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Sample records for polytene chromosome maps

  1. Polytene chromosome map and inversion polymorphism in Drosophila mediopunctata

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    Galina Ananina

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila mediopunctata belongs to the tripunctata group, and is one of the commonest Drosophila species collected in some places in Brazil, especially in the winter. A standard map of the polytene chromosomes is presented. The breakpoints of the naturally occurring chromosomal rearrangements are marked on the map. The distribution of breaking points through the chromosomes of D. mediopunctata is apparently non-random. Chromosomes X, II and IV show inversion polymorphisms. Chromosome II is the most polymorphic, with 17 inversions, 8 inversions in the distal region and 9 in the proximal region. Chromosome X has four different gene arrangements, while chromosome IV has only two.

  2. Polytene chromosome maps and RAPD polymorphisms in Glossina austeni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gariou-Papalexiou, A.; Yannopoulos, G.; Zacharopoulou, A.; Robinson, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    A combined methodology of cloned RAPD (random amplification of polymorphic DNA) polymorphic bands and in situ hybridisation to polytene chromosomes is an efficient way to initiate construction of a physical and genetic map of insect disease vectors (Dimopoulos et al. 1996, Mutebi et al. 1997). The studies presented here are the first step in developing this approach in tsetse flies. This technology will be used to support tsetse sterile insect technique (SIT) programmes by providing tools with which population structure and isolation can be assessed and genetic markers that can be used to differentiate released flies from wild flies identified. An added benefit is their possible use in unravelling epidemiological complexity and problems regarding speciation (Besansky et al. 1997). Polytene chromosomes of Diptera have been shown to be excellent material for the study of chromosome structure and function as well as for an understanding of the genetics of natural populations (Lefevre 1976). They provide a means for the accurate mapping of chromosome rearrangements and the precise localisation of genes, using both rearrangement analysis and in situ hybridisation. Previous reports on the cytology of the tsetse flies (Riordan 1968, Maudlin 1970, 1979, Southern et al. 1972, Southern and Pell 1973, Davies and Southern 1976, Southern 1980) have described the basic mitotic karyotype in several Glossina species, and demonstrated the presence of well banded polytene chromosomes in pupal trichogen cells (Southern and Pell 1974, 1981, Pell and Southern 1976). Polytene chromosomes were described for G. austeni Newstead, G. morsitans morsitans Westwood, G. pallidipes Austen and G. fuscipes fuscipes Newstead, but these descriptions are difficult to work with as they are drawings of polytene chromosome elements. In this paper, the photographic chromosome maps of pupal scutellar bristles of G. austeni are presented. They show that these chromosomes can be used with much greater ease

  3. Polytene chromosomal maps of 11 Drosophila species: the order of genomic scaffolds inferred from genetic and physical maps.

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    Schaeffer, Stephen W; Bhutkar, Arjun; McAllister, Bryant F; Matsuda, Muneo; Matzkin, Luciano M; O'Grady, Patrick M; Rohde, Claudia; Valente, Vera L S; Aguadé, Montserrat; Anderson, Wyatt W; Edwards, Kevin; Garcia, Ana C L; Goodman, Josh; Hartigan, James; Kataoka, Eiko; Lapoint, Richard T; Lozovsky, Elena R; Machado, Carlos A; Noor, Mohamed A F; Papaceit, Montserrat; Reed, Laura K; Richards, Stephen; Rieger, Tania T; Russo, Susan M; Sato, Hajime; Segarra, Carmen; Smith, Douglas R; Smith, Temple F; Strelets, Victor; Tobari, Yoshiko N; Tomimura, Yoshihiko; Wasserman, Marvin; Watts, Thomas; Wilson, Robert; Yoshida, Kiyohito; Markow, Therese A; Gelbart, William M; Kaufman, Thomas C

    2008-07-01

    The sequencing of the 12 genomes of members of the genus Drosophila was taken as an opportunity to reevaluate the genetic and physical maps for 11 of the species, in part to aid in the mapping of assembled scaffolds. Here, we present an overview of the importance of cytogenetic maps to Drosophila biology and to the concepts of chromosomal evolution. Physical and genetic markers were used to anchor the genome assembly scaffolds to the polytene chromosomal maps for each species. In addition, a computational approach was used to anchor smaller scaffolds on the basis of the analysis of syntenic blocks. We present the chromosomal map data from each of the 11 sequenced non-Drosophila melanogaster species as a series of sections. Each section reviews the history of the polytene chromosome maps for each species, presents the new polytene chromosome maps, and anchors the genomic scaffolds to the cytological maps using genetic and physical markers. The mapping data agree with Muller's idea that the majority of Drosophila genes are syntenic. Despite the conservation of genes within homologous chromosome arms across species, the karyotypes of these species have changed through the fusion of chromosomal arms followed by subsequent rearrangement events.

  4. Transmission electron microscopic method for gene mapping on polytene chromosomes by in situ hybridization

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    Wu, Madeline; Davidson, Norman

    1981-01-01

    A transmission electron microscope method for gene mapping by in situ hybridization to Drosophila polytene chromosomes has been developed. As electron-opaque labels, we use colloidal gold spheres having a diameter of 25 nm. The spheres are coated with a layer of protein to which Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA is photochemically crosslinked. Poly(dT) tails are added to the 3' OH ends of these DNA strands, and poly(dA) tails are added to the 3' OH ends of a fragmented cloned Drosophila DN...

  5. Drosophila polytene chromosome bands formed by gene introns.

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    Zhimulev, I F; Boldyreva, L V; Demakova, O V; Poholkova, G V; Khoroshko, V A; Zykova, T Yu; Lavrov, S A; Belyaeva, E S

    2016-01-01

    Genetic organization of bands and interbands in polytene chromosomes has long remained a puzzle for geneticists. It has been recently demonstrated that interbands typically correspond to the 5'-ends of house-keeping genes, whereas adjacent loose bands tend to be composed of coding sequences of the genes. In the present work, we made one important step further and mapped two large introns of ubiquitously active genes on the polytene chromosome map. We show that alternative promoter regions of these genes map to interbands, whereas introns and coding sequences found between those promoters correspond to loose grey bands. Thus, a gene having its long intron "sandwiched" between to alternative promoters and a common coding sequence may occupy two interbands and one band in the context of polytene chromosomes. Loose, partially decompacted bands appear to host large introns.

  6. Electron microscope mapping of the pericentric and intercalary heterochromatic regions of the polytene chromosomes of the mutant Suppressor of underreplication in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Semeshin, F; Belyaeva, S; Zhimulev, F

    2001-12-01

    Breaks and ectopic contacts in the heterochromatic regions of Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes are the manifestations of the cytological effects of DNA underreplication. Their appearance makes these regions difficult to map. The Su(UR)ES gene, which controls the phenomenon, has been described recently. Mutation of this locus gives rise to new blocks of material in the pericentric heterochromatic regions and causes the disappearance of breaks and ectopic contacts in the intercalary heterochromatic regions, thereby making the banding pattern distinct and providing better opportunities for mapping of the heterochromatic regions in polytene chromosomes. Here, we present the results of an electron microscope study of the heterochromatic regions. In the wild-type salivary glands, the pericentric regions correspond to the beta-heterochromatin and do not show the banding pattern. The most conspicuous cytological effect of the Su(UR)ES mutation is the formation of a large banded chromosome fragment comprising at least 25 bands at the site where the 3L and 3R proximal arms connect. In the other pericentric regions, 20CF, 40BF and 41BC, 15, 12 and 9 new bands were revealed, respectively. A large block of densely packed material appears in the most proximal part of the fourth chromosome. An electron microscope analysis of 26 polytene chromosome regions showing the characteristic features of intercalary heterochromatin was also performed. Suppression of DNA underreplication in the mutant transforms the bands with weak spots into large single bands.

  7. Genome-wide mapping of Painting of fourth on Drosophila melanogaster salivary gland polytene chromosomes.

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    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Larsson, Jan

    2014-12-01

    The protein Painting of fourth (POF) in Drosophila melanogaster specifically targets and stimulates expression output from the heterochromatic 4th chromosome, thereby representing an autosome specific protein [1,2]. Despite the high specificity for chromosome 4 genes, POF is occasionally observed binding to the cytological region 2L:31 in males and females [3] and two loci on the X-chromosome, PoX1 and PoX2 only in females [4]. Here we provide a detailed description of the experimental design and analysis of the tiling array data presented by Lundberg and colleagues in G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics 2013 [4], where the female specific POF binding to PoX1 and PoX2 loci on the X chromosome was reported. We show the genome-wide high resolution binding profile of the POF protein where these different POF binding sites are detected. The complete data set is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (accession: GSE45402).

  8. Identical functional organization of nonpolytene and polytene chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Tatyana Yu Vatolina

    Full Text Available Salivary gland polytene chromosomes demonstrate banding pattern, genetic meaning of which is an enigma for decades. Till now it is not known how to mark the band/interband borders on physical map of DNA and structures of polytene chromosomes are not characterized in molecular and genetic terms. It is not known either similar banding pattern exists in chromosomes of regular diploid mitotically dividing nonpolytene cells. Using the newly developed approach permitting to identify the interband material and localization data of interband-specific proteins from modENCODE and other genome-wide projects, we identify physical limits of bands and interbands in small cytological region 9F13-10B3 of the X chromosome in D. melanogaster, as well as characterize their general molecular features. Our results suggests that the polytene and interphase cell line chromosomes have practically the same patterns of bands and interbands reflecting, probably, the basic principle of interphase chromosome organization. Two types of bands have been described in chromosomes, early and late-replicating, which differ in many aspects of their protein and genetic content. As appeared, origin recognition complexes are located almost totally in the interbands of chromosomes.

  9. [Late-replicating regions in salivary gland polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster].

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    Kolesnikov, T D; Andreenkova, N G; Beliaeva, E S; Goncharov, F P; Zykova, T Iu; Boldyreva, L V; Pokholkova, g V; Zhimulev, I F

    2013-01-01

    About 240 specific regions that are replicated at the very end of the S-phase have been identified in D. melanogaster polytene chromosomes. These regions have a repressive chromatine state, low gene density, long intergenic distances and are enriched in tissue specific genes. In polytene chromosomes, about a quarter of these regions have no enough time to complete replication. As a result, underreplication zones represented by fewer DNA copy number, appear. We studied 60 chromosome regions that demonstrated the most pronounced under-replication. By comparing the location of these regions on a molecular map with syntenic blocks found earlier for Drosophila species by von Grotthuss et al., 2010, we have shown that across the genus Drosophila, these regions tend to have conserved gene order. This forces us to assume the existence of evolutionary mechanisms aimed at maintaining the integrity of these regions.

  10. Chromatin Structure in Bands and Interbands of Polytene Chromosomes Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Avogadro, A.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van der Werf, Kees; Otto, Cornelis; Kraan, Yvonne M.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster, observed from squash preparations, and chromosomes from Chironomus thummi thummi, investigated under physiological conditions, are imaged using an Atomic Force Microscope. Various chromatin fiber structures can be observed with high detail in fixed

  11. Cytological and cytochemical characterization of the polytene chromosomes of Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera: chironomidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, F. de; Leoncini, O.

    1985-01-01

    The chromosome complement of a Brazilian Chironomus Species, C. Sancticaroli, was analyzed cytochemically. The polytene Chromosomes were identified and characterized and the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) were located by a technique of in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence. Constitutive heterochromatin and its distribution in relation to the NORs were studied. (Author) [pt

  12. Cytological and cytochemical characterization of the polytene chromosomes of Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera: chironomidae)

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    Freitas, F. de; Leoncini, O.; Floeter-Winter, L.M.

    1985-03-01

    The chromosome complement of a Brazilian Chironomus Species, C. Sancticaroli, was analyzed cytochemically. The polytene Chromosomes were identified and characterized and the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) were located by a technique of in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence. Constitutive heterochromatin and its distribution in relation to the NORs were studied.

  13. Distribution of X-ray induced chromosome rearrangement breaks along the polytene chromosomes of Anopheles messeae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleshkova, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    Distribution of chromosomal aberrations localization along polytene chromosomes (aoutosomes) of salivary glands of malarial mosquito. Anopheles messeae is presented. Induced aberrations in F 1 posterity from X-ray irradiated fecundated females are studied. Poipts of breaks of inversions and trapslocations are localized separately. There are no considerable dif-- ferences in the distribution character of two types of aberrations. Over the length of autosomes the breaks are more frequent in distal halves, their frequency in proximal parts anally in near centromeric regions of chromosomes is reduced. Concentration of breaks in certain ''hot points'' of the chromosomes is pointed out. Comparison of distribution of actual and expected frequencies of break points according to chi 2 criterion revealed highly fiducial discrepancies, testifying to uneven participation of different regions of chromosomes in aberration formation. Similarities and differences of the data obtained from analogous ones, demonstrated in Drosophila, as well as possible reasons for the distribution unevennes are discussed. On the basis of analysis of intrinsic and literature data a supposition is made that the ''hot points'' (break concentrations) can be considered as localizaion markers of intercalary heterochromatin

  14. Polytene Chromosomes - A Portrait of Functional Organization of the Drosophila Genome.

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    Zykova, Tatyana Yu; Levitsky, Victor G; Belyaeva, Elena S; Zhimulev, Igor F

    2018-04-01

    This mini-review is devoted to the problem genetic meaning of main polytene chromosome structures - bands and interbands. Generally, densely packed chromatin forms black bands, moderately condensed regions form grey loose bands, whereas decondensed regions of the genome appear as interbands. Recent progress in the annotation of the Drosophila genome and epigenome has made it possible to compare the banding pattern and the structural organization of genes, as well as their activity. This was greatly aided by our ability to establish the borders of bands and interbands on the physical map, which allowed to perform comprehensive side-by-side comparisons of cytology, genetic and epigenetic maps and to uncover the association between the morphological structures and the functional domains of the genome. These studies largely conclude that interbands 5'-ends of housekeeping genes that are active across all cell types. Interbands are enriched with proteins involved in transcription and nucleosome remodeling, as well as with active histone modifications. Notably, most of the replication origins map to interband regions. As for grey loose bands adjacent to interbands, they typically host the bodies of house-keeping genes. Thus, the bipartite structure composed of an interband and an adjacent grey band functions as a standalone genetic unit. Finally, black bands harbor tissue-specific genes with narrow temporal and tissue expression profiles. Thus, the uniform and permanent activity of interbands combined with the inactivity of genes in bands forms the basis of the universal banding pattern observed in various Drosophila tissues.

  15. Polytene chromosomes of monogenic and amphogenic Chrysomya species (Calliphoridae, Diptera): analysis of banding patterns and in situ hybridization with Drosophila sex determining gene sequences.

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    Puchalla, S

    1994-03-01

    Standard maps for the five banded polytene chromosomes found in trichogen cell nuclei of the monogenic blowfly Chrysomya rufifacies and the amphogenic Chrysomya pinguis are presented. The chromosomes are highly homologous in the two species; differences in banding patterns are predominantly caused by one pericentric and ten paracentric inversions. In chromosome 5 of the amphogenic Chrysomya phaonis, also analysed in this paper, an additional paracentric inversion was observed. The distribution of species specific inversions indicates that the monogenic C. rufifacies is phylogenetically older than the amphogenic species. The maternal sex realizer locus F'/f on polytene chromosome 5 of C. rufifacies is not associated with a structural heterozygosity. Chromosome pair 6 of C. rufifacies and the sex chromosome pair of C. pinguis are under-replicated in polytene nuclei; they consist of irregular chromatin granules, frequently associated with nucleolus material. Evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes in Chrysomya is probably correlated with heterochromatin accumulation. A search for sex determining genes in Chrysomya was initiated using sex determining sequences from Drosophila melanogaster for in situ hybridization. The polytene band 41A1 on chromosome 5 of monogenic and amphogenic Chrysomya species contains sequences homologous to the maternal sex determining gene daughterless (da). Homology to the zygotic gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) of Drosophila is detected in band 39A1 on chromosome 5 of C. rufifacies. The findings reported here are the first evidence for a possible homology between the da gene of Drosophila and the maternal sex realizer F' of C. rufifacies. An hypothesis for the evolution of the maternal effect sex determination of C. rufifacies is proposed.

  16. /sup 3/H-UTP incorporation in polytene chromosomes of Chironomus permeabilized cells

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    Diez, J L; de la Torre, C [Consejo Superior de Investigacionis Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Inst. Biologia Celular

    1979-01-01

    A method is described that allows the cytologic detection of the transcriptional activity of endogenous RNA polymerase in fixed Chironomus polytene chromosomes. /sup 3/H-UTP is preferentially incorporated onto nucleoli and Balbiani rings where transcription is specially high. The former incorporation was sensitive to actinomycin D while incorporation on Balbiani rings was sensitive to ..cap alpha..-amanitin. The label pattern and frequency resemble those detected by /sup 3/H-uridine incorporation in the living state.

  17. Border Structure of Intercalary Heterochromatin Bands of Drosophila melanogaster Polytene Chromosomes.

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    Khoroshko, V A; Zykova, T Yu; Popova, O O; Zhimulev, I F

    2018-03-01

    The precise genomic localization of the borders of 62 intercalary heterochromatin bands in Drosophila polytene chromosomes was determined. A new type of bands containing chromatin of different states was identified. This type is a combination of the gray band and the intercalary heterochromatin band, creating a genetic structure that with a light microscope is identified as a continuous band. The border structure of such bands includes the coding regions of genes with ubiquitous activity.

  18. Rapid change of chromomeric and pairing patterns of polytene chromosome tips in D. melanogaster: migration of polytene-nonpolytene transition zone?

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    Roberts, P A

    1979-07-01

    The high variability of chromomeric patterns in near-terminal regions of polytene chromosome arms has been explored in a number of races, strains and hybrids of Drosophila melanogaster. Traditional explanations for tip differences between strains (differential compaction of chromatin, somatic or germinal deletion) are examined and, in the light of the reported observations, rejected. The range of polytene tip variability and rates of change in wild races are greater than has been supposed: strains formerly considered to be terminally deleted appear to gain terminal bands; others, formerly considered normal, appear to have lost them. Strains with high cell-to-cell tip variability are also described. Cell-to-cell variations, as well as much of the observed rapid changes in tip appearance, are probably due to heritable differences in the location of an abrupt transition zone between polytene and nonpolytene chromatin. A quantitative relationship between the amount of certain subterminal bands present and the frequency of tip association of nonhomologous chromosomes is shown and its possible significance for chromosome is shown and its possible for chromosome pairing discussed.

  19. Different structure of polytene chromosome of phaseolus coccineus suspensors during early embryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagliasacchi, A.M.; Forino, L.M.C.; Cionini, P.G.; Cavallini, A.; Durante, M.; Cremonini, R.; Avanzi, S.

    1984-01-01

    Different regions of polytene chromosomes pair VI have been characterized by: 1. morphological observations, 2. incorporation of 3 H-thymidine and 3 H-uridine, 3. cytophotometry of DNA and associated proteins, 4. hybridization with satellite DNA and highly repeated DNA sequences. The collected data indicate that DNA and RNA puffs are organized by heterochromatic segments. DNA puffs show often a clustered pattern of labeling by 3 H-thymidine and RNA puffs are always labeled by 3 H-urindine. Each heterochromatic segment is characterized by a definite ratio between DNA and associated fastgreen stainable proteins. Satellite DNA binds mostly to heterochromatic blocks at centromers, highly repeated DNA sequences bind, with approximately the same frequency, to centromeric heterochromatin and to the main intercalary heterochromatic band. The telomeric portions of euchromatin seem to be also enriched in highly repeated DNA sequences. The results indicate that heterochromatic chromosome segments might be sites of intense localized DNA replication. The same chromosome regions are also engaged in an active transcription process. The response to hybridization suggests that heterochromatic blocks of chromosome pair VI are heterogeneous in nucleotide sequences. The present studies also indicate that DNA and RNA puffs organized by different chromosome sites are specific of particular steps of embryo differentiation. The observed metabolic aspects of the suspensior's polytene chromosomes are discussed in relation to the synthesis of growth regulators which is known to occur in the suspensor. (Author)

  20. A technique for preparing polytene chromosomes from Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicinae

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    Jairo Campos

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Polytene chromosome preparations were obtained from larval, pupal and adult female Malpighian tubules of Aedes aegypti. The Malpighian tubules of the pupae (0-4 h old from larvae reared at 20ºC provided the best cytogenetic analysis. The interaction of nucleic acids and proteins that influence the spreading of the chromosomes could be reduced with the preparation technique of the sheets submitted to a stronger treatment starting with the hypotony of tissue and successive bathings with acetic acid. A simple technique should facilitate molecular cytogenetics used in the location of resistance and vector competence genes.

  1. [Advances in understanding Drosophila salivary gland polytene chromosome and its applications in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Chen, Fan-guo

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila salivary gland polytene chromosome, one of the three classical chromosomes with remarkable characteristics, has been used as an outstanding model for a variety of genetic studies since 1934. The greatest contribution of this model to genetics has been providing extraordinary angle of view in studying interphase chromosome structure and gene expression regulation. Additionally, it has been extensively used to understand some special genetic phenomena, such as dosage compensation and position-effect variegation. In this paper, we briefly review the advances in the study of Drosophila salivary gland chromosome, and try to systematically and effectively introduce this model system into genetics teaching practice in order to steer and inspire students' interest in genetics.

  2. Binding of doa kinase to specific loci in polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kováčiková, M.; Raška, Ivan; Mateášik, A.; Chase, B. A.; Farkaš, R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2006), s. 21-27 ISSN 1210-0668 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC535; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/02/0342 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/3025/23; SAV(SK) APVT-51-027402; NSF(US) IBN-97-24006; US-SK(SK) 13/029/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : specific protein kinases * DOA * polytene chromosomes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. Genotoxic effect of copper on salivary gland polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius Meigen 1804 (Diptera, Chironomidae)

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    Michailova, P. [Institute of Zoology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1 Tzar Osvoboditel boul., Sofia 1000 (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: michailova@zoology.bas.bg; Petrova, N. [Institute of Zoology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, 199034, Universit. nab. 1, Russia (Russian Federation); Ilkova, J. [Institute of Zoology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1 Tzar Osvoboditel boul., Sofia 1000 (Bulgaria); Bovero, S. [Department of Animal Biology, University of Turin, via Albertina 13, Turin (Italy); Brunetti, S. [Department of Animal Biology, University of Turin, via Albertina 13, Turin (Italy); White, K. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Sella, G. [Department of Animal Biology, University of Turin, via Albertina 13, Turin (Italy)

    2006-11-15

    The genotoxic action of copper (Cu) on the polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius was investigated by analysing structural and functional chromosome aberrations of fourth instars larvae hatched from eggs subject to acute (48 h) exposure with three environmentally relevant concentrations of aqueous Cu (0.005, 0.01, 0.05 mg/l). A dose dependent relationship was observed between Cu concentration and frequency of chromosomal aberrations. A significantly higher frequency of functional alterations, specifically decondensed centromeres and telomeres, and reduction in activity of Balbiani rings, was observed in treated material compared to control. A comparison of breakpoints resulting from treatment with chromium and lead from earlier studies with those Cu-induced identified a series of chromosomal weak points particularly vulnerable to trace metals. We also show that the appearance of structural and functional chromosome aberrations are more sensitive indicators of acute Cu toxicity in chironomid larvae than changes in external morphology. - Acute exposure of Chironomus eggs to copper resulted in changes in chromosome structure and function.

  4. Genotoxic effect of copper on salivary gland polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius Meigen 1804 (Diptera, Chironomidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michailova, P.; Petrova, N.; Ilkova, J.; Bovero, S.; Brunetti, S.; White, K.; Sella, G.

    2006-01-01

    The genotoxic action of copper (Cu) on the polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius was investigated by analysing structural and functional chromosome aberrations of fourth instars larvae hatched from eggs subject to acute (48 h) exposure with three environmentally relevant concentrations of aqueous Cu (0.005, 0.01, 0.05 mg/l). A dose dependent relationship was observed between Cu concentration and frequency of chromosomal aberrations. A significantly higher frequency of functional alterations, specifically decondensed centromeres and telomeres, and reduction in activity of Balbiani rings, was observed in treated material compared to control. A comparison of breakpoints resulting from treatment with chromium and lead from earlier studies with those Cu-induced identified a series of chromosomal weak points particularly vulnerable to trace metals. We also show that the appearance of structural and functional chromosome aberrations are more sensitive indicators of acute Cu toxicity in chironomid larvae than changes in external morphology. - Acute exposure of Chironomus eggs to copper resulted in changes in chromosome structure and function

  5. Polytene chromosome analysis in relation to genetic sex separation in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerremans, P.; Busch-Petersen, E.

    1990-01-01

    The development of stable genetic sexing strains in the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), is hampered by the presence of low levels of male recombination. Such recombination may be reduced by minimizing the distance between the translocation breakpoint and the translocated 'sexing' allele. Cytogenetic analysis of mitotic/meiotic and polytene chromosomes could provide information on the selection of such potentially stable genetic sexing strains. Translocation breakpoints in two genetic sexing strains in the medfly, based on a white female/brown male pupal colour dimorphism, have been determined. Preliminary results are described and the advantages and limitations of polytene chromosome analysis for the isolation of stable genetic sexing strains of the medfly are discussed. (author). 31 refs

  6. Critical electrolyte concentration of chromatin in polytene chromosomes of Trichosia pubescens (Diptera, Sciaridae

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    Ana Lúcia P. Monteiro

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The binding of toluidine blue molecules to nucleic acid phosphates under conditions of competition with Mg2+ ions was studied in Trichosia pubescens polytene chromosome regions differing in composition and organization (RNA-rich areas and puffs, DNA puffs, heterochromatin. The aim was to find variability in the Mg2+ concentration at which metachromasy was completely prevented (= critical electrolyte concentration; CEC and that could reflect differences at the level of nucleoprotein complexes in particular chromosome regions and developmental phases. Although high CEC values have been found in tightly packed chromatin such as that of heterochromatin zones, the CEC values for the other regions have proven to be affected not only by availability and proximity of DNA phosphates but also by RNA richness and other factors. Among these, changes in DNA geometry and packing state have been assumed for explaining increased values after RNA removal in DNA puffs and RNA-rich zones. Based on CEC values it has been suggested that alterations at the level of nucleoprotein complexes may occur in puffs before they are morphologically detectable. CEC results for polytene chromosomes were thus revealed to vary considerably with slight variations in nucleoprotein composition and organization. However, since a complex and apparently contradictory rationale has to be used for explaining part of the results, CEC is not recommended as a useful tool for extensive and comparative studies of this particular model.A ligação de moléculas de azul de toluidina a grupamentos fosfatos de ácido nucléico em condições de competição com íons Mg2+ foi estudada em regiões de cromossomos politênicos de Trichosia pubescens que diferem em composição e organização (áreas ricas em RNA, pufes de RNA e DNA, heterocromatina. O objetivo foi encontrar variabilidade na concentração de Mg2+ na qual a metacromasia fosse completamente abolida (= concentração crítica de eletr

  7. Binding of 3H-actinomycin D with polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhotia, S.C.

    1976-01-01

    Binding of 3 H-AMD (actinomycin D) in different regions of polytene nuclei of late third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster has been examined by EM autoradiography. It is observed that the binding capacity of 3 H-AMD is not related to the transcribing activity of a given region of nuclei, but it may be related to the DNA content. (M.G.B.)

  8. A Simple Key for Identifying the Sibling Species of the Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae (Giles Complex by Polytene Chromosome Cytogenetics

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    Music Temitope OBEMBE

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that Anopheles gambiae complex sibling species are the major Plasmodium malaria vectors in Africa; however, not all the sibling species transmit the infection. Easier molecular methods, PCR-based assays, have been developed to distinguish the several members of the A. gambiae complex. However, malaria vector research in less developed countries, particularly sub-Saharan Africa, is being hampered by the lack of PCR facilities in laboratories and the cost of carrying out the assay within lack of funding. Hence, the present study was designed to develop a simple identification key, based on an affordable method of polytene chromosome cytotaxonomy, for identifying the major P. falciparum vectors. The Identification Key was successfully used to identify two members of the A. gambiae complex, A. gambiae sensu stricto and A. arabiensis, which are the most potent malaria vectors in Africa; even so, it could not be used to establish the infective and the refractory strains.

  9. Functional and structural rearrangements of salivary gland polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius Mg. (Diptera,Chironomidae) in response to freshly neutralized aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michailova, P.; Ilkova, J.; White, K.N

    2003-05-01

    Aluminium impacts on aquatic biota can be detected using polytene chromosomes as bio-markers - Although recent work has shown that environmentally relevant concentrations of freshly neutralized aluminium (AI) are bioavailable and toxic to freshwater invertebrates, the genotoxicity of Al has not been examined. Here we show that freshly neutralized Al affects structure and function of the salivary gland polytene chromosomes of the ubiquitous chironomid larva Chironomus riparius over three generations. Exposure to 500 {mu}g l{sup -1} added Al for 24-25 days resulted in a significantly higher frequency of numerous somatic aberrations, while no structural aberrations were found in F1 controls and few in the second and third generation. Aberrations also included deletions of sections of chromosome G of C. riparius larvae as well as deletions of one or more Balbiani rings. Changes in functional activity included decreased activity of the Balbiani rings (BR), and an increase in the number of decondensed centromeres. The activity of the nucleolar organizer (NOR) significantly decreased in F1 chironomids exposed to Al, while in the F2 and F3 generations the NOR showed normal (high) activity. First generation chironomids were generally more susceptible to Al although no clear evidence of tolerance was apparent over three generations. The possible use of alterations in chironomid polytene chromosomes as biomarkers of trace metal pollution is discussed.

  10. Functional and structural rearrangements of salivary gland polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius Mg. (Diptera,Chironomidae) in response to freshly neutralized aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michailova, P.; Ilkova, J.; White, K.N.

    2003-01-01

    Aluminium impacts on aquatic biota can be detected using polytene chromosomes as bio-markers - Although recent work has shown that environmentally relevant concentrations of freshly neutralized aluminium (AI) are bioavailable and toxic to freshwater invertebrates, the genotoxicity of Al has not been examined. Here we show that freshly neutralized Al affects structure and function of the salivary gland polytene chromosomes of the ubiquitous chironomid larva Chironomus riparius over three generations. Exposure to 500 μg l -1 added Al for 24-25 days resulted in a significantly higher frequency of numerous somatic aberrations, while no structural aberrations were found in F1 controls and few in the second and third generation. Aberrations also included deletions of sections of chromosome G of C. riparius larvae as well as deletions of one or more Balbiani rings. Changes in functional activity included decreased activity of the Balbiani rings (BR), and an increase in the number of decondensed centromeres. The activity of the nucleolar organizer (NOR) significantly decreased in F1 chironomids exposed to Al, while in the F2 and F3 generations the NOR showed normal (high) activity. First generation chironomids were generally more susceptible to Al although no clear evidence of tolerance was apparent over three generations. The possible use of alterations in chironomid polytene chromosomes as biomarkers of trace metal pollution is discussed

  11. Sex chromosomes and associated rDNA form a heterochromatic network in the polytene nuclei of Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drosopoulou, E.; Nakou, I.; Šíchová, Jindra; Kubíčková, S.; Marec, František; Mavragani-Tsipidou, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 140, 4-6 (2012), s. 169-180 ISSN 0016-6707 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600960925 Grant - others:Ministry of Agriculture of the Czech Republic(CZ) MZE 0002716202; Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia(CZ) GAJU 137/2010/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : chromosome painting * FISH * laser microdissection Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.681, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10709-012-9668-3

  12. Mapping the pericentric heterochromatin by comparative genomic hybridization analysis and chromosome deletions in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Caudy, Amy; Parsons, Lance; Rosebrock, Adam; Pane, Attilio; Raj, Sandeep; Wieschaus, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Heterochromatin represents a significant portion of eukaryotic genomes and has essential structural and regulatory functions. Its molecular organization is largely unknown due to difficulties in sequencing through and assembling repetitive sequences enriched in the heterochromatin. Here we developed a novel strategy using chromosomal rearrangements and embryonic phenotypes to position unmapped Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatic sequence to specific chromosomal regions. By excluding sequences that can be mapped to the assembled euchromatic arms, we identified sequences that are specific to heterochromatin and used them to design heterochromatin specific probes ("H-probes") for microarray. By comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of embryos deficient for each chromosome or chromosome arm, we were able to map most of our H-probes to specific chromosome arms. We also positioned sequences mapped to the second and X chromosomes to finer intervals by analyzing smaller deletions with breakpoints in heterochromatin. Using this approach, we were able to map >40% (13.9 Mb) of the previously unmapped heterochromatin sequences assembled by the whole-genome sequencing effort on arm U and arm Uextra to specific locations. We also identified and mapped 110 kb of novel heterochromatic sequences. Subsequent analyses revealed that sequences located within different heterochromatic regions have distinct properties, such as sequence composition, degree of repetitiveness, and level of underreplication in polytenized tissues. Surprisingly, although heterochromatin is generally considered to be transcriptionally silent, we detected region-specific temporal patterns of transcription in heterochromatin during oogenesis and early embryonic development. Our study provides a useful approach to elucidate the molecular organization and function of heterochromatin and reveals region-specific variation of heterochromatin.

  13. Mapping the pericentric heterochromatin by comparative genomic hybridization analysis and chromosome deletions in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Caudy, Amy; Parsons, Lance; Rosebrock, Adam; Pane, Attilio; Raj, Sandeep; Wieschaus, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Heterochromatin represents a significant portion of eukaryotic genomes and has essential structural and regulatory functions. Its molecular organization is largely unknown due to difficulties in sequencing through and assembling repetitive sequences enriched in the heterochromatin. Here we developed a novel strategy using chromosomal rearrangements and embryonic phenotypes to position unmapped Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatic sequence to specific chromosomal regions. By excluding sequences that can be mapped to the assembled euchromatic arms, we identified sequences that are specific to heterochromatin and used them to design heterochromatin specific probes (“H-probes”) for microarray. By comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of embryos deficient for each chromosome or chromosome arm, we were able to map most of our H-probes to specific chromosome arms. We also positioned sequences mapped to the second and X chromosomes to finer intervals by analyzing smaller deletions with breakpoints in heterochromatin. Using this approach, we were able to map >40% (13.9 Mb) of the previously unmapped heterochromatin sequences assembled by the whole-genome sequencing effort on arm U and arm Uextra to specific locations. We also identified and mapped 110 kb of novel heterochromatic sequences. Subsequent analyses revealed that sequences located within different heterochromatic regions have distinct properties, such as sequence composition, degree of repetitiveness, and level of underreplication in polytenized tissues. Surprisingly, although heterochromatin is generally considered to be transcriptionally silent, we detected region-specific temporal patterns of transcription in heterochromatin during oogenesis and early embryonic development. Our study provides a useful approach to elucidate the molecular organization and function of heterochromatin and reveals region-specific variation of heterochromatin. PMID:22745230

  14. The Barley Chromosome 5 Linkage Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1975-01-01

    The distances between nine loci on barley chromosome 5 have been studied in five two-point tests, three three-point tests, and one four-point test. Our previous chromosome 5 linkage map, which contained eleven loci mapped from literature data (Jensen and Jørgensen 1975), is extended with four loci......-position is fixed on the map by a locus (necl), which has a good marker gene located centrally in the linkage group. The positions of the other loci are their distances in centimorgans from the 0-position; loci in the direction of the short chromosome arm are assigned positive values and those...

  15. [Chromomeric organization of interphase chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuimulev, I F; Beliaeva, E S; Zykova, T Iu; Semeshin, V F; Demakov, S A; Demakova, O V; Goncharov, F P; Khoroshko, V A; Boldyreva, L V; Kokoza, E B; Pokholkiova, G V

    2013-01-01

    As a result of treatment of bioinformatic data on the genome localization of structural proteins, histone modifications, DNase-hypersensitive regions, replication origins (taken from modENCODE) and their cytological localization to polytene chromosome structures, it is shown here that two types of interphase chromosomes -polytene chromosomes from salivary glands and from mitotically dividing cells cultures - demonstrate identical pictures of interband/band, i. e. the same localization and length on physical map and the same sets of proteins. In the interbands of both chromosome types we find the proteins that control initiation of transcription (RNA-polymerase II, transcription factors), replication (ORC2) as well as proteins modifying nucleosome structure (WDS, NURF) and proteins of insulators (BEAF). The nucleosome density and H1 histone concentration in the interbands are depleted; localization of DNase-hypersensitive regions corresponds strictly to the interbands. So, we conclude that both polytene and cell line interphase chromosomes are arranged according to general principle and polytene chromosomes represent precise model of interphase chromosomes. The interbands play a critical role in the initiation of transcription and replication. The interbands of interphase chromosomes are the sites of 5' parts of genes, while the 3' gene ends are located in the adjacent bands. The constancy of interbands decondensation results in the conclusion that the "interbands" genes are constantly active, i. e. they contain "house-keeping" genes. The large late replicating bands contain genes that do not have direct contact to the adjoining interbands are usually polygenic and contain tissue-specific genes.

  16. Homology of polytene elements between Drosophila and Zaprionus determined by in situ hybridization in Zaprionus indianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, S R C; Rieger, T T; Santos, J F

    2007-05-09

    The drosophilid Zaprionus indianus due to its economical importance as an insect pest in Brazil deserves more investigation into its genetics. Its mitotic karyotype and a line-drawing map of its polytene chromosomes are already available. This paper presents a photomap of Z. indianus polytene chromosomes, which was used as the reference map for identification of sections marked by in situ hybridization with gene probes. Hybridization signals for Hsp70 and Hsr-omega were detected, respectively, in sections 34B and 32C of chromosome V of Z. indianus, which indicates its homology to the chromosomal arm 3R of Drosophila melanogaster and, therefore, to Muller's element E. The main signal for Hsp83 gene probe hybridization was in section 17C of Z. indianus chromosome III, suggesting its homology to arm 3L of D. melanogaster and to element D of Muller. The Ubi probe hybridized in sections 10C of chromosome II and 17A of chromosome III. Probably the 17A is the polyubiquitin locus, with homology to arm 3L of D. melanogaster and to the mullerian D element, as suggested also by Hsp83 gene location. The Br-C gene was mapped in section 1D, near the tip of the X chromosome, indicating its homology to the X chromosome of D. melanogaster and to mullerian element A. The Dpp gene probe hybridized mainly in the section 32A of chromosome V and, at lower frequencies to other sections, although no signal was observed as expected in the correspondent mullerian B element. This result led to the suggestion of a rearrangement including the Dpp locus in Z. indianus, the secondary signals possibly pointing to related genes of the TGF-beta family. In conclusion, the results indicate that chromosomes X, III, V of Z. indianus are respectively correspondents to elements A, D, and E of Muller. At least chromosome V of Z. indianus seems to share synteny with the 3R arm of D. melanogaster, as indicated by the relative positions of Hsp70 and Hsr-omega, although the Dpp gene indicates a disruption of

  17. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  18. The map of chromosome 1 of man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. Burgerhout (Wim)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractMaking maps is an essential procedure in the exploration of new territories. In the field of genetics, many basic concepts concerning the structure of a genome and the regulation of gene activity have emerged from regional mapping studies on the chromosomes of e.g. Escherichia coli

  19. Radiation hybrid mapping of human chromosome 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francke, U.; Moon, A.J.; Chang, E.; Foellmer, B.; Strauss, B.; Haschke, A.; Chihlin Hsieh; Geigl, E.M.; Welch, S.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have generated a Chinese hamster V79/380-6 HPRT minus x human leukocyte hybrid cell line (18/V79) with chromosome 18 as the only human chromosome that is retained at high frequency without specific selection. Hybrid cells were selected in HAT medium, and 164 individual colonies were isolated. Of 110 colonies screened for human DNA by PCR amplification using a primer specific for human Alu repeats 67 (61%) were positive. These were expanded in culture for large-scale DNA preparations. Retesting expanded clones by PCR with Alu and LINE primers has revealed unique patterns of amplification products. In situ hybridization of biotin labelled total human DNA to metaphase spreads from various hybrids revealed the presence of one or more human DNA fragments integrated in hamster chromosomes. The authors have generated a resource that should allow the construction of a radiation map, to be compared with the YAC contig map also under construction in their laboratory

  20. Reassignment of Drosophila willistoni Genome Scaffolds to Chromosome II Arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carolina; Delprat, Alejandra; Ruiz, Alfredo; Valente, Vera L S

    2015-10-04

    Drosophila willistoni is a geographically widespread Neotropical species. The genome of strain Gd-H4-1 from Guadeloupe Island (Caribbean) was sequenced in 2007 as part of the 12 Drosophila Genomes Project. The assembled scaffolds were joined based on conserved linkage and assigned to polytene chromosomes based on a handful of genetic and physical markers. This paucity of markers was particularly striking in the metacentric chromosome II, comprised two similarly sized arms, IIL and IIR, traditionally considered homologous to Muller elements C and B, respectively. In this paper we present the cytological mapping of 22 new gene markers to increase the number of markers mapped by in situ hybridization and to test the assignment of scaffolds to the polytene chromosome II arms. For this purpose, we generated, by polymerase chain reaction amplification, one or two gene probes from each scaffold assigned to the chromosome II arms and mapped these probes to the Gd-H4-1 strain's polytene chromosomes by nonfluorescent in situ hybridization. Our findings show that chromosome arms IIL and IIR correspond to Muller elements B and C, respectively, directly contrasting the current homology assignments in D. willistoni and constituting a major reassignment of the scaffolds to chromosome II arms. Copyright © 2015 Garcia et al.

  1. Mapping replication origins in yeast chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1991-07-01

    The replicon hypothesis, first proposed in 1963 by Jacob and Brenner, states that DNA replication is controlled at sites called origins. Replication origins have been well studied in prokaryotes. However, the study of eukaryotic chromosomal origins has lagged behind, because until recently there has been no method for reliably determining the identity and location of origins from eukaryotic chromosomes. Here, we review a technique we developed with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that allows both the mapping of replication origins and an assessment of their activity. Two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization with total genomic DNA are used to determine whether a particular restriction fragment acquires the branched structure diagnostic of replication initiation. The technique has been used to localize origins in yeast chromosomes and assess their initiation efficiency. In some cases, origin activation is dependent upon the surrounding context. The technique is also being applied to a variety of eukaryotic organisms.

  2. Comparative physical mapping between wheat chromosome arm 2BL and rice chromosome 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tong Geon; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Dae Yeon; Seo, Yong Weon

    2010-12-01

    Physical maps of chromosomes provide a framework for organizing and integrating diverse genetic information. DNA microarrays are a valuable technique for physical mapping and can also be used to facilitate the discovery of single feature polymorphisms (SFPs). Wheat chromosome arm 2BL was physically mapped using a Wheat Genome Array onto near-isogenic lines (NILs) with the aid of wheat-rice synteny and mapped wheat EST information. Using high variance probe set (HVP) analysis, 314 HVPs constituting genes present on 2BL were identified. The 314 HVPs were grouped into 3 categories: HVPs that match only rice chromosome 4 (298 HVPs), those that match only wheat ESTs mapped on 2BL (1), and those that match both rice chromosome 4 and wheat ESTs mapped on 2BL (15). All HVPs were converted into gene sets, which represented either unique rice gene models or mapped wheat ESTs that matched identified HVPs. Comparative physical maps were constructed for 16 wheat gene sets and 271 rice gene sets. Of the 271 rice gene sets, 257 were mapped to the 18-35 Mb regions on rice chromosome 4. Based on HVP analysis and sequence similarity between the gene models in the rice chromosomes and mapped wheat ESTs, the outermost rice gene model that limits the translocation breakpoint to orthologous regions was identified.

  3. Genetic organization of interphase chromosome bands and interbands in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhimulev, Igor F; Zykova, Tatyana Yu; Goncharov, Fyodor P; Khoroshko, Varvara A; Demakova, Olga V; Semeshin, Valeriy F; Pokholkova, Galina V; Boldyreva, Lidiya V; Demidova, Darya S; Babenko, Vladimir N; Demakov, Sergey A; Belyaeva, Elena S

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes display specific banding pattern; the underlying genetic organization of this pattern has remained elusive for many years. In the present paper, we analyze 32 cytology-mapped polytene chromosome interbands. We estimated molecular locations of these interbands, described their molecular and genetic organization and demonstrate that polytene chromosome interbands contain the 5' ends of housekeeping genes. As a rule, interbands display preferential "head-to-head" orientation of genes. They are enriched for "broad" class promoters characteristic of housekeeping genes and associate with open chromatin proteins and Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) components. In two regions, 10A and 100B, coding sequences of genes whose 5'-ends reside in interbands map to constantly loosely compacted, early-replicating, so-called "grey" bands. Comparison of expression patterns of genes mapping to late-replicating dense bands vs genes whose promoter regions map to interbands shows that the former are generally tissue-specific, whereas the latter are represented by ubiquitously active genes. Analysis of RNA-seq data (modENCODE-FlyBase) indicates that transcripts from interband-mapping genes are present in most tissues and cell lines studied, across most developmental stages and upon various treatment conditions. We developed a special algorithm to computationally process protein localization data generated by the modENCODE project and show that Drosophila genome has about 5700 sites that demonstrate all the features shared by the interbands cytologically mapped to date.

  4. Genetic organization of interphase chromosome bands and interbands in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor F Zhimulev

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes display specific banding pattern; the underlying genetic organization of this pattern has remained elusive for many years. In the present paper, we analyze 32 cytology-mapped polytene chromosome interbands. We estimated molecular locations of these interbands, described their molecular and genetic organization and demonstrate that polytene chromosome interbands contain the 5' ends of housekeeping genes. As a rule, interbands display preferential "head-to-head" orientation of genes. They are enriched for "broad" class promoters characteristic of housekeeping genes and associate with open chromatin proteins and Origin Recognition Complex (ORC components. In two regions, 10A and 100B, coding sequences of genes whose 5'-ends reside in interbands map to constantly loosely compacted, early-replicating, so-called "grey" bands. Comparison of expression patterns of genes mapping to late-replicating dense bands vs genes whose promoter regions map to interbands shows that the former are generally tissue-specific, whereas the latter are represented by ubiquitously active genes. Analysis of RNA-seq data (modENCODE-FlyBase indicates that transcripts from interband-mapping genes are present in most tissues and cell lines studied, across most developmental stages and upon various treatment conditions. We developed a special algorithm to computationally process protein localization data generated by the modENCODE project and show that Drosophila genome has about 5700 sites that demonstrate all the features shared by the interbands cytologically mapped to date.

  5. The Barley Chromosome 5 Linkage Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1975-01-01

    The literature is surveyed for data on recombination between loci on chromosome 5 of barley; 13 loci fall into the category “mapped” loci, more than 20 into the category “associated” loci and nine into the category “loci once suggested to be on chromosome 5”. A procedure was developed...

  6. Genetic maps of polymorphic DNA loci on rat chromosome 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yan-Ping; Remmers, E.F.; Longman, R.E. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Genetic linkage maps of loci defined by polymorphic DNA markers on rat chromosome 1 were constructed by genotyping F2 progeny of F344/N x LEW/N, BN/SsN x LEW/N, and DA/Bkl x F344/Hsd inbred rat strains. In total, 43 markers were mapped, of which 3 were restriction fragment length polymorphisms and the others were simple sequence length polymorphisms. Nineteen of these markers were associated with genes. Six markers for five genes, {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor {beta}3 (Gabrb3), syntaxin 2 (Stx2), adrenergic receptor {beta}3 (Gabrb3), syntaxin 2 (Stx2), adrenergic receptor {beta}1 (Adrb1), carcinoembryonic antigen gene family member 1 (Cgm1), and lipogenic protein S14 (Lpgp), and 20 anonymous loci were not previously reported. Thirteen gene loci (Myl2, Aldoa, Tnt, Igf2, Prkcg, Cgm4, Calm3, Cgm3, Psbp1, Sa, Hbb, Ins1, and Tcp1) were previously mapped. Comparative mapping analysis indicated that the large portion of rat chromosome 1 is homologous to mouse chromosome 7, although the homologous to mouse chromosome 7, although the homologs of two rat genes are located on mouse chromosomes 17 and 19. Homologs of the rat chromosome 1 genes that we mapped are located on human chromosomes 6, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, and 19. 38 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping@ clones from a larger genome.

  8. Construction of barley consensus map showing chromosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the past, it has been difficult to accurately determine the location of many types of barley molecular markers due to the lack of commonality between international barley linkage maps. In this study, a consensus map of barley was constructed from five different maps (OWB, VxHs, KxM, barley consensus 2 and barley ...

  9. Identification of Pneumocystis carinii chromosomes and mapping of five genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, B; Cotton, R; Lundgren, J D

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis was used to identify the chromosome-size DNA of Pneumocystis carinii, a major pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Thirteen chromosomes of rodent Pneumocystis carinii, ranging in size from 300 to 700 kilobases (kb), were identified. The minimum genome size for P....... carinii, estimated on the basis of the sizes of chromosomes, is 7,000 kb. Genetic heterogeneity among different P. carinii isolates was documented by demonstration of chromosomal size variability. By hybridization studies, the genes for topoisomerase I, dihydrofolate reductase, rRNA, actin......, and thymidylate synthase were mapped to single chromosomes of approximately 650, 590, 550, 460, and 350 kb, respectively. Hybridization studies further confirmed the genetic heterogeneity of P. carinii....

  10. Mapping of the bcl-2 oncogene on mouse chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, B A; Givol, D; D'Hoostelaere, L A; Huppi, K; Seldin, M F; Gurfinkel, N; Unger, T; Potter, M; Mushinski, J F

    1988-01-01

    Two bcl-2 alleles have been identified in inbred strains of mice by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Analysis of a bcl-2 RFLP in a series of bilineal congenic strains (C.D2), developed as a tool for chromosomal mapping studies, revealed linkage of bcl-2 to the Idh-1/Pep-3 region of murine chromosome 1. The co-segregation of bcl-2 alleles with allelic forms of two other chromosome 1 loci, Ren-1,2 and Spna-1, in a set of back-cross progeny, positions bcl-2 7.8 cM centromeric from Ren-1,2.

  11. A Fine Physical Map of the Rice Chromosome 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Zhukuan; Chen, Mingsheng; Wang, Shengyue; Feng, Qi; Huang, Yucheng; Li, Ying; Tang, Yesheng; Zhou, Bo; Chen, Zhehua; Yu, Shuliang; Zhu, Jingjie; Hu, Xin; Mu, Jie; Ying, Kai; Hao, Pei; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Yiqi; Zhang, Lei S.; Liu, Yilei; Yu, Zhen; Fan, Danlin; Weng, Qijun; Chen, Ling; Lu, Tingting; Liu, Xiaohui; Jia, Peixin; Sun, Tongguo; Wu, Yongrui; Zhang, Yujun; Lu, Ying; Li, Can; Wang, Rong; Lei, Haiyan; Li, Tao; Hu, Hao; Wu, Mei; Zhang, Runquan; Guan, Jianping; Zhu, Jia; Fu, Gang; Gu, Minghong; Hong, Guofan; Xue, Yongbiao; Wing, Rod; Jiang, Jiming; Han, Bin

    2002-01-01

    As part of an international effort to completely sequence the rice genome, we have produced a fine bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based physical map of the Oryza sativa japonica Nipponbare chromosome 4 through an integration of 114 sequenced BAC clones from a taxonomically related subspecies O. sativa indica Guangluai 4 and 182 RFLP and 407 expressed sequence tag (EST) markers with the fingerprinted data of the Nipponbare genome. The map consists of 11 contigs with a total length of 34.5 Mb covering 94% of the estimated chromosome size (36.8 Mb). BAC clones corresponding to telomeres, as well as to the centromere position, were determined by BAC-pachytene chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This gave rise to an estimated length ratio of 5.13 for the long arm and 2.9 for the short arm (on the basis of the physical map), which indicates that the short arm is a highly condensed one. The FISH analysis and physical mapping also showed that the short arm and the pericentromeric region of the long arm are rich in heterochromatin, which occupied 45% of the chromosome, indicating that this chromosome is likely very difficult to sequence. To our knowledge, this map provides the first example of a rapid and reliable physical mapping on the basis of the integration of the data from two taxonomically related subspecies. [The following individuals and institutions kindly provided reagents, samples, or unpublished information as indicated in the paper: S. McCouch, T. Sasaki, and Monsanto.] PMID:11997348

  12. Development of a quantitative pachytene chromosome map and its unification with somatic chromosome and linkage maps of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmido, Nobuko; Iwata, Aiko; Kato, Seiji; Wako, Toshiyuki; Fukui, Kiichi

    2018-01-01

    A quantitative pachytene chromosome map of rice (Oryza sativa L.) was developed using imaging methods. The map depicts not only distribution patterns of chromomeres specific to pachytene chromosomes, but also the higher order information of chromosomal structures, such as heterochromatin (condensed regions), euchromatin (decondensed regions), the primary constrictions (centromeres), and the secondary constriction (nucleolar organizing regions, NOR). These features were image analyzed and quantitatively mapped onto the map by Chromosome Image Analyzing System ver. 4.0 (CHIAS IV). Correlation between H3K9me2, an epigenetic marker and formation and/or maintenance of heterochromatin, thus was, clearly visualized. Then the pachytene chromosome map was unified with the existing somatic chromosome and linkage maps by physically mapping common DNA markers among them, such as a rice A genome specific tandem repeat sequence (TrsA), 5S and 45S ribosomal RNA genes, five bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones, four P1 bacteriophage artificial chromosome (PAC) clones using multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Detailed comparison between the locations of the DNA probes on the pachytene chromosomes using multicolor FISH, and the linkage map enabled determination of the chromosome number and short/long arms of individual pachytene chromosomes using the chromosome number and arm assignment designated for the linkage map. As a result, the quantitative pachytene chromosome map was unified with two other major rice chromosome maps representing somatic prometaphase chromosomes and genetic linkages. In conclusion, the unification of the three rice maps serves as an indispensable basic information, not only for an in-depth comparison between genetic and chromosomal data, but also for practical breeding programs.

  13. An integrated genetic, physical, and transcriptional map of chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffer, H.; Kooy, R.F.; Wijngaard, A. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    In this study a genetic map containing 20 markers and typed in 40 CEPH families is presented. It includes 7 thusfar untyped microsatellite markers, 7 that have previously been mapped on a subset of 8 CEPH families, one reference marker, D13S71, and three telomeric VNTR markers. Also, 4 intragenic RB1 markers were typed. The markers have an average heterozygosity of 73% (80%, excluding the three RFLPs). The total sex average length of the map is 140 cM. The mean female to male ratio is 1.54. For the non-telomeric part of the chromosome between the markers D13S221 in 13q12 and D13S173 in 13q33-q34, this ratio is 1.99. This ratio is reversed in the telomeric part of the chromosome between D13S173 and D13S234 in distal 13q34, where it is 0.47. A high new mutation frequency of 1% was detected in the (CTTT(T)){sub n} repeat in intron 20 of the RB1 gene. The map has been integrated with 7 microsatellite markers and 2 RFLP markers from CEPH database version 7.0, resulting in a map with 32 markers (28 loci) of chromosome 13q. In addition, a deletion hybrid breakpoint map ordering 50 markers in 18 intervals is constructed. It includes 32 microsatellite markers, 4 genes, 5 STSs, and 9 ESTs. Each of 18 intervals contains at least one microsatellite marker included in the extended genetic map. These data allow a correlation between the genetic and physical map of chromosome 13. New ESTs are currently being identified and localized at this integrated map.

  14. Construction of barley consensus map showing chromosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-02-02

    Feb 2, 2006 ... the purpose of this consensus map (containing QTL) is to provide a tool for scientists to accurately locate molecular markers to ... community with powerful tools for comparative genomics. (Gai et al., 2000; Mekhdov et al., ...... and controlled by almost the same loci (Marquez et al.,. 2000). In the present study ...

  15. The mapping of novel genes to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buenaventura, J.M. [Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The principle goal of our laboratory is the discovery of new genes on human chromosome 19. One of the strategies to achieve this goal is through the use of cDNA clones known as {open_quotes}expressed sequence tags{close_quotes} (ESTs). ESTs, short segments of sequence from a cDNA clone that correspond to the mRNA, occur as unique regions in the genome and, therefore, can be used as markers for specific positions. In collaboration with researchers from Genethon in France, fifteen cDNA clones from a normalized human infant brain cDNA library were tested and determined to map to chromosome 19. A verification procedure is then followed to confirm assignment to chromosome 19. First, primers for each cDNA clone are developed and then amplified by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA. Next, a {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probe is made by polymerase chain reaction for each clone and then hybridized against filters containing an LLNL chromosome 19-specific cosmid library to find putative locations on the chromosome. The location is then verified by running a polymerase chain reactions from the positive cosmids. With the Browser database at LLNL, additional information about the positive cosmids can be found. Through use of the BLAST database at the National Library of Medicine, homologous sequences to the clones can be found. Among the fifteen cDNA clones received from Genethon, all have been amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Three have turned out as repetitive elements in the genome. Ten have been mapped to specific locations on chromosome 19. Putative locations have been found for the remaining two clones and thus verification testing will proceed.

  16. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in four Serrasalmidae species (Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Braga Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Serrasalmidae family is composed of a number of commercially interesting species, mainly in the Amazon region where most of these fishes occur. In the present study, we investigated the genomic organization of the 18S and 5S rDNA and telomeric sequences in mitotic chromosomes of four species from the basal clade of the Serrasalmidae family: Colossoma macropomum, Mylossoma aureum, M. duriventre, and Piaractus mesopotamicus, in order to understand the chromosomal evolution in the family. All the species studied had diploid numbers 2n = 54 and exclusively biarmed chromosomes, but variations of the karyotypic formulas were observed. C-banding resulted in similar patterns among the analyzed species, with heterochromatic blocks mainly present in centromeric regions. The 18S rDNA mapping of C. macropomum and P. mesopotamicus revealed multiple sites of this gene; 5S rDNA sites were detected in two chromosome pairs in all species, although not all of them were homeologs. Hybridization with a telomeric probe revealed signals in the terminal portions of chromosomes in all the species and an interstitial signal was observed in one pair of C. macropomum.

  17. Mapping EBNA-1 Domains Involved in Binding to Metaphase Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marechal, Vincent; Dehee, Axelle; Chikhi-Brachet, Roxane; Piolot, Tristan; Coppey-Moisan, Maité; Nicolas, Jean-Claude

    1999-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome can persist in dividing human B cells as multicopy circular episomes. Viral episomes replicate in synchrony with host cell DNA and are maintained at a relatively constant copy number for a long time. Only two viral elements, the replication origin OriP and the EBNA-1 protein, are required for the persistence of viral genomes during latency. EBNA-1 activates OriP during the S phase and may also contribute to the partition and/or retention of viral genomes during mitosis. Indeed, EBNA-1 has been shown to interact with mitotic chromatin. Moreover, viral genomes are noncovalently associated with metaphase chromosomes. This suggests that EBNA-1 may facilitate the anchorage of viral genomes on cellular chromosomes, thus ensuring proper partition and retention. In the present paper, we have investigated the chromosome-binding activity of EBV EBNA-1, herpesvirus papio (HVP) EBNA-1, and various derivatives of EBV EBNA-1, fused to a variant of the green fluorescent protein. The results show that binding to metaphase chromosomes is a common property of EBV and HVP EBNA-1. Further studies indicated that at least three independent domains (CBS-1, -2, and -3) mediate EBNA-1 binding to metaphase chromosomes. In agreement with the anchorage model, two of these domains mapped to a region that has been previously demonstrated to be required for the long-term persistence of OriP-containing plasmids. PMID:10196336

  18. A genetic linkage map of the chromosome 4 short arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, P.A.; MacDonald, M.E.; Srinidhi, J.; Tanzi, R.E.; Haines, J.L. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (United States)); Gilliam, T.C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Conneally, P.M. (Indiana Univ. Medical Center, Indianapolis (United States)); Wexler, N.S. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States) Hereditary Disease Foundation, Santa Monica, CA (United States)); Gusella, J.F. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (United States) Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The authors have generated an 18-interval contiguous genetic linkage map of human chromosome 4 spanning the entire short arm and proximal long arm. Fifty-seven polymorphisms, representing 42 loci, were analyzed in the Venezuelan reference pedigree. The markers included seven genes (ADRA2C, ALB, GABRB1, GC, HOX7, IDUA, QDPR), one pseudogene (RAF1P1), and 34 anonymous DNA loci. Four loci were represented by microsatellite polymorphisms and one (GC) was expressed as a protein polymorphism. The remainder were genotyped based on restriction fragment length polymorphism. The sex-averaged map covered 123 cM. Significant differences in sex-specific rates of recombination were observed only in the pericentromeric and proximal long arm regions, but these contributed to different overall map lengths of 115 cM in males and 138 cM in females. This map provides 19 reference points along chromosome 4 that will be particularly useful in anchoring and seeding physical mapping studies and in aiding in disease studies. 26 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. A high-resolution comparative map between pig chromosome 17 and human chromosomes 4, 8, and 20: Identification of synteny breakpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahbib-Mansais, Yvette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Mompart, Florence

    2005-01-01

    We report on the construction of a high-resolution comparative map of porcine chromosome 17 (SSC17) focusing on evolutionary breakpoints with human chromosomes. The comparative map shows high homology with human chromosome 20 but suggests more limited homologies with other human chromosomes. SSC1...

