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Sample records for polymerase manager proteins

  1. Distinct Mechanism Evolved for Mycobacterial RNA Polymerase and Topoisomerase I Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Srikanth; Cao, Nan; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2017-09-15

    We report here a distinct mechanism of interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis that has evolved independently from the previously characterized interaction between bacterial topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase. Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I is responsible for preventing the hyper-negative supercoiling of genomic DNA. The association of topoisomerase I with RNA polymerase during transcription elongation could efficiently relieve transcription-driven negative supercoiling. Our results demonstrate a direct physical interaction between the C-terminal domains of topoisomerase I (TopoI-CTDs) and the β' subunit of RNA polymerase of M. smegmatis in the absence of DNA. The TopoI-CTDs in mycobacteria are evolutionarily unrelated in amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure to the TopoI-CTD found in the majority of bacterial species outside Actinobacteria, including Escherichia coli. The functional interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase has evolved independently in mycobacteria and E. coli, with distinctively different structural elements of TopoI-CTD utilized for this protein-protein interaction. Zinc ribbon motifs in E. coli TopoI-CTD are involved in the interaction with RNA polymerase. For M. smegmatis TopoI-CTD, a 27-amino-acid tail that is rich in basic residues at the C-terminal end is responsible for the interaction with RNA polymerase. Overexpression of recombinant TopoI-CTD in M. smegmatis competed with the endogenous topoisomerase I for protein-protein interactions with RNA polymerase. The TopoI-CTD overexpression resulted in decreased survival following treatment with antibiotics and hydrogen peroxide, supporting the importance of the protein-protein interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase during stress response of mycobacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Binding of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli to RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkney, M; Hoggett, J G

    1988-03-15

    Fluorescence polarization studies were used to study the interaction of a fluorescein-labelled conjugate of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (F-CRP) and RNA polymerase. Under conditions of physiological ionic strength, F-CRP binds to RNA polymerase holoenzyme in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner; the dissociation constant was about 3 microM in the presence of cyclic AMP and about 100 microM in its absence. Binding to core RNA polymerase under the same conditions was weak (Kdiss. approx. 80-100 microM) and independent of cyclic AMP. Competition experiments established that native CRP and F-CRP compete for the same binding site on RNA polymerase holoenzyme and that the native protein binds about 3 times more strongly than does F-CRP. Analytical ultracentrifuge studies showed that CRP binds predominantly to the monomeric rather than the dimeric form of RNA polymerase.

  3. Promoter analysis of the Chilo iridescent virus DNA polymerase and major capsid protein genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalcacioglu, R.; Marks, H.; Vlak, J.M.; Demirbag, Z.; Oers, van M.M.

    2003-01-01

    The DNA polymerase (DNApol) and major capsid protein (MCP) genes were used as models to study promoter activity in Chilo iridescent virus (CIV). Infection of Bombyx mori SPC-BM-36 cells in the presence of inhibitors of DNA or protein synthesis showed that DNApol, as well as helicase, is an

  4. Probing Conformational Changes of Human DNA Polymerase λ Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Footprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jason D.; Brown, Jessica A.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Suo, Zucai

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Crystallographic studies of the C-terminal, DNA polymerase β-like domain of human DNA polymerase lambda (fPolλ) suggested that the catalytic cycle might not involve a large protein domain rearrangement as observed with several replicative DNA polymerases and DNA polymerase β. To examine solution-phase protein conformation changes in fPolλ, which also contains a breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 C-terminal domain and a Proline-rich domain at its N-terminus, we used a mass spectrometry - based protein footprinting approach. In parallel experiments, surface accessibility maps for Arg residues were compared for the free fPolλ versus the binary complex of enzyme•gapped DNA and the ternary complex of enzyme•gapped DNA•dNTP. These experiments suggested that fPolλ does not undergo major conformational changes during the catalysis in the solution phase. Furthermore, the mass spectrometry-based protein footprinting experiments revealed that active site residue R386 was shielded from the surface only in the presence of both a gapped DNA substrate and an incoming nucleotide dNTP. Site-directed mutagenesis and pre-steady state kinetic studies confirmed the importance of R386 for the enzyme activity, and indicated the key role for its guanidino group in stabilizing the negative charges of an incoming nucleotide and the leaving pyrophosphate product. We suggest that such interactions could be shared by and important for catalytic functions of other DNA polymerases. PMID:19467241

  5. QSAR Study on Caffeine Derivatives Docked on Poly(ARNA Polymerase Protein Cid1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora E. Harsa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most commonly ingested alkylxantine and is recognized as a psycho-stimulant. It improves some aspects of cognitive performance, however it reduces the cerebral blood flow both in animals and humans. In this paper a QSAR study on caffeine derivatives, docked on the Poly(ARNA polymerase protein cid1, is reported. A set of forty caffeine derivatives, downloaded from PubChem, was modeled, within the hypermolecule strategy; the predicted activity was LD50 and prediction was done on similarity clusters with the leaders chosen as the best docked ligands on the Poly(ARNA polymerase protein cid1. It was concluded that LD50 of the studied caffeines is not influenced by their binding to the target protein. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  6. Hamster endogenous retrovirus (HaER) - distinct properties of structural proteins and DNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmied-Reouven, A.; Yaniv, A.

    1983-01-01

    The structural proteins as well as some features of the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of the hamster endogenous retrovirus (HaER) were examined. The polypeptide pattern of this virus is substantially different from that of other known retroviruses in containing major polypeptides with molecular weights of 68000, 59000, 27000, 24000 daltons. Double antibody competitive radioimmunoassays showed that the HaER particles do not share any detectable antigenic relatedness with the murine viruses' p30, but manifest a considerable relatedness with the feline leukemia virus p27 and a slight cross-reactivity with the rat virus major protein. The RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of HaER virus has a molecular size of approximately 73000 daltons and in contrast to other mammalian retroviruses shows no significant preference for Mn 2+ over Mg 2+ . Apart from the lack of antigenic relatedness between the HaER virus proteins and the p30 protein of murine viruses, there is also no antigenic relatedness between HaER and murine viruses insofar as their DNA polymerase is concerned. (Author)

  7. Interplay Among Constitutes of Ebola Virus: Nucleoprotein, Polymerase L, Viral Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minchuan; He, Peiming; Su, Jing; Singh, Dadabhai T.; Su, Hailei; Su, Haibin

    Ebola virus is a highly lethal filovirus, claimed thousands of people in its recent outbreak. Seven viral proteins constitute ebola viral structure, and four of them (nucleoprotein (NP), polymerase L, VP35 and VP30) participate majorly in viral replication and transcription. We have elucidated a conformation change of NP cleft by VP35 NP-binding protein domains through superimposing two experimental NP structure images and discussed the function of this conformation change in the replication and transcription with polymerase complex (L, VP35 and VP30). The important roles of VP30 in viral RNA synthesis have also been discussed. A “tapping” model has been proposed in this paper for a better understanding of the interplay among the four viral proteins (NP, polymerase L, VP35 and VP30). Moreover, we have pinpointed some key residue changes on NP (both NP N- and C-terminal) and L between Reston and Zaire by computational studies. Together, this paper provides a description of interactions among ebola viral proteins (NP, L, VP35, VP30 and VP40) in viral replication and transcription, and sheds light on the complex system of viral reproduction.

  8. Bioinformatic prediction of polymerase elements in the rotavirus VP1 protein

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    RODRIGO VÁSQUEZ-DEL CARPIÓ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses are the major cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants world-wide. The genome consists of eleven double stranded RNA segments. The major segment encodes the structural protein VP1, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, which is a minor component of the viral inner core. This study is a detailed bioinformatic assessment of the VP1 sequence. Using various methods we have identified canonical motifs within the VP1 sequence which correspond to motifs previously identified within RdRps of other positive strand, double-strand RNA viruses. The study also predicts an overall structural conservation in the middle region that may correspond to the palm subdomain and part of the fingers and thumb subdomains, which comprise the polymerase core of the protein. Based on this analysis, we suggest that the rotavirus replicase has the minimal elements to function as an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. VP1, besides having common RdRp features, also contains large unique regions that might be responsible for characteristic features observed in the Reoviridae family

  9. GTP-dependent binding and nuclear transport of RNA polymerase II by Npa3 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staresincic, Lidija; Walker, Jane; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara

    2011-01-01

    in yeast extracts. Indeed, Npa3 depletion in vivo affects nuclear localization of RNAPII; the polymerase accumulates in the cytoplasm. Npa3 is a member of the GPN-LOOP family of GTPases. Npa3 mutants that either cannot bind GTP or that bind but cannot hydrolyze it are inviable and unable to support nuclear...... transport of RNAPII. Surprisingly, we were unable to detect interactions between Npa3 and proteins in the classical importin a/ß pathway for nuclear import. Interestingly, Npa3-RNAPII binding is significantly increased by the addition of GTP or its slowly hydrolyzable analogue guanosine 5'-3-O......-(thio)triphosphate (GTP¿S). Moreover, the Npa3 mutant that binds GTP, but cannot hydrolyze it, binds RNAPII even in the absence of added GTP, whereas the mutant that cannot bind GTP is unable to bind the polymerase. Together, our data suggest that Npa3 defines an unconventional pathway for nuclear import of RNAPII, which...

  10. Cooperative DNA binding of heterologous proteins: Evidence for contact between the cyclic AMP receptor protein and RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Y.L.; Garges, S.; Adhya, S.; Krakow, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Four cAMP-independent receptor protein mutants (designated CRP* mutants) isolated previously are able to activate in vivo gene transcription in the absence of cAMP and their activity can be enhanced by cAMP or cGMP. One of the four mutant proteins, CRP*598 (Arg-142 to His, Ala-144 to Thr), has been characterized with regard to its conformational properties and ability to bind to and support abortive initiation from the lac promoter. Binding of wild-type CRP to its site on the lac promoter and activation of abortive initiation by RNA polymerase on this promoter are effected by cAMP but not by cGMP. CRP*598 can activate lacP + -directed abortive initiation in the presence of cAMP and less efficiently in the presence of cGMP or in the absence of cyclic nucleotide. DNase I protection (footprinting) indicates that cAMP-CRP* binds to its site on the lac promoter whereas unliganded CRP* and cGMP-CRP* form a stable complex with the [ 32 P]lacP + fragment only in the presence of RNA polymerase, showing cooperative binding of two heterologous proteins. This cooperative binding provides strong evidence for a contact between CRP and RNA polymerase for activation of transcription. Although cGMP binds to CRP, it cannot replace cAMP in effecting the requisite conformational transition necessary for site-specific promoter binding

  11. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 is required for protein localization to Cajal body.

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    Elena Kotova

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the nuclear protein known as Poly (ADP-ribose Polymerase1 (PARP1 was shown to play a key role in regulating transcription of a number of genes and controlling the nuclear sub-organelle nucleolus. PARP1 enzyme is known to catalyze the transfer of ADP-ribose to a variety of nuclear proteins. At present, however, while we do know that the main acceptor for pADPr in vivo is PARP1 protein itself, by PARP1 automodification, the significance of PARP1 automodification for in vivo processes is not clear. Therefore, we investigated the roles of PARP1 auto ADP-ribosylation in dynamic nuclear processes during development. Specifically, we discovered that PARP1 automodification is required for shuttling key proteins into Cajal body (CB by protein non-covalent interaction with pADPr in vivo. We hypothesize that PARP1 protein shuttling follows a chain of events whereby, first, most unmodified PARP1 protein molecules bind to chromatin and accumulate in nucleoli, but then, second, upon automodification with poly(ADP-ribose, PARP1 interacts non-covalently with a number of nuclear proteins such that the resulting protein-pADPr complex dissociates from chromatin into CB.

  12. Mosaic amino acid conservation in 3D-structures of surface protein and polymerase of hepatitis B virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, Formijn J.; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Berkhout, Ben; Lukashov, Vladimir V.

    2008-01-01

    Surface protein and polymerase of hepatitis B virus provide a striking example of gene overlap. Inclusion of more coding constraints in the phylogenetic analysis forces the tree toward accepted topology. Three-dimensional protein modeling demonstrates that participation in local protein function

  13. Promoter analysis of the Chilo iridescent virus DNA polymerase and major capsid protein genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalcacioglu, Remziye; Marks, Hendrik; Vlak, Just M.; Demirbag, Zihni; Oers, Monique M. van

    2003-01-01

    The DNA polymerase (DNApol) and major capsid protein (MCP) genes were used as models to study promoter activity in Chilo iridescent virus (CIV). Infection of Bombyx mori SPC-BM-36 cells in the presence of inhibitors of DNA or protein synthesis showed that DNApol, as well as helicase, is an immediate-early gene and confirmed that the major capsid protein (MCP) is a late gene. Transcription of DNApol initiated 35 nt upstream and that of MCP 14 nt upstream of the translational start site. In a luciferase reporter gene assay both promoters were active only when cells were infected with CIV. For DNApol sequences between position -27 and -6, relative to the transcriptional start site, were essential for promoter activity. Furthermore, mutation of a G within the sequence TTGTTTT located just upstream of the DNApol transcription initiation site reduced the promoter activity by 25%. Sequences crucial for MCP promoter activity are located between positions -53 and -29

  14. Isolation and characterisation of the cDNA encoding a glycosylated accessory protein of pea chloroplast DNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaikwad, A; Tewari, K K; Kumar, D; Chen, W; Mukherjee, S K

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding p43, a DNA binding protein from pea chloroplasts (ct) that binds to cognate DNA polymerase and stimulates the polymerase activity, has been cloned and characterised. The characteristic sequence motifs of hydroxyproline-rich glyco-proteins (HRGP) are present in the cDNA corres-ponding to the N-terminal domain of the mature p43. The protein was found to be highly O-arabinosylated. Chemically deglycosylated p43 (i.e. p29) retains its binding to both DNA and pea ct-DNA polymeras...

  15. Polymerase chain reaction as a tool for developing stress protein probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochrane, B.J.; Mattley, Y.D. (Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Biology); Snell, T.W. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Div. of Biology)

    1994-08-01

    Because of the high degree of evolutionary conservation of stress proteins, potential exists for the development of nucleic acid probes from particular species that could be used to monitor stress-related changes in mRNA abundance. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful tool that can be applied to the generation of these probes, provided that primer sequences can be identified that specifically amplify sequences of interest from a wide variety of organisms. The authors identified such sequences from multiple alignments of published chaperonin and stress-70 sequences, and tested their ability to amplify appropriately sized fragments from genomic DNA from a variety of vertebrates and invertebrates. Although no primer pair could be used successfully with all species, the authors were able to derive specific products from most species by testing different pairs. One primer pair for chaperonin proved particularly useful. Products were obtained from all tested species, and with a single exception (human), these primers appeared to amplify a single copy sequence. The authors determined the nucleotide sequence of the product obtained from the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis and determined by phylogenetic analysis of the inferred protein product that the product obtained is most likely derived from a rotifer DNA template. Finally, the authors show that this product can be used to detect changes in abundance of homologous mRNA in heat-stressed rotifers.

  16. A Protein Complex Required for Polymerase V Transcripts and RNA- Directed DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Julie A.

