempt to remove any of their placenta, with the aim of conserving their uterus, or prior to hysterectomy, have reduced levels of haemorrhage and a reduced need for blood transfusion, supporting the recommendation of this practice. © 2013 RCOG.

  19. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and treatment outcomes among conflict-affected and forcibly displaced populations: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendelsohn Joshua B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is required to promote viral suppression and to prevent disease progression and mortality. Forcibly displaced and conflict-affected populations may face challenges succeeding on HAART. We performed a systematic review of the literature on adherence to HAART and treatment outcomes in these groups, including refugees and internally-displaced persons (IDPs, assessed the quality of the evidence and suggest a future research program. Methods Medline, Embase, and Global Health databases for 1995–2011 were searched using the Ovid platform. A backward citation review of subsequent work that had cited the Ovid results was performed using the Web of Science database. ReliefWeb and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF websites were searched for additional grey literature. Results and conclusion We screened 297 records and identified 17 reports covering 15 quantitative and two qualitative studies from 13 countries. Three-quarters (11/15 of the quantitative studies were retrospective studies based on chart review; five studies included

  20. Visual outcome of ranibizumab therapy for neovascular age related macular degeneration in the black population: a report of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopa Vemala

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Roopa Vemala, Bhaskar Gupta, Sobha SivaprasadLaser and Retinal Research Unit, King’s College Hospital, London SE5 9RS, UKIntroduction: Neovascular age related macular degeneration (AMD is relatively uncommon in the black population. We report the 12-month outcome of ranibizumab therapy in five black patients with choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV secondary to AMD.Material and methods: Retrospective analysis of a prospective audit database maintained for all patients on ranibizumab therapy in a retinal specialist unit that caters to a multi-ethnic cohort in London, United Kingdom.Results: At 12 months, all the 5 patients maintained stable vision (loss of less than 15 ETDRS letters. However, none of them gained more than 15 ETDRS letters. All eyes showed early subretinal fibrosis while 2 patients showed extended areas of retinal pigment atrophy.Conclusion: Our case studies indicate that ranibizumab stabilizes the vision in black patients with CNV secondary to AMD but they tend to develop early subretinal fibrosis and retinal pigment atrophy.Keywords: choroidal neovascular membrane, Afro-Caribbean, blacks

  1. Mathematical biology

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, James D

    1993-01-01

    The book is a textbook (with many exercises) giving an in-depth account of the practical use of mathematical modelling in the biomedical sciences. The mathematical level required is generally not high and the emphasis is on what is required to solve the real biological problem. The subject matter is drawn, e.g. from population biology, reaction kinetics, biological oscillators and switches, Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction, reaction-diffusion theory, biological wave phenomena, central pattern generators, neural models, spread of epidemics, mechanochemical theory of biological pattern formation and importance in evolution. Most of the models are based on real biological problems and the predictions and explanations offered as a direct result of mathematical analysis of the models are important aspects of the book. The aim is to provide a thorough training in practical mathematical biology and to show how exciting and novel mathematical challenges arise from a genuine interdisciplinary involvement with the biosci...

  2. Fortification of staple foods with zinc for improving zinc status and other health outcomes in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dheeraj; Sachdev, Harshpal S; Gera, Tarun; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo

    2016-06-09

    Zinc deficiency is a global nutritional problem, particularly in children and women residing in settings where diets are cereal based and monotonous. It has several negative health consequences. Fortification of staple foods with zinc may be an effective strategy for preventing zinc deficiency and improving zinc-related health outcomes. To evaluate the beneficial and adverse effects of fortification of staple foods with zinc on health-related outcomes and biomarkers of zinc status in the general population. We searched the following databases in April 2015: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 3 of 12, 2015, the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE & MEDLINE In Process (OVID) (1950 to 8 April 2015), EMBASE (OVID) (1974 to 8 April 2015), CINAHL (1982 to April 2015), Web of Science (1900 to 9 April 2015), BIOSIS (1969 to 9 April 2015), POPLINE (1970 to April 2015), AGRICOLA, OpenGrey, BiblioMap, and Trials Register of Promoting Health Interventions (TRoPHI), besides regional databases (April 2015) and theses. We also searched clinical trial registries (17 March 2015) and contacted relevant organisations (May 2014) in order to identify ongoing and unpublished studies. We included randomised controlled trials, randomised either at the level of the individual or cluster. We also included non-randomised trials at the level of the individual if there was a concurrent comparison group. We included non-randomised cluster trials and controlled before-after studies only if there were at least two intervention sites and two control sites. Interventions included fortification (central/industrial) of staple foods (cereal flours, edible fats, sugar, condiments, seasonings, milk and beverages) with zinc for a minimum period of two weeks. Participants were members of the general population who were over two years of age (including pregnant and lactating women) from any country. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion

  3. Association of MYCN copy number with clinical features, tumor biology, and outcomes in neuroblastoma: A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kevin; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Mann, Meegan; Naranjo, Arlene H; Van Ryn, Collin; Bagatell, Rochelle; Matthay, Katherine K; London, Wendy B; Irwin, Meredith S; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Granger, M Meaghan; Hogarty, Michael D; Park, Julie R; DuBois, Steven G

    2017-11-01

    High-level MYCN amplification (MNA) is associated with poor outcome and unfavorable clinical and biological features in patients with neuroblastoma. To the authors' knowledge, less is known regarding these associations in patients with low-level MYCN copy number increases. In this retrospective study, the authors classified patients has having tumors with MYCN wild-type tumors, MYCN gain (2-4-fold increase in MYCN signal compared with the reference probe), or MNA (>4-fold increase). Tests of trend were used to investigate ordered associations between MYCN copy number category and features of interest. Log-rank tests and Cox models compared event-free survival and overall survival by subgroup. Among 4672 patients, 3694 (79.1%) had MYCN wild-type tumors, 133 (2.8%) had MYCN gain, and 845 (18.1%) had MNA. For each clinical/biological feature, the percentage of patients with an unfavorable feature was lowest in the MYCN wild-type category, intermediate in the MYCN gain category, and highest in the MNA category (PNeuroblastoma Staging System) and patients with non-high-risk disease with MYCN gain had a significantly increased risk for death, a finding confirmed on multivariable testing. Increasing MYCN copy number is associated with an increasingly higher rate of unfavorable clinical/biological features, with 11q aberration being an exception. Patients with MYCN gain appear to have inferior outcomes, especially in otherwise more favorable groups. Cancer 2017;123:4224-4235. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  4. Predicting the effect of ionising radiation on biological populations: testing of a non-linear Leslie model applied to a small mammal population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the application of a non-linear Leslie model for predicting the effects of ionising radiation on wild populations. The model assumes that, for protracted chronic irradiation, the effect-dose relationship is linear. In particular, the effects of radiation are modelled by relating the increase in the mortality rates of the individuals to the dose rates through a proportionality factor C. The model was tested using independent data and information from a series of experiments that were aimed at assessing the response to radiation of wild populations of meadow voles and whose results were described in the international literature. The comparison of the model results with the data selected from the above mentioned experiments showed that the model overestimated the detrimental effects of radiation on the size of irradiated populations when the values of C were within the range derived from the median lethal dose (L 50 ) for small mammals. The described non-linear model suggests that the non-expressed biotic potential of the species whose growth is limited by processes of environmental resistance, such as the competition among the individuals of the same or of different species for the exploitation of the available resources, can be a factor that determines a more effective response of population to the radiation effects. -- Highlights: • A model to assess the radiation effects on wild population is described. • The model is based on non-linear Leslie matrix. • The model is applied to small mammals living in an irradiated meadow. • Model output is conservative if effect-dose factor estimated from L 50 is used. • Systemic response to stress of populations in competitive conditions may be more effective

  5. Short-term outcomes of small incision cataract surgery provided by a regional population in the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhikoo, Riyaz; Vellara, Hans; Lolokabaira, Salome; Murray, Neil; Sikivou, Biu; McGhee, Charles

    2017-11-01

    This study aims to describe patient demographics, visual and surgical outcomes of a cohort undergoing small incision cataract surgery at a Pacific regional ophthalmic training facility. This is a prospective, longitudinal study conducted at the Pacific Eye Institute, Fiji. One hundred fifty-six patients underwent small incision cataract surgery. Preoperatively, a complete ophthalmic examination, including pachymetry and macular optical coherence tomography performed by two independent investigators. Temporal small incision cataract surgery with intraocular lens insertion was performed by ophthalmologists, and trainee ophthalmologists. Follow-up occurred at day one, four weeks and 3 months. Patient characteristics, visual outcomes including surgically induced astigmatism and complications. Ninety-one per cent (142/156) attended 3-month follow-up with median age 63 years (range 19-82), 52% female (81/156) and 58% (90/156) Fijian ethnicity. In 37% (57/156), the contralateral eye was pseudophakic. Mean preoperative best spectacle-corrected visual acuity was logMAR 1.44 (6/165). At 3 months, 74% (105/142) achieved ≥6/18 unaided vision (94% [133/142] best spectacle-corrected visual acuity). Mean postoperative spherical equivalent was -0.78 (SD 0.95) D and mean surgically induced astigmatism 1.04 (0.57) D. Complications included posterior capsular rupture with vitreous loss (4% [6/156]), optical coherence tomography confirmed macular oedema (8% [12/152] at 4 weeks), significant posterior capsular opacity (23% [31/136]) and >5% increase in preoperative pachymetry (1% [1/142]) at 3 months. Reduction in preoperative best spectacle-corrected visual acuity occurred in 2% (3/142). No cases of endophthalmitis. Small incision cataract surgery provided to a regional population is effective with 94% achieving the World Health Organisation's definition of 'Good Vision' (≥6/18). Refinements in biometric and surgical techniques may allow a greater proportion of patients to

  6. Trends in the incidence, treatment, and outcomes of acute lower extremity ischemia in the United States Medicare population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T; Ghosh, Kaushik; Rosen, Allison B

    2014-09-01

    Acute lower extremity ischemia (ALI) is a common vascular surgery emergency associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to assess contemporary trends in the incidence of ALI, the methods of treatment, and the associated mortality and amputation rates in the U.S. Medicare population. This was an observational study using Medicare claims data between 1998 and 2009. Outcomes examined included trends in the incidence of ALI; trends in interventions for ALI; and trends in amputation, mortality, and amputation-free survival rates. Between 1998 and 2009, the incidence of hospitalization for ALI decreased from 45.7 per 100,000 to 26.0 per 100,000 (P for trend < .001). The percentage of patients undergoing surgical intervention decreased from 57.1% to 51.6% (P for trend < .001), whereas the percentage of patients undergoing endovascular interventions increased from 15.0% to 33.1% (P for trend < .001). In-hospital mortality rates decreased from 12.0% to 9.0% (P for trend < .001), whereas 1-year mortality rates remained stable at 41.0% and 42.5% (P for trend not significant). In-hospital amputation rates remained stable at 8.1% and 6.4% (P for trend not significant), whereas 1-year amputation rates decreased from 14.8% to 11.0% (P for trend < .001). In-hospital amputation-free survival after hospitalization for ALI increased from 81.2% to 85.4% (P for trend < .001); however, 1-year amputation-free survival remained unchanged. Between 1998 and 2009, the incidence of ALI among the U.S. Medicare population declined significantly, and the percentage of patients treated with endovascular techniques markedly increased. During this time, 1-year amputation rates declined. Furthermore, although in-hospital mortality rates declined after presentation with ALI, 1-year mortality rates remained unchanged. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The association of maternal vitamin D status with infant birth outcomes, postnatal growth and adiposity in the first 2 years of life in a multi-ethnic Asian population: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Yi Lin; Quah, Phaik Ling; Tint, Mya Thway; Aris, Izzuddin M; Chen, Ling Wei; van Dam, Rob M; Heppe, Denise; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Chong, Yap Seng; Yap, Fabian; Lee, Yung Seng; Foong-Fong Chong, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy has been associated with infant birth and postnatal growth outcomes, but reported findings have been inconsistent, especially in relation to postnatal growth and adiposity outcomes. In a mother-offspring cohort in Singapore, maternal plasma vitamin D was measured between 26 and 28 weeks of gestation, and anthropometric measurements were obtained from singleton offspring during the first 2 years of life with 3-month follow-up intervals to examine birth, growth and adiposity outcomes. Associations were analysed using multivariable linear regression. Of a total of 910 mothers, 13·2 % were vitamin D deficient (growth outcomes - weight-for-age z-scores, length-for-age z-scores, circumferences of the head, abdomen and mid-arm at birth or postnatally - and adiposity outcomes - BMI, and skinfold thickness (triceps, biceps and subscapular) at birth or postnatally. Maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy did not influence infant birth outcomes, postnatal growth and adiposity outcomes in this cohort, perhaps due to the low prevalence (1·6 % of the cohort) of severe maternal vitamin D deficiency (defined as of population.