  20. NEUROD2 and NEUROD3 genes map to human chromosomes 17q12 and 5q23-q31 and mouse chromosomes 11 and 13, respectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamimi, R.M.; Montgomery-Dyer, K.; Tapscott, S.J. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    NEUROD2 and NEUROD3 are transcription factors involved in neurogenesis that are related to the basic helix-loop-helix protein NEUROD. NEUROD2 maps to human chromosome 17q12 and mouse chromosome 11. NEUROD3 maps to human chromosome 5q23-q31 and mouse chromosome 13. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Human Chromosome 21: Mapping of the chromosomes and cloning of cDNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonarakis, S.E.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the research funded by DOE grant DE-FG02-89ER60857 from 6/15/89 to 8/31/91 was to contribute to the physical mapping of human chromosome 21 (HC21) by cloning large fragments of DNA into Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs) and identify YACs that map on HC21. A total of 54 sequence tagged sites (STS) have been developed and mapped in our laboratory to HC21 and can be used as initial reference points for YAC identification and construction of overlapping clones. A small YAC library was constructed which is HC21 specific. DNA from somatic cell hybrid WAV17 or from flow-sorted HC21 was partially digested with EcoRI, ligated into vectors PJS97, PJS98, and YACs have been obtained with average size insert of more than 300 kb. This library has been deposited in D. Patterson's lab for the Joint YAC screening effort. Additional YAC libraries from ICI Pharmaceuticals or from Los Alamos National Laboratories have been screened with several STS and positive YACs have been identified. Work in progress includes screening of YAC libraries in order to construct overlapping clones, characterization of the cloning ends of YACs, characterization of additional STS and cloning of HC21 specific cDNAs. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Genome mapping and characterization of the Anopheles gambiae heterochromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharakhova Maria V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterochromatin plays an important role in chromosome function and gene regulation. Despite the availability of polytene chromosomes and genome sequence, the heterochromatin of the major malaria vector Anopheles gambiae has not been mapped and characterized. Results To determine the extent of heterochromatin within the An. gambiae genome, genes were physically mapped to the euchromatin-heterochromatin transition zone of polytene chromosomes. The study found that a minimum of 232 genes reside in 16.6 Mb of mapped heterochromatin. Gene ontology analysis revealed that heterochromatin is enriched in genes with DNA-binding and regulatory activities. Immunostaining of the An. gambiae chromosomes with antibodies against Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 and the nuclear envelope protein lamin Dm0 identified the major invariable sites of the proteins' localization in all regions of pericentric heterochromatin, diffuse intercalary heterochromatin, and euchromatic region 9C of the 2R arm, but not in the compact intercalary heterochromatin. To better understand the molecular differences among chromatin types, novel Bayesian statistical models were developed to analyze genome features. The study found that heterochromatin and euchromatin differ in gene density and the coverage of retroelements and segmental duplications. The pericentric heterochromatin had the highest coverage of retroelements and tandem repeats, while intercalary heterochromatin was enriched with segmental duplications. We also provide evidence that the diffuse intercalary heterochromatin has a higher coverage of DNA transposable elements, minisatellites, and satellites than does the compact intercalary heterochromatin. The investigation of 42-Mb assembly of unmapped genomic scaffolds showed that it has molecular characteristics similar to cytologically mapped heterochromatin. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Anopheles polytene chromosomes

  3. Report of the Fourth international workshop on human chromosome 18 mapping 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, G.A.; Overhauser, J.; Gerken, S.; Aburomia, R.; O'Connell, P.; Krauter, K.S.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Yoshikawa, T.; Collins, A.R.; Geurts van Kessel, A.

    1996-01-01

    The fourth international workshop on human chromosome 18 mapping was held in Boston, Massachusetts, USA on October 7-9, 1996. The workshop was attended by 34 participants from 7 countries. The goals of the workshop were to (1) generate integrated genetic and physical maps, (2) update the transcriptional map, (3) assess the syntenic relationships between human chromosome 18 and the mouse genome, and (4) establish a chromosome 18 web site

  4. An integrated physical map of 210 markers assigned to the short arm of human chromosome 11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redeker, E.; Hoovers, J. M.; Alders, M.; van Moorsel, C. J.; Ivens, A. C.; Gregory, S.; Kalikin, L.; Bliek, J.; de Galan, L.; van den Bogaard, R.; Visser, J.; van der Voort, R.; Feinberg, A. P.; Little, P. F. R.; Westerveld, A.; Mannens, M.

    1994-01-01

    Using a panel of patient cell lines with chromosomal breakpoints, we constructed a physical map for the short arm of human chromosome 11. We focused on 11p15, a chromosome band harboring at least 25 known genes and associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, several childhood tumors, and

  5. Chromosome mapping by FISH to metaphase and interphase nuclei. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trask, B.

    1997-08-01

    The overall specific aims of this project were: (1) to determine the large-scale structure of interphase and metaphase chromosomes, in order to establish new capabilities for genome mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); (2) to detect chromosome abnormalities associated with genetic disease and map DNA sequences relative to them in order to facilitate the identification of new genes with disease-causing mutations; (3) to establish medium resolution physical maps of selected chromosomal regions using a combined metaphase and interphase mapping strategy and to corroborate physical and genetic maps and integrate these maps with the cytogenetic map; (4) to analyze the polymorphism and sequence evolution of subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes; (5) to establish a state-of-the-art FISH and image processing facility in the Department of Molecular Biotechnology, University of Washington, in order to map DNA sequences rapidly and accurately to benefit the Human Genome Project.

  6. Cloning, expression, and chromosome mapping of human galectin-7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H; Flint, T

    1995-01-01

    The galectins are a family of beta-galactoside-binding proteins implicated in modulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Here we report the cloning and expression of a novel member of this family (galectin-7) that correspond to IEF (isoelectric focusing) 17 (12,700 Da; pI, 7.6) in the human...... keratinocyte protein data base, and that is strikingly down-regulated in SV40 transformed keratinocytes (K14). The cDNA was cloned from a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library using degenerated oligodeoxyribonucleotides back-translated from an IEF 17 peptide sequence. The protein encoded by the galectin-7 clone......14 keratinocytes imply a role in cell-cell and/or cell-matrix interactions necessary for normal growth control. The galectin-7 gene was mapped to chromosome 19. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Mar-17...

  7. A high-resolution comparative RH map of porcine chromosome (SSC) 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rattink, A.P.; Faivre, M.; Jungerius, B.J.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Harlizius, B.

    2001-01-01

    A high-resolution comparative map was constructed for porcine Chromosome (SSC) 2, where a QTL for back fat thickness (BFT) is located. A radiation hybrid (RH) map containing 33 genes and 25 microsatellite markers was constructed for this chromosome with a 3000-rad porcine RH panel. In total, 16

  8. BioNano genome mapping of individual chromosomes supports physical mapping and sequence assembly in complex plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staňková, Helena; Hastie, Alex R; Chan, Saki; Vrána, Jan; Tulpová, Zuzana; Kubaláková, Marie; Visendi, Paul; Hayashi, Satomi; Luo, Mingcheng; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Doležel, Jaroslav; Šimková, Hana

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of a reference genome sequence of bread wheat is challenging due to its specific features such as the genome size of 17 Gbp, polyploid nature and prevalence of repetitive sequences. BAC-by-BAC sequencing based on chromosomal physical maps, adopted by the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium as the key strategy, reduces problems caused by the genome complexity and polyploidy, but the repeat content still hampers the sequence assembly. Availability of a high-resolution genomic map to guide sequence scaffolding and validate physical map and sequence assemblies would be highly beneficial to obtaining an accurate and complete genome sequence. Here, we chose the short arm of chromosome 7D (7DS) as a model to demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to couple chromosome flow sorting with genome mapping in nanochannel arrays and create a de novo genome map of a wheat chromosome. We constructed a high-resolution chromosome map composed of 371 contigs with an N50 of 1.3 Mb. Long DNA molecules achieved by our approach facilitated chromosome-scale analysis of repetitive sequences and revealed a ~800-kb array of tandem repeats intractable to current DNA sequencing technologies. Anchoring 7DS sequence assemblies obtained by clone-by-clone sequencing to the 7DS genome map provided a valuable tool to improve the BAC-contig physical map and validate sequence assembly on a chromosome-arm scale. Our results indicate that creating genome maps for the whole wheat genome in a chromosome-by-chromosome manner is feasible and that they will be an affordable tool to support the production of improved pseudomolecules. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:chap 69. Taber's Medical Dictionary Online. Chromosome. www.tabers.com/tabersonline/view/Tabers-Dictionary/753321/all/chromosome?q=Chromosome&ti=0 . Accessed June 11, 2017.

  10. Coupling amplified DNA from flow-sorted chromosomes to high-density SNP mapping in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartoš Jan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flow cytometry facilitates sorting of single chromosomes and chromosome arms which can be used for targeted genome analysis. However, the recovery of microgram amounts of DNA needed for some assays requires sorting of millions of chromosomes which is laborious and time consuming. Yet, many genomic applications such as development of genetic maps or physical mapping do not require large DNA fragments. In such cases time-consuming de novo sorting can be minimized by utilizing whole-genome amplification. Results Here we report a protocol optimized in barley including amplification of DNA from only ten thousand chromosomes, which can be isolated in less than one hour. Flow-sorted chromosomes were treated with proteinase K and amplified using Phi29 multiple displacement amplification (MDA. Overnight amplification in a 20-microlitre reaction produced 3.7 – 5.7 micrograms DNA with a majority of products between 5 and 30 kb. To determine the purity of sorted fractions and potential amplification bias we used quantitative PCR for specific genes on each chromosome. To extend the analysis to a whole genome level we performed an oligonucleotide pool assay (OPA for interrogation of 1524 loci, of which 1153 loci had known genetic map positions. Analysis of unamplified genomic DNA of barley cv. Akcent using this OPA resulted in 1426 markers with present calls. Comparison with three replicates of amplified genomic DNA revealed >99% concordance. DNA samples from amplified chromosome 1H and a fraction containing chromosomes 2H – 7H were examined. In addition to loci with known map positions, 349 loci with unknown map positions were included. Based on this analysis 40 new loci were mapped to 1H. Conclusion The results indicate a significant potential of using this approach for physical mapping. Moreover, the study showed that multiple displacement amplification of flow-sorted chromosomes is highly efficient and representative which

  11. Report of the Fourth International Workshop on human X chromosome mapping 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlessinger, D.; Mandel, J.L.; Monaco, A.P.; Nelson, D.L.; Willard, H.F. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    Vigorous interactive efforts by the X chromosome community have led to accelerated mapping in the last six months. Seventy-five participants from 12 countries around the globe contributed progress reports to the Fourth International X Chromosome Workshop, at St. Louis, MO, May 9-12, 1993. It became clear that well over half the chromosome is now covered by YAC contigs that are being extended, verified, and aligned by their content of STSs and other markers placed by cytogenetic or linkage mapping techniques. The major aim of the workshop was to assemble the consensus map that appears in this report, summarizing both consensus order and YAC contig information.

  12. Physical Mapping of Bread Wheat Chromosome 5A: An Integrated Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delfina Barabaschi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The huge size, redundancy, and highly repetitive nature of the bread wheat [ (L.] genome, makes it among the most difficult species to be sequenced. To overcome these limitations, a strategy based on the separation of individual chromosomes or chromosome arms and the subsequent production of physical maps was established within the frame of the International Wheat Genome Sequence Consortium (IWGSC. A total of 95,812 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones of short-arm chromosome 5A (5AS and long-arm chromosome 5A (5AL arm-specific BAC libraries were fingerprinted and assembled into contigs by complementary analytical approaches based on the FingerPrinted Contig (FPC and Linear Topological Contig (LTC tools. Combined anchoring approaches based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR marker screening, microarray, and sequence homology searches applied to several genomic tools (i.e., genetic maps, deletion bin map, neighbor maps, BAC end sequences (BESs, genome zipper, and chromosome survey sequences allowed the development of a high-quality physical map with an anchored physical coverage of 75% for 5AS and 53% for 5AL with high portions (64 and 48%, respectively of contigs ordered along the chromosome. In the genome of grasses, [ (L. Beauv.], rice ( L., and sorghum [ (L. Moench] homologs of genes on wheat chromosome 5A were separated into syntenic blocks on different chromosomes as a result of translocations and inversions during evolution. The physical map presented represents an essential resource for fine genetic mapping and map-based cloning of agronomically relevant traits and a reference for the 5A sequencing projects.

  13. Induced and natural break sites in the chromosomes of Hawaiian Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonzetich, J.; Lyttle, T.W.; Carson, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma-irradiation of a laboratory strain of the Hawaiian species of Drosophila heteroneura yielded 310 breaks in the five major acrocentric polytene chromosomes. Their map positions conform to the Poisson distribution, unlike most of the 436 natural breaks mapped in 105 closely related species endemic to Hawaii. Genome element E is longer and has more induced breaks than the others. Both in Hawaiian and related species groups, this element shows increased polymorphism and fixation of naturally occurring inversions. The X chromosome (element A) also accumulates many natural breaks; the majority of the resulting aberrations become fixed rather than remain as polymorphisms. Although size may play a small role in initial break distribution, the major effects relative to the establishment of a rearrangement in natural populations are ascribed to the interaction of selection and drift. Nonconformance of the natural breaks to the Poisson distribution appears to be due to the tendency for breaks to accumulate both in the proximal euchromatic portion of each arm and in heterochromatic regions that are not replicated in the polytene chromosomes

  14. Differential occurrence of chromosome inversion polymorphisms among Muller's elements in three species of the tripunctata group of Drosophila, including a species with fast chromosomal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brianti, Mitsue T; Ananina, Galina; Klaczko, Louis B

    2013-01-01

    Detailed chromosome maps with reliable homologies among chromosomes of different species are the first step to study the evolution of the genetic architecture in any set of species. Here, we present detailed photo maps of the polytene chromosomes of three closely related species of the tripunctata group (subgenus Drosophila): Drosophila mediopunctata, D. roehrae, and D. unipunctata. We identified Muller's elements in each species, using FISH, establishing reliable chromosome homologies among species and D. melanogaster. The simultaneous analysis of chromosome inversions revealed a distribution pattern for the inversion polymorphisms among Muller's elements in the three species. Element E is the most polymorphic, with many inversions in each species. Element C follows; while the least polymorphic elements are B and D. While interesting, it remains to be determined how general this pattern is among species of the tripunctata group. Despite previous studies showing that D. mediopunctata and D. unipunctata are phylogenetically closer to each other than to D. roehrae, D. unipunctata shows rare karyotypic changes. It has two chromosome fusions: an additional heterochromatic chromosome pair and a pericentric inversion in the X chromosome. This especial conformation suggests a fast chromosomal evolution that deserves further study.

  15. Progress towards construction of a total restriction fragment map of a human chromosome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Vissing; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. Solomon; G. Moore; N. Lench; N. Shennan; R. Williamson

    1987-01-01

    textabstractWe present an approach to the construction of an overlapping restriction fragment map of a single human chromosome. A genomic cosmid library genome was constructed from a mouse-human hybrid cell line containing chromosome 17 as its only human genetic component. Cosmids containing human

  16. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Identification of Pneumocystis carinii chromosomes and mapping of five genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, B; Cotton, R; Lundgren, J D

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis was used to identify the chromosome-size DNA of Pneumocystis carinii, a major pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Thirteen chromosomes of rodent Pneumocystis carinii, ranging in size from 300 to 700 kilobases (kb), were identified. The minimum genome size for ...

  18. A Plain English Map of the Chromosomes of the Fruit Fly Drosophila Melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Presents a plain English map of the chromosomes of the fruit fly that contains genes from very different kinds of studies. Represents the work of nearly a century by thousands of researchers using a tremendous variety of techniques. (JRH)

  19. Delimiting the origin of a B chromosome by FISH mapping, chromosome painting and DNA sequence analysis in Astyanax paranae (Teleostei, Characiformes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duílio M Z de A Silva

    Full Text Available Supernumerary (B chromosomes have been shown to contain a wide variety of repetitive sequences. For this reason, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH is a useful tool for ascertaining the origin of these genomic elements, especially when combined with painting from microdissected B chromosomes. In order to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in the fish species Astyanax paranae, these two approaches were used along with PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences obtained from the B chromosomes and its comparison with those residing in the A chromosomes. Remarkably, chromosome painting with the one-arm metacentric B chromosome probe showed hybridization signals on entire B chromosome, while FISH mapping revealed the presence of H1 histone and 18S rDNA genes symmetrically placed in both arms of the B chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that the B chromosome of A. paranae is an isochromosome. Additionally, the chromosome pairs Nos. 2 or 23 are considered the possible B chromosome ancestors since both contain syntenic H1 and 18S rRNA sequences. The analysis of DNA sequence fragments of the histone and rRNA genes obtained from the microdissected B chromosomes showed high similarity with those obtained from 0B individuals, which supports the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in A. paranae. Finally, the population hereby analysed showed a female-biased B chromosome presence suggesting that B chromosomes in this species could influence sex determinism.

  20. A high-resolution physical map integrating an anchored chromosome with the BAC physical maps of wheat chromosome 6B

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kobayashi, F.; Wu, J.Z.; Kanamori, H.; Tanaka, T.; Katagiri, S.; Karasawa, W.; Kaneko, S.; Watanabe, S.; Sakaguchi, T.; Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Mukai, Y.; Hamada, M.; Saito, M.; Hayakawa, K.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Nasuda, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Handa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, AUG 12 (2015), s. 595 ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Centromere * Chromosomal rearrangement * Chromosome 6B Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.867, year: 2015

  1. Physical mapping of the Period gene on meiotic chromosomes of South American grasshoppers (Acridomorpha, Orthoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, T E; Oliveira, D L; Santos, J F; Rieger, T T

    2014-12-19

    The single-copy gene Period was located in five grasshopper species belonging to the Acridomorpha group through permanent in situ hybridization (PISH). The mapping revealed one copy of this gene in the L1 chromosome pair in Ommexecha virens, Xyleus discoideus angulatus, Tropidacris collaris, Schistocerca pallens, and Stiphra robusta. A possible second copy was mapped on the L2 chromosome pair in S. robusta, which should be confirmed by further studies. Except for the latter case, the chromosomal position of the Period gene was highly conserved among the four families studied. The S. robusta karyotype also differs from the others both in chromosome number and morphology. The position conservation of the single-copy gene Period contrasts with the location diversification of multigene families in these species. The localization of single-copy genes by PISH can provide new insights about the genomic content and chromosomal evolution of grasshoppers and others insects.

  2. Genetic and physical mapping of two centromere-proximal regions of chromosome IV in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleksenko, Alexei Y.; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Clutterbuck, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    revision of the genetic map of the chromosome, including the position of the centromere, Comparison of physical and genetic maps indicates that meiotic recombination is low in subcentromeric DNA, its frequency being reduced from 1 crossover per 0.8 Mb to approximately 1 crossover per 5 Mb per meiosis...

  3. High-resolution YAC-cosmid-STS map of human chromosome 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayanis, E; Russo, J J; Kalachikov, S; Ye, X; Park, S H; Sunjevaric, I; Bonaldo, M F; Lawton, L; Venkatraj, V S; Schon, E; Soares, M B; Rothstein, R; Warburton, D; Edelman, I S; Zhang, P; Efstratiadis, A; Fischer, S G

    1998-01-01

    We have assembled a high-resolution physical map of human chromosome 13 DNA (approximately 114 Mb) from hybridization, PCR, and FISH mapping data using a specifically designed set of computer programs. Although the mapping of 13p is limited, 13q (approximately 98 Mb) is covered by an almost continuous contig of 736 YACs aligned to 597 contigs of cosmids. Of a total of 10,789 cosmids initially selected from a chromosome 13-specific cosmid library (16,896 colonies) using inter-Alu PCR probes from the YACs and probes for markers mapped to chromosome 13, 511 were assembled in contigs that were established from cross-hybridization relationships between the cosmids. The 13q YAC-cosmid map was annotated with 655 sequence tagged sites (STSs) with an average spacing of 1 STS per 150 kb. This set of STSs, each identified by a D number and cytogenetic location, includes database markers (198), expressed sequence tags (93), and STSs generated by sequencing of the ends of cosmid inserts (364). Additional annotation has been provided by positioning 197 cosmids mapped by FISH on 13q. The final (comprehensive) map, a list of STS primers, and raw data used in map assembly are available at our Web site (genome1.ccc.columbia.edu/ approximately genome/) and can serve as a resource to facilitate accurate localization of additional markers, provide substrates for sequencing, and assist in the discovery of chromosome 13 genes associated with hereditary diseases.

  4. A High Resolution Radiation Hybrid Map of Wheat Chromosome 4A

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balcárková, Barbora; Frenkel, Z.; Škopová, Monika; Abrouk, Michael; Kumar, A.; Chao, S.; Kianian, S. F.; Akhunov, E.; Korol, A.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Valárik, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, JAN 10 (2017), č. článku 2063. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-07164S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : triticum-aestivum l. * bread wheat * high-density * agronomic traits * tetraploid wheat * hexaploid wheat * polyploid wheat * genetic maps * genomes * recombination * endosperm radiation hybrid panel * radiation hybrid map * wheat chromosome 4A * chromosome deletion bin map * Triticum aestivum * SNP iSelect array Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  5. Chromosomal mapping of canine-derived BAC clones to the red fox and American mink genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukekova, Anna V; Vorobieva, Nadegda V; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Johnson, Jennifer L; Temnykh, Svetlana V; Yudkin, Dmitry V; Trut, Lyudmila N; Andre, Catherine; Galibert, Francis; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2009-01-01

    High-quality sequencing of the dog (Canis lupus familiaris) genome has enabled enormous progress in genetic mapping of canine phenotypic variation. The red fox (Vulpes vulpes), another canid species, also exhibits a wide range of variation in coat color, morphology, and behavior. Although the fox genome has not yet been sequenced, canine genomic resources have been used to construct a meiotic linkage map of the red fox genome and begin genetic mapping in foxes. However, a more detailed gene-specific comparative map between the dog and fox genomes is required to establish gene order within homologous regions of dog and fox chromosomes and to refine breakpoints between homologous chromosomes of the 2 species. In the current study, we tested whether canine-derived gene-containing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones can be routinely used to build a gene-specific map of the red fox genome. Forty canine BAC clones were mapped to the red fox genome by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Each clone was uniquely assigned to a single fox chromosome, and the locations of 38 clones agreed with cytogenetic predictions. These results clearly demonstrate the utility of FISH mapping for construction of a whole-genome gene-specific map of the red fox. The further possibility of using canine BAC clones to map genes in the American mink (Mustela vison) genome was also explored. Much lower success was obtained for this more distantly related farm-bred species, although a few BAC clones were mapped to the predicted chromosomal locations.

  6. Linkage and QTL mapping for Sus scrofa chromosome 5

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lee, S. S.; Chen, Y.; Moran, C.; Stratil, Antonín; Reiner, G.; Bartenschlager, H.; Moser, G.; Geldermann, H.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 1 (2003), s. 38-44 ISSN 0931-2668 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/97/1305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : chromosome 5 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.634, year: 2003

  7. Linkage and QTL mapping for Sus scrofa chromosome 2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lee, S. S.; Chen, Y.; Moran, C.; Čepica, Stanislav; Reiner, G.; Bartenschlager, H.; Moser, G.; Geldermann, H.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 1 (2003), s. 11 ISSN 0931-2668 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/97/1305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : chromosome 2 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.634, year: 2003

  8. Report of the fifth international workshop on human X chromosome mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, H.F.; Cremers, F.; Mandel, J.L.; Monaco, A.P.; Nelson, D.L.; Schlessinger, D.

    1994-12-31

    A high-quality integrated genetic and physical map of the X chromosome from telomere to telomere, based primarily on YACs formatted with probes and STSs, is increasingly close to reality. At the Fifth International X Chromosome Workshop, organized by A.M. Poustka and D. Schlessinger in Heidelberg, Germany, April 24--27, 1994, substantial progress was recorded on extension and refinement of the physical map, on the integration of genetic and cytogenetic data, on attempts to use the map to direct gene searches, and on nascent large-scale sequencing efforts. This report summarizes physical and genetic mapping information presented at the workshop and/or published since the reports of the fourth International X Chromosome Workshop. The principle aim of the workshop was to derive a consensus map of the chromosome, in terms of physical contigs emphasizing the location of genes and microsatellite markers. The resulting map is presented and updates previous versions. This report also updates the list of highly informative microsatellites. The text highlights the working state of the map, the genes known to reside on the X, and the progress toward integration of various types of data.

  9. Report of the first international workshop on human chromosome 14 mapping 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    The first International Workshop on Human Chromosome 14 mapping was held at Novotel in Toronto, Canada on June 9-12, 1993. There were 23 participants from nine countries. The goals of the workshop were to compile physical maps and a consensus linkage map, to consolidate available data on disease loci, to catalogue and facilitate distribution of resources and to encourage new collaborations and data sharing.

  10. Cytological maps of lampbrush chromosomes of European water frogs (Pelophylax esculentus complex) from the Eastern Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hybridogenesis (hemiclonal inheritance) is a kind of clonal reproduction in which hybrids between parental species are reproduced by crossing with one of the parental species. European water frogs (Pelophylax esculentus complex) represent an appropriate model for studying interspecies hybridization, processes of hemiclonal inheritance and polyploidization. P. esculentus complex consists of two parental species, P. ridibundus (the lake frog) and P. lessonae (the pool frog), and their hybridogenetic hybrid – P. esculentus (the edible frog). Parental and hybrid frogs can reproduce syntopically and form hemiclonal population systems. For studying mechanisms underlying the maintenance of water frog population systems it is required to characterize the karyotypes transmitted in gametes of parental and different hybrid animals of both sexes. Results In order to obtain an instrument for characterization of oocyte karyotypes in hybrid female frogs, we constructed cytological maps of lampbrush chromosomes from oocytes of both parental species originating in Eastern Ukraine. We further identified certain molecular components of chromosomal marker structures and mapped coilin-rich spheres and granules, chromosome associated nucleoli and special loops accumulating splicing factors. We recorded the dissimilarities between P. ridibundus and P. lessonae lampbrush chromosomes in the length of orthologous chromosomes, number and location of marker structures and interstitial (TTAGGG)n-repeat sites as well as activity of nucleolus organizer. Satellite repeat RrS1 was mapped in centromere regions of lampbrush chromosomes of the both species. Additionally, we discovered transcripts of RrS1 repeat in oocytes of P. ridibundus and P. lessonae. Moreover, G-rich transcripts of telomere repeat were revealed in association with terminal regions of P. ridibundus and P. lessonae lampbrush chromosomes. Conclusions The constructed cytological maps of lampbrush chromosomes of P

  11. Salmonid Chromosome Evolution as Revealed by a Novel Method for Comparing RADseq Linkage Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Thierry; Normandeau, Eric; Lamothe, Manuel; Isabel, Nathalie; Audet, Céline; Bernatchez, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) can provide material for evolutionary innovation. Family Salmonidae is ideal for studying the effects of WGD as the ancestral salmonid underwent WGD relatively recently, ∼65 Ma, then rediploidized and diversified. Extensive synteny between homologous chromosome arms occurs in extant salmonids, but each species has both conserved and unique chromosome arm fusions and fissions. Assembly of large, outbred eukaryotic genomes can be difficult, but structural rearrangements within such taxa can be investigated using linkage maps. RAD sequencing provides unprecedented ability to generate high-density linkage maps for nonmodel species, but can result in low numbers of homologous markers between species due to phylogenetic distance or differences in library preparation. Here, we generate a high-density linkage map (3,826 markers) for the Salvelinus genera (Brook Charr S. fontinalis), and then identify corresponding chromosome arms among the other available salmonid high-density linkage maps, including six species of Oncorhynchus, and one species for each of Salmo, Coregonus, and the nonduplicated sister group for the salmonids, Northern Pike Esox lucius for identifying post-duplicated homeologs. To facilitate this process, we developed MapComp to identify identical and proximate (i.e. nearby) markers between linkage maps using a reference genome of a related species as an intermediate, increasing the number of comparable markers between linkage maps by 5-fold. This enabled a characterization of the most likely history of retained chromosomal rearrangements post-WGD, and several conserved chromosomal inversions. Analyses of RADseq-based linkage maps from other taxa will also benefit from MapComp, available at: https://github.com/enormandeau/mapcomp/ PMID:28173098

  12. Using Linkage Maps as a Tool To Determine Patterns of Chromosome Synteny in the Genus Salvelinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Hale

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing techniques have revolutionized the collection of genome and transcriptome data from nonmodel organisms. This manuscript details the application of restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq to generate a marker-dense genetic map for Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis. The consensus map was constructed from three full-sib families totaling 176 F1 individuals. The map consisted of 42 linkage groups with a total female map size of 2502.5 cM, and a total male map size of 1863.8 cM. Synteny was confirmed with Atlantic Salmon for 38 linkage groups, with Rainbow Trout for 37 linkage groups, Arctic Char for 36 linkage groups, and with a previously published Brook Trout linkage map for 39 linkage groups. Comparative mapping confirmed the presence of 8 metacentric and 34 acrocentric chromosomes in Brook Trout. Six metacentric chromosomes seem to be conserved with Arctic Char suggesting there have been at least two species-specific fusion and fission events within the genus Salvelinus. In addition, the sex marker (sdY; sexually dimorphic on the Y chromosome was mapped to Brook Trout BC35, which is homologous with Atlantic Salmon Ssa09qa, Rainbow Trout Omy25, and Arctic Char AC04q. Ultimately, this linkage map will be a useful resource for studies on the genome organization of Salvelinus, and facilitates comparisons of the Salvelinus genome with Salmo and Oncorhynchus.

  13. Genome-wide mapping reveals single-origin chromosome replication in Leishmania, a eukaryotic microbe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Catarina A; Dickens, Nicholas J; Paape, Daniel; Campbell, Samantha J; McCulloch, Richard

    2015-10-19

    DNA replication initiates on defined genome sites, termed origins. Origin usage appears to follow common rules in the eukaryotic organisms examined to date: all chromosomes are replicated from multiple origins, which display variations in firing efficiency and are selected from a larger pool of potential origins. To ask if these features of DNA replication are true of all eukaryotes, we describe genome-wide origin mapping in the parasite Leishmania. Origin mapping in Leishmania suggests a striking divergence in origin usage relative to characterized eukaryotes, since each chromosome appears to be replicated from a single origin. By comparing two species of Leishmania, we find evidence that such origin singularity is maintained in the face of chromosome fusion or fission events during evolution. Mapping Leishmania origins suggests that all origins fire with equal efficiency, and that the genomic sites occupied by origins differ from related non-origins sites. Finally, we provide evidence that origin location in Leishmania displays striking conservation with Trypanosoma brucei, despite the latter parasite replicating its chromosomes from multiple, variable strength origins. The demonstration of chromosome replication for a single origin in Leishmania, a microbial eukaryote, has implications for the evolution of origin multiplicity and associated controls, and may explain the pervasive aneuploidy that characterizes Leishmania chromosome architecture.

  14. Construction of physical maps for the sex-specific regions of papaya sex chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Jong-Kuk

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papaya is a major fruit crop in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. It is trioecious with three sex forms: male, female, and hermaphrodite. Sex determination is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes with two slightly different Y chromosomes, Y for male and Yh for hermaphrodite. The sex chromosome genotypes are XY (male, XYh (hermaphrodite, and XX (female. The papaya hermaphrodite-specific Yh chromosome region (HSY is pericentromeric and heterochromatic. Physical mapping of HSY and its X counterpart is essential for sequencing these regions and uncovering the early events of sex chromosome evolution and to identify the sex determination genes for crop improvement. Results A reiterate chromosome walking strategy was applied to construct the two physical maps with three bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries. The HSY physical map consists of 68 overlapped BACs on the minimum tiling path, and covers all four HSY-specific Knobs. One gap remained in the region of Knob 1, the only knob structure shared between HSY and X, due to the lack of HSY-specific sequences. This gap was filled on the physical map of the HSY corresponding region in the X chromosome. The X physical map consists of 44 BACs on the minimum tiling path with one gap remaining in the middle, due to the nature of highly repetitive sequences. This gap was filled on the HSY physical map. The borders of the non-recombining HSY were defined genetically by fine mapping using 1460 F2 individuals. The genetically defined HSY spanned approximately 8.5 Mb, whereas its X counterpart extended about 5.4 Mb including a 900 Kb region containing the Knob 1 shared by the HSY and X. The 8.5 Mb HSY corresponds to 4.5 Mb of its X counterpart, showing 4 Mb (89% DNA sequence expansion. Conclusion The 89% increase of DNA sequence in HSY indicates rapid expansion of the Yh chromosome after genetic recombination was suppressed 2–3 million years ago. The

  15. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  16. A First Generation Comparative Chromosome Map between Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus) and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Svetlana A; Perelman, Polina L; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Serdyukova, Natalia A; Li, Tangliang; Fu, Beiyuan; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ng, Bee L; Nie, Wenhui; Liehr, Thomas; Stanyon, Roscoe; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2015-01-01

    The domesticated guinea pig, Cavia porcellus (Hystricomorpha, Rodentia), is an important laboratory species and a model for a number of human diseases. Nevertheless, genomic tools for this species are lacking; even its karyotype is poorly characterized. The guinea pig belongs to Hystricomorpha, a widespread and important group of rodents; so far the chromosomes of guinea pigs have not been compared with that of other hystricomorph species or with any other mammals. We generated full sets of chromosome-specific painting probes for the guinea pig by flow sorting and microdissection, and for the first time, mapped the chromosomal homologies between guinea pig and human by reciprocal chromosome painting. Our data demonstrate that the guinea pig karyotype has undergone extensive rearrangements: 78 synteny-conserved human autosomal segments were delimited in the guinea pig genome. The high rate of genome evolution in the guinea pig may explain why the HSA7/16 and HSA16/19 associations presumed ancestral for eutherians and the three syntenic associations (HSA1/10, 3/19, and 9/11) considered ancestral for rodents were not found in C. porcellus. The comparative chromosome map presented here is a starting point for further development of physical and genetic maps of the guinea pig as well as an aid for genome assembly assignment to specific chromosomes. Furthermore, the comparative mapping will allow a transfer of gene map data from other species. The probes developed here provide a genomic toolkit, which will make the guinea pig a key species to unravel the evolutionary biology of the Hystricomorph rodents.

  17. Fine mapping of quantitative trait loci for mastitis resistance on bovine chromosome 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, N F; Sahana, G; Iso-Touru, T

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting clinical mastitis (CM) and somatic cell score (SCS) were mapped on bovine chromosome 11. The mapping population consisted of 14 grandsire families belonging to three Nordic red cattle breeds: Finnish Ayrshire (FA), Swedish Red and White (SRB) and Danish Red......, each affecting one trait; or one QTL affecting a single trait. A QTL affecting CM was fine-mapped. In FA, a haplotype having a strong association with a high negative effect on mastitis resistance was identified. The mapping precision of an earlier detected SCS-QTL was not improved by the LDLA analysis...

  18. Comparative Chromosome Map and Heterochromatin Features of the Gray Whale Karyotype (Cetacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Proskuryakova, Anastasia A; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Lemskaya, Natalia A; Perelman, Polina L; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Cetacean karyotypes possess exceptionally stable diploid numbers and highly conserved chromosomes. To date, only toothed whales (Odontoceti) have been analyzed by comparative chromosome painting. Here, we studied the karyotype of a representative of baleen whales, the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus, Mysticeti), by Zoo-FISH with dromedary camel and human chromosome-specific probes. We confirmed a high degree of karyotype conservation and found an identical order of syntenic segments in both branches of cetaceans. Yet, whale chromosomes harbor variable heterochromatic regions constituting up to a third of the genome due to the presence of several types of repeats. To investigate the cause of this variability, several classes of repeated DNA sequences were mapped onto chromosomes of whale species from both Mysticeti and Odontoceti. We uncovered extensive intrapopulation variability in the size of heterochromatic blocks present in homologous chromosomes among 3 individuals of the gray whale by 2-step differential chromosome staining. We show that some of the heteromorphisms observed in the gray whale karyotype are due to distinct amplification of a complex of common cetacean repeat and heavy satellite repeat on homologous autosomes. Furthermore, we demonstrate localization of the telomeric repeat in the heterochromatin of both gray and pilot whale (Globicephala melas, Odontoceti). Heterochromatic blocks in the pilot whale represent a composite of telomeric and common repeats, while heavy satellite repeat is lacking in the toothed whale consistent with previous studies. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Characterization of a panel of somatic cell hybrids for regional mapping of the mouse X chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avner, P.; Arnaud, D.; Amar, L.; Cambrou, J.; Winking, H.; Russell, L.B.

    1987-01-01

    A panel of five hybrid cell lines containing mouse X chromosomes with various deletions has been obtained by fusing splenocytes from male mice carrying one of a series of reciprocal X-autosome translocations with the azaguanine-resistant Chinese hamster cell line CH3g. These hybrids have been extensively characterized by using the allozymes hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (encoded by the Hprt locus) and α-galactosidase (Ags) and a series of 11 X-chromosome-specific DNA probes whose localization had been previously established by linkage studies. Such studies have established the genetic breakpoints of the T(X;12)13R1 and T(X;2)14R1 X-autosome translocations on the X chromosome and provided additional information as to the X-chromosome genetic breakpoints of the T(X;16)16H, T(X;4)7R1, and T(X;7)6R1 translocations. The data establish clearly that both the T(X;7)5RI and T(X;12)13R1 X-chromosome breakpoints are proximal to Hprt, the breakpoint of the former being more centromeric, lying as it does in the 9-centimorgan interval between the ornithine transcarbamoylase (Otc) and DXPas7 (M2C) loci. These five hybrid cell lines provide, with the previously characterized EBS4 hybrid cell line, a nested series of seven mapping intervals distributed along the length of the mouse X chromosome. Their characterization not only allows further correlation of the genetic and cytological X-chromosome maps but also should permit the rapid identification of DNA probes specific for particular regions of the mouse X chromosome

  20. Construction of a map of chromosome 16 by using radiation hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccherini, I.; Romeo, G.; Lawrence, S.; Morton, N.E.; Breuning, M.H.; Harris, P.C.; Himmelbauer, H.; Frischauf, A.M.; Sutherland, G.R.; Germino, G.G.; Reeders, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    A human-hamster cell hybrid carrying a single copy of chromosome 16 as the only human genetic material was irradiated with a single dose of γ-rays and then fused with a thymidine kinase-deficient hamster cell line (RJKM) to generate radiation hybrids retaining unselected fragments of this human chromosome. In two experiments, 223 hybrids were isolated in hypoxanthine/aminopterine/thymidine (HAT) medium and screened with 38 DNA probes, corresponding to anonymous DNA or gene sequences localized on chromosome 16. The most likely order and location of the 38 DNA sequences were established by multiple pairwise analysis and scaled to estimate physical distance in megabases. The order and the distances thus obtained are mostly consistent with available data on genetic and physical mapping of these markers, illustrating the usefulness of radiation hybrids for mapping

  1. Features of the organization of bread wheat chromosome 5BS based on physical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salina, Elena A; Nesterov, Mikhail A; Frenkel, Zeev; Kiseleva, Antonina A; Timonova, Ekaterina M; Magni, Federica; Vrána, Jan; Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Korol, Abraham; Sergeeva, Ekaterina M

    2018-02-09

    The IWGSC strategy for construction of the reference sequence of the bread wheat genome is based on first obtaining physical maps of the individual chromosomes. Our aim is to develop and use the physical map for analysis of the organization of the short arm of wheat chromosome 5B (5BS) which bears a number of agronomically important genes, including genes conferring resistance to fungal diseases. A physical map of the 5BS arm (290 Mbp) was constructed using restriction fingerprinting and LTC software for contig assembly of 43,776 BAC clones. The resulting physical map covered ~ 99% of the 5BS chromosome arm (111 scaffolds, N50 = 3.078 Mb). SSR, ISBP and zipper markers were employed for anchoring the BAC clones, and from these 722 novel markers were developed based on previously obtained data from partial sequencing of 5BS. The markers were mapped using a set of Chinese Spring (CS) deletion lines, and F2 and RICL populations from a cross of CS and CS-5B dicoccoides. Three approaches have been used for anchoring BAC contigs on the 5BS chromosome, including clone-by-clone screening of BACs, GenomeZipper analysis, and comparison of BAC-fingerprints with in silico fingerprinting of 5B pseudomolecules of T. dicoccoides. These approaches allowed us to reach a high level of BAC contig anchoring: 96% of 5BS BAC contigs were located on 5BS. An interesting pattern was revealed in the distribution of contigs along the chromosome. Short contigs (200-999 kb) containing markers for the regions interrupted by tandem repeats, were mainly localized to the 5BS subtelomeric block; whereas the distribution of larger 1000-3500 kb contigs along the chromosome better correlated with the distribution of the regions syntenic to rice, Brachypodium, and sorghum, as detected by the Zipper approach. The high fingerprinting quality, LTC software and large number of BAC clones selected by the informative markers in screening of the 43,776 clones allowed us to significantly increase the

  2. Construction of chromosomal recombination maps of three genomes of lilies (Lilium) based on GISH analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadeem Khan, M.; Shujun Zhou,; Barba Gonzalez, R.; Ramanna, M.S.; Visser, R.G.F.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal recombination maps were constructed for three genomes of lily (Lilium) using GISH analyses. For this purpose, the backcross (BC) progenies of two diploid (2n = 2x = 24) interspecific hybrids of lily, viz. Longiflorum × Asiatic (LA) and Oriental × Asiatic (OA), were used. Mostly the BC

  3. The murine retinoblastoma homolog maps to chromosome 14 near Es-10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, J.C.; Crosby, J.J.; Kozak, C.A.; Schievella, A.R.; Bernards, R.A.; Nadeau, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Restriction fragment length variants have been exploited to map genetically Rb-1, the murine homolog of the human retinoblastoma gene. Rb-1 localized to mouse chromosome 14 on the basis of results from analysis of somatic cell hybrids. In an interspecific backcross involving Mus spretus, Rb-1 and

  4. Chromosome mapping of dragline silk genes in the genomes of widow spiders (Araneae, Theridiidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Zhao

    Full Text Available With its incredible strength and toughness, spider dragline silk is widely lauded for its impressive material properties. Dragline silk is composed of two structural proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2, which are encoded by members of the spidroin gene family. While previous studies have characterized the genes that encode the constituent proteins of spider silks, nothing is known about the physical location of these genes. We determined karyotypes and sex chromosome organization for the widow spiders, Latrodectus hesperus and L. geometricus (Araneae, Theridiidae. We then used fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the genomic locations of the genes for the silk proteins that compose the remarkable spider dragline. These genes included three loci for the MaSp1 protein and the single locus for the MaSp2 protein. In addition, we mapped a MaSp1 pseudogene. All the MaSp1 gene copies and pseudogene localized to a single chromosomal region while MaSp2 was located on a different chromosome of L. hesperus. Using probes derived from L. hesperus, we comparatively mapped all three MaSp1 loci to a single region of a L. geometricus chromosome. As with L. hesperus, MaSp2 was found on a separate L. geometricus chromosome, thus again unlinked to the MaSp1 loci. These results indicate orthology of the corresponding chromosomal regions in the two widow genomes. Moreover, the occurrence of multiple MaSp1 loci in a conserved gene cluster across species suggests that MaSp1 proliferated by tandem duplication in a common ancestor of L. geometricus and L. hesperus. Unequal crossover events during recombination could have given rise to the gene copies and could also maintain sequence similarity among gene copies over time. Further comparative mapping with taxa of increasing divergence from Latrodectus will pinpoint when the MaSp1 duplication events occurred and the phylogenetic distribution of silk gene linkage patterns.

  5. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, S.V.; Nadeau, J.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Watkins, P.C.; Jagadesh, J.; Taylor, B.A.; Haines, J.L.; Sacchi, N.; Gusella, J.F. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1988-08-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid {beta} precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, the authors have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS.

  6. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.V.; Nadeau, J.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Watkins, P.C.; Jagadesh, J.; Taylor, B.A.; Haines, J.L.; Sacchi, N.; Gusella, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid β precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, the authors have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS

  7. Chromosomal structures and repetitive sequences divergence in Cucumis species revealed by comparative cytogenetic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunxia; Cheng, Chunyan; Li, Ji; Yang, Shuqiong; Wang, Yunzhu; Li, Ziang; Chen, Jinfeng; Lou, Qunfeng

    2015-09-25

    Differentiation and copy number of repetitive sequences affect directly chromosome structure which contributes to reproductive isolation and speciation. Comparative cytogenetic mapping has been verified an efficient tool to elucidate the differentiation and distribution of repetitive sequences in genome. In present study, the distinct chromosomal structures of five Cucumis species were revealed through genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) technique and comparative cytogenetic mapping of major satellite repeats. Chromosome structures of five Cucumis species were investigated using GISH and comparative mapping of specific satellites. Southern hybridization was employed to study the proliferation of satellites, whose structural characteristics were helpful for analyzing chromosome evolution. Preferential distribution of repetitive DNAs at the subtelomeric regions was found in C. sativus, C hystrix and C. metuliferus, while majority was positioned at the pericentromeric heterochromatin regions in C. melo and C. anguria. Further, comparative GISH (cGISH) through using genomic DNA of other species as probes revealed high homology of repeats between C. sativus and C. hystrix. Specific satellites including 45S rDNA, Type I/II, Type III, Type IV, CentM and telomeric repeat were then comparatively mapped in these species. Type I/II and Type IV produced bright signals at the subtelomeric regions of C. sativus and C. hystrix simultaneously, which might explain the significance of their amplification in the divergence of Cucumis subgenus from the ancient ancestor. Unique positioning of Type III and CentM only at the centromeric domains of C. sativus and C. melo, respectively, combining with unique southern bands, revealed rapid evolutionary patterns of centromeric DNA in Cucumis. Obvious interstitial telomeric repeats were observed in chromosomes 1 and 2 of C. sativus, which might provide evidence of the fusion hypothesis of chromosome evolution from x = 12 to x = 7 in

  8. Comparative mapping in the beige-satin region of mouse chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perou, C.M.; Pryor, R.; Kaplan, J. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-15

    The proximal end of mouse chromosome (Chr) 13 contains regions conserved on human chromosomes 1q42-q44, 6p23-p21, and 7p22-p13. This region also contains mutations that may be models for human disease, including beige (human Chediak-Higashi syndrome). An interspecific backcross of SB/Le and Mus spretus mice was used to generate a molecular genetic linkage map of mouse chromosome 13 with an emphasis on the proximal region including beige (bg) and satin (sa). This map provides the gene order of the two phenotypic markers bg and sa relative to restriction fragment length polymorphisms and simple sequence length polymorphisms in 131 backcross animals. In parallel, we have created a physical map of the region using Nidogen (Nid) as a molecular starting point for cloning a YAC contig that was used to identify the beige gene. The physical map provides the fine-structure order of genes and anonymous DNA fragments that was not resolved by the genetic linkage mapping. The results show that the bg region of mouse Chr 13 is highly conserved on human Chr 1q42-q44 and provide a starting point for a complete functional analysis of the entire bg-sa interval. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Mapping of novel powdery mildew resistance gene(s) from Agropyron cristatum chromosome 2P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanhuan; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Jingchang; Lu, Yuqing; Zhang, Jinpeng; Pan, Cuili; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2017-01-01

    A physical map of Agropyron cristatum 2P chromosome was constructed for the first time and the novel powdery mildew resistance gene(s) from chromosome 2P was(were) also mapped. Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 28, PPPP), a wild relative of common wheat, is highly resistant to powdery mildew. Previous studies showed that wheat-A. cristatum 2P disomic addition line II-9-3 displayed high resistance to powdery mildew, and the resistance was attributable to A. cristatum chromosome 2P. To utilize and physically map the powdery mildew resistance gene(s), 15 wheat-A. cristatum 2P translocation lines and three A. cristatum 2P deletion lines with different chromosomal segment sizes, obtained from II-9-3 using 60 Co-γ ray irradiation, were characterized using cytogenetic and molecular marker analysis. A. cristatum 2P chromosomal segments in the translocations were translocated to different wheat chromosomes, including 1A, 4A, 5A, 6A, 7A, 1B, 2B, 3B, 7B, 3D, 4D, and 6D. A physical map of the 2P chromosome was constructed with 82 STS markers, consisting of nine bins with 34 markers on 2PS and eight bins with 48 markers on 2PL. The BC 1 F 2 populations of seven wheat-A. cristatum 2P translocation lines (2PT-3, 2PT-4, 2PT-5, 2PT-6, 2PT-8, 2PT-9, and 2PT-10) were developed by self-pollination, tested with powdery mildew and genotyped with 2P-specific STS markers. From these results, the gene(s) conferring powdery mildew resistance was(were) located on 2PL bin FL 0.66-0.86 and 19 2P-specific markers were identified in this bin. Moreover, two new powdery mildew-resistant translocation lines (2PT-4 and 2PT-5) with small 2PL chromosome segments were obtained. The newly developed wheat lines with powdery mildew resistance and the closely linked molecular markers will be valuable for wheat disease breeding in the future.

  10. Mapping of rDNA on the chromosomes of Eleusine species by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, M S; Mukai, Y

    2000-12-01

    Mapping of rDNA sites on the chromosomes of four diploid and two tetraploid species of Eleusine has provided valuable information on genome relationship between the species. Presence of 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA on the largest pair of the chromosomes, location of 5S rDNA at four sites on two pairs of chromosomes and presence of 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S rDNA at same location on one pair of chromosomes have clearly differentiated E. multiflora from rest of the species of Eleusine. The two tetraploid species, E. coracana and E. africana have the same number of 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S rDNA sites and located at similar position on the chromosomes. Diploid species, E. indica, E. floccifolia and E. tristachya have the same 18S-5.8S-26S sites and location on the chromosomes which also resembled with the two pairs of 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA locations in tetraploid species, E. coracana and E. africana. The 5S rDNA sites on chromosomes of E. indica and E. floccifolia were also comparable to the 5S rDNA sites of E. africana and E. coracana. The similarity of the rDNA sites and their location on chromosomes in the three diploid and two polyploid species also supports the view that genome donors to tetraploid species may be from these diploid species.

  11. Hominoid chromosomal rearrangements on 17q map to complex regions of segmental duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Maria Francesca; Jiang, Zhaoshi; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Mariano; Eichler, Evan E; Ventura, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements, such as translocations and inversions, are recurrent phenomena during evolution, and both of them are involved in reproductive isolation and speciation. To better understand the molecular basis of chromosome rearrangements and their part in karyotype evolution, we have investigated the history of human chromosome 17 by comparative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and sequence analysis. Human bacterial artificial chromosome/p1 artificial chromosome probes spanning the length of chromosome 17 were used in FISH experiments on great apes, Old World monkeys and New World monkeys to study the evolutionary history of this chromosome. We observed that the macaque marker order represents the ancestral organization. Human, chimpanzee and gorilla homologous chromosomes differ by a paracentric inversion that occurred specifically in the Homo sapiens/Pan troglodytes/Gorilla gorilla ancestor. Detailed analyses of the paracentric inversion revealed that the breakpoints mapped to two regions syntenic to human 17q12/21 and 17q23, both rich in segmental duplications. Sequence analyses of the human and macaque organization suggest that the duplication events occurred in the catarrhine ancestor with the duplication blocks continuing to duplicate or undergo gene conversion during evolution of the hominoid lineage. We propose that the presence of these duplicons has mediated the inversion in the H. sapiens/P. troglodytes/G. gorilla ancestor. Recently, the same duplication blocks have been shown to be polymorphic in the human population and to be involved in triggering microdeletion and duplication in human. These results further support a model where genomic architecture has a direct role in both rearrangement involved in karyotype evolution and genomic instability in human.

  12. Construction of the High-Density Genetic Linkage Map and Chromosome Map of Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqun Ao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available High-density genetic maps are essential for genome assembly, comparative genomic analysis and fine mapping of complex traits. In this study, 31,191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs evenly distributed across the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea genome were identified using restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq. Among them, 10,150 high-confidence SNPs were assigned to 24 consensus linkage groups (LGs. The total length of the genetic linkage map was 5451.3 cM with an average distance of 0.54 cM between loci. This represents the densest genetic map currently reported for large yellow croaker. Using 2889 SNPs to target specific scaffolds, we assigned 533 scaffolds, comprising 421.44 Mb (62.04% of the large yellow croaker assembled sequence, to the 24 linkage groups. The mapped assembly scaffolds in large yellow croaker were used for genome synteny analyses against the stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus and medaka (Oryzias latipes. Greater synteny was observed between large yellow croaker and stickleback. This supports the hypothesis that large yellow croaker is more closely related to stickleback than to medaka. Moreover, 1274 immunity-related genes and 195 hypoxia-related genes were mapped to the 24 chromosomes of large yellow croaker. The integration of the high-resolution genetic map and the assembled sequence provides a valuable resource for fine mapping and positional cloning of quantitative trait loci associated with economically important traits in large yellow croaker.

  13. Chromhome: a rich internet application for accessing comparative chromosome homology maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sridevi; Rens, Willem; Stalker, James; Cox, Tony; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

    2008-03-26

    Comparative genomics has become a significant research area in recent years, following the availability of a number of sequenced genomes. The comparison of genomes is of great importance in the analysis of functionally important genome regions. It can also be used to understand the phylogenetic relationships of species and the mechanisms leading to rearrangement of karyotypes during evolution. Many species have been studied at the cytogenetic level by cross species chromosome painting. With the large amount of such information, it has become vital to computerize the data and make them accessible worldwide. Chromhome http://www.chromhome.org is a comprehensive web application that is designed to provide cytogenetic comparisons among species and to fulfil this need. The Chromhome application architecture is multi-tiered with an interactive client layer, business logic and database layers. Enterprise java platform with open source framework OpenLaszlo is used to implement the Rich Internet Chromhome Application. Cross species comparative mapping raw data are collected and the processed information is stored into MySQL Chromhome database. Chromhome Release 1.0 contains 109 homology maps from 51 species. The data cover species from 14 orders and 30 families. The homology map displays all the chromosomes of the compared species as one image, making comparisons among species easier. Inferred data also provides maps of homologous regions that could serve as a guideline for researchers involved in phylogenetic or evolution based studies. Chromhome provides a useful resource for comparative genomics, holding graphical homology maps of a wide range of species. It brings together cytogenetic data of many genomes under one roof. Inferred painting can often determine the chromosomal homologous regions between two species, if each has been compared with a common third species. Inferred painting greatly reduces the need to map entire genomes and helps focus only on relevant

  14. Chromhome: A rich internet application for accessing comparative chromosome homology maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Tony

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics has become a significant research area in recent years, following the availability of a number of sequenced genomes. The comparison of genomes is of great importance in the analysis of functionally important genome regions. It can also be used to understand the phylogenetic relationships of species and the mechanisms leading to rearrangement of karyotypes during evolution. Many species have been studied at the cytogenetic level by cross species chromosome painting. With the large amount of such information, it has become vital to computerize the data and make them accessible worldwide. Chromhome http://www.chromhome.org is a comprehensive web application that is designed to provide cytogenetic comparisons among species and to fulfil this need. Results The Chromhome application architecture is multi-tiered with an interactive client layer, business logic and database layers. Enterprise java platform with open source framework OpenLaszlo is used to implement the Rich Internet Chromhome Application. Cross species comparative mapping raw data are collected and the processed information is stored into MySQL Chromhome database. Chromhome Release 1.0 contains 109 homology maps from 51 species. The data cover species from 14 orders and 30 families. The homology map displays all the chromosomes of the compared species as one image, making comparisons among species easier. Inferred data also provides maps of homologous regions that could serve as a guideline for researchers involved in phylogenetic or evolution based studies. Conclusion Chromhome provides a useful resource for comparative genomics, holding graphical homology maps of a wide range of species. It brings together cytogenetic data of many genomes under one roof. Inferred painting can often determine the chromosomal homologous regions between two species, if each has been compared with a common third species. Inferred painting greatly reduces the need to

  15. Three-dimensional maps of all chromosomes in human male fibroblast nuclei and prometaphase rosettes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bolzer

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies of higher-order chromatin arrangements are an essential part of ongoing attempts to explore changes in epigenome structure and their functional implications during development and cell differentiation. However, the extent and cell-type-specificity of three-dimensional (3D chromosome arrangements has remained controversial. In order to overcome technical limitations of previous studies, we have developed tools that allow the quantitative 3D positional mapping of all chromosomes simultaneously. We present unequivocal evidence for a probabilistic 3D order of prometaphase chromosomes, as well as of chromosome territories (CTs in nuclei of quiescent (G0 and cycling (early S-phase human diploid fibroblasts (46, XY. Radial distance measurements showed a probabilistic, highly nonrandom correlation with chromosome size: small chromosomes-independently of their gene density-were distributed significantly closer to the center of the nucleus or prometaphase rosette, while large chromosomes were located closer to the nuclear or rosette rim. This arrangement was independently confirmed in both human fibroblast and amniotic fluid cell nuclei. Notably, these cell types exhibit flat-ellipsoidal cell nuclei, in contrast to the spherical nuclei of lymphocytes and several other human cell types, for which we and others previously demonstrated gene-density-correlated radial 3D CT arrangements. Modeling of 3D CT arrangements suggests that cell-type-specific differences in radial CT arrangements are not solely due to geometrical constraints that result from nuclear shape differences. We also found gene-density-correlated arrangements of higher-order chromatin shared by all human cell types studied so far. Chromatin domains, which are gene-poor, form a layer beneath the nuclear envelope, while gene-dense chromatin is enriched in the nuclear interior. We discuss the possible functional implications of this finding.

  16. Features of the organization of bread wheat chromosome 5BS based on physical mapping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Salina, E.A.; Nesterov, V.; Frenkel, Z.; Kiseleva, V. I.; Timonova, E. M.; Magni, F.; Vrána, Jan; Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Korol, A.; Sergeeva, E.M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 19, FEB 9 (2018), č. článku 80. ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Chromosome 5BS * Genetic markers * Hexaploid wheat * Physical mapping * Sequencing * Synteny * Triticum aestivum Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 3.729, year: 2016

  17. Use of a human chromosome 11 radiation hybrid panel to map markers at 11q13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, D.; Richard, C. III; Meeker, T.C.; Maurer, S.; Evans, G.; Myers, R.M.; Cox, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    A human/hamster hybrid cell line containing human chromosome 11 was X-irradiated and 102-independent derivative lines were recovered. These 'radiation hybrids' contain random fragments of human chromosome 11. This radiation hybrid panel was used to score the retention of markers at band 11q13. Statistical analysis of marker co-retention patterns in the radiation hybrid panel permits a preliminary ordering and mapping of the markers used. The best order for six scored markers is: proximal - CD5 - CD20 - PGA - HST - BCL1 - SEA - distal. Additional markers are currently being scored. The six 11q13 markers above are spread over approximately 10-12 mB of DNA. The mapping data has implications for the identification of the bcl-1 gene. bcl-1 is the site of chromosome breakage in translocations associated with B lymphocytic malignancy. bcl-1 markers map at least 4 Mb away from any of four genes previously hypothesized to be activated by such translocations, thereby making them unlikely candidates for activation

  18. GenomeVx: simple web-based creation of editable circular chromosome maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conant, Gavin C; Wolfe, Kenneth H

    2008-03-15

    We describe GenomeVx, a web-based tool for making editable, publication-quality, maps of mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes and of large plasmids. These maps show the location of genes and chromosomal features as well as a position scale. The program takes as input either raw feature positions or GenBank records. In the latter case, features are automatically extracted and colored, an example of which is given. Output is in the Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) and can be edited by programs such as Adobe Illustrator. GenomeVx is available at http://wolfe.gen.tcd.ie/GenomeVx

  19. Physical mapping of chromosome 8p22 markers and their homozygous deletion in a metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bova, G.S.; Pin, S.S.; Isaacs, W.B. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Brady Urological Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the short arm of chromosome 8 as the site of one or more tumor suppressor genes inactivated in carcinogenesis of the prostate, colon, lung, and liver. Previously, we identified a homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22 in a metastatic prostate cancer. To map this homozygous deletion physically, long-range restriction mapping was performed using yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of chromosome band 8p22. Subcloned genomic DNA and cDNA probes isolated by hybrid capture from these YACs were mapped in relation to one another, reinforcing map integrity. Mapped single-copy probes from the region were then applied to DNA isolated from a metastatic prostate cancer containing a chromosome 8p22 homozygous deletion and indicated that its deletion spans 730-970 kb. Candidate genes PRLTS (PDGF-receptor {beta}-like tumor suppressor) and CTSB (cathepsin B) are located outside the region of homozygous deletion. Genethon marker D8S549 is located approximately at the center of this region of homozygous deletion. Two new microsatellite polymorphisms, D8S1991 and D8S1992, also located within the region of homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22, are described. Physical mapping places cosmid CI8-2644 telomeric to MSR (macrophage scavenger receptor), the reverse of a previously published map, altering the interpretation of published deletion studies. This work should prove helpful in the identification of candidate tumor suppressor genes in this region. 47 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A new physical mapping approach refines the sex-determining gene positions on the Silene latifolia Y-chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Yusuke; Ishii, Kotaro; Aonuma, Wataru; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Kawamoto, Hiroki; Koizumi, Ayako; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Chibalina, Margarita; Bergero, Roberta; Charlesworth, Deborah; Abe, Tomoko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are particularly interesting regions of the genome for both molecular genetics and evolutionary studies; yet, for most species, we lack basic information, such as the gene order along the chromosome. Because they lack recombination, Y-linked genes cannot be mapped genetically, leaving physical mapping as the only option for establishing the extent of synteny and homology with the X chromosome. Here, we developed a novel and general method for deletion mapping of non-recombining regions by solving “the travelling salesman problem”, and evaluate its accuracy using simulated datasets. Unlike the existing radiation hybrid approach, this method allows us to combine deletion mutants from different experiments and sources. We applied our method to a set of newly generated deletion mutants in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia and refined the locations of the sex-determining loci on its Y chromosome map.

  1. Structural divergence of chromosomes between malaria vectors Anopheles lesteri and Anopheles sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangtao Liang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles lesteri and Anopheles sinensis are two major malaria vectors in China and Southeast Asia. They are dramatically different in terms of geographical distribution, host preference, resting habitats, and other traits associated with ecological adaptation and malaria transmission. Both species belong to the Anopheles hyrcanus group, but the extent of genetic differences between them is not well understood. To provide an effective way to differentiate between species and to find useful markers for population genetics studies, we performed a comparative cytogenetic analysis of these two malaria vectors. Results Presented here is a standard cytogenetic map for An. lesteri, and a comparative analysis of chromosome structure and gene order between An. lesteri and An. sinensis. Our results demonstrate that much of the gene order on chromosomes X and 2 was reshuffled between the two species. However, the banding pattern and the gene order on chromosome 3 appeared to be conserved. We also found two new polymorphic inversions, 2Lc and 3Rb, in An. lesteri, and we mapped the breakpoints of these two inversions on polytene chromosomes. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the extent of structural divergence of chromosomes between An. lesteri and An. sinensis, and provide a new taxonomic cytogenetic tool to distinguish between these two species. Polymorphic inversions of An. lesteri could serve as markers for studies of the population structure and ecological adaptations of this major malaria vector.