    2010-05-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene silencing. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation is established by DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE 2 (DRM2), which is targeted by small interfering RNAs through a pathway termed RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) [1, 2]. Recently, RdDM was shown to require intergenic noncoding (IGN) transcripts that are dependent on the Pol V polymerase. These transcripts are proposed to function as scaffolds for the recruitment of downstream RdDM proteins, including DRM2, to loci that produce both siRNAs and IGN transcripts [3]. However, the mechanism(s) through which Pol V is targeted to specific genomic loci remains largely unknown. Through affinity purification of two known RdDM components, DEFECTIVE IN RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DRD1) [4] and DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING 3 (DMS3) [5, 6], we found that they copurify with each other and with a novel protein, RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (RDM1), forming a complex we term DDR. We also found that DRD1 copurified with Pol V subunits and that RDM1, like DRD1 [3] and DMS3 [7], is required for the production of Pol V-dependent transcripts. These results suggest that the DDR complex acts in RdDM at a step upstream of the recruitment or activation of Pol V. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Protein Complex Required for Polymerase V Transcripts and RNA- Directed DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Julie A.; Ausí n, Israel; Johnson, Lianna M.; Vashisht, Ajay  A Amar; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Wohlschlegel, James  A A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene silencing. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation is established by DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE 2 (DRM2), which is targeted by small interfering RNAs through a pathway termed RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) [1, 2]. Recently, RdDM was shown to require intergenic noncoding (IGN) transcripts that are dependent on the Pol V polymerase. These transcripts are proposed to function as scaffolds for the recruitment of downstream RdDM proteins, including DRM2, to loci that produce both siRNAs and IGN transcripts [3]. However, the mechanism(s) through which Pol V is targeted to specific genomic loci remains largely unknown. Through affinity purification of two known RdDM components, DEFECTIVE IN RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DRD1) [4] and DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING 3 (DMS3) [5, 6], we found that they copurify with each other and with a novel protein, RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (RDM1), forming a complex we term DDR. We also found that DRD1 copurified with Pol V subunits and that RDM1, like DRD1 [3] and DMS3 [7], is required for the production of Pol V-dependent transcripts. These results suggest that the DDR complex acts in RdDM at a step upstream of the recruitment or activation of Pol V. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cystoviral polymerase complex protein P7 uses its acidic C-terminal tail to regulate the RNA-directed RNA polymerase P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphonse, Sébastien; Arnold, Jamie J; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Wang, Hsin; Kloss, Brian; Cameron, Craig E; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2014-07-15

    In bacteriophages of the cystovirus family, the polymerase complex (PX) encodes a 75-kDa RNA-directed RNA polymerase (P2) that transcribes the double-stranded RNA genome. Also a constituent of the PX is the essential protein P7 that, in addition to accelerating PX assembly and facilitating genome packaging, plays a regulatory role in transcription. Deletion of P7 from the PX leads to aberrant plus-strand synthesis suggesting its influence on the transcriptase activity of P2. Here, using solution NMR techniques and the P2 and P7 proteins from cystovirus ϕ12, we demonstrate their largely electrostatic interaction in vitro. Chemical shift perturbations on P7 in the presence of P2 suggest that this interaction involves the dynamic C-terminal tail of P7, more specifically an acidic cluster therein. Patterns of chemical shift changes induced on P2 by the P7 C-terminus resemble those seen in the presence of single-stranded RNA suggesting similarities in binding. This association between P2 and P7 reduces the affinity of the former toward template RNA and results in its decreased activity both in de novo RNA synthesis and in extending a short primer. Given the presence of C-terminal acidic tracts on all cystoviral P7 proteins, the electrostatic nature of the P2/P7 interaction is likely conserved within the family and could constitute a mechanism through which P7 regulates transcription in cystoviruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rbs1, a new protein implicated in RNA polymerase III biogenesis in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśla, Małgorzata; Makała, Ewa; Płonka, Marta; Bazan, Rafał; Gewartowski, Kamil; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Boguta, Magdalena

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) complex assembly and its transport to the nucleus. We demonstrate that a missense cold-sensitive mutation, rpc128-1007, in the sequence encoding the C-terminal part of the second largest Pol III subunit, C128, affects the assembly and stability of the enzyme. The cellular levels and nuclear concentration of selected Pol III subunits were decreased in rpc128-1007 cells, and the association between Pol III subunits as evaluated by coimmunoprecipitation was also reduced. To identify the proteins involved in Pol III assembly, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the rpc128-1007 mutation and selected the Rbs1 gene, whose overexpression enhanced de novo tRNA transcription in rpc128-1007 cells, which correlated with increased stability, nuclear concentration, and interaction of Pol III subunits. The rpc128-1007 rbs1Δ double mutant shows a synthetic growth defect, indicating that rpc128-1007 and rbs1Δ function in parallel ways to negatively regulate Pol III assembly. Rbs1 physically interacts with a subset of Pol III subunits, AC19, AC40, and ABC27/Rpb5. Additionally, Rbs1 interacts with the Crm1 exportin and shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus. We postulate that Rbs1 binds to the Pol III complex or subcomplex and facilitates its translocation to the nucleus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Determinants of RNA polymerase alpha subunit for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma subunits: hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting.

    OpenAIRE

    Heyduk, T; Heyduk, E; Severinov, K; Tang, H; Ebright, R H

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) alpha subunit serves as the initiator for RNAP assembly, which proceeds according to the pathway 2 alpha-->alpha 2-->alpha 2 beta-->alpha 2 beta beta'-->alpha 2 beta beta' sigma. In this work, we have used hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting to define determinants of alpha for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma. Our results indicate that amino acids 30-75 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta ...

  1. Expression of RNA virus proteins by RNA polymerase II dependent expression plasmids is hindered at multiple steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Überla Klaus

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins of human and animal viruses are frequently expressed from RNA polymerase II dependent expression cassettes to study protein function and to develop gene-based vaccines. Initial attempts to express the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV by eukaryotic promoters revealed restrictions at several steps of gene expression. Results Insertion of an intron flanked by exonic sequences 5'-terminal to the open reading frames (ORF of VSV-G and RSV-F led to detectable cytoplasmic mRNA levels of both genes. While the exonic sequences were sufficient to stabilise the VSV-G mRNA, cytoplasmic mRNA levels of RSV-F were dependent on the presence of a functional intron. Cytoplasmic VSV-G mRNA levels led to readily detectable levels of VSV-G protein, whereas RSV-F protein expression remained undetectable. However, RSV-F expression was observed after mutating two of four consensus sites for polyadenylation present in the RSV-F ORF. Expression levels could be further enhanced by codon optimisation. Conclusion Insufficient cytoplasmic mRNA levels and premature polyadenylation prevent expression of RSV-F by RNA polymerase II dependent expression plasmids. Since RSV replicates in the cytoplasm, the presence of premature polyadenylation sites and elements leading to nuclear instability should not interfere with RSV-F expression during virus replication. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the destabilisation of the RSV-F and VSV-G mRNAs and the different requirements for their rescue by insertion of an intron remain to be defined.

  2. The L polymerase protein of parainfluenza virus 3 forms an oligomer and can interact with the heterologous Sendai virus L, P and C proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smallwood, Sherin; Moyer, Sue A.

    2004-01-01

    We recently showed that the L protein of Sendai virus is present as an oligomer in the active P-L polymerase complex [Smallwood et al., Virology 304 (2002) 235]. We now demonstrate using two different epitope tags that the L protein of a second respirovirus, human parainfluenza type 3 virus (PIV3), also forms an L-L complex. L oligomerization requires the coexpression of the differentially epitope tagged L proteins. By exploiting a series of C-terminal truncations the L-L binding site maps to the N-terminal half of L. There is some complex formation between the heterologous PIV3 and Sendai L and P proteins; however, the heterologous L protein does not function in transcription of either the PIV3 or Sendai template. The PIV3 C protein binds PIV3 L and inhibits RNA synthesis in vitro and in vivo. Significant homology exists between the C proteins of PIV3 and Sendai and complex formation occurs between the PIV3 and Sendai heterologous C and L proteins. In addition, the heterologous C proteins can inhibit transcription at ∼50% of the level of the homologous protein. These data suggest that while the C proteins may be functionally somewhat interchangeable, the L and P proteins are specific for each virus

  3. Automatic polymerase chain reaction product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger protein fused to luciferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Wataru; Kezuka, Aki; Murakami, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Jinhee; Abe, Koichi; Motoki, Hiroaki; Matsuo, Takafumi; Shimura, Nobuaki; Noda, Mamoru; Igimi, Shizunobu; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Zif268 fused to luciferase was used for E. coli O157, Salmonella and coliform detection. •Artificial zinc finger protein fused to luciferase was constructed for Norovirus detection. •An analyzer that automatically detects PCR products by zinc finger protein fused to luciferase was developed. •Target pathogens were specifically detected by the automatic analyzer with zinc finger protein fused to luciferase. -- Abstract: An automatic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger (ZF) protein fused to luciferase was developed. ZF protein fused to luciferase specifically binds to target double stranded DNA sequence and has luciferase enzymatic activity. Therefore, PCR products that comprise ZF protein recognition sequence can be detected by measuring the luciferase activity of the fusion protein. We previously reported that PCR products from Legionella pneumophila and Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 genomic DNA were detected by Zif268, a natural ZF protein, fused to luciferase. In this study, Zif268–luciferase was applied to detect the presence of Salmonella and coliforms. Moreover, an artificial zinc finger protein (B2) fused to luciferase was constructed for a Norovirus detection system. In the luciferase activity detection assay, several bound/free separation process is required. Therefore, an analyzer that automatically performed the bound/free separation process was developed to detect PCR products using the ZF–luciferase fusion protein. By means of the automatic analyzer with ZF–luciferase fusion protein, target pathogenic genomes were specifically detected in the presence of other pathogenic genomes. Moreover, we succeeded in the detection of 10 copies of E. coli BL21 without extraction of genomic DNA by the automatic analyzer and E. coli was detected with a logarithmic dependency in the range of 1.0 × 10 to 1.0 × 10 6 copies

  4. Automatic polymerase chain reaction product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger protein fused to luciferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Wataru; Kezuka, Aki; Murakami, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Jinhee; Abe, Koichi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Motoki, Hiroaki; Matsuo, Takafumi; Shimura, Nobuaki [System Instruments Co., Ltd., 776-2 Komiya-cho, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0031 (Japan); Noda, Mamoru; Igimi, Shizunobu [Division of Biomedical Food Research, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Ikebukuro, Kazunori, E-mail: ikebu@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Zif268 fused to luciferase was used for E. coli O157, Salmonella and coliform detection. •Artificial zinc finger protein fused to luciferase was constructed for Norovirus detection. •An analyzer that automatically detects PCR products by zinc finger protein fused to luciferase was developed. •Target pathogens were specifically detected by the automatic analyzer with zinc finger protein fused to luciferase. -- Abstract: An automatic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger (ZF) protein fused to luciferase was developed. ZF protein fused to luciferase specifically binds to target double stranded DNA sequence and has luciferase enzymatic activity. Therefore, PCR products that comprise ZF protein recognition sequence can be detected by measuring the luciferase activity of the fusion protein. We previously reported that PCR products from Legionella pneumophila and Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 genomic DNA were detected by Zif268, a natural ZF protein, fused to luciferase. In this study, Zif268–luciferase was applied to detect the presence of Salmonella and coliforms. Moreover, an artificial zinc finger protein (B2) fused to luciferase was constructed for a Norovirus detection system. In the luciferase activity detection assay, several bound/free separation process is required. Therefore, an analyzer that automatically performed the bound/free separation process was developed to detect PCR products using the ZF–luciferase fusion protein. By means of the automatic analyzer with ZF–luciferase fusion protein, target pathogenic genomes were specifically detected in the presence of other pathogenic genomes. Moreover, we succeeded in the detection of 10 copies of E. coli BL21 without extraction of genomic DNA by the automatic analyzer and E. coli was detected with a logarithmic dependency in the range of 1.0 × 10 to 1.0 × 10{sup 6} copies.

  5. Interactions between the cyclic AMP receptor protein and the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase at the Escherichia coli galactose operon P1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attey, A; Belyaeva, T; Savery, N; Hoggett, J; Fujita, N; Ishihama, A; Busby, S

    1994-10-25

    DNAase I footprinting has been used to study open complexes between Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and the galactose operon P1 promoter, both in the absence and the presence of CRP (the cyclic AMP receptor protein, a transcription activator). From the effects of deletion of the C-terminal part of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit, we deduce that alpha binds at the upstream end of both the binary RNA polymerase-galP1 and ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-galP1 complexes. Disruption of the alpha-upstream contact suppresses open complex formation at galP1 at lower temperatures. In ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-galP1 complexes, alpha appears to make direct contact with Activating Region 1 in CRP. DNAase I footprinting has been used to detect and quantify interactions between purified alpha and CRP bound at galP1.

  6. Molecular interactions and trafficking of influenza A virus polymerase proteins analyzed by specific monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Leslie A.; Aggarwal, Shilpa; Bussey, Kendra A.; Desmet, Emily A.; Kim, Baek; Takimoto, Toru, E-mail: toru_takimoto@urmc.rochester.edu

    2012-04-25

    The influenza polymerase complex composed of PA, PB1 and PB2, plays a key role in viral replication and pathogenicity. Newly synthesized components must be translocated to the nucleus, where replication and transcription of viral genomes take place. Previous studies suggest that while PB2 is translocated to the nucleus independently, PA and PB1 subunits could not localize to the nucleus unless in a PA-PB1 complex. To further determine the molecular interactions between the components, we created a panel of 16 hybridoma cell lines, which produce monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against each polymerase component. We showed that, although PB1 interacts with both PA and PB2 individually, nuclear localization of PB1 is enhanced only when co-expressed with PA. Interestingly, one of the anti-PA mAbs reacted much more strongly with PA when co-expressed with PB1. These results suggest that PA-PB1 interactions induce a conformational change in PA, which could be required for its nuclear translocation.

  7. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize the palm subdomain of hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingravallo, P; Lahser, F; Xia, E; Sodowich, B; Lai, V C; Hong, Z; Zhong, W

    2001-06-01

    The nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) which plays an essential role in viral RNA replication. Antibodies that specifically recognize NS5B will have utilities in monitoring NS5B production and subcellular localization, as well as in structure-function studies. In this report, three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 16A9C9, 16D9A4 and 20A12C7, against a recombinant NS5B protein (genotype 1a, H-77 strain) were produced. These mAbs specifically recognize HCV NS5B, but not RdRps of polivirus (PV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) or GB virus B (GBV-B). The mAbs can readily detect NS5B in cellular lysates of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells constitutively expressing the nonstructural region of HCV (NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5A-NS5B). NS5B proteins of different HCV genotypes/subtypes (1a, 1b, 2a, 2c, 5a) showed varied affinity for these mAbs. Interestingly, the epitopes for the mAbs were mapped to the palm subdomain (amino acid 188-370) of the HCV RdRp as determined by immunoblotting analysis of a panel of HCV/GBV-B chimeric NS5B proteins. The binding site was mapped between amino acid 231 and 267 of NS5B for 16A9C9, and between 282 and 372 for 16D9A4 and 20A12C7. Furthermore, these mAbs showed no inhibitory effect on the NS5B polymerase activity in vitro.

  8. Fusion of Taq DNA polymerase with single-stranded DNA binding-like protein of Nanoarchaeum equitans-Expression and characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Olszewski

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are present in all organisms and are important enzymes that synthesise DNA molecules. They are used in various fields of science, predominantly as essential components for in vitro DNA syntheses, known as PCR. Modern diagnostics, molecular biology and genetic engineering need DNA polymerases which demonstrate improved performance. This study was aimed at obtaining a new NeqSSB-TaqS fusion DNA polymerase from the Taq DNA Stoffel domain and a single-stranded DNA binding-like protein of Nanoarchaeum equitans in order to significantly improve the properties of DNA polymerase. The DNA coding sequence of Taq Stoffel DNA polymerase and the nonspecific DNA-binding protein of Nanoarchaeum equitans (NeqSSB-like protein were fused. A novel recombinant gene was obtained which was cloned into the pET-30 Ek/LIC vector and introduced into E. coli for expression. The recombinant enzyme was purified and its enzymatic properties including DNA polymerase activity, PCR amplification rate, thermostability, processivity and resistance to inhibitors, were tested. The yield of the target protein reached approximately 18 mg/l after 24 h of the IPTG induction. The specific activity of the polymerase was 2200 U/mg. The recombinant NeqSSB-TaqS exhibited a much higher extension rate (1000 bp template in 20 s, processivity (19 nt, thermostability (half-life 35 min at 95°C and higher tolerance to PCR inhibitors (0.3-1.25% of whole blood, 0.84-13.5 μg of lactoferrin and 4.7-150 ng of heparin than Taq Stoffel DNA polymerase. Furthermore, our studies show that NeqSSB-TaqS DNA polymerase has a high level of flexibility in relation to Mg2+ ions (from 1 to 5 mM and KCl or (NH42SO4 salts (more than 60 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Using NeqSSB-TaqS DNA polymerase instead of the Taq DNA polymerase could be a better choice in many PCR applications.

  9. Specificity and functional interaction of the polymerase complex proteins of human and avian metapneumoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T. de Graaf (Marieke); S. Herfst (Sander); E.J.A. Schrauwen (Eefje); Y. Choi (Ying); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHuman metapneumovirus (HMPV) and avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) have a similar genome organization and protein composition, but a different host range. AMPV subgroup C (AMPV-C) is more closely relaled to HMPV than other AMPVs. To investigate the specificity and functional interaction of

  10. Putative endogenous filovirus VP35-like protein potentially functions as an IFN antagonist but not a polymerase cofactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsunari Kondoh

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that some non-retroviral RNA virus genes are integrated into vertebrate genomes. Endogenous filovirus-like elements (EFLs have been discovered in some mammalian genomes. However, their potential roles in ebolavirus infection are unclear. A filovirus VP35-like element (mlEFL35 is found in the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus genome. Putative mlEFL35-derived protein (mlEFL35p contains nearly full-length amino acid sequences corresponding to ebolavirus VP35. Ebola virus VP35 has been shown to bind double-stranded RNA, leading to inhibition of type I interferon (IFN production, and is also known as a viral polymerase cofactor that is essential for viral RNA transcription/replication. In this study, we transiently expressed mlEFL35p in human kidney cells and investigated its biological functions. We first found that mlEFL35p was coimmunoprecipitated with itself and ebolavirus VP35s but not with the viral nucleoprotein. Then the biological functions of mlEFL35p were analyzed by comparing it to ebolavirus VP35s. We found that the expression of mlEFL35p significantly inhibited human IFN-β promoter activity as well as VP35s. By contrast, expression of mlEFL35p did not support viral RNA transcription/replication and indeed slightly decrease the reporter gene expression in a minigenome assay. These results suggest that mlEFL35p potentially acts as an IFN antagonist but not a polymerase cofactor.