  8. Long-Term Outcomes of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Diagnosed During Childhood: Results from a National Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Peta M A; Nugent, Alan W; Daubeney, Piers E F; Lee, Katherine J; Sleeper, Lynn A; Schuster, Tibor; Turner, Christian; Davis, Andrew M; Semsarian, Chris; Colan, Steven D; Robertson, Terry; Ramsay, James; Justo, Robert; Sholler, Gary F; King, Ingrid; Weintraub, Robert G

    2018-02-28

    Background -Late survival and symptomatic status of children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) have not been well defined. We examined long-term outcomes for pediatric HCM. Methods -The National Australian Childhood Cardiomyopathy Study is a longitudinal population-based cohort study of children (0-10 years) diagnosed with cardiomyopathy between 1987 and 1996. The primary study end-point was time to death or cardiac transplantation. Results -There were 80 patients with HCM with median age at diagnosis of 0.48 (Inter-quartile range [IQR] 0.1, 2.5) years. Freedom from death/transplantation (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 86 (77-92)% one year after presentation, 80 (69-87)% at 10 years and 78 (67-86)% at 20 years. From multivariable analyses, risk factors for death/transplantation included symmetric left ventricular hypertrophy at the time of diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR] 4.20 95%CI 1.60, 11.05 p=0.004), Noonan syndrome (HR 2.88, 95%CI 1.02, 8.08, p=0.045), higher posterior wall thickness z-score (HR 1.45, 95%CI 1.22, 1.73, p<0.001) and lower fractional shortening z-score (HR 0.84, 95%CI 0.74, 0.95, p=0.005) during follow-up. Nineteen (23%) subjects underwent left ventricular myectomy. At median 15.7 years' follow-up, 27 (42%) of 63 survivors were treated with beta-blocker and 13 (21%) had an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Conclusions -The highest risk of death or transplantation for children with HCM is within one year post-diagnosis, with low attrition rates thereafter. Many subjects receive medical, surgical or device therapy.

  9. Treatment outcome in Hodgkin's disease in patients above the age of 60: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enblad, G; Glimelius, B; Sundström, C

    1991-04-01

    All persons in three Swedish counties afflicted with Hodgkin's disease between 1979 and 1988 were traced. The objective was to analyze, in unselected, population-based material, whether an assumed worse prognosis in the elderly could be due to differences in staging procedures, treatment intensity, decreased tolerance to therapy or to a more aggressive disease. After histopathological revision, 163 of 202 patients (autopsy cases excluded) were accepted as HD, 61 (37%) of them above the age of 60. Although staging procedures had been more intense in the young, the elderly patients had a more advanced stage at diagnosis, and tended more often to have B-symptoms. The intensity of staging procedures did not seem to influence survival. The 5-yr relative survival was 37% above and 85% below the age of 60. Radiotherapy was the primary treatment in 12 (20%) above and 41 (41%) below the age of 60 with 5-yr relative survival figures of 84% and 85%, respectively. Thirty-seven patients (61%) above and 61 (59%) below 60 were treated with combination chemotherapy (MOPP/ABVD, MOPP, ChlVPP/OPEC) with curative intent. The 5-yr relative survival was 33% and 86%, respectively. The majority of the elderly patients (54%) received less than 40% of the planned chemotherapy dose. The main reason for this pronounced reduction was intolerance to therapy, with 8 treatment-related deaths. We conclude that tolerance to combination chemotherapy in the elderly patients with HD is poor and could be the major reason for poor treatment outcome in this age group.

  10. Exploring the rising incidence of neuroendocrine tumors: a population-based analysis of epidemiology, metastatic presentation, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallet, Julie; Law, Calvin How Lim; Cukier, Moises; Saskin, Refik; Liu, Ning; Singh, Simron

    2015-02-15

    An increased incidence of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) has been reported worldwide, but the reasons underlying this rise have not been identified. By assessing patterns of metastatic presentation, this study sought to examine the epidemiologic characteristics of NETs and the contribution of early-stage detection to the rising incidence. A population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted with prospectively maintained databases linked at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Adult patients with a NET diagnosis from 1994 to 2009 in Ontario, Canada were included. The main outcomes included the overall and site-specific incidence, proportion of metastatic disease, overall survival (OS), and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Five thousand six hundred nineteen NET cases were identified. The incidence of NETs increased from 2.48 to 5.86 per 100,000 per year. Metastases were found in 20.8% at presentation and in another 38% after the initial diagnosis. The proportion of metastases at presentation decreased from 1994 to 2009 (from 29% to 13%). Therefore, although the incidence of all NETs increased, the overall incidence of metastases did not change (0.63-0.69 per 100,000 per year). The 10-year OS rate was 46.5%, and the RFS rate was 64.6%. In addition to the primary tumor site, independent predictors of worse OS included an advanced age (P incidence of NETs has markedly increased over the course of 15 years. This is the first study to provide evidence suggesting that the increase in the incidence of NETs may be due to increased detection. In addition to tumor characteristics, low income and rural residency portend worse survival for patients with NETs. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  11. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis outcome measures and the role of albumin and creatinine: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiò, Adriano; Calvo, Andrea; Bovio, Giacomo; Canosa, Antonio; Bertuzzo, Davide; Galmozzi, Francesco; Cugnasco, Paolo; Clerico, Marinella; De Mercanti, Stefania; Bersano, Enrica; Cammarosano, Stefania; Ilardi, Antonio; Manera, Umberto; Moglia, Cristina; Sideri, Riccardo; Marinou, Kalliopi; Bottacchi, Edo; Pisano, Fabrizio; Cantello, Roberto; Mazzini, Letizia; Mora, Gabriele

    2014-09-01

    There is an urgent need to identify reliable biomarkers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) progression for clinical practice and pharmacological trials. To correlate several hematological markers evaluated at diagnosis with ALS outcome in a population-based series of patients (discovery cohort) and replicate the findings in an independent validation cohort from an ALS tertiary center. The discovery cohort included 712 patients with ALS from the Piemonte and Valle d'Aosta Register for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2011. The validation cohort comprised 122 patients with ALS at different stages of disease consecutively seen at an ALS tertiary center between January 1, 2007, and January 1, 2009. The following hematological factors were investigated and correlated with survival: total leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, glucose, creatinine, uric acid, albumin, bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, creatine kinase, thyroid-stimulating hormones, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate; all analyses were performed separately by sex. The patient of the validation cohort also underwent bioelectrical impedance analysis for the calculation of fat-free mass. Of the 712 patients in the examined period in Piemonte and Valle d'Aosta, 638 (89.6%) were included in the study. Only serum albumin (men: ≤ 4.3 vs >4.3 mg/dL, P 4.3 mg/dL, P creatinine levels (men: ≤ 0.82 vs >0.82 mg/dL, P = .004; women: ≤ 0.65 vs >0.05 mg/dL, P = .004) and lymphocyte count (men: ≤ 1700 vs >1700/μL, P = .04; women: ≤ 1700 vs >1700/μL, P = .02) were significantly associated with ALS outcome in both sexes with a dose-response effect (better survival with increasing levels). These findings were confirmed in the validation cohort. Multivariable analysis showed that serum albumin (men: hazard ratio [HR], 1.39; 95% CI, 1.05-1.90; P = .02; women: HR, 1.73; 95

  12. Population-level compensation impedes biological control of an invasive forb and indirect release of a native grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvette K. Ortega; Dean E. Pearson; Lauren P. Waller; Nancy J. Sturdevant; John L. Maron

    2012-01-01

    The intentional introduction of specialist insect herbivores for biological control of exotic weeds provides ideal but understudied systems for evaluating important ecological concepts related to top-down control, plant compensatory responses, indirect effects, and the influence of environmental context on these processes. Centaurea stoebe (spotted knapweed) is a...

  13. A Critical Review of Bioactive Food Components, and of their Functional Mechanisms, Biological Effects and Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gregorio, Rosa; Simal-Gandara, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Eating behaviours are closely related to some medical conditions potentially leading to death such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Healthy eating practices, maintaining a normal weight, and regular physical activity could prevent up to 80% of coronary heart disease, 90% of type-2 diabetes and onethird of all cancers [1]. Over the last two decades, the food industry has invested much effort in research and development of healthier, more nutritious foods. These foods are frequently designated "functional" when they contain nutritional components required for healthy living or "nutraceuticals" when intended to treat or prevent disease or disorders through a variety of bioactive (e.g., antioxidant, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, hypocholesterolaemic) functions that are performed by functional enzymes, probiotics, prebiotics, fibres, phytosterols, peptides, proteins, isoflavones, saponins or phytic acid, among other substances. Some agricultural and industrial residues have proven to be excellent choices as raw materials for producing bioactive compounds and have been proposed as potentially safe natural sources of antimicrobials and/or antioxidants for the food industry. Functional food ingredients containing bioactive compounds could be used as plant extracts by pharmaceutical and food industries. Bioactive food components influence health outcomes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Methodology of a population-based stroke and TIA incidence and outcomes study: the Auckland Regional Community Stroke Study (ARCOS IV) 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Rita; Jones, Amy; Barber, P Alan; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; McPherson, Kathryn; Bennett, Derrick; Rush, Elaine; Suh, Flora; Starkey, Nicola; Theadom, Alice; Parag, Varsha; Rathnasabapathy, Yogini; Feigin, Valery L

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Stroke burden is immense as it leads to premature deaths, leaves survivors with ongoing disabilities, and has a major financial impact on the individual, their families, and the community. Reliable, high-quality evidence is needed on stroke risk factors, incidence, and outcomes to provide information on how best to reduce this burden. Population-based studies are regarded as the 'gold-standard' of measuring disease burden but are not common due to the logistical and financial challenges they present. The Auckland Regional Community Stroke Studies are among a few in the world that have been carried out at a population level and at regular intervals. The aim of the fourth Auckland Regional Community Stroke Studies IV is to examine the current measures of stroke incidence, prevalence, and outcomes as well the trends over four decades. This article describes the methodology of the Auckland Regional Community Stroke Studies IV with stroke and transient ischemic attacks cases registered over a 12-month period from March 1, 2011 to February 29, 2012. The methodology described may be used as a guide in order to design similar population-based stroke incidence and outcome studies in other countries and populations, thus facilitating the collection of most consistent and accurate stroke epidemiological data. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  15. Differences in outcome between twins and singletons born very preterm: results from a population-based European cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papiernik, Emile; Zeitlin, Jennifer; Delmas, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    About 10% of twins are born before 32 weeks of gestation and very preterm birth rates are increasing. Preterm twins tend to have more favourable outcomes than singletons of the same gestational age, but fewer data are available for very preterm infants. This study aims to determine whether outcom...