  2. Comparison of the chromosome maps around a resistance hot spot on chromosome 5 of potato and tomato using BAC-FISH painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Ute C; Tang, Xiaomin; Ballvora, Agim; de Jong, Hans; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2010-02-01

    Potato chromosome 5 harbours numerous genes for important qualitative and quantitative traits, such as resistance to the root cyst nematode Globodera pallida and the late blight fungus, Phytophthora infestans. The genes make up part of a "hot spot" for resistances to various pathogens covering a genetic map length of 3 cM between markers GP21 and GP179. We established the physical size and position of this region on chromosome 5 in potato and tomato using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on pachytene chromosomes. Five potato bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones with the genetically anchored markers GP21, R1-contig (proximal end), CosA, GP179, and StPto were selected, labeled with different fluorophores, and hybridized in a five-colour FISH experiment. Our results showed the location of the BAC clones in the middle of the long arm of chromosome 5 in both potato and tomato. Based on chromosome measurements, we estimate the physical size of the GP21-GP179 interval at 0.85 Mb and 1.2 Mb in potato and tomato, respectively. The GP21-GP179 interval is part of a genome segment known to have inverted map positions between potato and tomato.

  3. Cytogenetic characterization and AFLP-based genetic linkage mapping for the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, covering all 28 karyotyped chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen E Van't Hof

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chromosome characteristics of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, have received little attention, despite the scientific importance of this species. This study presents the characterization of chromosomes in this species by means of cytogenetic analysis and linkage mapping. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Physical genomic features in the butterfly B. anynana were examined by karyotype analysis and construction of a linkage map. Lepidoptera possess a female heterogametic W-Z sex chromosome system. The WZ-bivalent in pachytene oocytes of B. anynana consists of an abnormally small, heterochromatic W-chromosome with the Z-chromosome wrapped around it. Accordingly, the W-body in interphase nuclei is much smaller than usual in Lepidoptera. This suggests an intermediate stage in the process of secondary loss of the W-chromosome to a ZZ/Z sex determination system. Two nucleoli are present in the pachytene stage associated with an autosome and the WZ-bivalent respectively. Chromosome counts confirmed a haploid number of n = 28. Linkage mapping had to take account of absence of crossing-over in females, and of our use of a full-sib crossing design. We developed a new method to determine and exclude the non-recombinant uninformative female inherited component in offspring. The linkage map was constructed using a novel approach that uses exclusively JOINMAP-software for Lepidoptera linkage mapping. This approach simplifies the mapping procedure, avoids over-estimation of mapping distance and increases the reliability of relative marker positions. A total of 347 AFLP markers, 9 microsatellites and one single-copy nuclear gene covered all 28 chromosomes, with a mapping distance of 1354 cM. Conserved synteny of Tpi on the Z-chromosome in Lepidoptera was confirmed for B. anynana. The results are discussed in relation to other mapping studies in Lepidoptera. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study adds to the knowledge of chromosome structure and

  4. Allele-specific marker generation and linkage mapping on the Xiphophorus sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolcock, B; Kazianis, S; Lucito, R; Walter, R B; Kallman, K D; Morizot, D C; Vielkind, J R

    2006-01-01

    There is great interest in the sex chromosomes of Xiphophorus fishes because both WY/YY and XX/XY sex-determining mechanisms function in these species, with at least one taxon possessing all three types of sex chromosomes, and because in certain interspecific hybrids melanoma arises as a consequence of inheritance of the sex-linked macromelanophore determining locus (MDL). Representational difference analysis (RDA) has been used to clone two sequences from the sex-determining region of X. maculatus, including a cholinergic receptor, nicotinic, delta polypeptide (CHRND) orthologue. Allele-specific assays for these sequences, as well as for the sex-linked XMRK1 and XMRK2 genes, were developed to distinguish W, X, and Y chromosomes derived from a X. maculatus (XX/XY) strain and a X. helleri (WY/YY) strain. Linkage mapping localized these markers to linkage group (LG) 24. No recombinants were observed between XMRK2 and MDL, confirming a role for XMRK2 in macromelanophore development. Although the master sex-determining (SD) locus certainly resides on Xiphophorus LG 24, autosomal loci are probably involved in sex determination as well, as indicated by the abnormal sex ratios in the backcross hybrids that contrast theoretical predictions based on LG 24 genotyping. Marker development and allelic discrimination on the Xiphophorus sex chromosomes should prove highly useful for studies that utilize this genus as an animal model.

  5. Chromosomal mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling elastin content in rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauguier, Dominique; Behmoaras, Jacques; Argoud, Karène; Wilder, Steven P; Pradines, Christelle; Bihoreau, Marie Thérèse; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Jacob, Marie Paule

    2005-03-01

    Extracellular matrix molecules such as elastin and collagens provide mechanical support to the vessel wall. In addition to its structural role, elastin is a regulator that maintains homeostasis through biologic signaling. Genetically determined minor modifications in elastin and collagen in the aorta could influence the onset and evolution of arterial pathology, such as hypertension and its complications. We previously demonstrated that the inbred Brown Norway (BN) rat shows an aortic elastin deficit in both abdominal and thoracic segments, partly because of a decrease in tropoelastin synthesis when compared with the LOU rat, that elastin gene polymorphisms in these strains do not significantly account for. After a genome-wide search for quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing the aortic elastin, collagen, and cell protein contents in an F2 population derived from BN and LOU rats, we identified on chromosomes 2 and 14, 3 QTL specifically controlling elastin levels, and a further highly significant QTL on chromosome 17 linked to the level of cell proteins. We also mapped 3 highly significant QTL linked to body weight (on chromosomes 1 and 3) and heart weight (on chromosome 1) in the cross. This study demonstrates the polygenic control of the content of key components of the arterial wall. Such information represents a first step in understanding possible mechanisms involved in dysregulation of these parameters in arterial pathology.

  6. Establishment of a molecular genetic map of distal mouse chromosome 1: further definition of a conserved linkage group syntenic with human chromosome 1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, M F; Morse, H C; LeBoeuf, R C; Steinberg, A D

    1988-01-01

    A linkage map of distal mouse chromosome 1 was constructed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of DNAs from seven sets of recombinant inbred (RI) strains. The data obtained with seven probes on Southern hybridization combined with data from previous studies suggest the gene order Cfh, Pep-3/Ren-1,2, Ly-5, Lamb-2, At-3, Apoa-2/Ly-17,Spna-1. These results confirm and extend analyses of a large linkage group which includes genes present on a 20-30 cM span of mouse chromosome 1 and those localized to human chromosome 1q21-32. Moreover, the data indicate similar relative positions of human and mouse complement receptor-related genes REN, CD45, LAMB2, AT3, APOA2, and SPTA. These results suggest that mouse gene analyses may help in detailed mapping of human genes within such a syntenic group.

  7. Imaginal discs--a new source of chromosomes for genome mapping of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V Sharakhova

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the primary global vector for dengue and yellow fever viruses. Sequencing of the Ae. aegypti genome has stimulated research in vector biology and insect genomics. However, the current genome assembly is highly fragmented with only ~31% of the genome being assigned to chromosomes. A lack of a reliable source of chromosomes for physical mapping has been a major impediment to improving the genome assembly of Ae. aegypti.In this study we demonstrate the utility of mitotic chromosomes from imaginal discs of 4(th instar larva for cytogenetic studies of Ae. aegypti. High numbers of mitotic divisions on each slide preparation, large sizes, and reproducible banding patterns of the individual chromosomes simplify cytogenetic procedures. Based on the banding structure of the chromosomes, we have developed idiograms for each of the three Ae. aegypti chromosomes and placed 10 BAC clones and a 18S rDNA probe to precise chromosomal positions.The study identified imaginal discs of 4(th instar larva as a superior source of mitotic chromosomes for Ae. aegypti. The proposed approach allows precise mapping of DNA probes to the chromosomal positions and can be utilized for obtaining a high-quality genome assembly of the yellow fever mosquito.

  8. Resistance to stem rust Ug99 in six bread wheat cultivars maps to chromosome 6DS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Vera, Eric E; Nelson, Sarah; Singh, Ravi P; Basnet, Bhoja R; Haley, Scott D; Bhavani, Sridhar; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Xoconostle-Cazares, Beatriz G; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto; Rouse, Matthew N; Singh, Sukhwinder

    2014-01-01

    Identified SSR markers ( Xcfd49 and Xbarc183 ) linked with stem rust resistance for efficient use in marker-assisted selection and stacking of resistance genes in wheat breeding programs. More than 80 % of the worldwide wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) area is currently sown with varieties susceptible to the Ug99 race group of stem rust fungus. However, wheat lines Niini, Tinkio, Coni, Pfunye, Blouk, and Ripper have demonstrated Ug99 resistance at the seedling and adult plant stages. We mapped stem rust resistance in populations derived from crosses of a susceptible parent with each of the resistant lines. The segregation of resistance in each population indicated the presence of a single gene. The resistance gene in Niini mapped to short arm of chromosome 6D and was flanked by SSR markers Xcfd49 at distances of 3.9 cM proximal and Xbarc183 8.4 cM distal, respectively. The chromosome location of this resistance was validated in three other populations: PBW343/Coni, PBW343/Tinkio, and Cacuke/Pfunye. Resistance initially postulated to be conferred by the SrTmp gene in Blouk and Ripper was also linked to Xcfd49 and Xbarc183 on 6DS, but it was mapped proximal to Xbarc183 at a similar position to previously mapped genes Sr42 and SrCad. Based on the variation in diagnostic marker alleles, it is possible that Niini and Pfunye may carry different resistance genes/alleles. Further studies are needed to determine the allelic relationships between various genes located on chromosome arm 6DS. Our results provide valuable molecular marker and genetic information for developing Ug99 resistant wheat varieties in diverse germplasm and using these markers to tag the resistance genes in wheat breeding.

  9. A high resolution radiation hybrid map of bovine chromosome 14 identifies scaffold rearrangement in the latest bovine assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhiquan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation hybrid (RH maps are considered to be a tool of choice for fine mapping closely linked loci, considering that the resolution of linkage maps is determined by the number of informative meiosis and recombination events which may require very large mapping populations. Accurately defining the marker order on chromosomes is crucial for correct identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL, haplotype map construction and refinement of candidate gene searches. Results A 12 k Radiation hybrid map of bovine chromosome 14 was constructed using 843 single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The resulting map was aligned with the latest version of the bovine assembly (Btau_3.1 as well as other previously published RH maps. The resulting map identified distinct regions on Bovine chromosome 14 where discrepancies between this RH map and the bovine assembly occur. A major region of discrepancy was found near the centromere involving the arrangement and order of the scaffolds from the assembly. The map further confirms previously published conserved synteny blocks with human chromosome 8. As well, it identifies an extra breakpoint and conserved synteny block previously undetected due to lower marker density. This conserved synteny block is in a region where markers between the RH map presented here and the latest sequence assembly are in very good agreement. Conclusion The increase of publicly available markers shifts the rate limiting step from marker discovery to the correct identification of their order for further use by the research community. This high resolution map of bovine chromosome 14 will facilitate identification of regions in the sequence assembly where additional information is required to resolve marker ordering.

  10. Molecular cloning and chromosome mapping of the human gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-Shimer, S.; Johnson, K.A.; Bruskin, A.; Green, N.R.; Hill, D.E.; Lawrence, J.B.; Johnson, C.

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of growth suppressor genes appears to play a major role in the malignant process. To assess whether protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatases function as growth suppressors, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone encoding human protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B for structural and functional characterization. The translation product deduced from the 1,305-nucleotide open reading frame predicts a protein containing 435 amino acids and having a molecular mass of 49,966 Da. The amino-terminal 321 amino acids deduced from the cDNA sequence are identical to the empirically determined sequence of protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B. A genomic clone has been isolated and used in an in situ hybridization to banded metaphase chromosomes to determine that the gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B maps as a single-copy gene to the long arm of chromosome 20 in the region q13.1-q13.2

  11. Report of the first international workshop on human chromosome 8 mapping. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, S.; Ben Othmane, K.; Bergerheim, U.S.R. [and others

    1993-12-31

    The first international chromosome 8 workshop was held in Vancouver, Canada May 2--4, 1993. The conference was attended by 23 participants from Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the US. Twenty three abstracts are included from this workshop. The workshop was supported by CGAT/CTAG (Canadian Genome Analysis & Technology Program/Programme Canadien de Technologie & D`Analyse du Genome) as well as by travel funds allocated by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Energy of the United States and by agencies within the countries of overseas participants. The goals of the workshop were to evaluate new locus assignments, review new data obtained for previously assigned loci, develop a consensus marker order for chromosome 8, assess and integrate physical mapping information, identify resources and foster collaboration.

  12. A novel locus for dilated cardiomyopathy maps to canine chromosome 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Petra; Raducha, Michael G; Prociuk, Ulana; Sleeper, Meg M; Van Winkle, Thomas J; Henthorn, Paula S

    2008-06-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), the most common form of cardiomyopathy, often leads to heart failure and sudden death. While a substantial proportion of DCMs are inherited, mutations responsible for the majority of DCMs remain unidentified. A genome-wide linkage study was performed to identify the locus responsible for an autosomal recessive inherited form of juvenile DCM (JDCM) in Portuguese water dogs using 16 families segregating the disease. Results link the JDCM locus to canine chromosome 8 with two-point and multipoint lod scores of 10.8 and 14, respectively. The locus maps to a 3.9-Mb region, with complete syntenic homology to human chromosome 14, that contains no genes or loci known to be involved in the development of any type of cardiomyopathy. This discovery of a DCM locus with a previously unknown etiology will provide a new gene to examine in human DCM patients and a model for testing therapeutic approaches for heart failure.

  13. Genetic and radiation hybrid mapping of the hyperekplexia region on chromosome 5q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, S.G.; O' Connell, P. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (United States)); Dixon, M.J. (Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)); Nigro, M.A. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)); Kelts, K.A. (Black Hills Neurology, Rapid City, SD (United States)); Markand, O.N. (Indiana Univ., Indianopolis (United States)); Shiang, R.; Wasmuth, J.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)); Terry, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    Hyperekplexia, or startle disease (STHE), is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by muscular rigidity of central nervous system origin, particularly in the neonatal period, and by an exaggerated startle response to sudden, unexpected acoustic or tactile stimuli. STHE responds dramatically to the benzodiazepine drug clonazepam, which acts at gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA-A) receptors. The STHE locus (STHE) was recently assigned to chromosome 5q, on the basis of tight linkage to the colony-stimulating factor 1-receptor (CSF1-R) locus in a single large family. The authors performed linkage analysis in the original and three additional STHE pedigrees with eight chromosome 5q microsatellite markers and placed several of the most closely linked markers on an existing radiation hybrid (RH) map of the region. The results provide strong evidence for genetic locus homogeneity and assign STHE to a 5.9-cM interval defined by CSF1-R and D5S379, which are separated by an RH map distance of 74 centirays (roughly 2.2-3.7 Mb). Two polymorphic markers (D5S119 and D5S209) lie within this region, but they could not be ordered with respect to STHE. RH mapping eliminated the candidate genes GABRA1 and GABRG2, which encode GABA-A receptor components, by showing that they are telomeric to the target region. 45 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Nucleotide diversity maps reveal variation in diversity among wheat genomes and chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire Patrick E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A genome-wide assessment of nucleotide diversity in a polyploid species must minimize the inclusion of homoeologous sequences into diversity estimates and reliably allocate individual haplotypes into their respective genomes. The same requirements complicate the development and deployment of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers in polyploid species. We report here a strategy that satisfies these requirements and deploy it in the sequencing of genes in cultivated hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, genomes AABBDD and wild tetraploid wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides, genomes AABB from the putative site of wheat domestication in Turkey. Data are used to assess the distribution of diversity among and within wheat genomes and to develop a panel of SNP markers for polyploid wheat. Results Nucleotide diversity was estimated in 2114 wheat genes and was similar between the A and B genomes and reduced in the D genome. Within a genome, diversity was diminished on some chromosomes. Low diversity was always accompanied by an excess of rare alleles. A total of 5,471 SNPs was discovered in 1791 wheat genes. Totals of 1,271, 1,218, and 2,203 SNPs were discovered in 488, 463, and 641 genes of wheat putative diploid ancestors, T. urartu, Aegilops speltoides, and Ae. tauschii, respectively. A public database containing genome-specific primers, SNPs, and other information was constructed. A total of 987 genes with nucleotide diversity estimated in one or more of the wheat genomes was placed on an Ae. tauschii genetic map, and the map was superimposed on wheat deletion-bin maps. The agreement between the maps was assessed. Conclusions In a young polyploid, exemplified by T. aestivum, ancestral species are the primary source of genetic diversity. Low effective recombination due to self-pollination and a genetic mechanism precluding homoeologous chromosome pairing during polyploid meiosis can lead to the loss of diversity from large

  15. Predicting chromosomal locations of genetically mapped loci in maize using the Morgan2McClintock Translator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Carolyn J; Seigfried, Trent E; Bass, Hank W; Anderson, Lorinda K

    2006-03-01

    The Morgan2McClintock Translator permits prediction of meiotic pachytene chromosome map positions from recombination-based linkage data using recombination nodule frequency distributions. Its outputs permit estimation of DNA content between mapped loci and help to create an integrated overview of the maize nuclear genome structure.

  16. A genetic map of mouse chromosome 1 near the Lsh-Ity-Bcg disease resistance locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, B; Krall, M; Blackwell, J; O'Brien, A; Schurr, E; Gros, P; Skamene, E; Potter, M

    1990-05-01

    Isozyme and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses of backcross progeny, recombinant inbred strains, and congenic strains of mice positioned eight genetic markers with respect to the Lsh-Ity-Bcg disease resistance locus. Allelic isoforms of Idh-1 and Pep-3 and RFLPs detected by Southern hybridization for Myl-1, Cryg, Vil, Achrg, bcl-2, and Ren-1,2, between BALB/cAnPt and DBA/2NPt mice, were utilized to examine the cosegregation of these markers with the Lsh-Ity-Bcg resistance phenotype in 103 backcross progeny. An additional 47 backcross progeny from a cross between C57BL/10ScSn and B10.L-Lshr/s mice were examined for the cosegregation of Myl-1 and Vil RFLPs with Lsh phenotypic differences. Similarly, BXD recombinant inbred strains were typed for RFLPs upon hybridization with Vil and Achrg. Recombination frequencies generated in the different test systems were statistically similar, and villin (Vil) was identified as the molecular marker closest (1.7 +/- 0.8 cM) to the Lsh-Ity-Bcg locus. Two other DNA sequences, nebulin (Neb) and an anonymous DNA fragment (D2S3), which map to a region of human chromosome 2q that is homologous to proximal mouse chromosome 1, were not closely linked to the Lsh-Ity-Bcg locus. This multipoint linkage analysis of chromosome 1 surrounding the Lsh-Ity-Bcg locus provides a basis for the eventual isolation of the disease gene.

  17. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  18. Neuropeptide Y receptor genes on human chromosome 4q31-q32 map to conserved linkage groups on mouse chromosomes 3 and 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, C.M.; Frankel, W.N. [Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (United States); Richards, J.E. [Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Npy1r and Npy2r, the genes encoding mouse type 1 and type 2 neuropeptide Y receptors, have been mapped by interspecific backcross analysis. Previous studies have localized the human genes encoding these receptors to chromosome 4q31-q32. We have now assigned Npy1r and Npy2r to conserved linkage groups on mouse Chr 8 and Chr 3, respectively, which correspond to the distal region of human chromosome 4q. Using yeast artificial chromosomes, we have estimated the distance between the human genes to be approximately 6 cM. Although ancient tandem duplication events may account for some closely spaced G-protein-coupled receptor genes, the large genetic distance between the human type 1 and type 2 neuropeptide Y receptor genes raises questions about whether this mechanism accounts for their proximity. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  19. A physical map of Brassica oleracea shows complexity of chromosomal changes following recursive paleopolyploidizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Evolution of the Brassica species has been recursively affected by polyploidy events, and comparison to their relative, Arabidopsis thaliana, provides means to explore their genomic complexity. Results A genome-wide physical map of a rapid-cycling strain of B. oleracea was constructed by integrating high-information-content fingerprinting (HICF) of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clones with hybridization to sequence-tagged probes. Using 2907 contigs of two or more BACs, we performed several lines of comparative genomic analysis. Interspecific DNA synteny is much better preserved in euchromatin than heterochromatin, showing the qualitative difference in evolution of these respective genomic domains. About 67% of contigs can be aligned to the Arabidopsis genome, with 96.5% corresponding to euchromatic regions, and 3.5% (shown to contain repetitive sequences) to pericentromeric regions. Overgo probe hybridization data showed that contigs aligned to Arabidopsis euchromatin contain ~80% of low-copy-number genes, while genes with high copy number are much more frequently associated with pericentromeric regions. We identified 39 interchromosomal breakpoints during the diversification of B. oleracea and Arabidopsis thaliana, a relatively high level of genomic change since their divergence. Comparison of the B. oleracea physical map with Arabidopsis and other available eudicot genomes showed appreciable 'shadowing' produced by more ancient polyploidies, resulting in a web of relatedness among contigs which increased genomic complexity. Conclusions A high-resolution genetically-anchored physical map sheds light on Brassica genome organization and advances positional cloning of specific genes, and may help to validate genome sequence assembly and alignment to chromosomes. All the physical mapping data is freely shared at a WebFPC site (http://lulu.pgml.uga.edu/fpc/WebAGCoL/brassica/WebFPC/; Temporarily password-protected: account: pgml; password: 123qwe123

  20. A physical map of Brassica oleracea shows complexity of chromosomal changes following recursive paleopolyploidizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giattina Emily

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of the Brassica species has been recursively affected by polyploidy events, and comparison to their relative, Arabidopsis thaliana, provides means to explore their genomic complexity. Results A genome-wide physical map of a rapid-cycling strain of B. oleracea was constructed by integrating high-information-content fingerprinting (HICF of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC clones with hybridization to sequence-tagged probes. Using 2907 contigs of two or more BACs, we performed several lines of comparative genomic analysis. Interspecific DNA synteny is much better preserved in euchromatin than heterochromatin, showing the qualitative difference in evolution of these respective genomic domains. About 67% of contigs can be aligned to the Arabidopsis genome, with 96.5% corresponding to euchromatic regions, and 3.5% (shown to contain repetitive sequences to pericentromeric regions. Overgo probe hybridization data showed that contigs aligned to Arabidopsis euchromatin contain ~80% of low-copy-number genes, while genes with high copy number are much more frequently associated with pericentromeric regions. We identified 39 interchromosomal breakpoints during the diversification of B. oleracea and Arabidopsis thaliana, a relatively high level of genomic change since their divergence. Comparison of the B. oleracea physical map with Arabidopsis and other available eudicot genomes showed appreciable 'shadowing' produced by more ancient polyploidies, resulting in a web of relatedness among contigs which increased genomic complexity. Conclusions A high-resolution genetically-anchored physical map sheds light on Brassica genome organization and advances positional cloning of specific genes, and may help to validate genome sequence assembly and alignment to chromosomes. All the physical mapping data is freely shared at a WebFPC site (http://lulu.pgml.uga.edu/fpc/WebAGCoL/brassica/WebFPC/; Temporarily password-protected: account

  1. Analysis of aneuploid lines of bread wheat to map chromosomal locations of genes controlling root hair length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; Rathjen, Tina; Weligama, Kumara; Forrest, Kerrie; Hayden, Matthew; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    Long root hairs enable the efficient uptake of poorly mobile nutrients such as phosphorus. Mapping the chromosomal locations of genes that control root hair length can help exploit the natural variation within crops to develop improved cultivars. Genetic stocks of the wheat cultivar 'Chinese Spring' were used to map genes that control root hair length. Aneuploid stocks of 'Chinese Spring' were screened using a rapid method based on rhizosheath size and then selected lines were assayed for root hair length to identify chromosomes harbouring genes controlling root hair length. A series of lines with various fractional deletions of candidate chromosomes were then screened to map the root hair loci more accurately. A line with a deletion in chromosome 5A was analysed with a 90 000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. The phosphorus acquisition efficiency (PAE) of one deletion line was compared with that of euploid 'Chinese Spring' by growing the seedlings in pots at low and luxury phosphorus supplies. Chromosomes 1A, 1D and 5A were found to harbour genes controlling root hair length. The 90 000 SNP array identified two candidate genes controlling root hair length located on chromosome 5A. The line with a deletion in chromosome 5A had root hairs that were approx. 20 % shorter than euploid 'Chinese Spring', but this was insufficient to reduce its PAE. A rapid screen for rhizosheath size enabled chromosomal regions controlling root hair length to be mapped in the wheat cultivar 'Chinese Spring' and subsequent analysis with an SNP array identified candidate genes controlling root hair length. The difference in root hair length between euploid 'Chinese Spring' and a deletion line identified in the rapid screen was still apparent, albeit attenuated, when the seedlings were grown on a fully fertilized soil. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. An Improved Consensus Linkage Map of Barley Based on Flow-Sorted Chromosomes and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Muñoz-Amatriaín

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping have made it easier to combine information from different mapping populations into consensus genetic maps, which provide increased marker density and genome coverage compared to individual maps. Previously, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-based genotyping platform was developed and used to genotype 373 individuals in four barley ( L. mapping populations. This led to a 2943 SNP consensus genetic map with 975 unique positions. In this work, we add data from six additional populations and more individuals from one of the original populations to develop an improved consensus map from 1133 individuals. A stringent and systematic analysis of each of the 10 populations was performed to achieve uniformity. This involved reexamination of the four populations included in the previous map. As a consequence, we present a robust consensus genetic map that contains 2994 SNP loci mapped to 1163 unique positions. The map spans 1137.3 cM with an average density of one marker bin per 0.99 cM. A novel application of the genotyping platform for gene detection allowed the assignment of 2930 genes to flow-sorted chromosomes or arms, confirmed the position of 2545 SNP-mapped loci, added chromosome or arm allocations to an additional 370 SNP loci, and delineated pericentromeric regions for chromosomes 2H to 7H. Marker order has been improved and map resolution has been increased by almost 20%. These increased precision outcomes enable more optimized SNP selection for marker-assisted breeding and support association genetic analysis and map-based cloning. It will also improve the anchoring of DNA sequence scaffolds and the barley physical map to the genetic map.

  3. Reassignment of Drosophila willistoni Genome Scaffolds to Chromosome II Arms

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Carolina; Delprat, Alejandra; Ruiz, Alfredo; Valente, Vera L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila willistoni is a geographically widespread Neotropical species. The genome of strain Gd-H4-1 from Guadeloupe Island (Caribbean) was sequenced in 2007 as part of the 12 Drosophila Genomes Project. The assembled scaffolds were joined based on conserved linkage and assigned to polytene chromosomes based on a handful of genetic and physical markers. This paucity of markers was particularly striking in the metacentric chromosome II, comprised two similarly sized arms, IIL and IIR, tradit...

  4. Chromosome mapping of repetitive DNAs in sergeant major fishes (Abudefdufinae, Pomacentridae): a general view on the chromosomal conservatism of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getlekha, Nuntaporn; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Yano, Cassia Fernanda; Maneechot, Nuntiya; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Supiwong, Weerayuth; Tanomtong, Alongklod; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2016-10-01

    Species of the Abudefduf genus (sergeant-majors) are widely distributed in the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic oceans, with large schools inhabiting rocky coastal regions and coral reefs. This genus consists of twenty recognized species are of generalist habit, showing typical characteristics of colonizers. Some populations maintain gene flow between large oceanic areas, a condition that may influence their cytogenetic features. A number of species have been shown to be invaders and able to hybridize with local species. However, cytogenetic data in this genus are restricted to few species. In this way, the present study includes the chromosomal investigation, using conventional (Giemsa staining, Ag-NOR and C-banding) and molecular (in situ mapping of six different repetitive DNA classes) approaches in four Abudefduf species from different oceanic regions (A. bengalensis and A. sexfasciatus from the Indo-Pacific, A. vaigiensis from the Indian and A. saxatilis from the Atlantic oceans, respectively), to investigate the evolutionary events associated with the chromosomal diversification in this group. All species share a similar karyotype (2n = 48; NF = 52), except A. sexfasciatus (2n = 48; NF = 50), which possesses a characteristic pericentric inversion in the NOR-bearing chromosomal pair. Mapping of repetitive sequences suggests a chromosomal conservatism in this genus. The high karyotypic similarity between allopatric species of Abudefduf may be related to the success of natural viable hybrids among species with recent secondary contact.

  5. In Silico and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Mapping Reveals Collinearity between the Pennisetum squamulatum Apomixis Carrier-Chromosome and Chromosome 2 of Sorghum and Foxtail Millet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirjan Sapkota

    Full Text Available Apomixis, or clonal propagation through seed, is a trait identified within multiple species of the grass family (Poaceae. The genetic locus controlling apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum (syn Cenchrus squamulatus and Cenchrus ciliaris (syn Pennisetum ciliare, buffelgrass is the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR. Previously, the ASGR was shown to be highly conserved but inverted in marker order between P. squamulatum and C. ciliaris based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and varied in both karyotype and position of the ASGR on the ASGR-carrier chromosome among other apomictic Cenchrus/Pennisetum species. Using in silico transcript mapping and verification of physical positions of some of the transcripts via FISH, we discovered that the ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum is collinear with chromosome 2 of foxtail millet and sorghum outside of the ASGR. The in silico ordering of the ASGR-carrier chromosome markers, previously unmapped in P. squamulatum, allowed for the identification of a backcross line with structural changes to the P. squamulatum ASGR-carrier chromosome derived from gamma irradiated pollen.

  6. In Silico and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Mapping Reveals Collinearity between the Pennisetum squamulatum Apomixis Carrier-Chromosome and Chromosome 2 of Sorghum and Foxtail Millet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Sirjan; Conner, Joann A; Hanna, Wayne W; Simon, Bindu; Fengler, Kevin; Deschamps, Stéphane; Cigan, Mark; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis, or clonal propagation through seed, is a trait identified within multiple species of the grass family (Poaceae). The genetic locus controlling apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum (syn Cenchrus squamulatus) and Cenchrus ciliaris (syn Pennisetum ciliare, buffelgrass) is the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). Previously, the ASGR was shown to be highly conserved but inverted in marker order between P. squamulatum and C. ciliaris based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and varied in both karyotype and position of the ASGR on the ASGR-carrier chromosome among other apomictic Cenchrus/Pennisetum species. Using in silico transcript mapping and verification of physical positions of some of the transcripts via FISH, we discovered that the ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum is collinear with chromosome 2 of foxtail millet and sorghum outside of the ASGR. The in silico ordering of the ASGR-carrier chromosome markers, previously unmapped in P. squamulatum, allowed for the identification of a backcross line with structural changes to the P. squamulatum ASGR-carrier chromosome derived from gamma irradiated pollen.

  7. High-resolution physical map for chromosome 16q12.1-q13, the Blau syndrome locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonavita Gina

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Blau syndrome (MIM 186580, an autosomal dominant granulomatous disease, was previously mapped to chromosome 16p12-q21. However, inconsistent physical maps of the region and consequently an unknown order of microsatellite markers, hampered us from further refining the genetic locus for the Blau syndrome. To address this problem, we constructed our own high-resolution physical map for the Blau susceptibility region. Results We generated a high-resolution physical map that provides more than 90% coverage of a refined Blau susceptibility region. The map consists of four contigs of sequence tagged site-based bacterial artificial chromosomes with a total of 124 bacterial artificial chromosomes, and spans approximately 7.5 Mbp; however, three gaps still exist in this map with sizes of 425, 530 and 375 kbp, respectively, estimated from radiation hybrid mapping. Conclusions Our high-resolution map will assist genetic studies of loci in the interval from D16S3080, near D16S409, and D16S408 (16q12.1 to 16q13.

  8. Fine-mapping of a QTL influencing pork tenderness on porcine chromosome 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beever Jonathan E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study, a quantitative trait locus (QTL exhibiting large effects on both Instron shear force and taste panel tenderness was detected within the Illinois Meat Quality Pedigree (IMQP. This QTL mapped to the q arm of porcine chromosome 2 (SSC2q. Comparative analysis of SSC2q indicates that it is orthologous to a segment of human chromosome 5 (HSA5 containing a strong positional candidate gene, calpastatin (CAST. CAST polymorphisms have recently been shown to be associated with meat quality characteristics; however, the possible involvement of other genes and/or molecular variation in this region cannot be excluded, thus requiring fine-mapping of the QTL. Results Recent advances in porcine genome resources, including high-resolution radiation hybrid and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC physical maps, were utilized for development of novel informative markers. Marker density in the ~30-Mb region surrounding the most likely QTL position was increased by addition of eighteen new microsatellite markers, including nine publicly-available and nine novel markers. Two newly-developed markers were derived from a porcine BAC clone containing the CAST gene. Refinement of the QTL position was achieved through linkage and haplotype analyses. Within-family linkage analyses revealed at least two families segregating for a highly-significant QTL in strong positional agreement with CAST markers. A combined analysis of these two families yielded QTL intervals of 36 cM and 7 cM for Instron shear force and taste panel tenderness, respectively, while haplotype analyses suggested further refinement to a 1.8 cM interval containing CAST markers. The presence of additional tenderness QTL on SSC2q was also suggested. Conclusion These results reinforce CAST as a strong positional candidate. Further analysis of CAST molecular variation within the IMQP F1 boars should enhance understanding of the molecular basis of pork tenderness, and thus

  9. Rapid mapping of chromosomal breakpoints: from blood to BAC in 20 days.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Weier, Jingly F.; Baumgartner, Aldof; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne, Santiago; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-02-25

    Structural chromosome aberrations and associated segmental or chromosomal aneusomies are major causes of reproductive failure in humans. Despite the fact that carriers of reciprocal balanced translocation often have no other clinical symptoms or disease, impaired chromosome homologue pairing in meiosis and karyokinesis errors lead to over-representation of translocations carriers in the infertile population and in recurrent pregnancy loss patients. At present, clinicians have no means to select healthy germ cells or balanced zygotes in vivo, but in vitro fertilization (IVF) followed by preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) offers translocation carriers a chance to select balanced or normal embryos for transfer. Although a combination of telomeric and centromeric probes can differentiate embryos that are unbalanced from normal or unbalanced ones, a seemingly random position of breakpoints in these IVF-patients poses a serious obstacle to differentiating between normal and balanced embryos, which for most translocation couples, is desirable. Using a carrier with reciprocal translocation t(4;13) as an example, we describe our state-of-the-art approach to the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes that span or 'extent' the breakpoints. With the techniques and resources described here, most breakpoints can be accurately mapped in a matter of days using carrier lymphocytes, and a few extra days are allowed for PGD-probe optimization. The optimized probes will then be suitable for interphase cell analysis, a prerequisite for PGD since blastomeres are biopsied from normally growing day 3 - embryos regardless of their position in the mitotic cell cycle. Furthermore, routine application of these rapid methods should make PGD even more affordable for translocation carriers enrolled in IVF programs.

  10. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Bacillus subtilis. Cloning, characterization and chromosomal mapping of the prs gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Dan; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1987-01-01

    The gene (prs) encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase has been cloned from a library of Bacillus subtilis DNA by complementation of an Escherichia coli prs mutation. Flanking DNA sequences were pruned away by restriction endonuclease and exonuclease BAL 31 digestions, resulting...... in a DNA fragment of approx. 1.8 kb complementing the E. coli prs mutation. Minicell experiments revealed that this DNA fragment coded for a polypeptide, shown to be the PRPP synthetase subunit, with an Mr of approx. 40,000. B. subtilis strains harbouring the prs gene in a multicopy plasmid contained up...... to nine-fold increased PRPP synthetase activity. The prs gene was cloned in an integration vector and the resulting hybrid plasmid inserted into the B. subtilis chromosome by homologous recombination. The integration site was mapped by transduction and the gene order established as purA-guaA-prs-cysA....

  11. Mapping Second Chromosome Mutations to Defined Genomic Regions in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahsai, Lily; Cook, Kevin R

    2018-01-04

    Hundreds of Drosophila melanogaster stocks are currently maintained at the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center with mutations that have not been associated with sequence-defined genes. They have been preserved because they have interesting loss-of-function phenotypes. The experimental value of these mutations would be increased by tying them to specific genomic intervals so that geneticists can more easily associate them with annotated genes. Here, we report the mapping of 85 second chromosome complementation groups in the Bloomington collection to specific, small clusters of contiguous genes or individual genes in the sequenced genome. This information should prove valuable to Drosophila geneticists interested in processes associated with particular phenotypes and those searching for mutations affecting specific sequence-defined genes. Copyright © 2018 Kahsai,Cook.

  12. Mapping Second Chromosome Mutations to Defined Genomic Regions in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Kahsai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of Drosophila melanogaster stocks are currently maintained at the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center with mutations that have not been associated with sequence-defined genes. They have been preserved because they have interesting loss-of-function phenotypes. The experimental value of these mutations would be increased by tying them to specific genomic intervals so that geneticists can more easily associate them with annotated genes. Here, we report the mapping of 85 second chromosome complementation groups in the Bloomington collection to specific, small clusters of contiguous genes or individual genes in the sequenced genome. This information should prove valuable to Drosophila geneticists interested in processes associated with particular phenotypes and those searching for mutations affecting specific sequence-defined genes.

  13. Localization of the MEN1 gene to a small region within chromosome 11q13 by deletion mapping in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystroem, C.; Larsson, C.; Blomberg, C.; Nordenskjoeld, M.; Sandelin, K.; Falkmer, U.; Werner, S.; Skogseid, B.; Oeberg, K.

    1990-01-01

    The gene for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), and inherited predisposition to neuroendocrine neoplasm of the parathyroid glands, the pancreatic islet parenchyma, and the anterior pituitary gland, was recently mapped to chromosome 11q13 based on genetic linkage in families. The authors now show that the pathogenesis of MEN1-associated parathyroid lesions involves unmasking of a recessive mutation at the disease locus and that sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism shares the same mechanisms. By examination of allele losses in MEN1-associated lesions, they could define deletions of chromosome 11 and map the MEN1 locus to a small region within chromosome band 11q13, telomeric to the PYGM locus. In contrast, a low incidence of deletions involving the MEN1 gene was found in sporadic pituitary adenomas

  14. Fine Physical Bin Mapping of the Powdery Mildew Resistance Gene Pm21 Based on Chromosomal Structural Variations in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanying Zhu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pm21, derived from wheat wild relative Dasypyrum villosum, is one of the most effective powdery mildew resistance genes and has been widely applied in wheat breeding in China. Mapping and cloning Pm21 are of importance for understanding its resistance mechanism. In the present study, physical mapping was performed using different genetic stocks involving in structural variations of chromosome 6VS carrying Pm21. The data showed that 6VS could be divided into eight distinguishable chromosomal bins, and Pm21 was mapped to the bin FLb4–b5/b6 closely flanked by the markers 6VS-08.6 and 6VS-10.2. Comparative genomic mapping indicated that the orthologous regions of FLb4–b5/b6 carrying Pm21 were narrowed to a 117.7 kb genomic region harboring 19 genes in Brachypodium and a 37.7 kb region harboring 5 genes in rice, respectively. The result was consistent with that given by recent genetic mapping in diploid D. villosum. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that physical mapping based on chromosomal structural variations is an efficient method for locating alien genes in wheat background.

  15. A bacterial artificial chromosome-based physical map of Manihot esculenta ssp.flabellifolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhua FU; Zhiqiang XIA; Shujuan WANG; Xin CHEN; Cheng LU; Mingcheng LUO; Hongbin ZHANG; Wenquan WANG

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is known as the third most important food crop in the tropics and also used for industrial feedstock for biofuels.Two new bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries were constructed for W14 (M.Esculenta ssp.flabellifolia),a wild ancestor of domesticated cassava.The libraries were constructed with EcoRI and HindⅢ insertion vectors,respectively.The EcoRI library has 29952 clones with an average insert size of 115 kb,while the HindⅢ library consists of 29952 clones with an average insert of 129 kb.The combined libraries contain a total of 59904 clones with an average insert size of 125 kb,representing approximately 10×haploid genome equivalents.A total of 29952 clones were fingerprinted and resulted in a cassava physical map composed of 2485 contigs with an average physical length of 336 kb and 2909 singletons,representing approximately 762 Mb of the cassava genome.5000 clones located at the ends of BAC contigs were selected and sequenced.A total of 6077 SNPs and 231 indels were identified,that covered 459 gene sequences,of which 6 genes were associated with starch and sucrose metabolism.This BAC-based physical map provides valuable tools to understand the genetics and evolution of cassava.

  16. Tissue-specific expression of the human laminin alpha5-chain, and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 and to distal mouse chromosome 2 near the locus for the ragged (Ra) mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Loechel, F; Mattei, M G

    1997-01-01

    , heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, and pancreas. The human laminin alpha5-chain gene (LAMA5) was assigned to chromosome 20q13.2-q13.3 by in situ hybridization, and the mouse gene (Lama5) was mapped by linkage analysis to a syntonic region of distal chromosome 2, close to the locus for the ragged (Ra...

  17. The Norrie disease gene maps to a 150 kb region on chromosome Xp11.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, K B; Lebo, R V; Benson, G; Shalish, C; Schuback, D; Chen, Z Y; Bruns, G; Craig, I W; Golbus, M S; Breakefield, X O

    1992-05-01

    Norrie disease is a human X-linked recessive disorder of unknown etiology characterized by congenital blindness, sensory neural deafness and mental retardation. This disease gene was previously linked to the DXS7 (L1.28) locus and the MAO genes in band Xp11.3. We report here fine physical mapping of the obligate region containing the Norrie disease gene (NDP) defined by a recombination and by the smallest submicroscopic chromosomal deletion associated with Norrie disease identified to date. Analysis, using in addition two overlapping YAC clones from this region, allowed orientation of the MAOA and MAOB genes in a 5'-3'-3'-5' configuration. A recombination event between a (GT)n polymorphism in intron 2 of the MAOB gene and the NDP locus, in a family previously reported to have a recombination between DXS7 and NDP, delineates a flanking marker telomeric to this disease gene. An anonymous DNA probe, dc12, present in one of the YACs and in a patient with a submicroscopic deletion which includes MAOA and MAOB but not L1.28, serves as a flanking marker centromeric to the disease gene. An Alu-PCR fragment from the right arm of the MAO YAC (YMAO.AluR) is not deleted in this patient and also delineates the centromeric extent of the obligate disease region. The apparent order of these loci is telomere ... DXS7-MAOA-MAOB-NDP-dc12-YMAO.AluR ... centromere. Together these data define the obligate region containing the NDP gene to a chromosomal segment less than 150 kb.

  18. Late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, J.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M. [Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Stargardt`s disease (MIM 248200), originally described in 1909, is an autosomal recessive condition of childhood, characterized by a sudden and bilateral loss of central vision. Typically, it has an early onset (7 to 12 years), a rapidly progressive course and a poor final outcome. The central area of the retina (macula) displays pigmentary changes in a ring form with depigmentation and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium (RPE). Perimacular yellowish spots, termed fundus flavimaculatus, are observed in a high percentage of patients. We have recently reported the genetic mapping of Stargardt`s disease to chromosome 1p13. On the other hand, considering that fundus flavimaculatus (MIM 230100) is another form of fleck fundus disease, with a Stargardt-like retinal aspect but with a late-onset and a more progressive course, we decided to test the hypothesis of allelism between typical Stargardt`s disease and late-onset autosomal recessive fundus flavimaculatus. Significant pairwise lod scores were obtained in each of four multiplex families (11 affected individuals, 12 relatives) with four markers of the 1p13 region (Z = 4.79, 4.64, 3.07, 3.16 at loci D1S435, D1S424, D1S236, and D1S415, respectively at {theta} = 0). Multipoint analysis showed that the best estimate for location of the disease gene is between D1S424 and D1S236 (maximum lod score of 5.20) as also observed in Stargardt`s disease. Our results are consistent with the location of the gene responsible of the late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy in the 1p13 region and raise the hypothesis of either allelic mutational events or contiguous genes in this chromosomal region. The question of possible relationship with some age-related macular dystrophies in now open to debate.

  19. Integrated gene mapping and synteny studies give insights into the evolution of a sex proto-chromosome in Solea senegalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela-Bens, Silvia; Merlo, Manuel Alejandro; Rodríguez, María Esther; Cross, Ismael; Manchado, Manuel; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Rebordinos, Laureana

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of genes related to sex and reproduction in fish shows high plasticity and, to date, the sex determination system has only been identified in a few species. Solea senegalensis has 42 chromosomes and an XX/XY chromosome system for sex determination, while related species show the ZZ/ZW system. Next-generation sequencing (NGS), multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques, and bioinformatics analysis have been carried out, with the objective of revealing new information about sex determination and reproduction in S. senegalensis. To that end, several bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that contain candidate genes involved in such processes (dmrt1, dmrt2, dmrt3, dmrt4, sox3, sox6, sox8, sox9, lh, cyp19a1a, amh, vasa, aqp3, and nanos3) were analyzed and compared with the same region in other related species. Synteny studies showed that the co-localization of dmrt1-dmrt2-drmt3 in the largest metacentric chromosome of S. senegalensis is coincident with that found in the Z chromosome of Cynoglossus semilaevis, which would potentially make this a sex proto-chromosome. Phylogenetic studies show the close proximity of S. senegalensis to Oryzias latipes, a species with an XX/XY system and a sex master gene. Comparative mapping provides evidence of the preferential association of these candidate genes in particular chromosome pairs. By using the NGS and mFISH techniques, it has been possible to obtain an integrated genetic map, which shows that 15 out of 21 chromosome pairs of S. senegalensis have at least one BAC clone. This result is important for distinguishing those chromosome pairs of S. senegalensis that are similar in shape and size. The mFISH analysis shows the following co-localizations in the same chromosomes: dmrt1-dmrt2-dmrt3, dmrt4-sox9-thrb, aqp3-sox8, cyp19a1a-fshb, igsf9b-sox3, and lysg-sox6.

  20. SNP discovery and chromosome anchoring provide the first physically-anchored hexaploid oat map and reveal synteny with model species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah E Oliver

    Full Text Available A physically anchored consensus map is foundational to modern genomics research; however, construction of such a map in oat (Avena sativa L., 2n = 6x = 42 has been hindered by the size and complexity of the genome, the scarcity of robust molecular markers, and the lack of aneuploid stocks. Resources developed in this study include a modified SNP discovery method for complex genomes, a diverse set of oat SNP markers, and a novel chromosome-deficient SNP anchoring strategy. These resources were applied to build the first complete, physically-anchored consensus map of hexaploid oat. Approximately 11,000 high-confidence in silico SNPs were discovered based on nine million inter-varietal sequence reads of genomic and cDNA origin. GoldenGate genotyping of 3,072 SNP assays yielded 1,311 robust markers, of which 985 were mapped in 390 recombinant-inbred lines from six bi-parental mapping populations ranging in size from 49 to 97 progeny. The consensus map included 985 SNPs and 68 previously-published markers, resolving 21 linkage groups with a total map distance of 1,838.8 cM. Consensus linkage groups were assigned to 21 chromosomes using SNP deletion analysis of chromosome-deficient monosomic hybrid stocks. Alignments with sequenced genomes of rice and Brachypodium provide evidence for extensive conservation of genomic regions, and renewed encouragement for orthology-based genomic discovery in this important hexaploid species. These results also provide a framework for high-resolution genetic analysis in oat, and a model for marker development and map construction in other species with complex genomes and limited resources.

  1. Hereditary motor and autonomic neuronopathy 1 maps to chromosome 20q13.2-13.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Marques Jr.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The spinal muscular atrophies (SMA or hereditary motor neuronopathies result from the continuous degeneration and death of spinal cord lower motor neurons, leading to progressive muscular weakness and atrophy. We describe a large Brazilian family exhibiting an extremely rare, late-onset, dominant, proximal, and progressive SMA accompanied by very unusual manifestations, such as an abnormal sweating pattern, and gastrointestinal and sexual dysfunctions, suggesting concomitant involvement of the autonomic nervous system. We propose a new disease category for this disorder, `hereditary motor and autonomic neuronopathy', and attribute the term, `survival of motor and autonomic neurons 1' (SMAN1 to the respective locus that was mapped to a 14.5 cM region on chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 by genetic linkage analysis and haplotype studies using microsatellite polymorphic markers. This locus lies between markers D20S120 and D20S173 showing a maximum LOD score of 4.6 at D20S171, defining a region with 33 known genes, including several potential candidates. Identifying the SMAN1 gene should not only improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying lower motor neuron diseases but also help to clarify the relationship between motor and autonomic neurons.

  2. Quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping for growth traits on bovine chromosome 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Miyata

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping in livestock allows the identification of genes that determine the genetic variation affecting traits of economic interest. We analyzed the birth weight and weight at 60 days QTL segregating on bovine chromosome BTA14 in a F2 resource population using genotypes produced from seven microsatellite markers. Phenotypes were derived from 346 F2 progeny produced from crossing Bos indicus Gyr x Holstein Bos taurus F1 parents. Interval analysis to detect QTL for birth weight revealed the presence of a QTL (p < 0.05 at 1 centimorgan (cM from the centromere with an additive effect of 1.210 ± 0.438 kg. Interval analysis for weight at 60 days revealed the presence of a QTL (p < 0.05 at 0 cM from the centromere with an additive effect of 2.122 ± 0.735 kg. The region to which the QTL were assigned is described in the literature as responsible for some growth traits, milk yield, milk composition, fat deposition and has also been related to reproductive traits such as daughter pregnancy rate and ovulation rate. The effects of the QTL described on other traits were not investigated.

  3. Mapping and expression studies of the mir17-92 cluster on pig chromosome 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawera, Milena; Gorodkin, Jan; Cirera, Susanna

    2005-01-01

    We have identified the first porcine microRNA (miRNA) cluster (the mir17-92 cluster) and localized it to the q-arm of pig Chromosome 11. The miRNA cluster was found by sequence similarity search with human miRNA sequences against the pig genomic data generated within the Sino-Danish pig genome...... from the human data. The expression profiles of seven studied miRNAs were analyzed by hybridization to Northern blots containing five porcine tissues: cerebellum, cortex, hippocampus, kidney, and liver. In order to determine the localization of the mir17-92 cluster in the pig genome, we mapped...... project. The resulting data contained three complete and two incomplete miRNA precursors of seven miRNAs from the human mir17-92 cluster. Because there is a 100% sequence identity between the four pig miRNAs and the corresponding human miRNAs, the sequences of three unavailable pig miRNAs were derived...

  4. Fine-structure analysis and gentic organization at the base of the x chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifschytz, E.

    1978-01-01

    Genetic organization at the base of the X chromosome was studied through the analysis of x-ray-induced deficiencies. Deficiencies were recovered so as to have a preselected right end anchored in the centric heterochromatin to the right of the su(f) locus. Free ends of deficiencies occurred at any of 22 intervals in Section 20 and in the proximal portion of Section 19 of Bridges' (1938) polytene chromosome map. The distribution of 130 such free ends of deficiencies induced in normal, In(1)sc 8 , and In(1)w/sup m4/ chromosomes suggests that on the single section level, genes are flanked by hot or cold sites for x-ray-induced breaks, and that occurrence of the hot spots is dependent on their interaction with the fixed-end sites in the centric heterochromatin. In the light of these results, it is argued that long heterochromatic sequences separate the relatively few genes in Section 20, and thus endow it with several characteristics typical of heterochromatic regions. Section 20 is considered to be a transition region between the mostly heterochromatic and mostly euchromatic regions of the X chromosome; the differences between them are suggested as being merely quantitative

  5. Multistudy fine mapping of chromosome 2q identifies XRCC5 as a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, Craig P; Pillai, Sreekumar G; Zhu, Guohua

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE: Several family-based studies have identified genetic linkage for lung function and airflow obstruction to chromosome 2q. OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that merging results of high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in four separate populations would lead to the ident......RATIONALE: Several family-based studies have identified genetic linkage for lung function and airflow obstruction to chromosome 2q. OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that merging results of high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in four separate populations would lead...... the National Emphysema Treatment Trial and 330 community control subjects. Significant associations from the combined results across the two case-control studies were followed up in 1,839 individuals from 603 families from the International COPD Genetics Network (ICGN) and in 949 individuals from 127 families...

  6. Exclusion of candidate genes from the chromosome 1q juvenile glaucoma region and mapping of the peripheral cannabis receptor gene (CNR2) to chromosome 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunden, S.L.F.; Nichols, B.E.; Alward, W.L.M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma has been mapped by linkage to 1q21-q31. Several candidate genes were evaluated in the same family used to identify the primary linkage. Atrionatriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR1) and laminin C1 (LAMC1) have been previously mapped to this region and could putatively play a role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. A third gene, the peripheral cannabis receptor (CNR2) was not initially mapped in humans but was a candidate because of the relief that cannabis affords some patients with primary open angle glaucoma. Microsatellites associated with NPR1 and LAMC1 revealed multiple recombinations in affected members of this pedigree. CNR2 was shown to be on chromosome 1 by PCR amplification of a 150 bp fragment of the 3{prime} untranslated region in monochromosomal somatic cell hybrids (NIGMS panel No. 2). These primers also revealed a two allele single strand conformation polymorphism which showed multiple recombinants with juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma in large pedigrees, segregating this disorder. The marker was then mapped to 1p34-p36 by linkage, with the most likely location between liver alkaline phosphatase (ALPL) and alpha-L-1 fucosidase (FUCA1).

  7. High-resolution gene maps of horse chromosomes 14 and 21: additional insights into evolution and rearrangements of HSA5 homologs in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Glenda; Raudsepp, Terje; Durkin, Keith; Wagner, Michelle L; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Agarwala, Richa; Tozaki, Teruaki; Mickelson, James R; Chowdhary, Bhanu P

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution physically ordered gene maps for equine homologs of human chromosome 5 (HSA5), viz., horse chromosomes 14 and 21 (ECA14 and ECA21), were generated by adding 179 new loci (131 gene-specific and 48 microsatellites) to the existing maps of the two chromosomes. The loci were mapped primarily by genotyping on a 5000-rad horse x hamster radiation hybrid panel, of which 28 were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The approximately fivefold increase in the number of mapped markers on the two chromosomes improves the average resolution of the map to 1 marker/0.9 Mb. The improved resolution is vital for rapid chromosomal localization of traits of interest on these chromosomes and for facilitating candidate gene searches. The comparative gene mapping data on ECA14 and ECA21 finely align the chromosomes to sequence/gene maps of a range of evolutionarily distantly related species. It also demonstrates that compared to ECA14, the ECA21 segment corresponding to HSA5 is a more conserved region because of preserved gene order in a larger number of and more diverse species. Further, comparison of ECA14 and the distal three-quarters region of ECA21 with corresponding chromosomal segments in 50 species belonging to 11 mammalian orders provides a broad overview of the evolution of these segments in individual orders from the putative ancestral chromosomal configuration. Of particular interest is the identification and precise demarcation of equid/Perissodactyl-specific features that for the first time clearly distinguish the origins of ECA14 and ECA21 from similar-looking status in the Cetartiodactyls.

  8. The Chriz–Z4 complex recruits JIL-1 to polytene chromosomes, a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reducing the core component Chriz by RNAi results in destabilization of the complex and a strong reduction of interband-specific ... is a chromodomain protein interacting with Z4 (Eggert et al. 2004 .... Analysis of colocalization was carried out on the digital .... main is localized to bands, indicating that the chromodo- main is ...

  9. A high density physical map of chromosome 1BL supports evolutionary studies, map-based cloning and sequencing in wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Philippe, R.; Paux, E.; Bertin, I.; Sourdille, P.; Choulet, F.; Laugier, Ch.; Šimková, Hana; Šafář, Jan; Bellec, A.; Vautrin, S.; Frenkel, Z.; Cattonaro, F.; Magni, F.; Scalabrin, S.; Martis, M.M.; Mayer, K. F. X.; Korol, A.; Berges, H.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Feuillet, C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 6 (2013) ISSN 1465-6906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : chromosome 1BL * evolution * gene space Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 10.465, year: 2013

  10. Construction of reference chromosome-scale pseudomolecules for potato: integrating the potato genome with genetic and physical maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bolser, Daniel; de Boer, Jan; Sønderkær, Mads; Amoros, Walter; Carboni, Martin Federico; D'Ambrosio, Juan Martín; de la Cruz, German; Di Genova, Alex; Douches, David S; Eguiluz, Maria; Guo, Xiao; Guzman, Frank; Hackett, Christine A; Hamilton, John P; Li, Guangcun; Li, Ying; Lozano, Roberto; Maass, Alejandro; Marshall, David; Martinez, Diana; McLean, Karen; Mejía, Nilo; Milne, Linda; Munive, Susan; Nagy, Istvan; Ponce, Olga; Ramirez, Manuel; Simon, Reinhard; Thomson, Susan J; Torres, Yerisf; Waugh, Robbie; Zhang, Zhonghua; Huang, Sanwen; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B; Sagredo, Boris; Feingold, Sergio E; Orjeda, Gisella; Veilleux, Richard E; Bonierbale, Merideth; Jacobs, Jeanne M E; Milbourne, Dan; Martin, David Michael Alan; Bryan, Glenn J

    2013-11-06

    The genome of potato, a major global food crop, was recently sequenced. The work presented here details the integration of the potato reference genome (DM) with a new sequence-tagged site marker-based linkage map and other physical and genetic maps of potato and the closely related species tomato. Primary anchoring of the DM genome assembly was accomplished by the use of a diploid segregating population, which was genotyped with several types of molecular genetic markers to construct a new ~936 cM linkage map comprising 2469 marker loci. In silico anchoring approaches used genetic and physical maps from the diploid potato genotype RH89-039-16 (RH) and tomato. This combined approach has allowed 951 superscaffolds to be ordered into pseudomolecules corresponding to the 12 potato chromosomes. These pseudomolecules represent 674 Mb (~93%) of the 723 Mb genome assembly and 37,482 (~96%) of the 39,031 predicted genes. The superscaffold order and orientation within the pseudomolecules are closely collinear with independently constructed high density linkage maps. Comparisons between marker distribution and physical location reveal regions of greater and lesser recombination, as well as regions exhibiting significant segregation distortion. The work presented here has led to a greatly improved ordering of the potato reference genome superscaffolds into chromosomal "pseudomolecules".

  11. Precise localization of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia and pseudoachondroplasia mutations by genetic and physical mapping of chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, R.G.; Cekleniak, J.A. [Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cohn, D.H. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1), a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia resulting in peripheral joint deformities and premature osteoarthritis, and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), a more severe disorder associated with short-limbed dwarfism, have recently been mapped to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19. Chondrocytes from some PSACH patients accumulate lamellar deposits in the endoplasmic reticulum that are immunologically cross-reactive with aggrecan. However, neither aggrecan nor any known candidate gene maps to the EDM1/PSACH region of chromosome 19. Genetic linkage mapping in two lage families had placed the disease locus between D19S215 (19p12) and D19S212 (19p13.1), an interval of about 3.5 Mb. With at least five potentially informative cross-overs within this interval, recombination mapping at greater resolution was undertaken. From cosmids assigned to the region by fluorescence in situ hybridization and contig assembly, dinucleotide repeat tracts were identified for use as polymorphic genetic markers. Linkage data from three new dinucleotide repeat markers from cosmids mapped between D19S212 and D19S215 limit the EDM1/PSACH locus to an interval spanning approximately 2 Mb.

  12. European gene mapping project (EUROGEM) : Breakpoint panels for human chromosomes based on the CEPH reference families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attwood, J; Bryant, SP; Bains, R; Povey, R; Povey, S; Rebello, M; Kapsetaki, M; Moschonas, NK; Grzeschik, KH; Otto, M; Dixon, M; Sudworth, HE; Kooy, RF; Wright, A; Teague, P; Terrenato, L; Vergnaud, G; Monfouilloux, S; Weissenbach, J; Alibert, O; Dib, C; Faure, S; Bakker, E; Pearson, NM; Vossen, RHAM; Gal, A; MuellerMyhsok, B; Cann, HM; Spurr, NK

    Meiotic breakpoint panels for human chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 17; 18, 20 and X were constructed from genotypes from the CEPH reference families. Each recombinant chromosome included has a breakpoint well-supported with reference to defined quantitative criteria. The panels

  13. Mapping the pericentric heterochromatin by comparative genomic hybridization analysis and chromosome deletions in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    He, Bing; Caudy, Amy; Parsons, Lance; Rosebrock, Adam; Pane, Attilio; Raj, Sandeep; Wieschaus, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Heterochromatin represents a significant portion of eukaryotic genomes and has essential structural and regulatory functions. Its molecular organization is largely unknown due to difficulties in sequencing through and assembling repetitive sequences enriched in the heterochromatin. Here we developed a novel strategy using chromosomal rearrangements and embryonic phenotypes to position unmapped Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatic sequence to specific chromosomal regions. By excluding seque...