  11. Heat shock 70 protein interaction with Turnip mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase within virus-induced membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, Philippe J.; Thivierge, Karine; Cotton, Sophie; Beauchemin, Chantal; Ide, Christine; Ubalijoro, Eliane; Laliberte, Jean-Francois; Fortin, Marc G.

    2008-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification was used in Arabidopsis thaliana to identify cellular interactors of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The heat shock cognate 70-3 (Hsc70-3) and poly(A)-binding (PABP) host proteins were recovered and shown to interact with the RdRp in vitro. As previously shown for PABP, Hsc70-3 was redistributed to nuclear and membranous fractions in infected plants and both RdRp interactors were co-immunoprecipitated from a membrane-enriched extract using RdRp-specific antibodies. Fluorescently tagged RdRp and Hsc70-3 localized to the cytoplasm and the nucleus when expressed alone or in combination in Nicotiana benthamiana. However, they were redistributed to large perinuclear ER-derived vesicles when co-expressed with the membrane binding 6K-VPg-Pro protein of TuMV. The association of Hsc70-3 with the RdRp could possibly take place in membrane-derived replication complexes. Thus, Hsc70-3 and PABP2 are potentially integral components of the replicase complex and could have important roles to play in the regulation of potyviral RdRp functions

  12. An RNA polymerase II-and AGO4-associated protein acts in RNA-directed DNA methylation

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Zhihuan

    2010-04-21

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark in many eukaryotes. In plants, 24-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) bound to the effector protein, Argonaute 4 (AGO4), can direct de novo DNA methylation by the methyltransferase DRM2 (refs 2, 4-6). Here we report a new regulator of RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) in Arabidopsis: RDM1. Loss-of-function mutations in the RDM1 gene impair the accumulation of 24-nucleotide siRNAs, reduce DNA methylation, and release transcriptional gene silencing at RdDM target loci. RDM1 encodes a small protein that seems to bind single-stranded methyl DNA, and associates and co-localizes with RNA polymerase II (Pol II, also known as NRPB), AGO4 and DRM2 in the nucleus. Our results indicate that RDM1 is a component of the RdDM effector complex and may have a role in linking siRNA production with pre-existing or de novo cytosine methylation. Our results also indicate that, although RDM1 and Pol V (also known as NRPE) may function together at some RdDM target sites in the peri-nucleolar siRNA processing centre, Pol II rather than Pol V is associated with the RdDM effector complex at target sites in the nucleoplasm. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  13. A quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction approach for estimating processed animal proteins in feed: preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cesarina Abete

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lifting of the ban on the use of processed animal proteins (PAPs from non-ruminants in non-ruminant feed is in the wind, avoiding intraspecies recycling. Discrimination of species will be performed through polymerase chain reaction (PCR, which is at a moment a merely qualitative method. Nevertheless, quantification of PAPs in feed is needed. The aim of this study was to approach the quantitative determination of PAPs in feed through Real Time (RT-PCR technique; three different protocols picked up from the literature were tested. Three different kind of matrices were examined: pure animal meals (bovine, chicken and pork; one feed sample certified by the European reference laboratory on animal proteins (EURL AP in feed spiked with 0.1% bovine meal; and genomic DNAs from bovine, chicken and pork muscles. The limit of detection (LOD of the three protocols was set up. All the results obtained from the three protocols considered failed in the quantification process, most likely due to the uncertain copy numbers of the analytical targets chosen. This preliminary study will allow us to address further investigations, with the purpose of developing a RT-PCR quantitative method.

  14. Two modes of interaction of the single-stranded DNA-binding protein of bacteriophage T7 with the DNA polymerase-thioredoxin complex

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sharmistha; Hamdan, Samir; Richardson, Charles C.

    2010-01-01

    The DNA polymerase encoded by bacteriophage T7 has low processivity. Escherichia coli thioredoxin binds to a segment of 76 residues in the thumb subdomain of the polymerase and increases the processivity. The binding of thioredoxin leads to the formation of two basic loops, loops A and B, located within the thioredoxin-binding domain (TBD). Both loops interact with the acidic C terminus of the T7 helicase. A relatively weak electrostatic mode involves the C-terminal tail of the helicase and the TBD, whereas a high affinity interaction that does not involve the C-terminal tail occurs when the polymerase is in a polymerization mode. T7 gene 2.5 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (gp2.5) also has an acidic C-terminal tail. gp2.5 also has two modes of interaction with the polymerase, but both involve the C-terminal tail of gp2.5. An electrostatic interaction requires the basic residues in loops A and B, and gp2.5 binds to both loops with similar affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance. When the polymerase is in a polymerization mode, the C terminus of gene 2.5 protein interacts with the polymerase in regions outside the TBD.gp2.5 increases the processivity of the polymerase-helicase complex during leading strand synthesis. When loop B of the TBD is altered, abortive DNA products are observed during leading strand synthesis. Loop B appears to play an important role in communication with the helicase and gp2.5, whereas loop A plays a stabilizing role in these interactions. © 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Two modes of interaction of the single-stranded DNA-binding protein of bacteriophage T7 with the DNA polymerase-thioredoxin complex

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sharmistha

    2010-04-06

    The DNA polymerase encoded by bacteriophage T7 has low processivity. Escherichia coli thioredoxin binds to a segment of 76 residues in the thumb subdomain of the polymerase and increases the processivity. The binding of thioredoxin leads to the formation of two basic loops, loops A and B, located within the thioredoxin-binding domain (TBD). Both loops interact with the acidic C terminus of the T7 helicase. A relatively weak electrostatic mode involves the C-terminal tail of the helicase and the TBD, whereas a high affinity interaction that does not involve the C-terminal tail occurs when the polymerase is in a polymerization mode. T7 gene 2.5 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (gp2.5) also has an acidic C-terminal tail. gp2.5 also has two modes of interaction with the polymerase, but both involve the C-terminal tail of gp2.5. An electrostatic interaction requires the basic residues in loops A and B, and gp2.5 binds to both loops with similar affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance. When the polymerase is in a polymerization mode, the C terminus of gene 2.5 protein interacts with the polymerase in regions outside the TBD.gp2.5 increases the processivity of the polymerase-helicase complex during leading strand synthesis. When loop B of the TBD is altered, abortive DNA products are observed during leading strand synthesis. Loop B appears to play an important role in communication with the helicase and gp2.5, whereas loop A plays a stabilizing role in these interactions. © 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. On the efficient bio-incorporation of 5-hydroxy-tryptophan in recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli with T7 RNA polymerase-based vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Souza, Wellington P; Bronze, Fellipe; Broos, Jaap; Marcondes, Marcelo F M; Oliveira, Vitor

    2017-10-21

    Biosynthetic incorporation of non-canonic amino acids is an attractive strategy to introduce new properties in recombinant proteins. Trp analogs can be incorporated in recombinant proteins replacing regular Trp during protein translation into a Trp-auxotrophic cell host. This straightforward method however, is limited to few analogs recognized and accepted by the cellular protein production machinery. 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5OH-Trp) can be bio-incorporated using E. coli as expression host however; we have experienced very low incorporation yields - amount of protein containing regular Trp/amount of protein containing the Trp analog - during expressions of 5OH-Trp labeled proteins. Furthermore, this low incorporation yield were verified especially when the widely-used vectors based on the T7 RNA polymerase were used. Testing different 5OH-Trp incorporation protocols we verified that in these T7-based systems, the production of the T7 RNA polymerase is driven by the same elements - lac promoter/IPTG - as the target protein. Consequently, the bio-incorporation of the 5OH-Trp residues also occurs in this crucial enzyme, but, the produced T7 RNA polymerase labeled with 5OH-Trp is inactive or much less active. In the present work, we describe an efficient method to overcome this mentioned problem and bio-incorporate 5OH-Trp in proteins expressed in E. coli., using vectors based on the T7 RNA polymerase-T7 promoter. The two-step induction protocol here described showed incorporation efficiencies of 5OH-Trp higher than 90%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Following DNA chain extension and protein conformational changes in crystals of a Y-family DNA polymerase via Raman crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Herrera, Shirly J; Gaur, Vineet; Suo, Zucai; Carey, Paul R

    2013-07-23

    Y-Family DNA polymerases are known to bypass DNA lesions in vitro and in vivo. Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA polymerase (Dpo4) was chosen as a model Y-family enzyme for investigating the mechanism of DNA synthesis in single crystals. Crystals of Dpo4 in complexes with DNA (the binary complex) in the presence or absence of an incoming nucleotide were analyzed by Raman microscopy. (13)C- and (15)N-labeled d*CTP, or unlabeled dCTP, were soaked into the binary crystals with G as the templating base. In the presence of the catalytic metal ions, Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), nucleotide incorporation was detected by the disappearance of the triphosphate band of dCTP and the retention of *C modes in the crystal following soaking out of noncovalently bound C(or *C)TP. The addition of the second coded base, thymine, was observed by adding cognate dTTP to the crystal following a single d*CTP addition. Adding these two bases caused visible damage to the crystal that was possibly caused by protein and/or DNA conformational change within the crystal. When d*CTP is soaked into the Dpo4 crystal in the absence of Mn(2+) or Mg(2+), the primer extension reaction did not occur; instead, a ternary protein·template·d*CTP complex was formed. In the Raman difference spectra of both binary and ternary complexes, in addition to the modes of d(*C)CTP, features caused by ring modes from the template/primer bases being perturbed and from the DNA backbone appear, as well as features from perturbed peptide and amino acid side chain modes. These effects are more pronounced in the ternary complex than in the binary complex. Using standardized Raman intensities followed as a function of time, the C(*C)TP population in the crystal was maximal at ∼20 min. These remained unchanged in the ternary complex but declined in the binary complexes as chain incorporation occurred.

  18. Sampling the genomic pool of protein tyrosine kinase genes using the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, A C; Wollberg, P; Achen, M G; Wilks, A F

    1998-08-28

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with cDNA as template, has been widely used to identify members of protein families from many species. A major limitation of using cDNA in PCR is that detection of a family member is dependent on temporal and spatial patterns of gene expression. To circumvent this restriction, and in order to develop a technique that is broadly applicable we have tested the use of genomic DNA as PCR template to identify members of protein families in an expression-independent manner. This test involved amplification of DNA encoding protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) genes from the genomes of three animal species that are well known development models; namely, the mouse Mus musculus, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. Ten PTK genes were identified from the mouse, 13 from the fruit fly, and 13 from the nematode worm. Among these kinases were 13 members of the PTK family that had not been reported previously. Selected PTKs from this screen were shown to be expressed during development, demonstrating that the amplified fragments did not arise from pseudogenes. This approach will be useful for the identification of many novel members of gene families in organisms of agricultural, medical, developmental and evolutionary significance and for analysis of gene families from any species, or biological sample whose habitat precludes the isolation of mRNA. Furthermore, as a tool to hasten the discovery of members of gene families that are of particular interest, this method offers an opportunity to sample the genome for new members irrespective of their expression pattern.

  19. Mediator, TATA-binding Protein, and RNA Polymerase II Contribute to Low Histone Occupancy at Active Gene Promoters in Yeast*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Suraiya A.; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z.; Rode, Kara A.; Barber, Wesley T.; Ellis, Laura C.; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M.; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. PMID:24727477

  20. Mammalian α-polymerase: cloning of partial complementary DNA and immunobinding of catalytic subunit in crude homogenate protein blots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SenGupta, D.N.; Kumar, P.; Zmudzka, B.Z.; Coughlin, S.; Vishwanatha, J.K.; Robey, F.A.; Parrott, C.; Wilson, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    A new polyclonal antibody against the α-polymerase catalytic polypeptide was prepared by using homogeneous HeLa cellα-polymerase. The antibody neutralized α-polymerase activity and was strong and specific for the α-polymerase catalytic polypeptide (M/sub r/ 183,000) in Western blot analysis of crude extracts of HeLa cells. The antibody was used to screen a cDNA library of newborn rat brain poly(A+) RNA in λgt11. A positive phage was identified and plaque purified. This phage, designated λpolα1.2, also was found to be positive with an antibody against Drosophila α-polymerase. The insert in λpolα1.2 (1183 base pairs) contained a poly(A) sequence at the 3' terminus and a short in-phase open reading frame at the 5' terminus. A synthetic oligopeptide (eight amino acids) corresponding to the open reading frame was used to raise antiserum in rabbits. Antibody affinity purified from this serum was found to be immunoreactive against purified α-polymerase by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and was capable of immunoprecipitating α-polymerase. This indicated the λpolα1.2 insert encoded an α-polymerase epitope and suggested that the cDNA corresponded to an α-polymerase mRNA. This was confirmed in hybrid selection experiments using pUC9 containing the cDNA insert and poly(A+) RNA from newborn rat brain; the insert hybridized to mRNA capable of encoding α-polymerase catalytic polypeptides. Northern blot analysis of rat brain poly(A+) RNA revealed that this mRNA is ∼5.4 kilobases

  1. Mediator, TATA-binding protein, and RNA polymerase II contribute to low histone occupancy at active gene promoters in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Suraiya A; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z; Rode, Kara A; Barber, Wesley T; Ellis, Laura C; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H

    2014-05-23

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Strand Displacement by DNA Polymerase III Occurs through a τ-ψ-χ Link to Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Coating the Lagging Strand Template*

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Quan; McHenry, Charles S.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the well characterized processive replication reaction catalyzed by the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme on single-stranded DNA templates, the enzyme possesses an intrinsic strand displacement activity on flapped templates. The strand displacement activity is distinguished from the single-stranded DNA-templated reaction by a high dependence upon single-stranded DNA binding protein and an inability of γ-complex to support the reaction in the absence of τ. However, if γ-complex is p...

  3. Strand displacement by DNA polymerase III occurs through a tau-psi-chi link to single-stranded DNA-binding protein coating the lagging strand template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Quan; McHenry, Charles S

    2009-11-13

    In addition to the well characterized processive replication reaction catalyzed by the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme on single-stranded DNA templates, the enzyme possesses an intrinsic strand displacement activity on flapped templates. The strand displacement activity is distinguished from the single-stranded DNA-templated reaction by a high dependence upon single-stranded DNA binding protein and an inability of gamma-complex to support the reaction in the absence of tau. However, if gamma-complex is present to load beta(2), a truncated tau protein containing only domains III-V will suffice. This truncated protein is sufficient to bind both the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase (Pol) III and chipsi. This is reminiscent of the minimal requirements for Pol III to replicate short single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB)-coated templates where tau is only required to serve as a scaffold to hold Pol III and chi in the same complex (Glover, B., and McHenry, C. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 23476-23484). We propose a model in which strand displacement by DNA polymerase III holoenzyme depends upon a Pol III-tau-psi-chi-SSB binding network, where SSB is bound to the displaced strand, stabilizing the Pol III-template interaction. The same interaction network is probably important for stabilizing the leading strand polymerase interactions with authentic replication forks. The specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) for the strand displacement reaction is approximately 300-fold less favorable than reactions on single-stranded templates and proceeds with a slower rate (150 nucleotides/s) and only moderate processivity (approximately 300 nucleotides). PriA, the initiator of replication restart on collapsed or misassembled replication forks, blocks the strand displacement reaction, even if added to an ongoing reaction.

  4. Novel mechanism of gene regulation: the protein Rv1222 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits transcription by anchoring the RNA polymerase onto DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Paulami; Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Sengupta, Shreya; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2015-07-13

    We propose a novel mechanism of gene regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis where the protein Rv1222 inhibits transcription by anchoring RNA polymerase (RNAP) onto DNA. In contrast to our existing knowledge that transcriptional repressors function either by binding to DNA at specific sequences or by binding to RNAP, we show that Rv1222-mediated transcription inhibition requires simultaneous binding of the protein to both RNAP and DNA. We demonstrate that the positively charged C-terminus tail of Rv1222 is responsible for anchoring RNAP on DNA, hence the protein slows down the movement of RNAP along the DNA during transcription elongation. The interaction between Rv1222 and DNA is electrostatic, thus the protein could inhibit transcription from any gene. As Rv1222 slows down the RNA synthesis, upon expression of the protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis or Escherichia coli, the growth rate of the bacteria is severely impaired. The protein does not possess any significant affinity for DNA polymerase, thus, is unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. The proposed mechanism by which Rv1222 inhibits transcription reveals a new repertoire of prokaryotic gene regulation. © Crown copyright 2015.