  16. Risk factors and adverse pregnancy outcomes among births affected by velamentous umbilical cord insertion: a retrospective population-based register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, Sari; Georgiadis, Leena; Harju, Maija; Keski-Nisula, Leea; Heinonen, Seppo

    2012-12-01

    To identify risk factors associated with velamentous cord insertion (VCI) and to evaluate the association between adverse pregnancy outcomes and VCI in singleton pregnancies. The total population of women (n=26,849) with singleton pregnancies delivered in Kuopio University Hospital during the study period between 2000 and 2011 was reviewed. Risk factors and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes (admission to a neonatal unit, fetal death, preterm delivery, low birth weight (LBWprematurity and impaired fetal growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of a population-level performance dashboard intervention on maternal-newborn outcomes: an interrupted time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Deborah; Dunn, Sandra I; Sprague, Ann E; Fell, Deshayne B; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Darling, Elizabeth; Graham, Ian D; Harrold, JoAnn; Smith, Graeme N; Peterson, Wendy E; Reszel, Jessica; Lanes, Andrea; Walker, Mark C; Taljaard, Monica

    2018-06-01

    To assess the effect of the Maternal Newborn Dashboard on six key clinical performance indicators in the province of Ontario, Canada. Interrupted time series using population-based data from the provincial birth registry covering a 3-year period before implementation of the Dashboard and 2.5 years after implementation (November 2009 through March 2015). All hospitals in the province of Ontario providing maternal-newborn care (n=94). A hospital-based online audit and feedback programme. Rates of the six performance indicators included in the Dashboard. 2.5 years after implementation, the audit and feedback programme was associated with statistically significant absolute decreases in the rates of episiotomy (decrease of 1.5 per 100 women, 95% CI 0.64 to 2.39), induction for postdates in women who were less than 41 weeks at delivery (decrease of 11.7 per 100 women, 95% CI 7.4 to 16.0), repeat caesarean delivery in low-risk women performed before 39 weeks (decrease of 10.4 per 100 women, 95% CI 9.3 to 11.5) and an absolute increase in the rate of appropriately timed group B streptococcus screening (increase of 2.8 per 100, 95% CI 2.2 to 3.5). The audit and feedback programme did not significantly affect the rates of unsatisfactory newborn screening blood samples or formula supplementation at discharge. No statistically significant effects were observed for the two internal control outcomes or the four external control indicators-in fact, two external control indicators (episiotomy and postdates induction) worsened relative to before implementation. An electronic audit and feedback programme implemented in maternal-newborn hospitals was associated with clinically relevant practice improvements at the provincial level in the majority of targeted indicators. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. A population-based study of the use and outcome of radical radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, Charles R.R.; Paszat, Lawrence F.; Groome, Patti A.; Schulze, Karleen; Mackillop, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to describe the use and outcome of radical radiotherapy for bladder cancer in the province of Ontario, Canada, between 1982 and 1994. Methods: Electronic records of invasive bladder cancer (ICD code 188) from the Ontario Cancer Registry were linked to surgical records from all Ontario hospitals and radiotherapy (RT) records from all Ontario cancer centers. We identified cases receiving radical RT by selecting RT records containing 'bladder' or 'pelvis' anatomic region codes and a radical or curative intent code (or dose > 39.5 Gy if intent missing). We identified cases receiving salvage total cystectomy by selecting total cystectomy procedure codes occurring at any time beyond 4 months from the start of radical RT. We used life table methods to compute the following: the time from diagnosis to radical RT, the time from radical RT to salvage cystectomy, overall and cause-specific survival from radical radiotherapy to death, and overall and cause-specific survival from salvage cystectomy to death. We modeled the factors associated with time to death, time to cystectomy conditional on survival, and time to cystectomy or death, whichever came first, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: From the 20,906 new cases of bladder cancer diagnosed in Ontario from 1982 to 1994, we identified 1,372 cases treated by radical radiotherapy (78% male, 22% female; mean age 69.8 years). The median interval to start of radical RT from diagnosis was 13.4 weeks. Ninety-three percent of patients were treated on high-energy linacs, and the most common dose/fractionation scheme was 60 Gy/30 (31% of cases). Five-year survival rates were as follows: bladder cancer cause-specific, 41%; overall, 28%; cystectomy-free, 25%; bladder cancer cause-specific following salvage cystectomy, 36%; overall following salvage cystectomy, 28%. Factors associated with a higher risk of death and a poorer cystectomy-free survival were histology (squamous or

  19. Alcohol use disorders among people living with HIV/AIDS in Southern Brazil: prevalence, risk factors and biological markers outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cláudio Moss; Mendoza-Sassi, Raúl Andrés; da Mota, Luisa Dias; Nader, Maíba Mikhael; de Martinez, Ana Maria Barral

    2017-04-11

    Alcohol abuse is an important public health problem, frequently unrecognized among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), and requires investigation and intervention. It is usually associated with lower adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). It can also produce adverse clinical outcomes, such as changes in certain HIV markers, particularly CD4 cell counts and HIV viral loads (VLs). Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of alcohol abuse among PLWHA, its associated risk factors and effects on CD4 cell counts and HIV VLs in southern Brazil. Between December 2012 and July 2013, 343 patients were interviewed at a reference hospital in southern Brazil. The instrument used was the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), and a cutoff of eight points or more was applied. Socioeconomic, demographic, clinical and laboratory data were also collected. The statistical analysis included a Poisson regression to evaluate the factors associated with alcohol use disorder, and a linear regression was performed to assess the relationship between AUDIT scores and CD4 cell counts and HIV VLs. Alcohol abuse was present in 28.6% of the respondents, and possible dependence was present in 5%. The risk factors identified included being male, mixed or black skin color, low education and the use of intravenous or inhaled drugs. A higher AUDIT score was associated with a lower CD4 cell count but was not associated with higher HIV VL values. Our results show the importance of screening for alcohol abuse in this group. The prevalence of alcohol abuse was high, and it was associated with socioeconomic factors and the use of illicit drugs. Moreover, AUDIT score negatively affected CD4 cell counts as well.

  20. Population biology and distribution of the portunid crab Callinectes ornatus (Decapoda: Brachyura) in an estuary-bay complex of southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Timoteo T. Watanabe; Bruno S. Sant'Anna; Gustavo Y. Hattori; Fernando J. Zara

    2014-01-01

    Trawl fisheries are associated with catches of swimming crabs, which are an important economic resource for commercial as well for small-scale fisheries. This study evaluated the population biology and distribution of the swimming crab Callinectes ornatus (Ordway, 1863) in the Estuary-Bay of São Vicente, state of São Paulo, Brazil. Crabs were collected from a shrimp fishing boat equipped with a semi-balloon otter-trawl net, on eight transects (four in the estuary and four in the bay) from Mar...

  1. Population biology of the mangrove crab Ucides cordatus (Decapoda: Ucididae) in an estuary from semiarid northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Marcos de Miranda Leão; Rezende, Carla Ferreira; Silva, José Roberto Feitosa

    2013-12-01

    The mangrove crab Ucides cordatus is an important resource of estuarine regions along the Brazilian coast. U. cordatus is distributed from Florida, U.S.A., to the coast of Santa Catarina, Brazil. The species plays an important role in processing leaf litter in the mangroves, which optimizes the processes of energy transfer and nutrient cycling, and is considered a keystone species in the ecosystem. Population declines have been reported in different parts of the Brazilian coast. In the present study we evaluated aspects of the population structure, sex ratio and size at morphological sexual maturity. We analyzed 977 specimens collected monthly over 24 months (2010-2012), in a mangrove of the Jaguaribe River, in the municipality of Aracati on the East coast of Ceará state, Northeastern Brazil. The study area has a mild semiarid tropical climate, with mean temperatures between 26 and 28 degrees C. The area is located within the eco-region of the semiarid Northeast coast, where mangroves occur in small areas and estuaries are affected by mesomareal regimes. The population structure was evaluated by the frequency distribution of size classes in each month, and the overall sex ratio was analyzed using the chi-square test. Size at morphological sexual maturity was estimated based on the allometry of the cheliped of the males and the abdomen width of the females, using the program REGRANS. The size-frequency distribution was unimodal in both sexes. The overall sex ratio (M:F) (1:0.6) was significantly different from 1:1. Analysis of the sex ratio by size class showed that the proportion of males increased significantly from size class 55-60 mm upward, and this pattern persisted in the larger size classes. In the smaller size classes the sex ratio did not differ from 1:1. The size at morphological sexual maturity was estimated at a carapace width (CW) of 52 mm and 45 mm for males and females, respectively. Analysis of the population parameters indicated that the

  2. The household food insecurity gradient and potential reductions in adverse population mental health outcomes in Canadian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessiman-Perreault, Geneviève; McIntyre, Lynn

    2017-12-01

    Household food insecurity is related to poor mental health. This study examines whether the level of household food insecurity is associated with a gradient in the risk of reporting six adverse mental health outcomes. This study further quantifies the mental health impact if severe food insecurity, the extreme of the risk continuum, were eliminated in Canada. Using a pooled sample of the Canadian Community Health Survey (N = 302,683), we examined the relationship between level of food insecurity, in adults 18-64 years, and reporting six adverse mental health outcomes. We conducted a probit analysis adjusted for multi-variable models, to calculate the reduction in the odds of reporting mental health outcomes that might accrue from the elimination of severe food insecurity. Controlling for various demographic and socioeconomic covariates, a food insecurity gradient was found in six mental health outcomes. We calculated that a decrease between 8.1% and 16.0% in the reporting of these mental health outcomes would accrue if those who are currently severely food insecure became food secure, after controlling for covariates. Household food insecurity has a pervasive graded negative effect on a variety of mental health outcomes, in which significantly higher levels of food insecurity are associated with a higher risk of adverse mental health outcomes. Reduction of food insecurity, particularly at the severe level, is a public health concern and a modifiable structural determinant of health worthy of macro-level policy intervention.

  3. Biological half-life and distribution of radiocesium in a contaminated population of green treefrogs Hyla cinerea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dapson, R.W.; Kaplan, L.

    1975-01-01

    Radiocesium content of adult male green treefrogs Hyla cinerea from a contaminated habitat is adequately described by a log normal distribution with mean 2.277 log 10 pCi g -1 dry wt (189.2 pCi g -1 ) and variance of 0.031. There was significant negative correlation of body burden with body length and weight (p 2 = 0.10). Biological half-life of radiocesium in unfed, captive frogs held at 20 deg - 30 deg C averaged 30.1 d. (author)

  4. Population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in West Africa: multilocus sequence typing of serotypes that exhibit different predisposition to invasive disease and carriage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S Donkor

    Full Text Available Little is known about the population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in developing countries, although the majority of pneumococcal infections occur in this setting. The aim of the study was to apply MLST to investigate the population biology of S. pneumoniae in West Africa.Seventy three invasive and carriage S. pneumoniae isolates from three West African countries including The Gambia, Nigeria and Ghana were investigated. The isolates covered seven serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 11, 14, 23F and were subjected to multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility testing.Overall, 50 different sequence types (STs were identified, of which 38% (29 were novel. The most common ST was a novel clone-ST 4012 (6.5%, and some clones including STs 913, 925, 1737, 2160 and 3310 appeared to be specific to the study region. Two STs including ST 63 and ST 4012 were associated with multiple serotypes indicating a history of serotype switching. ST 63 was associated with serotypes 3 and 23F, while ST 4012 was associated with serotypes 6A and 23. eBURST analyses using the stringent 6/7 identical loci definition grouped the 50 STs into 5 clonal complexes and 65 singletons, expressing a high level of genetic diversity among the isolates. Compared to the other serotypes, serotypes 1 and 5 isolates appeared to be more clonal. Internationally recognized antibiotic resistant clones of S. pneumoniae were generally absent in the population investigated and the only multidrug resistant isolate identified (1/66 belong to the Pneumocococcal Epidemiology Network clone ST 63.The pneumococcal population in West Africa is quite divergent, and serotypes that are common in invasive disease (such as serotypes 1 and 5 are more likely to be clonal than serotypes that are common in carriage.

  5. Essential oils from wild populations of Algerian Lavandula stoechas L.: composition, chemical variability, and in vitro biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabdelkader, Tarek; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Guitton, Yann; Jullien, Frédéric; Maitre, Dany; Casabianca, Hervé; Legendre, Laurent; Kameli, Abdelkrim

    2011-05-01

    In an effort to develop local productions of aromatic and medicinal plants, a comprehensive assessment of the composition and biological activities of the essential oils (EOs) extracted from the aerial flowering parts of wild growing Lavandula stoechas L. collected from eleven different locations in northern Algeria was performed. The oils were characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses, and 121 compounds were identified, accounting for 69.88-91.2% of the total oil compositions. The eleven oils greatly differed in their compositions, since only 66 compounds were common to all oils. Major EO components were fenchone (2; 11.27-37.48%), camphor (3, 1.94-21.8%), 1,8-cineole (1; 0.16-8.71%), and viridiflorol (10; 2.89-7.38%). The assessed in vitro biological properties demonstrated that the DPPH-based radical-scavenging activities and the inhibition of the β-carotene/linoleic acid-based lipid oxidation differed by an eight-fold factor between the most and the least active oils and were linked to different sets of molecules in the different EOs. The eleven EOs exhibited good antimicrobial activities against most of the 16 tested strains of bacteria, filamentous fungi, and yeasts, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 0.16 to 11.90 mg/ml. Copyright © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  6. The outcome of a quality-controlled mammography screening program: Experience from a population-based study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huay-Ben Pan

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: From the outcome review of this national mammography screening, there is still room to ameliorate our performance through comprehensive and continued education, to improve the competence of cancer detection and decrease false negative (FN cases.