  14. Clustering by neurocognition for fine-mapping of the schizophrenia susceptibility loci on chromosome 6p

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Liu, Chih-Min; Liu, Yu-Li; Fann, Cathy Shen-Jang; Hsiao, Po-Chang; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Chen, Chun-Houh; Wu, Han-Ming; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Liu, Shi K.; Hwang, Tzung J.; Hsieh, Ming H.; Chang, Chien-Ching; Yang, Wei-Chih; Lin, Jin-Jia; Chou, Frank Huang-Chih; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Chen, Wei J.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome 6p is one of the most commonly implicated regions in the genome-wide linkage scans of schizophrenia, whereas further association studies for markers in this region were inconsistent likely due to heterogeneity. This study aimed to identify more homogeneous subgroups of families for fine mapping on regions around markers D6S296 and D6S309 (both in 6p24.3) as well as D6S274 (in 6p22.3) by means of similarity in neurocognitive functioning. A total of 160 families of patients with schizophrenia comprising at least two affected siblings who had data for 8 neurocognitive test variables of the Continuous Performance Test (CPT) and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) were subjected to cluster analysis with data visualization using the test scores of both affected siblings. Family clusters derived were then used separately in family-based association tests for 64 single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the region of 6p24.3 and 6p22.3. Three clusters were derived from the family-based clustering, with deficit cluster 1 representing deficit on the CPT, deficit cluster 2 representing deficit on both the CPT and the WCST, and a third cluster of non-deficit. After adjustment using false discovery rate for multiple testing, SNP rs13873 and haplotype rs1225934-rs13873 on BMP6-TXNDC5 genes were significantly associated with schizophrenia for the deficit cluster 1 but not for the deficit cluster 2 or non-deficit cluster. Our results provide further evidence that the BMP6-TXNDC5 locus on 6p24.3 may play a role in the selective impairments on sustained attention of schizophrenia. PMID:19694819

  15. Physical and transcription map of a 25 Mb region on human chromosome 7 (region q21-q22)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, S. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)]|[Hosptial for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Little, S.; Vandenberg, A. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We are interested in the q21-q22 region of chromosome 7 because of its implication in a number of diseases. This region of about 25 Mb appears to be involved in ectrodactyly/ectodermal dysplasia/cleft plate (EEC) and split hand/split foot deformity (SHFD1), as well as myelodysplastic syndrome and acute non-lymphocyte leukemia. In order to identify the genes responsible for these and other diseases, we have constructed a physical map of this region. The proximal and distal boundaries of the region were operationally defined by the microsatellite markers D7S660 and D7S692, which are about 35 cM apart. This region between these two markers could be divided into 13 intervals on the basis of chromosome breakpoints contained in somatic cell hybrids. The map positions for 43 additional microsatellite markers and 25 cloned genes were determined with respect to these intervals. A physical map based on contigs of over 250 YACs has also been assembled. While the contigs encompass all of the known genetic markers mapped to the region and almost cover the entire 25-Mb region, there are 3 gaps on the map. One of these gaps spans a set of DNA markers for which no corresponding YAC clones could be identified. To connect the two adjacent contigs we have initiated cosmid walking with a chromosome 7-specific library (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory). A tiling path of 60 contiguous YAC clones has been assembled and used for direct cDNA selection. Over 300 cDNA clones have been isolated and characterized. They are being grouped into transcription units by Northern blot analysis and screening of full-length cDNA libraries. Further, exon amplification and direct cDNA library screening with evolutionarily conserved sequences are being performed for a 1-Mb region spanning the SHFD1 locus to ensure detection of all transcribed sequences.

  16. Genome-wide mapping of susceptibility to coronary artery disease identifies a novel replicated locus on chromosome 17.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Farrall

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a leading cause of death world-wide, and most cases have a complex, multifactorial aetiology that includes a substantial heritable component. Identification of new genes involved in CAD may inform pathogenesis and provide new therapeutic targets. The PROCARDIS study recruited 2,658 affected sibling pairs (ASPs with onset of CAD before age 66 y from four European countries to map susceptibility loci for CAD. ASPs were defined as having CAD phenotype if both had CAD, or myocardial infarction (MI phenotype if both had a MI. In a first study, involving a genome-wide linkage screen, tentative loci were mapped to Chromosomes 3 and 11 with the CAD phenotype (1,464 ASPs, and to Chromosome 17 with the MI phenotype (739 ASPs. In a second study, these loci were examined with a dense panel of grid-tightening markers in an independent set of families (1,194 CAD and 344 MI ASPs. This replication study showed a significant result on Chromosome 17 (MI phenotype; p = 0.009 after adjustment for three independent replication tests. An exclusion analysis suggests that further genes of effect size lambda(sib > 1.24 are unlikely to exist in these populations of European ancestry. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide linkage analysis to map, and replicate, a CAD locus. The region on Chromosome 17 provides a compelling target within which to identify novel genes underlying CAD. Understanding the genetic aetiology of CAD may lead to novel preventative and/or therapeutic strategies.

  17. Autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia with axonal sensory motor polyneuropathy maps to chromosome 21q 22.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Hanna, Philip A; Igo, Robert P; Luo, Yuqun A; Won, Sungho; Hirano, Michio; Grewal, Raji P

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. At present, 19 autosomal dominant loci for HSP have been mapped. We ascertained an American family of European descent segregating an autosomal dominant HSP associated with peripheral neuropathy. A genome wide scan was performed with 410 microsatellite repeat marker (Weber lab screening set 16) and following linkage and haplotype analysis, fine mapping was performed. Established genes or loci for HSP were excluded by direct sequencing or haplotype analysis. All established loci for HSP were excluded. Fine mapping suggested a locus on chromosome 21q22.3 flanked by markers D21S1411 and D21S1446 with a maximum logarithm of odds score of 2.05 and was supported by haplotype analysis. A number of candidate genes in this region were analyzed and no disease-producing mutations were detected. We present the clinical and genetic analysis of an American family with autosomal dominant HSP with axonal sensory motor polyneuropathy mapping to a novel locus on chromosome 21q22.3 designated SPG56.

  18. A gene for late-onset fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.; Bonneau, D.; Souied, E.; Camuzat, A.; Munnich, A.; Kaplan, J. [Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Dufier, J.L. [Hopital Laeennec, Paris (France); Amalric, P. [Consultation d`Ophtalmologie, Albi (France); Weissenbach, J. [Genethon, Evry (France)

    1995-02-01

    Fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disease responsible for a progressive loss of visual acuity in adulthood, with pigmentary changes of the macula, perimacular flecks, and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium. Since this condition shares several clinical features with Stargardt disease, which has been mapped to chromosome 1p21-p13, we tested the disease for linkage to chromosome 1p. We report the mapping of the disease locus to chromosome 1p13-p21, in the genetic interval defined by loci D1S435 and D1S415, in four multiplex families (maximum lod score 4.79 at recombination fraction 0 for probe AFM217xb2 at locus D1S435). Thus, despite differences in the age at onset, clinical course, and severity, fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy and Stargardt disease are probably allelic disorders. This result supports the view that allelic mutations produce a continuum of macular dystrophies, with onset in early childhood to late adulthood. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Integrated physical map of bread wheat chromosome arm 7DS to facilitate gene cloning and comparative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulpová, Zuzana; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Toegelová, Helena; Visendi, Paul; Hayashi, Satomi; Vojta, Petr; Paux, Etienne; Kilian, Andrzej; Abrouk, Michaël; Bartoš, Jan; Hajdúch, Marián; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Doležel, Jaroslav; Šimková, Hana

    2018-03-08

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a staple food for a significant part of the world's population. The growing demand on its production can be satisfied by improving yield and resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. Knowledge of the genome sequence would aid in discovering genes and QTLs underlying these traits and provide a basis for genomics-assisted breeding. Physical maps and BAC clones associated with them have been valuable resources from which to generate a reference genome of bread wheat and to assist map-based gene cloning. As a part of a joint effort coordinated by the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, we have constructed a BAC-based physical map of bread wheat chromosome arm 7DS consisting of 895 contigs and covering 94% of its estimated length. By anchoring BAC contigs to one radiation hybrid map and three high resolution genetic maps, we assigned 73% of the assembly to a distinct genomic position. This map integration, interconnecting a total of 1713 markers with ordered and sequenced BAC clones from a minimal tiling path, provides a tool to speed up gene cloning in wheat. The process of physical map assembly included the integration of the 7DS physical map with a whole-genome physical map of Aegilops tauschii and a 7DS Bionano genome map, which together enabled efficient scaffolding of physical-map contigs, even in the non-recombining region of the genetic centromere. Moreover, this approach facilitated a comparison of bread wheat and its ancestor at BAC-contig level and revealed a reconstructed region in the 7DS pericentromere. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Microsatellite organization in the grasshopper Abracris flavolineata (Orthoptera: Acrididae revealed by FISH mapping: remarkable spreading in the A and B chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Milani

    Full Text Available With the aim of acquiring deeper knowledge about repetitive DNAs chromosomal organization in grasshoppers, we used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH to map the distribution of 16 microsatellite repeats, including mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotides, in the chromosomes of the species Abracris flavolineata (Acrididae, which harbors B chromosome. FISH revealed two main patterns: (i exclusively scattered signals, and (ii scattered and specific signals, forming evident blocks. The enrichment was observed in both euchromatic and heterochromatic areas and only the motif (C30 was absent in heterochromatin. The A and B chromosomes were enriched with all the elements that were mapped, being observed in the B chromosome more distinctive blocks for (GA15 and (GAG10. For A complement distinctive blocks were noticed for (A30, (CA15, (CG15, (GA15, (CAC10, (CAA10, (CGG10, (GAA10, (GAC10 and (GATA8. These results revealed an intense spreading of microsatellites in the A. flavolineata genome that was independent of the A+T or G+C enrichment in the repeats. The data indicate that the microsatellites compose the B chromosome and could be involved in the evolution of this element in this species, although no specific relationship with any A chromosome was observed to discuss about its origin. The systematic analysis presented here contributes to the knowledge of repetitive DNA chromosomal organization among grasshoppers including the B chromosomes.

  1. Mapping a Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL conferring pyrethroid resistance in the African malaria vector Anopheles funestus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunt Richard H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles funestus populations has led to an increase in malaria transmission in southern Africa. Resistance has been attributed to elevated activities of cytochrome P450s but the molecular basis underlying this metabolic resistance is unknown. Microsatellite and SNP markers were used to construct a linkage map and to detect a quantitative trait locus (QTL associated with pyrethroid resistance in the FUMOZ-R strain of An. funestus from Mozambique. Results By genotyping 349 F2 individuals from 11 independent families, a single major QTL, rp1, at the telomeric end of chromosome 2R was identified. The rp1 QTL appears to present a major effect since it accounts for more than 60% of the variance in susceptibility to permethrin. This QTL has a strong additive genetic effect with respect to susceptibility. Candidate genes associated with pyrethroid resistance in other species were physically mapped to An. funestus polytene chromosomes. This showed that rp1 is genetically linked to a cluster of CYP6 cytochrome P450 genes located on division 9 of chromosome 2R and confirmed earlier reports that pyrethroid resistance in this strain is not associated with target site mutations (knockdown resistance. Conclusion We hypothesize that one or more of these CYP6 P450s clustered on chromosome 2R confers pyrethroid resistance in the FUMOZ-R strain of An. funestus.

  2. A genome-wide map of aberrantly expressed chromosomal islands in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castanos-Velez Esmeralda

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer development is accompanied by genetic phenomena like deletion and amplification of chromosome parts or alterations of chromatin structure. It is expected that these mechanisms have a strong effect on regional gene expression. Results We investigated genome-wide gene expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC and normal epithelial tissues from 25 patients using oligonucleotide arrays. This allowed us to identify 81 distinct chromosomal islands with aberrant gene expression. Of these, 38 islands show a gain in expression and 43 a loss of expression. In total, 7.892 genes (25.3% of all human genes are located in aberrantly expressed islands. Many chromosomal regions that are linked to hereditary colorectal cancer show deregulated expression. Also, many known tumor genes localize to chromosomal islands of misregulated expression in CRC. Conclusion An extensive comparison with published CGH data suggests that chromosomal regions known for frequent deletions in colon cancer tend to show reduced expression. In contrast, regions that are often amplified in colorectal tumors exhibit heterogeneous expression patterns: even show a decrease of mRNA expression. Because for several islands of deregulated expression chromosomal aberrations have never been observed, we speculate that additional mechanisms (like abnormal states of regional chromatin also have a substantial impact on the formation of co-expression islands in colorectal carcinoma.

  3. Admixture mapping and subsequent fine-mapping suggests a biologically relevant and novel association on chromosome 11 for type 2 diabetes in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina M Jeff

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a complex metabolic disease that disproportionately affects African Americans. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified several loci that contribute to T2D in European Americans, but few studies have been performed in admixed populations. We first performed a GWAS of 1,563 African Americans from the Vanderbilt Genome-Electronic Records Project and Northwestern University NUgene Project as part of the electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE network. We successfully replicate an association in TCF7L2, previously identified by GWAS in this African American dataset. We were unable to identify novel associations at p5,000 African Americans. We identified 13 independent associations between TCIRG1, CHKA, and ALDH3B1 genes on chromosome 11 and T2D. Our results suggest a novel region on chromosome 11 identified by admixture mapping is associated with T2D in African Americans.

  4. Identification of two new repetitive elements and chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNA sequences in the fish Gymnothorax unicolor (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Coluccia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Muraenidae is a species-rich family, with relationships among genera and species and taxonomy that have not been completely clarified. Few cytogenetic studies have been conducted on this family, and all of them showed the same diploid chromosome number (2n=42 but with conspicuous karyotypic variation among species. The Mediterranean moray eel Gymnothorax unicolor was previously cytogenetically studied using classical techniques that allowed the characterization of its karyotype structure and the constitutive heterochromatin and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs distribution pattern. In the present study, we describe two new repetitive elements (called GuMboI and GuDdeI obtained from restricted genomic DNA of G. unicolor that were characterized by Southern blot and physically localized by in situ hybridization on metaphase chromosomes. As they are highly repetitive DNA sequences, they map in heterochromatic regions. However, while GuDdeI was localized in the centromeric regions, the GuMboI fraction was distributed on some centromeres and was co-localized with the nucleolus organizer region (NOR. Comparative analysis with other Mediterranean species such as Muraena helena pointed out that these DNA fractions are species-specific and could potentially be used for species discrimination. As a new contribution to the karyotype of this species, we found that the major ribosomal genes are localized on acrocentric chromosome 9 and that the telomeres of each chromosome are composed of a tandem repeat derived from a poly-TTAGGG DNA sequence, as it occurs in most vertebrate species. The results obtained add new information useful in comparative genomics at the chromosomal level and contribute to the cytogenetic knowledge regarding this fish family, which has not been extensively studied.

  5. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNAs in the Grasshopper Abracris flavolineata Reveal Possible Ancestry of the B Chromosome and H3 Histone Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2013-01-01

    Supernumerary chromosomes (B chromosomes) occur in approximately 15% of eukaryote species. Although these chromosomes have been extensively studied, knowledge concerning their specific molecular composition is lacking in most cases. The accumulation of repetitive DNAs is one remarkable characteristic of B chromosomes, and the occurrence of distinct types of multigene families, satellite DNAs and some transposable elements have been reported. Here, we describe the organization of repetitive DNAs in the A complement and B chromosome system in the grasshopper species Abracris flavolineata using classical cytogenetic techniques and FISH analysis using probes for five multigene families, telomeric repeats and repetitive C0t-1 DNA fractions. The 18S rRNA and H3 histone multigene families are highly variable and well distributed in A. flavolineata chromosomes, which contrasts with the conservation of U snRNA genes and less variable distribution of 5S rDNA sequences. The H3 histone gene was an extensively distributed with clusters occurring in all chromosomes. Repetitive DNAs were concentrated in C-positive regions, including the pericentromeric region and small chromosomal arms, with some occurrence in C-negative regions, but abundance was low in the B chromosome. Finally, the first demonstration of the U2 snRNA gene in B chromosomes in A. flavolineata may shed light on its possible origin. These results provide new information regarding chromosomal variability for repetitive DNAs in grasshoppers and the specific molecular composition of B chromosomes. PMID:23826099

  6. Genetic defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease maps on chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. George-Hyslop, P.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Polinsky, R.J.; Haines, J.L.; Nee, L.; Watkins, P.C.; Myers, R.H.; Feldman, R.G.; Pollen, D.; Drachman, D.; Growdon, J.

    1987-02-20

    Alzheimer's disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Several families have been described in which Alzheimer's disease is caused by an autosomal dominant gene defect. The chromosomal location of this defective gene has been discovered by using genetic linkage to DNA markers on chromosome 21. The localization on chromosome 21 provides an explanation for the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in Down syndrome. Isolation and characterization of the gene at this locus may yield new insights into the nature of the defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease and possibly, into the etiology of all forms of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Examination of X chromosome markers in Rett syndrome: Exclusion mapping with a novel variation on multilocus linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, K.A.; Fill, C.P. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Terwililger, J.; Percy, A.K.; Zobhbi, H. (Columbia University, NY (United States)); DeGennaro, L.J.; Ott, J. (University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester (United States)); Anvret, M.; Martin-Gallardo, A. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurologic disorder characterized by early normal development followed by regression, acquired deceleration of head growth, autism, ataxia, and sterotypic hand movements. The exclusive occurrence of the syndrome in females and the occurrence of a few familial cases with inheritance through maternal lines suggest that this disorder is most likely secondary to a mutation on the X chromosome. To address this hypothesis and to identify candidate regions for the Rett syndrome gene locus, genotypic analysis was performed in two families with maternally related affected half-sisters by using 63 DNA markers from the X chromosome. Nineteen of the loci studied were chosen for multipoint linkage analysis because they have been previously genetically mapped using a large number of meioses from reference families. Using the exclusion criterion of a lod score less than [minus]2, the authors were able to exclude the region between the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus and the DXS456 locus. This region extends from Xp21.2 to Xq21-q23. The use of the multipoint linkage analysis approach outlined in this study should allow the exclusion of additional regions of the X chromosome as new markers are analyzed.

  8. Fine mapping analysis confirms and strengthens linkage of four chromosomal regions in familial hypospadias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soderhall, C.; Korberg, I.B.; Thai, H.T.; Cao, J.; Chen, Y; Zhang, X.; Shulu, Z.; Zanden, L.F.M. van der; Rooij, I.A.L.M. van; Frisen, L.; Roeleveld, N.; Markljung, E.; Kockum, I.; Nordenskjold, A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common male genital malformation and is regarded as a complex disease affected by multiple genetic as well as environmental factors. In a previous genome-wide scan for familial hypospadias, we reported suggestive linkage in nine chromosomal regions. We have extended this analysis by

  9. Comparative genetic mapping in Fragaria virginiana reveals autosomal origin of sex chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although most flowering plants are hermaphrodite, separate sexes (dioecy) have evolved repeatedly. The evolution of sex chromosomes from autosomes can often, but not always, accompany this transition. Thus, many have argued that plant genera that contain both hermaphroditic and dioecious members pro...

  10. BAC-FISH mapping of synteny between chromosomes of Bombyx mori and Manducta sexta

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sahara, K.; Yoshido, A.; Marec, František; Vrbová, Iva; Kamimura, M.; Yasukochi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 15, suppl. 2 (2007), s. 32-32 ISSN 0967-3849. [International Chromosome Conference /16./. 25.08.2007-29.08.2007, Amsterdam] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Bombyx mori Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  11. Physical map of the short arm of bread wheat chromosome 3D

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holušová, Kateřina; Vrána, Jan; Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Balcárková, Barbora; Frenkel, Z.; Darrier, B.; Paux, E.; Cattonaro, F.; Berges, H.; Letellier, T.; Alaux, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Bartoš, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2017) ISSN 1940-3372 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-08786S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : TRITICUM-AESTIVUM L. * COMPLEX GENOMES * INDIVIDUAL CHROMOSOMES Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.736, year: 2016

  12. Mapping of 5q35 chromosomal rearrangements within a genomically unstable region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buysse, Karen; Crepel, An; Menten, Björn

    2008-01-01

    these rearrangements. METHODS: We analysed a series of patients with breakpoints clustering within chromosome band 5q35. Using high density arrays and subsequent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we characterised the breakpoints of four interstitial deletions (including one associated with an unbalanced...

  13. Identification and Mapping of Simple Sequence Repeat Markers from Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome End Sequences for Genome Characterization and Genetic–Physical Map Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana M. Córdoba

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers or simple sequence repeat (SSR loci are useful for diversity characterization and genetic–physical mapping. Different in silico microsatellite search methods have been developed for mining bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC end sequences for SSRs. The overall goal of this study was genome characterization based on SSRs in 89,017 BAC end sequences (BESs from the G19833 common bean ( L. library. Another objective was to identify new SSR taking into account three tandem motif identification programs (Automated Microsatellite Marker Development [AMMD], Tandem Repeats Finder [TRF], and SSRLocator [SSRL]. Among the microsatellite search engines, SSRL identified the highest number of SSRs; however, when primer design was attempted, the number dropped due to poor primer design regions. Automated Microsatellite Marker Development software identified many SSRs with valuable AT/TA or AG/TC motifs, while TRF found fewer SSRs and produced no primers. A subgroup of 323 AT-rich, di-, and trinucleotide SSRs were selected from the AMMD results and used in a parental survey with DOR364 and G19833, of which 75 could be mapped in the corresponding population; these represented 4052 BAC clones. Together with 92 previously mapped BES- and 114 non-BES-derived markers, a total of 280 SSRs were included in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based map, integrating a total of 8232 BAC clones in 162 contigs from the physical map.

  14. Physical mapping of a large plant genome using global high-information-content-fingerprinting: the distal region of the wheat ancestor Aegilops tauschii chromosome 3DS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Frank M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical maps employing libraries of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones are essential for comparative genomics and sequencing of large and repetitive genomes such as those of the hexaploid bread wheat. The diploid ancestor of the D-genome of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, Aegilops tauschii, is used as a resource for wheat genomics. The barley diploid genome also provides a good model for the Triticeae and T. aestivum since it is only slightly larger than the ancestor wheat D genome. Gene co-linearity between the grasses can be exploited by extrapolating from rice and Brachypodium distachyon to Ae. tauschii or barley, and then to wheat. Results We report the use of Ae. tauschii for the construction of the physical map of a large distal region of chromosome arm 3DS. A physical map of 25.4 Mb was constructed by anchoring BAC clones of Ae. tauschii with 85 EST on the Ae. tauschii and barley genetic maps. The 24 contigs were aligned to the rice and B. distachyon genomic sequences and a high density SNP genetic map of barley. As expected, the mapped region is highly collinear to the orthologous chromosome 1 in rice, chromosome 2 in B. distachyon and chromosome 3H in barley. However, the chromosome scale of the comparative maps presented provides new insights into grass genome organization. The disruptions of the Ae. tauschii-rice and Ae. tauschii-Brachypodium syntenies were identical. We observed chromosomal rearrangements between Ae. tauschii and barley. The comparison of Ae. tauschii physical and genetic maps showed that the recombination rate across the region dropped from 2.19 cM/Mb in the distal region to 0.09 cM/Mb in the proximal region. The size of the gaps between contigs was evaluated by comparing the recombination rate along the map with the local recombination rates calculated on single contigs. Conclusions The physical map reported here is the first physical map using fingerprinting of a complete

  15. Construction of chromosome segment substitution lines enables QTL mapping for flowering and morphological traits in Brassica rapa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan eLi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs represent a powerful method for precise quantitative trait loci (QTL detection of complex agronomical traits in plants. In this study, we used a marker-assisted backcrossing strategy to develop a population consisting of 63 CSSLs, derived from backcrossing of the F1 generated from a cross between two Brassica rapa subspecies: ‘Chiifu’ (ssp. pekinensis, the Brassica A genome-represented line used as the donor, and ‘49caixin’ (ssp. parachinensis, a non-heading cultivar used as the recipient. The 63 CSSLs covered 87.95% of the B. rapa genome. Among them, 39 lines carried a single segment; 15 lines, two segments; and nine lines, three or more segments of the donor parent chromosomes. To verify the potential advantage of these CSSL lines, we used them to locate QTL for six morphology-related traits. A total of 58 QTL were located on eight chromosomes for all six traits: 17 for flowering time, 14 each for bolting time and plant height, 6 for plant diameter, 2 for leaf width, and 5 for flowering stalk diameter. Co-localized QTL were mainly distributed on eight genomic regions in A01, A02, A05, A06, A08, A09, and A10, present in the corresponding CSSLs. Moreover, new chromosomal fragments that harbored QTL were identified using the findings of previous studies. The CSSL population constructed in our study paves the way for fine mapping and cloning of candidate genes involved in late bolting, flowering, and plant architecture-related traits in B. rapa. Furthermore, it has great potential for future marker-aided gene/QTL pyramiding of other interesting traits in B. rapa breeding.

  16. Construction of radiation-reduced hybrids and their use in mapping of microclones from chromosome 10p11.2-q11.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Shoichi; Shin, Eisei; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Mori, Takesada; Takai, Shin-ichiro; Nishisho, Isamu; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Tanaka, Kiyoji.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-reduced hybrids for mapping of DNA markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10 were developed. A Chinese hamster/human somatic cell hybrid (762-8A) carrying chromosomes 10 and Y as the only human material were exposed to 40,000 rads of irradiation and then rescued by fusion with non-irradiated recipient Chinese hamster cells (GM459). Southern hybridization analyses revealed that 10 of 128 HAT-resistant clones contained human chromosomal fragments corresponding to at least one marker locus between FNRB (10p11.2) and RBP3 (10q11.2). These hybrids were then used to map microdissection clones previously isolated and roughly mapped to this chromosomal region by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Two of the six microclones studies could be mapped to the proximity of the D10S102 locus. These radiation hybrids are useful for the construction of refined genetic maps of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10. (author) 50 refs

  17. A Dense Brown Trout (Salmo trutta) Linkage Map Reveals Recent Chromosomal Rearrangements in the Salmo Genus and the Impact of Selection on Linked Neutral Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitwein, Maeva; Guinand, Bruno; Pouzadoux, Juliette; Desmarais, Erick; Berrebi, Patrick; Gagnaire, Pierre-Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    High-density linkage maps are valuable tools for conservation and eco-evolutionary issues. In salmonids, a complex rediploidization process consecutive to an ancient whole genome duplication event makes linkage maps of prime importance for investigating the evolutionary history of chromosome rearrangements. Here, we developed a high-density consensus linkage map for the brown trout (Salmo trutta), a socioeconomically important species heavily impacted by human activities. A total of 3977 ddRAD markers were mapped and ordered in 40 linkage groups using sex- and lineage-averaged recombination distances obtained from two family crosses. Performing map comparison between S. trutta and its sister species, S. salar, revealed extensive chromosomal rearrangements. Strikingly, all of the fusion and fission events that occurred after the S. salar/S. trutta speciation happened in the Atlantic salmon branch, whereas the brown trout remained closer to the ancestral chromosome structure. Using the strongly conserved synteny within chromosome arms, we aligned the brown trout linkage map to the Atlantic salmon genome sequence to estimate the local recombination rate in S. trutta at 3721 loci. A significant positive correlation between recombination rate and within-population nucleotide diversity (π) was found, indicating that selection constrains variation at linked neutral sites in brown trout. This new high-density linkage map provides a useful genomic resource for future aquaculture, conservation, and eco-evolutionary studies in brown trout. PMID:28235829

  18. A Dense Brown Trout (Salmo trutta Linkage Map Reveals Recent Chromosomal Rearrangements in the Salmo Genus and the Impact of Selection on Linked Neutral Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeva Leitwein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High-density linkage maps are valuable tools for conservation and eco-evolutionary issues. In salmonids, a complex rediploidization process consecutive to an ancient whole genome duplication event makes linkage maps of prime importance for investigating the evolutionary history of chromosome rearrangements. Here, we developed a high-density consensus linkage map for the brown trout (Salmo trutta, a socioeconomically important species heavily impacted by human activities. A total of 3977 ddRAD markers were mapped and ordered in 40 linkage groups using sex- and lineage-averaged recombination distances obtained from two family crosses. Performing map comparison between S. trutta and its sister species, S. salar, revealed extensive chromosomal rearrangements. Strikingly, all of the fusion and fission events that occurred after the S. salar/S. trutta speciation happened in the Atlantic salmon branch, whereas the brown trout remained closer to the ancestral chromosome structure. Using the strongly conserved synteny within chromosome arms, we aligned the brown trout linkage map to the Atlantic salmon genome sequence to estimate the local recombination rate in S. trutta at 3721 loci. A significant positive correlation between recombination rate and within-population nucleotide diversity (π was found, indicating that selection constrains variation at linked neutral sites in brown trout. This new high-density linkage map provides a useful genomic resource for future aquaculture, conservation, and eco-evolutionary studies in brown trout.

  19. High-resolution linkage map of mouse chromosome 13 in the vicinity of the host resistance locus Lgn1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, M.C.; Ernst, E.; Diez, E. [McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Natural resistance of inbred mouse strains to infection with Legionella pneumophila is controlled by the expression of a single dominant gene on chromosome 13, designated Lgn1. The genetic difference at Lgn1 is phenotypically expressed as the presence or absence of intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in host macrophages. In our effort to identify the Lgn1 gene by positional cloning, we have generated a high-resolution linkage map of the Lgn1 chromosomal region. For this, we have carried out extensive segregation analysis in a total of 1270 (A/J x C57BL/6J) X A/J informative backcross mice segregating the resistance allele of C57BL/6J and the susceptibility allele of A/J. Additional segregation analyses were carried out in three preexisting panels of C57BL/6J X Mus spretus interspecific backcross mice. A total of 39 DNA markers were mapped within an interval of approximately 30 cM overlapping the Lgn1 region. Combined pedigree analyses for the 5.4-cM segment overlapping Lgn1 indicated the locus order and the interlocus distances (in cM): D13Mit128-(1.4)-D13Mit194-(0.1)-D13Mit147-(0.9)-Dl3Mit36-(0.9)-D13Mit146-(0.2)-Lgn1/D 13Mit37-(1.0)-D13Mit70. Additional genetic linkage studies of markers not informative in the A/J X C57BL/6J cross positioned D13Mit30, -72, -195, and -203, D13Gor4, D13Hun35, and Mtap5 in the immediate vicinity of the Lgn1 locus. The marker density and resolution of this genetic linkage map should allow the construction of a physical map of the region and the isolation of YAC clones overlapping the gene. 60 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. A novel locus for Usher syndrome type I, USH1G, maps to chromosome 17q24-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Mirna; Chouery, Eliane; Torchard-Pagnez, Delphine; Nouaille, Sylvie; Khrais, Awni; Sayegh, Fouad N; Mégarbané, André; Loiselet, Jacques; Lathrop, Mark; Petit, Christine; Weil, Dominique

    2002-04-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with sensorineural hearing impairment and progressive visual loss attributable to retinitis pigmentosa. This syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Three clinical types have been described of which type I (USH1) is the most severe. Six USH1 loci have been identified. We report a Palestinian consanguineous family from Jordan with three affected children. In view of the combination of profound hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa in the patients, we classified the disease as USH1. Linkage analysis excluded the involvement of any of the known USH1 loci. A genome-wide screening allowed us to map this novel locus, USH1G, in a 23-cM interval on chromosome 17q24-25. The USH1G interval overlaps the intervals for two dominant forms of isolated hearing loss, namely DFNA20 and DFNA26. Since several examples have been reported of syndromic and isolated forms of deafness being allelic, USH1G, DFNA20, and DFNA26 might result from alterations of the same gene. Finally, a mouse mutant, jackson shaker ( js), with deafness and circling behavior has been mapped to the murine homologous region on chromosome 11.

  1. Chromosomal mapping and mutational analysis of the coding region of the glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha and beta isoforms in patients with NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Arden, K C; Rasmussen, S B

    1997-01-01

    isoforms of GSK-3alpha and GSK-3beta in 72 NIDDM patients and 12 control subjects. No structural changes were detected apart from a few silent mutations. Mapping of the GSK-3alpha to chromosome 19q13.1-13.2 and the GSK-3beta to chromosome 3q13.3-q21 outside known genetic loci linked to NIDDM further makes...

  2. Phenotype and 244k array-CGH characterization of chromosome 13q deletions: an update of the phenotypic map of 13q21.1-qter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhoff, Maria; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Stoeva, Radka

    2009-01-01

    Partial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 13 lead to variable phenotypes dependant on the size and position of the deleted region. In order to update the phenotypic map of chromosome 13q21.1-qter deletions, we applied 244k Agilent oligonucleotide-based array-CGH to determine the exact break......-genotype correlation on chromosome 13. In contrast to previous reports of carriers of 13q32 band deletions as the most seriously affected patients, we present two such individuals with long-term survival, 28 and 2.5 years....

  3. Cloning of the cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila white gene and mapping to chromosome 21q22.3.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H.; Rossier, C.; Lalioti, M. D.; Lynn, A.; Chakravarti, A.; Perrin, G.; Antonarakis, S. E.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to contribute to the transcript map of human chromosome 21 and the understanding of the pathophysiology of trisomy 21, we have used exon trapping to identify fragments of chromosome 21 genes. Two trapped exons, from pools of chromosome 21-specific cosmids, showed homology to the Drosophila white (w) gene. We subsequently cloned the corresponding cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila w gene (hW) from human retina and fetal brain cDNA libraries. The gene belongs to the ATP-b...

  4. Fine genetic map of mouse chromosome 10 around the polycystic kidney disease gene, jcpk, and ankyrin 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryda, E.C.; Ling, H.; Rathbun, D.E. [New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A chlorambucil (CHL)-induced mutation of the jcpk (juvenile congenital polycystic kidney disease) gene causes a severe early onset polycystic kidney disease. In an intercross involving Mus musculus castaneus, jcpk was precisely mapped 0.2 cM distal to D10Mit115 and 0.8 cM proximal to D10Mit173. In addition, five genes, Cdc2a, Col6al, Col6a2, Bcr, and Ank3 were mapped in both this jcpk intercross and a (BALB/c X CAST/Ei)F{sub 1} x BALB/c backcross. All five genes were eliminated as possible candidates for jcpk based on the mapping data. The jcpk intercross allowed the orientation of the Ank3 gene relative to the centromere to be determined. D10Mit115, D10Mit173, D10Mit199, and D10Mit200 were separated genetically in this cross. The order and genetic distances of all markers and gene loci mapped in the jcpk intercross were consistent with those derived from the BALB/c backcross, indicating that the CHL-induced lesion has not generated any gross chromosomal abnormalities detectable in these studies. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Chromosomal mapping of HCaRG, a novel hypertension-related, calcium-regulated gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Solban, N.; Dumas, P.; Gossard, F.; Sun, Y.; Pravenec, Michal; Křen, Vladimír; Lewanczuk, R.; Hamet, P.; Tremblay, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2002), s. 9-14 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/98/K015; GA ČR GA305/00/1646 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55000331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : chromosome * localization * gene Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.615, year: 2002

  6. Genetic mapping of centromeres in the nine Citrus clementina chromosomes using half-tetrad analysis and recombination patterns in unreduced and haploid gametes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleza, Pablo; Cuenca, José; Hernández, María; Juárez, José; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2015-03-08

    Mapping centromere locations in plant species provides essential information for the analysis of genetic structures and population dynamics. The centromere's position affects the distribution of crossovers along a chromosome and the parental heterozygosity restitution by 2n gametes is a direct function of the genetic distance to the centromere. Sexual polyploidisation is relatively frequent in Citrus species and is widely used to develop new seedless triploid cultivars. The study's objectives were to (i) map the positions of the centromeres of the nine Citrus clementina chromosomes; (ii) analyse the crossover interference in unreduced gametes; and (iii) establish the pattern of genetic recombination in haploid clementine gametes along each chromosome and its relationship with the centromere location and distribution of genic sequences. Triploid progenies were derived from unreduced megagametophytes produced by second-division restitution. Centromere positions were mapped genetically for all linkage groups using half-tetrad analysis. Inference of the physical locations of centromeres revealed one acrocentric, four metacentric and four submetacentric chromosomes. Crossover interference was observed in unreduced gametes, with variation seen between chromosome arms. For haploid gametes, a strong decrease in the recombination rate occurred in centromeric and pericentromeric regions, which contained a low density of genic sequences. In chromosomes VIII and IX, these low recombination rates extended beyond the pericentromeric regions. The genomic region corresponding to a genetic distance recombination pattern along each chromosome. However, regions with low recombination rates extended beyond the pericentromeric regions of some chromosomes into areas richer in genic sequences. The persistence of strong linkage disequilibrium between large numbers of genes promotes the stability of epistatic interactions and multilocus-controlled traits over successive generations but

  7. BioNano genome mapping of individual chromosomes supports physical mapping and sequence assembly in complex plant genomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staňková, Helena; Hastie, A.; Chan, S.; Vrána, Jan; Tulpová, Zuzana; Kubaláková, Marie; Visendi, P.; Hayashi, S.; Luo, M.; Batley, J.; Edwards, D.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Šimková, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 7 (2016), s. 1523-1531 ISSN 1467-7644 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/2554; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : optical mapping * wheat * sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.443, year: 2016

  8. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes Map to Two Chromosomes in an Evolutionarily Ancient Reptile, the Tuatara Sphenodon punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Hilary C; O'Meally, Denis; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Marshall-Graves, Jennifer A; Edwards, Scott

    2015-05-07

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are a central component of the vertebrate immune system and usually exist in a single genomic region. However, considerable differences in MHC organization and size exist between different vertebrate lineages. Reptiles occupy a key evolutionary position for understanding how variation in MHC structure evolved in vertebrates, but information on the structure of the MHC region in reptiles is limited. In this study, we investigate the organization and cytogenetic location of MHC genes in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), the sole extant representative of the early-diverging reptilian order Rhynchocephalia. Sequencing and mapping of 12 clones containing class I and II MHC genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library indicated that the core MHC region is located on chromosome 13q. However, duplication and translocation of MHC genes outside of the core region was evident, because additional class I MHC genes were located on chromosome 4p. We found a total of seven class I sequences and 11 class II β sequences, with evidence for duplication and pseudogenization of genes within the tuatara lineage. The tuatara MHC is characterized by high repeat content and low gene density compared with other species and we found no antigen processing or MHC framework genes on the MHC gene-containing clones. Our findings indicate substantial differences in MHC organization in tuatara compared with mammalian and avian MHCs and highlight the dynamic nature of the MHC. Further sequencing and annotation of tuatara and other reptile MHCs will determine if the tuatara MHC is representative of nonavian reptiles in general. Copyright © 2015 Miller et al.

  9. The Charles River "hairless" rat mutation maps to chromosome 1: allelic with fuzzy and a likely orthologue of mouse frizzy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, K; Akkouris, G; Berry, P R; Chrissluis, R R; Crooks, I M; Dull, A K; Grable, S; Jeruzal, J; Lanza, J; Lavoie, C; Maloney, R A; Pitruzzello, M; Sharma, R; Stoklasek, T A; Tweeddale, J; King, T R

    2002-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that the recessive mutation affecting hypotrichosis in the Charles River (CR) "hairless" rat does not involve the hairless gene (hr) on rat chromosome 15. To determine if this mutation might be allelic (or orthologous) with any other previously mapped hypotrichosis-generating mutation in mammals, we have produced a panel of backcross rats segregating for the CR hairless rat mutation as well as numerous other markers from throughout the rat genome. Analysis of this panel has located the CR hairless rat's hypotrichosis-generating mutation on chromosome 1, near Myl2, where only the fuzzy mutation in rat (fz) and the frizzy mutation in mouse (fr) have been previously localized. Intercrossing fz/fz and CR hairless rats produced hybrid offspring with abnormal hair, showing that these two rat mutations are allelic. We suggest that the CR hairless rat mutation and fuzzy be renamed frizzy-Charles River (fr(CR)) and frizzy-Harlan (fr(H)), respectively, to reflect their likely orthology with the mouse fr mutation.

  10. Mapping of the bovine spinal muscular atrophy locus to Chromosome 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medugorac, Ivica; Kemter, Juliane; Russ, Ingolf; Pietrowski, Detlef; Nüske, Stefan; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Schmahl, Wolfgang; Förster, Martin

    2003-06-01

    A hereditary form of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by an autosomal recessive gene has been reported for American Brown-Swiss cattle and in advanced backcrosses between American Brown-Swiss and many European brown cattle breeds. Bovine SMA (bovSMA) bears remarkable resemblance to the human SMA (SMA1). Affected homozygous calves also show progressive symmetric weakness and neurogenic atrophy of proximal muscles. The condition is characterized by severe muscle atrophy, quadriparesis, and sternal recumbency as result of neurogenic atrophy. We report on the localization of the gene causing bovSMA within a genomic interval between the microsatellite marker URB031 and the telomeric end of bovine Chromosome (Chr) 24 (BTA24). Linkage analysis of a complex pedigree of German Braunvieh cattle revealed a recombination fraction of 0.06 and a three-point lod score of 11.82. The results of linkage and haplotyping analysis enable a marker-assisted selection against bovSMA based on four microsatellite markers most telomeric on BTA24 to a moderate accuracy of 89-94%. So far, this region is not orthologous to any human chromosome segments responsible for twelve distinct disease phenotypes of autosomal neuropathies. Our results indicate the apoptosis-inhibiting protein BCL2 as the most promising positional candidate gene causing bovSMA. Our findings offer an attractive animal model for a better understanding of human forms of SMA and for a probable anti-apoptotic synergy of SMN-BCL2 aggregates in mammals.

  11. Identification and chromosome mapping of repetitive elements in the Astyanax scabripinnis (Teleostei: Characidae) species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Patrícia; de Oliveira, Luiz Antonio; Pucci, Marcela Baer; Santos, Mateus Henrique; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Nogaroto, Viviane; de Almeida, Mara Cristina; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira

    2015-02-01

    Most part of the eukaryotic genome is composed of repeated sequences or multiple copies of DNA, which were considered as "junk DNA", and may be associated to the heterochromatin. In this study, three populations of Astyanax aff. scabripinnis from Brazilian rivers of Guaratinguetá and Pindamonhangaba (São Paulo) and a population from Maringá (Paraná) were analyzed concerning the localization of the nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs), the As51 satellite DNA, the 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), and the 5S rDNA. Repeated sequences were also isolated and identified by the Cot - 1 method, which indicated similarity (90%) with the LINE UnaL2 retrotransposon. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed the retrotransposon dispersed and more concentrated markers in centromeric and telomeric chromosomal regions. These sequences were co-localized and interspaced with 18S and 5S rDNA and As51, confirmed by fiber-FISH essay. The B chromosome found in these populations pointed to a conspicuous hybridization with LINE probe, which is also co-located in As51 sequences. The NORs were active at unique sites of a homologous pair in the three populations. There were no evidences that transposable elements and repetitive DNA had influence in the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal genes in our analyses.

  12. USH1H, a novel locus for type I Usher syndrome, maps to chromosome 15q22-23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Z M; Riazuddin, S; Khan, S N; Friedman, P L; Riazuddin, S; Friedman, T B

    2009-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a hereditary disorder associated with sensorineural hearing impairment, progressive loss of vision attributable to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and variable vestibular function. Three clinical types have been described with type I (USH1) being the most severe. To date, six USH1 loci have been reported. We ascertained two large Pakistani consanguineous families segregating profound hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and RP, the defining features of USH1. In these families, we excluded linkage of USH to the 11 known USH loci and subsequently performed a genome-wide linkage screen. We found a novel USH1 locus designated USH1H that mapped to chromosome 15q22-23 in a 4.92-cM interval. This locus overlaps the non-syndromic deafness locus DFNB48 raising the possibility that the two disorders may be caused by allelic mutations.

  13. Comparative mapping of the wild perennial Glycine latifolia and soybean (G. max reveals extensive chromosome rearrangements in the genus Glycine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungyul Chang

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max L. Mer., like many cultivated crops, has a relatively narrow genetic base and lacks diversity for some economically important traits. Glycine latifolia (Benth. Newell & Hymowitz, one of the 26 perennial wild Glycine species related to soybean in the subgenus Glycine Willd., shows high levels of resistance to multiple soybean pathogens and pests including Alfalfa mosaic virus, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib. de Bary. However, limited information is available on the genomes of these perennial Glycine species. To generate molecular resources for gene mapping and identification, high-density linkage maps were constructed for G. latifolia using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers generated by genotyping by sequencing and evaluated in an F2 population and confirmed in an F5 population. In each population, greater than 2,300 SNP markers were selected for analysis and segregated to form 20 large linkage groups. Marker orders were similar in the F2 and F5 populations. The relationships between G. latifolia linkage groups and G. max and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. chromosomes were examined by aligning SNP-containing sequences from G. latifolia to the genome sequences of G. max and P. vulgaris. Twelve of the 20 G. latifolia linkage groups were nearly collinear with G. max chromosomes. The remaining eight G. latifolia linkage groups appeared to be products of multiple interchromosomal translocations relative to G. max. Large syntenic blocks also were observed between G. latifolia and P. vulgaris. These experiments are the first to compare genome organizations among annual and perennial Glycine species and common bean. The development of molecular resources for species closely related to G. max provides information into the evolution of genomes within the genus Glycine and tools to identify genes within perennial wild relatives of cultivated soybean that could be beneficial to soybean

  14. Admixture mapping of 15,280 African Americans identifies obesity susceptibility loci on chromosomes 5 and X.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yu Cheng

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity (body mass index (BMI > or =30 kg/m(2 is higher in African Americans than in European Americans, even after adjustment for socioeconomic factors, suggesting that genetic factors may explain some of the difference. To identify genetic loci influencing BMI, we carried out a pooled analysis of genome-wide admixture mapping scans in 15,280 African Americans from 14 epidemiologic studies. Samples were genotyped at a median of 1,411 ancestry-informative markers. After adjusting for age, sex, and study, BMI was analyzed both as a dichotomized (top 20% versus bottom 20% and a continuous trait. We found that a higher percentage of European ancestry was significantly correlated with lower BMI (rho = -0.042, P = 1.6x10(-7. In the dichotomized analysis, we detected two loci on chromosome X as associated with increased African ancestry: the first at Xq25 (locus-specific LOD = 5.94; genome-wide score = 3.22; case-control Z = -3.94; and the second at Xq13.1 (locus-specific LOD = 2.22; case-control Z = -4.62. Quantitative analysis identified a third locus at 5q13.3 where higher BMI was highly significantly associated with greater European ancestry (locus-specific LOD = 6.27; genome-wide score = 3.46. Further mapping studies with dense sets of markers will be necessary to identify the alleles in these regions of chromosomes X and 5 that may be associated with variation in BMI.

  15. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K. [Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Mapping of the gene encoding the. beta. -amyloid precursor protein and its relationship to the Down syndrome region of chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, D.; Gardiner, K.; Kao, F.T.; Tanzi, R.; Watkins, P.; Gusella, J.F. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer Research, Denver, CO (USA))

    1988-11-01

    The gene encoding the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein has been assigned to human chromosome 21, as has a gene responsible for at least some cases of familial Alzheimer disease. Linkage studies strongly suggest that the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein and the product corresponding to familial Alzheimer disease are from two genes, or at least that several million base pairs of DNA separate the markers. The precise location of the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 has not yet been determined. Here the authors show, by using a somatic-cell/hybrid-cell mapping panel, in situ hybridization, and transverse-alternating-field electrophoresis, that the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene is located on chromosome 21 very near the 21q21/21q/22 border and probably within the region of chromosome 21 that, when trisomic, results in Down syndrome.

  17. QTL Mapping of Grain Quality Traits Using Introgression Lines Carrying Oryza rufipogon Chromosome Segments in Japonica Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yeo-Tae; Chung, Chong-Tae; Lee, Young-Ju; Na, Han-Jung; Lee, Jae-Chul; Lee, Sun-Gye; Lee, Kwang-Won; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kang, Ju-Won; Lee, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Jong-Yeol; Ahn, Sang-Nag

    2016-12-01

    Improved eating quality is a major breeding target in japonica rice due to market demand. Consequently, quantitative trait loci (QTL) for glossiness of cooked rice and amylose content associated with eating quality have received much research focus because of their importance in rice quality. In this study, QTL associated with 12 grain quality traits were identified using 96 introgression lines (IL) of rice developed from an interspecific cross between the Korean elite O. sativa japonica cultivar 'Hwaseong' and O. rufipogon over 7 years. QTL analyses indicated that QTL qDTH6 for heading date, detected on chromosome 6 is associated with variance in grain traits. Most QTLs detected in this study clustered near the qDTH6 locus on chromosome 6, suggesting the effect of qDTH6. O. rufipogon alleles negatively affected grain quality traits except for a few QTLs, including qGCR9 for glossiness of cooked rice on chromosome 9. To characterize the effect of the O. rufipogon locus harboring qGCR9, four lines with a single but different O. rufipogon segment near qGCR9 were compared to Hwaseong. Three lines (O. rufipopgon ILs) having O. rufipogon segment between RM242 and RM245 in common showed higher glossiness of cooked rice than Hwaseong and the other line (Hwaseong IL), indicating that qGCR9 is located in the 3.4-Mb region between RM242 and RM245. Higher glossiness of cooked rice conferred by the O. rufipogon allele might be associated with protein content considering that three lines had lower protein content than Hwaseong (P < 0.1). These three O. rufipogon ILs showed higher yield than Hwaseong and Hwaseong IL due to increase in spikelets per panicle and grain weight indicating the linkage of qGCR9 and yield component QTLs. The qGCR9 locus is of particular interest because of its independence from other undesirable grain quality traits in O. rufipogon. SSR markers linked to qGCR9 can be used to develop high-quality japonica lines and offer a starting point for map

  18. Assignment of the gene for human tetranectin (TNA) to chromosome 3p22-->p21.3 by somatic cell hybrid mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Naylor, S L; Albrechtsen, R

    1997-01-01

    Tetranectin is a plasminogen-binding protein that is induced during the mineralization phase of osteogenesis. By screening a human chromosome 3 somatic cell hybrid mapping panel, we have localized the human tetranectin gene (TNA) to 3p22-->p21.3, which is distinct from the loci of two human...

  19. Molecular mapping of stripe rust resistance gene Yr51 in chromosome 4AL of wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Randhawa, M.; Bansal, U.; Valárik, Miroslav; Klocová, Barbora; Doležel, Jaroslav; Bariana, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 2 (2014), s. 317-324 ISSN 0040-5752 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1740; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : TRITICUM-AESTIVUM L. * DIVERSITY ARRAYS * MAP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.790, year: 2014

  20. Feasibility of physical map construction from fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome libraries of polyploid plant species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luo, M. C.; Ma, Y. Q.; You, F. M.; Anderson, O. D.; Kopecký, David; Šimková, Hana; Šafář, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav; Gill, B.; McGuire, P. E.; Dvorak, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 122 (2010), s. 1-8 ISSN 1471-2164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BREAD WHEAT * TETRAPLOID WHEAT * GENETIC-MAP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.206, year: 2010

  1. Multi-environment analysis and improved mapping of a yield-related QTL on chromosome 3B of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, Julien; Taylor, Julian; Parent, Boris; Bennett, Dion; Reynolds, Matthew; Feuillet, Catherine; Langridge, Peter; Mather, Diane

    2013-03-01

    Improved mapping, multi-environment quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis and dissection of allelic effects were used to define a QTL associated with grain yield, thousand grain weight and early vigour on chromosome 3BL of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under abiotic stresses. The QTL had pleiotropic effects and showed QTL x environment interactions across 21 diverse environments in Australia and Mexico. The occurrence and the severity of water deficit combined with high temperatures during the growing season affected the responsiveness of this QTL, resulting in a reversal in the direction of allelic effects. The influence of this QTL can be substantial, with the allele from one parent (RAC875) increasing grain yield by up to 12.5 % (particularly in environments where both heat and drought stress occurred) and the allele from the other parent (Kukri) increasing grain yield by up to 9 % in favourable environments. With the application of additional markers and the genotyping of additional recombinant inbred lines, the genetic map in the QTL region was refined to provide a basis for future positional cloning.

  2. Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia (SPG30) with mild ataxia and sensory neuropathy maps to chromosome 2q37.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebe, Stephan; Azzedine, Hamid; Durr, Alexandra; Bastien, Patrick; Bouslam, Naima; Elleuch, Nizar; Forlani, Sylvie; Charon, Celine; Koenig, Michel; Melki, Judith; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2006-06-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by progressive spasticity in the lower limbs. Twenty-nine different loci (SPG) have been mapped so far, and 11 responsible genes have been identified. Clinically, one distinguishes between pure and complex HSP forms which are variably associated with numerous combinations of neurological and extra-neurological signs. Less is known about autosomal recessive forms (ARHSP) since the mapped loci have been identified often in single families and account for only a small percentage of patients. We report a new ARHSP locus (SPG30) on chromosome 2q37.3 in a consanguineous family with seven unaffected and four affected members of Algerian origin living in Eastern France with a significant multipoint lod score of 3.8. Ten other families from France (n = 4), Tunisia (n = 2), Algeria (n = 3) and the Czech Republic (n = 1) were not linked to the newly identified locus thus demonstrating further genetic heterogeneity. The phenotype of the linked family consists of spastic paraparesis and peripheral neuropathy associated with slight cerebellar signs confirmed by cerebellar atrophy on one CT scan.

  3. Genetic characterization and fine mapping of S25, a hybrid male sterility gene, on rice chromosome 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Kurata, Nori

    2018-02-10

    Hybrid male sterility genes are important factors in creating postzygotic reproductive isolation barriers in plants. One such gene, S25, is known to cause severe transmission ratio distortion in inter-subspecific progeny of cultivated rice Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica. To further characterize the S25 gene, we fine-mapped and genetically characterized the S25 gene using near-isogenic lines with reciprocal genetic backgrounds. We mapped the S25 locus within the 0.67-1.02 Mb region on rice chromosome 12. Further genetic analyses revealed that S25 substantially reduced male fertility in the japonica background, but not in the indica background. In first-generation hybrid progeny, S25 had a milder effect than it had in the japonica background. These results suggest that the expression of S25 is epistatically regulated by at least one partially dominant gene present in the indica genome. This finding supports our previous studies showing that hybrid male sterility due to pollen killer genes results from epistatic interaction with other genes that are hidden in the genetic background.

  4. The Juberg-Marsidi syndrome maps to the proximal long arm of the X chromosome (Xq12-q21)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saugier-Veber, P.; Abadie, V.; Turleau, C.; Munnich, A.; Lyonnet, S. (Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France)); Moncla, A. (Centre de Genetique Medicale, Marseille (France)); Mathieu, M.; Piussan, C.; Mattei, J.F. (Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire, Amiens (France))

    1993-06-01

    Juberg-Marsidi syndrome (McKusick 309590) is a rare X-linked recessive condition characterized by severe mental retardation, growth failure, sensorineural deafness, and microgenitalism. Here the authors report on the genetic mapping of the Juberg-Marsidi gene to the proximal long arm of the X chromosome (Xq12-q21) by linkage to probe pRX214H1 at the DXS441 locus (Z = 3.24 at [theta] = .00). Multipoint linkage analysis placed the Juberg-Marsidi gene within the interval defined by the DXS159 and the DXYS1X loci in the Xq12-q21 region. These data provide evidence for the genetic distinction between Juberg-Marsidi syndrome and several other X-linked mental retardation syndromes that have hypogonadism and hypogenitalism and that have been localized previously. Finally, the mapping of the Juberg-Marsidi gene is of potential interest for reliable genetic counseling of at-risk women. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Genetic dissection of hybrid incompatibilities between Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana. II. Mapping hybrid male sterility loci on the third chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yun; Zeng, Zhao-Bang; Li, Jian; Hartl, Daniel L; Laurie, Cathy C

    2003-08-01

    Hybrid male sterility (HMS) is a rapidly evolving mechanism of reproductive isolation in Drosophila. Here we report a genetic analysis of HMS in third-chromosome segments of Drosophila mauritiana that were introgressed into a D. simulans background. Qualitative genetic mapping was used to localize 10 loci on 3R and a quantitative trait locus (QTL) procedure (multiple-interval mapping) was used to identify 19 loci on the entire chromosome. These genetic incompatibilities often show dominance and complex patterns of epistasis. Most of the HMS loci have relatively small effects and generally at least two or three of them are required to produce complete sterility. Only one small region of the third chromosome of D. mauritiana by itself causes a high level of infertility when introgressed into D. simulans. By comparison with previous studies of the X chromosome, we infer that HMS loci are only approximately 40% as dense on this autosome as they are on the X chromosome. These results are consistent with the gradual evolution of hybrid incompatibilities as a by-product of genetic divergence in allopatric populations.

  6. Refined mapping of a quantitative trait locus on chromosome 1 responsible for mouse embryonic death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalie Vatin

    Full Text Available Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA is defined as the loss of three or more consecutive pregnancies during the first trimester of embryonic intrauterine development. This kind of human infertility is frequent among the general population since it affects 1 to 5% of women. In half of the cases the etiology remains unelucidated. In the present study, we used interspecific recombinant congenic mouse strains (IRCS in the aim to identify genes responsible for embryonic lethality. Applying a cartographic approach using a genotype/phenotype association, we identified a minimal QTL region, of about 6 Mb on chromosome 1, responsible for a high rate of embryonic death (∼30%. Genetic analysis suggests that the observed phenotype is linked to uterine dysfunction. Transcriptomic analysis of the uterine tissue revealed a preferential deregulation of genes of this region compared to the rest of the genome. Some genes from the QTL region are associated with VEGF signaling, mTOR signaling and ubiquitine/proteasome-protein degradation pathways. This work may contribute to elucidate the molecular basis of a multifactorial and complex human disorder as RSA.

  7. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  8. A High-Density Genetic Map of Wild Emmer Wheat from the Karaca Dağ Region Provides New Evidence on the Structure and Evolution of Wheat Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Jorgensen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wild emmer (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides is a progenitor of all cultivated wheat grown today. It has been hypothesized that emmer was domesticated in the Karaca Dağ region in southeastern Turkey. A total of 445 recombinant inbred lines of T. turgidum ssp. durum cv. ‘Langdon’ x wild emmer accession PI 428082 from this region was developed and genotyped with the Illumina 90K single nucleotide polymorphism Infinium assay. A genetic map comprising 2,650 segregating markers was constructed. The order of the segregating markers and an additional 8,264 co-segregating markers in the Aegilops tauschii reference genome sequence was used to compare synteny of the tetraploid wheat with the Brachypodium distachyon, rice, and sorghum. These comparisons revealed the presence of 15 structural chromosome rearrangements, in addition to the already known 4A-5A-7B rearrangements. The most common type was an intra-chromosomal translocation in which the translocated segment was short and was translocated only a short distance along the chromosome. A large reciprocal translocation, one small non-reciprocal translocation, and three large and one small paracentric inversions were also discovered. The use of inversions for a phylogeny reconstruction in the Triticum–Aegilops alliance was illustrated. The genetic map was inconsistent with the current model of evolution of the rearranged chromosomes 4A-5A-7B. Genetic diversity in the rearranged chromosome 4A showed that the rearrangements might have been contemporary with wild emmer speciation. A selective sweep was found in the centromeric region of chromosome 4A in Karaca Dağ wild emmer but not in 4A of T. aestivum. The absence of diversity from a large portion of chromosome 4A of wild emmer, believed to be ancestral to all domesticated wheat, is puzzling.

  9. Over half of breakpoints in gene pairs involved in cancer-specific recurrent translocations are mapped to human chromosomal fragile sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce Levi CT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene rearrangements such as chromosomal translocations have been shown to contribute to cancer development. Human chromosomal fragile sites are regions of the genome especially prone to breakage, and have been implicated in various chromosome abnormalities found in cancer. However, there has been no comprehensive and quantitative examination of the location of fragile sites in relation to all chromosomal aberrations. Results Using up-to-date databases containing all cancer-specific recurrent translocations, we have examined 444 unique pairs of genes involved in these translocations to determine the correlation of translocation breakpoints and fragile sites in the gene pairs. We found that over half (52% of translocation breakpoints in at least one gene of these gene pairs are mapped to fragile sites. Among these, we examined the DNA sequences within and flanking three randomly selected pairs of translocation-prone genes, and found that they exhibit characteristic features of fragile DNA, with frequent AT-rich flexibility islands and the potential of forming highly stable secondary structures. Conclusion Our study is the first to examine gene pairs involved in all recurrent chromosomal translocations observed in tumor cells, and to correlate the location of more than half of breakpoints to positions of known fragile sites. These results provide strong evidence to support a causative role for fragile sites in the generation of cancer-specific chromosomal rearrangements.

  10. An intron capture strategy used to identify and map a lysyl oxidase-like gene on chromosome 9 in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wydner, K.S.; Passmore, H.C. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Kim, Houngho; Csiszar, K.; Boyd, C.D. [UMDNJ, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    1997-03-01

    An intron capture strategy involving use of polymerase chain reaction was used to identify and map the mouse homologue of a human lysyl oxidase-like gene (LOXL). Oligonucleotides complementary to conserved domains within exons 4 and 5 of the human lysyl oxidase-like gene were used to amplify the corresponding segment from mouse genomic DNA. Sequencing of the resulting mouse DNA fragment of approximately 1 kb revealed that the exon sequences at the ends of the amplified fragment are highly homologous (90% nucleotide identity) to exons 4 and 5 of the human lysyl oxidase-like gene. An AluI restriction site polymorphism within intron 4 was used to map the mouse lysyl oxidase-like gene (Loxl) to mouse Chromosome 9 in a region that shares linkage conservation with human chromosome 15q24, to which the LOXL was recently mapped. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Fine mapping of a QTL on chromosome 13 for submaximal exercise capacity training response: the HERITAGE Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Treva K; Sarzynski, Mark A; Sung, Yun Ju; Argyropoulos, George; Stütz, Adrian M; Teran-Garcia, Margarita; Rao, D C; Bouchard, Claude; Rankinen, Tuomo

    2012-08-01

    Although regular exercise improves submaximal aerobic capacity, there is large variability in its response to exercise training. While this variation is thought to be partly due to genetic differences, relatively little is known about the causal genes. Submaximal aerobic capacity traits in the current report include the responses of oxygen consumption (ΔVO(2)60), power output (ΔWORK60), and cardiac output (ΔQ60) at 60% of VO2max to a standardized 20-week endurance exercise training program. Genome-wide linkage analysis in 475 HERITAGE Family Study Caucasians identified a locus on chromosome 13q for ΔVO(2)60 (LOD = 3.11). Follow-up fine mapping involved a dense marker panel of over 1,800 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a 7.9-Mb region (21.1-29.1 Mb from p-terminus). Single-SNP analyses found 14 SNPs moderately associated with both ΔVO(2)60 at P ≤ 0.005 and the correlated traits of ΔWORK60 and ΔQ60 at P < 0.05. Haplotype analyses provided several strong signals (P < 1.0 × 10(-5)) for ΔVO(2)60. Overall, association analyses narrowed the target region and included potential biological candidate genes (MIPEP and SGCG). Consistent with maximal heritability estimates of 23%, up to 20% of the phenotypic variance in ΔVO(2)60 was accounted for by these SNPs. These results implicate candidate genes on chromosome 13q12 for the ability to improve submaximal exercise capacity in response to regular exercise. Submaximal exercise at 60% of maximal capacity is an exercise intensity that falls well within the range recommended in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans and thus has potential public health relevance.