  5. Dynamic conformational change regulates the protein-DNA recognition: an investigation on binding of a Y-family polymerase to its target DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Chu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA recognition is a central biological process that governs the life of cells. A protein will often undergo a conformational transition to form the functional complex with its target DNA. The protein conformational dynamics are expected to contribute to the stability and specificity of DNA recognition and therefore may control the functional activity of the protein-DNA complex. Understanding how the conformational dynamics influences the protein-DNA recognition is still challenging. Here, we developed a two-basin structure-based model to explore functional dynamics in Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Y-family polymerase IV (DPO4 during its binding to DNA. With explicit consideration of non-specific and specific interactions between DPO4 and DNA, we found that DPO4-DNA recognition is comprised of first 3D diffusion, then a short-range adjustment sliding on DNA and finally specific binding. Interestingly, we found that DPO4 is under a conformational equilibrium between multiple states during the binding process and the distributions of the conformations vary at different binding stages. By modulating the strength of the electrostatic interactions, the flexibility of the linker, and the conformational dynamics in DPO4, we drew a clear picture on how DPO4 dynamically regulates the DNA recognition. We argue that the unique features of flexibility and conformational dynamics in DPO4-DNA recognition have direct implications for low-fidelity translesion DNA synthesis, most of which is found to be accomplished by the Y-family DNA polymerases. Our results help complete the description of the DNA synthesis process for the Y-family polymerases. Furthermore, the methods developed here can be widely applied for future investigations on how various proteins recognize and bind specific DNA substrates.

  6. Data management of protein interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cannataro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Interactomics: a complete survey from data generation to knowledge extraction With the increasing use of high-throughput experimental assays, more and more protein interaction databases are becoming available. As a result, computational analysis of protein-to-protein interaction (PPI) data and networks, now known as interactomics, has become an essential tool to determine functionally associated proteins. From wet lab technologies to data management to knowledge extraction, this timely book guides readers through the new science of interactomics, giving them the tools needed to: Generate

  7. Avian reovirus L2 genome segment sequences and predicted structure/function of the encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wanhong

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The orthoreoviruses are infectious agents that possess a genome comprised of 10 double-stranded RNA segments encased in two concentric protein capsids. Like virtually all RNA viruses, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp enzyme is required for viral propagation. RdRp sequences have been determined for the prototype mammalian orthoreoviruses and for several other closely-related reoviruses, including aquareoviruses, but have not yet been reported for any avian orthoreoviruses. Results We determined the L2 genome segment nucleotide sequences, which encode the RdRp proteins, of two different avian reoviruses, strains ARV138 and ARV176 in order to define conserved and variable regions within reovirus RdRp proteins and to better delineate structure/function of this important enzyme. The ARV138 L2 genome segment was 3829 base pairs long, whereas the ARV176 L2 segment was 3830 nucleotides long. Both segments were predicted to encode λB RdRp proteins 1259 amino acids in length. Alignments of these newly-determined ARV genome segments, and their corresponding proteins, were performed with all currently available homologous mammalian reovirus (MRV and aquareovirus (AqRV genome segment and protein sequences. There was ~55% amino acid identity between ARV λB and MRV λ3 proteins, making the RdRp protein the most highly conserved of currently known orthoreovirus proteins, and there was ~28% identity between ARV λB and homologous MRV and AqRV RdRp proteins. Predictive structure/function mapping of identical and conserved residues within the known MRV λ3 atomic structure indicated most identical amino acids and conservative substitutions were located near and within predicted catalytic domains and lining RdRp channels, whereas non-identical amino acids were generally located on the molecule's surfaces. Conclusion The ARV λB and MRV λ3 proteins showed the highest ARV:MRV identity values (~55% amongst all currently known ARV and MRV

  8. Inhibition of iridovirus protein synthesis and virus replication by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides targeted to the major capsid protein, the 18 kDa immediate-early protein, and a viral homolog of RNA polymerase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample, Robert; Bryan, Locke; Long, Scott; Majji, Sai; Hoskins, Glenn; Sinning, Allan; Olivier, Jake; Chinchar, V. Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Frog virus 3 (FV3) is a large DNA virus that encodes ∼ 100 proteins. Although the general features of FV3 replication are known, the specific roles that most viral proteins play in the virus life cycle have not yet been elucidated. To address the question of viral gene function, antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (asMOs) were used to transiently knock-down expression of specific viral genes and thus infer their role in virus replication. We designed asMOs directed against the major capsid protein (MCP), an 18 kDa immediate-early protein (18K) that was thought to be a viral regulatory protein, and the viral homologue of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (vPol-IIα). All three asMOs successfully inhibited translation of the targeted protein, and two of the three asMOs resulted in marked phenotypic changes. Knock-down of the MCP resulted in a marked reduction in viral titer without a corresponding drop in the synthesis of other late viral proteins. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that in cells treated with the anti-MCP MO assembly sites were devoid of viral particles and contained numerous aberrant structures. In contrast, inhibition of 18K synthesis did not block virion formation, suggesting that the 18K protein was not essential for replication of FV3 in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. Finally, consistent with the view that late viral gene expression is catalyzed by a virus-encoded or virus-modified Pol-II-like protein, knock-down of vPol-IIα triggered a global decline in late gene expression and virus yields without affecting the synthesis of early viral genes. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of using asMOs to elucidate the function of FV3 proteins

  9. SHH1, a homeodomain protein required for DNA methylation, as well as RDR2, RDM4, and chromatin remodeling factors, associate with RNA polymerase IV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Law

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic modification that is critical for gene silencing and the maintenance of genome integrity. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the de novo DNA methyltransferase, domains rearranged methyltransferase 2 (DRM2, is targeted to specific genomic loci by 24 nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs through a pathway termed RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM. Biogenesis of the targeting siRNAs is thought to be initiated by the activity of the plant-specific RNA polymerase IV (Pol-IV. However, the mechanism through which Pol-IV is targeted to specific genomic loci and whether factors other than the core Pol-IV machinery are required for Pol-IV activity remain unknown. Through the affinity purification of nuclear RNA polymerase D1 (NRPD1, the largest subunit of the Pol-IV polymerase, we found that several previously identified RdDM components co-purify with Pol-IV, namely RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2, CLASSY1 (CLSY1, and RNA-directed DNA methylation 4 (RDM4, suggesting that the upstream siRNA generating portion of the RdDM pathway may be more physically coupled than previously envisioned. A homeodomain protein, SAWADEE homeodomain homolog 1 (SHH1, was also found to co-purify with NRPD1; and we demonstrate that SHH1 is required for de novo and maintenance DNA methylation, as well as for the accumulation of siRNAs at specific loci, confirming it is a bonafide component of the RdDM pathway.

  10. The 25 kDa subunit of cleavage factor Im Is a RNA-binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Pezet-Valdez

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, polyadenylation of pre-mRNA 3' end is essential for mRNA export, stability and translation. Taking advantage of the knowledge of genomic sequences of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, we previously reported the putative polyadenylation machinery of this parasite. Here, we focused on the predicted protein that has the molecular features of the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25 from other organisms, including the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to another moiety X domain, as well as the RNA binding domain and the PAP/PAB interacting region. The recombinant EhCFIm25 protein (rEhCFIm25 was expressed in bacteria and used to generate specific antibodies in rabbit. Subcellular localization assays showed the presence of the endogenous protein in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays, rEhCFIm25 was able to form specific RNA-protein complexes with the EhPgp5 mRNA 3´ UTR used as probe. In addition, Pull-Down and LC/ESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry assays evidenced that the putative EhCFIm25 was able to interact with the poly(A polymerase (EhPAP that is responsible for the synthesis of the poly(A tail in other eukaryotic cells. By Far-Western experiments, we confirmed the interaction between the putative EhCFIm25 and EhPAP in E. histolytica. Taken altogether, our results showed that the putative EhCFIm25 is a conserved RNA binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase, another member of the pre-mRNA 3' end processing machinery in this protozoan parasite.

  11. The 3D protein of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 binds to a viral genomic 3' UTR and shows RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Cao, Qianda; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Shun; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Xinxin; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2017-12-01

    To explore the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) function of the 3D protein of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1), the gene was cloned into the pET-32a(+) vector for prokaryotic expression. The 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of DHAV-1 together with a T7 promoter was cloned into the pMD19-T vector for in vitro transcription of 3' UTR RNA, which was further used as a template in RNA-dependent RNA polymerization. In this study, three methods were applied to analyze the RdRP function of the 3D protein: (1) ammonium molybdate spectrophotometry to detect pyrophosphate produced during polymerization; (2) quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) to investigate the changes in RNA quantity during polymerization; and (3) electrophoresis mobility shift assay to examine the interaction between the 3D protein and 3' UTR. The results showed the 3D protein was successfully expressed in bacteria culture supernatant in a soluble form, which could be purified by affinity chromatography. In 3D enzymatic activity assays, pyrophosphate and RNA were produced, the amounts of which increased based on approximative kinetics, and binding of the 3D protein to the 3' UTR was observed. These results indicate that prokaryotically expressed soluble DHAV-13D protein can bind to a viral genomic 3' UTR and exhibit RdRP activity.

  12. Nucleolar targeting of proteins by the tandem array of basic amino acid stretches identified in the RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushijima, Ryujiro; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Nagata, Izumi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence to indicate that the regulation of subnuclear compartmentalization plays important roles in cellular processes. The RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49 has been shown to accumulate in the nucleolus in growing cells, but disperse into the nucleoplasm in growth-arrested cells. Serial deletion analysis revealed that amino acids 199-338 were necessary for the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Combinatorial point mutation analysis indicated that the individual basic amino acid stretches (BS) within the central (BS1-4) and the C-terminal (BS5 and 6) regions may cooperatively confer the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Addition of the basic stretches in tandem to a heterologous protein, such as the interferon regulatory factor-3, translocated the tagged protein into the nucleolus, even in the presence of an intrinsic nuclear export sequence. Thus, tandem array of the basic amino acid stretches identified here functions as a dominant nucleolar targeting sequence

  13. PIP degron proteins, substrates of CRL4Cdt2, and not PIP boxes, interfere with DNA polymerase η and κ focus formation on UV damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsanov, Nikolay; Kermi, Chames; Coulombe, Philippe; Van der Laan, Siem; Hodroj, Dana; Maiorano, Domenico

    2014-04-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a well-known scaffold for many DNA replication and repair proteins, but how the switch between partners is regulated is currently unclear. Interaction with PCNA occurs via a domain known as a PCNA-Interacting Protein motif (PIP box). More recently, an additional specialized PIP box has been described, the « PIP degron », that targets PCNA-interacting proteins for proteasomal degradation via the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4(Cdt2). Here we provide evidence that CRL4(Cdt2)-dependent degradation of PIP degron proteins plays a role in the switch of PCNA partners during the DNA damage response by facilitating accumulation of translesion synthesis DNA polymerases into nuclear foci. We show that expression of a nondegradable PIP degron (Cdt1) impairs both Pol η and Pol κ focus formation on ultraviolet irradiation and reduces cell viability, while canonical PIP box-containing proteins have no effect. Furthermore, we identify PIP degron-containing peptides from several substrates of CRL4(Cdt2) as efficient inhibitors of Pol η foci formation. By site-directed mutagenesis we show that inhibition depends on a conserved threonine residue that confers high affinity for PCNA-binding. Altogether these findings reveal an important regulative role for the CRL4(Cdt2) pathway in the switch of PCNA partners on DNA damage.

  14. A point mutation in the polymerase protein PB2 allows a reassortant H9N2 influenza isolate of wild-bird origin to replicate in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Islam T.M.; Ma, Eric J.; Meixell, Brandt; Hill, Nichola J.; Lindberg, Mark S.; Albrecht , Randy A.; Bahl, Justin; Runstadler, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 influenza A viruses are on the list of potentially pandemic subtypes. Therefore, it is important to understand how genomic reassortment and genetic polymorphisms affect phenotypes of H9N2 viruses circulating in the wild bird reservoir. A comparative genetic analysis of North American H9N2 isolates of wild bird origin identified a naturally occurring reassortant virus containing gene segments derived from both North American and Eurasian lineage ancestors. The PB2 segment of this virus encodes 10 amino acid changes that distinguish it from other H9 strains circulating in North America. G590S, one of the 10 amino acid substitutions observed, was present in ~ 12% of H9 viruses worldwide. This mutation combined with R591 has been reported as a marker of pathogenicity for human pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses. Screening by polymerase reporter assay of all the natural polymorphisms at these two positions identified G590/K591 and S590/K591 as the most active, with the highest polymerase activity recorded for the SK polymorphism. Rescued viruses containing these two polymorphic combinations replicated more efficiently in MDCK cells and they were the only ones tested that were capable of establishing productive infection in NHBE cells. A global analysis of all PB2 sequences identified the K591 signature in six viral HA/NA subtypes isolated from several hosts in seven geographic locations. Interestingly, introducing the K591 mutation into the PB2 of a human-adapted H3N2 virus did not affect its polymerase activity. Our findings demonstrate that a single point mutation in the PB2 of a low pathogenic H9N2 isolate could have a significant effect on viral phenotype and increase its propensity to infect mammals. However, this effect is not universal, warranting caution in interpreting point mutations without considering protein sequence context.

  15. Cyclosporin A associated helicase-like protein facilitates the association of hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase with its cellular cyclophilin B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Morohashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cyclosporin A (CsA is well known as an immunosuppressive drug useful for allogeneic transplantation. It has been reported that CsA inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV genome replication, which indicates that cellular targets of CsA regulate the viral replication. However, the regulation mechanisms of HCV replication governed by CsA target proteins have not been fully understood. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show a chemical biology approach that elucidates a novel mechanism of HCV replication. We developed a phage display screening to investigate compound-peptide interaction and identified a novel cellular target molecule of CsA. This protein, named CsA associated helicase-like protein (CAHL, possessed RNA-dependent ATPase activity that was negated by treatment with CsA. The downregulation of CAHL in the cells resulted in a decrease of HCV genome replication. CAHL formed a complex with HCV-derived RNA polymerase NS5B and host-derived cyclophilin B (CyPB, known as a cellular cofactor for HCV replication, to regulate NS5B-CyPB interaction. CONCLUSIONS: We found a cellular factor, CAHL, as CsA associated helicase-like protein, which would form trimer complex with CyPB and NS5B of HCV. The strategy using a chemical compound and identifying its target molecule by our phage display analysis is useful to reveal a novel mechanism underlying cellular and viral physiology.

  16. Cyclosporin A associated helicase-like protein facilitates the association of hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase with its cellular cyclophilin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohashi, Kengo; Sahara, Hiroeki; Watashi, Koichi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sunoki, Takashi; Kuramochi, Kouji; Takakusagi, Kaori; Miyashita, Hiroki; Sato, Noriyuki; Tanabe, Atsushi; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Kobayashi, Susumu; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Sugawara, Fumio

    2011-04-29

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is well known as an immunosuppressive drug useful for allogeneic transplantation. It has been reported that CsA inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome replication, which indicates that cellular targets of CsA regulate the viral replication. However, the regulation mechanisms of HCV replication governed by CsA target proteins have not been fully understood. Here we show a chemical biology approach that elucidates a novel mechanism of HCV replication. We developed a phage display screening to investigate compound-peptide interaction and identified a novel cellular target molecule of CsA. This protein, named CsA associated helicase-like protein (CAHL), possessed RNA-dependent ATPase activity that was negated by treatment with CsA. The downregulation of CAHL in the cells resulted in a decrease of HCV genome replication. CAHL formed a complex with HCV-derived RNA polymerase NS5B and host-derived cyclophilin B (CyPB), known as a cellular cofactor for HCV replication, to regulate NS5B-CyPB interaction. We found a cellular factor, CAHL, as CsA associated helicase-like protein, which would form trimer complex with CyPB and NS5B of HCV. The strategy using a chemical compound and identifying its target molecule by our phage display analysis is useful to reveal a novel mechanism underlying cellular and viral physiology.

  17. Minocycline attenuates streptomycin-induced cochlear hair cell death by inhibiting protein nitration and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Li, Haonan; Yu, Shuyuan; Jin, Peng; Hassan, Abdurahman; Du, Bo

    2017-08-24

    This study aimed to elucidate the protective effect of minocycline against streptomycin-induced damage of cochlear hair cells and its mechanism. Cochlear membranes were isolated from newborn Wistar rats and randomly divided into control, 500μmol/L streptomycin, 100μmol/L minocycline, and streptomycin and minocycline treatment groups. Hair cell survival was analyzed by detecting the expression of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) in cochlear hair cells by immunofluorescence and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Expression of 3-NT and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3 activation were evaluated by western blotting. The results demonstrated hair cell loss at 24h after streptomycin treatment. No change was found in supporting cells of the cochleae. Minocycline pretreatment improved hair cell survival and significantly reduced the expression of iNOS and 3-NT in cochlear tissues compared with the streptomycin treatment group. PARP and caspase-3 activation was increased in the streptomycin treatment group compared with the control group, and pretreatment with minocycline decreased cleaved PARP and activated caspase-3 expression. Minocycline protected cochlear hair cells from injury caused by streptomycin in vitro. The mechanism underlying the protective effect may be associated with the inhibition of excessive formation of nitric oxide, reduction of the nitration stress reaction, and inhibition of PARP and caspase-3 activation in cochlear hair cells. Combined minocycline therapy can be applied to patients requiring streptomycin treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. In vivo interactions between the proteins of infectious bursal disease virus: capsid protein VP3 interacts with the RNA dependent polymerase VP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacken, M.G.J.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Gielkens, A.L.J.; Peeters, B.P.H.