  7. Mode of Delivery and Long-Term Health-Related Quality-of-Life Outcomes: A Prospective Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Stavros; Kim, Sung Wook; McParland, Penny; Boyle, Elaine M

    2017-06-01

    Relatively little is known about the effects of mode of delivery on long-term health-related quality-of-life outcomes. Furthermore, no previous study has expressed these outcomes in preference-based (utility) metrics. The study population comprised 2,161 mothers recruited from a prospective population-based study in the East Midlands of England encompassing live births and stillbirths between 32 +0 and 36 +6 weeks' gestation and a sample of term-born controls. Perinatal data were extracted from the mothers' maternity records. Health-related quality-of-life outcomes were assessed at 12 months postpartum, using the EuroQol Five Dimensions (EQ-5D) measure with responses to the EQ-5D descriptive system converted into health utility scores. Descriptive statistics and multivariable analyses were used to estimate the relationship between the mode of delivery and health-related quality-of-life outcomes. The overall health-related quality-of-life profile of the women in the study cohort mirrored that of the English adult population as revealed by national health surveys. A significantly higher proportion of women delivering by cesarean delivery reported some, moderate, severe, or extreme pain or discomfort at 12 months postpartum than women undergoing spontaneous vaginal delivery. Multivariable analyses, using the Ordinary Least Squares estimator revealed that, after controlling for maternal sociodemographic characteristics, cesarean delivery without maternal or fetal compromise was associated with a significant EQ-5D utility decrement in comparison to spontaneous vaginal delivery among all women (-0.026; p = 0.038) and among mothers of term-born infants (-0.062; p quality of life in comparison to spontaneous vaginal delivery. Further longitudinal studies are needed to understand the magnitude, trajectory, and underpinning mechanisms of health-related quality-of-life outcomes following different modes of delivery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Ecotoxicity of triphenyltin on the marine copepod Tigriopus japonicus at various biological organisations: from molecular to population-level effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Andy Xianliang; Han, Jeonghoon; Lee, Jae-Seong; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2014-09-01

    Triphenyltin compounds (TPTs), as effective biocides for different industrial and agricultural purposes, have been detected in coastal marine environments worldwide, in particular in Asian countries. However, little is known about their toxicity to marine organisms. This study comprehensively investigated the molecular, individual and population responses of the marine copepod, Tigriopus japonicus upon waterborne exposure to TPT chloride (TPTCl). Our results indicated that TPTCl was highly toxic to adult T. japonicus, with a 96-h LC50 concentration at 6.3 μg/L. As shown in a chronic full life-cycle test, T. japonicus exposed to 1.0 μg/L TPTCl exhibited a delay in development and a significant reduction of population growth, in terms of the intrinsic rate of increase (r m ). Based on the negative relationship between the r m and exposure concentration, a critical effect concentration was estimated at 1.6 μg/L TPTCl; at or above which population extinction could occur. At 0.1 μg/L TPTCl or above, the sex ratio of the second generation of the copepod was significantly altered and changed to a male-biased population. At molecular level, the inhibition of the transcriptional expression of glutathione S-transferase related genes might lead to dysfunction of detoxification, and the inhibition of retinoid X receptor mRNA expression implied an interruption of the growth and moulting process in T. japonicus. As the only gene that observed up-regulated in this study, the expression of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) increased in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating its function in protecting the copepod from TPT-mediated oxidative stress. The study advances our understanding on the ecotoxicity of TPT, and provides some initial data on its toxic mechanisms in small crustaceans like copepods.

  9. Addressing long-term physical healthcare needs in a forensic mental health inpatient population using the UK primary care Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF): an audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivbijaro, Go; Kolkiewicz, LA; McGee, Lsf; Gikunoo, M

    2008-03-01

    Objectives This audit aims to evaluate the effectiveness of delivering an equivalent primary care service to a long-term forensic psychiatric inpatient population, using the UK primary care national Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF).Method The audit compares the targets met by the general practitioner with special interest (GPwSI) service, using local and national QOF benchmarks (2005-2006), and determines the prevalence of chronic disease in a long-term inpatient forensic psychiatry population.Results The audit results show that the UK national QOF is a useful tool for assessment and evaluation of physical healthcare needs in a non-community based population. It shows an increased prevalence of all QOF-assessed long-term physical conditions when compared to the local East London population and national UK population, confirming previously reported elevated levels of physical healthcare need in psychiatric populations.Conclusions This audit shows that the UK General Practice QOF can be used as a standardised instrument for commissioning and monitoring the delivery of physical health services to in-patient psychiatric populations, and for the evaluation of the effectiveness of clinical interventions in long-term physical conditions. The audit also demonstrates the effectiveness of using a GPwSI in healthcare delivery in non-community based settings. We suggest that the findings may be generalisable to other long-term inpatient psychiatric and prison populations in order to further the objective of delivering an equivalent primary care service to all populations.The QOF is a set of national primary care audit standards and is freely available on the British Medical Association website or the UK Department of Health website. We suggest that primary care workers in health economies who have not yet developed their own national primary care standards can access and adapt these standards in order to improve the clinical standards of care given to the primary care

  10. Simulation to aid in interpreting biological relevance and setting of population-level protection goals for risk assessment of pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Christopher John; Luttik, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Specific protection goals (SPGs) comprise an explicit expression of the environmental components that need protection and the maximum impacts that can be tolerated. SPGs are set by risk managers and are typically based on protecting populations or functions. However, the measurable endpoints available to risk managers, at least for vertebrates, are typically laboratory tests. We demonstrate, using the example of eggshell thinning in skylarks, how simulation can be used to place laboratory endpoints in context of population-level effects as an aid to setting the SPGs. We develop explanatory scenarios investigating the impact of different assumptions of eggshell thinning on skylark population size, density and distribution in 10 Danish landscapes, chosen to represent the range of typical Danish agricultural conditions. Landscape and timing of application of the pesticide were found to be the most critical factors to consider in the impact assessment. Consequently, a regulatory scenario of monoculture spring barley with an early spray treatment eliciting the eggshell thinning effect was applied using concentrations eliciting effects of zero to 100% in steps of 5%. Setting the SPGs requires balancing scientific, social and political realities. However, the provision of clear and detailed options such as those from comprehensive simulation results can inform the decision process by improving transparency and by putting the more abstract testing data into the context of real-world impacts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Population and reproductive biology of the fiddler crab Uca thayeri Rathbun, 1900 (Crustacea: Ocypodidae) in a tropical mangrove from Northeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda Bezerra, Luis Ernesto; Matthews-Cascon, Helena

    2007-05-01

    Population and reproductive biology of Uca thayeri Rathbun, 1900 were studied for the first time in a tropical mangrove. Absolute density, sex ratio, population structure, handedness, breeding season and fecundity were investigated. Seven transects were delimited in a mangrove area of the Pacoti River, Northeast of Brazil (3° 43' 02″ S/38° 32' 35″ W). On each transect, ten 0.25 m 2 squares were sampled on a monthly basis during low tide periods from September 2003 to August 2004. A total of 483 crabs were obtained, of which 250 were males, 219 non-ovigerous females, and 14 ovigerous females. The U. thayeri population presented bi-modal size frequency distribution, with males and non-ovigerous females not differing significantly size-wise. Ovigerous females were larger than males and non-ovigerous females. The overall sex ratio (1:1.07) did not differ significantly from the expected 1:1 proportion. The major cheliped was the right one in 50% of the males. The observed density was of 8.5 individuals/m 2, with the specimens being found mostly in shaded areas. Ovigerous females were found in 5 months of the year, coinciding with the rainy season, suggesting that the population of U. thayeri presents seasonal reproductive events. Juvenile crabs were more abundant during the dry period, while larger crabs were found mainly during the rainy period. The fecundity of the studied population was much smaller than that of subtropical populations of this species. The regression analysis shows that the number of eggs increases linearly with the increase of carapace width.

  12. Protocol for a multicentre, prospective, population-based cohort study of variation in practice of cholecystectomy and surgical outcomes (The CholeS study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Ravinder S; Spreadborough, Philip; Johnstone, Marianne; Marriott, Paul; Bhangu, Aneel; Alderson, Derek; Morton, Dion G; Griffiths, Ewen A

    2015-01-12

    Cholecystectomy is one of the most common general surgical operations performed. Despite level one evidence supporting the role of cholecystectomy in the management of specific gallbladder diseases, practice varies between surgeons and hospitals. It is unknown whether these variations account for the differences in surgical outcomes seen in population-level retrospective data sets. This study aims to investigate surgical outcomes following acute, elective and delayed cholecystectomies in a multicentre, contemporary, prospective, population-based cohort. UK and Irish hospitals performing cholecystectomies will be recruited utilising trainee-led research collaboratives. Two months of consecutive, adult patient data will be included. The primary outcome measure of all-cause 30-day readmission rate will be used in this study. Thirty-day complication rates, bile leak rate, common bile duct injury, conversion to open surgery, duration of surgery and length of stay will be measured as secondary outcomes. Prospective data on over 8000 procedures is anticipated. Individual hospitals will be surveyed to determine local policies and service provision. Variations in outcomes will be investigated using regression modelling to adjust for confounders. Research ethics approval is not required for this study and has been confirmed by the online National Research Ethics Service (NRES) decision tool. This novel study will investigate how hospital-level surgical provision can affect patient outcomes, using a cross-sectional methodology. The results are essential to inform commissioning groups and implement changes within the National Health Service (NHS). Dissemination of the study protocol is primarily through the trainee-led research collaboratives and the Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons (AUGIS). Individual centres will have access to their own results and the collective results of the study will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant

  13. Multiple Paternity in a Reintroduced Population of the Orinoco Crocodile (Crocodylus intermedius) at the El Frío Biological Station, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi Lafferriere, Natalia A; Antelo, Rafael; Alda, Fernando; Mårtensson, Dick; Hailer, Frank; Castroviejo-Fisher, Santiago; Ayarzagüena, José; Ginsberg, Joshua R; Castroviejo, Javier; Doadrio, Ignacio; Vilá, Carles; Amato, George

    2016-01-01

    The success of a reintroduction program is determined by the ability of individuals to reproduce and thrive. Hence, an understanding of the mating system and breeding strategies of reintroduced species can be critical to the success, evaluation and effective management of reintroduction programs. As one of the most threatened crocodile species in the world, the Orinoco crocodile (Crocodylus intermedius) has been reduced to only a few wild populations in the Llanos of Venezuela and Colombia. One of these populations was founded by reintroduction at Caño Macanillal and La Ramera lagoon within the El Frío Biological Station, Venezuela. Twenty egg clutches of C. intermedius were collected at the El Frío Biological Station for incubation in the lab and release of juveniles after one year. Analyzing 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci from 335 hatchlings we found multiple paternity in C. intermedius, with half of the 20 clutches fathered by two or three males. Sixteen mothers and 14 fathers were inferred by reconstruction of multilocus parental genotypes. Our findings showed skewed paternal contributions to multiple-sired clutches in four of the clutches (40%), leading to an overall unequal contribution of offspring among fathers with six of the 14 inferred males fathering 90% of the total offspring, and three of those six males fathering more than 70% of the total offspring. Our results provide the first evidence of multiple paternity occurring in the Orinoco crocodile and confirm the success of reintroduction efforts of this critically endangered species in the El Frío Biological Station, Venezuela.