  12. Physical mapping of the Bloom syndrome region by the identification of YAC and P1 clones from human chromosome 15 band q26.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straughen, J.; Groden, J. [Univ. of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (United States); Ciocci, S. [New York Blood Center, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The gene for Bloom syndrome (BLM) has been mapped to human chromosome 15 band q26.1 by homozygosity mapping. Further refinement of the location of BLM has relied upon linkage-disequilibrium mapping and somatic intragenic recombination. In combination with these mapping approaches and to identify novel DNA markers and probes for the BLM candidate region, a contiguous representation of the 2-Mb region that contains the BLM gene was generated and is presented here. YAC and P1 clones from the region have been identified and ordered by using previously available genetic markers in the region along with newly developed sequence-tagged sites from radiation-restriction map of the 2-Mb region that allowed estimation of the distance between polymorphic microsatellite loci is also reported. This map and the DNA markers derived from it were instrumental in the recent identification of the BLM gene. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. A histone map of human chromosome 20q13.12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Akan

    Full Text Available We present a systematic search for regulatory elements in a 3.5 Mb region on human chromosome 20q13.12, a region associated with a number of medical conditions such as type II diabetes and obesity.We profiled six histone modifications alongside RNA polymerase II (PolII and CTCF in two cell lines, HeLa S3 and NTERA-2 clone D1 (NT2/D1, by chromatin immunoprecipitation using an in-house spotted DNA array, constructed with 1.8 kb overlapping plasmid clones. In both cells, more than 90% of transcription start sites (TSSs of expressed genes showed enrichments with PolII, di-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me2, tri-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3 or acetylated H3 (H3Ac, whereas mono-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me1 signals did not correlate with expression. No TSSs were enriched with tri-methylated lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3 in HeLa S3, while eight TSSs (4 expressed showed enrichments in NT2/D1. We have also located several CTCF binding sites that are potential insulator elements.In summary, we annotated a number of putative regulatory elements in 20q13.12 and went on to verify experimentally a subset of them using dual luciferase reporter assays. Correlating this data to sequence variation can aid identification of disease causing variants.

  14. Mapping of the locus for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH2) to a 4-Mb YAC contig on chromosome 4q11-q21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerrman, C.; Holmgren, G.; Forsman, K. [Univ. Hospital, Umea (Sweden)]|[Univ. of Umea (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-01-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (Al) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited enamel defects. We recently mapped a locus for autosomal dominant local hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH2) to the long arm of chromosome 4. The disease gene was localized to a 17.6-cM region between the markers D4S392 and D4S395. The albumin gene (ALB), located in the same interval, was a candidate gene for autosomal dominant AI (ADAI) since albumin has a potential role in enamel maturation. Here we describe refined mapping of the AIH2 locus and the construction of marker maps by radiation hybrid mapping and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC)-based sequence tagged site-content mapping. A radiation hybrid map consisting of 11 microsatellite markers in the 5-cM interval between D4S409 and D4S1558 was constructed. Recombinant haplotypes in six Swedish ADAI families suggest that the disease gene is located in the interval between D4S2421 and ALB. ALB is therefore not likely to be the disease-causing gene. Affected members in all six families share the same allele haplotypes, indicating a common ancestral mutation in all families. The AIH2 critical region is less than 4 cM and spans a physical distance of approximately 4 Mb as judged from radiation hybrid maps. A YAC contig over the AIH2 critical region including several potential candidate genes was constructed. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A BAC-based physical map of the Drosophila buzzatii genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Josefa; Nefedov, Michael; Bosdet, Ian; Casals, Ferran; Calvete, Oriol; Delprat, Alejandra; Shin, Heesun; Chiu, Readman; Mathewson, Carrie; Wye, Natasja; Hoskins, Roger A.; Schein, JacquelineE.; de Jong, Pieter; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2005-03-18

    Large-insert genomic libraries facilitate cloning of large genomic regions, allow the construction of clone-based physical maps and provide useful resources for sequencing entire genomes. Drosophilabuzzatii is a representative species of the repleta group in the Drosophila subgenus, which is being widely used as a model in studies of genome evolution, ecological adaptation and speciation. We constructed a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) genomic library of D. buzzatii using the shuttle vector pTARBAC2.1. The library comprises 18,353 clones with an average insert size of 152 kb and a {approx}18X expected representation of the D. buzzatii euchromatic genome. We screened the entire library with six euchromatic gene probes and estimated the actual genome representation to be {approx}23X. In addition, we fingerprinted by restriction digestion and agarose gel electrophoresis a sample of 9,555 clones, and assembled them using Finger Printed Contigs (FPC) software and manual editing into 345 contigs (mean of 26 clones per contig) and 670singletons. Finally, we anchored 181 large contigs (containing 7,788clones) to the D. buzzatii salivary gland polytene chromosomes by in situ hybridization of 427 representative clones. The BAC library and a database with all the information regarding the high coverage BAC-based physical map described in this paper are available to the research community.

  16. Application of dissociation curve analysis to radiation hybrid panel marker scoring: generation of a map of river buffalo (B. bubalis chromosome 20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäffer Alejandro A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescence of dyes bound to double-stranded PCR products has been utilized extensively in various real-time quantitative PCR applications, including post-amplification dissociation curve analysis, or differentiation of amplicon length or sequence composition. Despite the current era of whole-genome sequencing, mapping tools such as radiation hybrid DNA panels remain useful aids for sequence assembly, focused resequencing efforts, and for building physical maps of species that have not yet been sequenced. For placement of specific, individual genes or markers on a map, low-throughput methods remain commonplace. Typically, PCR amplification of DNA from each panel cell line is followed by gel electrophoresis and scoring of each clone for the presence or absence of PCR product. To improve sensitivity and efficiency of radiation hybrid panel analysis in comparison to gel-based methods, we adapted fluorescence-based real-time PCR and dissociation curve analysis for use as a novel scoring method. Results As proof of principle for this dissociation curve method, we generated new maps of river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis chromosome 20 by both dissociation curve analysis and conventional marker scoring. We also obtained sequence data to augment dissociation curve results. Few genes have been previously mapped to buffalo chromosome 20, and sequence detail is limited, so 65 markers were screened from the orthologous chromosome of domestic cattle. Thirty bovine markers (46% were suitable as cross-species markers for dissociation curve analysis in the buffalo radiation hybrid panel under a standard protocol, compared to 25 markers suitable for conventional typing. Computational analysis placed 27 markers on a chromosome map generated by the new method, while the gel-based approach produced only 20 mapped markers. Among 19 markers common to both maps, the marker order on the map was maintained perfectly. Conclusion Dissociation curve

  17. Fine mapping of shattering locus Br2 reveals a putative chromosomal inversion polymorphism between the two lineages of Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhi; Zhu, Huilan; Gill, Bikram S; Li, Wanlong

    2015-04-01

    This work laid the foundation for cloning of shattering gene Br2 and provided first line of evidence that two major Aegilops tauschii lineages are differentiated by an inversion polymorphism. Chromosome inversions often accompany population differentiation and capture local adaptation during speciation. Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor species of hexaploid wheat, consists of two genetically isolated lineages, L1 and L2, but little is known about the genetic mechanisms underlying the population differentiation in this diploid species. During fine mapping of the shattering gene Br2 using a large F2 population derived from a cross between TA1604 (an L1 accession) and AL8/78 (an L2 accession), we found contrasting patterns of crossover distribution in the Br2 interval and neighboring regions despite the high local gene synteny with Brachypodium distachyon and rice. Br2 was localized in a 0.08-cM interval, and 13 marker loci formed a block, where single-crossovers were completely suppressed, but double-crossovers were enriched with a recombination rate of ~11 cM/Mb. In contrast, in a neighboring region no double-crossover was recovered, but single-crossover rate reached 24 cM/Mb, which is much higher than the genome-wide average. This result suggests a putative inversion polymorphism between the parental lines in the Br2 region. Genotyping using the markers from the Br2 region divided a collection of 55 randomly sampled A. tauschii accessions into two major groups, and they are largely genetically isolated. The two groups correspond to the L1 and L2 lineages based on their geographic distribution patterns. This provides first evidence that inversions may underlie the evolution of A. tauschii lineages. The presence of inter-lineage inversions may complicate map-based cloning in A. tauschii and transfer of useful traits to wheat.

  18. A gene prenature ovarian failure associated with eyelid malformation maps to chromosomes 3q22-q23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    Premature ovarian failure and XX gonadal dysgenesis leading to female infertility have been reported in association with an autosomal dominantly inherited malformation of the eyelids: blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES; MIM 110100). This association distinguishes BPES type I from BPES type II, in which affected females are fertile and the transmission occurs through both sexes. Recently, a gene responsible for BPES type II has been mapped to chromosome 3q22-q23, and the critical region for the gene location has been reduced to the interval between loci D3S1615 and D3S1316. Hitherto, however, no information regarding the localization of the gene for BPES type I, in which female ovarian failure is associated with eyelid malformation, has been available. We have studied two independent families affected with BPES type I, including a total of 12 affected individuals (6 infertile women) and 6 healthy relatives. The diagnostic criteria for the ophthalmological anomaly included (1) reduced horizontal diameter of palpebral fissures, (2) drooping of the upper eyelids, and (3) an abnormal skinfold running from the lower lids. Telecanthus and a flat nasal bridge were present in most cases. In both families the disease was transmitted only by the male, and no affected woman of childbearing age was fertile. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Mapping carcass and meat quality QTL on Sus Scrofa chromosome 2 in commercial finishing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Kampen Tony A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Quantitative trait loci (QTL affecting carcass and meat quality located on SSC2 were identified using variance component methods. A large number of traits involved in meat and carcass quality was detected in a commercial crossbred population: 1855 pigs sired by 17 boars from a synthetic line, which where homozygous (A/A for IGF2. Using combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium mapping (LDLA, several QTL significantly affecting loin muscle mass, ham weight and ham muscles (outer ham and knuckle ham and meat quality traits, such as Minolta-L* and -b*, ultimate pH and Japanese colour score were detected. These results agreed well with previous QTL-studies involving SSC2. Since our study is carried out on crossbreds, different QTL may be segregating in the parental lines. To address this question, we compared models with a single QTL-variance component with models allowing for separate sire and dam QTL-variance components. The same QTL were identified using a single QTL variance component model compared to a model allowing for separate variances with minor differences with respect to QTL location. However, the variance component method made it possible to detect QTL segregating in the paternal line (e.g. HAMB, the maternal lines (e.g. Ham or in both (e.g. pHu. Combining association and linkage information among haplotypes improved slightly the significance of the QTL compared to an analysis using linkage information only.

  20. Mapping of the human APOB gene to chromosome 2p and demonstration of a two-allele restriction fragment length polymorphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, L.; Miller, D.A.; Bruns, G.A.P.; Breslow, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    ApoB is a large glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass of 550 kDa on NaDodSO 4 /PAGE. Recently, apoB cDNA clones have been isolated from an expression library made with mRNA from a human hepatoma cell line. These clones, which were all 1.5-1.6 kilobases (kb) long and corresponded to the 3' end of apoB mRNA, were used to demonstrate that hepatic apoB mRNA is ≅ 22 kb long. In the current report, a probe derived from one of these cDNA clones, pB8, was used for in situ hybridization experiments to map the human gene for apoB, APOB, to the distal half of the short arm of chromosome 2. This probe was also used to analyze somatic cell hybrids and, in agreement with the in situ hybridization studies, concordancy was demonstrated with chromosome 2. In addition, two hybrids with chromosome 2 translocations that contain only the short arm reacted with the pB8 probe. A third hybrid with a complex rearrangement of chromosome 2, which deleted an interstitial region and the tip of the short arm of chromosome 2, did not react. These data indicate that APOB maps to either 2p21-p23 or 2p24-pter. In further studies, DNA from normal individuals, digested with the restriction endonuclease EcoRI and subjected to Southern blot analysis with the pB8 probe, revealed a two-allele restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The mapping studies provide the means for understanding the relationship of the APOB locus to others in the human genome, whereas the demonstration of an APOB RFLP increases their ability to assess the role of this locus in determining plasma lipoprotein levels

  1. Construction of a river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis whole-genome radiation hybrid panel and preliminary RH mapping of chromosomes 3 and 10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Womack

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The buffalo (Bubalus bubalis not only is a useful source of milk, it also provides meat and works as a natural source of labor and biogas. To establish a project for buffalo genome mapping a 5,000-rad whole genome radiation hybrid panel was constructed for river buffalo and used to build preliminary RH maps from two chromosomes (BBU 3 and BBU10. The preliminary maps contain 66 markers, including coding genes, cattle ESTs and microsatellite loci. The RH maps presented here are the starting point for mapping additional loci, in particular, genes and expressed sequence tags that will allow detailed comparative maps between buffalo, cattle and other species to be constructed. A large quantity of DNA has been prepared from the cell lines forming the RH panel reported here and will be made publicly available to the international community both for the study of chromosome evolution and for the improvement of traits important to the role of buffalo in animal agriculture.

  2. Female site-specific transposase-induced recombination: a high-efficiency method for fine mapping mutations on the X chromosome in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Jeffrey M

    2003-01-01

    P-element transposons in the Drosophila germline mobilize only in the presence of the appropriate transposase enzyme. Sometimes, instead of mobilizing completely, P elements will undergo site-specific recombination with the homologous chromosome. Site-specific recombination is the basis for male recombination mapping, since the male germline does not normally undergo recombination. Site-specific recombination also takes place in females, but this has been difficult to study because of the obs...

  3. Chromosome identification and gene mapping in potato by pachytene, trisomic and half-tetrad analysis = [Chromosoomidentificatie en gen-kartering bij de aardappel door middel van pachyteen- trimosomen- en halftetraden-analyse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenvoort, M.

    1993-01-01

    The research described in this thesis deals with chromosome identification and gene mapping. In contrast to results from literature, in this study only three chromosomes (1, 2 and 12) could unambiguously be identified in mitotic cells using conventional staining, and four (1, 2, 3 and 4) in

  4. Fine mapping of a linkage peak with integration of lipid traits identifies novel coronary artery disease genes on chromosome 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolan Daniel K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery disease (CAD, and one of its intermediate risk factors, dyslipidemia, possess a demonstrable genetic component, although the genetic architecture is incompletely defined. We previously reported a linkage peak on chromosome 5q31-33 for early-onset CAD where the strength of evidence for linkage was increased in families with higher mean low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C. Therefore, we sought to fine-map the peak using association mapping of LDL-C as an intermediate disease-related trait to further define the etiology of this linkage peak. The study populations consisted of 1908 individuals from the CATHGEN biorepository of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization; 254 families (N = 827 individuals from the GENECARD familial study of early-onset CAD; and 162 aorta samples harvested from deceased donors. Linkage disequilibrium-tagged SNPs were selected with an average of one SNP per 20 kb for 126.6-160.2 MB (region of highest linkage and less dense spacing (one SNP per 50 kb for the flanking regions (117.7-126.6 and 160.2-167.5 MB and genotyped on all samples using a custom Illumina array. Association analysis of each SNP with LDL-C was performed using multivariable linear regression (CATHGEN and the quantitative trait transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT; GENECARD. SNPs associated with the intermediate quantitative trait, LDL-C, were then assessed for association with CAD (i.e., a qualitative phenotype using linkage and association in the presence of linkage (APL; GENECARD and logistic regression (CATHGEN and aortas. Results We identified four genes with SNPs that showed the strongest and most consistent associations with LDL-C and CAD: EBF1, PPP2R2B, SPOCK1, and PRELID2. The most significant results for association of SNPs with LDL-C were: EBF1, rs6865969, p = 0.01; PPP2R2B, rs2125443, p = 0.005; SPOCK1, rs17600115, p = 0.003; and PRELID2, rs10074645, p = 0.0002. The most significant results for

  5. The neurological mouse mutations jittery and hesitant are allelic and map to the region of mouse chromosome 10 homologous to 19p13.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapfhamer, D.; Sufalko, D.; Warren, S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Jittery (ji) is a recessive mouse mutation on Chromosome 10 characterized by progressive ataxic gait, dystonic movements, spontaneus seizures, and death by dehydration/starvation before fertility. Recently, a viable neurological recessive mutation, hesitant, was discovered. It is characterized by hesitant, uncoordinated movements, exaggerated stepping of the hind limbs, and reduced fertility in males. In a complementation test and by genetic mapping we have shown here that hesitant and jittery are allelic. Using several large intersubspecific backcrosses and intercrosses we have genetically mapped ji near the marker Amh and microsatellite markers D10Mit7, D10Mit21, and D10Mit23. The linked region of mouse Chromosome 10 is homologous to human 19p13.3, to which several human ataxia loci have recently been mapped. By excluding genes that map to human 21q22.3 (Pfkl) and 12q23 (Nfyb), we conclude that jittery is not likely to be a genetic mouse model for human Unverricht-Lundborg progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) on 21q22.3 nor for spinocerebellar ataxia II (SCA2) on 12q22-q24. The closely linked markers presented here will facilitate positional cloning of the ji gene. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Chromosomal evolution in the Drosophila cardini group (Diptera: Drosophilidae): photomaps and inversion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Juliana; De Toni, Daniela Cristina; da Silva, Gisele de Souza; Valente, Vera Lucia da Silva

    2014-10-01

    Detailed chromosome photomaps are the first step to develop further chromosomal analysis to study the evolution of the genetic architecture in any set of species, considering that chromosomal rearrangements, such as inversions, are common features of genome evolution. In this report, we analyzed inversion polymorphisms in 25 different populations belonging to six neotropical species in the cardini group: Drosophila cardini, D. cardinoides, D. neocardini, D. neomorpha, D. parthenogenetica and D. polymorpha. Furthermore, we present the first reference photomaps for the Neotropical D. cardini and D. parthenogenetica and improved photomaps for D. cardinoides, D. neocardini and D. polymorpha. We found 19 new inversions for these species. An exhaustive pairwise comparison of the polytene chromosomes was conducted for the six species in order to understand evolutionary patterns of their chromosomes.

  7. A high-resolution whole genome radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 17q22-q25.3 across the genes for GH and TK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, J.W.; Schafer, A.J.; Critcher, R. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    We have constructed a whole genome radiation hybrid (WG-RH) map across a region of human chromosome 17q, from growth hormone (GH) to thymidine kinase (TK). A panel of 128 WG-RH hybrid cell lines generated by X-irradiation and fusion has been tested for the retention of 39 sequence-tagged site (STS) markers by the polymerase chain reaction. This genome mapping technique has allowed the integration of existing VNTR and microsatellite markers with additional new markers and existing STS markers previously mapped to this region by other means. The WG-RH map includes eight expressed sequence tag (EST) and three anonymous markers developed for this study, together with 23 anonymous microsatellites and five existing ESTs. Analysis of these data resulted in a high-density comprehensive map across this region of the genome. A subset of these markers has been used to produce a framework map consisting of 20 loci ordered with odds greater than 1000:1. The markers are of sufficient density to build a YAC contig across this region based on marker content. We have developed sequence tags for both ends of a 2.1-Mb YAC and mapped these using the WG-RH panel, allowing a direct comparison of cRay{sub 6000} to physical distance. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. High Resolution Consensus Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci for Fiber Strength, Length and Micronaire on Chromosome 25 of the Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    Full Text Available Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. is an important agricultural crop that provides renewable natural fiber resources for the global textile industry. Technological developments in the textile industry and improvements in human living standards have increased the requirement for supplies and better quality cotton. Upland cotton 0-153 is an elite cultivar harboring strong fiber strength genes. To conduct quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping for fiber quality in 0-153, we developed a population of 196 recombinant inbred lines (RILs from a cross between 0-153 and sGK9708. The fiber quality traits in 11 environments were measured and a genetic linkage map of chromosome 25 comprising 210 loci was constructed using this RIL population, mainly using simple sequence repeat markers and single nucleotide polymorphism markers. QTLs were identified across diverse environments using the composite interval mapping method. A total of 37 QTLs for fiber quality traits were identified on chromosome 25, of which 17 were stably expressed in at least in two environments. A stable fiber strength QTL, qFS-chr25-4, which was detected in seven environments and was located in the marker interval between CRI-SNP120491 and BNL2572, could explain 6.53%-11.83% of the observed phenotypic variations. Meta-analysis also confirmed the above QTLs with previous reports. Application of these QTLs could contribute to improving fiber quality and provide information for marker-assisted selection.

  9. High Resolution Consensus Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci for Fiber Strength, Length and Micronaire on Chromosome 25 of the Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Li, Junwen; Muhammad, Jamshed; Cai, Juan; Jia, Fei; Shi, Yuzhen; Gong, Juwu; Shang, Haihong; Liu, Aiying; Chen, Tingting; Ge, Qun; Palanga, Koffi Kibalou; Lu, Quanwei; Deng, Xiaoying; Tan, Yunna; Li, Wei; Sun, Linyang; Gong, Wankui; Yuan, Youlu

    2015-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is an important agricultural crop that provides renewable natural fiber resources for the global textile industry. Technological developments in the textile industry and improvements in human living standards have increased the requirement for supplies and better quality cotton. Upland cotton 0-153 is an elite cultivar harboring strong fiber strength genes. To conduct quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping for fiber quality in 0-153, we developed a population of 196 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross between 0-153 and sGK9708. The fiber quality traits in 11 environments were measured and a genetic linkage map of chromosome 25 comprising 210 loci was constructed using this RIL population, mainly using simple sequence repeat markers and single nucleotide polymorphism markers. QTLs were identified across diverse environments using the composite interval mapping method. A total of 37 QTLs for fiber quality traits were identified on chromosome 25, of which 17 were stably expressed in at least in two environments. A stable fiber strength QTL, qFS-chr25-4, which was detected in seven environments and was located in the marker interval between CRI-SNP120491 and BNL2572, could explain 6.53%-11.83% of the observed phenotypic variations. Meta-analysis also confirmed the above QTLs with previous reports. Application of these QTLs could contribute to improving fiber quality and provide information for marker-assisted selection.

  10. A dense SNP-based linkage map for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar reveals extended chromosome homeologies and striking differences in sex-specific recombination patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien Sigbjørn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Atlantic salmon genome is in the process of returning to a diploid state after undergoing a whole genome duplication (WGD event between 25 and100 million years ago. Existing data on the proportion of paralogous sequence variants (PSVs, multisite variants (MSVs and other types of complex sequence variation suggest that the rediplodization phase is far from over. The aims of this study were to construct a high density linkage map for Atlantic salmon, to characterize the extent of rediploidization and to improve our understanding of genetic differences between sexes in this species. Results A linkage map for Atlantic salmon comprising 29 chromosomes and 5650 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was constructed using genotyping data from 3297 fish belonging to 143 families. Of these, 2696 SNPs were generated from ESTs or other gene associated sequences. Homeologous chromosomal regions were identified through the mapping of duplicated SNPs and through the investigation of syntenic relationships between Atlantic salmon and the reference genome sequence of the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus. The sex-specific linkage maps spanned a total of 2402.3 cM in females and 1746.2 cM in males, highlighting a difference in sex specific recombination rate (1.38:1 which is much lower than previously reported in Atlantic salmon. The sexes, however, displayed striking differences in the distribution of recombination sites within linkage groups, with males showing recombination strongly localized to telomeres. Conclusion The map presented here represents a valuable resource for addressing important questions of interest to evolution (the process of re-diploidization, aquaculture and salmonid life history biology and not least as a resource to aid the assembly of the forthcoming Atlantic salmon reference genome sequence.

  11. The gene for the alpha 1 subunit of the skeletal muscle dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel (Cchl1a3) maps to mouse chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, H; Krall, M; Kim, H L; Kozak, C A; Mock, B

    1992-12-01

    Cchl1a3 encodes the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel alpha 1 subunit isoform predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle. mdg (muscular dysgenesis) has previously been implicated as a mutant allele of this gene. Hybridization of a rat brain cDNA probe for Cchl1a3 to Southern blots of DNAs from a panel of Chinese hamster x mouse somatic cell hybrids suggested that this gene maps to mouse Chromosome 1. Analysis of the progeny of an inbred strain cross-positioned Cchl1a3 1.3 cM proximal to the Pep-3 locus on Chr 1.

  12. The evolution of imprinting: chromosomal mapping of orthologues of mammalian imprinted domains in monotreme and marsupial mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunham Ian

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of genomic imprinting, the parental-origin specific expression of genes, is the subject of much debate. There are several theories to account for how the mechanism evolved including the hypothesis that it was driven by the evolution of X-inactivation, or that it arose from an ancestrally imprinted chromosome. Results Here we demonstrate that mammalian orthologues of imprinted genes are dispersed amongst autosomes in both monotreme and marsupial karyotypes. Conclusion These data, along with the similar distribution seen in birds, suggest that imprinted genes were not located on an ancestrally imprinted chromosome or associated with a sex chromosome. Our results suggest imprinting evolution was a stepwise, adaptive process, with each gene/cluster independently becoming imprinted as the need arose.

  13. Multistudy fine mapping of chromosome 2q identifies XRCC5 as a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, Craig P; Pillai, Sreekumar G; Zhu, Guohua

    2010-01-01

    to the identification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility genes on chromosome 2q. METHODS: Within the chromosome 2q linkage region, 2,843 SNPs were genotyped in 806 COPD cases and 779 control subjects from Norway, and 2,484 SNPs were genotyped in 309 patients with severe COPD from...... the National Emphysema Treatment Trial and 330 community control subjects. Significant associations from the combined results across the two case-control studies were followed up in 1,839 individuals from 603 families from the International COPD Genetics Network (ICGN) and in 949 individuals from 127 families...

  14. USH1K, a novel locus for type I Usher syndrome, maps to chromosome 10p11.21-q21.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworek, Thomas J; Bhatti, Rashid; Latief, Noreen; Khan, Shaheen N; Riazuddin, Saima; Ahmed, Zubair M

    2012-10-01

    We ascertained two large Pakistani consanguineous families (PKDF231 and PKDF608) segregating profound hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa; the defining features of Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1). To date, seven USH1 loci have been reported. Here, we map a novel locus, USH1K, on chromosome 10p11.21-q21.1. In family PKDF231, we performed a genome-wide linkage screen and found a region of homozygosity shared among the affected individuals at chromosome 10p11.21-q21.1. Meiotic recombination events in family PKDF231 define a critical interval of 11.74 cM (20.20 Mb) bounded by markers D10S1780 (63.83 cM) and D10S546 (75.57 cM). Affected individuals of family PKDF608 were also homozygous for chromosome 10p11.21-q21.1-linked STR markers. Of the 85 genes within the linkage interval, PCDH15, GJD4, FZD4, RET and LRRC18 were sequenced in both families, but no potential pathogenic mutation was identified. The USH1K locus overlaps the non-syndromic deafness locus DFNB33 raising the possibility that the two disorders may be caused by allelic mutations.

  15. Linkage and RH mapping of 10 genes to a QTL region for fatness and muscling traits on pig chromosome X

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čepica, Stanislav; Masopust, Martin; Knoll, Aleš; Bartenschlager, H.; Yerle, M.; Rohrer, G. A.; Geldermann, H.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 37, 6 (2006), s. 603-604 ISSN 0268-9146 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/04/0106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : pig chromosome X Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.520, year: 2006

  16. Chromosome Mapping of Repetitive Sequences in Rachycentron canadum (Perciformes: Rachycentridae: Implications for Karyotypic Evolution and Perspectives for Biotechnological Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uedson Pereira Jacobina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cobia, Rachycentron canadum, a species of marine fish, has been increasingly used in aquaculture worldwide. It is the only member of the family Rachycentridae (Perciformes showing wide geographic distribution and phylogenetic patterns still not fully understood. In this study, the species was cytogenetically analyzed by different methodologies, including Ag-NOR and chromomycin A3 (CMA3/DAPI staining, C-banding, early replication banding (RGB, and in situ fluorescent hybridization with probes for 18S and 5S ribosomal genes and for telomeric sequences (TTAGGGn. The results obtained allow a detailed chromosomal characterization of the Atlantic population. The chromosome diversification found in the karyotype of the cobia is apparently related to pericentric inversions, the main mechanism associated to the karyotypic evolution of Perciformes. The differential heterochromatin replication patterns found were in part associated to functional genes. Despite maintaining conservative chromosomal characteristics in relation to the basal pattern established for Perciformes, some chromosome pairs in the analyzed population exhibit markers that may be important for cytotaxonomic, population, and biodiversity studies as well as for monitoring the species in question.

  17. Tyramide-FISH mapping of single genes for development of an integrated recombination and cytogenetic map of chromosome 5 of Allium cepa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosome 5 of onion carries major quantitative trait loci (QTL) of interest to breeders that control dry-matter content, pungency and storability of bulbs, amounts and types of epicuticular waxes, and resistances to abiotic factors. SNPs, SSRs and RFLPs in expressed regions of the onion genome hav...

  18. Physical mapping of the major early-onset familial Alzheimer`s disease locus on chromosome 14 and analysis of candidate gene sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanzi, R.E.; Romano, D.M.; Crowley, A.C. [Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Genetic studies of kindreds displaying evidence for familial AD (FAD) have led to the localization of gene defects responsible for this disorder on chromosomes 14, 19, and 21. A minor early-onset FAD gene on chromosome 21 has been identified to enode the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and the late-onset FAD susceptibility locus on chromosome 19 has been shown to be in linkage disequilibrium with the E4 allele of the APOE gene. Meanwhile, the locus responsible for the major form of early-onset FAD on chromosome 14q24 has not yet been identified. By recombinational analysis, we have refined the minimal candidate region containing the gene defect to approximately 3 megabases in 14q24. We will describe our laboratory`s progress on attempts to finely localize this locus, as well as test known candidate genes from this region for either inclusion in the minimal candidate region or the presence of pathogenic mutations. Candidate genes that have been tested so far include cFOS, heat shock protein 70 member (HSF2A), transforming growth factor beta (TGFB3), the trifunctional protein C1-THF synthase (MTHFD), bradykinin receptor (BR), and the E2k component of a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. HSP2A, E2k, MTHFD, and BR do not map to the current defined minimal candidate region; however, sequence analysis must be performed to confirm exclusion of these genes as true candidates. Meanwhile, no pathogenic mutations have yet been found in cFOS or TGFB3. We have also isolated a large number of novel transcribed sequences from the minimal candidate region in the form of {open_quotes}trapped exons{close_quotes} from cosmids identified by hybridization to select YAC clones; we are currently in the process of searching for pathogenic mutations in these exons in affected individuals from FAD families.

  19. Mapping the Flavor Contributing Traits on "Fengwei Melon" (Cucumis melo L. Chromosomes Using Parent Resequencing and Super Bulked-Segregant Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    Full Text Available We used a next-generation high-throughput sequencing platform to resequence the Xinguowei and Shouxing melon cultivars, the parents of Fengwei melon. We found 84% of the reads (under a coverage rate of "13×" placed on the reference genome DHL92. There were 2,550,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 140,000 structural variations in the two genomes. We also identified 1,290 polymorphic genes between Xinguowei and Shouxing. We combined specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq and bulked-segregant analysis (super-BSA to analyze the two parents and the F2 extreme phenotypes. This combined method yielded 12,438,270 reads, 46,087 SLAF tags, and 4,480 polymorphic markers (average depth of 161.81×. There were six sweet trait-related regions containing 13 differential SLAF markers, and 23 sour trait-related regions containing 48 differential SLAF markers. We further fine-mapped the sweet trait to the genomic regions on chromosomes 6, 10, 11, and 12. Correspondingly, we mapped the sour trait-related genomic regions to chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, and 12. Finally, we positioned nine of the 61 differential markers in the sweet and sour trait candidate regions on the parental genome. These markers corresponded to one sweet and eight sour trait-related genes. Our study provides a basis for marker-assisted breeding of desirable sweet and sour traits in Fengwei melons.

  20. Physical mapping of chromosome 17p13.3 in the region of a putative tumor suppressor gene important in medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.D.; Daneshvar, L.; Willert, J.R. [Univ. of California, San Franciso, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Deletion mapping of a medulloblastoma tumor panel revealed loss of distal chromosome 17p13.3 sequences in tumors from 14 of 32 patients (44%). Of the 14 tumors showing loss of heterozygosity by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, 14 of 14 (100%) displayed loss of the telomeric marker p144-D6 (D17S34), while a probe for the ABR gene on 17p13.3 was lost in 7 of 8 (88%) informative cases. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we localized the polymorphic marker (VNTR-A) of the ABR gene locus to within 220 kb of the p144-D6 locus. A cosmid contig constructed in this region was used to demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the ABR gene is oriented transcriptionally 5{prime} to 3{prime} toward the telomere. This report provides new physical mapping data for the ABR gene, which has not been previously shown to be deleted in medulloblastoma. These results provide further evidence for the existence of a second tumor suppressor gene distinct from p53 on distal chromosome 17p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Physical mapping of the split hand/split foot (SHSF) locus on chromosome 7 reveals a relationship between SHSF and the syndromic ectrodactylies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poorkaj, P.; Nunes, M.E.; Geshuri, D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Split hand/split foot (also knows as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental malformation characterized by missing digits and claw-like extremities. An autosomal dominant form of this disorder has been mapped to 7q21.3-q22.1 on the basis of SHSF-associated chromosomal rearrangements: this locus has been designated SHFD1. We have constructed a physical map of the SHFD1 region that consists of contiguous yeast artificial chromosome clones and spans approximately 8 Mb. Somatic cell hybrid and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were used to define SHSF-associated chromosomal breakpoints in fourteen patients. A critical interval of about 1 Mb was established for SHFD1 by analysis of six patients with deletions. Translocation and inversion breakpoints in seven other patients were found to localize within a 500-700 kb interval within the critical region. Several candidate genes including DLX5 and DLX6 (members of the Drosophilia Distal-less homeobox-containing gene family) localize to this region. At least four of these genes are expressed in the developing mouse limb bud. Of particular interest is the observation that 8 of the 14 patients studied have syndromic ectrodactyly, which is characterized by the association of SHSF with a variety of other anomalies including cleft lip/palate, ectodermal dysplasia, and renal anomalies. Thus, these data implicate a single gene or cluster of genes at the SHFD1 locus in a wide range of developmental processes and serve to establish a molecular genetic relationship between simple SHSF and a broad group of human birth defects.

  2. Mapping recessive ophthalmic diseases: linkage of the locus for Usher syndrome type II to a DNA marker on chromosome 1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R A; Otterud, B; Stauffer, D; Lalouel, J M; Leppert, M

    1990-06-01

    Usher syndrome is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders that combines variably severe congenital neurosensory hearing impairment with progressive night-blindness and visual loss similar to that in retinitis pigmentosa. Usher syndrome type I is distinguished by profound congenital (preverbal) deafness and retinal disease with onset in the first decade of life. Usher syndrome type II is characterized by partial hearing impairment and retinal dystrophy that occurs in late adolescence or early adulthood. The chromosomal assignment and the regional localization of the genetic mutation(s) causing the Usher syndromes are unknown. We analyzed a panel of polymorphic genomic markers for linkage to the disease gene among six families with Usher syndrome type I and 22 families with Usher syndrome type II. Significant linkage was established between Usher syndrome type II and the DNA marker locus THH33 (D1S81), which maps to chromosome 1q. The most likely location of the disease gene is at a map distance of 9 cM from THH33 (lod score 6.5). The same marker failed to show linkage in families segregating an allele for Usher syndrome type I. These data confirm the provisional assignment of the locus for Usher syndrome type II to the distal end of chromosome 1q and demonstrate that the clinical heterogeneity between Usher types I and II is caused by mutational events at different genetic loci. Regional localization has the potential to improve carrier detection and to provide antenatal diagnosis in families at risk for the disease.

  3. Multiple sex-associated regions and a putative sex chromosome in zebrafish revealed by RAD mapping and population genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Anderson

    Full Text Available Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio, neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate, the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F(2 offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome.

  4. The human homologue of unc-93 maps to chromosome 6q27 - characterisation and analysis in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Dodds, Phillippa; Emilion, Gracy

    2002-01-01

    In sporadic ovarian cancer, we have previously reported allele loss at D6S193 (62%) on chromosome 6q27, which suggested the presence of a putative tumour suppressor gene. Based on our data and that from another group, the minimal region of allele loss was between D6S264 and D6S149 (7.4 cM). To id...

  5. High-resolution meiotic and physical mapping of the Best`s vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) locus to pericentromeric chromosome 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, B.H.F.; Vogt, G. [Institut fuer Humangenetik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Walker, D. [UBC, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy, also known as Best`s disease, is a juvenile-onset macular degeneration with autosomal dominant inheritance. It is characterized by well-demarcated accumulation of lipofuscin-like material within and beneath the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and classically results in an egg yolk-like appearance of the macula. Typically, carriers of the disease gene show a specific electrophysiological sign which can be detected by electrooculography (EOG). The EOG measures a standing potential between the cornea and the retina which is primarily generated by the RPE. The histopathological findings as well as the EOG abnormalities suggest that Best`s disease is a generalized disorder of the RPE. The basic biochemical defect is still unknown. As a first step in the positional cloning of the defective gene, the Best`s disease locus was mapped to chromosome 11 between markers at D11S871 and INT2. Subsequently, his region was refined to a 3.7 cM interval flanked by loci D11S903 and PYGM. To further narrow the D11S903-PYGM interval and to obtain an estimate of the physical size of the minimal candidate region, we used a combination of high-resolution PCR hybrid mapping and analysis of recombinant Best`s disease chromosomes. We identified six markers from within the D11S903-PYGM interval that show no recombination with the defective gene in three multigeneration Best`s disease pedigrees. Our hybrid panel localizes these markers on either side of the centromere on chromosome 11. The closest markers flanking the disease gene are at D11S986 in band p12-11.22 and at D11S480 in band q13.2-13.3. Our study demonstrates that the physical size of the Best`s disease region is exceedingly larger than was previously estimated from the genetic data due to the proximity of the defective gene to the centromere of chromosome 11.

  6. Microclones derived from the mouse chromosome 7 D-E bands map within the proximal region of the c14CoS deletion in albino mutant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toenjes, R.R.W.; Weith, A.; Rinchik, E.M.; Winking, H.; Carnwath, J.W.; Kaliner, B.; Paul, D.

    1991-01-01

    A group of radiation-induced perinatal-lethal deletions that include the albino (c) locus on mouse chromosome 7 causes failure of expression of various hepatocyte-specific genes when homozygous. The transcription of such genes could be controlled in trans by a regulatory gene(s) located within the proximal region of the C14CoS deletion. To identify this potential regulatory gene, a microclone library was established from microdissected D and E bands of chromosome 7. Three nonoverlapping microclones (E305, E336B, and E453B) hybridizing with wildtype but not with C14CoS/C14CoS DNA were isolated. E336B represents a single-copy DNA fragment, whereas E305 and E453B hybridized with 3 and 10 EcoRI DNA restriction fragments, respectively. All fragments map exclusively within the deletion. The microclones hybridized to DNA of viable C6H/C14CoS deletion heterozygotes but not to DNA of homozygotes for the lethal mutation c10R75M, which belongs to the same complementation group as c14CoS. DNA of viable homozygous mutant C62DSD, which carries a deletion breakpoint proximal to that of c6H, hybridized only with E453B. This microclone identified 6 EcoRI restriction fragments in C62DSD/C62DSD DNA. The results demonstrate that of the isolated microclones, E453B identifies a locus (D7RT453B) that maps closest to the hsdr-1 (hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation) locus, which maps between the proximal breakpoints of deletions c10R75M and c62DSD

  7. A gene-based high-resolution comparative radiation hybrid map as a framework for genome sequence assembly of a bovine chromosome 6 region associated with QTL for growth, body composition, and milk performance traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Pascal

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of different quantitative trait loci (QTL for various phenotypic traits, including milk production, functional, and conformation traits in dairy cattle as well as growth and body composition traits in meat cattle, have been mapped consistently in the middle region of bovine chromosome 6 (BTA6. Dense genetic and physical maps and, ultimately, a fully annotated genome sequence as well as their mutual connections are required to efficiently identify genes and gene variants responsible for genetic variation of phenotypic traits. A comprehensive high-resolution gene-rich map linking densely spaced bovine markers and genes to the annotated human genome sequence is required as a framework to facilitate this approach for the region on BTA6 carrying the QTL. Results Therefore, we constructed a high-resolution radiation hybrid (RH map for the QTL containing chromosomal region of BTA6. This new RH map with a total of 234 loci including 115 genes and ESTs displays a substantial increase in loci density compared to existing physical BTA6 maps. Screening the available bovine genome sequence resources, a total of 73 loci could be assigned to sequence contigs, which were already identified as specific for BTA6. For 43 loci, corresponding sequence contigs, which were not yet placed on the bovine genome assembly, were identified. In addition, the improved potential of this high-resolution RH map for BTA6 with respect to comparative mapping was demonstrated. Mapping a large number of genes on BTA6 and cross-referencing them with map locations in corresponding syntenic multi-species chromosome segments (human, mouse, rat, dog, chicken achieved a refined accurate alignment of conserved segments and evolutionary breakpoints across the species included. Conclusion The gene-anchored high-resolution RH map (1 locus/300 kb for the targeted region of BTA6 presented here will provide a valuable platform to guide high-quality assembling and

  8. Mapping of the serotonin 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} autoreceptor gene (HTR1D) on chromosome 1 using a silent polymorphism in the coding region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, N.; Lappalainen, J.; Linnoila, M. [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-24

    Serotonin (5-HT){sub ID} receptors are 5-HT release-regulating autoreceptors in the human brain. Abnormalities in brain 5-HT function have been hypothesized in the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism, mood disorders, eating disorders, impulsive violent behavior, and alcoholism. Thus, mutations occurring in 5-HT autoreceptors may cause or increase the vulnerability to any of these conditions. 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} and 5-HT{sub 1D{Beta}} subtypes have been previously localized to chromosomes 1p36.3-p34.3 and 6q13, respectively, using rodent-human hybrids and in situ localization. In this communication, we report the detection of a 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} receptor gene polymorphism by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding sequence. The polymorphism was used for fine scale linkage mapping of 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} on chromosome 1. This polymorphism should also be useful for linkage studies in populations and in families. Our analysis also demonstrates that functionally significant coding sequence variants of the 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} are probably not abundant either among alcoholics or in the general population. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Physical mapping of a 330 X 10(3)-base-pair region of the Myxococcus xanthus chromosome that is preferentially labeled during spore germination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komano, T.; Inouye, S.; Inouye, M.

    1985-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus was pulse-labeled with [ 3 H]thymidine immediately after germination of dimethyl sulfoxide-induced spores. The restriction enzyme digests of the total chromosomal DNA from the pulse- labeled cells were analyzed by one-dimensional as well as two- dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis. Four PstI fragments preferentially labeled at a very early stage of germination were cloned into the unique PstI site of pBR322. By using these clones as probes, a restriction enzyme map was established covering approximately 6% of the total M. xanthus genome (330 X 10(3) base pairs). The distribution of the specific activities of the restriction fragments pulse-labeled after germination suggests a bidirectional mode of DNA replication from a fixed origin

  10. An autosomal recessive leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa maps to chromosome 17q24.2-25.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouhouche Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-gene disorders related to ischemic stroke seem to be an important cause of stroke in young patients without known risk factors. To identify new genes responsible of such diseases, we studied a consanguineous Moroccan family with three affected individuals displaying hereditary leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa that appears to segregate in autosomal recessive pattern. Methods All family members underwent neurological and radiological examinations. A genome wide search was conducted in this family using the ABI PRISM linkage mapping set version 2.5 from Applied Biosystems. Six candidate genes within the region linked to the disease were screened for mutations by direct sequencing. Results Evidence of linkage was obtained on chromosome 17q24.2-25.3. Analysis of recombination events and LOD score calculation suggests linkage of the responsible gene in a genetic interval of 11 Mb located between D17S789 and D17S1806 with a maximal multipoint LOD score of 2.90. Sequencing of seven candidate genes in this locus, ATP5H, FDXR, SLC25A19, MCT8, CYGB, KCNJ16 and GRIN2C, identified three missense mutations in the FDXR gene which were also found in a homozygous state in three healthy controls, suggesting that these variants are not disease-causing mutations in the family. Conclusion A novel locus for leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa has been mapped to chromosome 17q24.2-25.3 in a consanguineous Moroccan family.

  11. Physical and transcript map of the region between D6S264 and D6S149 on chromosome 6q27, the minimal region of allele loss in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Emilion, Gracy; Mungall, Andrew J

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown a high frequency of allele loss at D6S193 (62%) on chromosomal arm 6q27 in ovarian tumours and mapped the minimal region of allele loss between D6S297 and D6S264 (3 cM). We isolated and mapped a single non-chimaeric YAC (17IA12, 260-280 kb) containing D6S193 and D6S297...

  12. A second generation genetic map of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758 reveals slow genome and chromosome evolution in the Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kube Michael

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bumblebee Bombus terrestris is an ecologically and economically important pollinator and has become an important biological model system. To study fundamental evolutionary questions at the genomic level, a high resolution genetic linkage map is an essential tool for analyses ranging from quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping to genome assembly and comparative genomics. We here present a saturated linkage map and match it with the Apis mellifera genome using homologous markers. This genome-wide comparison allows insights into structural conservations and rearrangements and thus the evolution on a chromosomal level. Results The high density linkage map covers ~ 93% of the B. terrestris genome on 18 linkage groups (LGs and has a length of 2'047 cM with an average marker distance of 4.02 cM. Based on a genome size of ~ 430 Mb, the recombination rate estimate is 4.76 cM/Mb. Sequence homologies of 242 homologous markers allowed to match 15 B. terrestris with A. mellifera LGs, five of them as composites. Comparing marker orders between both genomes we detect over 14% of the genome to be organized in synteny and 21% in rearranged blocks on the same homologous LG. Conclusions This study demonstrates that, despite the very high recombination rates of both A. mellifera and B. terrestris and a long divergence time of about 100 million years, the genomes' genetic architecture is highly conserved. This reflects a slow genome evolution in these bees. We show that data on genome organization and conserved molecular markers can be used as a powerful tool for comparative genomics and evolutionary studies, opening up new avenues of research in the Apidae.

  13. Linkage mapping of the gene for Type III collagen (COL3A1) to human chromosome 2q using a VNTR polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Summar, M.L. (Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States))

    1994-03-15

    The gene for the [alpha]1(III) chain of type III collagen, COL3A1, has been previously mapped to human chromosome 2q24.3-q31 by in situ hybridization. Physical mapping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has demonstrated that COL3A1 lies within 35 kb of COL5A2. The authors genotyped the CEPH families at the COL3A2 locus using a pentanucleotide repeat polymorphism within intron 25. They demonstrated significant linkage to 18 anonymous markers as well as the gene for carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSI), which had been previously mapped to this region. No recombination was seen between COL3A1 and COL5A2 (Z = 9.93 at [theta] = 0) or D2S24 (Z = 10.55 at [theta] = 0). The locus order is (D2S32-D2S138-D2S148)-(D2S24-COL5A2-COL3A1)-(D2S118-D2S161), with odds of 1:2300 for the next most likely order. These relationships are consistent with the physical mapping of COL3A1 to the distal portion of 2q and place it proximal to CPSI by means of multipoint analysis. These linkage relationships should prove useful in further studies of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and carbamyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency and provide an additional framework for localizing other genes in this region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Physical Mapping Integrated with Syntenic Analysis to Characterize the Gene Space of the Long Arm of Wheat Chromosome 1A

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lucas, S.; Akpinar, B.A.; Kantar, M.; Weinstein, Z.; Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Frenkel, Z.; Berges, H.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Budak, H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013) E-ISSN 1932-6203 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Program:ED Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BREAD WHEAT * COMPLEX GENOMES * MAP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  15. Cytogenetic characterization and AFLP-based genetic linkage mapping for the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, covering all 28 karyotyped chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Van´t Hof, A. E.; Marec, František; Saccheri, I. J.; Brakefield, P. M.; Zwaan, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 12 (2008), e3882 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/06/1860 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Bicyclus anynana * cytogenetic characterization * AFLP-based genetic linkage mapping Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  16. Genotype-specific SNP map based on whole chromosome 3B sequence information from wheat cultivars Arina and Forno

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shatalina, M.; Wicker, T.; Buchmann, J. P.; Oberhaensli, S.; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Keller, B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2013), s. 23-32 ISSN 1467-7644 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : wheat * genetic mapping * single-nucleotide polymorphism Subject RIV: EB - Genetic s ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.677, year: 2013

  17. Tissue-specific features of the X chromosome and nucleolus spatial dynamics in a malaria mosquito, Anopheles atroparvus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, Semen M; Artemov, Gleb N; Sharakhov, Igor V; Stegniy, Vladimir N

    2017-01-01

    Spatial organization of chromosome territories is important for maintenance of genomic stability and regulation of gene expression. Recent studies have shown tissue-specific features of chromosome attachments to the nuclear envelope in various organisms including malaria mosquitoes. However, other spatial characteristics of nucleus organization, like volume and shape of chromosome territories, have not been studied in Anopheles. We conducted a thorough analysis of tissue-specific features of the X chromosome and nucleolus volume and shape in follicular epithelium and nurse cells of the Anopheles atroparvus ovaries using a modern open-source software. DNA of the polytene X chromosome from ovarian nurse cells was obtained by microdissection and was used as a template for amplification with degenerate oligo primers. A fluorescently labeled X chromosome painting probe was hybridized with formaldehyde-fixed ovaries of mosquitoes using a 3D-FISH method. The nucleolus was stained by immunostaining with an anti-fibrillarin antibody. The analysis was conducted with TANGO-a software for a chromosome spatial organization analysis. We show that the volume and position of the X chromosome have tissue-specific characteristics. Unlike nurse cell nuclei, the growth of follicular epithelium nuclei is not accompanied with the proportional growth of the X chromosome. However, the shape of the X chromosome does not differ between the tissues. The dynamics of the X chromosome attachment regions location is tissue-specific and it is correlated with the process of nucleus growth in follicular epithelium and nurse cells.

  18. A donor-specific QTL, exhibiting allelic variation for leaf sheath hairiness in a nested association mapping population, is located on barley chromosome 4H

    KAUST Repository

    Saade, Stephanie; Kutlu, Burcu; Draba, Vera; Fö rster, Karin; Schumann, Erika; Tester, Mark A.; Pillen, Klaus; Maurer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Leaf sheath hairiness is a morphological trait associated with various advantages, including tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, thereby increasing yield. Understanding the genetic basis of this trait in barley can therefore improve the agronomic performance of this economically important crop. We scored leaf sheath hairiness in a two-year field trial in 1,420 BC1S3 lines from the wild barley nested association mapping (NAM) population HEB-25. Leaf sheath hairiness segregated in six out of 25 families with the reference parent Barke being glabrous. We detected the major hairy leaf sheath locus Hs (syn. Hsh) on chromosome 4H (111.3 cM) with high precision. The effects of the locus varied across the six different wild barley donors, with donor of HEB family 11 conferring the highest score of leaf sheath hairiness. Due to the high mapping resolution present in HEB-25, we were able to discuss physically linked pentatricopeptide repeat genes and subtilisin-like proteases as potential candidate genes underlying this locus. In this study, we proved that HEB-25 provides an appropriate tool to further understand the genetic control of leaf sheath hairiness in barley. Furthermore, our work represents a perfect starting position to clone the gene responsible for the 4H locus observed.

  19. A donor-specific QTL, exhibiting allelic variation for leaf sheath hairiness in a nested association mapping population, is located on barley chromosome 4H

    KAUST Repository

    Saade, Stephanie

    2017-12-07

    Leaf sheath hairiness is a morphological trait associated with various advantages, including tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, thereby increasing yield. Understanding the genetic basis of this trait in barley can therefore improve the agronomic performance of this economically important crop. We scored leaf sheath hairiness in a two-year field trial in 1,420 BC1S3 lines from the wild barley nested association mapping (NAM) population HEB-25. Leaf sheath hairiness segregated in six out of 25 families with the reference parent Barke being glabrous. We detected the major hairy leaf sheath locus Hs (syn. Hsh) on chromosome 4H (111.3 cM) with high precision. The effects of the locus varied across the six different wild barley donors, with donor of HEB family 11 conferring the highest score of leaf sheath hairiness. Due to the high mapping resolution present in HEB-25, we were able to discuss physically linked pentatricopeptide repeat genes and subtilisin-like proteases as potential candidate genes underlying this locus. In this study, we proved that HEB-25 provides an appropriate tool to further understand the genetic control of leaf sheath hairiness in barley. Furthermore, our work represents a perfect starting position to clone the gene responsible for the 4H locus observed.

  20. QTL influencing blood pressure maps to the region of PPH1 on chromosome 2q31-34 in Old Order Amish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, W C; Mitchell, B D; Schneider, J L; Wagner, M J; Bell, C J; Nanthakumar, E; Shuldiner, A R

    2000-06-20

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure, renal insufficiency, and peripheral vascular disease. Although the genetic contribution to variation in blood pressure is well recognized, the specific genes involved are mostly unknown. We carried out a genome-wide scan to identify loci influencing blood pressure in the Old Order Amish population of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Blood pressures were measured in 694 adult participants from families recruited without regard to blood pressure. We performed a quantitative linkage analysis by using 357 microsatellite markers. In multipoint analysis, strong evidence for linkage was observed with both diastolic (lod=3.36; P=0.00004) and to a lesser extent systolic (lod=1.64; P=0.003) blood pressure in the region of chromosome 2q31-34. Peak evidence for linkage occurred at map positions 217 and 221 cM from pter for diastolic and systolic blood pressure, respectively. A gene linked to familial primary pulmonary hypertension has recently been mapped to this same region, suggesting the intriguing hypothesis that other (attenuated) mutations in this same gene may influence variation in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in this population.

  1. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    genetic maps with specific segments of polytene chromosomes provided the first evidence of ... tion in Drosophila and other organisms identified the heterochromatin ... such modifications seem to provide a “histone code” in the context of gene ...

  2. The amyloid precursor-like protein (APLP) gene maps to the long arm of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasco, W.; Tanzi, R.E. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Brook, J.D. (Center for Medical Genetics, Nottingham (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    We have recently isolated a cDNA from a mouse brain library that encodes a protein whose predicted amino acid sequence is 42% identical and 64% similar to that of the amyloid [beta] protein precursor (APP; 16). This 653-amino-acid amyloid precursor-like protein (APLP) is similar to APP in overall structure as well as amino acid sequence. The amino acid homologies are particularly strong in three distinct regions of the proteins where the identities are 47, 54, and 56% (16). All three of these regions are also conserved in the Drosophila APP-like gene, APPL (11). Notably, 12 cysteine residues and a N -glyco-sylation site are conserved in the extracellular portion of APLP and APP, and a clathrin-binding domain is conserved in the cytoplasmic domain. The cytoplasmic domain is also conserved in a partial CDNA reported to encode an APP-like gene in rat testes (17), These data suggest that APLP and APP are members of a highly conserved gene family. A panel of DNAs from 31 human-rodent somatic cell lines of known karyotype was digested with EcoR1. These DNAs were then probed with the human APLP cDNA clone and the hybridization pattern was consistent with the assignment of the APLP locus to chromosome 19. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  3. CCAT2, a novel noncoding RNA mapping to 8q24, underlies metastatic progression and chromosomal instability in colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hui; Spizzo, Riccardo; Atlasi, Yaser; Nicoloso, Milena; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Redis, Roxana S.; Nishida, Naohiro; Gafà, Roberta; Song, Jian; Guo, Zhiyi; Ivan, Cristina; Barbarotto, Elisa; De Vries, Ingrid; Zhang, Xinna; Ferracin, Manuela; Churchman, Mike; van Galen, Janneke F.; Beverloo, Berna H.; Shariati, Maryam; Haderk, Franziska; Estecio, Marcos R.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Patijn, Gijs A.; Gotley, David C.; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Shureiqi, Imad; Sen, Subrata; Multani, Asha S.; Welsh, James; Yamamoto, Ken; Taniguchi, Itsuki; Song, Min-Ae; Gallinger, Steven; Casey, Graham; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Mani, Sendurai A.; Zhang, Wei; Davuluri, Ramana V.; Mimori, Koshi; Mori, Masaki; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Martens, John W.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Negrini, Massimo; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Foekens, John A.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Lanza, Giovanni; Kopetz, Scott; Fodde, Riccardo; Calin, George A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional roles of SNPs within the 8q24 gene desert in the cancer phenotype are not yet well understood. Here, we report that CCAT2, a novel long noncoding RNA transcript (lncRNA) encompassing the rs6983267 SNP, is highly overexpressed in microsatellite-stable colorectal cancer and promotes tumor growth, metastasis, and chromosomal instability. We demonstrate that MYC, miR–17–5p, and miR–20a are up-regulated by CCAT2 through TCF7L2-mediated transcriptional regulation. We further identify the physical interaction between CCAT2 and TCF7L2 resulting in an enhancement of WNT signaling activity. We show that CCAT2 is itself a WNT downstream target, which suggests the existence of a feedback loop. Finally, we demonstrate that the SNP status affects CCAT2 expression and the risk allele G produces more CCAT2 transcript. Our results support a new mechanism of MYC and WNT regulation by the novel lncRNA CCAT2 in colorectal cancer pathogenesis, and provide an alternative explanation of the SNP-conferred cancer risk. PMID:23796952

  4. Chromosome-level genome map provides insights into diverse defense mechanisms in the medicinal fungus Ganoderma sinense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingjie; Xu, Jiang; Sun, Chao; Zhou, Shiguo; Xu, Haibin; Nelson, David R.; Qian, Jun; Song, Jingyuan; Luo, Hongmei; Xiang, Li; Li, Ying; Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Wang, Lizhi; Lu, Shanfa; Hayward, Alice; Sun, Wei; Li, Xiwen; Schwartz, David C.; Wang, Yitao; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    Fungi have evolved powerful genomic and chemical defense systems to protect themselves against genetic destabilization and other organisms. However, the precise molecular basis involved in fungal defense remain largely unknown in Basidiomycetes. Here the complete genome sequence, as well as DNA methylation patterns and small RNA transcriptomes, was analyzed to provide a holistic overview of secondary metabolism and defense processes in the model medicinal fungus, Ganoderma sinense. We reported the 48.96 Mb genome sequence of G. sinense, consisting of 12 chromosomes and encoding 15,688 genes. More than thirty gene clusters involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, as well as a large array of genes responsible for their transport and regulation were highlighted. In addition, components of genome defense mechanisms, namely repeat-induced point mutation (RIP), DNA methylation and small RNA-mediated gene silencing, were revealed in G. sinense. Systematic bioinformatic investigation of the genome and methylome suggested that RIP and DNA methylation combinatorially maintain G. sinense genome stability by inactivating invasive genetic material and transposable elements. The elucidation of the G. sinense genome and epigenome provides an unparalleled opportunity to advance our understanding of secondary metabolism and fungal defense mechanisms. PMID:26046933

  5. Pure chromosome-specific PCR libraries from single sorted chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanDevanter, D. R.; Choongkittaworn, N. M.; Dyer, K. A.; Aten, J. A.; Otto, P.; Behler, C.; Bryant, E. M.; Rabinovitch, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome-specific DNA libraries can be very useful in molecular and cytogenetic genome mapping studies. We have developed a rapid and simple method for the generation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences that relies on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a single flow-sorted

  6. Isolation of the Drosophila melanogaster dunce chromosomal region and recombinational mapping of dunce sequences with restriction site polymorphisms as genetic markers

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Ronald L.; Davidson, Norman

    1984-01-01

    Using the method of chromosomal walking, we have isolated a contiguous region of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome which corresponds to salivary gland chromosome bands 3C12 to 3D4. This five-band region contains approximately 100 kilobases of DNA, including those sequences comprising dunce, a gene which functions in memory and cyclic nucleotide metabolism. Genome blots of DNA from flies carrying several different chromosomal aberrations with breakpoints in the region have been probed w...

  7. Genetic analysis and chromosome mapping of resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (FON) race 1 and race 2 in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi; Di Jiao; Gong, Guoyi; Zhang, Haiying; Guo, Shaogui; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Yong

    Fusarium wilt (FW) caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp . niveum (FON) is the major soilborne disease of watermelon ( Citrullus lanatus L.). The development and deployment of resistant cultivars is generally considered to be an effective approach to control FW. In this study, an F8 population consisting of 103 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between the cultivar 97103 and a wild accession PI 296341-FR was used for FON race 1 and race 2 fungal inoculations. One major QTL on chromosome 1 for FON race 1 resistance was detected with a logarithm of odds of 13.2 and explained phenotypic variation R 2  = 48.1 %; two QTLs of FON race 2 resistance on chromosomes 9 and 10 were discovered based on the high-density integrated genetic map we constructed. The nearest molecular marker should be useful for marker-assisted selection of FON race 1 and race 2 resistance. One receptor kinase, one glucan endo-1,3-β-glucosidase precursors and three acidic chitinase located in the FON-1 QTL genomic region. In Qfon2.1 QTL region, one lipoxygenase gene, five receptor-like kinases and four glutathione S-transferase genes are discovered. One arginine biosynthesis bifunctional protein, two receptor kinase proteins and one lipid-transfer protein located in Qfon2.2 QTL region. Based on SNP analysis by using 20 re-sequenced accessions of watermelon and 231-plant F 2 population generated from Black Diamond × Calhoun Grey, we developed a SNP marker Chr1SNP_502124 for FON-1 detection.