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about the intermolecular interactions between the viral proteins of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). By using the yeast two-hybrid system, which allows the detection of protein-protein interactions in vivo, all possible interactions were tested by fusing the viral proteins to

  19. Interactions in vivo between the proteins of infectious bursal disease virus: capsid protein VP3 interacts with the RNA-dependent polymerase, VP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacken, M.G.J.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Gielkens, A.L.J.; Peeters, B.P.H.

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about the intermolecular interactions between the viral proteins of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). By using the yeast two-hybrid system, which allows the detection of protein-protein interactions in vivo, all possible interactions were tested by fusing the viral proteins to

  20. C-terminal phenylalanine of bacteriophage T7 single-stranded DNA-binding protein is essential for strand displacement synthesis by T7 DNA polymerase at a nick in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sharmistha; Marintcheva, Boriana; Takahashi, Masateru; Richardson, Charles C

    2009-10-30

    Single-stranded DNA-binding protein (gp2.5), encoded by gene 2.5 of bacteriophage T7, plays an essential role in DNA replication. Not only does it remove impediments of secondary structure in the DNA, it also modulates the activities of the other replication proteins. The acidic C-terminal tail of gp2.5, bearing a C-terminal phenylalanine, physically and functionally interacts with the helicase and DNA polymerase. Deletion of the phenylalanine or substitution with a nonaromatic amino acid gives rise to a dominant lethal phenotype, and the altered gp2.5 has reduced affinity for T7 DNA polymerase. Suppressors of the dominant lethal phenotype have led to the identification of mutations in gene 5 that encodes the T7 DNA polymerase. The altered residues in the polymerase are solvent-exposed and lie in regions that are adjacent to the bound DNA. gp2.5 lacking the C-terminal phenylalanine has a lower affinity for gp5-thioredoxin relative to the wild-type gp2.5, and this affinity is partially restored by the suppressor mutations in DNA polymerase. gp2.5 enables T7 DNA polymerase to catalyze strand displacement DNA synthesis at a nick in DNA. The resulting 5'-single-stranded DNA tail provides a loading site for T7 DNA helicase. gp2.5 lacking the C-terminal phenylalanine does not support this event with wild-type DNA polymerase but does to a limited extent with T7 DNA polymerase harboring the suppressor mutations.

  1. C-terminal Phenylalanine of Bacteriophage T7 Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Is Essential for Strand Displacement Synthesis by T7 DNA Polymerase at a Nick in DNA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sharmistha; Marintcheva, Boriana; Takahashi, Masateru; Richardson, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding protein (gp2.5), encoded by gene 2.5 of bacteriophage T7, plays an essential role in DNA replication. Not only does it remove impediments of secondary structure in the DNA, it also modulates the activities of the other replication proteins. The acidic C-terminal tail of gp2.5, bearing a C-terminal phenylalanine, physically and functionally interacts with the helicase and DNA polymerase. Deletion of the phenylalanine or substitution with a nonaromatic amino acid gives rise to a dominant lethal phenotype, and the altered gp2.5 has reduced affinity for T7 DNA polymerase. Suppressors of the dominant lethal phenotype have led to the identification of mutations in gene 5 that encodes the T7 DNA polymerase. The altered residues in the polymerase are solvent-exposed and lie in regions that are adjacent to the bound DNA. gp2.5 lacking the C-terminal phenylalanine has a lower affinity for gp5-thioredoxin relative to the wild-type gp2.5, and this affinity is partially restored by the suppressor mutations in DNA polymerase. gp2.5 enables T7 DNA polymerase to catalyze strand displacement DNA synthesis at a nick in DNA. The resulting 5′-single-stranded DNA tail provides a loading site for T7 DNA helicase. gp2.5 lacking the C-terminal phenylalanine does not support this event with wild-type DNA polymerase but does to a limited extent with T7 DNA polymerase harboring the suppressor mutations. PMID:19726688

  2. An RNA polymerase II-and AGO4-associated protein acts in RNA-directed DNA methylation

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Zhihuan; Liu, Hai-Liang; Daxinger, Lucia; Pontes, Olga; He, Xinjian; Qian, Weiqiang; Lin, Huixin; Xie, Mingtang; Lorkovic, Zdravko J.; Zhang, ShouDong; Miki, Daisuke; Zhan, Xianqiang; Pontier, Dominique; Lagrange, Thierry; Jin, Hailing; Matzke, Antonius J.; Matzke, Marjori; Pikaard, Craig S.; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark in many eukaryotes. In plants, 24-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) bound to the effector protein, Argonaute 4 (AGO4), can direct de novo DNA methylation by the methyltransferase DRM2 (refs 2

  3. The L-L oligomerization domain resides at the very N-terminus of the sendai virus L RNA polymerase protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cevik, Bayram; Smallwood, Sherin; Moyer, Sue A.

    2003-01-01

    The Sendai virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is composed of the L and P proteins. We previously showed that the L protein gives intragenic complementation and forms an oligomer where the L-L interaction site mapped to the N-terminal half of the protein (S. Smallwood et al., 2002, Virology, 00, 000-000). We now show that L oligomerization does not depend on P protein and progressively smaller N-terminal fragments of L from amino acids (aa) 1-1146 through aa 1-174 all bind wild-type L. C-terminal truncations up to aa 424, which bind L, can complement the transcription defect in an L mutant altered at aa 379, although these L truncation mutants do not bind P. The fragment of L comprising aa 1-895, furthermore, acts as a dominant-negative mutant to inhibit transcription of wild-type L. N-terminal deletions of aa 1-189 and aa 1-734 have lost the ability to form the L-L complex as well as the L-P complex, although they still bind C protein. These data are consistent with the L-L interaction site residing in aa 1-174. Site-directed mutations in the N-terminal 347 aa, of L which abolish P binding, do not affect L-L complex formation, so while the L and P binding sites on L are overlapping they are mediated by different amino acids. The N-terminal portions of L with aa 1-424, aa 1-381, and to a lesser extent aa 1-174, can complement the transcription defect in an L mutant altered at aa 77-81, showing their L-L interaction is functional

  4. KONSTRUKSI MUTAN PROTEIN FOSFATASE ptc2D Saccharomyces cerevisiae DENGAN METODE PENGGANTIAN GEN TARGET DENGAN POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermansyah

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to studi genes function of eukarotic cells such as study of gene encoding protein phosphatase PTC2. Novel phenotypic caused by mutated gene is an important step to study function of gene. In this study constructed mutant of PTC2 gene encoding protein phosphatase. Method that used in this construction was replacement of target gene (PTC2 with auxotroph marker Candida albicans HIS3 by Polymer Chain Reaction (PCR or called by PCR-mediated disruption. Mutant colonies which grew in selective medium SC without histidine were confirmed by PCR amplification. By using 1% Agarose gel electrophoresis the result showed that size of ptc2D::CgHIS3 transformant was 3.52 kb while wild type strain was 2.9 kb, indicated that ptc2D::CgHIS3 has integrated on chromosome V replacing PTC2 wild type.

  5. The duck hepatitis B virus polymerase and core proteins accumulate in different patterns from their common mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Ermei; Schaller, Heinz; Tavis, John E.

    2003-01-01

    Hepadnaviral reverse transcription occurs in capsids in which the core (C) protein surrounds the reverse transcriptase (P) and pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). We analyzed the accumulation patterns of duck hepatitis B virus P, C, and pgRNA in transfected LMH cells, infected primary duck hepatocytes (PDH), and infected duck liver. In all three systems, P accumulated over time in a different pattern compared with C, despite translation of both proteins from the pgRNA. Although the accumulation patterns of the proteins varied between the systems, in each case P became detectable at the same time or earlier than C and the ratio of P relative to C dropped with time. These accumulation patterns were consistent with the translation rates and half-lives of P and C. Comparing the translation rates of P and C with the pgRNA level over time revealed that translation of P and C was negatively regulated in LMH cells. These data provide a framework for comparing replication studies performed in LMH cells, PDHs and ducks

  6. Gly184 of the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein provides optimal context for both DNA binding and RNA polymerase interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Matt N; Gunasekara, Sanjiva; Serate, Jose; Park, Jin; Mosharaf, Pegah; Zhou, Yue; Lee, Jin-Won; Youn, Hwan

    2017-10-01

    The Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) utilizes the helix-turn-helix motif for DNA binding. The CRP's recognition helix, termed F-helix, includes a stretch of six amino acids (Arg180, Glu181, Thr182, Val183, Gly184, and Arg185) for direct DNA contacts. Arg180, Glu181 and Arg185 are known as important residues for DNA binding and specificity, but little has been studied for the other residues. Here we show that Gly184 is another F-helix residue critical for the transcriptional activation function of CRP. First, glycine was repeatedly selected at CRP position 184 for its unique ability to provide wild type-level transcriptional activation activity. To dissect the glycine requirement, wild type CRP and mutants G184A, G184F, G184S, and G184Y were purified and their in vitro DNA-binding activity was measured. G184A and G184F displayed reduced DNA binding, which may explain their low transcriptional activation activity. However, G184S and G184Y displayed apparently normal DNA affinity. Therefore, an additional factor is needed to account for the diminished transcriptional activation function in G184S and G184Y, and the best explanation is perturbations in their interaction with RNA polymerase. The fact that glycine is the smallest amino acid could not fully warrant its suitability, as shown in this study. We hypothesize that Gly184 fulfills the dual functions of DNA binding and RNA polymerase interaction by conferring conformational flexibility to the F-helix.

  7. Visualized and precise design of artificial small RNAs for regulating T7 RNA polymerase and enhancing recombinant protein folding in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujia Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs have received much attention in recent years due to their unique biological properties, which can efficiently and specifically tune target gene expressions in bacteria. Inspired by natural sRNAs, recent works have proposed the use of artificial sRNAs (asRNAs as genetic tools to regulate desired gene that has been applied in several fields, such as metabolic engineering and bacterial physiology studies. However, the rational design of asRNAs is still a challenge. In this study, we proposed structure and length as two criteria to implement rational visualized and precise design of asRNAs. T7 expression system was one of the most useful recombinant protein expression systems. However, it was deeply limited by the formation of inclusion body. To settle this problem, we designed a series of asRNAs to inhibit the T7 RNA polymerase (Gene1 expression to balance the rate between transcription and folding of recombinant protein. Based on the heterologous expression of Aspergillus oryzae Li-3 glucuronidase in E. coli, the asRNA-antigene1-17bp can effectively decrease the inclusion body and increase the enzyme activity by 169.9%.

  8. Children with protein energy malnutrition: management and out ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children with protein energy malnutrition: management and out-come in a ... Sahel Medical Journal ... Demographic data, predisposing factors, clinical types of PEM, outcome of management and time of discharge or death were also extracted ...

  9. Wheat-specific gene, ribosomal protein l21, used as the endogenous reference gene for qualitative and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction detection of transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Ke; Li, He-Ping; Huang, Tao; Cheng, Wei; Gao, Chun-Sheng; Zuo, Dong-Yun; Zhao, Zheng-Xi; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2014-10-29

    Wheat-specific ribosomal protein L21 (RPL21) is an endogenous reference gene suitable for genetically modified (GM) wheat identification. This taxon-specific RPL21 sequence displayed high homogeneity in different wheat varieties. Southern blots revealed 1 or 3 copies, and sequence analyses showed one amplicon in common wheat. Combined analyses with sequences from common wheat (AABBDD) and three diploid ancestral species, Triticum urartu (AA), Aegilops speltoides (BB), and Aegilops tauschii (DD), demonstrated the presence of this amplicon in the AA genome. Using conventional qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the limit of detection was 2 copies of wheat haploid genome per reaction. In the quantitative real-time PCR assay, limits of detection and quantification were about 2 and 8 haploid genome copies, respectively, the latter of which is 2.5-4-fold lower than other reported wheat endogenous reference genes. Construct-specific PCR assays were developed using RPL21 as an endogenous reference gene, and as little as 0.5% of GM wheat contents containing Arabidopsis NPR1 were properly quantified.

  10. The nuclear protein Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 3 (AtPARP3) is required for seed storability in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissel, D; Losch, J; Peiter, E

    2014-11-01

    The deterioration of seeds during prolonged storage results in a reduction of viability and germination rate. DNA damage is one of the major cellular defects associated with seed deterioration. It is provoked by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) even in the quiescent state of the desiccated seed. In contrast to other stages of seed life, DNA repair during storage is hindered through the low seed water content; thereby DNA lesions can accumulate. To allow subsequent seedling development, DNA repair has thus to be initiated immediately upon imbibition. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are important components in the DNA damage response in humans. Arabidopsis thaliana contains three homologues to the human HsPARP1 protein. Of these three, only AtPARP3 was very highly expressed in seeds. Histochemical GUS staining of embryos and endosperm layers revealed strong promoter activity of AtPARP3 during all steps of germination. This coincided with high ROS activity and indicated a role of the nuclear-localised AtPARP3 in DNA repair during germination. Accordingly, stored parp3-1 mutant seeds lacking AtPARP3 expression displayed a delay in germination as compared to Col-0 wild-type seeds. A controlled deterioration test showed that the mutant seeds were hypersensitive to unfavourable storage conditions. The results demonstrate that AtPARP3 is an important component of seed storability and viability. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  11. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and cloning of immunogenic protein NAD-dependent beta hydroxybutyryl CoA dehydrogenase gene of Clostridium chauvoei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K. Dangi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was aimed at polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification and cloning of NAD-dependent betahydroxybutyryl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (BHBD gene of Clostridium chauvoei. Materials and Methods: C. chauvoei was cultured and confirmed by 16-23S rDNA spacer region primers. The primers for nad-bhbd gene of C. chauvoei were designed to aid in cloning into pRham-N-His SUMO-Kan vector, and nad-bhbd gene was amplified by PCR. The amplified nad-bhbd gene was purified and cloned into pRham-N-His SUMO-Kan expression vector. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. cloni 10 G cells and the clone was confirmed by colony PCR using the pRham-SUMO-NAD-For and pRham-SUMO-NAD-Rev primers and also by sequencing. Results: PCR amplification of nad-bhbd gene yielded a product length of 844 base pairs which was cloned into pRham-NHis SUMO-Kan vector followed by transformation into E. cloni 10G chemically competent cells. The recombinant clones were characterized by colony PCR, sequencing, followed by basic local alignment search tool (BLAST analysis to confirm the insert. Conclusions: Immunogenic protein NAD- dependent BHBD of C. chauvoei was cloned and the recombinant clones were confirmed by colony PCR and sequencing analysis.

  12. Fine-tuning of Smad protein function by poly(ADP-ribose polymerases and poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase during transforming growth factor β signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Dahl

    Full Text Available Initiation, amplitude, duration and termination of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ signaling via Smad proteins is regulated by post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination and acetylation. We previously reported that ADP-ribosylation of Smads by poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1 negatively influences Smad-mediated transcription. PARP-1 is known to functionally interact with PARP-2 in the nucleus and the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase (PARG can remove poly(ADP-ribose chains from target proteins. Here we aimed at analyzing possible cooperation between PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG in regulation of TGFβ signaling.A robust cell model of TGFβ signaling, i.e. human HaCaT keratinocytes, was used. Endogenous Smad3 ADP-ribosylation and protein complexes between Smads and PARPs were studied using proximity ligation assays and co-immunoprecipitation assays, which were complemented by in vitro ADP-ribosylation assays using recombinant proteins. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of mRNA levels and promoter-reporter assays provided quantitative analysis of gene expression in response to TGFβ stimulation and after genetic perturbations of PARP-1/-2 and PARG based on RNA interference.TGFβ signaling rapidly induces nuclear ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 that coincides with a relative enhancement of nuclear complexes of Smads with PARP-1 and PARP-2. Inversely, PARG interacts with Smads and can de-ADP-ribosylate Smad3 in vitro. PARP-1 and PARP-2 also form complexes with each other, and Smads interact and activate auto-ADP-ribosylation of both PARP-1 and PARP-2. PARP-2, similar to PARP-1, negatively regulates specific TGFβ target genes (fibronectin, Smad7 and Smad transcriptional responses, and PARG positively regulates these genes. Accordingly, inhibition of TGFβ-mediated transcription caused by silencing endogenous PARG expression could be relieved after simultaneous depletion of PARP-1.Nuclear Smad function is negatively

  13. Co-targeting Deoxyribonucleic Acid–Dependent Protein Kinase and Poly(Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Promotes Accelerated Senescence of Irradiated Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, Arun, E-mail: arun.azad@bccancer.bc.ca [Division of Cancer Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Pathology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Bukczynska, Patricia; Jackson, Susan [Division of Cancer Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Haput, Ygal; Cullinane, Carleen [Division of Cancer Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); McArthur, Grant A.; Solomon, Benjamin [Division of Cancer Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Division of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of combined blockade of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) on accelerated senescence in irradiated H460 and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of KU5788 and AG014699 (inhibitors of DNA-PK and PARP-1, respectively) on clonogenic survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and accelerated senescence in irradiated cells were examined in vitro. For in vivo experiments, H460 xenografts established in athymic nude mice were treated with BEZ235 (a DNA-PK, ATM, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor) and AG014699 to determine effects on proliferation, DNA DSBs, and accelerated senescence after radiation. Results: Compared with either inhibitor alone, combination treatment with KU57788 and AG014699 reduced postradiation clonogenic survival and significantly increased persistence of Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) foci in irradiated H460 and A549 cells. Notably, these effects coincided with the induction of accelerated senescence in irradiated cells as reflected by positive β-galactosidase staining, G2-M cell-cycle arrest, enlarged and flattened cellular morphology, increased p21 expression, and senescence-associated cytokine secretion. In irradiated H460 xenografts, concurrent therapy with BEZ235 and AG014699 resulted in sustained Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) staining and prominent β-galactosidase activity. Conclusion: Combined DNA-PK and PARP-1 blockade increased tumor cell radiosensitivity and enhanced the prosenescent properties of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. These data provide a rationale for further preclinical and clinical testing of this therapeutic combination.