  14. Multiple Paternity in a Reintroduced Population of the Orinoco Crocodile (Crocodylus intermedius at the El Frío Biological Station, Venezuela.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Rossi Lafferriere

    Full Text Available The success of a reintroduction program is determined by the ability of individuals to reproduce and thrive. Hence, an understanding of the mating system and breeding strategies of reintroduced species can be critical to the success, evaluation and effective management of reintroduction programs. As one of the most threatened crocodile species in the world, the Orinoco crocodile (Crocodylus intermedius has been reduced to only a few wild populations in the Llanos of Venezuela and Colombia. One of these populations was founded by reintroduction at Caño Macanillal and La Ramera lagoon within the El Frío Biological Station, Venezuela. Twenty egg clutches of C. intermedius were collected at the El Frío Biological Station for incubation in the lab and release of juveniles after one year. Analyzing 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci from 335 hatchlings we found multiple paternity in C. intermedius, with half of the 20 clutches fathered by two or three males. Sixteen mothers and 14 fathers were inferred by reconstruction of multilocus parental genotypes. Our findings showed skewed paternal contributions to multiple-sired clutches in four of the clutches (40%, leading to an overall unequal contribution of offspring among fathers with six of the 14 inferred males fathering 90% of the total offspring, and three of those six males fathering more than 70% of the total offspring. Our results provide the first evidence of multiple paternity occurring in the Orinoco crocodile and confirm the success of reintroduction efforts of this critically endangered species in the El Frío Biological Station, Venezuela.

  15. Short-Term and Long-Term Biological Effects of Chronic Chemical Contamination on Natural Populations of a Marine Bivalve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Breitwieser

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of chronic chemical contamination on natural populations of marine organisms is complex due to the combined effects of different types of pollutants and environmental parameters that can modulate the physiological responses to stress. Here, we present the effects of a chronic contamination in a marine bivalve by combining multiple approaches that provide information on individual and population health. We sampled variegated scallops (Mimachlamys varia at sites characterized by different contaminants and contamination levels to study the short and long-term (intergenerational responses of this species to physiological stress. We used biomarkers (SOD, MDA, GST, laccase, citrate synthase and phosphatases as indicators of oxidative stress, immune system alteration, mitochondrial respiration and general metabolism, and measured population genetic diversity at each site. In parallel, concentration of 14 trace metals and 45 organic contaminants (PAHs, PCBs, pesticides in tissues were measured. Scallops were collected outside and during their reproductive season to investigate temporal variability in contaminant and biomarker levels. Our analyses revealed that the levels of two biomarkers (Laccase-type phenoloxidase and malondialdehyde were significantly correlated with Cd concentration. Additionally, we observed significant seasonal differences for four of the five biomarkers, which is likely due to the scallop reproductive status at time of sampling. As a source of concern, a location that was identified as a reference site on the basis of inorganic contaminant levels presented the same level of some persistent organic pollutants (DDT and its metabolites than more impacted sites. Finally, potential long-term effects of heavy metal contamination were observed for variegated scallops as genetic diversity was depressed in the most polluted sites.

  16. Population structure and reproductive biology of Atlantoscia floridana (van Name, 1940) (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Paula Beatriz; Bond-Buckup, Georgina

    2005-11-01

    Data were obtained on the population structure and reproduction of Atlantoscia floridana, one of the most common species of terrestrial isopods in the restinga (coastal dune) forests of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. During a 19-month period, a total of 7833 individuals were sampled: 2792 males, 3400 females and 1691 mancas. There was a significant difference between the size of both males and females collected in 2000 and 2001: the mean size was smaller in the second year when individuals in the larger size classes were lacking. Population density varied with season. The minimum population was 131 ind per m 2 individuals, the maximum 1040 ind per m 2 and the mean 450 per m 2. While the overall sex ratio was clearly female biased, the operational sex ratio favored males, and showed no changes with season. Because both ovigerous and post-ovigerous females were present throughout the year, reproduction is considered continuous; however, reproduction peaked during autumn and spring. Ovigerous females were measured (CW = cephalothorax width) and the number of eggs was counted. Fecundity (F) varied from 5 to 23 eggs ( x¯ = 11.18 ± 4) per female, and was expressed by the regression F = -18.48 + 22.59 CW, with the female cephalothorax width varying from 1.04 to 1.68 mm. Marsupial mortality was only 0.9%. Egg production was 588 eggs per m 2 in spring and 660 eggs per m 2 in autumn. Recruitment occurred in all months, and eggs, embryos and marsupial mancas were also present year-round. A. floridana is the dominant species of terrestrial isopod in the study area. Its most remarkable characteristic is its high reproductive investment.

  17. Short-Term and Long-Term Biological Effects of Chronic Chemical Contamination on Natural Populations of a Marine Bivalve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitwieser, Marine; Viricel, Amélia; Graber, Marianne; Murillo, Laurence; Becquet, Vanessa; Churlaud, Carine; Fruitier-Arnaudin, Ingrid; Huet, Valérie; Lacroix, Camille; Pante, Eric; Le Floch, Stéphane; Thomas-Guyon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the effects of chronic chemical contamination on natural populations of marine organisms is complex due to the combined effects of different types of pollutants and environmental parameters that can modulate the physiological responses to stress. Here, we present the effects of a chronic contamination in a marine bivalve by combining multiple approaches that provide information on individual and population health. We sampled variegated scallops (Mimachlamys varia) at sites characterized by different contaminants and contamination levels to study the short and long-term (intergenerational) responses of this species to physiological stress. We used biomarkers (SOD, MDA, GST, laccase, citrate synthase and phosphatases) as indicators of oxidative stress, immune system alteration, mitochondrial respiration and general metabolism, and measured population genetic diversity at each site. In parallel, concentration of 14 trace metals and 45 organic contaminants (PAHs, PCBs, pesticides) in tissues were measured. Scallops were collected outside and during their reproductive season to investigate temporal variability in contaminant and biomarker levels. Our analyses revealed that the levels of two biomarkers (Laccase-type phenoloxidase and malondialdehyde) were significantly correlated with Cd concentration. Additionally, we observed significant seasonal differences for four of the five biomarkers, which is likely due to the scallop reproductive status at time of sampling. As a source of concern, a location that was identified as a reference site on the basis of inorganic contaminant levels presented the same level of some persistent organic pollutants (DDT and its metabolites) than more impacted sites. Finally, potential long-term effects of heavy metal contamination were observed for variegated scallops as genetic diversity was depressed in the most polluted sites.

  18. Observations on health outcome studies of exposure of the worker and the general population during the nuclear reactor accident at three mile island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear reactor accident at Three Mile Island in March 1979 resulted in the release of radioactivity to the environment. Radiation exposure of the workers and the general population living in the vicinity of the damaged nuclear reactor was estimated based on dose measurements, meteorological conditions, demographic characteristics, reconstruction of the source term, and a number of other factors. The projected estimates of potential delayed health effects in the worker and general population, notable cancer, developmental abnormalities of the newborn, and genetic ill-health, were carefully estimated based on then-current knowledge of radiation risks and statistical techniques of analysis. Almost a decade later, we now have epidemiological and statistical data on certain of these health outcomes in the exposed populations at risk. Discussion includes the reliability of the initial radiation risk estimates, the major illnesses of concern, the mental stress and behavioral effects at the time of and following the accident, and the current findings of the ongoing studies of the health outcomes of the vulnerable populations at risk

  19. Towards a reassessment of the role of divorce in suicide outcomes: evidence from five Pacific Rim populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Paul S F; Chen, Ying-Yeh; Yousuf, Saman; Lee, Carmen K M; Kawano, Kenji; Routley, Virginia; Ben Park, B C; Yamauchi, Takashi; Tachimori, Hisateru; Clapperton, Angela; Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang

    2012-07-01

    The connection between divorce and suicide risk in Asia is unclear. To understand the contribution of cultural transitions to suicide among the divorced, we compare age- and sex-specific suicide rates among divorced men and women from five Pacific Rim populations: Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea and the state of Victoria in Australia. On a cultural spectrum, we consider Hong Kong and Taiwan to lie between the more individualistic Australian culture and the more collectivistic Japanese and Korean cultures. Coefficients of aggravation (COA) are also compared. Suicide rates were found to be higher among the divorced than among other marital status groups in all five populations, but this difference was small in Victoria. The effect of divorce was significantly greater for men than for women only in Japan and South Korea. In the other populations, divorced men and women were at equal risk. Age trends in suicide rates for the divorced groups differed across populations. The COAs for the divorced group aged 40 or younger in the East Asian populations were higher than the COAs for older divorced groups, though this was not the case in the Victorian population. Suicide patterns among the divorced in the East Asian populations can be understood in terms of the legacy of Confucian traditions. Gender differences in Japan and South Korea may reflect either gender inequality (male dominance in formal interactions and emotional dependence in domestic life within a deteriorating Confucian family support system) or unique socio-cultural factors among married women. Divorced East Asian groups aged 40 or younger may be at a higher risk of suicide due to individual-level cultural ambivalence combined with a desire for systemic-level emotional interdependence. Social welfare regimes in the four East Asian populations need to fill the vacancy left by retreating traditional family systems. Research implications are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biological Variation and Reference Change Value Data for Serum Neuron-Specific Enolase in a Turkish Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyar, Selcuk; Goruroglu Ozturk, Ozlem; Ziyanoglu Karacor, Esin; Yuzbasioglu Ariyurek, Sedefgul; Sahin, Gulhan; Kibar, Filiz; Yaman, Akgun; Inal, Tamer

    2016-11-01

    Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a recognized biomarker for the assessment of cerebral injury in neurological disorders. This study aims to report a definitive assessment of the biological variation (BV) components of this biomarker, including within-subject BV (CVI), between-subject BV (CVG), index of individuality (II), and reference change value (RCV), in a cohort of Turkish participants using an experimental protocol. Six blood specimens were collected from each of the 13 apparently healthy volunteers (seven women, six men; ranging in age from 23 to 36) on the same day, every 2 weeks for 2 months. Serum specimens were stored at -20°C until analysis. Neuron-specific enolase levels were evaluated in serum samples using an electrochemiluminescence (ECLIA) immunoassay kit with a Roche Cobas e 411 auto-analyser. ANOVA test was used to calculate the variations. The CVI and CVG for NSE were 21.5% and 28.8%, respectively. Analytical variation (CVA) was calculated as 10.2%. Additionally, II and RCV were calculated as 0.74 and 66% (95% confident interval, CI), respectively. As the performance index (PI) was found to be less than 2 (PI = 0.95), it is concluded that the NSE measurements have a desirable performance for analytical imprecision. Since the II was found to be less than 1 (II: 0.74), the reference values will be of little use. Thus, RCV would provide better information for deciding whether a significant change has occurred. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Population dynamics in wastewater treatment plants with enhanced biological phosphorus removal operated with and without nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, N.; Jansen, J.l.C.; Aspegren, H.

    2002-01-01

    belonged to the β Proteobacteria, whereas the rest of the clusters belonged either to the Actinobacteria or to the α Proteobacteria. The relative abundance of Rhodocyclus-related bacteria in the activated sludge varied significantly in both systems during the whole period (from 6 to 18% in BNP, and from 4...... Proteobacteria (part of them Rhodocyclus-related, the identity of the rest unknown) and the Actinobacteria. However, not all of the Rhodocyclus-related bacteria showed 33Pi uptake. The P removal in the investigated plants is thus believed to be mediated by a mixed population consisting of a part...... of the Rhodocyclus-related bacteria, the Actinobacteria and other, yet unidentified bacteria....