  8. Mapping of Mcs30, a new mammary carcinoma susceptibility quantitative trait locus (QTL30 on rat chromosome 12: identification of fry as a candidate Mcs gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Ren

    Full Text Available Rat strains differ dramatically in their susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis. On the assumption that susceptibility genes are conserved across mammalian species and hence inform human carcinogenesis, numerous investigators have used genetic linkage studies in rats to identify genes responsible for differential susceptibility to carcinogenesis. Using a genetic backcross between the resistant Copenhagen (Cop and susceptible Fischer 344 (F344 strains, we mapped a novel mammary carcinoma susceptibility (Mcs30 locus to the centromeric region on chromosome 12 (LOD score of ∼8.6 at the D12Rat59 marker. The Mcs30 locus comprises approximately 12 Mbp on the long arm of rat RNO12 whose synteny is conserved on human chromosome 13q12 to 13q13. After analyzing numerous genes comprising this locus, we identified Fry, the rat ortholog of the furry gene of Drosophila melanogaster, as a candidate Mcs gene. We cloned and determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the 13 kbp Fry mRNA. Sequence analysis indicated that the Fry gene was highly conserved across evolution, with 90% similarity of the predicted amino acid sequence among eutherian mammals. Comparison of the Fry sequence in the Cop and F344 strains identified two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, one of which creates a putative, de novo phosphorylation site. Further analysis showed that the expression of the Fry gene is reduced in a majority of rat mammary tumors. Our results also suggested that FRY activity was reduced in human breast carcinoma cell lines as a result of reduced levels or mutation. This study is the first to identify the Fry gene as a candidate Mcs gene. Our data suggest that the SNPs within the Fry gene contribute to the genetic susceptibility of the F344 rat strain to mammary carcinogenesis. These results provide the foundation for analyzing the role of the human FRY gene in cancer susceptibility and progression.

  9. Heterochromatin and rDNA sites distribution in the holocentric chromosomes of Cuscuta approximata Bab. (Convolvulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Marcelo; García, Miguel A

    2004-02-01

    Cuscuta is a widely distributed genus of holoparasitic plants. Holocentric chromosomes have been reported only in species of one of its subgenera (Cuscuta subg. Cuscuta). In this work, a representative of this subgenus, Cuscuta approximata, was investigated looking for its mitotic and meiotic chromosome behaviour and the heterochromatin distribution. The mitotic chromosomes showed neither primary constriction nor Rabl orientation whereas the meiotic ones exhibited the typical quadripartite structure characteristic of holocentrics, supporting the assumption of holocentric chromosomes as a synapomorphy of Cuscuta subg. Cuscuta. Chromosomes and interphase nuclei displayed many heterochromatic blocks that stained deeply with hematoxylin, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), or after C banding. The banded karyotype showed terminal or subterminal bands in all chromosomes and central bands in some of them. The single pair of 45S rDNA sites was observed at the end of the largest chromosome pair, close to a DAPI band and a 5S rDNA site. Two other 5S rDNA site pairs were found, both closely associated with DAPI bands. The noteworthy giant nuclei of glandular cells of petals and ovary wall exhibited large chromocentres typical of polytenic nuclei. The chromosomal location of heterochromatin and rDNA sites and the structure of the endoreplicated nuclei of C. approximata seemed to be similar to those known in monocentric nuclei, suggesting that centromeric organization has little or no effect on chromatin organization.

  10. Genome-wide mapping of boundary element-associated factor (BEAF) binding sites in Drosophila melanogaster links BEAF to transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Emberly, Eldon; Cuvier, Olivier; Hart, Craig M

    2009-07-01

    Insulator elements play a role in gene regulation that is potentially linked to nuclear organization. Boundary element-associated factors (BEAFs) 32A and 32B associate with hundreds of sites on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. We hybridized DNA isolated by chromatin immunoprecipitation to genome tiling microarrays to construct a genome-wide map of BEAF binding locations. A distinct difference in the association of 32A and 32B with chromatin was noted. We identified 1,820 BEAF peaks and found that more than 85% were less than 300 bp from transcription start sites. Half are between head-to-head gene pairs. BEAF-associated genes are transcriptionally active as judged by the presence of RNA polymerase II, dimethylated histone H3 K4, and the alternative histone H3.3. Forty percent of these genes are also associated with the polymerase negative elongation factor NELF. Like NELF-associated genes, most BEAF-associated genes are highly expressed. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we found that the expression levels of most BEAF-associated genes decrease in embryos and cultured cells lacking BEAF. These results provide an unexpected link between BEAF and transcription, suggesting that BEAF plays a role in maintaining most associated promoter regions in an environment that facilitates high transcription levels.

  11. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, chromosome mapping, tissues expression pattern and identification of a novel splicing variant of porcine CIDEb gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, YanHua; Li, AiHua; Yang, Z.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector b (CIDEb) is a member of the CIDE family of apoptosis-inducing factors, CIDEa and CIDEc have been reported to be Lipid droplets (LDs)-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes, and responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions, whereas CIDEb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions [1], and promotes the formation of triacylglyceride-enriched VLDL particles in hepatocytes [2]. Here, we report the gene cloning, chromosome mapping, tissue distribution, genetic expression analysis, and identification of a novel splicing variant of the porcine CIDEb gene. Sequence analysis shows that the open reading frame of the normal porcine CIDEb isoform covers 660bp and encodes a 219-amino acid polypeptide, whereas its alternative splicing variant encodes a 142-amino acid polypeptide truncated at the fourth exon and comprised of the CIDE-N domain and part of the CIDE-C domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of normal porcine CIDEb shows an 85.8% similarity to the human protein and 80.0% to the mouse protein. The CIDEb genomic sequence spans approximately 6KB comprised of five exons and four introns. Radiation hybrid mapping demonstrated that porcine CIDEb is located at chromosome 7q21 and at a distance of 57cR from the most significantly linked marker, S0334, regions that are syntenic with the corresponding region in the human genome. Tissue expression analysis indicated that normal CIDEb mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in many porcine tissues. It was highly expressed in white adipose tissue and was observed at relatively high levels in the liver, lung, small intestine, lymphatic tissue and brain. The normal version of CIDEb was the predominant form in all tested tissues, whereas the splicing variant was expressed at low levels in all examined tissues except the lymphatic tissue. Furthermore, genetic expression analysis indicated that CIDEb mRNA levels were

  12. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, chromosome mapping, tissues expression pattern and identification of a novel splicing variant of porcine CIDEb gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, YanHua, E-mail: liyanhua.1982@aliyun.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Translational Medical Research in Cognitive Development and Learning and Memory Disorders, China International Science and Technology Cooperation base of Child development and Critical Disorders, Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014 (China); Li, AiHua [Chongqing Cancer Institute & Hospital & Cancer Center, Chongqing 404100 (China); Yang, Z.Q. [Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2016-09-09

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector b (CIDEb) is a member of the CIDE family of apoptosis-inducing factors, CIDEa and CIDEc have been reported to be Lipid droplets (LDs)-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes, and responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions, whereas CIDEb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions [1], and promotes the formation of triacylglyceride-enriched VLDL particles in hepatocytes [2]. Here, we report the gene cloning, chromosome mapping, tissue distribution, genetic expression analysis, and identification of a novel splicing variant of the porcine CIDEb gene. Sequence analysis shows that the open reading frame of the normal porcine CIDEb isoform covers 660bp and encodes a 219-amino acid polypeptide, whereas its alternative splicing variant encodes a 142-amino acid polypeptide truncated at the fourth exon and comprised of the CIDE-N domain and part of the CIDE-C domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of normal porcine CIDEb shows an 85.8% similarity to the human protein and 80.0% to the mouse protein. The CIDEb genomic sequence spans approximately 6KB comprised of five exons and four introns. Radiation hybrid mapping demonstrated that porcine CIDEb is located at chromosome 7q21 and at a distance of 57cR from the most significantly linked marker, S0334, regions that are syntenic with the corresponding region in the human genome. Tissue expression analysis indicated that normal CIDEb mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in many porcine tissues. It was highly expressed in white adipose tissue and was observed at relatively high levels in the liver, lung, small intestine, lymphatic tissue and brain. The normal version of CIDEb was the predominant form in all tested tissues, whereas the splicing variant was expressed at low levels in all examined tissues except the lymphatic tissue. Furthermore, genetic expression analysis indicated that CIDEb mRNA levels were

  13. Mapping of the human NMDA receptor subunit (NMDAR1) and the proposed NMDA receptor glutamate-binding subunit (NMDARA1) to chromosomes 9q34.3 and chromosome 8, respectively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, C; Duff, C; Duncan, A M

    1993-01-01

    to human chromosome 8 using a somatic cell hybrid panel. Because the gene causing HD has been localized to chromosome 4p16.3, the chromosome assignments reported here are inconsistent with either of these genes playing a causative role in the molecular pathology of HD. However, it is noteworthy......A role for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the molecular pathology underlying Huntington disease (HD) has been proposed on the basis of neurochemical studies in HD and the ability of the NMDA receptor to mediate neuronal cell death. The molecular cloning of the human NMDA receptor...

  14. A new sodium channel {alpha}-subunit gene (Scn9a) from Schwann cells maps to the Scn1a, Scn2a, Scn3a cluster of mouse chromosome 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, M.C.; Ernst, E.; Gros, P. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)

    1996-08-15

    We have used a total of 27 AXB/BXA recombinant inbred mouse strains to determine the chromosomal location of a newly identified gene encoding an {alpha}-subunit isoform of the sodium channel from Schwann cells, Scn9a. Linkage analysis established that Scn9a mapped to the proximal segment of mouse chromosome 2. The segregation of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 145 progeny from a Mus spretus x C57BL/6J backcross indicates that Scn9a is very tightly linked to Scn1a (gene encoding the type I sodium channel {alpha}-subunit of the brain) and forms part of a cluster of four Scna genes located on mouse chromosome 2. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO to nalidixic acid and low levels of beta-lactam antibiotics: mapping of chromosomal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, M; Haas, D

    1982-01-01

    Resistance to high concentrations of nalidixic acid in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO was due to mutations in one locus designated nalA, which was mapped by transduction between hex-9001 and leu-10. The nalA mutants were cross-resistant to pipemidic acid, a nalidixic acid analog, at relatively low concentrations. Replicative DNA synthesis was resistant to both drugs in permeabilized cells of nalA mutants. A locus coding for low-level resistance to nalidixic acid, nalB, was cotransducible with pyrB, proC, and met-28. The nalB mutants were also resistant to low levels of pipemidic acid, novobiocin, and beta-lactam antibiotics (e.g., carbenicillin, azlocillin, and cefsulodin), but not to other drugs, such as gentamicin, rifampin, kanamycin, or tetracycline. In nalB mutants, DNA replication showed wild-type sensitivity to nalidixic acid, whereas carbenicillin-induced filamentation required higher drug levels than in the wild-type strain. Thus, nalB mutations appear to decrease cell permeability to some antibiotics. The sensitivity of replicative DNA synthesis to nalidixic acid and novobiocin was very similar in P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli; by contrast, the concentrations of these drugs needed to inhibit growth of P. aeruginosa were higher than those reported for E. coli by one or two orders of magnitude. PMID:6821455

  16. Mapping of Ppd-B1, a Major Candidate Gene for Late Heading on Wild Emmer Chromosome Arm 2BS and Assessment of Its Interactions with Early Heading QTLs on 3AL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wu, Shasha; Ding, Mingquan; Li, Jingjuan; Shi, Zhaobin; Wei, Wei; Guo, Jialian; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Yurong; Rong, Junkang

    2016-01-01

    Wheat heading date is an important agronomic trait determining maturation time and yield. A set of common wheat (Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring; CS)-wild emmer (T. turgidum L. subsp. dicoccoides (TDIC)) chromosome arm substitution lines (CASLs) was used to identify and allocate QTLs conferring late or early spike emergence by examining heading date. Genetic loci accelerating heading were found on TDIC chromosome arms 3AL and 7BS, while loci delaying heading were located on 4AL and 2BS. To map QTLs conferring late heading on 2BS, F2 populations derived from two cross combinations of CASL2BS × CS and CASL3AL × CASL2BS were developed and each planted at two times, constituting four F2 mapping populations. Heading date varied continuously among individuals of these four populations, suggesting quantitative characteristics. A genetic map of 2BS, consisting of 23 SSR and one single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) marker(s), was constructed using these F2 populations. This map spanned a genetic length of 53.2 cM with average marker density of 2.3 cM. The photoperiod-sensitivity gene Ppd-B1 was mapped to chromosome arm 2BS as a SSCP molecular marker, and was validated as tightly linked to a major QTL governing late heading of CASL2BS in all mapping populations. A significant dominance by additive effect of Ppd-B1 with the LUX gene located on 3AL was also detected. CS had more copies of Ppd-B1 than CASL2BS, implying that increased copy number could elevate the expression of Ppd-1 in CS, also increasing expression of LUX and FT genes and causing CS to have an earlier heading date than CASL2BS in long days.

  17. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  18. Chromosomal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Chromosomal conditions Chromosomal conditions ... Disorders See also: Genetic counseling , Your family health history Last reviewed: February, 2013 ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & ...

  19. Human thyroid peroxidase: complete cDNA and protein sequence, chromosome mapping, and identification of two alternately spliced mRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, S.; Kotani, T.; McBride, O.W.; Umeki, K.; Hirai, K.; Nakayama, T.; Ohtaki, S.

    1987-01-01

    Two forms of human thyroid peroxidase cDNAs were isolated from a λgt11 cDNA library, prepared from Graves disease thyroid tissue mRNA, by use of oligonucleotides. The longest complete cDNA, designated phTPO-1, has 3048 nucleotides and an open reading frame consisting of 933 amino acids, which would encode a protein with a molecular weight of 103,026. Five potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites are found in the deduced amino acid sequence. The second peroxidase cDNA, designated phTPO-2, is almost identical to phTPO-1 beginning 605 base pairs downstream except that it contains 1-base-pair difference and lacks 171 base pairs in the middle of the sequence. This results in a loss of 57 amino acids corresponding to a molecular weight of 6282. Interestingly, this 171-nucleotide sequence has GT and AG at its 5' and 3' boundaries, respectively, that are in good agreement with donor and acceptor splice site consensus sequences. Using specific oligonucleotide probes for the mRNAs derived from the cDNA sequences hTOP-1 and hTOP-2, the authors show that both are expressed in all thyroid tissues examined and the relative level of two mRNAs is different in each sample. The results suggest that two thyroid peroxidase proteins might be generated through alternate splicing of the same gene. By using somatic cell hybrid lines, the thyroid peroxidase gene was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 2

  20. Pendred syndrome (goitre and sensorineural hearing loss) maps to chromosome 7 in the region containing the nonsyndromic deafness gene DFNB4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, B; Coffey, R; Armour, J A; Gausden, E; Hochberg, Z; Grossman, A; Britton, K; Pembrey, M; Reardon, W; Trembath, R

    1996-04-01

    Inherited causes account for about 50% of individuals presenting with childhood (prelingual) hearing loss, of which 70% are due to mutation in numerous single genes which impair auditory function alone (non-syndromic). The remainder are associated with other developmental anomalies termed syndromic deafness. Genes responsible for syndromic forms of hearing loss include the COL4A5 gene in Alport syndrome and the PAX3 and MITF genes in Waardenburg syndrome. Pendred syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with developmental abnormalities of the cochlea, sensorineural hearing loss and diffuse thyroid enlargement (goitre). Pendred syndrome is the most common syndromal form of deafness, yet the primary defect remains unknown. We have established a panel of 12 families with two or more affected individuals and used them to search for the location of the Pendred gene by linkage analysis. We excluded localization to four previously mapped nonsyndromic deafness loci but obtained conclusive evidence for linkage of the Pendred syndrome gene to microsatellite markers on chromosome 7q31 (D7S495 Zmax 7.32, Qmax = 0). This region contains a gene, DFNBL, for autosomal recessive non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss. Multipoint analysis indicates that DFNB4 and Pendred syndrome co-localize to the same 5.5 centiMorgan (cM) interval flanked by D7S501 and D7S523. These data raise the possibility that Pendred syndrome is either allelic with DFNB4 or may represent an inherited contiguous gene disorder, not clinically manifest in the heterozygote.

  1. Genetic mapping of a new race specific resistance allele effective to Puccinia hordei at the Rph9/Rph12 locus on chromosome 5HL in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracatos, Peter M; Khatkar, Mehar S; Singh, Davinder; Park, Robert F

    2014-12-20

    Barley is an important cereal crop cultivated for malt and ruminant feed and in certain regions it is used for human consumption. It is vulnerable to numerous foliar diseases including barley leaf rust caused by the pathogen Puccinia hordei. A temporarily designated resistance locus RphCantala (RphC) identified in the Australian Hordeum vulgare L. cultivar 'Cantala' displayed an intermediate to low infection type (";12 = N") against the P. hordei pathotype 253P- (virulent on Rph1, Rph2, Rph4, Rph6, Rph8 and RphQ). Phenotypic assessment of a 'CI 9214' (susceptible) x 'Stirling' (RphC) (CI 9214/Stirling) doubled haploid (DH) population at the seedling stage using P. hordei pathotype 253P-, confirmed that RphC was monogenically inherited. Marker-trait association analysis of RphC in the CI 9214/Stirling DH population using 4,500 DArT-seq markers identified a highly significant (-log10Pvalue > 17) single peak on the long arm of chromosome 5H (5HL). Further tests of allelism determined that RphC was genetically independent of Rph3, Rph7, Rph11, Rph13 and Rph14, and was an allele of Rph12 (Rph9.z), which also maps to 5HL. Multipathotype tests and subsequent pedigree analysis determined that 14 related Australian barley varieties (including 'Stirling' and 'Cantala') carry RphC and that the likely source of this resistance is via a Czechoslovakian landrace LV-Kvasice-NA-Morave transferred through common ancestral cultivars 'Hanna' and 'Abed Binder'. RphC is an allele of Rph12 (Rph9.z) and is therefore designated Rph9.am. Bioinformatic analysis using sequence arrays from DArT-seq markers in linkage disequilibrium with Rph9.am identified possible candidates for further gene cloning efforts and marker development at the Rph9/Rph12/Rph9.am locus.

  2. Fine mapping of powdery mildew resistance genes PmTb7A.1 and PmTb7A.2 in Triticum boeoticum (Boiss.) using the shotgun sequence assembly of chromosome 7AL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhuneja, Parveen; Yadav, Bharat; Stirnweis, Daniel; Hurni, Severine; Kaur, Satinder; Elkot, Ahmed Fawzy; Keller, Beat; Wicker, Thomas; Sehgal, Sunish; Gill, Bikram S; Singh, Kuldeep

    2015-10-01

    A novel powdery mildew resistance gene and a new allele of Pm1 were identified and fine mapped. DNA markers suitable for marker-assisted selection have been identified. Powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis is one of the most important foliar diseases of wheat and causes significant yield losses worldwide. Diploid A genome species are an important genetic resource for disease resistance genes. Two powdery mildew resistance genes, identified in Triticum boeoticum (A(b)A(b)) accession pau5088, PmTb7A.1 and PmTb7A.2 were mapped on chromosome 7AL. In the present study, shotgun sequence assembly data for chromosome 7AL were utilised for fine mapping of these Pm resistance genes. Forty SSR, 73 resistance gene analogue-based sequence-tagged sites (RGA-STS) and 36 single nucleotide polymorphism markers were designed for fine mapping of PmTb7A.1 and PmTb7A.2. Twenty-one RGA-STS, 8 SSR and 13 SNP markers were mapped to 7AL. RGA-STS markers Ta7AL-4556232 and 7AL-4426363 were linked to the PmTb7A.1 and PmTb7A.2, at a genetic distance of 0.6 and 6.0 cM, respectively. The present investigation established that PmTb7A.1 is a new powdery mildew resistance gene that confers resistance to a broad range of Bgt isolates, whereas PmTb7A.2 most probably is a new allele of Pm1 based on chromosomal location and screening with Bgt isolates showing differential reaction on lines with different Pm1 alleles. The markers identified to be linked to the two Pm resistance genes are robust and can be used for marker-assisted introgression of these genes to hexaploid wheat.

  3. Vietnam, a Hotspot for Chromosomal Diversity and Cryptic Species in Black Flies (Diptera: Simuliidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd; Low, Van Lun; Ya’cob, Zubaidah; Chen, Chee Dhang; Lau, Koon Weng; Pham, Xuan Da

    2016-01-01

    The increasing attention on Vietnam as a biodiversity hotspot prompted an investigation of the potential for cryptic diversity in black flies, a group well known elsewhere for its high frequency of isomorphic species. We analyzed the banding structure of the larval polytene chromosomes in the Simulium tuberosum species group to probe for diversity beyond the morphological level. Among 272 larvae, 88 different chromosomal rearrangements, primarily paracentric inversions, were discovered in addition to 25 already known in the basic sequences of the group in Asia. Chromosomal diversity in Vietnam far exceeds that known for the group in Thailand, with only about 5% of the rearrangements shared between the two countries. Fifteen cytoforms and nine morphoforms were revealed among six nominal species in Vietnam. Chromosomal evidence, combined with available molecular and morphological evidence, conservatively suggests that at least five of the cytoforms are valid species, two of which require formal names. The total chromosomal rearrangements and species (15) now known from the group in Vietnam far exceed those of any other area of comparable size in the world, supporting the country’s status as a biodiversity hotspot. Phylogenetic inference based on uniquely shared, derived chromosomal rearrangements supports the clustering of cytoforms into two primary lineages, the Simulium tani complex and the Southeast Asian Simulium tuberosum subgroup. Some of these taxa could be threatened by habitat destruction, given their restricted geographical distributions and the expanding human population of Vietnam. PMID:27695048

  4. Mapping of four distinct BCR-related loci to chromosome region 22q11: order of BCR loci relative to chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia breakpoints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croce, C.M.; Huebner, K.; Isobe, M.; Fainstain, E.; Lifshitz, B.; Shtivelman, E.; Canaani, E.

    1987-01-01

    A probe derived from the 3' region of the BCR gene (breakpoint cluster region gene) detects four distinct loci in the human genome. One of the loci corresponds to the complete BCR gene, whereas the other contain a 3' segment of the gene. After HindIII cleavage of human DNA, these four loci are detected as 23-, 19-, 13-, and 9-kikobase-pair fragments, designated BCR4, BCR3, BCR2, and BCR1, respectively, with BCR1 deriving from the original complete BCR gene. All four BCR loci segregate 100% concordantly with human chromosome 22 in a rodent-human somatic cell hybrid panel and are located at chromosome region 22q11.2 by chromosomal in situ hybridization. The BCR2 and BCR4 loci are amplified in leukemia cell line K562 cells, indicating that they fall within the amplification unit that includes immunoglobulin λ light chain locus (IGL) and ABL locus on the K562 Philadelphia chromosome (Ph 1 ). Similarly, in mouse-human hybrids retaining a Ph 1 chromosome derived from an acute lymphoblastic leukemia-in the absence of the 9q + and 22, only BCR2 and BCR4 loci are retained. Thus, the order of loci on chromosome 22 is centromere → BCR2, BCR4, and IGL → BCR1 → BCR3 → SIS, possibly eliminating BCR2 and BCR4 loci as candidate targets for juxtaposition to the ABL gene in the acute lymphoblastic leukemia Ph 1 chromosome

  5. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Pan

    Full Text Available Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs, which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques.

  6. Chromosome Territories

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Thomas; Cremer, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome territories (CTs) constitute a major feature of nuclear architecture. In a brief statement, the possible contribution of nuclear architecture studies to the field of epigenomics is considered, followed by a historical account of the CT concept and the final compelling experimental evidence of a territorial organization of chromosomes in all eukaryotes studied to date. Present knowledge of nonrandom CT arrangements, of the internal CT architecture, and of structural interactions wit...

  7. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G 2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G 2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G 2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G 1 phase. (author)

  8. Sixty-five radiation hybrids for the short arm of human chromosome 6: their value as a mapping panel and as a source for rapid isolation of new probes using repeat element-mediated PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoghbi, H.Y.; McCall, A.E.; LeBorgne-Demarquoy, F.

    1991-01-01

    We have used an irradiation and fusion procedure to generate somatic cell hybrids that retain fragments of the short arm of human chromosome 6 (6p). To identify hybrids retaining human material, we performed repeat element-mediated PCR on crude lysates of cells from individual clones. Sixty-five hybrids were shown to contain human material and fifty of those contained one or more 6p-specific probes. Detailed characterization of these hybrids identified a subset that divides 6p into ten mapping intervals. Using repeat element-mediated PCR, we were able to isolate and map 61 new DNA fragments from specific regions of 6p. Fifteen of these fragments were used to screen for restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), and nine identified RFLPs with one or more enzymes. The radiation hybrids described in this study provide a valuable resource for high-resolution mapping of 6p and for the rapid isolation of region-specific markers

  9. The human homologue of unc-93 maps to chromosome 6q27 – characterisation and analysis in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charnock F Mark L

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sporadic ovarian cancer, we have previously reported allele loss at D6S193 (62% on chromosome 6q27, which suggested the presence of a putative tumour suppressor gene. Based on our data and that from another group, the minimal region of allele loss was between D6S264 and D6S149 (7.4 cM. To identify the putative tumour suppressor gene, we established a physical map initially with YACs and subsequently with PACs/BACs from D6S264 to D6S149. To accelerate the identification of genes, we sequenced the entire contig of approximately 1.1 Mb. Seven genes were identified within the region of allele loss between D6S264 and D6S149. Results The human homologue of unc-93 (UNC93A in C. elegans was identified to be within the interval of allele loss centromeric to D6S149. This gene is 24.5 kb and comprises of 8 exons. There are two transcripts with the shorter one due to splicing out of exon 4. It is expressed in testis, small intestine, spleen, prostate, and ovary. In a panel of 8 ovarian cancer cell lines, UNC93A expression was detected by RT-PCR which identified the two transcripts in 2/8 cell lines. The entire coding sequence was examined for mutations in a panel of ovarian tumours and ovarian cancer cell lines. Mutations were identified in exons 1, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8. Only 3 mutations were identified specifically in the tumour. These included a c.452G>A (W151X mutation in exon 3, c.676C>T (R226X in exon 5 and c.1225G>A(V409I mutation in exon 8. However, the mutations in exon 3 and 5 were also present in 6% and 2% of the normal population respectively. The UNC93A cDNA was shown to express at the cell membrane and encodes for a protein of 60 kDa. Conclusions These results suggest that no evidence for UNC93A as a tumour suppressor gene in sporadic ovarian cancer has been identified and further research is required to evaluate its normal function and role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer.

  10. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia gene region cloned in yeast artificial chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kere, J. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)]|[Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Grzeschik, K.H. [Univ. of Marburg (Germany); Limon, J. [Medical Academy, Gdansk (Poland); Gremaud, M.; Schlessinger, D. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); De La Chapelle, A. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    1993-05-01

    Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA), an X-chromosomal recessive disorder, is expressed in a few females with chromosomal translocations involving bands Xq12-q13. Using available DNA markers from the region and somatic cell hybrids the authors mapped the X-chromosomal breakpoints in two such translocations. The breakpoints were further mapped within a yeast artificial chromosome contig constructed by chromosome walking techniques. Genomic DNA markers that map between the two translocation breakpoints were recovered representing putative portions of the EDA gene. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Association mapping of quantitative trait loci for carcass and meat quality traits at the central part of chromosome 2 in Italian Large White pigs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čepica, Stanislav; Zambonelli, P.; Weisz, Filip; Bigi, M.; Knoll, Aleš; Vykoukalová, Z.; Masopust, Martin; Gallo, M.; Buttazzoni, L.; Davoli, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 2 (2013), s. 368-375 ISSN 0309-1740 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/10/1216 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : pig * association * chromosome 2 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.231, year: 2013

  12. Locating a Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Gene on the X Chromosome by Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping Using Three Founder Populations in Quebec and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Gordon PH, Wang Q, Puisieux, A, Foulkes WD and Trifiro M. Polymorphisms and HNPCC: PMS2 -MLH1 protein interactions diminished by ‘single nucleotide...and PMS2 responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Genes Chromosomes Cancer, 44 (2): 123-38, 2005. 120. Soravia C

  13. Fine mapping of the autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa locus (RP12) on chromosome 1q; exclusion of the phosducin gene (PDC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, S.; te Nijenhuis, S.; van den Born, L. I.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.; Sharp, E.; Sandkuijl, L. A.; Westerveld, A.; Bergen, A. A.

    1996-01-01

    In a previous study on a large pedigree from a genetically isolated population in the Netherlands, we localized a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with paraarteriolar preservation of the retinal pigment epithelium (PPRPE) on the long arm of chromosome 1. In this study, we present an

  14. Whole-genome profiling and shotgun sequencing delivers an anchored, gene-decorated, physical map assembly of bread wheat chromosome 6A

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poursarebani, N.; Nussbaumer, T.; Šimková, Hana; Šafář, Jan; Witsenboer, H.; van Oeveren, J.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Mayer, K. F. X.; Stein, N.; Schnurbusch, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 2 (2014), s. 334-347 ISSN 0960-7412 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : bread wheat chromosome 6A * whole-genome profiling * LINEAR TOPOLOGICAL CONTIGS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.972, year: 2014

  15. Gene mapping of 28S and 5S rDNA sites in chromosomes of two Barbus species and their F1 hybrids (Teleostei, Cyprinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Spoz

    2015-11-01

    Chromosomal location of ribosomal DNA sequences is useful for comparative cytogenetic fish studies due to their relatively fast rate of evolution. The results of species from the family Barbinae comparatively presented here for the first time, and they may support further taxonomical studies of the Barbus species.

  16. A YAC contig and an EST map in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 13 surrounding the loci for neurosensory nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB1 and DFNA3) and Limb-Girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilford, P.; Crozet, F.; Blanchard, S. [Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Two forms of inherited childhood nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB1 and DFNA3) and a Duchenne-like form of progressive muscular dystrophy (LGMD2C) have been mapped to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 13. To clone the genes responsible for these diseases we constructed a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig spanning an 8-cM region between the polymorphic markers D13S221. The contig comprises 24 sequence-tagged sites, among which 15 were newly obtained. This contig allowed us to order the polymorphic markers centromere- D13S175-D13S141-D13S143-D13S115-AFM128yc1-D13S292-D13S283-AFM323vh5-D13S221-telomere. Eight expressed sequence tags, previously assigned to 13q11-q12 (D13S182E, D13S183E, D13S502E, D13S504E, D13S505E, D13S837E, TUBA2, ATP1AL1), were localized on the YAC contig. YAC screening of a cDNA library derived from mouse cochlea allowed us to identify an {alpha}-tubulin gene (TUBA2) that was subsequently precisely mapped within the candidate region. 36 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. AFM image of an entire polygene chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Minqian; Takeuchi; Ikai, A.

    1994-01-01

    The author present AFM images of an entire polygene chromosome of Drosophila for the first time. Comparing with conventional optical microscope, the AFM image of the polygene chromosomes provides much higher resolution and 3-D measurement capability which will lead to finer scale gene mapping and identification

  18. Evolutionary history of the third chromosome gene arrangements of Drosophila pseudoobscura inferred from inversion breakpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andre G; Detweiler, Don; Schaeffer, Stephen W

    2011-08-01

    The third chromosome of Drosophila pseudoobscura is polymorphic for numerous gene arrangements that form classical clines in North America. The polytene salivary chromosomes isolated from natural populations revealed changes in gene order that allowed the different gene arrangements to be linked together by paracentric inversions representing one of the first cases where genetic data were used to construct a phylogeny. Although the inversion phylogeny can be used to determine the relationships among the gene arrangements, the cytogenetic data are unable to infer the ancestral arrangement or the age of the different chromosome types. These are both important properties if one is to infer the evolutionary forces responsible for the spread and maintenance of the chromosomes. Here, we employ the nucleotide sequences of 18 regions distributed across the third chromosome in 80-100 D. pseudoobscura strains to test whether five gene arrangements are of unique or multiple origin, what the ancestral arrangement was, and what are the ages of the different arrangements. Each strain carried one of six commonly found gene arrangements and the sequences were used to infer their evolutionary relationships. Breakpoint regions in the center of the chromosome supported monophyly of the gene arrangements, whereas regions at the ends of the chromosome gave phylogenies that provided less support for monophyly of the chromosomes either because the individual markers did not have enough phylogenetically informative sites or genetic exchange scrambled information among the gene arrangements. A data set where the genetic markers were concatenated strongly supported a unique origin of the different gene arrangements. The inversion polymorphism of D. pseudoobscura is estimated to be about a million years old. We have also shown that the generated phylogeny is consistent with the cytological phylogeny of this species. In addition, the data presented here support hypothetical as the ancestral

  19. Hi-C 2.0: An optimized Hi-C procedure for high-resolution genome-wide mapping of chromosome conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaghzal, Houda; Dekker, Job; Gibcus, Johan H

    2017-07-01

    Chromosome conformation capture-based methods such as Hi-C have become mainstream techniques for the study of the 3D organization of genomes. These methods convert chromatin interactions reflecting topological chromatin structures into digital information (counts of pair-wise interactions). Here, we describe an updated protocol for Hi-C (Hi-C 2.0) that integrates recent improvements into a single protocol for efficient and high-resolution capture of chromatin interactions. This protocol combines chromatin digestion and frequently cutting enzymes to obtain kilobase (kb) resolution. It also includes steps to reduce random ligation and the generation of uninformative molecules, such as unligated ends, to improve the amount of valid intra-chromosomal read pairs. This protocol allows for obtaining information on conformational structures such as compartment and topologically associating domains, as well as high-resolution conformational features such as DNA loops. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A high-resolution map of the Grp1 locus on chromosome V of potato harbouring broad-spectrum resistance to the cyst nematode species Globodera pallida and Globodera rostochiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Danan, Sarah; van Dijk, Thijs; Beyene, Amelework; Bouwman, Liesbeth; Overmars, Hein; van Eck, Herman; Goverse, Aska; Bakker, Jaap; Bakker, Erin

    2009-06-01

    The Grp1 locus confers broad-spectrum resistance to the potato cyst nematode species Globodera pallida and Globodera rostochiensis and is located in the GP21-GP179 interval on the short arm of chromosome V of potato. A high-resolution map has been developed using the diploid mapping population RHAM026, comprising 1,536 genotypes. The flanking markers GP21 and GP179 have been used to screen the 1,536 genotypes for recombination events. Interval mapping of the resistances to G. pallida Pa2 and G. rostochiensis Ro5 resulted in two nearly identical LOD graphs with the highest LOD score just north of marker TG432. Detailed analysis of the 44 recombinant genotypes showed that G. pallida and G. rostochiensis resistance could not be separated and map to the same location between marker SPUD838 and TG432. It is suggested that the quantitative resistance to both nematode species at the Grp1 locus is mediated by one or more tightly linked R genes that might belong to the NBS-LRR class.

  1. Mapping of QTL on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 12, 14, 15 and X in pigs: characteristics carcass and quality of meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paixao, D.M.; Carneiro, P.L.S.; Paiva, S.R.; Sousa, K.R.S.; Verardo, L.L.; Braccini Neto, J.; Pinto, A.P.G.; Marubayashi Hidalgo, A.; Nascimento, C.; Périssé, I.V.; Lopes, P.S.; Guimaraes, S.E.F.

    2012-01-01

    The accomplishment of the present study had as objective to map Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) associated to carcass and quality traits in a F2 pig population developed by mating two Brazilian Piau breed sires with 18 dams from a commercial line (Landrace × Large White × Pietrain). The linkage map

  2. Macronuclear genome structure of the ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis: Single-gene chromosomes and tiny introns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landweber Laura F

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nyctotherus ovalis is a single-celled eukaryote that has hydrogen-producing mitochondria and lives in the hindgut of cockroaches. Like all members of the ciliate taxon, it has two types of nuclei, a micronucleus and a macronucleus. N. ovalis generates its macronuclear chromosomes by forming polytene chromosomes that subsequently develop into macronuclear chromosomes by DNA elimination and rearrangement. Results We examined the structure of these gene-sized macronuclear chromosomes in N. ovalis. We determined the telomeres, subtelomeric regions, UTRs, coding regions and introns by sequencing a large set of macronuclear DNA sequences (4,242 and cDNAs (5,484 and comparing them with each other. The telomeres consist of repeats CCC(AAAACCCCn, similar to those in spirotrichous ciliates such as Euplotes, Sterkiella (Oxytricha and Stylonychia. Per sequenced chromosome we found evidence for either a single protein-coding gene, a single tRNA, or the complete ribosomal RNAs cluster. Hence the chromosomes appear to encode single transcripts. In the short subtelomeric regions we identified a few overrepresented motifs that could be involved in gene regulation, but there is no consensus polyadenylation site. The introns are short (21–29 nucleotides, and a significant fraction (1/3 of the tiny introns is conserved in the distantly related ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. As has been observed in P. tetraurelia, the N. ovalis introns tend to contain in-frame stop codons or have a length that is not dividable by three. This pattern causes premature termination of mRNA translation in the event of intron retention, and potentially degradation of unspliced mRNAs by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Conclusion The combination of short leaders, tiny introns and single genes leads to very minimal macronuclear chromosomes. The smallest we identified contained only 150 nucleotides.

  3. Fine mapping of genetic polymorphisms of pulmonary tuberculosis within chromosome 18q11.2 in the Chinese population: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Yaoyao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, one genome-wide association study identified a susceptibility locus of rs4331426 on chromosome 18q11.2 for tuberculosis in the African population. To validate the significance of this susceptibility locus in other areas, we conducted a case-control study in the Chinese population. Methods The present study consisted of 578 cases and 756 controls. The SNP rs4331426 and other six tag SNPs in the 100 Kbp up and down stream of rs4331426 on chromosome 18q11.2 were genotyped by using the Taqman-based allelic discrimination system. Results As compared with the findings from the African population, genetic variation of the SNP rs4331426 was rare among the Chinese. No significant differences were observed in genotypes or allele frequencies of the tag SNPs between cases and controls either before or after adjusting for age, sex, education, smoking, and drinking history. However, we observed strong linkage disequilibrium of SNPs. Constructed haplotypes within this block were linked the altered risks of tuberculosis. For example, in comparison with the common haplotype AA(rs8087945-rs12456774, haplotypes AG(rs8087945-rs12456774 and GA(rs8087945-rs12456774 were associated with a decreased risk of tuberculosis, with the adjusted odds ratio(95% confidence interval of 0.34(0.27-0.42 and 0.22(0.16-0.29, respectively. Conclusions Susceptibility locus of rs4331426 discovered in the African population could not be validated in the Chinese population. None of genetic polymorphisms we genotyped were related to tuberculosis in the single-point analysis. However, haplotypes on chromosome 18q11.2 might contribute to an individual's susceptibility. More work is necessary to identify the true causative variants of tuberculosis.

  4. Chromosomal rearrangements in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol; Hjermind, Lena E

    2013-01-01

    , and identification of susceptibility genes through linkage and association studies has been complicated due to inherent difficulties such as no clear mode of inheritance, genetic heterogeneity, and apparently incomplete penetrance. Positional cloning through mapping of disease-related chromosome rearrangements has...... been an efficient tool for the cloning of disease genes in several Mendelian disorders and in a number of complex disorders. Through cytogenetic investigation of 205 TS patients, we identified three possibly disease-associated chromosome rearrangements rendering this approach relevant in chasing TS...

  5. A map of nuclear matrix attachment regions within the breast cancer loss-of-heterozygosity region on human chromosome 16q22.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaposhnikov, Sergey A.; Akopov, Sergey B.; Chernov, Igor P.

    2007-01-01

    There is abundant evidence that the DNA in eukaryotic cells is organized into loop domains that represent basic structural and functional units of chromatin packaging. To explore the DNA domain organization of the breast cancer loss-of-heterozygosity region on human chromosome 16q22.1, we have...... in the region are regulated and of how the structural architecture and functional organization of the DNA are related....... identified a significant portion of the scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) within this region. Forty independent putative S/MAR elements were assigned within the 16q22.1 locus. More than 90% of these S/MARs are AT rich, with GC contents as low as 27% in 2 cases. Thirty-nine (98%) of the S...

  6. Studies in two allopatric populations of Hypostomus affinis (Steindachner, 1877): the role of mapping the ribosomal genes to understand the chromosome evolution of the group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Karina de Oliveira; Rocha-Reis, Dinaíza Abadia; Garcia, Caroline; Pazza, Rubens; de Almeida-Toledo, Lurdes Foresti; Kavalco, Karine Frehner

    2018-01-01

    Several cytogenetic markers show chromosomal diversity in the fish such as "armoured catfish". Although studies have characterized many species in the major genera representing these Siluridae, particularly in the genus Hypostomus Lacépède, 1803, trends in chromosome evolution of this group remain unclear. The Paraíba do Sul river basin contains the armoured catfish Hypostomus affinis Steindachner, 1877, which is unique because of its distribution of repetitive DNAs, the 5S and 18S rDNA. Identified samples and registered collections in Brazilian museums were identified as the same typological species, while we observed wide variations in the physical location of this gene in the karyotype based on fluorescent in situ hybridization results. In this study, we propose that these species can represent evolutionarily independent units, as these fish frequently undergo processes such as dispersion and vicariance and that the rDNA is associated with DNA that spreads in the genome, such as transposons. Additionally, the absence of gene flow due to the distance of the sample location could intensify evolutionary processes. The phenotypes found for the 18S rDNA showed minor changes in relation to the number of sites between the lower and upper drainage regions of Paraíba do Sul. The large difference in the number of sites found for the 5S rDNA entered the same region (upper drainage of the basin) and the literature data could represent a population dynamics where an expansion of the 5S rDNA sites provides an extinct or non-sampled cytotype in this work.

  7. Chromosome-wide mapping of DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells reveals pervasive methylation of gene-associated and conserved intergenic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Marzo Angelo M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation has been linked to genome regulation and dysregulation in health and disease respectively, and methods for characterizing genomic DNA methylation patterns are rapidly emerging. We have developed/refined methods for enrichment of methylated genomic fragments using the methyl-binding domain of the human MBD2 protein (MBD2-MBD followed by analysis with high-density tiling microarrays. This MBD-chip approach was used to characterize DNA methylation patterns across all non-repetitive sequences of human chromosomes 21 and 22 at high-resolution in normal and malignant prostate cells. Results Examining this data using computational methods that were designed specifically for DNA methylation tiling array data revealed widespread methylation of both gene promoter and non-promoter regions in cancer and normal cells. In addition to identifying several novel cancer hypermethylated 5' gene upstream regions that mediated epigenetic gene silencing, we also found several hypermethylated 3' gene downstream, intragenic and intergenic regions. The hypermethylated intragenic regions were highly enriched for overlap with intron-exon boundaries, suggesting a possible role in regulation of alternative transcriptional start sites, exon usage and/or splicing. The hypermethylated intergenic regions showed significant enrichment for conservation across vertebrate species. A sampling of these newly identified promoter (ADAMTS1 and SCARF2 genes and non-promoter (downstream or within DSCR9, C21orf57 and HLCS genes hypermethylated regions were effective in distinguishing malignant from normal prostate tissues and/or cell lines. Conclusions Comparison of chromosome-wide DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells revealed significant methylation of gene-proximal and conserved intergenic sequences. Such analyses can be easily extended for genome-wide methylation analysis in health and disease.

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities in human glioblastomas: gain in chromosome 7p correlating with loss in chromosome 10q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, María del Mar; Fan, Xing; Muñoz, Jorge; Perot, Christine; Fauvet, Didier; Danglot, Giselle; Palacio, Ana; Madero, Pilar; Zazpe, Idoya; Portillo, Eduardo; Tuñón, Teresa; Martínez-Peñuela, José María; Alfaro, Jorge; Eiras, José; Bernheim, Alain; Castresana, Javier S

    2003-01-01

    Various genomic alterations have been detected in glioblastoma. Chromosome 7p, with the epidermal growth factor receptor locus, together with chromosome 10q, with the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10 and deleted in malignant brain tumors-1 loci, and chromosome 9p, with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A locus, are among the most frequently damaged chromosomal regions in glioblastoma. In this study, we evaluated the genetic status of 32 glioblastomas by comparative genomic hybridization; the sensitivity of comparative genomic hybridization versus differential polymerase chain reaction to detect deletions at the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10, deleted in malignant brain tumors-1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A loci and amplifications at the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 locus; the frequency of genetic lesions (gain or loss) at 16 different selected loci (including oncogenes, tumor-suppressor genes, and proliferation markers) mapping on 13 different chromosomes; and the possible existence of a statistical association between any pair of molecular markers studied, to subdivide the glioblastoma entity molecularly. Comparative genomic hybridization showed that the most frequent region of gain was chromosome 7p, whereas the most frequent losses occurred on chromosomes 10q and 13q. The only statistically significant association was found for 7p gain and 10q loss. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Isolation of anonymous, polymorphic DNA fragments from human chromosome 22q12-qter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Dumanski (Jan); A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); M. Ruttledge (Martin); A. Wladis (Andreas); N. Sugawa (Noriaki); V.P. Collins (Peter); M. Nordenskjöld

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA series of 195 random chromosome 22-specific probes, equivalent to approximately 1% of the size of this chromosome, have been isolated from a chromosome 22-specific bacteriophage lambda genomic library. These probes were mapped to four different regions of chromosome 22 on a panel of

  10. Progress and problems in the cytology of Ceratitis capitata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedo, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years of cytological work with Ceratitis capitata has expanded rapidly in concert with increased interest in the application of genetics and molecular biology in the control of this species. Previous studies using mitotic chromosomes produced essential basic karyotypic data but resulted in a confused situation in which several chromosome nomenclature systems were in use. The need for better cytological methods and a standardization of nomenclature was recognised by the IAEA which recommended a system based on that used for Drosophila melanogaster. Polytene chromosome analysis was soon available with the development of techniques for preparing chromosome squashes from male pupal orbital trichogen cells and larval salivary glands. The application of chromosome banding techniques quickly provided detailed morphological information on mitotic chromosomes, particularly the sex chromosomes, and mapping of chromosome rearrangement break-points on newly prepared polytene chromosome maps commenced. This report describes recent unpublished results and offers comments on the still unresolved nomenclature problems in C. capitata

  11. Fine-scale mapping of a locus for severe bipolar mood disorder on chromosome 18p11.3 in the Costa Rican population

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, L. Alison; Service, Susan K.; Reus, Victor I.; Barnes, Glenn; Charlat, Olga; Jawahar, Satya; Lewitzky, Steve; Yang, Qing; Duong, Quyen; Spesny, Mitzi; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Gallegos, Alvaro; Meza, Luis; Molina, Julio; Ramirez, Rolando; Mendez, Roxana; Silva, Sandra; Fournier, Eduardo; Batki, Steven L.; Mathews, Carol A.; Neylan, Thomas; Glatt, Charles E.; Escamilla, Michael A.; Luo, David; Gajiwala, Paresh; Song, Terry; Crook, Stephen; Nguyen, Jasmine B.; Roche, Erin; Meyer, Joanne M.; Leon, Pedro; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk A.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Chen, Hong

    2001-01-01

    We have searched for genes predisposing to bipolar disorder (BP) by studying individuals with the most extreme form of the affected phenotype, BP-I, ascertained from the genetically isolated population of the Central Valley of Costa Rica (CVCR). The results of a previous linkage analysis on two extended CVCR BP-I pedigrees, CR001 and CR004, and of linkage disequilibrium (LD) analyses of a CVCR population sample of BP-I patients implicated a candidate region on 18p11.3. We further investigated this region by creating a physical map and developing 4 new microsatellite and 26 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers for typing in the pedigree and population samples. We report the results of fine-scale association analyses in the population sample, as well as evaluation of haplotypes in pedigree CR001. Our results suggest a candidate region containing six genes but also highlight the complexities of LD mapping of common disorders. PMID:11572994

  12. Mapping of the X-linked cataract (Xcat) mutation, the gene implicated in the Nance Horan syndrome, on the mouse X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian, D; Favor, J; Silvers, W; Avner, P; Chapman, V; Zhou, E

    1994-07-15

    The Xcat mutation in the mouse, an X-linked inherited disorder, is characterized by the congenital onset of cataracts. The cataracts have morphologies similar to those of cataracts found in the human Nance Horan (X-linked cataract dental) syndrome, suggesting that Xcat is an animal model for Nance Horan. The Xcat mutation provides an opportunity to investigate, at the molecular level, the pathogenesis of cataract. As a first step to cloning the Xcat gene, we report the localization of the Xcat mutation with respect to known molecular markers on the mouse X chromosome. Back-cross progeny carrying the Xcat mutation were obtained from an interspecific cross. Genomic DNA from each mouse was subjected to Southern and PCR analysis to identify restriction fragment length polymorphisms and simple sequence length polymorphisms, respectively. Our results refine the location of Xcat to a 2-cM region, eliminate several genes from consideration as the Xcat mutation, identify molecular probes tightly linked with Xcat, and suggest candidate genes responsible for the Xcat phenotype.

  13. cDNA cloning and characterization of the human THRAP2 gene which maps to chromosome 12q24, and its mouse ortholog Thrap2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Luciana; Bartsch, Oliver; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Kalscheuer, Vera M

    2004-05-12

    Characterization of a balanced t(2;12)(q37;q24) translocation in a patient with suspicion of Noonan syndrome revealed that the chromosome 12 breakpoint lies in the vicinity of a novel human gene, thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 2 (THRAP2). We therefore characterized this gene and its mouse counterpart in more detail. Human and mouse THRAP2/Thrap2 span a genomic region of about 310 and >170 kilobases (kb), and both contain 31 exons. Corresponding transcripts are approximately 9.5 kb long. Their open reading frames code for proteins of 2210 and 2203 amino acids, which are 93% identical. By northern blot analysis, human and mouse THRAP2/Thrap2 genes showed ubiquitous expression. Transcripts were most abundant in human skeletal muscle and in mouse heart. THRAP2 protein is 56% identical to human TRAP240, which belongs to the thyroid hormone receptor associated protein (TRAP) complex and is evolutionary conserved up to yeast. This complex is involved in transcriptional regulation and is believed to serve as adapting interface between regulatory proteins bound to specific DNA sequences and RNA polymerase II.

  14. X chromosome and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, L M; Zouk, H; Himmelman, C; Turecki, G

    2011-02-01

    Suicide completion rates are significantly higher in males than females in most societies. Although gender differences in suicide rates have been partially explained by environmental and behavioral factors, it is possible that genetic factors, through differential expression between genders, may also help explain gender moderation of suicide risk. This study investigated X-linked genes in suicide completers using a two-step strategy. We first took advantage of the genetic structure of the French-Canadian population and genotyped 722 unrelated French-Canadian male subjects, of whom 333 were suicide completers and 389 were non-suicide controls, using a panel of 37 microsatellite markers spanning the entire X chromosome. Nine haplotype windows and several individual markers were associated with suicide. Significant results aggregated primarily in two regions, one in the long arm and another in the short arm of chromosome X, limited by markers DXS8051 and DXS8102, and DXS1001 and DXS8106, respectively. The second stage of the study investigated differential brain expression of genes mapping to associated regions in Brodmann areas 8/9, 11, 44 and 46, in an independent sample of suicide completers and controls. Six genes within these regions, Rho GTPase-activating protein 6, adaptor-related protein complex 1 sigma 2 subunit, glycoprotein M6B, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 90  kDa polypeptide 3, spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1 and THO complex 2, were found to be differentially expressed in suicide completers.

  15. Mitotic chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  16. Mitotic chromosome structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heermann, Dieter W., E-mail: heermann@tphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2012-07-15

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  17. Cloning of a cDNA encoding the rat high molecular weight neurofilament peptide (NF-H): Developmental and tissue expression in the rat, and mapping of its human homologue to chromosomes 1 and 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberburg, I.; Spinner, N.; Snyder, S.

    1989-01-01

    Neurofilaments (NFs) are the intermediate filaments specific to nervous tissue. Three peptides with apparent molecular masses of approximately 68 (NF-L), 145 (NF-M), and 200 (NF-H) kDa appear to be the major components of NF. The expression of these peptides is specific to nervous tissue and is developmentally regulated. Recently, complete cDNAs encoding NF-L and NF-M, and partial cDNAs encoding NF-H, have been described. To better understand the normal pathophysiology of NFs the authors chose to clone the cDNA encoding the rat NF-H peptide. Using monoclonal antibodies that recognized NF-H, they screened a rat brain λgt11 library and identified a clone that contained a 2,100-nucleotide cDNA insert representing the carboxyl-terminal portion of the NF-H protein. Levels of NF-H mRNA varied 20-fold among brain regions, with highest levels in pons/medulla, spinal cord, and cerebellum, and lowest levels in olfactory bulb and hypothalamus. Based on these results, the authors infer that half of the developmental increase and most of the interregional variation in the levels of the NF-H mRNA are mediated through message stabilization. Sequence information revealed that the carboxyl-terminal region of the NF-H peptide contained a unique serine-, proline-, alanine-, glutamic acid-, and lysine-rich repeat. Genomic blots revealed a single copy of the gene in the rat genome and two copies in the human genome. In situ hybridizations performed on human chromosomes mapped the NF-H gene to chromosomes 1 and 22

  18. Karyotype characterization of Crotalaria juncea (L. by chromosome banding and physical mapping of 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S rRNA gene sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Mondin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The chromosomes of Crotalaria juncea, a legume of agronomic interest with a 2n = 16 karyotype composed of metacentric chromosomes, were analyzed using several cytogenetic techniques. C-banding revealed heterochromatic regions around the centromeres in all chromosomes and adjacent to the secondary constriction on the chromosome 1 short arm. Fluorescent staining with the GC-specific chromomycin A3 (CMA highlighted these heterochromatic regions and a tiny site on the chromosome 1 long arm while the AT-specific stain 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI induced a reversed pattern. Staining with CMA combined with AT-specific distamycin A (DA counterstaining quenched the pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes, but enhanced fluorescence was observed at the heterochromatic regions around the secondary constriction and on the long arms of chromosomes 1 and 4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH revealed 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA gene sites (45S rDNA on chromosomes 1 and 4, and one 5S rDNA locus on chromosome 1. All the rDNA sites were co-located with the positive-CMA/DA bands, suggesting they were very rich in GC. Silver staining revealed signals at the main 45S rDNA locus on chromosome 1 and, in some cells, chromosome 4 was labeled. Two small nucleoli were detected in a few interphase cells, suggesting that the minor site on chromosome 4 could be active at some stages of the cell cycle.

  19. Association mapping and haplotype analysis of a 3.1-Mb genomic region involved in Fusarium head blight resistance on wheat chromosome 3BS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyang Hao

    Full Text Available A previous study provided an in-depth understanding of molecular population genetics of European and Asian wheat gene pools using a sequenced 3.1-Mb contig (ctg954 on chromosome 3BS. This region is believed to carry the Fhb1 gene for response to Fusarium head blight. In this study, 266 wheat accessions were evaluated in three environments for Type II FHB response based on the single floret inoculation method. Hierarchical clustering (UPGMA based on a Manhattan dissimilarity matrix divided the accessions into eight groups according to five FHB-related traits which have a high correlation between them; Group VIII comprised six accessions with FHB response levels similar to variety Sumai 3. Based on the compressed mixed linear model (MLM, association analysis between five FHB-related traits and 42 molecular markers along the 3.1-Mb region revealed 12 significant association signals at a threshold of P0.1 and P0.05 within each HapB at r(2>0.1 and P<0.001 showed significant differences between the Hap carried by FHB resistant resources, such as Sumai 3 and Wangshuibai, and susceptible genotypes in HapB3 and HapB6. These results suggest that Fhb1 is located within HapB6, with the possibility that another gene is located at or near HapB3. SSR markers and Haps detected in this study will be helpful in further understanding the genetic basis of FHB resistance, and provide useful information for marker-assisted selection of Fhb1 in wheat breeding.

  20. Profound, prelingual nonsyndromic deafness maps to chromosome 10q21 and is caused by a novel missense mutation in the Usher syndrome type IF gene PCDH15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Lance; Merner, Nancy D; Cooke, Sandra; Ives, Elizabeth; Galutira, Dante; Walsh, Vanessa; Walsh, Tom; MacLaren, Linda; Cater, Tracey; Fernandez, Bridget; Green, Jane S; Wilcox, Edward R; Shotland, Lawrence I; Shotland, Larry; Li, Xiaoyan Cindy; Li, X C; Lee, Ming; King, Mary-Claire; Young, Terry-Lynn

    2009-05-01

    We studied a consanguineous family (Family A) from the island of Newfoundland with an autosomal recessive form of prelingual, profound, nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. A genome-wide scan mapped the deafness trait to 10q21-22 (max LOD score of 4.0; D10S196) and fine mapping revealed a 16 Mb ancestral haplotype in deaf relatives. The PCDH15 gene was mapped within the critical region and was an interesting candidate because truncating mutations cause Usher syndrome type IF (USH1F) and two missense mutations have been previously associated with isolated deafness (DFNB23). Sequencing of the PCDH15 gene revealed 33 sequencing variants. Three of these variants were homozygous exclusively in deaf siblings but only one of them was not seen in ethnically matched controls. This novel c.1583 T>A transversion predicts an amino-acid substitution of a valine with an aspartic acid at codon 528 (V528D). Like the two DFNB23 mutations, the V528D mutation in Family A occurs in a highly conserved extracellular cadherin (EC) domain of PCDH15 and is predicted to be more deleterious than the previously identified DFNB23 missense mutations (R134G and G262D). Physical assessment, vestibular and visual function testing in deaf adults ruled out syndromic deafness because of Usher syndrome. This study validates the DFNB23 designation and supports the hypothesis that missense mutations in conserved motifs of PCDH15 cause nonsyndromic hearing loss. This emerging genotype-phenotype correlation in USH1F is similar to that in several other USH1 genes and cautions against a prognosis of a dual sensory loss in deaf children found to be homozygous for hypomorphic mutations at the USH1F locus.

  1. [Immunoprecipitation mapping of the TRX-associated chromosome elements in the fork head gene promoter in the Drosophila melanogaster salivary gland cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riakhovskiĭ, A A; Tillib, S V

    2007-09-01

    Using the method of immunoprecipitation of the in vivo crosslinked and sheared by sonication chromatin, mapping of potential trithorax-associated regulatory elements within the extended (9 kb) promoter region of the fork head gene (fkh) in the Drosophila melanogaster salivary gland cells was performed. Relative homogeneity of the salivary gland cells, along with the parallel use of the antibodies to different domains of the same trithorax protein (TRX), and the introduction of cross-hybridization steps for additional specific enrichment of initial DNA libraries, provided improvement of the method effectiveness and identification of one major and two less expressed potential TRX-binding sites.

  2. Chromosomal Translocations in Black Flies (Diptera: Simuliidae-Facilitators of Adaptive Radiation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Adler

    Full Text Available A macrogenomic investigation of a Holarctic clade of black flies-the Simulium cholodkovskii lineage-provided a platform to explore the implications of a unique, synapomorphic whole-arm interchange in the evolution of black flies. Nearly 60 structural rearrangements were discovered in the polytene complement of the lineage, including 15 common to all 138 analyzed individuals, relative to the central sequence for the entire subgenus Simulium. Three species were represented, of which two Palearctic entities (Simulium cholodkovskii and S. decimatum were sympatric; an absence of hybrids confirmed their reproductive isolation. A third (Nearctic entity had nonhomologous sex chromosomes, relative to the other species, and is considered a separate species, for which the name Simulium nigricoxum is revalidated. A cytophylogeny is inferred and indicates that the two Palearctic taxa are sister species and these, in turn, are the sister group of the Nearctic species. The rise of the S. cholodkovskii lineage encompassed complex chromosomal and genomic restructuring phenomena associated with speciation in black flies, viz. expression of one and the same rearrangement as polymorphic, fixed, or sex linked in different species; taxon-specific differentiation of sex chromosomes; and reciprocal translocation of chromosome arms. The translocation is hypothesized to have occurred early in male spermatogonia, with the translocated chromosomal complement being transmitted to the X- and Y-bearing sperm during spermatogenesis, resulting in alternate disjunction of viable F1 translocation heterozygotes and the eventual formation of more viable and selectable F2 translocation homozygous progeny. Of 11 or 12 independently derived whole-arm interchanges known in the family Simuliidae, at least six are associated with subsequent speciation events, suggesting a facilitating role of translocations in adaptive radiations. The findings are discussed in the context of potential

  3. GenMapDB: a database of mapped human BAC clones

    OpenAIRE

    Morley, Michael; Arcaro, Melissa; Burdick, Joshua; Yonescu, Raluca; Reid, Thomas; Kirsch, Ilan R.; Cheung, Vivian G.

    2001-01-01

    GenMapDB (http://genomics.med.upenn.edu/genmapdb) is a repository of human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones mapped by our laboratory to sequence-tagged site markers. Currently, GenMapDB contains over 3000 mapped clones that span 19 chromosomes, chromosomes 2, 4, 5, 9–22, X and Y. This database provides positional information about human BAC clones from the RPCI-11 human male BAC library. It also contains restriction fragment analysis data and end sequen...

  4. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...

  5. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  6. Analysis of the Ceratitis capitata y chromosome using in situ hybridization to mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willhoeft, U.; Franz, G.

    1998-01-01

    In Ceratitis capitata the Y chromosome is responsible for sex-determination. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for cytogenetic analysis of mitotic chromosomes. FISH with the wild-type strain EgyptII and two repetitive DNA probes enabled us to differentiate between the short and the long arm of the Y chromosome and gives a much better resolution than C-banding of mitotic chromosomes. We identified the Y-chromosomal breakpoints in Y-autosome translocations using FISH. Even more complex rearrangements i.e. deletions and insertions in some translocation strains were detected by this method. A strategy for mapping the primary sex determination factor in Ceratitis capitata by FISH is presented. (author)

  7. ON THE TOPOGRAPHY OF THE SEX- CHROMOSOME IN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    over, we endeavoured to find the relative distribution of these genes in their chromosome, and to determine the distance between them, having in view the construction of a map of the sex-chromosome of fowls. We studied the following genes (in ...