  14. Co-targeting Deoxyribonucleic Acid–Dependent Protein Kinase and Poly(Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Promotes Accelerated Senescence of Irradiated Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azad, Arun; Bukczynska, Patricia; Jackson, Susan; Haput, Ygal; Cullinane, Carleen; McArthur, Grant A.; Solomon, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of combined blockade of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) on accelerated senescence in irradiated H460 and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of KU5788 and AG014699 (inhibitors of DNA-PK and PARP-1, respectively) on clonogenic survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and accelerated senescence in irradiated cells were examined in vitro. For in vivo experiments, H460 xenografts established in athymic nude mice were treated with BEZ235 (a DNA-PK, ATM, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor) and AG014699 to determine effects on proliferation, DNA DSBs, and accelerated senescence after radiation. Results: Compared with either inhibitor alone, combination treatment with KU57788 and AG014699 reduced postradiation clonogenic survival and significantly increased persistence of Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) foci in irradiated H460 and A549 cells. Notably, these effects coincided with the induction of accelerated senescence in irradiated cells as reflected by positive β-galactosidase staining, G2-M cell-cycle arrest, enlarged and flattened cellular morphology, increased p21 expression, and senescence-associated cytokine secretion. In irradiated H460 xenografts, concurrent therapy with BEZ235 and AG014699 resulted in sustained Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) staining and prominent β-galactosidase activity. Conclusion: Combined DNA-PK and PARP-1 blockade increased tumor cell radiosensitivity and enhanced the prosenescent properties of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. These data provide a rationale for further preclinical and clinical testing of this therapeutic combination

  15. Molecular characterization of amino acid deletion in VP1 (1D) protein and novel amino acid substitutions in 3D polymerase protein of foot and mouth disease virus subtype A/Iran87.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaelizad, Majid; Jelokhani-Niaraki, Saber; Hashemnejad, Khadije; Kamalzadeh, Morteza; Lotfi, Mohsen

    2011-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the VP1 (1D) and partial 3D polymerase (3D(pol)) coding regions of the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine strain A/Iran87, a highly passaged isolate (~150 passages), was determined and aligned with previously published FMDV serotype A sequences. Overall analysis of the amino acid substitutions revealed that the partial 3D(pol) coding region contained four amino acid alterations. Amino acid sequence comparison of the VP1 coding region of the field isolates revealed deletions in the highly passaged Iranian isolate (A/Iran87). The prominent G-H loop of the FMDV VP1 protein contains the conserved arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide, which is a well-known ligand for a specific cell surface integrin. Despite losing the RGD sequence of the VP1 protein and an Asp(26)→Glu substitution in a beta sheet located within a small groove of the 3D(pol) protein, the virus grew in BHK 21 suspension cell cultures. Since this strain has been used as a vaccine strain, it may be inferred that the RGD deletion has no critical role in virus attachment to the cell during the initiation of infection. It is probable that this FMDV subtype can utilize other pathways for cell attachment.

  16. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  17. Genomic DNA fingerprinting of clinical Haemophilus influenzae isolates by polymerase chain reaction amplification: comparison with major outer-membrane protein and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Belkum, A.; Duim, B.; Regelink, A.; Möller, L.; Quint, W.; van Alphen, L.

    1994-01-01

    Non-capsulate strains of Haemophilus influenzae were genotyped by analysis of variable DNA segments obtained by amplification of genomic DNA with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR fingerprinting). Discrete fragments of 100-2000 bp were obtained. The reproducibility of the procedure was assessed by

  18. RNA polymerase II mediated transcription from the polymerase III promoters in short hairpin RNA expression vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumi, Mohammad; Ishihara, Shunji; Aziz, Monowar; Kazumori, Hideaki; Ishimura, Norihisa; Yuki, Takafumi; Kadota, Chikara; Kadowaki, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    RNA polymerase III promoters of human ribonuclease P RNA component H1, human U6, and mouse U6 small nuclear RNA genes are commonly used in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vectors due their precise initiation and termination sites. During transient transfection of shRNA vectors, we observed that H1 or U6 promoters also express longer transcripts enough to express several reporter genes including firefly luciferase, green fluorescent protein EGFP, and red fluorescent protein JRed. Expression of such longer transcripts was augmented by upstream RNA polymerase II enhancers and completely inhibited by downstream polyA signal sequences. Moreover, the transcription of firefly luciferase from human H1 promoter was sensitive to RNA polymerase II inhibitor α-amanitin. Our findings suggest that commonly used polymerase III promoters in shRNA vectors are also prone to RNA polymerase II mediated transcription, which may have negative impacts on their targeted use

  19. Recording information on protein complexes in an information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitsky, Marc; Diprose, Jonathan M; Morris, Chris; Griffiths, Susanne L; Daniel, Edward; Lin, Bill; Daenke, Susan; Bishop, Benjamin; Siebold, Christian; Wilson, Keith S; Blake, Richard; Stuart, David I; Esnouf, Robert M

    2011-08-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is a laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for use with the production of proteins in a research environment. The software is distributed under the CCP4 licence, and so is available free of charge to academic laboratories. Like most LIMS, the underlying PiMS data model originally had no support for protein-protein complexes. To support the SPINE2-Complexes project the developers have extended PiMS to meet these requirements. The modifications to PiMS, described here, include data model changes, additional protocols, some user interface changes and functionality to detect when an experiment may have formed a complex. Example data are shown for the production of a crystal of a protein complex. Integration with SPINE2-Complexes Target Tracker application is also described. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The expanding polymerase universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M F; Tippin, B

    2000-11-01

    Over the past year, the number of known prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases has exploded. Many of these newly discovered enzymes copy aberrant bases in the DNA template over which 'respectable' polymerases fear to tread. The next step is to unravel their functions, which are thought to range from error-prone copying of DNA lesions, somatic hypermutation and avoidance of skin cancer, to restarting stalled replication forks and repairing double-stranded DNA breaks.

  1. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z.

    1990-01-01

    We have synthesized 32 P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies

  2. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We have synthesized {sup 32}P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies.

  3. Practical dietary management of protein energy malnutrition in young children with cow's milk protein allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Rosan; Venter, Carina; Fox, Adam T; Shah, Neil

    2012-06-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) affects between 1.9 and 4.9% of infants and young children. This food allergy requires the complete elimination of cow's milk and its derivatives, impacting on nutritional status. The risk of having protein energy malnutrition (PEM) in children with CMPA has been well documented. In 2007, the World Health Organisation published guidelines on the dietary management of PEM, which has impacted on the recommendations and composition on specialist feeds for many chronic diseases, but not on CMPA. The main change in management of the child with PEM is the protein energy ratio and energy requirements. The ideal protein energy ratio lies between 8.9 and 11.5%, which would ensure a deposition of about 70% lean and 30% fat mass. In addition, for optimal catch-up growth between 5 and 10 g/kg/day, energy requirements should be between 105 and 126 kcal/kg/day. Although most current hypoallergenic formulas fall well within the recommendation for protein, there is a problem in achieving energy requirements. As a result, modular additions are often made, disturbing the protein energy ratio or feeds are concentrated, which impacts on osmolality. We therefore aimed to review current guidelines on PEM and how these can be applied in the management of the malnourished child with CMPA. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. ProteinTracker: an application for managing protein production and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponko, Stefan C; Bienvenue, David

    2012-05-10

    Laboratories that produce protein reagents for research and development face the challenge of deciding whether to track batch-related data using simple file based storage mechanisms (e.g. spreadsheets and notebooks), or commit the time and effort to install, configure and maintain a more complex laboratory information management system (LIMS). Managing reagent data stored in files is challenging because files are often copied, moved, and reformatted. Furthermore, there is no simple way to query the data if/when questions arise. Commercial LIMS often include additional modules that may be paid for but not actually used, and often require software expertise to truly customize them for a given environment. This web-application allows small to medium-sized protein production groups to track data related to plasmid DNA, conditioned media samples (supes), cell lines used for expression, and purified protein information, including method of purification and quality control results. In addition, a request system was added that includes a means of prioritizing requests to help manage the high demand of protein production resources at most organizations. ProteinTracker makes extensive use of existing open-source libraries and is designed to track essential data related to the production and purification of proteins. ProteinTracker is an open-source web-based application that provides organizations with the ability to track key data involved in the production and purification of proteins and may be modified to meet the specific needs of an organization. The source code and database setup script can be downloaded from http://sourceforge.net/projects/proteintracker. This site also contains installation instructions and a user guide. A demonstration version of the application can be viewed at http://www.proteintracker.org.

  5. ProteinTracker: an application for managing protein production and purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponko Stefan C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laboratories that produce protein reagents for research and development face the challenge of deciding whether to track batch-related data using simple file based storage mechanisms (e.g. spreadsheets and notebooks, or commit the time and effort to install, configure and maintain a more complex laboratory information management system (LIMS. Managing reagent data stored in files is challenging because files are often copied, moved, and reformatted. Furthermore, there is no simple way to query the data if/when questions arise. Commercial LIMS often include additional modules that may be paid for but not actually used, and often require software expertise to truly customize them for a given environment. Findings This web-application allows small to medium-sized protein production groups to track data related to plasmid DNA, conditioned media samples (supes, cell lines used for expression, and purified protein information, including method of purification and quality control results. In addition, a request system was added that includes a means of prioritizing requests to help manage the high demand of protein production resources at most organizations. ProteinTracker makes extensive use of existing open-source libraries and is designed to track essential data related to the production and purification of proteins. Conclusions ProteinTracker is an open-source web-based application that provides organizations with the ability to track key data involved in the production and purification of proteins and may be modified to meet the specific needs of an organization. The source code and database setup script can be downloaded from http://sourceforge.net/projects/proteintracker. This site also contains installation instructions and a user guide. A demonstration version of the application can be viewed at http://www.proteintracker.org.

  6. ProteinTracker: an application for managing protein production and purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Laboratories that produce protein reagents for research and development face the challenge of deciding whether to track batch-related data using simple file based storage mechanisms (e.g. spreadsheets and notebooks), or commit the time and effort to install, configure and maintain a more complex laboratory information management system (LIMS). Managing reagent data stored in files is challenging because files are often copied, moved, and reformatted. Furthermore, there is no simple way to query the data if/when questions arise. Commercial LIMS often include additional modules that may be paid for but not actually used, and often require software expertise to truly customize them for a given environment. Findings This web-application allows small to medium-sized protein production groups to track data related to plasmid DNA, conditioned media samples (supes), cell lines used for expression, and purified protein information, including method of purification and quality control results. In addition, a request system was added that includes a means of prioritizing requests to help manage the high demand of protein production resources at most organizations. ProteinTracker makes extensive use of existing open-source libraries and is designed to track essential data related to the production and purification of proteins. Conclusions ProteinTracker is an open-source web-based application that provides organizations with the ability to track key data involved in the production and purification of proteins and may be modified to meet the specific needs of an organization. The source code and database setup script can be downloaded from http://sourceforge.net/projects/proteintracker. This site also contains installation instructions and a user guide. A demonstration version of the application can be viewed at http://www.proteintracker.org. PMID:22574679

  7. Citrus psorosis virus RNA 1 is of negative polarity and potentially encodes in its complementary strand a 24K protein of unknown function and 280K putative RNA dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naum-Onganía, Gabriela; Gago-Zachert, Selma; Peña, Eduardo; Grau, Oscar; Garcia, Maria Laura

    2003-10-01

    Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), the type member of genus Ophiovirus, has three genomic RNAs. Complete sequencing of CPsV RNA 1 revealed a size of 8184 nucleotides and Northern blot hybridization with chain specific probes showed that its non-coding strand is preferentially encapsidated. The complementary strand of RNA 1 contains two open reading frames (ORFs) separated by a 109-nt intergenic region, one located near the 5'-end potentially encoding a 24K protein of unknown function, and another of 280K containing the core polymerase motifs characteristic of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp). Comparison of the core RdRp motifs of negative-stranded RNA viruses, supports grouping CPsV, Ranunculus white mottle virus (RWMV) and Mirafiori lettuce virus (MiLV) within the same genus (Ophiovirus), constituting a monophyletic group separated from all other negative-stranded RNA viruses. Furthermore, RNAs 1 of MiLV, CPsV and RWMV are similar in size and those of MiLV and CPsV also in genomic organization and sequence.

  8. PIP degron proteins, substrates of CRL4Cdt2, and not PIP boxes, interfere with DNA polymerase η and κ focus formation on UV damage

    OpenAIRE

    Tsanov, Nikolay; Kermi, Chames; Coulombe, Philippe; Van der Laan, Siem; Hodroj, Dana; Maiorano, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a well-known scaffold for many DNA replication and repair proteins, but how the switch between partners is regulated is currently unclear. Interaction with PCNA occurs via a domain known as a PCNA-Interacting Protein motif (PIP box). More recently, an additional specialized PIP box has been described, the « PIP degron », that targets PCNA-interacting proteins for proteasomal degradation via the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4Cdt2. Here we provide evidence...

  9. Augmentation of protein production by a combination of the T7 RNA polymerase system and ubiquitin fusion: Overproduction of the human DNA repair protein, ERCC1, as a ubiquitin fusion protein in Escherichia coli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); J.H. Odijk; M. van Duin (Mark); M.W.J. Fornerod (Maarten); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThis article presents the development of a set of new expression vectors for overproduction of proteins in Escherichia coli. The vectors, pETUBI-ES1, 2 and 3, allow in-frame cloning of any sequence with the ubiquitin gene driven by the strong T7f10 promoter. Combination of the T7

  10. Arranging eukaryotic nuclear DNA polymerases for replication: Specific interactions with accessory proteins arrange Pols α, δ, and ϵ in the replisome for leading-strand and lagging-strand DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Thomas A; Burgers, Peter M J

    2017-08-01

    Biochemical and cryo-electron microscopy studies have just been published revealing interactions among proteins of the yeast replisome that are important for highly coordinated synthesis of the two DNA strands of the nuclear genome. These studies reveal key interactions important for arranging DNA polymerases α, δ, and ϵ for leading and lagging strand replication. The CMG (Mcm2-7, Cdc45, GINS) helicase is central to this interaction network. These are but the latest examples of elegant studies performed in the recent past that lead to a much better understanding of how the eukaryotic replication fork achieves efficient DNA replication that is accurate enough to prevent diseases yet allows evolution. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Dietary management of chronic kidney disease: protein restriction and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Nimrit; Wesson, Donald E

    2012-11-01

    More kidney protective strategies are needed to reduce the burden of complete kidney failure from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinicians sometimes use protein restriction as kidney protection despite its demonstrated lack of effectiveness in the only large-scale study. Small-scale studies support that dietary acid reduction is kidney-protective, including when done with base-inducing foods like fruits and vegetables. We review these studies in light of current kidney-protective recommendations. Animal models of CKD show that acid-inducing dietary protein exacerbates and base-inducing protein ameliorates nephropathy progression, and that increased intake of acid-inducing but not base-inducing dietary protein exacerbates progression. Clinical studies show that dietary acid reduction with Na-based alkali reduces kidney injury and slows nephropathy progression in patients with CKD and reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR); base-inducing fruits and vegetables reduce kidney injury in patients with reduced GFR; and base-inducing fruits and vegetables improve metabolic acidosis in CKD. Protein type rather than amount might more importantly affect nephropathy progression. Base-inducing foods might be another way to reduce dietary acid, a strategy shown in small studies to slow nephropathy progression. Further studies will determine if CKD patients should be given base-inducing food as part of their management.

  12. Use of T7 RNA polymerase to direct expression of outer Surface Protein A (OspA) from the Lyme disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John J.; Lade, Barbara N.

    1991-01-01

    The OspA gene from a North American strain of the Lyme disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, was cloned under the control of transciption and translation signals from bacteriophage T7. Full-length OspA protein, a 273 amino acid (31kD) lipoprotein, is expressed poorly in Escherichia coli and is associated with the insoluble membrane fraction. In contrast, a truncated form of OspA lacking the amino-terminal signal sequence which normally would direct localization of the protein to the outer membrane is expressed at very high levels (less than or equal to 100 mg/liter) and is soluble. The truncated protein was purified to homogeneity and is being tested to see if it will be useful as an immunogen in a vaccine against Lyme disease. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the secondary structure and study conformational changes in the protein. Studies underway with other surface proteins from B burgdorferi and a related spirochete, B. hermsii, which causes relapsing fever, leads us to conclude that a strategy similar to that used to express the truncated OspA can provide a facile method for producing variations of Borrelia lipoproteins which are highly expressed in E. coli and soluble without exposure to detergents.