  2. Prevalence, outcome, and women’s experiences of external cephalic version in a low-risk population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnders, M.; Offerhaus, P.; Dommelen, P. van; Wiegers, T.; Buitendijk, S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Until recently, external cephalic version to prevent breech presentation at birth was not widely accepted. The objective of our study was to assess the prevalence, outcomes, and women's experiences of external cephalic version to improve the implementation of the procedure in the

  3. The Impact of Engagement with Extracurricular Activities on the Student Experience and Graduate Outcomes for Widening Participation Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mary; Lido, Catherine; Morgan, Jessica; Solomon, Lucy; May, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This research examined extracurricular activity (ECA) effects on students' experiences, outcomes and future job prospects. A survey of diverse undergraduate students, along with alumni and potential employer interviews, revealed differences in students' engagement with ECAs beyond the classroom. Variations between "traditional" and…

  4. Differences in outcome between twins and singletons born very preterm: results from a population-based European cohort.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papiernik, E.; Zeitlin, J.; Delmas, D.; Blondel, B.; Kunzel, W.; Cuttini, M.; Weber, T.; Petrou, S.; Gortner, L.; Kollee, L.A.A.; Draper, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About 10% of twins are born before 32 weeks of gestation and very preterm birth rates are increasing. Preterm twins tend to have more favourable outcomes than singletons of the same gestational age, but fewer data are available for very preterm infants. This study aims to determine

  5. Bridge Over an Aging Population: Examining Longitudinal Relations Among Human Resource Management, Social Support, and Employee Outcomes Among Bridge Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veth, Klaske N.; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; Korzilius, Hubert P. L. M.; De Lange, Annet H.; Emans, Ben J. M.

    2018-01-01

    This two-wave complete panel study aims to examine human resource management (HRM) bundles of practices in relation to social support [i.e., leader–member exchange (LMX), coworker exchange (CWX)] and employee outcomes (i.e., work engagement, employability, and health), within a context of workers aged 65+. Based upon the social exchange theory and the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) framework, it was hypothesized that HRM bundles at Time 1 would increase bridge workers' outcomes at Time 2, and that this relationship would be mediated by perceptions of LMX and CWX at Time 2. Using a longitudinal design, hypotheses were tested in a unique sample of Dutch bridge employees (N = 228). Results of several structural equation modeling analyses revealed no significant associations between HRM bundles, and social support, moreover, no significant associations were found in relation to employee outcomes. However, the results of the best-fitting final model revealed the importance of the impact of social support on employee (65+) outcomes over time. PMID:29755386

  6. A retrospective study comparing outcomes in a midwestern US population after introduction of IADPSG guidelines for gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gene T; Satyan, Megha Teeka; Grothusen, Jill D; Drummond, Kelsi M; Hagen, Grace; Brown, Crystal; Satterwhite, Catherine L

    2017-09-06

    More evidence is required to endorse the 1-step approach for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) for clinical practice. Since 2010, our department has pragmatically allowed faculty to self-select the guidelines they use to screen and diagnose GDM. We sought to compare the maternal and neonatal outcomes from these two simultaneous cohorts. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all singleton pregnancies delivered between October 2011 and -November 2013 at our hospital. Patients were excluded if they had preexisting diabetes, were not screened or screened inappropriately, or their fetus had congenital anomalies. Patients were grouped by their screening strategy, and maternal and neonatal outcomes were analyzed. The 1-step group had a higher incidence of GDM (21.6% versus 5.0%). Initial results suggested higher rates of neonatal hypoglycemia, phototherapy for hyperbilirubinemia, and a lower rate of gestational HTN. After adjustment, these differences disappeared, but a lower rate of large for gestational age (LGA) infants was discovered (adjusted odds ratios (aOR) 0.78). The picture remains unclear as to whether the 1-step approach is associated with significantly improved outcomes compared with the 2-step approach. We did find a lower risk for a LGA infant in our 1-step cohort, but it is unlikely that the 1-step approach would be cost-effective due to the absence of other improved outcomes.

  7. Bridge Over an Aging Population: Examining Longitudinal Relations Among Human Resource Management, Social Support, and Employee Outcomes Among Bridge Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaske N. Veth

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This two-wave complete panel study aims to examine human resource management (HRM bundles of practices in relation to social support [i.e., leader–member exchange (LMX, coworker exchange (CWX] and employee outcomes (i.e., work engagement, employability, and health, within a context of workers aged 65+. Based upon the social exchange theory and the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R framework, it was hypothesized that HRM bundles at Time 1 would increase bridge workers' outcomes at Time 2, and that this relationship would be mediated by perceptions of LMX and CWX at Time 2. Using a longitudinal design, hypotheses were tested in a unique sample of Dutch bridge employees (N = 228. Results of several structural equation modeling analyses revealed no significant associations between HRM bundles, and social support, moreover, no significant associations were found in relation to employee outcomes. However, the results of the best-fitting final model revealed the importance of the impact of social support on employee (65+ outcomes over time.

  8. Bridge Over an Aging Population: Examining Longitudinal Relations Among Human Resource Management, Social Support, and Employee Outcomes Among Bridge Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veth, Klaske N; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M; Korzilius, Hubert P L M; De Lange, Annet H; Emans, Ben J M

    2018-01-01

    This two-wave complete panel study aims to examine human resource management (HRM) bundles of practices in relation to social support [i.e., leader-member exchange (LMX), coworker exchange (CWX)] and employee outcomes (i.e., work engagement, employability, and health), within a context of workers aged 65+. Based upon the social exchange theory and the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) framework, it was hypothesized that HRM bundles at Time 1 would increase bridge workers' outcomes at Time 2, and that this relationship would be mediated by perceptions of LMX and CWX at Time 2. Using a longitudinal design, hypotheses were tested in a unique sample of Dutch bridge employees ( N = 228). Results of several structural equation modeling analyses revealed no significant associations between HRM bundles, and social support, moreover, no significant associations were found in relation to employee outcomes. However, the results of the best-fitting final model revealed the importance of the impact of social support on employee (65+) outcomes over time.

  9. Cultural processes in parenting and youth outcomes: examining a model of racial-ethnic socialization and identity in diverse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, James; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana; Smith, Emilie Phillips; Johnson, Deborah J

    2009-04-01

    We review and summarize the findings across 7 studies contained in the special section titled, "Racial-Ethnic Socialization, Identity, and Youth Outcomes: Excavating Culture." These studies represent a significant advance for research in issues related to the impact of racial-ethnic socialization and identity on child outcomes. All 7 studies attempted to test in whole or part a hypothetical model in which ethnic-racial socialization in families of color is related to child psychosocial and academic outcomes directly and indirectly through effects on self-system variables such as racial-ethnic identity and self-esteem. Two types of racial socialization messages were of particular interest: messages that promote cultural pride (referred to as ethnic or cultural socialization) and messages that address children's exposure to discrimination (referred to as racial socialization). Collectively, the studies suggest that ethnic-racial socialization processes are related to youth outcomes through indirect associations with ethnic-racial identity and self-esteem. Findings were most consistent in the studies with African American youth and some aspects of the model were not supported for American Indian and Chinese youth. Ethnic and racial group differences and directions for future research are discussed.

  10. Investigations on population dynamics and biology of the Tardigrades Hypsibius oberhaeuseri (Doyere, 1840), Milnesium tardigradum (Doyere, 1840) and Echiniscus testudo (Doyere, 1840)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetz, G.

    1987-07-01

    The population dynamics of Hypsibius oberhaeuseri, Milnesium tardigradum and Echiniscus testudo in the lichen Xanthoria parietina (L.) Th. Fr. was investigated over a period of 27 months. In addition, problems regarding the biology of the animals were worked on. New methods of keeping the animals and of radioactive marking of them ( 3 H 2 O; to determine the life-span under natural habits) are described. Seasonal variations in population dynamics were only observed in H. oberhaeuseri and E. testudo whereas M. tardigradum remained at a nearly constant level throughout the yearly cycle. Only extreme precipitation volume, temperature and steam pressure exerted -especially on H. oberhaeuseri - a direct influence on population density. The minimum average life-span was determined for H. oberhaeuseri at 11 months, M. tardigradum at 6 months and E. testudo at 4,5 months. Owing to the fact that M. tardigradum and E. testudo prefer to lay their eggs in specialized deposit areas and because of the different life-style of the animals, the dispersion of the individuals, eggs and casts in the habitat is quite variable: equal (H. ob.), unequal/cumulative (M. tard.) and insular (E. test.). Nutrition, the change in food-habits during the course of life (M. tard.) and the speed of embryonic development are also described and discussed. 280 refs., 38 figs., 10 tabs

  11. Development of computationally predicted Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) networks through data mining and integration of publicly available in vivo, in vitro, phenotype, and biological pathway data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework is increasingly being adopted as a tool for organizing and summarizing the mechanistic information connecting molecular perturbations by environmental stressors with adverse outcomes relevant for ecological and human health outcomes. Ho...

  12. Environmental biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschumi, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    Environmental biology illustrates the functioning of ecosystems and the dynamics of populations with many examples from limnology and terrestrial ecology. On this basis, present environmental problems are analyzed. The present environmental crisis is seen as a result of the failure to observe ecological laws. (orig.) [de

  13. Medical and biological aspects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident influence on the population of the Republic of Moldova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koretskaya, L.; Bahnarel, I.; Cechirlan, N.

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Stress factors action on the population health evaluation, especially on the emergency workers remains on e of the most important problems of the contemporary medicine. In this line the Chernobyl nuclear accident (CNA) that look place on the 26th April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station (CNPS) is an eloquent example. Radioactive substances produced in the result of CNA fell out in a significant part of the Europe, including the Republic of Moldova territory, affecting more than 5,000,000 persons. In CNA consequences liquidation participated a lot of military staff including a great number of reservists. Lack of previous experience in the field (it was the first large-scale nuclear accident) made it impossible to prepare specially trained personnel for CNA limitation and liquidation. Consequently a lot of military staff even from the first days presented to medical authorities with a gamma of symptoms, which were henceforth characterized as somatic diseases after detailed investigations. Ionizing radiation influence on the health status of the participants in diminishing of consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear accident (PDCCNA) evaluation is difficult enough and so calls for an ample multilateral study applying modern diagnostic techniques. Large studies were yet conducted in the Russian Federation, the Ukraine and the Republic of Belarus. Acquired data suggests the existence of noticeable deteriorating effect of ionizing radiation produced secondary to CNA with the increased incidence of health status disturbances in affected population. Approximately 3500 inhabitants from the Republic of Moldova took part in the Chernobyl nuclear accident consequences liquidation. Study objective comprises the determination of clinical, immunological and cytogenetic features in PDCCNA from the Republic of Moldova and their descendants. Between 1996 and 2005 period 850 patients - participants in removal of consequences of Chernobyl

  14. Medical and biological aspects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident influence on the population of the Republic of Moldova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coretchi, L.S.; Bahnarel, I.N.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Stress factors action on the population health evaluation, especially on the emergency workers remains one of the most important problems of the contemporary medicine. In this line the Chernobyl nuclear accident (CNA) that took place on the 26th April 1986 at the Chernobyl nuclear power station (NPS) is an eloquent example. Radioactive substances produced in the result of CNA fell out in a significant part of the Europe, including the Republic of Moldova territory, affecting more than 5,000,000 persons. In CNA consequences liquidation participated a lot of military staff including a great number of reservists. Lack of previous experience in the field (it was the first large-scale nuclear accident) made it impossible to prepare specially trained personnel for CNA limitation and liquidation. Consequently a lot of military staff even from the first days presented to medical authorities with a gamma of symptoms, which were henceforth characterized as somatic diseases after detailed investigations. Ionizing radiation influence on the health status of the participants in diminishing of consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear accident (PDCCNA) evaluation is difficult enough and so calls for an ample multilateral study applying modern diagnostic techniques. Large studies were yet conducted in the Russian Federation, the Ukraine and the Republic of Belarus. Acquired data suggests the existence of noticeable deteriorating effect of ionizing radiation produced secondary to CNA with the increased incidence of health status disturbances in affected population. Approximately 3500 inhabitants from the Republic of Moldova took part in the Chernobyl nuclear accident consequences liquidation. Study objective comprises the determination of clinical, immunological and cytogenetic features in PDCCNA from the Republic of Moldova and their descendants. Between 1996 and 2005 period 850 patients - participants in removal of consequences of Chernobyl

  15. Quality of Life Outcomes in Community-based Mental Health Consumers: Comparisons with Population Norms and Changes over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Stanton, Robert; Hodgetts, Danya; Scott, David

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life is shown to be lower in people diagnosed with mental illness in comparison to the general population. The aim of this study is to examine the Quality of life in a subset of people accessing mental health services in a regional Queensland Centre. Thirty-seven people accessing mental health services completed the SF36 Health Survey on three occasions. Differences and relationships between Physical Composite Scores and Mental Composite Scores, comparisons with Australian population norms, and temporal change in Quality of Life were examined. Physical Composite Scores were significantly different to, but significantly correlated with, Mental Composite Scores on each occasion. Physical Composite Scores and Mental Composite Scores were significantly different to population norms, and did not vary significantly across time. The poor Quality of life of people with mental illness remains a significant challenge for the mental health workforce.