  8. Chromosomal mapping of H3 histone and 5S rRNA genes in eight species of Astyanax (Pisces, Characiformes) with different diploid numbers: syntenic conservation of repetitive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscor, Diovani; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia Pasquali

    2016-03-01

    The genus Astyanax is widely distributed from the southern United States to northern Patagonia, Argentina. While cytogenetic studies have been performed for this genus, little is known about the histone gene families. The aim of this study was to examine the chromosomal relationships among the different species of Astyanax. The chromosomal locations of the 5S rRNA and H3 histone genes were determined in A. abramis, A. asuncionensis, A. altiparanae, A. bockmanni, A. eigenmanniorum, A. mexicanus (all 2n = 50), A. fasciatus (2n = 46), and A. schubarti (2n = 36). All eight species exhibited H3 histone clusters on two chromosome pairs. In six species (A. abramis, A. asuncionensis, A. altiparanae, A. bockmanni, A. eigenmanniorum, and A. fasciatus), syntenic clusters of H3 histone and 5S rDNA were observed on metacentric (m) or submetacentric (sm) chromosomes. In seven species, clusters of 5S rDNA sequences were located on one or two chromosome pairs. In A. mexicanus, 5S rDNA clusters were located on four chromosome pairs. This study demonstrates that H3 histone clusters are conserved on two chromosome pairs in the genus Astyanax, and specific chromosomal features may contribute to the genomic organization of the H3 histone and 5S rRNA genes.

  9. The Drosophila melanogaster CHD1 chromatin remodeling factor modulates global chromosome structure and counteracts HP1a and H3K9me2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Lakshmi; McDaniel, Ivy E; Engie, Liana; Armstrong, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    CHD1 is a conserved chromatin remodeling factor that localizes to active genes and functions in nucleosome assembly and positioning as well as histone turnover. Mouse CHD1 is required for the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency while human CHD1 may function as a tumor suppressor. To investigate the action of CHD1 on higher order chromatin structure in differentiated cells, we examined the consequences of loss of CHD1 and over-expression of CHD1 on polytene chromosomes from salivary glands of third instar Drosophila melanogaster larvae. We observed that chromosome structure is sensitive to the amount of this remodeler. Loss of CHD1 resulted in alterations of chromosome structure and an increase in the heterochromatin protein HP1a, while over-expression of CHD1 disrupted higher order chromatin structure and caused a decrease in levels of HP1a. Over-expression of an ATPase inactive form of CHD1 did not result in severe chromosomal defects, suggesting that the ATPase activity is required for this in vivo phenotype. Interestingly, changes in CHD1 protein levels did not correlate with changes in the levels of the euchromatin mark H3K4me3 or elongating RNA Polymerase II. Thus, while CHD1 is localized to transcriptionally active regions of the genome, it can function to alter the levels of HP1a, perhaps through changes in methylation of H3K9.

  10. The Drosophila melanogaster CHD1 chromatin remodeling factor modulates global chromosome structure and counteracts HP1a and H3K9me2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Bugga

    Full Text Available CHD1 is a conserved chromatin remodeling factor that localizes to active genes and functions in nucleosome assembly and positioning as well as histone turnover. Mouse CHD1 is required for the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency while human CHD1 may function as a tumor suppressor. To investigate the action of CHD1 on higher order chromatin structure in differentiated cells, we examined the consequences of loss of CHD1 and over-expression of CHD1 on polytene chromosomes from salivary glands of third instar Drosophila melanogaster larvae. We observed that chromosome structure is sensitive to the amount of this remodeler. Loss of CHD1 resulted in alterations of chromosome structure and an increase in the heterochromatin protein HP1a, while over-expression of CHD1 disrupted higher order chromatin structure and caused a decrease in levels of HP1a. Over-expression of an ATPase inactive form of CHD1 did not result in severe chromosomal defects, suggesting that the ATPase activity is required for this in vivo phenotype. Interestingly, changes in CHD1 protein levels did not correlate with changes in the levels of the euchromatin mark H3K4me3 or elongating RNA Polymerase II. Thus, while CHD1 is localized to transcriptionally active regions of the genome, it can function to alter the levels of HP1a, perhaps through changes in methylation of H3K9.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be something about the ring structure itself that causes epilepsy. Seizures may occur because certain genes on the ... mapping of telomeric 14q32 deletions: search for the cause of seizures. Am J Med Genet A. ... L, Elia M, Vigevano F. Epilepsy in ring 14 chromosome syndrome. Epilepsy Behav. 2012 ...

  12. Painting of fourth and chromosome-wide regulation of the 4th chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Stenberg, Per; Bernhardsson, Carolina; Larsson, Jan

    2007-05-02

    Drosophila melanogaster exhibits two expression-regulating systems that target whole, specific chromosomes: the dosage compensation system whereby the male-specific lethal complex doubles transcription of genes on the male X-chromosome and the chromosome 4-specific protein Painting of fourth, POF. POF is the first example of an autosome-specific protein and its presence raises the question of the universality of chromosome-specific regulation. Here we show that POF and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) are involved in the global regulation of the 4th chromosome. Contrary to previous conclusions, Pof is not essential for survival of diplo-4th karyotype flies. However, Pof is essential for survival of haplo-4th individuals and expression of chromosome 4 genes in diplo-4th individuals is decreased in the absence of Pof. Mapping of POF using chromatin immunoprecipitation suggested that it binds within genes. Furthermore, we show that POF binding is dependent on heterochromatin and that POF and HP1 bind interdependently to the 4th chromosome. We propose a balancing mechanism involving POF and HP1 that provides a feedback system for fine-tuning expression status of genes on the 4th chromosome.

  13. Origin of amphibian and avian chromosomes by fission, fusion, and retention of ancestral chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Stephen R.; Kump, D. Kevin; Putta, Srikrishna; Pauly, Nathan; Reynolds, Anna; Henry, Rema J.; Basa, Saritha; Walker, John A.; Smith, Jeramiah J.

    2011-01-01

    Amphibian genomes differ greatly in DNA content and chromosome size, morphology, and number. Investigations of this diversity are needed to identify mechanisms that have shaped the evolution of vertebrate genomes. We used comparative mapping to investigate the organization of genes in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), a species that presents relatively few chromosomes (n = 14) and a gigantic genome (>20 pg/N). We show extensive conservation of synteny between Ambystoma, chicken, and human, and a positive correlation between the length of conserved segments and genome size. Ambystoma segments are estimated to be four to 51 times longer than homologous human and chicken segments. Strikingly, genes demarking the structures of 28 chicken chromosomes are ordered among linkage groups defining the Ambystoma genome, and we show that these same chromosomal segments are also conserved in a distantly related anuran amphibian (Xenopus tropicalis). Using linkage relationships from the amphibian maps, we predict that three chicken chromosomes originated by fusion, nine to 14 originated by fission, and 12–17 evolved directly from ancestral tetrapod chromosomes. We further show that some ancestral segments were fused prior to the divergence of salamanders and anurans, while others fused independently and randomly as chromosome numbers were reduced in lineages leading to Ambystoma and Xenopus. The maintenance of gene order relationships between chromosomal segments that have greatly expanded and contracted in salamander and chicken genomes, respectively, suggests selection to maintain synteny relationships and/or extremely low rates of chromosomal rearrangement. Overall, the results demonstrate the value of data from diverse, amphibian genomes in studies of vertebrate genome evolution. PMID:21482624

  14. Chromosomal localization of the human diazepam binding inhibitor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBernardi, M.A.; Crowe, R.R.; Mocchetti, I.; Shows, T.B.; Eddy, R.L.; Costa, E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have used in situ chromosome hybridization and human-mouse somatic cell hybrids to map the gene(s) for human diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous putative modulator of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor acting at the allosteric regulatory center of this receptor that includes the benzodiazepine recognition site. In 784 chromosome spreads hybridized with human DBI cDNA, the distribution of 1,476 labeled sites revealed a significant clustering of autoradiographic grains (11.3% of total label) on the long arm of chromosome 2 (2q). Furthermore, 63.5% of the grains found on 2q were located on 2q12-21, suggesting regional mapping of DBI gene(s) to this segment. Secondary hybridization signals were frequently observed on other chromosomes and they were statistically significant mainly for chromosomes 5, 6, 11, and 14. In addition, DNA from 32 human-mouse cell hybrids was digested with BamHI and probed with human DBI cDNA. A 3.5-kilobase band, which probably represents the human DBI gene, was assigned to chromosome 2. Four higher molecular weight bands, also detected in BamHI digests, could not be unequivocally assigned. A chromosome 2 location was excluded for the 27-, 13-, and 10-kilobase bands. These results assign a human DBI gene to chromosome 2 (2q12-21) and indicate that three of the four homologous sequences detected by the human DBI probe are located on three other chromosomes

  15. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G; Baker, Robert J; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-10-13

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae), focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  16. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele G. Sotero-Caio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62. As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae, focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  17. Linkage group-chromosome correlations in Sordaria macrospora: Chromosome identification by three dimensional reconstruction of their synaptonemal complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickler, D; Leblon, G; Haedens, V; Collard, A; Thuriaux, P

    1984-01-01

    Reconstruction of serially sectioned zygotene and pachytene nuclei has allowed, by measuring the lengths of synaptonemal complexes, an assignment of the 7 linkage (LG) groups to the 7 chromosomes in the fungus Sordaria macrospora. The 7 LG have been established using 19 mutants showing low second division segregation frequencies. Eight chromosomal rearrangements mapped on the 7 LG were used to identify the chromosomes involved. The following one to one assignment of the 7 LG to specific chromosomes was obtained: LG a: chromosome (chr) 1, LG b: chr5, LG c: chr6, LG d: chr7, LG e: chr4, LG f: chr3 and LG g: chr2 (the chromosome carrying the nucleolus organizer region).

  18. Functional Identification of the Plasmodium Centromere and Generation of a Plasmodium Artificial Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Iwanaga, Shiroh; Khan, Shahid M.; Kaneko, Izumi; Christodoulou, Zoe; Newbold, Chris; Yuda, Masao; Janse, Chris J.; Waters, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The artificial chromosome represents a useful tool for gene transfer, both as cloning vectors and in chromosome biology research. To generate a Plasmodium artificial chromosome (PAC), we had to first functionally identify and characterize the parasite's centromere. A putative centromere (pbcen5) was cloned from chromosome 5 of the rodent parasite P. berghei based on a Plasmodium gene-synteny map. Plasmids containing pbcen5 were stably maintained in parasites during a blood-stage infec...

  19. Discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masubuchi, Masanori

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography. In this method, the difference in DNA synthetic phase between each chromosome was used as a standard, and the used chromosome was in metaphase, as morphological characteristics were markedly in this phase. Cell cycle and autoradiography with 3 H-thymidine were also examined. In order to discriminate chromosome by autoradiography, it was effective to utilize the labelled pattern in late DNA synthetic phase, where asynchronous replication of chromosome appeared most obviously. DNA synthesis in chromosome was examined in each DNA synthetic phase by culturing the chromosome after the treatment with 3 H-thymidine and altering the time to prepare chromosome specimen. Discrimination of chromosome in plants and animals by autoradiography was also mentioned. It was noticed as a structural and functional discrimination of chromosome to observe amino acid uptake into chromosome protein and to utilize the difference in labelled pattern between the sites of chromosome. (K. Serizawa)

  20. Fetal chromosome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, A; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...

  1. Effects of chromosomal rearrangements on the zeste-white interaction in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik-Utlaut, S.M.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    Three gene systems have been shown to exhibit proximity-dependent phenotypes in Drosophila melanogaster; bithorax (BX-C), decapentaplegic (DPP-C) and white (w). In structurally homozygous genotypes, specific allelic combinations at these loci exhibit one phenotype, while in certain rearrangement heterozygotes the same allelic combinations exhibit dramatically different phenotypes. The genetic properties of the proximity-dependent allelic complementation (termed transvection effects) at the BX-C and DPP-C, are quite similar. As determined by cytogenetic analysis of transvection-disrupting rearrangements, the critical regions for the BX-C and DDP-C transvection effects extend proximally from these loci for several hundred polytene chromosome bands. The interaction between the zeste and white loci appears to depend upon the proximity of the two w + alleles. By use of insertional duplications, displacement of w + homologues has been shown to interfere with the zeste-white interaction. In this report, the authors investigate the basis for the difference in the size of the BX-C and DPP-C critical regions from that of white using a 137 Cs-mutagenesis procedure. The authors test and eliminate the possibility that the difference is due to evidence strongly suggests that the zeste-white interaction is, at the phenotypic level, much less sensitive to displacement of the homologous genes than is transvection at either the BX-C or DPP-C. Given these results, they suggest that the zeste-white interaction and transvection are two different proximity-dependent phenomena

  2. Genetic linkage maps of chicken chromosomes 6, 7, 8, 11 and 13 from a Brazilian resource population Mapas de ligação dos cromossomos 6, 7, 8, 11 e 13 de uma população brasileira de galinha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Ambo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A linkage map is essential not only for quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping, but also for the organization and location of genes along the chromosomes. The present study is part of a project whose major objective is, besides from construction the linkage maps, the whole genome scan for mapping QTL for performance traits in the Brazilian experimental chicken population. Linkage maps of chicken chromosomes 6 to 8, 11 and 13 were constructed based on this population. The population was developed from two generations of crossbreeding between a broiler and a layer line. Fifty-one microsatellite markers were tested, from which 28 were informative: 4, 8, 7, 4 and 5 for chromosomes 6, 7, 8, 11 and 13, respectively. A SNP located in the leptin receptor gene was included for chromosome 8. Ten parental, 8 F1 and 459 F2 chickens from five full-sib families were genotyped with these markers. The number of total informative meioses per locus varied from 232 to 862, and the number of phase-known informative meioses from 0 to 764. Marker orders in the chromosomes coincided with those of the chicken consensus map, except for markers ADL0147 and MCW0213, on chromosome 13, which were inverted. The reduced number of phase-known informative meioses for ADL0147 (150 may be pointed out as a possible cause for this inversion, apart from the relative short distance between the two markers involved in the inversion (10.5 cM.O mapa de ligação além de ser fundamental no mapeamento de locos de características quantitativas (QTLs é importante na organização e localização de genes distribuídos ao longo dos cromossomos. O presente estudo é parte de um trabalho cujo objetivo maior, é a análise de mapeamento de QTLs para características de desempenho no genoma de uma população experimental desenvolvida no Brasil. Com base nesta população foram construídos os mapas de ligação dos cromossomos 6 a 8, 11 e 13 da galinha. A população foi desenvolvida a partir

  3. FISH mapping of microsatellite loci from Drosophila subobscura and its comparison to related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Josiane; Serra, Lluis; Solé, Elisabet; Pascual, Marta

    2010-02-01

    Microsatellites are highly polymorphic markers that are distributed through all the genome being more abundant in non-coding regions. Whether they are neutral or under selection, these markers if localized can be used as co-dominant molecular markers to explore the dynamics of the evolutionary processes. Their cytological localization can allow identifying genes under selection, inferring recombination from a genomic point of view, or screening for the genomic reorganizations occurring during the evolution of a lineage, among others. In this paper, we report for the first time the localization of microsatellite loci by fluorescent in situ hybridization on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. In Drosophila subobscura, 72 dinucleotide microsatellite loci were localized by fluorescent in situ hybridization yielding unique hybridization signals. In the sex chromosome, microsatellite distribution was not uniform and its density was higher than in autosomes. We identified homologous segments to the sequence flanking the microsatellite loci by browsing the genome sequence of Drosophila pseudoobscura and Drosophila melanogaster. Their localization supports the conservation of Muller's chromosomal elements among Drosophila species and the existence of multiple intrachromosomal rearrangements within each evolutionary lineage. Finally, the lack of microsatellite repeats in the homologous D. melanogaster sequences suggests convergent evolution for high microsatellite density in the distal part of the X chromosome.

  4. Report on the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, D.J. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Armour, J. [Univ. of Leicester (England). Dept. of Genetics; Bale, A.E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Genetics] [and others

    1993-12-31

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 9 was held in Chatham, Massachusetts on April 18--20, 1993. Fifty-three abstracts were received and the data presented on posters. The purpose of the meeting was to bring together all interested investigators working on the map of chromosome 9, many of whom had disease-specific interests. After a brief presentation of interests and highlighted results, the meeting broke up into the following subgroups for production of consensus maps: 9p; 9cen-q32; 9q32 ter. A global mapping group also met. Reports of each of these working groups is presented in the summary.

  5. CHROMOSOMES OF WOODY SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio R Daviña

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome numbers of nine subtropical woody species collected in Argentina and Paraguay are reported. The counts tor Coutarea hexandra (2n=52, Inga vera subsp. affinis 2n=26 (Fabaceae and Chorisia speciosa 2n=86 (Bombacaceae are reported for the first time. The chromosome number given for Inga semialata 2n=52 is a new cytotype different from the previously reported. Somatic chromosome numbers of the other taxa studied are: Sesbania punicea 2n=12, S. virgata 2n=12 and Pilocarpus pennatifolius 2n=44 from Argentina

  6. Chromosomal organization of adrenergic receptor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang-Feng, T.L.; Xue, Feiyu; Zhong, Wuwei; Cotecchia, S.; Frielle, T.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Francke, U.

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptors (ARs) (subtypes α 1 , α 2 , β 1 , and β 2 ) are a prototypic family of guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-coupled receptors that mediate the physiological effects of the hormone epinephrine and the neurotransmitter norepinephrine. The authors have previously assigned the genes for β 2 -and α 2 -AR to human chromosomes 5 and 10, respectively. By Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, they have now mapped the α 1 -AR gene to chromosome 5q32→q34, the same position as β 2 -AR, and the β 1 -AR gene to chromosome 10q24→q26, the region where α 2 -AR, is located. In mouse, both α 2 -and β 1 -AR genes were assigned to chromosome 19, and the α 1 -AR locus was localized to chromosome 11. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis has shown that the α 1 -and β 2 -AR genes in humans are within 300 kilobases (kb) and the distance between the α 2 - and β 1 -AR genes is <225 kb. The proximity of these two pairs of AR genes and the sequence similarity that exists among all the ARs strongly suggest that they are evolutionarily related. Moreover, they likely arose from a common ancestral receptor gene and subsequently diverged through gene duplication and chromosomal duplication to perform their distinctive roles in mediation the physiological effects of catecholamines. The AR genes thus provide a paradigm for understanding the evolution of such structurally conserved yet functionally divergent families off receptor molecules

  7. Chromosome polymorphism in a population of ceratitis capitata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifschitz, E.

    1987-08-01

    A morphological chromosomal polymorphism along with the observation of B chromosomes in a natural population of Ceratitis capitata is reported. A variability affecting the centromere size of chromosome 3 is described. The observed B chromosome is minute, heterochromatic and telocentric. The B chromosome was found in the male and female germ cells and it exhibited, in the males, intra-individual numerical variation with OB and IB cells, which suggested a mitotic instability. It was also found, in both sexes, in somatic cells (cerebral ganglia tissue). Only males transmitted the B chromosomes to the progeny. The high rate of transmission suggested a differential utilization of the sperm carrying the B chromosomes or a preferential segregation into secondary spermatocytes. Previously reported linkage relationship between a pupal esterase gene (Est-1) and a pupa colour mutant (nig) has been extended to a line carrying a Y-chromosome (Y,B) shorter than the one previously studied (Y,A). Furthermore, an elaborate crossing scheme has been devised in order to estimate the recombination distances between these two genes and a third one affecting pupal length (lp-1). It is concluded that all three genes are in the same linkage group but Est-1 is far from the other two. In turn, nig and lp-1 are separated by 14.9 map units. It is confirmed that genetic recombination does not regularly occur at high frequency in the male and this frequency is not increased by the varying length of the Y-chromosome. Refs, figs, tabs

  8. Conserved chromosomal positions of dual domains of the ets protooncogene in cats, mice, and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, D.K.; McWilliams-Smith, M.J.; Kozak, C.

    1986-01-01

    The mammalian protooncogene homologue of the avian v-ets sequence from the E26 retrovirus consists of two sequentially distinct domains located on different chromosomes. Using somatic cell hybrid panels, the authors have mapped the mammalian homologue of the 5' v-ets-domain to chromosome 11 (ETS1) in man, to chromosome 9 (ets-1) in mouse, and to chromosome D1 (ETS1) in the domestic cat. The mammalian homologue of the 3' v-ets domain was similarly mapped to human chromosome 21 (ETS2), to mouse chromosome 16 (Ets-2), and to feline chromosome C2 (ETS2). Both protooncogenes fell in syntenic groups of homologous linked loci that were conserved among the three species. The occurrence of two distinct functional protooncogenes and their conservation of linkage positions in the three mammalian orders indicate that these two genes have been separate since before the evolutionary divergence of mammals

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  10. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas-Pequignot, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs [fr

  11. B chromosomes are associated with redistribution of genetic recombination towards lower recombination chromosomal regions in perennial ryegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, John; Phillips, Dylan; Thomas, Ann; Gasior, Dagmara; Evans, Caron; Powell, Wayne; King, Julie; King, Ian; Jenkins, Glyn; Armstead, Ian

    2018-04-09

    Supernumerary 'B' chromosomes are non-essential components of the genome present in a range of plant and animal species-including many grasses. Within diploid and polyploid ryegrass and fescue species, including the forage grass perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), the presence of B chromosomes has been reported as influencing both chromosome pairing and chiasma frequencies. In this study, the effects of the presence/absence of B chromosomes on genetic recombination has been investigated through generating DArT (Diversity Arrays Technology) marker genetic maps for six perennial ryegrass diploid populations, the pollen parents of which contained either two B or zero B chromosomes. Through genetic and cytological analyses of these progeny and their parents, we have identified that, while overall cytological estimates of chiasma frequencies were significantly lower in pollen mother cells with two B chromosomes as compared with zero B chromosomes, the recombination frequencies within some marker intervals were actually increased, particularly for marker intervals in lower recombination regions of chromosomes, namely pericentromeric regions. Thus, in perennial ryegrass, the presence of two B chromosomes redistributed patterns of meiotic recombination in pollen mother cells in ways which could increase the range of allelic variation available to plant breeders.

  12. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    OpenAIRE

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G.; Baker, Robert J.; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within d...

  13. First report on an X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia family with X chromosome inversion: Breakpoint mapping reveals the pathogenic mechanism and preimplantation genetics diagnosis achieves an unaffected birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tonghua; Yin, Biao; Zhu, Yuanchang; Li, Guangui; Ye, Lijun; Liang, Desheng; Zeng, Yong

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the etiology of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) in a family with an inversion of the X chromosome [inv(X)(p21q13)] and to achieve a healthy birth following preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Next generation sequencing (NGS) and Sanger sequencing analysis were carried out to define the inversion breakpoint. Multiple displacement amplification, amplification of breakpoint junction fragments, Sanger sequencing of exon 1 of ED1, haplotyping of informative short tandem repeat markers and gender determination were performed for PGD. NGS data of the proband sample revealed that the size of the possible inverted fragment was over 42Mb, spanning from position 26, 814, 206 to position 69, 231, 915 on the X chromosome. The breakpoints were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. A total of 5 blastocyst embryos underwent trophectoderm biopsy. Two embryos were diagnosed as carriers and three were unaffected. Two unaffected blastocysts were transferred and a singleton pregnancy was achieved. Following confirmation by prenatal diagnosis, a healthy baby was delivered. This is the first report of an XLHED family with inv(X). ED1 is disrupted by the X chromosome inversion in this XLHED family and embryos with the X chromosomal abnormality can be accurately identified by means of PGD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Bloom syndrome and maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodage, T.; Prasad, M.; Trent, R.J.; Smith, A. (Children' s Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales (New Zealand)); Dixon, J.W.; Romain, D.R.; Columbano-Green, L.M.; Selby, R.E. (Wellington Hospital (New Zealand)); Graham, D. (Waikato Hospital, Hamilton (New Zealand)); Rogan, P.K. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey, PA (United States)) (and others)

    1994-07-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increases in the frequency of sister-chromatid exchange and in the incidence of malignancy. Chromosome-transfer studies have shown the BS locus to map to chromosome 15q. This report describes a subject with features of both BS and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Molecular analysis showed maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 15. Meiotic recombination between the two disomic chromosomes 15 has resulted in heterodisomy for proximal 15q and isodisomy for distal 15q. In this individual BS is probably due to homozygosity for a gene that is telomeric to D15S95 (15q25), rather than to genetic imprinting, the mechanism responsible for the development of PWS. This report represents the first application of disomy analysis to the regional localization of a disease gene. This strategy promises to be useful in the genetic mapping of other uncommon autosomal recessive conditions. 37 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  16. Mapping of repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Tadaaki

    1985-01-01

    Chromosome mapping of repair genes involved in U.V. sensitivity is reported. Twenty-three of 25 hybrid cells were resistant to U.V. light. Survival curves of 2 U.V.-resistant cell strains, which possessed mouse chromosomes and human chromosome No.7 - 16, were similar to those of wild strain (L5178Y). On the other hand, survival curves of U.V.-sensitive hybrid cells was analogous to those of Q31. There was a definitive difference in the frequency of inducible chromosome aberrations between U.V. resistant and sensitive mouse-human hybrid cells. U.V.-resistant cell strains possessed the ability of excision repair. Analysis of karyotype in hybrid cells showed that the difference in U.V. sensitivity is dependent upon whether or not human chromosome No.13 is present. Synteny test on esterase D-determining locus confirmed that there is an agreement between the presence of chromosome No.13 and the presence of human esterase D activity. These results led to a conclusion that human genes which compensate recessive character of U.V.-sensitive mutant strain, Q31, with mouse-human hybrid cells are located on the locus of chromosome No.13. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...... chromosomes, we find a core set of 1269 encoded protein families for chromosome 1, and a core of 252 encoded protein families for chromosome 2. Many of these core proteins are also found in the draft genomes (although which chromosome they are located on is unknown.) Of the chromosome specific core protein...... families, 1169 and 153 are uniquely found in chromosomes 1 and 2, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) terms for each of the protein families were determined, and the different sets for each chromosome were compared. A total of 363 different "Molecular Function" GO categories were found for chromosome 1...

  18. The study of human Y chromosome variation through ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivisild, Toomas

    2017-05-01

    High throughput sequencing methods have completely transformed the study of human Y chromosome variation by offering a genome-scale view on genetic variation retrieved from ancient human remains in context of a growing number of high coverage whole Y chromosome sequence data from living populations from across the world. The ancient Y chromosome sequences are providing us the first exciting glimpses into the past variation of male-specific compartment of the genome and the opportunity to evaluate models based on previously made inferences from patterns of genetic variation in living populations. Analyses of the ancient Y chromosome sequences are challenging not only because of issues generally related to ancient DNA work, such as DNA damage-induced mutations and low content of endogenous DNA in most human remains, but also because of specific properties of the Y chromosome, such as its highly repetitive nature and high homology with the X chromosome. Shotgun sequencing of uniquely mapping regions of the Y chromosomes to sufficiently high coverage is still challenging and costly in poorly preserved samples. To increase the coverage of specific target SNPs capture-based methods have been developed and used in recent years to generate Y chromosome sequence data from hundreds of prehistoric skeletal remains. Besides the prospects of testing directly as how much genetic change in a given time period has accompanied changes in material culture the sequencing of ancient Y chromosomes allows us also to better understand the rate at which mutations accumulate and get fixed over time. This review considers genome-scale evidence on ancient Y chromosome diversity that has recently started to accumulate in geographic areas favourable to DNA preservation. More specifically the review focuses on examples of regional continuity and change of the Y chromosome haplogroups in North Eurasia and in the New World.

  19. Neo-sex Chromosomes in the Monarch Butterfly, Danaus plexippus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Mongue

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the discovery of a neo-sex chromosome in the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, and several of its close relatives. Z-linked scaffolds in the D. plexippus genome assembly were identified via sex-specific differences in Illumina sequencing coverage. Additionally, a majority of the D. plexippus genome assembly was assigned to chromosomes based on counts of one-to-one orthologs relative to the butterfly Melitaea cinxia (with replication using two other lepidopteran species, in which genome scaffolds have been mapped to linkage groups. Sequencing coverage-based assessments of Z linkage combined with homology-based chromosomal assignments provided strong evidence for a Z-autosome fusion in the Danaus lineage, involving the autosome homologous to chromosome 21 in M. cinxia. Coverage analysis also identified three notable assembly errors resulting in chimeric Z-autosome scaffolds. Cytogenetic analysis further revealed a large W chromosome that is partially euchromatic, consistent with being a neo-W chromosome. The discovery of a neo-Z and the provisional assignment of chromosome linkage for >90% of D. plexippus genes lays the foundation for novel insights concerning sex chromosome evolution in this female-heterogametic model species for functional and evolutionary genomics.

  20. HRAS1-selected chromosome transfer generates markers that colocalize aniridia- and genitourinary dysplasia-associated translocation breakpoints and the Wilms tumor gene within band 11p13.

    OpenAIRE

    Porteous, D J; Bickmore, W; Christie, S; Boyd, P A; Cranston, G; Fletcher, J M; Gosden, J R; Rout, D; Seawright, A; Simola, K O

    1987-01-01

    We show that chromosome-mediated gene transfer can provide an enriched source of DNA markers for predetermined, subchromosomal regions of the human genome. Forty-four human DNA recombinants isolated from a HRAS1-selected chromosome-mediated gene transformant map exclusively to chromosome 11, with several sublocalizing to the Wilms tumor region at 11p13. We present a detailed molecular map of the deletion chromosomes 11 from five WAGR (Wilms tumor/aniridia/genitourinary abnormalities/mental re...

  1. Utilization of deletion bins to anchor and order sequences along the wheat 7B chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, Tatiana; Grønvold, Lars; Kumar, Ajay; Kianian, Shahryar; He, Xinyao; Lillemo, Morten; Springer, Nathan M; Lien, Sigbjørn; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Sandve, Simen R

    2014-09-01

    A total of 3,671 sequence contigs and scaffolds were mapped to deletion bins on wheat chromosome 7B providing a foundation for developing high-resolution integrated physical map for this chromosome. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has a large, complex and highly repetitive genome which is challenging to assemble into high quality pseudo-chromosomes. As part of the international effort to sequence the hexaploid bread wheat genome by the international wheat genome sequencing consortium (IWGSC) we are focused on assembling a reference sequence for chromosome 7B. The successful completion of the reference chromosome sequence is highly dependent on the integration of genetic and physical maps. To aid the integration of these two types of maps, we have constructed a high-density deletion bin map of chromosome 7B. Using the 270 K Nimblegen comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array on a set of cv. Chinese spring deletion lines, a total of 3,671 sequence contigs and scaffolds (~7.8 % of chromosome 7B physical length) were mapped into nine deletion bins. Our method of genotyping deletions on chromosome 7B relied on a model-based clustering algorithm (Mclust) to accurately predict the presence or absence of a given genomic sequence in a deletion line. The bin mapping results were validated using three different approaches, viz. (a) PCR-based amplification of randomly selected bin mapped sequences (b) comparison with previously mapped ESTs and (c) comparison with a 7B genetic map developed in the present study. Validation of the bin mapping results suggested a high accuracy of the assignment of 7B sequence contigs and scaffolds to the 7B deletion bins.

  2. Cytogenetic mapping of the Muller F element genes in Drosophila willistoni group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Sebastián; Panzera, Yanina; Lúcia da Silva Valente, Vera; de Melo, Zilpa das Graças Silva; Garcia, Carolina; Garcia, Ana Cristina Lauer; Montes, Martín Alejandro; Rohde, Claudia

    2014-10-01

    Comparative genomics in Drosophila began in 1940, when Muller stated that the ancestral haploid karyotype of this genus is constituted by five acrocentric chromosomes and one dot chromosome, named A to F elements. In some species of the willistoni group such as Drosophila willistoni and D. insularis, the F element, instead of a dot chromosome, has been incorporated into the E element, forming chromosome III (E + F fusion). The aim of this study was to investigate the scope of the E + F fusion in the willistoni group, evaluating six other species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to locate two genes of the F element previously studied-cubitus interruptus (ci) and eyeless (ey)-in species of the willistoni and bocainensis subgroups. Moreover, polytene chromosome photomaps corresponding to the F element (basal portion of chromosome III) were constructed for each species studied. In D. willistoni, D. paulistorum and D. equinoxialis, the ci gene was located in subSectction 78B and the ey gene in 78C. In D. tropicalis, ci was located in subSection 76B and ey in 76C. In species of the bocainensis subgroup, ci and ey were localized, respectively, at subsections 76B and 76C in D. nebulosa and D. capricorni, and 76A and 76C in D. fumipennis. Despite the differences in the subsection numbers, all species showed the same position for ci and ey. The results confirm the synteny of E + F fusion in willistoni and bocainensis subgroups, and allow estimating the occurrence of this event at 15 Mya, at least.

  3. PCR-Based EST Mapping in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. PERRY GUSTAFSON

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mapping expressed sequence tags (ESTs to hexaploid wheat is aimed to reveal the structure and function of the hexaploid wheat genome. Sixty eight ESTs representing 26 genes were mapped into all seven homologous chromosome groups of wheat (Triticum aestivum L using a polymerase chain reaction technique. The majority of the ESTs were mapped to homologous chromosome group 2, and the least were mapped to homologous chromosome group 6. Comparative analysis between the EST map from this study and the EST map based on RFLPs showed 14 genes that have been mapped by both approaches were mapped to the same arm of the same homologous chromosome, which indicated that using PCR-based ESTs was a reliable approach in mapping ESTs in hexaploid wheat.

  4. Johannsen's criticism of the chromosome theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    The genotype theory of Wilhelm Johannsen (1857-1927) was an important contribution to the founding of classical genetics. This theory built on Johannsen's experimental demonstration that hereditary change is discontinuous, not continuous as had been widely assumed. Johannsen is also known for his criticism of traditional Darwinian evolution by natural selection, as well as his criticism of the classical Mendelian chromosome theory of heredity. He has often been seen as one of the anti-Darwinians that caused the "eclipse of Darwinism" in the early 20th century, before it was saved by the Modern Synthesis. This article focuses on Johannsen's criticism of the chromosome theory. He was indeed skeptical of the notion of the chromosomes as the sole carriers of heredity, but he praised the mapping of Mendelian genes on the chromosomes as a major step forward. Johannsen objected that these genes could not account for the whole of heredity, and that the stability of the genotype depended on much more than the stability of Mendelian genes. For Johannsen, the genotype, as a property of the whole organism, was the fundamental and empirically well-established entity.

  5. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... chromosomes that results in formation of derivative chromosomes with a mixed DNA sequence. The method currently used for their detection is Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization, which requires a use of expensive, fluorescently labeled probes that target the derivative chromosomes. We present here a double...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...

  6. Mutations and chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlman, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    The genetic changes of mutations and chromosomal aberrations are discussed. The consequences of both depend not only on the type of genetic change produced but also on the type of cell that is affected and on the development stage of the organism. (C.F.)

  7. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-01-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  8. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Know Your Chromosomes The Strong Holds of Family Trees. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 30-38. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...

  10. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  11. The human intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin: molecular characterization and chromosomal mapping of the gene to 10p within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozyraki, R; Kristiansen, M; Silahtaroglu, A

    1998-01-01

    -5445 on the short arm of chromosome 10. This is within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) 6-cM region harboring the unknown recessive-gene locus of juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by intestinal malabsorption of cobalamin (Imerslund-Gräsbeck's disease). In conclusion, the present...... molecular and genetic information on human cubilin now provides circumstantial evidence that an impaired synthesis, processing, or ligand binding of cubilin is the molecular background of this hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-May-15...

  12. The alpha-spectrin gene is on chromosome 1 in mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, K; Palumbo, A P; Isobe, M; Kozak, C A; Monaco, S; Rovera, G; Croce, C M; Curtis, P J

    1985-06-01

    By using alpha-spectrin cDNA clones of murine and human origin and somatic cell hybrids segregating either mouse or human chromosomes, the gene for alpha-spectrin has been mapped to chromosome 1 in both species. This assignment of the mouse alpha-spectrin gene to mouse chromosome 1 by DNA hybridization strengthens the previous identification of the alpha-spectrin locus in mouse with the sph locus, which previously was mapped by linkage analysis to mouse chromosome 1, distal to the Pep-3 locus. By in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes, the human alpha-spectrin gene has been localized to 1q22-1q25; interestingly, the locus for a non-Rh-linked form of elliptocytosis has been provisionally mapped to band 1q2 by family linkage studies.

  13. Statistical methods in physical mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.O.

    1995-05-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. This dissertation concentrates on constructing high-resolution physical maps. It demonstrates how probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis can aid molecular geneticists in the tasks of planning, execution, and evaluation of physical maps of chromosomes and large chromosomal regions. The dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the field of physical mapping, describing the role of physical mapping in gene isolation and ill past efforts at mapping chromosomal regions. The next two chapters review and extend known results on predicting progress in large mapping projects. Such predictions help project planners decide between various approaches and tactics for mapping large regions of the human genome. Chapter 2 shows how probability models have been used in the past to predict progress in mapping projects. Chapter 3 presents new results, based on stationary point process theory, for progress measures for mapping projects based on directed mapping strategies. Chapter 4 describes in detail the construction of all initial high-resolution physical map for human chromosome 19. This chapter introduces the probability and statistical models involved in map construction in the context of a large, ongoing physical mapping project. Chapter 5 concentrates on one such model, the trinomial model. This chapter contains new results on the large-sample behavior of this model, including distributional results, asymptotic moments, and detection error rates. In addition, it contains an optimality result concerning experimental procedures based on the trinomial model. The last chapter explores unsolved problems and describes future work

  14. Statistical methods in physical mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, David O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. This dissertation concentrates on constructing high-resolution physical maps. It demonstrates how probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis can aid molecular geneticists in the tasks of planning, execution, and evaluation of physical maps of chromosomes and large chromosomal regions. The dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the field of physical mapping, describing the role of physical mapping in gene isolation and ill past efforts at mapping chromosomal regions. The next two chapters review and extend known results on predicting progress in large mapping projects. Such predictions help project planners decide between various approaches and tactics for mapping large regions of the human genome. Chapter 2 shows how probability models have been used in the past to predict progress in mapping projects. Chapter 3 presents new results, based on stationary point process theory, for progress measures for mapping projects based on directed mapping strategies. Chapter 4 describes in detail the construction of all initial high-resolution physical map for human chromosome 19. This chapter introduces the probability and statistical models involved in map construction in the context of a large, ongoing physical mapping project. Chapter 5 concentrates on one such model, the trinomial model. This chapter contains new results on the large-sample behavior of this model, including distributional results, asymptotic moments, and detection error rates. In addition, it contains an optimality result concerning experimental procedures based on the trinomial model. The last chapter explores unsolved problems and describes future work.

  15. Genome landscape and evolutionary plasticity of chromosomes in malaria mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Xia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonrandom distribution of rearrangements is a common feature of eukaryotic chromosomes that is not well understood in terms of genome organization and evolution. In the major African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, polymorphic inversions are highly nonuniformly distributed among five chromosomal arms and are associated with epidemiologically important adaptations. However, it is not clear whether the genomic content of the chromosomal arms is associated with inversion polymorphism and fixation rates.To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of chromosomal inversions, we created a physical map for an Asian malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi, and compared it with the genome of An. gambiae. We also developed and deployed novel Bayesian statistical models to analyze genome landscapes in individual chromosomal arms An. gambiae. Here, we demonstrate that, despite the paucity of inversion polymorphisms on the X chromosome, this chromosome has the fastest rate of inversion fixation and the highest density of transposable elements, simple DNA repeats, and GC content. The highly polymorphic and rapidly evolving autosomal 2R arm had overrepresentation of genes involved in cellular response to stress supporting the role of natural selection in maintaining adaptive polymorphic inversions. In addition, the 2R arm had the highest density of regions involved in segmental duplications that clustered in the breakpoint-rich zone of the arm. In contrast, the slower evolving 2L, 3R, and 3L, arms were enriched with matrix-attachment regions that potentially contribute to chromosome stability in the cell nucleus.These results highlight fundamental differences in evolutionary dynamics of the sex chromosome and autosomes and revealed the strong association between characteristics of the genome landscape and rates of chromosomal evolution. We conclude that a unique combination of various classes of genes and repetitive DNA in each arm, rather than a single type

  16. Chromosome Banding in Amphibia. XXXII. The Genus Xenopus (Anura, Pipidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic chromosomes of 16 species of the frog genus Xenopus were prepared from kidney and lung cell cultures. In the chromosomes of 7 species, high-resolution replication banding patterns could be induced by treating the cultures with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and deoxythymidine (dT) in succession, and in 6 of these species the BrdU/dT-banded chromosomes could be arranged into karyotypes. In the 3 species of the clade with 2n = 20 and 4n = 40 chromosomes (X. tropicalis, X. epitropicalis, X. new tetraploid 1), as well as in the 3 species with 4n = 36 chromosomes (X. laevis, X. borealis, X. muelleri), the BrdU/dT-banded karyotypes show a high degree of homoeology, though differences were detected between these groups. Translocations, inversions, insertions or sex-specific replication bands were not observed. Minor replication asynchronies found between chromosomes probably involve heterochromatic regions. BrdU/dT replication banding of Xenopus chromosomes provides the landmarks necessary for the exact physical mapping of genes and repetitive sequences. FISH with an X. laevis 5S rDNA probe detected multiple hybridization sites at or near the long-arm telomeric regions in most chromosomes of X. laevis and X. borealis, whereas in X. muelleri, the 5S rDNA sequences are located exclusively at the long-arm telomeres of a single chromosome pair. Staining with the AT base pair-specific fluorochrome quinacrine mustard revealed brightly fluorescing heterochromatic regions in the majority of X. borealis chromosomes which are absent in other Xenopus species.

  17. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Seldin, M.F. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Molecular characterization and chromosomal distribution of a species-specific transcribed centromeric satellite repeat from the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina T Tsoumani

    Full Text Available Satellite repetitive sequences that accumulate in the heterochromatin consist a large fraction of a genome and due to their properties are suggested to be implicated in centromere function. Current knowledge of heterochromatic regions of Bactrocera oleae genome, the major pest of the olive tree, is practically nonexistent. In our effort to explore the repetitive DNA portion of B. oleae genome, a novel satellite sequence designated BoR300 was isolated and cloned. The present study describes the genomic organization, abundance and chromosomal distribution of BoR300 which is organized in tandem, forming arrays of 298 bp-long monomers. Sequence analysis showed an AT content of 60.4%, a CENP-B like-motif and a high curvature value based on predictive models. Comparative analysis among randomly selected monomers demonstrated a high degree of sequence homogeneity (88%-97% of BoR300 repeats, which are present at approximately 3,000 copies per haploid genome accounting for about 0.28% of the total genomic DNA, based on two independent qPCR approaches. In addition, expression of the repeat was also confirmed through RT-PCR, by which BoR300 transcripts were detected in both sexes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of BoR300 on mitotic metaphases and polytene chromosomes revealed signals to the centromeres of two out of the six chromosomes which indicated a chromosome-specific centromeric localization. Moreover, BoR300 is not conserved in the closely related Bactrocera species tested and it is also absent in other dipterans, but it's rather restricted to the B. oleae genome. This feature of species-specificity attributed to BoR300 satellite makes it a good candidate as an identification probe of the insect among its relatives at early development stages.

  19. Dissection of barley chromosomes 1H and 6H by the gametocidal system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ishihara, A.; Mizuno, N.; Islam, R.A.K.M.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Endo, Takashi R.; Nasuda, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 5 (2014), s. 203-214 ISSN 1341-7568 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : barley * chromosome dissection * chromosome mapping Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.930, year: 2014 http://gateway.isiknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=MEDLINE&DestLinkType=FullRecord&UT=25832747

  20. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) linked to chromosome 3q in an Italian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, P; De Fazio, A; Croce, A I; Stanziale, P; Zelante, L

    1998-08-01

    We report an Italian family affected by Usher type III syndrome. Linkage study, performed using markers corresponding to the Usher loci already mapped, clearly showed linkage with markers on chromosome 3q24-25. Our data further support the presence of an Usher III locus on chromosome 3, as recently reported in a Finnish population.

  1. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) linked to chromosome 3q in an Italian family.

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparini, P; De Fazio, A; Croce, A I; Stanziale, P; Zelante, L

    1998-01-01

    We report an Italian family affected by Usher type III syndrome. Linkage study, performed using markers corresponding to the Usher loci already mapped, clearly showed linkage with markers on chromosome 3q24-25. Our data further support the presence of an Usher III locus on chromosome 3, as recently reported in a Finnish population.

  2. The X chromosome in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégu, Teddy; Aeby, Eric; Lee, Jeannie T

    2017-06-01

    Extensive 3D folding is required to package a genome into the tiny nuclear space, and this packaging must be compatible with proper gene expression. Thus, in the well-hierarchized nucleus, chromosomes occupy discrete territories and adopt specific 3D organizational structures that facilitate interactions between regulatory elements for gene expression. The mammalian X chromosome exemplifies this structure-function relationship. Recent studies have shown that, upon X-chromosome inactivation, active and inactive X chromosomes localize to different subnuclear positions and adopt distinct chromosomal architectures that reflect their activity states. Here, we review the roles of long non-coding RNAs, chromosomal organizational structures and the subnuclear localization of chromosomes as they relate to X-linked gene expression.

  3. Karyotypical characteristics of two allopatric African populations of anhydrobiotic Polypedilum Kieffer, 1912 (Diptera, Chironomidae) originating from Nigeria and Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Ninel A; Cornette, Richard; Shimura, Sachiko; Gusev, Oleg A; Pemba, Dylo; Kikawada, Takahiro; Zhirov, Sergey V; Okuda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The African chironomid Polypedilumvanderplanki Hinton, 1951 is the only chironomid able to withstand almost complete desiccation in an ametabolic state known as anhydrobiosis. The karyotypes of two allopatric populations of this anhydrobiotic chironomid, one from Nigeria and another from Malawi, were described according to the polytene giant chromosomes. The karyotype from the Nigerian population was presented as the reference chromosome map for Polypedilumvanderplanki. Both populations, Nigerian and Malawian, showed the same number of chromosomes (2n=8), but important differences were found in the band sequences of polytene chromosomes, and in the number and the arrangement of active regions between the two populations. Such important differences raise the possibility that the Malawian population could constitute a distinct new species of anhydrobiotic chironomid.

  4. Isolation of chromosomal mutations in Drosophila melanogaster by the nondisjunction test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadov, B.F.; Ivanov, Yu.N.; Artemova, E.V.

    1986-01-01

    The females carrying the combination of metacentric autosome 2 with two acrocentrics, F(2L) and F(2R), produce aneuploid egg cells 2/F(2L) and F(2R)(2-F(2L) nondisjunction) as well as egg cells 2/F(2R) and F(2L) (2-F(2R) nondisjunction). The frequency of nondisjunction 2-F(2L) sharply increases in the presence of inversion in the left arm of metacentric 2, and the frequency of nondisjunction 2-F(2R) increases when the right arm of the metacentric carries the inversion. The presence of the rearrangement in the left arm can be detected by the unusually high progeny size in the cross between 2/F(2L);F(2R) females, and C(2L);F(2R)/F(2R) males, and the presence of rearrangement in the right arm of the metacentric is inferred from a large progeny in the cross of similar females with F(2L)/F(2L);C(2R) males. The SPx 2 /F(2L);F(2R) daughters were obtained from SPx 2 /+ males irradiated with the dose of 3000R. Out of these, 972 daughters were individually crossed with F(2L)/F(2L); C(2R) males. Fifty-two cultures with large progeny size were identified by visual observation. Preparations of polytene chromsomes were made from the larvae. Twenty-six cultures had arrangements in 2 R: eight carried rearrangement In (2R), six In(2LR), ten T(2R; 3) and T(2R; X), and two Tp (2). The method can be used effective to detect chromosomal mutations, especially inversions in large samples

  5. Turnover of sex chromosomes in the stickleback fishes (gasterosteidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Ross

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Diverse sex-chromosome systems are found in vertebrates, particularly in teleost fishes, where different systems can be found in closely related species. Several mechanisms have been proposed for the rapid turnover of sex chromosomes, including the transposition of an existing sex-determination gene, the appearance of a new sex-determination gene on an autosome, and fusions between sex chromosomes and autosomes. To better understand these evolutionary transitions, a detailed comparison of sex chromosomes between closely related species is essential. Here, we used genetic mapping and molecular cytogenetics to characterize the sex-chromosome systems of multiple stickleback species (Gasterosteidae. Previously, we demonstrated that male threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus have a heteromorphic XY pair corresponding to linkage group (LG 19. In this study, we found that the ninespine stickleback (Pungitius pungitius has a heteromorphic XY pair corresponding to LG12. In black-spotted stickleback (G. wheatlandi males, one copy of LG12 has fused to the LG19-derived Y chromosome, giving rise to an X(1X(2Y sex-determination system. In contrast, neither LG12 nor LG19 is linked to sex in two other species: the brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans and the fourspine stickleback (Apeltes quadracus. However, we confirmed the existence of a previously reported heteromorphic ZW sex-chromosome pair in the fourspine stickleback. The sex-chromosome diversity that we have uncovered in sticklebacks provides a rich comparative resource for understanding the mechanisms that underlie the rapid turnover of sex-chromosome systems.

  6. New insights into sex chromosome evolution in anole lizards (Reptilia, Dactyloidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannotti, M; Trifonov, V A; Paoletti, A; Kichigin, I G; O'Brien, P C M; Kasai, F; Giovagnoli, G; Ng, B L; Ruggeri, P; Cerioni, P Nisi; Splendiani, A; Pereira, J C; Olmo, E; Rens, W; Caputo Barucchi, V; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    2017-03-01

    Anoles are a clade of iguanian lizards that underwent an extensive radiation between 125 and 65 million years ago. Their karyotypes show wide variation in diploid number spanning from 26 (Anolis evermanni) to 44 (A. insolitus). This chromosomal variation involves their sex chromosomes, ranging from simple systems (XX/XY), with heterochromosomes represented by either micro- or macrochromosomes, to multiple systems (X 1 X 1 X 2 X 2 /X 1 X 2 Y). Here, for the first time, the homology relationships of sex chromosomes have been investigated in nine anole lizards at the whole chromosome level. Cross-species chromosome painting using sex chromosome paints from A. carolinensis, Ctenonotus pogus and Norops sagrei and gene mapping of X-linked genes demonstrated that the anole ancestral sex chromosome system constituted by microchromosomes is retained in all the species with the ancestral karyotype (2n = 36, 12 macro- and 24 microchromosomes). On the contrary, species with a derived karyotype, namely those belonging to genera Ctenonotus and Norops, show a series of rearrangements (fusions/fissions) involving autosomes/microchromosomes that led to the formation of their current sex chromosome systems. These results demonstrate that different autosomes were involved in translocations with sex chromosomes in closely related lineages of anole lizards and that several sequential microautosome/sex chromosome fusions lead to a remarkable increase in size of Norops sagrei sex chromosomes.

  7. Cross-species BAC-FISH painting of the tomato and potato chromosome 6 reveals undescribed chromosomal rearrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, X.; Szinay, D.; Ramanna, M.S.; Vossen, van der E.A.G.; Datema, E.; Klein Lankhorst, R.M.; Boer, de J.M.; Peters, S.A.; Bachem, C.W.B.; Stiekema, W.J.; Visser, R.G.F.; Jong, de J.H.; Bai, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Ongoing genomics projects of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ) and potato (Solanum tuberosum) are providing unique tools for comparative mapping studies in Solanaceae. At the chromosomal level, BACs can be positioned on pachytene comple-ments by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on homoeologous

  8. Chromosome phylogenies of man, great apes, and Old World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grouchy, J

    1987-08-31

    The karyotypes of man and of the closely related Pongidae--chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan--differ by a small number of well known rearrangements, mainly pericentric inversions and one fusion which reduced the chromosome number from 48 in the Pongidae to 46 in man. Dutrillaux et al. (1973, 1975, 1979) reconstructed the chromosomal phylogeny of the entire primate order. More and more distantly related species were compared thus moving backward in evolution to the common ancestors of the Pongidae, of the Cercopithecoidae, the Catarrhini, the Platyrrhini, the Prosimians, and finally the common ancestor of all primates. Descending the pyramid it becomes possible to assign the rearrangements that occurred in each phylum, and the one that led to man in particular. The main conclusions are that this phylogeny is compatible with the occurrence during evolution of simple chromosome rearrangements--inversions, fusions, reciprocal translocation, acquisition or loss of heterochromatin--and that it is entirely consistent with the known primate phylogeny based on physical morphology and molecular evolution. If heterochromatin is not taken into account, man has in common with the other primates practically all of his chromosomal material as determined by chromosome banding. However, it is arranged differently, according to species, on account of chromosome rearrangements. This interpretation has been confirmed by comparative gene mapping, which established that the same chromosome segments, identified by banding, carry the same genes (Finaz et al., 1973; Human Gene Mapping 8, 1985). A remarkable observation made by Dutrillaux is that different primate phyla seem to have adopted different chromosome rearrangements in the course of evolution: inversions for the Pongidae, Robertsonian fusions for the lemurs, etc. This observation may raise many questions, among which is that of an organized evolution. Also, the breakpoints of chromosomal rearrangements observed during evolution

  9. First-generation physical map of the Culicoides variipennis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunamaker, R A; Brown, S E; McHolland, L E; Tabachnick, W J; Knudson, D L

    1999-11-01

    Recombinant cosmids labeled with biotin-11-dUTP or digoxigenin by nick translation were used as in situ hybridization probes to metaphase chromosomes of Culicoides variipennis (Coquillett). Paired fluorescent signals were detected on each arm of sister chromatids and were ordered along the 3 chromosomes. Thirty-three unique probes were mapped to the 3 chromosomes of C. variipennis (2n = 6): 7 to chromosome 1, 20 to chromosome 2, and 6 to chromosome 3. This work represents the first stage in generating a physical map of the genome of C. variipennis.

  10. Phylogenetic inferences of Atelinae (Platyrrhini) based on multi-directional chromosome painting in Brachyteles arachnoides, Ateles paniscus paniscus and Ateles b. marginatus

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, EHC; Neusser, M.; Pieczarka, J. C.; Nagamachi, C.; Sbalqueiro, I. J.; Müller, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    We performed multi-directional chromosome painting in a comparative cytogenetic study of the three Atelinae species Brachyteles arachnoides, Ateles paniscus paniscus and Ateles belzebuth marginatus, in order to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships within this Platyrrhini subfamily. Comparative chromosome maps between these species were established by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization ( FISH) employing human, Saguinus oedipus and Lagothrix lagothricha chromosome-specific probes....

  11. Identification of the linkage group of the Z sex chromosomes of the sand lizard (Lacerta agilis, Lacertidae) and elucidation of karyotype evolution in lacertid lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Matsubara, Kazumi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nishida, Chizuko; Olsson, Mats; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2014-12-01

    The sand lizard (Lacerta agilis, Lacertidae) has a chromosome number of 2n = 38, with 17 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes, one pair of microchromosomes, a large acrocentric Z chromosome, and a micro-W chromosome. To investigate the process of karyotype evolution in L. agilis, we performed chromosome banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization for gene mapping and constructed a cytogenetic map with 86 functional genes. Chromosome banding revealed that the Z chromosome is the fifth largest chromosome. The cytogenetic map revealed homology of the L. agilis Z chromosome with chicken chromosomes 6 and 9. Comparison of the L. agilis cytogenetic map with those of four Toxicofera species with many microchromosomes (Elaphe quadrivirgata, Varanus salvator macromaculatus, Leiolepis reevesii rubritaeniata, and Anolis carolinensis) showed highly conserved linkage homology of L. agilis chromosomes (LAG) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5(Z), 7, 8, 9, and 10 with macrochromosomes and/or macrochromosome segments of the four Toxicofera species. Most of the genes located on the microchromosomes of Toxicofera were localized to LAG6, small acrocentric chromosomes (LAG11-18), and a microchromosome (LAG19) in L. agilis. These results suggest that the L. agilis karyotype resulted from frequent fusions of microchromosomes, which occurred in the ancestral karyotype of Toxicofera and led to the disappearance of microchromosomes and the appearance of many small macrochromosomes.

  12. Meiotic transmission of Drosophila pseudoobscura chromosomal arrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Meisel

    Full Text Available Drosophila pseudoobscura harbors a rich gene arrangement polymorphism on the third chromosome generated by a series of overlapping paracentric inversions. The arrangements suppress recombination in heterokaryotypic individuals, which allows for the selective maintenance of coadapted gene complexes. Previous mapping experiments used to determine the degree to which recombination is suppressed in gene arrangement heterozygotes produced non-recombinant progeny in non-Mendelian ratios. The deviations from Mendelian expectations could be the result of viability differences between wild and mutant chromosomes, meiotic drive because of achiasmate pairing of homologues in heterokaryotypic females during meiosis, or a combination of both mechanisms. The possibility that the frequencies of the chromosomal arrangements in natural populations are affected by mechanisms other than adaptive selection led us to consider these hypotheses. We performed reciprocal crosses involving both heterozygous males and females to determine if the frequency of the non-recombinant progeny deviates significantly from Mendelian expectations and if the frequencies deviate between reciprocal crosses. We failed to observe non-Mendelian ratios in multiple crosses, and the frequency of the non-recombinant classes differed in only one of five pairs of reciprocal crosses despite sufficient power to detect these differences in all crosses. Our results indicate that deviations from Mendelian expectations in recombination experiments involving the D. pseudoobscura inversion system are most likely due to fitness differences of gene arrangement karyotypes in different environments.

  13. Molecular fundamentals of chromosomal mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganassi, E.Eh.; Zaichkina, S.I.; Malakhova, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Precise quantitative correlation between the yield of chromosome structure damages and the yield of DNA damages is shown when comparing data on molecular and cytogenetic investigations carried out in cultural Mammalia cells. As the chromosome structure damage is to be connected with the damage of its carcass structure, then it is natural that DNA damage in loop regions is not to affect considerably the structure, while DNA damage lying on the loop base and connected with the chromosome carcass is to play a determining role in chromosomal mutagenesis. This DNA constitutes 1-2% from the total quantity of nuclear DNA. If one accepts that damages of these regions of DNA are ''hot'' points of chromosomal mutagenesis, then it becomes clear why 1-2% of preparation damages in a cell are realized in chromosome structural damages

  14. Chromosome microdissection and cloning in human genome and genetic disease analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Faten; Yu, Jingwei

    1991-01-01

    A procedure has been described for microdissection and microcloning of human chromosomal DNA sequences in which universal amplification of the dissected fragments by Mbo I linker adaptor and polymerase chain reaction is used. A very large library comprising 700,000 recombinant plasmid microclones from 30 dissected chromosomes of human chromosome 21 was constructed. Colony hybridization showed that 42% of the clones contained repetitive sequences and 58% contained single or low-copy sequences. The insert sizes generated by complete Mbo I cleavage ranged from 50 to 1,100 base pairs with a mean of 416 base pairs. Southern blot analysis of microclones from the library confirmed their human origin and chromosome 21 specificity. Some of these clones have also been regionally mapped to specific sites of chromosome 21 by using a regional mapping panel of cell hybrids. This chromosome microtechnology can generate large numbers of microclones with unique sequences from defined chromosomal regions and can be used for processes such as (i) isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones with large inserts, (ii) screening various cDNA libraries for isolating expressed sequences, and (iii) constructing region-specific libraries of the entire human genome. The studies described here demonstrate the power of this technology for high-resolution genome analysis and explicate their use in an efficient search for disease-associated genes localized to specific chromosomal regions

  15. Chromosomal inversion differences correlate with range overlap in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Daniel M; Price, Trevor D

    2017-10-01

    Chromosomal inversions evolve frequently but the reasons for this remain unclear. We used cytological descriptions of 411 species of passerine birds to identify large pericentric inversion differences between species, based on the position of the centromere. Within 81 small clades comprising 284 of the species, we found 319 differences on the 9 largest autosomes combined, 56 on the Z chromosome, and 55 on the W chromosome. We also identified inversions present within 32 species. Using a new fossil-calibrated phylogeny, we examined the phylogenetic, demographic and genomic context in which these inversions have evolved. The number of inversion differences between closely related species is consistently predicted by whether the ranges of species overlap, even when time is controlled for as far as is possible. Fixation rates vary across the autosomes, but inversions are more likely to be fixed on the Z chromosome than the average autosome. Variable mutagenic input alone (estimated by chromosome size, map length, GC content or repeat density) cannot explain the differences between chromosomes in the number of inversions fixed. Together, these results support a model in which inversions increase because of their effects on recombination suppression in the face of hybridization. Other factors associated with hybridization may also contribute, including the possibility that inversions contain incompatibility alleles, making taxa less likely to collapse following secondary contact.

  16. Chromosomal localization of microsatellite loci in Drosophila mediopunctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Cavasini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila mediopunctata has been used as a model organism for genetics and evolutionary studies in the last three decades. A linkage map with 48 microsatellite loci recently published for this species showed five syntenic groups, which had their homology determined to Drosophila melanogaster chromosomes. Then, by inference, each of the groups was associated with one of the five major chromosomes of D. mediopunctata. Our objective was to carry out a genetic (chromosomal analysis to increase the number of available loci with known chromosomal location. We made a simultaneous analysis of visible mutant phenotypes and microsatellite genotypes in a backcross of a standard strain and a mutant strain, which had each major autosome marked. Hence, we could establish the chromosomal location of seventeen loci; including one from each of the five major linkage groups previously published, and twelve new loci. Our results were congruent with the previous location and they open new possibilities to future work integrating microsatellites, chromosomal inversions, and genetic determinants of physiological and morphological variation.