  13. Estrogen Drives Cellular Transformation and Mutagenesis in Cells Expressing the Breast Cancer-Associated R438W DNA Polymerase Lambda Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Antonia A; Bush, Korie B; Towle-Weicksel, Jamie B; Taylor, B Frazier; Schulz, Vincent; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Tuck, David P; Sweasy, Joann B

    2016-11-01

    Repair of DNA damage is critical for maintaining the genomic integrity of cells. DNA polymerase lambda (POLL/Pol λ) is suggested to function in base excision repair (BER) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), and is likely to play a role in damage tolerance at the replication fork. Here, using next-generation sequencing, it was discovered that the POLL rs3730477 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) encoding R438W Pol λ was significantly enriched in the germlines of breast cancer patients. Expression of R438W Pol λ in human breast epithelial cells induces cellular transformation and chromosomal aberrations. The role of estrogen was assessed as it is commonly used in hormone replacement therapies and is a known breast cancer risk factor. Interestingly, the combination of estrogen treatment and the expression of the R438W Pol λ SNP drastically accelerated the rate of transformation. Estrogen exposure produces 8-oxoguanine lesions that persist in cells expressing R438W Pol λ compared with wild-type (WT) Pol λ-expressing cells. Unlike WT Pol λ, which performs error-free bypass of 8-oxoguanine lesions, expression of R438W Pol λ leads to an increase in mutagenesis and replicative stress in cells treated with estrogen. Together, these data suggest that individuals who carry the rs3730477 POLL germline variant have an increased risk of estrogen-associated breast cancer. The Pol λ R438W mutation can serve as a biomarker to predict cancer risk and implicates that treatment with estrogen in individuals with this mutation may further increase their risk of breast cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 14(11); 1068-77. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. RNA binding and replication by the poliovirus RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberste, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    RNA binding and RNA synthesis by the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were studied in vitro using purified polymerase. Templates for binding and RNA synthesis studies were natural RNAs, homopolymeric RNAs, or subgenomic poliovirus-specific RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNA clones using SP6 or T7 RNA polymerases. The binding of the purified polymerase to poliovirion and other RNAs was studied using a protein-RNA nitrocellulose filter binding assay. A cellular poly(A)-binding protein was found in the viral polymerase preparations, but was easily separated from the polymerase by chromatography on poly(A) Sepharose. The binding of purified polymerase to 32 P-labeled ribohomopolymeric RNAs was examined, and the order of binding observed was poly(G) >>> poly(U) > poly(C) > poly(A). The K a for polymerase binding to poliovirion RNA and to a full-length negative strand transcript was about 1 x 10 9 M -1 . The polymerase binds to a subgenomic RNAs which contain the 3' end of the genome with a K a similar to that for virion RNA, but binds less well to 18S rRNA, globin mRNA, and subgenomic RNAs which lack portions of the 3' noncoding region

  15. Detection of a Bacteriophage Gene Encoding a Mu-like Portal Protein in Haemophilus parasuis Reference Strains and Field Isolates by Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    A nested PCR assay was developed to determine the presence of a gene encoding a bacteriophage Mu-like portal protein, gp29, in 15 reference strains and 31 field isolates of Haemophilus parasuis. Specific primers, based on the gene’s sequence, were utilized. A majority of the virulent reference strai...

  16. O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein expression by immunohistochemistry in brain and non-brain systemic tumours: systematic review and meta-analysis of correlation with methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brell, Marta; Ibáñez, Javier; Tortosa, Avelina

    2011-01-01

    The DNA repair protein O 6 -Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) confers resistance to alkylating agents. Several methods have been applied to its analysis, with methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) the most commonly used for promoter methylation study, while immunohistochemistry (IHC) has become the most frequently used for the detection of MGMT protein expression. Agreement on the best and most reliable technique for evaluating MGMT status remains unsettled. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the correlation between IHC and MSP. A computer-aided search of MEDLINE (1950-October 2009), EBSCO (1966-October 2009) and EMBASE (1974-October 2009) was performed for relevant publications. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were those comparing MGMT protein expression by IHC with MGMT promoter methylation by MSP in the same cohort of patients. Methodological quality was assessed by using the QUADAS and STARD instruments. Previously published guidelines were followed for meta-analysis performance. Of 254 studies identified as eligible for full-text review, 52 (20.5%) met the inclusion criteria. The review showed that results of MGMT protein expression by IHC are not in close agreement with those obtained with MSP. Moreover, type of tumour (primary brain tumour vs others) was an independent covariate of accuracy estimates in the meta-regression analysis beyond the cut-off value. Protein expression assessed by IHC alone fails to reflect the promoter methylation status of MGMT. Thus, in attempts at clinical diagnosis the two methods seem to select different groups of patients and should not be used interchangeably

  17. O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein expression by immunohistochemistry in brain and non-brain systemic tumours: systematic review and meta-analysis of correlation with methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibáñez Javier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DNA repair protein O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT confers resistance to alkylating agents. Several methods have been applied to its analysis, with methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP the most commonly used for promoter methylation study, while immunohistochemistry (IHC has become the most frequently used for the detection of MGMT protein expression. Agreement on the best and most reliable technique for evaluating MGMT status remains unsettled. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the correlation between IHC and MSP. Methods A computer-aided search of MEDLINE (1950-October 2009, EBSCO (1966-October 2009 and EMBASE (1974-October 2009 was performed for relevant publications. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were those comparing MGMT protein expression by IHC with MGMT promoter methylation by MSP in the same cohort of patients. Methodological quality was assessed by using the QUADAS and STARD instruments. Previously published guidelines were followed for meta-analysis performance. Results Of 254 studies identified as eligible for full-text review, 52 (20.5% met the inclusion criteria. The review showed that results of MGMT protein expression by IHC are not in close agreement with those obtained with MSP. Moreover, type of tumour (primary brain tumour vs others was an independent covariate of accuracy estimates in the meta-regression analysis beyond the cut-off value. Conclusions Protein expression assessed by IHC alone fails to reflect the promoter methylation status of MGMT. Thus, in attempts at clinical diagnosis the two methods seem to select different groups of patients and should not be used interchangeably.

  18. Structure and function of DNA polymerase μ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takuro; Maezawa, So

    2013-01-01

    DNA polymerases are enzymes playing the central role in DNA metabolism, including DNA replication, DNA repair and recombination. DNA polymerase μ (pol μ DNA polymerase λ (pol λ) and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT) in X family DNA polymerases function in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is the predonmiant repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEJ involves enzymes that capture both ends of the broken DNA strand, bring them together in a synaptic DNA-protein complex, and repair the DSB. Pol μ and pol λ fill in the gaps at the junction to maintain the genomic integrity. TdT synthesizes N region at the junction during V(D)J recombination and promotes diversity of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor gene. Among these three polymerases, the regulatory mechanisms of pol μ remain rather unclear. We have approached the mechanism of pol μ from both sides of structure and cellular dynamics. Here, we propose some new insights into pol μ and the probable NHEJ model including our findings. (author)

  19. Human Mediator Enhances Activator-Facilitated Recruitment of RNA Polymerase II and Promoter Recognition by TATA-Binding Protein (TBP) Independently of TBP-Associated Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Zhou, Tianyuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2003-01-01

    Mediator is a general cofactor implicated in the functions of many transcriptional activators. Although Mediator with different protein compositions has been isolated, it remains unclear how Mediator facilitates activator-dependent transcription, independent of its general stimulation of basal transcription. To define the mechanisms of Mediator function, we isolated two forms of human Mediator complexes (Mediator-P.5 and Mediator-P.85) and demonstrated that Mediator-P.5 clearly functions by e...

  20. Expression of the Long Intergenic Non-Protein Coding RNA 665 (LINC00665) Gene and the Cell Cycle in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, the Gene Expression Omnibus, and Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dong-Yue; Lin, Peng; Pang, Yu-Yan; Chen, Gang; He, Yun; Dang, Yi-Wu; Yang, Hong

    2018-05-05

    BACKGROUND Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have a role in physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of the long intergenic non-protein coding RNA 665 (LINC00665) gene and the cell cycle in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using database analysis including The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). MATERIAL AND METHODS Expression levels of LINC00665 were compared between human tissue samples of HCC and adjacent normal liver, clinicopathological correlations were made using TCGA and the GEO, and qPCR was performed to validate the findings. Other public databases were searched for other genes associated with LINC00665 expression, including The Atlas of Noncoding RNAs in Cancer (TANRIC), the Multi Experiment Matrix (MEM), Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. RESULTS Overexpression of LINC00665 in patients with HCC was significantly associated with gender, tumor grade, stage, and tumor cell type. Overexpression of LINC00665 in patients with HCC was significantly associated with overall survival (OS) (HR=1.47795%; CI: 1.046-2.086). Bioinformatics analysis identified 469 related genes and further analysis supported a hypothesis that LINC00665 regulates pathways in the cell cycle to facilitate the development and progression of HCC through ten identified core genes: CDK1, BUB1B, BUB1, PLK1, CCNB2, CCNB1, CDC20, ESPL1, MAD2L1, and CCNA2. CONCLUSIONS Overexpression of the lncRNA, LINC00665 may be involved in the regulation of cell cycle pathways in HCC through ten identified hub genes.

  1. Competition between replicative and translesion polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Kane

    Full Text Available In metazoans, the mechanism by which DNA is synthesized during homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks is poorly understood. Specifically, the identities of the polymerase(s that carry out repair synthesis and how they are recruited to repair sites are unclear. Here, we have investigated the roles of several different polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila melanogaster. Using a gap repair assay, we found that homologous recombination is impaired in Drosophila lacking DNA polymerase zeta and, to a lesser extent, polymerase eta. In addition, the Pol32 protein, part of the polymerase delta complex, is needed for repair requiring extensive synthesis. Loss of Rev1, which interacts with multiple translesion polymerases, results in increased synthesis during gap repair. Together, our findings support a model in which translesion polymerases and the polymerase delta complex compete during homologous recombination repair. In addition, they establish Rev1 as a crucial factor that regulates the extent of repair synthesis.

  2. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2016-02-18

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  3. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng; Chen, Tao; Qin, Tao; Ding, Feng; Wang, Zhenyu; Chen, Hao; Xiong, Liming

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  4. [Attitudes towards cow's milk protein allergy management by spanish gastroenterologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual Pérez, Alicia Isabel; Méndez Sánchez, Alejandra; Segarra Cantón, Óscar; Espin Jaime, Beatriz; Jiménez Treviño, Santiago; Bousoño García, Carlos; Díaz Martín, Juan José

    2018-01-09

    Food allergy is an increasing health problem in the developed world. Cow's milk protein is the main cause of food allergy in infants. Without an appropriate diagnostic workup, there is a high risk of both over- and underdiagnosis and therefore, over and undertreatment. The objective of our study was to analyze the variability in cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) management by pediatric gastroenterologists in Spain. A fifty item questionnaire, including open and closed items in a Likert's scale from 0 to 5, was drafted and distributed through the Spanish Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (SEGHNP) e-mail list. Seventy-three questionnaires were received back out of 321. Only 3 of the items achieved concordance greater than 90%. Thirty-three percent considered oral challenge to be necessary for the diagnosis of CMPA under any circumstance. Twenty-five percent considered that symptom improvement after cow's milk removal was enough for the diagnosis. Oral challenge was performed at home by 83.5% in non-IgE mediated cases. Extensively hydrolyzed casein formulas were the treatment of choice for 69.9%. Soy formulas were the last option. Almost all respondents were aware of the existence of clinical guidelines on CMPA, being European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines the most followed (64.4%). Twenty-three percent considered that their knowledge about allergy was inadequate. Although CMPA is a prevalent condition that pediatric gastroenterologists have been treating for decades, we found a huge variability on its management. There is potential for improvement in this field among pediatric gastroenterologist in the future. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  5. Ubiquitylation and degradation of elongating RNA polymerase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Marcus D; Harreman, Michelle; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2013-01-01

    During its journey across a gene, RNA polymerase II has to contend with a number of obstacles to its progression, including nucleosomes, DNA-binding proteins, DNA damage, and sequences that are intrinsically difficult to transcribe. Not surprisingly, a large number of elongation factors have....... In this review, we describe the mechanisms and factors responsible for the last resort mechanism of transcriptional elongation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA polymerase II Transcript Elongation....

  6. PARPs database: A LIMS systems for protein-protein interaction data mining or laboratory information management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picard-Cloutier Aude

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the "post-genome" era, mass spectrometry (MS has become an important method for the analysis of proteins and the rapid advancement of this technique, in combination with other proteomics methods, results in an increasing amount of proteome data. This data must be archived and analysed using specialized bioinformatics tools. Description We herein describe "PARPs database," a data analysis and management pipeline for liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS proteomics. PARPs database is a web-based tool whose features include experiment annotation, protein database searching, protein sequence management, as well as data-mining of the peptides and proteins identified. Conclusion Using this pipeline, we have successfully identified several interactions of biological significance between PARP-1 and other proteins, namely RFC-1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.

  7. Discovery of cyanophage genomes which contain mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yi-Wah; Mohr, Remus; Millard, Andrew D; Holmes, Antony B; Larkum, Anthony W; Whitworth, Anna L; Mann, Nicholas H; Scanlan, David J; Hess, Wolfgang R; Clokie, Martha R J

    2011-08-01

    DNA polymerase γ is a family A DNA polymerase responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA in eukaryotes. The origins of DNA polymerase γ have remained elusive because it is not present in any known bacterium, though it has been hypothesized that mitochondria may have inherited the enzyme by phage-mediated nonorthologous displacement. Here, we present an analysis of two full-length homologues of this gene, which were found in the genomes of two bacteriophages, which infect the chlorophyll-d containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina. Phylogenetic analyses of these phage DNA polymerase γ proteins show that they branch deeply within the DNA polymerase γ clade and therefore share a common origin with their eukaryotic homologues. We also found homologues of these phage polymerases in the environmental Community Cyberinfrastructure for Advanced Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis (CAMERA) database, which fell in the same clade. An analysis of the CAMERA assemblies containing the environmental homologues together with the filter fraction metadata indicated some of these assemblies may be of bacterial origin. We also show that the phage-encoded DNA polymerase γ is highly transcribed as the phage genomes are replicated. These findings provide data that may assist in reconstructing the evolution of mitochondria.

  8. Expression of human DNA polymerase β in Escherichia coli and characterization of the recombinant enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbotts, J.; SenGupta, D.N.; Zmudzka, B.; Widen, S.G.; Notario, V.; Wilson, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The coding region of a human β-polymerase cDNA, predicting a 335 amino acid protein, was subcloned in the Escherichia coli expression plasmid pRC23. After induction of transformed cells, the crude soluble extract was found to contain a new protein immunoreactive with β-polymerase antibody and corresponding in size to the protein deduced from the cDNA. This protein was purified in a yield of 1-2 mg/50 g of cells. The recombinant protein had about the same DNA polymerase specific activity as β-polymerase purified from mammalian tissues, and template-primer specificity and immunological properties of the recombinant polymerase were similar to those of natural β-polymerases. The purified enzyme was free of nuclease activity. The authors studied detailed catalytic properties of the recombinant β-polymerase using defined template-primer systems. The results indicate that this β-polymerase is essentially identical with natural β-polymerases. The recombinant enzyme is distributive in mode of synthesis and is capable of detecting changes in the integrity of the single-stranded template, such as methylated bases and a double-stranded region. The enzyme recognizes a template region four to seven bases downstream of the primer 3' end and utilizes alternative primers if this downstream template region is double stranded. The enzyme is unable to synthesize past methylated bases N 3 -methyl-dT or O 6 -methyl-dG

  9. Leucine supplementation in the management of protein energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To establish if leucine could be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of protein energy malnutrition. Study selection: Based on defined key words a search was carried out on Pubmed to retrieve all publications on leucine supplementation and muscle protein synthesis. Only studies that met the search ...

  10. GENOMIC DNA-FINGERPRINTING OF CLINICAL HAEMOPHILUS-INFLUENZAE ISOLATES BY POLYMERASE CHAIN-REACTION AMPLIFICATION - COMPARISON WITH MAJOR OUTER-MEMBRANE PROTEIN AND RESTRICTION-FRAGMENT-LENGTH-POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBELKUM, A; DUIM, B; REGELINK, A; MOLLER, L; QUINT, W; VANALPHEN, L

    Non-capsulate strains of Haemophilus influenzae were genotyped by analysis of variable DNA segments obtained by amplification of genomic DNA with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR fingerprinting). Discrete fragments of 100-2000 bp were obtained. The reproducibility of the procedure was assessed by

  11. GBA manager: an online tool for querying low-complexity regions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Nirmalya; Kahveci, Tamer

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We developed GBA Manager, an online software that facilitates the Graph-Based Algorithm (GBA) we proposed in our earlier work. GBA identifies the low-complexity regions (LCR) of protein sequences. GBA exploits a similarity matrix, such as BLOSUM62, to compute the complexity of the subsequences of the input protein sequence. It uses a graph-based algorithm to accurately compute the regions that have low complexities. GBA Manager is a user friendly web-service that enables online querying of protein sequences using GBA. In addition to querying capabilities of the existing GBA algorithm, GBA Manager computes the p-values of the LCR identified. The p-value gives an estimate of the possibility that the region appears by chance. GBA Manager presents the output in three different understandable formats. GBA Manager is freely accessible at http://bioinformatics.cise.ufl.edu/GBA/GBA.htm .