  16. POPULATION BIOLOGY OF SEABOB-SHRIMP Xiphopenaeus kroyeri (Heller, 1862 CAPTURED ON THE SOUTH COAST OF PERNAMBUCO STATE, NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Francisco Corrêa Lopes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to describe the population dynamics and to evaluate the stock of the seabob-shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri on the coast of Pernambuco. Sampling was carried out between August/2011 and July/2012 in Sirinhaém, southern coast of Pernambuco. A total of 1201 individuals were analyzed, 673 females and 528 males. Total length (Lt of females varied from 4.5 to 13.5 cm while the Lt of males ranged between 4.0 and 11.0 cm. The relationship between the Lt and carapace length and Lt and total weight showed negative allometry (males, females and pooled sexes. The slope of the curve "b" was statistically different between males and females for both relationships. Females mature with 8.90 cm. Asymptotic length L∞ was lower for males than for females (12.26 to 14.79 and 10.72 to 11.5 cm, respectively, K was similar between sexes (1.00-2.04 and 1.00-2.63 cm/year-1 respectively as well as the longevity and size at 1st capture (1.50 to 1.97 years and 7.9 to 8.9 cm for males and females, respectively. The results indicate that X. kroyeri in the region is not overexploited for males, however considering females and pooled sexes the stock is near to being fully exploited.

  17. Hepatocellular Carcinoma in the Pediatric Population: A Population Based Clinical Outcomes Study Involving 257 Patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result (SEER Database (1973–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine S. M. Lau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a rare pediatric cancer accounting for 0.5% of all pediatric malignancies. This study examines a large cohort of HCC patients in an effort to define the factors impacting clinical outcomes in pediatric HCC patients compared to adults. Methods. Demographic and clinical data on 63,771 HCC patients (257 pediatric patients ≤ 19 and 63,514 adult patients age ≥ 20 were abstracted from the SEER database (1973–2011. Results. HCC was more common among males (59.5% pediatric and 75.1% adults and Caucasians (50.4% and 50.5%, p 4 cm in size (79.6% versus 62.0%, p=0.02. Pediatric HCC patients undergoing surgery (13.107 versus 8.324 years, p4 cm in Caucasian males. Children with HCC achieve significantly longer mean overall survival compared to adults with HCC, primarily attributable to the more favorable fibrolamellar histologic variant, and more aggressive surgical intervention, which significantly improves survival.

  18. The joint influence of area income, income inequality, and immigrant density on adverse birth outcomes: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giraud Julie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between area characteristics and birth outcomes is modified by race. Whether such associations vary according to social class indicators beyond race has not been assessed. Methods This study evaluated effect modification by maternal birthplace and education of the relationship between neighbourhood characteristics and birth outcomes of newborns from 1999–2003 in the province of Québec, Canada (N = 353,120 births. Areas (N = 143 were defined as administrative local health service delivery districts. Multi-level logistic regression was used to model the association between three area characteristics (median household income, immigrant density and income inequality and the two outcomes preterm birth (PTB and small-for-gestational age (SGA birth. Effect modification by social class indicators was evaluated in analyses stratified according to maternal birthplace and education. Results Relative to the lowest tertile, high median household income was associated with SGA birth among Canadian-born mothers (odds ratio (OR 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.06, 1.20 and mothers with high school education or less (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.02, 1.24. Associations between median household income and PTB were weaker. Relative to the highest tertile, low immigrant density was associated with a lower odds of PTB among foreign-born mothers (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.63, 1.00 but a higher odds of PTB among Canadian-born mothers (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07, 1.21. Associations with income inequality were weak or absent. Conclusion The association between area factors and birth outcomes is modified by maternal birthplace and education. Studies have found that race interacts in a similar manner. Public health policies focussed on perinatal health must consider the interaction between individual and area characteristics.

  19. Early life predictors of adolescent suicidal thoughts and adverse outcomes in two population-based cohort studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Dykxhoorn

    Full Text Available Understanding suicidality has proven challenging given the complex aetiology in early childhood. Being able to accurately predict groups at increased risk of developing suicidal thoughts may aid in the development of targeted prevention programs that mitigate increased vulnerability. Further, the predictors of suicidal thoughts may be shared with other outcomes in adolescence. Previous research has linked many factors to suicidality, so the objective of this study was to consider how these factors may act together to increase risk of suicidal thoughts and other non-mental health outcomes.Two longitudinal datasets were used in this analysis: the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY and the Avon Longitudinal Survey of Parents and Children (ALSPAC. A Classification and Regression Tree model comprised of 75 factors describing early childhood was constructed to identify subgroups of adolescents at high risk of suicidal thoughts in the NLSCY and was validated in ALSPAC. These subgroups were investigated to see if they also had elevated rates of antisocial behaviour, substance misuse, poor physical health, poor mental health, risky health behaviours, and/or poor academic performance.The sensitivity was calculated to be 22·7%, specificity was 89·2%, positive predictive value 17·8%, and negative predictive value 91·8% and had similar accuracy in the validation dataset. The models were better at predicting other adverse outcomes compared to suicidal thoughts.There are groups of risk factors present in early life that can predict higher risk of suicidality in adolescence. Notably, these factors were also predictive of a range of adverse outcomes in adolescence.

  20. Parent-child aggression, adult-partner violence, and child outcomes: A prospective, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneta, E K; White, M; Mezzacappa, E

    2017-06-01

    Parent-child physical aggression (PCPA) and adult intimate partner violence (IPV) are common forms of family violence that often co-occur. Their deleterious effects on children and adolescents have been well documented. However, important questions remain regarding whether the type of violence exposure, the experience of one or both forms, the chronicity of violent experiences, and the age, gender, and SES of the child, differentially influence developmental outcomes. Data on 2810 children from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods were analyzed. Children aged 3-9 at the outset were assessed three times, at 3-year intervals. Primary caregivers reported on IPV, PCPA, and children's externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Children's externalizing and internalizing symptoms were examined as a function of time, age, gender, socioeconomic status (SES), and the time-varying effects of cumulative IPV and PCPA exposure. Cumulative experiences of IPV and PCPA each adversely affected the developmental trajectories of both externalizing and internalizing symptoms, but in different ways; and they did so independently of participants' age, gender, or SES, which all functioned as significant, independent predictors of child outcomes. PCPA was by far the more potent of the two forms of violence; and when both forms occurred, they worked additively to affect outcomes. Important questions remain regarding the reasons for the differential potency of these two forms of family violence on childhood symptoms, and related implications for interventions, as well as for later adult behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele and outcomes of traumatic spinal cord injury in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chongyi; Ji, Guangrong; Liu, Qingpeng; Yao, Meng

    2011-10-01

    The association between apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon 4 (ε4) allele and outcomes of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is still controversial and ambiguous. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that APOE polymorphisms are associated with outcomes after SCI in Chinese Han patients. APOE polymorphisms were determined in 100 patients with cervical SCI (C3-C8). The genotype frequency of this polymorphism was determined by using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Patients with an APOE ε4 allele had significantly less motor recovery during rehabilitation than did patients without an APOE ε4 allele (mean 3.7 vs. 6.1; P = 0.04) and a longer rehabilitation length of stay (LOS) (mean 117.4 vs. 94.5; P = 0.02), but better sensory-pinprick recovery (mean 6.1 vs. 4.0; P = 0.03). There were no significant differences by APOE ε4 allele status in sensory-light touch recovery or acute LOS. This study suggests that the APOE ε4 allele is associated with outcomes after SCI and longer rehabilitation LOS in Chinese Han patients.

  2. Contribution of chronic conditions to functional limitations using a multinomial outcome: Results for the older population in Belgium and Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokota, R.T.C. (Renata T.C.); W.J. Nusselder (Wilma); J-M. Robine (Jean-Marie); J. Tafforeau (Jean); P. Deboosere (Patrick); Moura, L. (Lenildo); Andrade, S.S.C.A. (Silvânia S.C.A.); Castro, S.S. (Shamyr S.); H. van Oyen (Herman)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The global phenomenon of population ageing is creating new challenges in both high and middle income countries, as functional limitations are expected to increase with age. The attribution method has been proposed to identify which conditions contribute most to disability

  3. Are blood pressure and diabetes additive or synergistic risk factors? outcome in 8494 subjects randomly recruited from 10 populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehestedt, Thomas; Hansen, Tine W; Li, Yan

    2011-01-01

    were not different from those of diabetic patients (P-values for interaction, 0.09¿P¿0.72). In conclusion, in a large international population-based database, both diabetes mellitus and BP contributed equally to the risk of cardiovascular complications without evidence for a synergistic effect...

  4. Peri-operative blood transfusion for resected colon cancer: Practice patterns and outcomes in a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunil V; Brennan, Kelly E; Nanji, Sulaiman; Karim, Safiya; Merchant, Shaila; Booth, Christopher M

    2017-12-01

    Literature suggests that peri-operative blood transfusion among patients with resected colon cancer may be associated with inferior long-term survival. The study objective was to characterize this association in our population. This is a retrospective cohort study using the population-based Ontario Cancer Registry (2002-2008). Pathology reports were obtained for a 25% random sample of all cases and constituted the study population. Log binomial regression was used to identify factors associated with transfusion. Cox proportional hazards model explored the association between transfusion and cancer specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS). The study population included 7198 patients: 18% stage I, 36% stage II, 40% stage III, and 6% stage IV. Twenty-eight percent of patients were transfused. Factors independently associated with transfusion included advanced age (pTransfusion was associated with inferior CSS (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.38-1.65) and OS (HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.41-1.63), after adjusting for important confounders. Peri-operative transfusion rates among patients with colon cancer have decreased over time. Transfusion is associated with inferior long-term CSS and OS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Validity of the EQ-5D as a generic health outcome instrument in a heroin-dependent population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zanden, Bart P.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Blanken, Peter; de Borgie, Corianne A. J. M.; van Ree, Jan M.; van den Brink, Wim

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the validity of the EuroQol (EQ-5D) in a population of chronic, treatment-resistant heroin-dependent patients. METHODS: The EQ-5D is studied relative to the Maudsley Addiction Profile (MAP), the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90) and the European Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI)

  6. Effects of in vitro fertilization and maternal characteristics on perinatal outcomes : a population-based study using siblings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seggers, Jorien; Pontesilli, Martina; Ravelli, Anita C. J.; Painter, Rebecca C.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Heineman, Maas Jan; Repping, Sjoerd; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Roseboom, Tessa J.; Ensing, Sabine

    Objective: To study birthweight in consecutively born sibling singletons conceived with and without in vitro fertilization (IVF) to disentangle the effects of maternal characteristics from those of the IVF treatment itself. Design: Population-based study. Setting: Not applicable. Patient(s):

  7. Adequate Prenatal Care Reduces the Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes in Women with History of Infertility: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibekova, Raushan; Huang, Jian-Pei; Chen, Yi-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of various measures of prenatal care on adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with a history of infertility. Study Design A retrospective cohort study. Methods Data were derived by linking 2 large nationwide population-based datasets, the National Health Insurance Research Database and Taiwan Birth Certificate Registry. The study sample included 15,056 women with an infertility diagnosis and 60,224 randomly selected women without infertility matched to the study sample by maternal age. A conditional logistic regression analysis was performed for the analysis. Results Women diagnosed with infertility respectively had 1.39 (95% CI, 1.06~1.83), 1.15 (95% CI, 1.08~1.24), 1.13 (95% CI, 1.08~1.18), and 1.08 (95% CI, 1.05~1.12) higher odds of having very low birth weight (VLBW) babies, preterm births, labor complications, and cesarean sections (CSs) compared to women without infertility. Inadequate numbers of total and major prenatal visits and late initiation of prenatal care increased the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with infertility, especially the risk of a VLBW baby. However, no significant associations were found for the risks of adverse birth outcomes in infertile women with adequate prenatal care compared to fertile women with adequate care. Conclusions Study findings suggest that adequate prenatal care can reduce the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with infertility. PMID:24358347

  8. Impact of the Implementation of New WHO Diagnostic Criteria for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus on Prevalence and Perinatal Outcomes: A Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Erjavec

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine the impact of the implementation of new WHO diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM on prevalence, predictors, and perinatal outcomes in Croatian population. Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed using data from medical birth certificates collected in 2010 and 2014. Data collected include age, height, and weight before and at the end of pregnancy, while perinatal outcome was assessed by onset of labor, mode of delivery, and Apgar score. Results. A total of 81.748 deliveries and 83.198 newborns were analysed. Prevalence of GDM increased from 2.2% in 2010 to 4.7% in 2014. GDM was a significant predictor of low Apgar score (OR 1.656, labor induction (OR 2.068, and caesarean section (OR 1.567 in 2010, while in 2014 GD was predictive for labor induction (OR 1.715 and caesarean section (OR 1.458 only. Age was predictive for labor induction only in 2014 and for caesarean section in both years, while BMI before pregnancy was predictive for all observed perinatal outcomes in both years. Conclusions. Despite implementation of new guidelines, GDM remains burdened with increased risk of labor induction and caesarean section, but no longer with low Apgar score, while BMI remains an important predictor for all three perinatal outcomes.