  17. Partial preferential chromosome pairing is genotype dependent in tetraploid rose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Peter M; Arens, Paul; Voorrips, Roeland E; Esselink, G Danny; Koning-Boucoiran, Carole F S; Van't Westende, Wendy P C; Santos Leonardo, Tiago; Wissink, Patrick; Zheng, Chaozhi; van Geest, Geert; Visser, Richard G F; Krens, Frans A; Smulders, Marinus J M; Maliepaard, Chris

    2017-04-01

    It has long been recognised that polyploid species do not always neatly fall into the categories of auto- or allopolyploid, leading to the term 'segmental allopolyploid' to describe everything in between. The meiotic behaviour of such intermediate species is not fully understood, nor is there consensus as to how to model their inheritance patterns. In this study we used a tetraploid cut rose (Rosa hybrida) population, genotyped using the 68K WagRhSNP array, to construct an ultra-high-density linkage map of all homologous chromosomes using methods previously developed for autotetraploids. Using the predicted bivalent configurations in this population we quantified differences in pairing behaviour among and along homologous chromosomes, leading us to correct our estimates of recombination frequency to account for this behaviour. This resulted in the re-mapping of 25 695 SNP markers across all homologues of the seven rose chromosomes, tailored to the pairing behaviour of each chromosome in each parent. We confirmed the inferred differences in pairing behaviour among chromosomes by examining repulsion-phase linkage estimates, which also carry information about preferential pairing and recombination. Currently, the closest sequenced relative to rose is Fragaria vesca. Aligning the integrated ultra-dense rose map with the strawberry genome sequence provided a detailed picture of the synteny, confirming overall co-linearity but also revealing new genomic rearrangements. Our results suggest that pairing affinities may vary along chromosome arms, which broadens our current understanding of segmental allopolyploidy. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. Sex chromosome turnover contributes to genomic divergence between incipient stickleback species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohta Yoshida

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sex chromosomes turn over rapidly in some taxonomic groups, where closely related species have different sex chromosomes. Although there are many examples of sex chromosome turnover, we know little about the functional roles of sex chromosome turnover in phenotypic diversification and genomic evolution. The sympatric pair of Japanese threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus provides an excellent system to address these questions: the Japan Sea species has a neo-sex chromosome system resulting from a fusion between an ancestral Y chromosome and an autosome, while the sympatric Pacific Ocean species has a simple XY sex chromosome system. Furthermore, previous quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping demonstrated that the Japan Sea neo-X chromosome contributes to phenotypic divergence and reproductive isolation between these sympatric species. To investigate the genomic basis for the accumulation of genes important for speciation on the neo-X chromosome, we conducted whole genome sequencing of males and females of both the Japan Sea and the Pacific Ocean species. No substantial degeneration has yet occurred on the neo-Y chromosome, but the nucleotide sequence of the neo-X and the neo-Y has started to diverge, particularly at regions near the fusion. The neo-sex chromosomes also harbor an excess of genes with sex-biased expression. Furthermore, genes on the neo-X chromosome showed higher non-synonymous substitution rates than autosomal genes in the Japan Sea lineage. Genomic regions of higher sequence divergence between species, genes with divergent expression between species, and QTL for inter-species phenotypic differences were found not only at the regions near the fusion site, but also at other regions along the neo-X chromosome. Neo-sex chromosomes can therefore accumulate substitutions causing species differences even in the absence of substantial neo-Y degeneration.

  19. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  20. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... chromosomes are evolutionary consequences of that func- tion. Given sufficient ... (for a review, see Charlesworth et al. 2005). ... In the present paper, I review sex deter- mination .... part had apparently been exchanged against the homologous ... age group III-Y chromosomes were successful while in well-.

  1. Demarcation of informative chromosomes in tropical sweet corn inbred lines using microsatellite DNA markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Kashiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of genetic variation among 10 pairs of chromosomes extracted from 13 tropical sweet corn inbred lines, using 99 microsatellite markers, revealed a wide range of genetic diversity. Allelic richness and the number of effective alleles per chromosome ranged from 2.78 to 4.33 and 1.96 to 3.47, respectively, with respective mean values of 3.62 and 2.73. According to the Shannon's information index (I and Nei's gene diversity coefficient (Nei, Chromosome 10 was the most informative chromosome (I = 1.311 and Nei = 0.703, while Chromosome 2 possessed the least (I = 0.762 and Nei = 0.456. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD measurements for loci less than 50 cM apart on the same chromosome, all loci on Chromosomes 1, 6 and 7 were in equilibrium. Even so, there was a high proportion of genetic variation in Chromosomes 4, 5, 8, 9 and 10, thereby revealing their appropriateness for use in the genetic diversity investigations among tropical sweet corn lines. Chromosome 4, with the highest number of loci in linkage disequilibrium, was considered the best for marker-phenotype association and QTL mapping, followed by Chromosomes 5, 8, 9 and 10.

  2. Chromosomal localization of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene to human chromosome 4q13. 1-q21. 1 and mouse chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, U.B.; Dushkin, H.; Beier, D.R.; Chin, W.W. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Altherr, M.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1994-04-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GRHR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor on the cell surface of pituitary gonadotropes, where it serves to transduce signals from the extracellular ligand, the hypothalamic factor gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and to modulate the synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. The authors have localized the GRHR gene to the q13.1-q21.1 region of the human chromosome 4 using mapping panels of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids containing different human chromosomes or different regions of human chromosome 4. Furthermore, using linkage analysis of single-strand conformational polymorphisms, the murine GRHR gene was localized to mouse chromosome 5, linked to the endogenous retroviral marker Pmv-11. This is consistent with the evolutionary conservation of homology between these two regions, as has been previously suggested from comparative mapping of several other loci. The localization of the GRHR gene may be useful in the study of disorders of reproduction. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  3. X chromosome control of meiotic chromosome synapsis in mouse inter-subspecific hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Bhattacharyya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid sterility (HS belongs to reproductive isolation barriers that safeguard the integrity of species in statu nascendi. Although hybrid sterility occurs almost universally among animal and plant species, most of our current knowledge comes from the classical genetic studies on Drosophila interspecific crosses or introgressions. With the house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus and Mus m. domesticus as a model, new research tools have become available for studies of the molecular mechanisms and genetic networks underlying HS. Here we used QTL analysis and intersubspecific chromosome substitution strains to identify a 4.7 Mb critical region on Chromosome X (Chr X harboring the Hstx2 HS locus, which causes asymmetrical spermatogenic arrest in reciprocal intersubspecific F1 hybrids. Subsequently, we mapped autosomal loci on Chrs 3, 9 and 13 that can abolish this asymmetry. Combination of immunofluorescent visualization of the proteins of synaptonemal complexes with whole-chromosome DNA FISH on pachytene spreads revealed that heterosubspecific, unlike consubspecific, homologous chromosomes are predisposed to asynapsis in F1 hybrid male and female meiosis. The asynapsis is under the trans- control of Hstx2 and Hst1/Prdm9 hybrid sterility genes in pachynemas of male but not female hybrids. The finding concurred with the fertility of intersubpecific F1 hybrid females homozygous for the Hstx2(Mmm allele and resolved the apparent conflict with the dominance theory of Haldane's rule. We propose that meiotic asynapsis in intersubspecific hybrids is a consequence of cis-acting mismatch between homologous chromosomes modulated by the trans-acting Hstx2 and Prdm9 hybrid male sterility genes.

  4. X chromosome control of meiotic chromosome synapsis in mouse inter-subspecific hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Reifova, Radka; Gregorova, Sona; Simecek, Petr; Gergelits, Vaclav; Mistrik, Martin; Martincova, Iva; Pialek, Jaroslav; Forejt, Jiri

    2014-02-01

    Hybrid sterility (HS) belongs to reproductive isolation barriers that safeguard the integrity of species in statu nascendi. Although hybrid sterility occurs almost universally among animal and plant species, most of our current knowledge comes from the classical genetic studies on Drosophila interspecific crosses or introgressions. With the house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus and Mus m. domesticus as a model, new research tools have become available for studies of the molecular mechanisms and genetic networks underlying HS. Here we used QTL analysis and intersubspecific chromosome substitution strains to identify a 4.7 Mb critical region on Chromosome X (Chr X) harboring the Hstx2 HS locus, which causes asymmetrical spermatogenic arrest in reciprocal intersubspecific F1 hybrids. Subsequently, we mapped autosomal loci on Chrs 3, 9 and 13 that can abolish this asymmetry. Combination of immunofluorescent visualization of the proteins of synaptonemal complexes with whole-chromosome DNA FISH on pachytene spreads revealed that heterosubspecific, unlike consubspecific, homologous chromosomes are predisposed to asynapsis in F1 hybrid male and female meiosis. The asynapsis is under the trans- control of Hstx2 and Hst1/Prdm9 hybrid sterility genes in pachynemas of male but not female hybrids. The finding concurred with the fertility of intersubpecific F1 hybrid females homozygous for the Hstx2(Mmm) allele and resolved the apparent conflict with the dominance theory of Haldane's rule. We propose that meiotic asynapsis in intersubspecific hybrids is a consequence of cis-acting mismatch between homologous chromosomes modulated by the trans-acting Hstx2 and Prdm9 hybrid male sterility genes.

  5. X Chromosome Control of Meiotic Chromosome Synapsis in Mouse Inter-Subspecific Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Reifova, Radka; Gregorova, Sona; Simecek, Petr; Gergelits, Vaclav; Mistrik, Martin; Martincova, Iva; Pialek, Jaroslav; Forejt, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid sterility (HS) belongs to reproductive isolation barriers that safeguard the integrity of species in statu nascendi. Although hybrid sterility occurs almost universally among animal and plant species, most of our current knowledge comes from the classical genetic studies on Drosophila interspecific crosses or introgressions. With the house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus and Mus m. domesticus as a model, new research tools have become available for studies of the molecular mechanisms and genetic networks underlying HS. Here we used QTL analysis and intersubspecific chromosome substitution strains to identify a 4.7 Mb critical region on Chromosome X (Chr X) harboring the Hstx2 HS locus, which causes asymmetrical spermatogenic arrest in reciprocal intersubspecific F1 hybrids. Subsequently, we mapped autosomal loci on Chrs 3, 9 and 13 that can abolish this asymmetry. Combination of immunofluorescent visualization of the proteins of synaptonemal complexes with whole-chromosome DNA FISH on pachytene spreads revealed that heterosubspecific, unlike consubspecific, homologous chromosomes are predisposed to asynapsis in F1 hybrid male and female meiosis. The asynapsis is under the trans- control of Hstx2 and Hst1/Prdm9 hybrid sterility genes in pachynemas of male but not female hybrids. The finding concurred with the fertility of intersubpecific F1 hybrid females homozygous for the Hstx2Mmm allele and resolved the apparent conflict with the dominance theory of Haldane's rule. We propose that meiotic asynapsis in intersubspecific hybrids is a consequence of cis-acting mismatch between homologous chromosomes modulated by the trans-acting Hstx2 and Prdm9 hybrid male sterility genes. PMID:24516397

  6. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  7. Sex chromosomes in Ephestia kuehniella

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marec, František; Sahara, K.; Traut, W.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2001), s. 131 ISSN 0003-3995. [European Cytogenetics Conference /3./. 07.07.2001-10.07.2001, Paris] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Telomere * sex chromosomes * chromosome fragments Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Slit scan flow cytometry of isolated chromosomes following fluorescence hybridization: an approach of online screening for specific chromosomes and chromosome translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, M.; Dudin, G.; Aten, J. A.; Heilig, R.; Diaz, E.; Cremer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently developed methods of non radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes offer new aspects for chromosome analysis. Fluorescent labelling of hybridized chromosomes or chromosomal subregions allows to facilitate considerably the detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities. For many

  9. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne' , Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  10. Karyotypic relationships among Equus grevyi, Equus burchelli and domestic horse defined using horse chromosome arm-specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, P; Kubickova, S; Zrnova, E; Horin, P; Vahala, J; Rubes, J

    2007-01-01

    Using laser microdissection we prepared a set of horse chromosome arm-specific probes. Most of the probes were generated from horse chromosomes, some of them were derived from Equus zebra hartmannae. The set of probes were hybridized onto E. grevyi chromosomes in order to establish a genome-wide chromosomal correspondence between this zebra and horse. The use of arm-specific probes provided us with more information on the mutual arrangement of the genomes than we could obtain by means of whole-chromosome paints generated by flow sorting, even if we used reciprocal painting with probe sets from both species. By comparison of our results and results of comparative mapping in E. burchelli, we also established the chromosomal correspondence between E. grevyi and E. burchelli, providing evidence for a very close karyotypic relationship between these two zebra species. Establishment of the comparative map for E. grevyi contributes to the knowledge of the karyotypic phylogeny in the Equidae family.

  11. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  12. Mapping out Map Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferjan Ormeling

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Discussing the requirements for map data quality, map users and their library/archives environment, the paper focuses on the metadata the user would need for a correct and efficient interpretation of the map data. For such a correct interpretation, knowledge of the rules and guidelines according to which the topographers/cartographers work (such as the kind of data categories to be collected, and the degree to which these rules and guidelines were indeed followed are essential. This is not only valid for the old maps stored in our libraries and archives, but perhaps even more so for the new digital files as the format in which we now have to access our geospatial data. As this would be too much to ask from map librarians/curators, some sort of web 2.0 environment is sought where comments about data quality, completeness and up-to-dateness from knowledgeable map users regarding the specific maps or map series studied can be collected and tagged to scanned versions of these maps on the web. In order not to be subject to the same disadvantages as Wikipedia, where the ‘communis opinio’ rather than scholarship, seems to be decisive, some checking by map curators of this tagged map use information would still be needed. Cooperation between map curators and the International Cartographic Association ( ICA map and spatial data use commission to this end is suggested.

  13. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  14. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  15. Construction of BAC Libraries from Flow-Sorted Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Cloned DNA libraries in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) are the most widely used form of large-insert DNA libraries. BAC libraries are typically represented by ordered clones derived from genomic DNA of a particular organism. In the case of large eukaryotic genomes, whole-genome libraries consist of a hundred thousand to a million clones, which make their handling and screening a daunting task. The labor and cost of working with whole-genome libraries can be greatly reduced by constructing a library derived from a smaller part of the genome. Here we describe construction of BAC libraries from mitotic chromosomes purified by flow cytometric sorting. Chromosome-specific BAC libraries facilitate positional gene cloning, physical mapping, and sequencing in complex plant genomes.

  16. Monoamine oxidase deficiency in males with an X chromosome deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, K B; de la Chapelle, A; Norio, R; Sankila, E M; Hsu, Y P; Rinehart, W B; Corey, T J; Ozelius, L; Powell, J F; Bruns, G

    1989-01-01

    Mapping of the human MAOA gene to chromosomal region Xp21-p11 prompted our study of two affected males in a family previously reported to have Norrie disease resulting from a submicroscopic deletion in this chromosomal region. In this investigation we demonstrate in these cousins deletion of the MAOA gene, undetectable levels of MAO-A and MAO-B activities in their fibroblasts and platelets, respectively, loss of mRNA for MAO-A in fibroblasts, and substantial alterations in urinary catecholamine metabolites. The present study documents that a marked deficiency of MAO activity is compatible with life and that genes for MAO-A and MAO-B are near each other in this Xp chromosomal region. Some of the clinical features of these MAO deletion patients may help to identify X-linked MAO deficiency diseases in humans.

  17. A major QTL controlling deep rooting on rice chromosome 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uga, Yusaku; Yamamoto, Eiji; Kanno, Noriko; Kawai, Sawako; Mizubayashi, Tatsumi; Fukuoka, Shuichi

    2013-10-24

    Drought is the most serious abiotic stress that hinders rice production under rainfed conditions. Breeding for deep rooting is a promising strategy to improve the root system architecture in shallow-rooting rice cultivars to avoid drought stress. We analysed the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the ratio of deep rooting (RDR) in three F₂ mapping populations derived from crosses between each of three shallow-rooting varieties ('ARC5955', 'Pinulupot1', and 'Tupa729') and a deep-rooting variety, 'Kinandang Patong'. In total, we detected five RDR QTLs on chromosomes 2, 4, and 6. In all three populations, QTLs on chromosome 4 were found to be located at similar positions; they explained from 32.0% to 56.6% of the total RDR phenotypic variance. This suggests that one or more key genetic factors controlling the root growth angle in rice is located in this region of chromosome 4.

  18. B chromosome in the beetle Coprophanaeus cyanescens (Scarabaeidae: emphasis in the organization of repetitive DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes de Oliveira Sarah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To contribute to the knowledge of coleopteran cytogenetics, especially with respect to the genomic content of B chromosomes, we analyzed the composition and organization of repetitive DNA sequences in the Coprophanaeus cyanescens karyotype. We used conventional staining and the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH mapping using as probes C0t-1 DNA fraction, the 18S and 5S rRNA genes, and the LOA-like non-LTR transposable element (TE. Results The conventional analysis detected 3 individuals (among 50 analyzed carrying one small metacentric and mitotically unstable B chromosome. The FISH analysis revealed a pericentromeric block of C0t-1 DNA in the B chromosome but no 18S or 5S rDNA clusters in this extra element. Using the LOA-like TE probe, the FISH analysis revealed large pericentromeric blocks in eight autosomal bivalents and in the B chromosome, and a pericentromeric block extending to the short arm in one autosomal pair. No positive hybridization signal was observed for the LOA-like element in the sex chromosomes. Conclusions The results indicate that the origin of the B chromosome is associated with the autosomal elements, as demonstrated by the hybridization with C0t-1 DNA and the LOA-like TE. The present study is the first report on the cytogenetic mapping of a TE in coleopteran chromosomes. These TEs could have been involved in the origin and evolution of the B chromosome in C. cyanescens.

  19. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-07-08

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat.

  20. A molecular deletion of distal chromosome 4p in two families with a satellited chromosome 4 lacking the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrooks, L L; Lamb, A N; Kirkman, H N; Callanan, N P; Rao, K W

    1992-11-01

    We report two families with a satellited chromosome 4 short arm (4ps). Satellites and stalks normally occur on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes; however, the literature cites several reports of satellited nonacrocentric chromosomes, which presumably result from a translocation with an acrocentric chromosome. This is the first report of 4ps chromosomes. Our families are remarkable in that both unaffected and affected individuals carry the 4ps chromosome. The phenotypes observed in affected individuals, although dissimilar, were sufficient to encourage a search for a deletion of chromosome 4p. By Southern blot analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, a deletion of material mapping approximately 150 kb from chromosome 4pter was discovered. This deletion is notable because it does not result in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and can result in an apparently normal phenotype. We speculate that homology between subterminal repeat sequences on 4p and sequences on the acrocentric short arms may explain the origin of the rearrangement and that position effect may play a role in the expression of the abnormal phenotype.

  1. The importance of a sub-region on chromosome 19q13.3 for prognosis of multiple myeloma patients after high-dose treatment and stem cell support: a linkage disequilibrium mapping in RAI and CD3EAP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, Annette Juul; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Gimsing, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The gene RAI was originally described as an inhibitor of RelA/p65 subunit of nuclear factor ¿B (NF-¿B). Here, we analyse the association between genetic variation in the genes RAI and CD3EAP and outcome of 348 myeloma patients treated with high-dose treatment (HDT), 146 patients treated with inte......The gene RAI was originally described as an inhibitor of RelA/p65 subunit of nuclear factor ¿B (NF-¿B). Here, we analyse the association between genetic variation in the genes RAI and CD3EAP and outcome of 348 myeloma patients treated with high-dose treatment (HDT), 146 patients treated...... with interferon-a (INF-a) as maintenance treatment, 177 patients treated with thalidomide, and 74 patients treated with bortezomib at relapse and address if the effects of polymorphisms in CD3EAP and RAI are modified by a functional polymorphism in NF¿B1. By linkage disequilibrium mapping, we found that variant...... alleles of several polymorphisms in a sub-region of 19q13.3 spanning the regions RAI-intron1-1 to RAI intron1-3 and the region exon1 to exon3-6 in CD3EAP were associated with prolonged time-to-treatment failure (TTF; p¿=¿0.003) and overall survival (OS; p¿=¿0.02). Haplotype analyses revealed that none...

  2. The importance of a sub-region on chromosome 19q13.3 for prognosis of multiple myeloma patients after high-dose treatment and stem cell support: a linkage disequilibrium mapping in RAI and CD3EAP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, Annette J.; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Gimsing, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The gene RAI was originally described as an inhibitor of RelA/p65 subunit of nuclear factor κB (NF–κB). Here, we analyse the association between genetic variation in the genes RAI and CD3EAP and outcome of 348 myeloma patients treated with high-dose treatment (HDT), 146 patients treated with inte......The gene RAI was originally described as an inhibitor of RelA/p65 subunit of nuclear factor κB (NF–κB). Here, we analyse the association between genetic variation in the genes RAI and CD3EAP and outcome of 348 myeloma patients treated with high-dose treatment (HDT), 146 patients treated...... with interferon-α (INF-α) as maintenance treatment, 177 patients treated with thalidomide, and 74 patients treated with bortezomib at relapse and address if the effects of polymorphisms in CD3EAP and RAI are modified by a functional polymorphism in NFКB1. By linkage disequilibrium mapping, we found that variant...... alleles of several polymorphisms in a sub-region of 19q13.3 spanning the regions RAI-intron1-1 to RAI intron1-3 and the region exon1 to exon3–6 in CD3EAP were associated with prolonged time-to-treatment failure (TTF; p = 0.003) and overall survival (OS; p = 0.02). Haplotype analyses revealed that none...

  3. X chromosome dosage compensation via enhanced transcriptional elongation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larschan, Erica; Bishop, Eric P; Kharchenko, Peter V; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T; Park, Peter J; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2011-03-03

    The evolution of sex chromosomes has resulted in numerous species in which females inherit two X chromosomes but males have a single X, thus requiring dosage compensation. MSL (Male-specific lethal) complex increases transcription on the single X chromosome of Drosophila males to equalize expression of X-linked genes between the sexes. The biochemical mechanisms used for dosage compensation must function over a wide dynamic range of transcription levels and differential expression patterns. It has been proposed that the MSL complex regulates transcriptional elongation to control dosage compensation, a model subsequently supported by mapping of the MSL complex and MSL-dependent histone 4 lysine 16 acetylation to the bodies of X-linked genes in males, with a bias towards 3' ends. However, experimental analysis of MSL function at the mechanistic level has been challenging owing to the small magnitude of the chromosome-wide effect and the lack of an in vitro system for biochemical analysis. Here we use global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to examine the specific effect of the MSL complex on RNA Polymerase II (RNAP II) on a genome-wide level. Results indicate that the MSL complex enhances transcription by facilitating the progression of RNAP II across the bodies of active X-linked genes. Improving transcriptional output downstream of typical gene-specific controls may explain how dosage compensation can be imposed on the diverse set of genes along an entire chromosome.

  4. Radiation hybrids from human chromosome 3: A basis for the construction of region and specific sublibraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, L.; Cosmis, R.L.; Atchison, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The authors are interested in identifying genes on human chromosome involved in disease processes. To date at least 20 different loci on this chromosome are implicated with various disease states. DNA libraries containing clones derived from a small chromosomal subregion implicated in a particular disease would greatly assist these studies. They have utilized the radiation hybrid (RH) technique to generate a series of somatic cell hybrids that contain small segments of human chromosome 3 as the only human genetic material. A Chinese hamster-human cell hybrid (Q314-2) containing only human chromosome 3 was used to prepare radiation hybrids. Cells were lethally X-irradiated with 6,000 rads and fused to Urd(??) Chinese hamster cells by PEG 1000 treatment. The majority of hybrids (>72%) analyzed retained portions of chromosome 3. The amount of chromosome 3 in each hybrid ranged from nearly all of the chromosome to very little. Currently these hybrids are being further characterized with single copy probes of known map location in order to isolate regions of chromosome 3 that contain specific disease locus. These reduced hybrids can then be used for the construction of region specific libraries and for the generation of new DNA probes from the specific region of interest

  5. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  6. A role for a neo-sex chromosome in stickleback speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Jun; Ross, Joseph A.; Mori, Seiichi; Kume, Manabu; Jones, Felicity C.; Chan, Yingguang F.; Absher, Devin M.; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Myers, Richard M.; Kingsley, David M.; Peichel, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual antagonism, or conflict between the sexes, has been proposed as a driving force in both sex chromosome turnover and speciation. Although closely related species often have different sex chromosome systems, it is unknown whether sex chromosome turnover contributes to the evolution of reproductive isolation between species. In this study, we show that a newly evolved sex chromosome harbours genes that contribute to speciation in threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus). We first identified a neo-sex chromosome system found only in one member of a sympatric species pair in Japan. We then performed genetic linkage mapping of male-specific traits important for reproductive isolation between the Japanese species pair. The neo-X chromosome harbours loci for male courtship display traits that contribute to behavioural isolation, while the ancestral X chromosome contains loci for both behavioural isolation and hybrid male sterility. Our work not only provides strong evidence for a large-X effect on reproductive isolation in a vertebrate system, but also provides direct evidence that a young neo-X chromosome contributes to reproductive isolation between closely related species. Our data suggest that sex chromosome turnover might play a greater role in speciation than previously appreciated. PMID:19783981

  7. Cytogenetic and molecular studies on tomato chromosomes using diploid tomato and tomato monosomic additions in tetraploid potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    Geneticists have studied the tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, for several decades and now obtained a saturated linkage map on which numerous genes controlling morphological traits and disease resistances, and molecular markers have been positioned. They also investigated the chromosomes of tomato,

  8. Multiple mouse chromosomal loci for dynein-based motility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, K.T.; Mikami, Atsushi; Paschal, B.M. [Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research, Shrewsbury, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-15

    Dyneins are multisubunit mechanochemical enzymes capable of interacting with microtubules to generate force. Axonemal dyneins produce the motive force for ciliary and flagellar beating by inducing sliding between adjacent microtubules within the axoneme. Cytoplasmic dyneins translocate membranous organelles and chromosomes toward the minus ends of cytoplasmic microtubules. Dynactin is an accessory complex implicated in tethering cytoplasmic dynein to membranous organelles and mitotic kinetochores. In the studies described here, we have identified a number of new dynein genes and determined their mouse chromosomal locations by interspecific backcross analysis. We have also mapped several dynein and dynactin genes cloned previously. Our studies provide the first comprehensive attempt to map dynein and dynactin genes in mammals and provide a basis for the further analysis of dynein function in development and disease. 65 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  10. Are There Knots in Chromosomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Siebert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments have for the first time allowed the determination of three-dimensional structures of individual chromosomes and genomes in nuclei of single haploid mouse embryonic stem (ES cells based on Hi–C chromosome conformation contact data. Although these first structures have a relatively low resolution, they provide the first experimental data that can be used to study chromosome and intact genome folding. Here we further analyze these structures and provide the first evidence that G1 phase chromosomes are knotted, consistent with the fact that plots of contact probability vs sequence separation show a power law dependence that is intermediate between that of a fractal globule and an equilibrium structure.

  11. Flow cytogenetics and chromosome sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, L S

    1990-06-01

    This review of flow cytogenetics and chromosome sorting provides an overview of general information in the field and describes recent developments in more detail. From the early developments of chromosome analysis involving single parameter or one color analysis to the latest developments in slit scanning of single chromosomes in a flow stream, the field has progressed rapidly and most importantly has served as an important enabling technology for the human genome project. Technological innovations that advanced flow cytogenetics are described and referenced. Applications in basic cell biology, molecular biology, and clinical investigations are presented. The necessary characteristics for large number chromosome sorting are highlighted. References to recent review articles are provided as a starting point for locating individual references that provide more detail. Specific references are provided for recent developments.

  12. Algorithm for sorting chromosomal aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ida; Lund, Najaaraq; Rasmussen, Steen

    2018-01-01

    Prenatal diagnostic methods and screening procedures change rapidly in these years. Years ago only karyotyping was performed prenatally, and we monitored only Down syndrome(1) . Since then the diagnostic possibilities have increased to QF-PCR, FISH, MLPA and chromosomal microarray.......Prenatal diagnostic methods and screening procedures change rapidly in these years. Years ago only karyotyping was performed prenatally, and we monitored only Down syndrome(1) . Since then the diagnostic possibilities have increased to QF-PCR, FISH, MLPA and chromosomal microarray....

  13. Topography of multi-locus deletions induced by gamma-rays and neutrons in the black, cinnabar and vestigial regions of drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, I.V.; Lapidus, I.L.; Alexandrova, M.V.

    1997-01-01

    The extend and breakpoint location of 85 chromosomal-scale deletions induced by gamma-rays or fission neutrons in the black, cinnabar and vestigial regions of Drosophila genome have been examined by conventional cytogenetic analysis of the polytene chromosomes. It was found that the topographies of deletions are similar for both type of radiation and for all regions under study: the largest deletions have 3.5 Mb length, i.e. more than 2 divisions of the polytene chromosome; the breakpoints of deletions are located within the inter-bands and mapped more often in the centro-metric directions; the sizes of deletions are multiple to one, two or more visible chromomeres of polytene chromosome. These findings seem to be very well explained within the framework of the rosette-loopy model of higher (super-chromosome) level of the chromatin organization and of the notions about the illegitimate recombination promoted by the clustered damages of the core DNA resulting from the one-hit events of energy deposition at this target supported by the linear relationship observed between the delation yield and the dose of radiations studied. (authors)

  14. Diagnostic radiation and chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.R.; Hecht, F.; Lubs, H.A.; Kimberling, W.; Brown, J.; Gerald, P.S.; Summitt, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Some evidence is presented suggesting that diagnostic X-rays may be important in the origin of a new chromosomal abnormality other than Down syndrome. Chromosome analyses have been carried out on 4342 children, seven or eight years old. Maternal diagnostic irradiation in the year before conception and up to third lunar month of the index pregnancy was recorded, before the chromosome study began, together with a large amount of family and clinical data. Information on X-ray exposure was supplied by the mothers, s o radiation dosage could not be estimated. 21 children (including a pair of twins and a pair of siblings) born to 19 mothers had chromosomal aberrations. The mothers of six children with inherited translocations, rearrangements and XYY karyotypes were excluded, and 3 (23%) of the remaining 13 mothers had received abdominal and pelvic X-ray exposures. In the whole sample, however, only 6% of the mothers had diagnostic irradiation. Two of these mothers, aged sixteen and twenty, gave birth to a child each with de-novo autosomal translocations, and the third mother, aged thirty-two, had a child with a complex mosaicism involving one X chromosome. Although the sample size of the mothers with chromosomally abnormal children is small, the results are significant. (U.K.)

  15. Diagnostic radiation and chromosome aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, S R; Hecht, F [Dept. of Pediatrics, Child Development and Rehabilitation Center, Univ. of Oregon Health Sciences Center, Portland, Oregon (USA); Lubs, H A; Kimberling, W; Brown, J; Gerald, P S; Summitt, R L

    1977-01-15

    Some evidence is presented suggesting that diagnostic X-rays may be important in the origin of a new chromosomal abnormality other than Down syndrome. Chromosome analyses have been carried out on 4342 children, seven or eight years old. Maternal diagnostic irradiation in the year before conception and up to third lunar month of the index pregnancy was recorded, before the chromosome study began, together with a large amount of family and clinical data. Information on X-ray exposure was supplied by the mothers, so radiation dosage could not be estimated. 21 children (including a pair of twins and a pair of siblings) born to 19 mothers had chromosomal aberrations. The mothers of six children with inherited translocations, rearrangements and XYY karyotypes were excluded, and 3 (23%) of the remaining 13 mothers had received abdominal and pelvic X-ray exposures. In the whole sample, however, only 6% of the mothers had diagnostic irradiation. Two of these mothers, aged sixteen and twenty, gave birth to a child each with de-novo autosomal translocations, and the third mother, aged thirty-two, had a child with a complex mosaicism involving one X chromosome. Although the sample size of the mothers with chromosomally abnormal children is small, the results are significant.

  16. Epilepsy and ring chromosome 20: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Marleide da Mota

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the clinical, electroencephalographic, neuroimaging (brain magnetic resonance image - MRI and spectroscopy by MRI and cytogenetic findings of a young male patient with a rare cytogenetic anomaly characterised by a de novo 46,XY,r(20(p13q13.3 karyotype. He presents with mental retardation, emotional liability, and strabismus, without any other significant dysmorphies. There are brain anomalies characterised by corpus callosum, uvula, nodule and cerebellum pyramid hypoplasias, besides arachnoid cysts in the occipital region. He had seizures refractory to pharmacotherapy and long period of confusional status with or without a motor component. The authors recognised that the EEG pattern was not fixed but changed over time, specially for bursts of slow waves with great amplitude accompanied or not by sharp components, and bursts of theta waves sharply contoured. Previously, epilepsy solely has been assigned to region 20q13. However, the important structural cerebral alterations present in our case has not been reported associated to such chromosomal abnormality and may indicate possible new chromosomal sites where such atypical neurological characteristics could be mapped.

  17. Designing of plant artificial chromosome (PAC) by using the Chlorella smallest chromosome as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutoshi, Y; Arai, R; Fujie, M; Yamada, T

    1997-01-01

    As a model for plant-type chromosomes, we have been characterizing molecular organization of the Chlorella vulgaris C-169 chromosome I. To identify chromosome structural elements including the centromeric region and replication origins, we constructed a chromosome I specific cosmid library and aligned each cosmid clones to generate contigs. So far, more than 80% of the entire chromosome I has been covered. A complete clonal physical reconstitution of chromosome I provides information on the structure and genomic organization of plant genome. We propose our strategy to construct an artificial chromosome by assembling the functional chromosome structural elements identified on Chrorella chromosome I.

  18. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Comparison of C. elegans and C. briggsae genome sequences reveals extensive conservation of chromosome organization and synteny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaDeana W Hillier

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether the distinctive features of Caenorhabditis elegans chromosomal organization are shared with the C. briggsae genome, we constructed a single nucleotide polymorphism-based genetic map to order and orient the whole genome shotgun assembly along the six C. briggsae chromosomes. Although these species are of the same genus, their most recent common ancestor existed 80-110 million years ago, and thus they are more evolutionarily distant than, for example, human and mouse. We found that, like C. elegans chromosomes, C. briggsae chromosomes exhibit high levels of recombination on the arms along with higher repeat density, a higher fraction of intronic sequence, and a lower fraction of exonic sequence compared with chromosome centers. Despite extensive intrachromosomal rearrangements, 1:1 orthologs tend to remain in the same region of the chromosome, and colinear blocks of orthologs tend to be longer in chromosome centers compared with arms. More strikingly, the two species show an almost complete conservation of synteny, with 1:1 orthologs present on a single chromosome in one species also found on a single chromosome in the other. The conservation of both chromosomal organization and synteny between these two distantly related species suggests roles for chromosome organization in the fitness of an organism that are only poorly understood presently.

  20. Comparative cytogenetics of six Indo-Pacific moray eels (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae) by chromosomal banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccia, E; Deidda, F; Cannas, R; Lobina, C; Cuccu, D; Deiana, A M; Salvadori, S

    2015-09-01

    A comparative cytogenetic analysis, using both conventional staining techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization, of six Indo-Pacific moray eels from three different genera (Gymnothorax fimbriatus, Gymnothorax flavimarginatus, Gymnothorax javanicus, Gymnothorax undulatus, Echidna nebulosa and Gymnomuraena zebra), was carried out to investigate the chromosomal differentiation in the family Muraenidae. Four species displayed a diploid chromosome number 2n = 42, which is common among the Muraenidae. Two other species, G. javanicus and G. flavimarginatus, were characterized by different chromosome numbers (2n = 40 and 2n = 36). For most species, a large amount of constitutive heterochromatin was detected in the chromosomes, with species-specific C-banding patterns that enabled pairing of the homologous chromosomes. In all species, the major ribosomal genes were localized in the guanine-cytosine-rich region of one chromosome pair, but in different chromosomal locations. The (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequences were mapped onto chromosomal ends in all muraenid species studied. The comparison of the results derived from this study with those available in the literature confirms a substantial conservation of the diploid chromosome number in the Muraenidae and supports the hypothesis that rearrangements have occurred that have diversified their karyotypes. Furthermore, the finding of two species with different diploid chromosome numbers suggests that additional chromosomal rearrangements, such as Robertsonian fusions, have occurred in the karyotype evolution of the Muraenidae. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Cross-species chromosome painting in bats from Madagascar: the contribution of Myzopodidae to revealing ancestral syntenies in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Leigh R; Rambau, Ramugondo V; Lamb, Jennifer M; Taylor, Peter J; Yang, Fengtang; Schoeman, M Corrie; Goodman, Steven M

    2010-09-01

    The chiropteran fauna of Madagascar comprises eight of the 19 recognized families of bats, including the endemic Myzopodidae. While recent systematic studies of Malagasy bats have contributed to our understanding of the morphological and genetic diversity of the island's fauna, little is known about their cytosystematics. Here we investigate karyotypic relationships among four species, representing four families of Chiroptera endemic to the Malagasy region using cross-species chromosome painting with painting probes of Myotis myotis: Myzopodidae (Myzopoda aurita, 2n = 26), Molossidae (Mormopterus jugularis, 2n = 48), Miniopteridae (Miniopterus griveaudi, 2n = 46), and Vespertilionidae (Myotis goudoti, 2n = 44). This study represents the first time a member of the family Myzopodidae has been investigated using chromosome painting. Painting probes of M. myotis were used to delimit 29, 24, 23, and 22 homologous chromosomal segments in the genomes of M. aurita, M. jugularis, M. griveaudi, and M. goudoti, respectively. Comparison of GTG-banded homologous chromosomes/chromosomal segments among the four species revealed the genome of M. aurita has been structured through 14 fusions of chromosomes and chromosomal segments of M. myotis chromosomes leading to a karyotype consisting solely of bi-armed chromosomes. In addition, chromosome painting revealed a novel X-autosome translocation in M. aurita. Comparison of our results with published chromosome maps provided further evidence for karyotypic conservatism within the genera Mormopterus, Miniopterus, and Myotis. Mapping of chromosomal rearrangements onto a molecular consensus phylogeny revealed ancestral syntenies shared between Myzopoda and other bat species of the infraorders Pteropodiformes and Vespertilioniformes. Our study provides further evidence for the involvement of Robertsonian (Rb) translocations and fusions/fissions in chromosomal evolution within Chiroptera.

  2. A novel genetic tool for clonal analysis of fourth chromosome mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa-Neves, Rui; Schinaman, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    The fourth chromosome of Drosophila remains one of the most intractable regions of the fly genome to genetic analysis. The main difficulty posed to the genetic analyses of mutations on this chromosome arises from the fact that it does not undergo meiotic recombination, which makes recombination mapping impossible, and also prevents clonal analysis of mutations, a technique which relies on recombination to introduce the prerequisite recessive markers and FLP-recombinase recognition targets (FR...

  3. The Human Proteome Organization Chromosome 6 Consortium: integrating chromosome-centric and biology/disease driven strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, C H; Kast, J; Foster, L J; Siu, K W M; Overall, C M; Binkowski, T A; Hildebrand, W H; Scherer, A; Mansoor, M; Keown, P A

    2014-04-04

    The Human Proteome Project (HPP) is designed to generate a comprehensive map of the protein-based molecular architecture of the human body, to provide a resource to help elucidate biological and molecular function, and to advance diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Within this framework, the chromosome-based HPP (C-HPP) has allocated responsibility for mapping individual chromosomes by country or region, while the biology/disease HPP (B/D-HPP) coordinates these teams in cross-functional disease-based groups. Chromosome 6 (Ch6) provides an excellent model for integration of these two tasks. This metacentric chromosome has a complement of 1002-1034 genes that code for known, novel or putative proteins. Ch6 is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, many with high population prevalence, devastating clinical impact and profound societal consequences. The unique combination of genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, phenomic and health services data being drawn together within the Ch6 program has enormous potential to advance personalized medicine by promoting robust biomarkers, subunit vaccines and new drug targets. The strong liaison between the clinical and laboratory teams, and the structured framework for technology transfer and health policy decisions within Canada will increase the speed and efficacy of this transition, and the value of this translational research. Canada has been selected to play a leading role in the international Human Proteome Project, the global counterpart of the Human Genome Project designed to understand the structure and function of the human proteome in health and disease. Canada will lead an international team focusing on chromosome 6, which is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, including immune and inflammatory disorders affecting the brain, skeletal system, heart and blood vessels, lungs, kidney, liver, gastrointestinal tract and endocrine system. Many of these chronic and persistent

  4. Comparative Genomics of Interreplichore Translocations in Bacteria: A Measure of Chromosome Topology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedkar, Supriya; Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2016-06-01

    Genomes evolve not only in base sequence but also in terms of their architecture, defined by gene organization and chromosome topology. Whereas genome sequence data inform us about the changes in base sequences for a large variety of organisms, the study of chromosome topology is restricted to a few model organisms studied using microscopy and chromosome conformation capture techniques. Here, we exploit whole genome sequence data to study the link between gene organization and chromosome topology in bacteria. Using comparative genomics across ∼250 pairs of closely related bacteria we show that: (a) many organisms show a high degree of interreplichore translocations throughout the chromosome and not limited to the inversion-prone terminus (ter) or the origin of replication (oriC); (b) translocation maps may reflect chromosome topologies; and (c) symmetric interreplichore translocations do not disrupt the distance of a gene from oriC or affect gene expression states or strand biases in gene densities. In summary, we suggest that translocation maps might be a first line in defining a gross chromosome topology given a pair of closely related genome sequences. Copyright © 2016 Khedkar and Seshasayee.

  5. Comparative Genomics of Interreplichore Translocations in Bacteria: A Measure of Chromosome Topology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Khedkar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomes evolve not only in base sequence but also in terms of their architecture, defined by gene organization and chromosome topology. Whereas genome sequence data inform us about the changes in base sequences for a large variety of organisms, the study of chromosome topology is restricted to a few model organisms studied using microscopy and chromosome conformation capture techniques. Here, we exploit whole genome sequence data to study the link between gene organization and chromosome topology in bacteria. Using comparative genomics across ∼250 pairs of closely related bacteria we show that: (a many organisms show a high degree of interreplichore translocations throughout the chromosome and not limited to the inversion-prone terminus (ter or the origin of replication (oriC; (b translocation maps may reflect chromosome topologies; and (c symmetric interreplichore translocations do not disrupt the distance of a gene from oriC or affect gene expression states or strand biases in gene densities. In summary, we suggest that translocation maps might be a first line in defining a gross chromosome topology given a pair of closely related genome sequences.

  6. Dog Y chromosomal DNA sequence: identification, sequencing and SNP discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkness Ewen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population genetic studies of dogs have so far mainly been based on analysis of mitochondrial DNA, describing only the history of female dogs. To get a picture of the male history, as well as a second independent marker, there is a need for studies of biallelic Y-chromosome polymorphisms. However, there are no biallelic polymorphisms reported, and only 3200 bp of non-repetitive dog Y-chromosome sequence deposited in GenBank, necessitating the identification of dog Y chromosome sequence and the search for polymorphisms therein. The genome has been only partially sequenced for one male dog, disallowing mapping of the sequence into specific chromosomes. However, by comparing the male genome sequence to the complete female dog genome sequence, candidate Y-chromosome sequence may be identified by exclusion. Results The male dog genome sequence was analysed by Blast search against the human genome to identify sequences with a best match to the human Y chromosome and to the female dog genome to identify those absent in the female genome. Candidate sequences were then tested for male specificity by PCR of five male and five female dogs. 32 sequences from the male genome, with a total length of 24 kbp, were identified as male specific, based on a match to the human Y chromosome, absence in the female dog genome and male specific PCR results. 14437 bp were then sequenced for 10 male dogs originating from Europe, Southwest Asia, Siberia, East Asia, Africa and America. Nine haplotypes were found, which were defined by 14 substitutions. The genetic distance between the haplotypes indicates that they originate from at least five wolf haplotypes. There was no obvious trend in the geographic distribution of the haplotypes. Conclusion We have identified 24159 bp of dog Y-chromosome sequence to be used for population genetic studies. We sequenced 14437 bp in a worldwide collection of dogs, identifying 14 SNPs for future SNP analyses, and

  7. Localization of the panhypopituitary dwarf mutation (df) on mouse chromosome 11 in an intersubspecific backcross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckwalter, M S; Katz, R W; Camper, S A

    1991-07-01

    Ames dwarf (df) is an autosomal recessive mutation characterized by severe dwarfism and infertility. This mutation provides a mouse model for panhypopituitarism. The dwarf phenotype results from failure in the differentiation of the cells which produce growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid stimulating hormone. Using the backcross (DF/B-df/df X CASA/Rk) X DF/B-df/df, we confirmed the assignment of df to mouse chromosome 11 and demonstrated recombination between df and the growth hormone gene. This backcross is an invaluable resource for screening candidate genes for the df mutation. The df locus maps to less than 1 cM distal to Pad-1 (0.85 +/- 0.85 cM). Two new genes localized on mouse chromosome 11, Rpo2-1, and Edp-1, map to a region of conserved synteny with human chromosome 17. The localization of the alpha 1 adrenergic receptor, Adra-1, extends a known region of synteny conservation between mouse chromosome 11 and human chromosome 5, and suggests that a human counterpart to df would map to human chromosome 5.

  8. Localization of the Laevigatum powdery mildew resistance gene to barley chromosome 2 by the use of RFLP markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, H.; Holm-Jensen, A.G.; Jensen, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    The powdery mildew disease resistance gene Ml(La) was found to belong to a locus on barely chromosome 2. We suggest that this locus be designated MlLa. Linkage analysis was carried out on 72 chromosome-doubled, spring-type progeny lines from a cross between the winter var 'Vogelsanger Gold' and t......' and the spring var 'Alf'. A map of chromosome 2 spanning 119 cM and flanked by two peroxidase gene loci was constructed. In addition to the Laevigatum resistance locus the map includes nine RFLP markers, the two peroxidase gene loci and the six-row locus in barley....

  9. Transmission of chromosomal and instability via a chromosome irradiated with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji; Tanabe, Masateru; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    We examined the stability of the transferred chromosome in 5 and 12 microcell hybrids including unirradiated human chromosomes 6 and 8, respectively, and 6 and 19 microcell hybrids including 4 Gy-irradiated human chromosomes 6 and 8, respectively. The transferred chromosome was structurally stable in most microcell hybrids transferred with the unirradiated chromosomes 6 and 8. In contrast, the 4 Gy-irradiated human chromosomes were unstable in 3 out of 6 hybrids (50%) with chromosome 6 and 3 out of 19 hybrids (16%) with chromosome 8, showing multiple aberrations in high frequencies (35∼98%). To know the cause of delayed chromosomal instability, intrachromosomal rearrangements of the human chromosome is investigated by subtelomere FISH in 17 microcell hybrids transferred with chromosomes 6 and 8. We found frequent intrachromosomal in 7 microcell hybrids (41%). However, no clear correlation was observed between the intrachromosomal rearrangements and the induction of delayed chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

  10. Retrospective dosimetry using chromosome painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.B.; Giorgio, M.D.; Taja, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency measured in peripheral lymphocytes of persons exposed to ionizing radiation has been used since 1960s for dose assessment. Suspected overexposure is usually evaluated by the frequency of dicentrics and centric rings using an appropriate in vitro calibration curve. However, these chromosome aberrations are unstable with time after exposure and dose reconstruction may encounter uncertainties when the time between the exposure and the analysis is considerable or even unknown. It appears that translocations persist with time after exposure and may be used as an indication of acute past overexposures. Moreover, they appear to accumulate the cytogenetical information, which correlates with the dose received under fractionated, chronic or even occupational exposure conditions. Translocations may be detected using G-banding, which allows to score the total amount of radiation induced translocations but it is a time consuming method, or by Chromosome Painting, a method base on the Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) technique, painting only some chromosome pairs with specific whole chromosome probes and then extrapolating the observed translocation frequencies to the full genome. The latter method allows a faster aberration scoring than G-banding and appears to be the most promissory tool for biodosimetry, particularly when it is necessary to assess low doses and consequently to score a large number of metaphases, e.g. radiation workers exposed within dose limits. As with the unstable chromosome aberration, it is necessary an in vitro calibration curve based on the frequency of stable chromosome aberrations to assess doses. Our laboratory performed calibration curves for Co 60 γ-rays based on the frequencies of unstable (dicentrics and centric rings detected by conventional Giemsa staining) and stable chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions, detected by G-banding). In order to minimize the interlaboratory variability, we

  11. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/μm) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  12. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  13. Radiation exposure and chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.

    1979-01-01

    Chromosome damage is discussed as a means of biologically measuring radiation exposure to the body. Human lymphocytes are commonly used for this test since the extent of chromosome damage induced is related to the exposure dose. Several hundred lymphocytes are analysed in metaphase for chromosome damage, particularly dicentrics. The dose estimate is made by comparing the observed dicentric yield against calibration curves, previously produced by in vitro irradiation of blood samples to known doses of different types of radiation. This test is useful when there is doubt that the film badge has recorded a reasonable whole body dose and also when there is an absence of any physical data. A case of deliberate exposure is described where the chromosome damage test estimated an exposure of 152 rads. The life span of cell aberrations is also considered. Regular checks on radiotherapy patients and some accidental overdose cases have shown little reduction in the aberration levels over the first six weeks after which the damage disappears slowly with a half-life of about three years. In conclusion, chromosome studies have been shown to be of value in resolving practical problems in radiological protection. (U.K.)

  14. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, David; Ivánek, Robert; Čapková, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2007), s. 1431-1437 ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA301/06/1334; GA ČR GA301/07/1383 Grant - others:Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI 55000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromosomal translocations * meiotic X chromosome inactivation * spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.224, year: 2007

  15. International workshop on chromosome 3. Final report, April 15, 1991--April 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmill, R.M.

    1992-07-01

    The Second Workshop on Human Chromosome 3 was held on April 4--5, 1991 at Denver, Colorado. There were 43 participants representing 8 nations. The workshop participants reviewed the current state of the chromosome 3 map, both physical and genetic, and prepared lists of markers and cell lines to be made commonly available. These markers and cell lines should be incorporated into the mapping efforts of diverse groups to permit the integration of data and development of consensus maps at future workshops. Region specific efforts were described for sections of the chromosome harboring genes thought to be involved in certain diseases including Von Hippel-Lindau disease, 3p-syndrome, lung cancer and renal cancer. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Quantitative trait loci mapping for stomatal traits in interspecific ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Sumathi

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... Journal of Genetics, Vol. ... QTL analysis was carried out to identify the chromosomal regions affecting ... Keywords. linkage map; quantitative trait loci; stomata; stress ..... of India for providing financial support for the project.

  17. Molecular analysis of the distribution of chromosomal breakpoints: characterization of a 'hot' region for breaks in human chromosome 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannais, D.B.; Hirai, Y.; Cologne, J.B.; Waldren, C.A.; Ueno, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Ionizing radiation randomly damages DNA and chromosomes whereas subsequent chromosome breaks are non-random. Assuming, as an ideal and naive but useful proposition, that breaks are equally likely anywhere in the chromosome and that a deletion always occurs between two breaks, the frequency of fragments would decrease linearly with increasing fragment size. This simple distribution is not, however, observed. To shed light on the 'real' situation of break formation we mapped breakpoints in the human chromosome no. 11 of 353 independent CD59- mutants isolated from human/hamster hybrid AL cells exposed to radiations (high and low dose-rate gamma rays, high LET carbon or nitrogen ions, protons) or chemicals (arsenic or irradiated, mutagenic histidine) or unexposed. The number of breaks per unit length of DNA differed significantly in different regions of chromosome 11.The highest level of breaks (140/mbp) were in the 0.8 mbp segment between CD59 and Catalase (CAT). Finer mapping of break points was carried out using 26 PCR primer pairs spread across this interval in 15 independent mutants. In two mutants, the break point was in a 107 bp fragment; in the other 13 the breaks were in a single 35 mbp fragment, but not all were at exactly the same site; 4 of 13 occurred in 3 different 3 mbp sub-segments. We are sequencing these fragments to look for such features as repeats: 'colder' regions like that between CD59 and WT will also be analyzed. But, since at least some breaks occurred at different sites and the frequency and distribution of breaks was about the same for all treatments, our we postulate that hot (and cold spots) may be due more to structural features or specific repair than to sequence or type of damage

  18. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Nicke, B.; Schuett, M.

    2009-01-01

    chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells. Overexpression of these "CIN-survival'' genes is associated with poor outcome in estrogen receptor......-positive breast cancer and occurs frequently in basal-like and Her2-positive cases. In diploid cells, but not in chromosomally unstable cells, paclitaxel causes repression of CIN-survival genes, followed by cell death. In the OV01 ovarian cancer clinical trial, a high level of CIN was associated with taxane...

  19. Chromosome isolation by flow sorting in Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Molnár

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the potential of flow cytometry for chromosome sorting in two wild diploid wheats Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their natural allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata. Flow karyotypes obtained after the analysis of DAPI-stained chromosomes were characterized and content of chromosome peaks was determined. Peaks of chromosome 1U could be discriminated in flow karyotypes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. biuncialis and the chromosome could be sorted with purities exceeding 95%. The remaining chromosomes formed composite peaks and could be sorted in groups of two to four. Twenty four wheat SSR markers were tested for their position on chromosomes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. comosa using PCR on DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes and genomic DNA of wheat-Ae. geniculata addition lines, respectively. Six SSR markers were located on particular Aegilops chromosomes using sorted chromosomes, thus confirming the usefulness of this approach for physical mapping. The SSR markers are suitable for marker assisted selection of wheat-Aegilops introgression lines. The results obtained in this work provide new opportunities for dissecting genomes of wild relatives of wheat with the aim to assist in alien gene transfer and discovery of novel genes for wheat improvement.

  20. BAC-HAPPY mapping (BAP mapping: a new and efficient protocol for physical mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang T H Vu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Physical and linkage mapping underpin efforts to sequence and characterize the genomes of eukaryotic organisms by providing a skeleton framework for whole genome assembly. Hitherto, linkage and physical "contig" maps were generated independently prior to merging. Here, we develop a new and easy method, BAC HAPPY MAPPING (BAP mapping, that utilizes BAC library pools as a HAPPY mapping panel together with an Mbp-sized DNA panel to integrate the linkage and physical mapping efforts into one pipeline. Using Arabidopsis thaliana as an exemplar, a set of 40 Sequence Tagged Site (STS markers spanning approximately 10% of chromosome 4 were simultaneously assembled onto a BAP map compiled using both a series of BAC pools each comprising 0.7x genome coverage and dilute (0.7x genome samples of sheared genomic DNA. The resultant BAP map overcomes the need for polymorphic loci to separate genetic loci by recombination and allows physical mapping in segments of suppressed recombination that are difficult to analyze using traditional mapping techniques. Even virtual "BAC-HAPPY-mapping" to convert BAC landing data into BAC linkage contigs is possible.

  1. [Multiplexing mapping of human cDNAs]. Final report, September 1, 1991--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    Using PCR with automated product analysis, 329 human brain cDNA sequences have been assigned to individual human chromosomes. Primers were designed from single-pass cDNA sequences expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Primers were used in PCR reactions with DNA from somatic cell hybrid mapping panels as templates, often with multiplexing. Many ESTs mapped match sequence database records. To evaluate of these matches, the position of the primers relative to the matching region (In), the BLAST scores and the Poisson probability values of the EST/sequence record match were determined. In cases where the gene product was stringently identified by the sequence match had already been mapped, the gene locus determined by EST was consistent with the previous position which strongly supports the validity of assigning unknown genes to human chromosomes based on the EST sequence matches. In the present cases mapping the ESTs to a chromosome can also be considered to have mapped the known gene product: rolipram-sensitive cAMP phosphodiesterase, chromosome 1; protein phosphatase 2A{beta}, chromosome 4; alpha-catenin, chromosome 5; the ELE1 oncogene, chromosome 10q11.2 or q2.1-q23; MXII protein, chromosome l0q24-qter; ribosomal protein L18a homologue, chromosome 14; ribosomal protein L3, chromosome 17; and moesin, Xp11-cen. There were also ESTs mapped that were closely related to non-human sequence records. These matches therefore can be considered to identify human counterparts of known gene products, or members of known gene families. Examples of these include membrane proteins, translation-associated proteins, structural proteins, and enzymes. These data then demonstrate that single pass sequence information is sufficient to design PCR primers useful for assigning cDNA sequences to human chromosomes. When the EST sequence matches previous sequence database records, the chromosome assignments of the EST can be used to make preliminary assignments of the human gene to a chromosome.

  2. A microsatellite linkage map of Drosophila mojavensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schully Sheri

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila mojavensis has been a model system for genetic studies of ecological adaptation and speciation. However, despite its use for over half a century, no linkage map has been produced for this species or its close relatives. Results We have developed and mapped 90 microsatellites in D. mojavensis, and we present a detailed recombinational linkage map of 34 of these microsatellites. A slight excess of repetitive sequence was observed on the X-chromosome relative to the autosomes, and the linkage groups have a greater recombinational length than the homologous D. melanogaster chromosome arms. We also confirmed the conservation of Muller's elements in 23 sequences between D. melanogaster and D. mojavensis. Conclusions The microsatellite primer sequences and localizations are presented here and made available to the public. This map will facilitate future quantitative trait locus mapping studies of phenotypes involved in adaptation or reproductive isolation using this species.

  3. Generation of meiomaps of genome-wide recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottolini, Christian S; Capalbo, Antonio; Newnham, Louise

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a protocol for the generation of genome-wide maps (meiomaps) of recombination and chromosome segregation for the three products of human female meiosis: the first and second polar bodies (PB1 and PB2) and the corresponding oocyte. PB1 is biopsied and the oocyte is artificially......-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genome-wide by microarray. Informative maternal heterozygous SNPs are phased using a haploid PB2 or oocyte as a reference. A simple algorithm is then used to identify the maternal haplotypes for each chromosome, in all of the products of meiosis for each oocyte. This allows mapping...

  4. The Huntington disease locus is most likely within 325 kilobases of the chromosome 4p telomere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, N.A.; Cheng, J.F.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The genetic defect responsible for Huntington disease was originally localized near the tip of the short arm of chromosome 4 by genetic linkage to the locus D4S10. Several markers closer to Huntington disease have since been isolated, but these all appear to be proximal to the defect. A physical map that extends from the most distal of these loci, D4S90, to the telomere of chromosome 4 was constructed. This map identifies at least two CpG islands as markers for Huntington disease candidate genes and places the most likely location of the Huntington disease defect remarkably close (within 325 kilobases) to the telomere

  5. A large-scale chromosome-specific SNP discovery guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Bala Ani; Lucas, Stuart; Budak, Hikmet

    2017-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most prevalent type of variation in genomes that are increasingly being used as molecular markers in diversity analyses, mapping and cloning of genes, and germplasm characterization. However, only a few studies reported large-scale SNP discovery in Aegilops tauschii, restricting their potential use as markers for the low-polymorphic D genome. Here, we report 68,592 SNPs found on the gene-related sequences of the 5D chromosome of Ae. tauschii genotype MvGB589 using genomic and transcriptomic sequences from seven Ae. tauschii accessions, including AL8/78, the only genotype for which a draft genome sequence is available at present. We also suggest a workflow to compare SNP positions in homologous regions on the 5D chromosome of Triticum aestivum, bread wheat, to mark single nucleotide variations between these closely related species. Overall, the identified SNPs define a density of 4.49 SNPs per kilobyte, among the highest reported for the genic regions of Ae. tauschii so far. To our knowledge, this study also presents the first chromosome-specific SNP catalog in Ae. tauschii that should facilitate the association of these SNPs with morphological traits on chromosome 5D to be ultimately targeted for wheat improvement.

  6. Termini of human chromosomes display elevated rates of mitotic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornforth, M N; Eberle, R L

    2001-01-01

    The strand-specific in situ hybridization technique of CO-FISH was used to probe telomeres of human mitotic cells in order to determine the spontaneous frequency of crossover. This approach allowed the detection of recombinational crossovers occurring anywhere along the length of individual chromosomes, including reciprocal events taking place between sister chromatids. Although the process of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) is the most prominent type of recombination in somatic mammalian cells, our results show that SCEs accounted for less than a third of the recombinational events revealed by CO-FISH. It is concluded that chromosomal regions near the termini of chromosome arms undergo extraordinarily high rates of spontaneous recombination, producing terminal crossovers whose small size precludes detection by standard cytogenetic methods. That similar results were observed for transformed epithelial cells, as well as primary fibroblasts, suggests that the phenomenon is a common characteristic of human cells. These findings are noteworthy because, although telomeric and subtelomeric DNA is known to be preferentially involved in certain types of recombination, the tips of somatic mammalian chromosomes have not previously been identified as preferred sites for crossover. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of limitations imposed on CO-FISH for its proposed use in directional hybridization mapping.

  7. Dosage compensation and demasculinization of X chromosomes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtrog, Doris; Toda, Nicholas R T; Lockton, Steven

    2010-08-24

    The X chromosome of Drosophila shows a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, whereas mammalian X chromosomes are enriched for spermatogenesis genes expressed premeiosis and multicopy testis genes. Meiotic X-inactivation and sexual antagonism can only partly account for these patterns. Here, we show that dosage compensation (DC) in Drosophila may contribute substantially to the depletion of male genes on the X. To equalize expression between X-linked and autosomal genes in the two sexes, male Drosophila hypertranscribe their single X, whereas female mammals silence one of their two X chromosomes. We combine fine-scale mapping data of dosage compensated regions with genome-wide expression profiles and show that most male-biased genes on the D. melanogaster X are located outside dosage compensated regions. Additionally, X-linked genes that have newly acquired male-biased expression in D. melanogaster are less likely to be dosage compensated, and parental X-linked genes that gave rise to an autosomal male-biased retrocopy are more likely located within compensated regions. This suggests that DC contributes to the observed demasculinization of X chromosomes in Drosophila, both by limiting the emergence of male-biased expression patterns of existing X genes, and by contributing to gene trafficking of male genes off the X. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rare recombination events generate sequence diversity among balancer chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danny E; Cook, Kevin R; Yeganeh Kazemi, Nazanin; Smith, Clarissa B; Cockrell, Alexandria J; Hawley, R Scott; Bergman, Casey M

    2016-03-08

    Multiply inverted balancer chromosomes that