  9. Short spatio-temporal variations in the population dynamics and biology of the deep-water rose shrimp Parapenaeus longirostris (Decapoda: Crustacea in the western Mediterranean

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    Beatriz Guijarro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The deep-water rose shrimp Parapenaeus longirostris is a demersal decapod crustacean that is commercially exploited by trawl fleets. The present work compares its population dynamics, biology and condition in two locations (southern and north-western Mallorca in the Balearic Islands, western Mediterranean, separated by a distance of 120 km with different environmental conditions and explores the relationships between the species and certain environmental factors. Six multidisciplinary bimonthly surveys were carried out during 2003 and 2004 in these two locations (between 150 and 750 m depth in order to collect data on the demersal species with bottom trawl, the hydrography (temperature and salinity with CTD casts, and trophic resources (zooplankton in the water column and suprabenthos with Bongo net and Macer-GIROQ sledge respectively and sediments with a Shipeck dredge. The trawl fleets from both locations were monitored by monthly on board sampling and daily landings obtained from sales bills. Additional data was obtained from other trawl surveys. Temporal differences were detected both annually, with a decreasing trend over the last years in species abundance, and seasonally, in the biological indexes analysed. Bathymetric differences were also found in abundance, mean length, sex-ratio and condition of females. There were clear differences between the two locations studied, with higher abundance, condition and mean length and a lower length at first maturity for females in the north-western location. Trophic conditions could act as a link between geo-physical and biological changes. These short spatio-temporal differences could be due to the higher productivity found at this location, with higher density of preferred prey for the studied species together with adequate seafloor topography, sediment composition and hydrographical characteristics.

  10. Independent replication of a melanoma subtype gene signature and evaluation of its prognostic value and biological correlates in a population cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsengimana, Jérémie; Laye, Jon; Filia, Anastasia; Walker, Christy; Jewell, Rosalyn; Van den Oord, Joost J; Wolter, Pascal; Patel, Poulam; Sucker, Antje; Schadendorf, Dirk; Jönsson, Göran B; Bishop, D Timothy; Newton-Bishop, Julia

    2015-05-10

    Development and validation of robust molecular biomarkers has so far been limited in melanoma research. In this paper we used a large population-based cohort to replicate two published gene signatures for melanoma classification. We assessed the signatures prognostic value and explored their biological significance by correlating them with factors known to be associated with survival (vitamin D) or etiological routes (nevi, sun sensitivity and telomere length). Genomewide microarray gene expressions were profiled in 300 archived tumors (224 primaries, 76 secondaries). The two gene signatures classified up to 96% of our samples and showed strong correlation with melanoma specific survival (P=3 x 10(-4)), Breslow thickness (P=5 x 10(-10)), ulceration (P=9.x10-8) and mitotic rate (P=3 x 10(-7)), adding prognostic value over AJCC stage (adjusted hazard ratio 1.79, 95%CI 1.13-2.83), as previously reported. Furthermore, molecular subtypes were associated with season-adjusted serum vitamin D at diagnosis (P=0.04) and genetically predicted telomere length (P=0.03). Specifically, molecular high-grade tumors were more frequent in patients with lower vitamin D levels whereas high immune tumors came from patients with predicted shorter telomeres. Our data confirm the utility of molecular biomarkers in melanoma prognostic estimation using tiny archived specimens and shed light on biological mechanisms likely to impact on cancer initiation and progression.

  11. Mid-term study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation in an Asian population with severe aortic stenosis: two-year Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Nicholas; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Yip, Wei Luen James; Chan, Siew Pang; Poh, Kian-Keong; Kong, William Kok-Fai; Teoh, Kristine Leok Kheng; Yeo, Tiong Cheng; Tan, Huay Cheem; Tay, Edgar Lik Wui

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an effective treatment for high-risk or inoperative patients with severe aortic stenosis. Given the unique characteristics of Asian populations, questions regarding mid-term outcomes in Asians undergoing TAVI have yet to be addressed. We evaluated the two-year clinical outcomes of TAVI in an Asian population using Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions. This prospective study recruited 59 patients from a major academic medical centre in Singapore. The main outcomes were two-year survival rates, peri-procedural complications, symptom improvement, valvular function and assessment of learning curve. Mean age was 76.8 years (61.0% male), mean body surface area 1.6 m 2 and mean logistic EuroSCORE 18.7%. Survival was 93.2%, 86.0% and 79.1% at 30 days, one year and two years, respectively. At 30 days post TAVI, the rate of stroke was 1.7%, life-threatening bleeding 5.1%, acute kidney injury 25.0%, major vascular complication 5.1%, and new permanent pacemaker implantation 6.8%. 29.3% of TAVI patients were rehospitalised (47.1% cardiovascular-related) within one year. These composite outcomes were measured: device success (93.2%); early safety (79.7%); clinical efficacy (66.1%); and time-related valve safety (84.7%). Univariate analysis found these predictors of two-year all-cause mortality: logistic EuroSCORE (hazard ratio [HR] 1.07; p < 0.001); baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (HR 0.97; p = 0.048); and acute kidney injury (HR 5.33; p = 0.022). Multivariate analysis identified non-transfemoral TAVI as a predictor of cardiovascular-related two-year mortality (HR 14.64; p = 0.008). Despite the unique clinical differences in Asian populations, this registry demonstrated favourable mid-term clinical and safety outcomes in Asians undergoing TAVI. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  12. Validation of birth outcomes from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS): population-based analysis from the Massachusetts Outcome Study of Assisted Reproductive Technology (MOSART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; Gopal, Daksha; Liberman, Rebecca F; Anderka, Marlene; Kotelchuck, Milton; Luke, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    To assess the validity of outcome data reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) compared with data from vital records and the birth defects registry in Massachusetts. Longitudinal cohort. Not applicable. A total of 342,035 live births and fetal deaths from Massachusetts mothers giving birth in the state from July 1, 2004, to December 31, 2008; 9,092 births and fetal deaths were from mothers who had conceived with the use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and whose cycle data had been reported to the SART CORS. Not applicable. Percentage agreement between maternal race and ethnicity, delivery outcome (live birth or fetal death), plurality (singleton, twin, or triplet+), delivery date, and singleton birth weight reported in the SART CORS versus vital records; sensitivity and specificity for birth defects among singletons as reported in the SART CORS versus the Massachusetts Birth Defects Monitoring Program (BDMP). There was >95% agreement between the SART CORS and vital records for fields of maternal race/ethnicity, live birth/fetal death, and plurality; birth outcome date was within 1 day with 94.9% agreement and birth weight was within 100 g with 89.6% agreement. In contrast, sensitivity for report of any birth defect was 38.6%, with a range of 18.4%-50.0%, for specific birth defect categories. Although most SART CORS outcome fields are accurately reported, birth defect variables showed poor sensitivity compared with the gold standard data from the BDMP. We suggest that reporting of birth defects be discontinued. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes following treatment of adolescent and young adult cancer: a population-based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima A Haggar

    Full Text Available To investigate obstetric and perinatal outcomes among female survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA cancers and their offspring.Using multivariate analysis of statewide linked data, outcomes of all first completed pregnancies (n = 1894 in female survivors of AYA cancer diagnosed in Western Australia during the period 1982-2007 were compared with those among females with no cancer history. Comparison pregnancies were matched by maternal age-group, parity and year of delivery.Compared with the non-cancer group, female survivors of AYA cancer had an increased risk of threatened abortion (adjusted relative risk 2.09, 95% confidence interval 1.51-2.74, gestational diabetes (2.65, 2.08-3.57, pre-eclampsia (1.32, 1.04-1.87, post-partum hemorrhage (2.83, 1.92-4.67, cesarean delivery (2.62, 2.22-3.04, and maternal postpartum hospitalization>5 days (3.01, 1.72-5.58, but no excess risk of threatened preterm delivery, antepartum hemorrhage, premature rupture of membranes, failure of labor to progress or retained placenta. Their offspring had an increased risk of premature birth (<37 weeks: 1.68, 1.21-2.08, low birth weight (<2500 g: 1.51, 1.23-2.12, fetal growth restriction (3.27, 2.45-4.56, and neonatal distress indicated by low Apgar score (<7 at 1 minute (2.83, 2.28-3.56, need for resuscitation (1.66, 1.27-2.19 or special care nursery admission (1.44, 1.13-1.78. Congenital abnormalities and perinatal deaths (intrauterine or ≤7 days of birth were not increased among offspring of survivors.Female survivors of AYA cancer have moderate excess risks of adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes arising from subsequent pregnancies that may require additional surveillance or intervention.

  14. Big Data, Big Research: Implementing Population Health-Based Research Models and Integrating Care to Reduce Cost and Improve Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoushiravani, Afshin A; Patton, Jason; Sayeed, Zain; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-10-01

    Recent trends in clinical research have moved attention toward reporting clinical outcomes and resource consumption associated with various care processes. This change is the result of technological advancement and a national effort to critically assess health care delivery. As orthopedic surgeons traverse an unchartered health care environment, a more complete understanding of how clinical research is conducted using large data sets is necessary. The purpose of this article is to review various advantages and disadvantages of large data sets available for orthopaedic use, examine their ideal use, and report how they are being implemented nationwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ligand binding affinity at the insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A and subsequent IR-A tyrosine phosphorylation kinetics are important determinants of mitogenic biological outcomes.

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    Harinda eRajapaksha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The insulin receptor (IR is a tyrosine kinase receptor that can mediate both metabolic and mitogenic biological actions. The IR isoform-A (IR-A arises from alternative splicing of exon 11 and has different ligand binding and signalling properties compared to the IR isoform-B. The IR-A not only binds insulin but also insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II with high affinity. IGF-II acting through the IR-A promotes cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration by activating some unique signalling molecules compared to those activated by insulin. This observation led us to investigate whether the different IR-A signalling outcomes in response to IGF-II and insulin could be attributed to phosphorylation of a different subset of IR-A tyrosine residues or to the phosphorylation kinetics. We correlated IR-A phosphorylation to activation of molecules involved in mitogenic and metabolic signalling (MAPK and Akt and receptor internalisation rates (related to mitogenic signalling. We also extended this study to incorporate two ligands that are known to promote predominantly mitogenic ([His4, Tyr15, Thr49, Ile51] IGF-I, qIGF-I or metabolic (S597 peptide biological actions, to see if common mechanisms can be used to define mitogenic or metabolic signalling through the IR-A. The 3-fold lower mitogenic action of IGF-II compared to insulin was associated with a decreased potency in activation of Y960, Y1146, Y1150, Y1151, Y1316 and Y1322, in MAPK phosphorylation and in IR-A internalization. With the poorly mitogenic S597 peptide it was a decreased rate of tyrosine phosphory