  12. Health of issues of whey proteins: 2. Weight management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, G.

    2006-01-01

    The increasing prevalence in many countries of people with overweight and obesity is undoubtedly one of the biggest threats to public health. Dietary proteins, because of their positive effects on satiation/ satiety, may help to reduce energy intake and promote a healthy body composition with less

  13. Health issues of whey proteins: 2. Weight management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, G.

    2006-01-01

    The increasing prevalence in many countries of people with overweight and obesity is undoubtedly one of the biggest threats to public health. Dietary proteins, because of their positive effects on satiation/satiety, may help to reduce energy intake and promote a healthy body composition with Less

  14. A domain of the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I has polymerase but no exonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemont, P S; Ollis, D L; Steitz, T A; Joyce, C M

    1986-09-01

    The Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I from Escherichia coli has two enzymatic activities: DNA polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease. The crystal structure showed that the fragment is folded into two distinct domains. The smaller domain has a binding site for deoxynucleoside monophosphate and a divalent metal ion that is thought to identify the 3'-5' exonuclease active site. The larger C-terminal domain contains a deep cleft that is believed to bind duplex DNA. Several lines of evidence suggested that the large domain also contains the polymerase active site. To test this hypothesis, we have cloned the DNA coding for the large domain into an expression system and purified the protein product. We find that the C-terminal domain has polymerase activity (albeit at a lower specific activity than the native Klenow fragment) but no measurable 3'-5' exonuclease activity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that each of the three enzymatic activities of DNA polymerase I from E. coli resides on a separate protein structural domain.

  15. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-induced RNA polymerase is associated with Golgi apparatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Polatnick, J; Wool, S H

    1985-01-01

    Electrophoretic analysis of the Golgi apparatus isolated by differential centrifugation from radiolabeled cells infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus showed about 10 protein bands. The virus-induced RNA polymerase was identified by immunoprecipitation and electron microscope staining procedures. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that the polymerase passed through the Golgi apparatus in less than 1 h.

  16. Poliovirus RNA polymerase: in vitro enzymatic activities, fidelity of replication, and characterization of a temperature-sensitive RNA-negative mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, M.A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro activities of the purified poliovirus RNA polymerase were investigated in this study. The polymerase was shown to be a strict RNA dependent RNA polymerase. It only copied RNA templates but used either a DNA or RNA primer to initiate RNA synthesis. Partially purified polymerase has some DNA polymerase activities. Additional purification of the enzyme and studies with a mutant poliovirus RNA polymerase indicated that the DNA polymerase activities were due to a cellular polymerase. The fidelity of RNA replication in vitro by the purified poliovirus RNA polymerase was studied by measuring the rate of misincorporation of noncomplementary ribonucleotide monophosphates on synthetic homopolymeric RNA templates. The results showed that the ratio of noncomplementary to complementary ribonucleotides incorporated was 1-5 x 10 -3 . The viral polymerase of a poliovirus temperature sensitive RNA-negative mutant, Ts 10, was isolated. This study confirmed that the mutant was viable 33 0 , but was RNA negative at 39 0 . Characterization of the Ts 10 polymerase showed it was significantly more sensitive to heat inactivation than was the old-type polymerase. Highly purified poliovirions were found to contain several noncapsid proteins. At least two of these proteins were labeled by [ 35 S]methionine infected cells and appeared to be virally encoded proteins. One of these proteins was immunoprecipitated by anti-3B/sup vpg/ antiserum. This protein had the approximate Mr = 50,000 and appeared to be one of the previously identified 3B/sup vpg/ precursor proteins

  17. Advancing Polymerase Ribozymes Towards Self-Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjhung, K. F.; Joyce, G. F.

    2017-07-01

    Autocatalytic replication and evolution in vitro by (i) a cross-chiral RNA polymerase catalyzing polymerization of mononucleotides of the opposite handedness; (ii) non-covalent assembly of component fragments of an existing RNA polymerase ribozyme.

  18. Generation and Comprehensive Analysis of an Influenza Virus Polymerase Cellular Interaction Network▿†§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafforeau, Lionel; Chantier, Thibault; Pradezynski, Fabrine; Pellet, Johann; Mangeot, Philippe E.; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Andre, Patrice; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Lotteau, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The influenza virus transcribes and replicates its genome inside the nucleus of infected cells. Both activities are performed by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that is composed of the three subunits PA, PB1, and PB2, and recent studies have shown that it requires host cell factors to transcribe and replicate the viral genome. To identify these cellular partners, we generated a comprehensive physical interaction map between each polymerase subunit and the host cellular proteome. A total of 109 human interactors were identified by yeast two-hybrid screens, whereas 90 were retrieved by literature mining. We built the FluPol interactome network composed of the influenza virus polymerase (PA, PB1, and PB2) and the nucleoprotein NP and 234 human proteins that are connected through 279 viral-cellular protein interactions. Analysis of this interactome map revealed enriched cellular functions associated with the influenza virus polymerase, including host factors involved in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription and mRNA processing. We confirmed that eight influenza virus polymerase-interacting proteins are required for virus replication and transcriptional activity of the viral polymerase. These are involved in cellular transcription (C14orf166, COPS5, MNAT1, NMI, and POLR2A), translation (EIF3S6IP), nuclear transport (NUP54), and DNA repair (FANCG). Conversely, we identified PRKRA, which acts as an inhibitor of the viral polymerase transcriptional activity and thus is required for the cellular antiviral response. PMID:21994455

  19. Generation and comprehensive analysis of an influenza virus polymerase cellular interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafforeau, Lionel; Chantier, Thibault; Pradezynski, Fabrine; Pellet, Johann; Mangeot, Philippe E; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Andre, Patrice; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Lotteau, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The influenza virus transcribes and replicates its genome inside the nucleus of infected cells. Both activities are performed by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that is composed of the three subunits PA, PB1, and PB2, and recent studies have shown that it requires host cell factors to transcribe and replicate the viral genome. To identify these cellular partners, we generated a comprehensive physical interaction map between each polymerase subunit and the host cellular proteome. A total of 109 human interactors were identified by yeast two-hybrid screens, whereas 90 were retrieved by literature mining. We built the FluPol interactome network composed of the influenza virus polymerase (PA, PB1, and PB2) and the nucleoprotein NP and 234 human proteins that are connected through 279 viral-cellular protein interactions. Analysis of this interactome map revealed enriched cellular functions associated with the influenza virus polymerase, including host factors involved in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription and mRNA processing. We confirmed that eight influenza virus polymerase-interacting proteins are required for virus replication and transcriptional activity of the viral polymerase. These are involved in cellular transcription (C14orf166, COPS5, MNAT1, NMI, and POLR2A), translation (EIF3S6IP), nuclear transport (NUP54), and DNA repair (FANCG). Conversely, we identified PRKRA, which acts as an inhibitor of the viral polymerase transcriptional activity and thus is required for the cellular antiviral response.

  20. Optimal conditions to use Pfu exo(-) DNA polymerase for highly efficient ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angers, M; Cloutier, J F; Castonguay, A; Drouin, R

    2001-08-15

    Ligation-Mediated Polymerase Chain Reaction (LMPCR) is the most sensitive sequencing technique available to map single-stranded DNA breaks at the nucleotide level of resolution using genomic DNA. LMPCR has been adapted to map DNA damage and reveal DNA-protein interactions inside living cells. However, the sequence context (GC content), the global break frequency and the current combination of DNA polymerases used in LMPCR affect the quality of the results. In this study, we developed and optimized an LMPCR protocol adapted for Pyrococcus furiosus exo(-) DNA polymerase (Pfu exo(-)). The relative efficiency of Pfu exo(-) was compared to T7-modified DNA polymerase (Sequenase 2.0) at the primer extension step and to Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase (Taq) at the PCR amplification step of LMPCR. At all break frequencies tested, Pfu exo(-) proved to be more efficient than Sequenase 2.0. During both primer extension and PCR amplification steps, the ratio of DNA molecules per unit of DNA polymerase was the main determinant of the efficiency of Pfu exo(-), while the efficiency of Taq was less affected by this ratio. Substitution of NaCl for KCl in the PCR reaction buffer of Taq strikingly improved the efficiency of the DNA polymerase. Pfu exo(-) was clearly more efficient than Taq to specifically amplify extremely GC-rich genomic DNA sequences. Our results show that a combination of Pfu exo(-) at the primer extension step and Taq at the PCR amplification step is ideal for in vivo DNA analysis and DNA damage mapping using LMPCR.

  1. A specific subdomain in φ29 DNA polymerase confers both processivity and strand-displacement capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Irene; Lázaro, José M.; Blanco, Luis; Kamtekar, Satwik; Berman, Andrea J.; Wang, Jimin; Steitz, Thomas A.; Salas, Margarita; de Vega, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    Recent crystallographic studies of φ29 DNA polymerase have provided structural insights into its strand displacement and processivity. A specific insertion named terminal protein region 2 (TPR2), present only in protein-primed DNA polymerases, together with the exonuclease, thumb, and palm subdomains, forms two tori capable of interacting with DNA. To analyze the functional role of this insertion, we constructed a φ29 DNA polymerase deletion mutant lacking TPR2 amino acid residues Asp-398 to Glu-420. Biochemical analysis of the mutant DNA polymerase indicates that its DNA-binding capacity is diminished, drastically decreasing its processivity. In addition, removal of the TPR2 insertion abolishes the intrinsic capacity of φ29 DNA polymerase to perform strand displacement coupled to DNA synthesis. Therefore, the biochemical results described here directly demonstrate that TPR2 plays a critical role in strand displacement and processivity. PMID:15845765

  2. Sulfolobus Replication Factor C stimulates the activity of DNA Polymerase B1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Likui; Guo, Li

    2014-01-01

    the hyperthermophilic archaea of the genus Sulfolobus physically interacts with DNA polymerase B1 (PolB1) and enhances both the polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities of PolB1 in an ATP-independent manner. Stimulation of the PolB1 activity by RFC is independent of the ability of RFC to bind DNA but is consistent...... with the ability of RFC to facilitate DNA binding by PolB1 through protein-protein interaction. These results suggest that Sulfolobus RFC may play a role in recruiting DNA polymerase for efficient primer extension, in addition to clamp loading, during DNA replication....

  3. Diagnosis and management of cow's milk protein allergy in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Greef, Elisabeth; Hauser, Bruno; Devreker, Thierry; Veereman-Wauters, Gigi; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2012-02-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is frequently suspected in infants with a variety of symptoms. A thorough history and careful clinical examination are necessary to exclude other underlying diseases and to evaluate the severity of the suspected allergy. Care should be taken to diagnose CMPA adequately to avoid an unnecessary diet. We make recommendations based on systematic literature searches using the best-available evidence from PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and bibliographies. Skin prick tests, patch tests and serum specific IgE are only indicative of CMPA. Breastfed infants have a decreased risk of developing CMPA; an elimination diet for the mother is indicated if CMPA is confirmed. If a food challenge is positive in formula fed infants, an extensively hydrolysed formula and cow's milk-free diet is recommended. If symptoms do not improve, an amino acid based formula should be considered. In severe CMPA with life-threatening symptoms, an amino-acid formula is recommended. Elimination diet by a double-blind placebo controlled food challenge is the gold standard for diagnosis. Elimination of the offending allergen from the infants' diet is the main treatment principle.

  4. Laboratory information management system for membrane protein structure initiative--from gene to crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Petr V; Morris, Chris; Prince, Stephen M; Papiz, Miroslav Z

    2008-12-01

    Membrane Protein Structure Initiative (MPSI) exploits laboratory competencies to work collaboratively and distribute work among the different sites. This is possible as protein structure determination requires a series of steps, starting with target selection, through cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and finally structure determination. Distributed sites create a unique set of challenges for integrating and passing on information on the progress of targets. This role is played by the Protein Information Management System (PIMS), which is a laboratory information management system (LIMS), serving as a hub for MPSI, allowing collaborative structural proteomics to be carried out in a distributed fashion. It holds key information on the progress of cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. PIMS is employed to track the status of protein targets and to manage constructs, primers, experiments, protocols, sample locations and their detailed histories: thus playing a key role in MPSI data exchange. It also serves as the centre of a federation of interoperable information resources such as local laboratory information systems and international archival resources, like PDB or NCBI. During the challenging task of PIMS integration, within the MPSI, we discovered a number of prerequisites for successful PIMS integration. In this article we share our experiences and provide invaluable insights into the process of LIMS adaptation. This information should be of interest to partners who are thinking about using LIMS as a data centre for their collaborative efforts.

  5. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase is Involved in the Repair of DNA Damage Due to Sulfur Mustard by a Mechanism Other Than DNA Ligase I Activation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhat, K. Ramachandra; Benton, Betty J; Ray, Radharaman

    2004-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) modulates several cellular functional proteins by a mechanism in which the proteins are poly-ADP-ribosylated by transferring the ADP-ribose moieties from the enzyme substrate NAD+ to the proteins...

  6. Natural minus-strand RNAs of alfalfa mosaic virus as in vitro templates for viral RNA polymerase. 3'-Terminal non-coded guanosine and coat protein are insufficient factors for full-size plus-strand synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, C.J.; Huis in 't Veld, M.; Zuidema, D.; Graaff, de M.; Jaspars, E.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Replication complexes of alfalfa mosaic virus produce in vivo large quantities of plus-strand RNAs, but this production is fully dependent on the presence of coat protein. In order to study this process of RNA-dependent and coat protein-regulated RNA synthesis we have isolated the three natural

  7. Identification of a conserved archaeal RNA polymerase subunit contacted by the basal transcription factor TFB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, C P; Jackson, S P; Bell, S D

    2001-12-14

    Archaea possess two general transcription factors that are required to recruit RNA polymerase (RNAP) to promoters in vitro. These are TBP, the TATA-box-binding protein and TFB, the archaeal homologue of TFIIB. Thus, the archaeal and eucaryal transcription machineries are fundamentally related. In both RNAP II and archaeal transcription systems, direct contacts between TFB/TFIIB and the RNAP have been demonstrated to mediate recruitment of the polymerase to the promoter. However the subunit(s) directly contacted by these factors has not been identified. Using systematic yeast two-hybrid and biochemical analyses we have identified an interaction between the N-terminal domain of TFB and an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the RNA polymerase, RpoK. Intriguingly, homologues of RpoK are found in all three nuclear RNA polymerases (Rpb6) and also in the bacterial RNA polymerase (omega-subunit).

  8. The replisome uses mRNA as a primer after colliding with RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Richard T; O'Donnell, Mike

    2008-12-11

    Replication forks are impeded by DNA damage and protein-nucleic acid complexes such as transcribing RNA polymerase. For example, head-on collision of the replisome with RNA polymerase results in replication fork arrest. However, co-directional collision of the replisome with RNA polymerase has little or no effect on fork progression. Here we examine co-directional collisions between a replisome and RNA polymerase in vitro. We show that the Escherichia coli replisome uses the RNA transcript as a primer to continue leading-strand synthesis after the collision with RNA polymerase that is displaced from the DNA. This action results in a discontinuity in the leading strand, yet the replisome remains intact and bound to DNA during the entire process. These findings underscore the notable plasticity by which the replisome operates to circumvent obstacles in its path and may explain why the leading strand is synthesized discontinuously in vivo.

  9. DNA polymerase beta participates in mitochondrial DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykora, P; Kanno, S; Akbari, M

    2017-01-01

    We have detected DNA polymerase beta (Polβ), known as a key nuclear base excision repair (BER) protein, in mitochondrial protein extracts derived from mammalian tissue and cells. Manipulation of the N-terminal sequence affected the amount of Polβ in the mitochondria. Using Polβ fragments, mitocho......We have detected DNA polymerase beta (Polβ), known as a key nuclear base excision repair (BER) protein, in mitochondrial protein extracts derived from mammalian tissue and cells. Manipulation of the N-terminal sequence affected the amount of Polβ in the mitochondria. Using Polβ fragments......, mitochondrial-specific protein partners were identified, with the interactors mainly functioning in DNA maintenance and mitochondrial import. Of particular interest was the identification of the proteins TWINKLE, SSBP1 and TFAM, all of which are mitochondria specific DNA effectors and are known to function...... in the nucleoid. Polβ directly interacted with, and influenced the activity of, the mitochondrial helicase TWINKLE. Human kidney cells with Polβ knock-out (KO) had higher endogenous mtDNA damage. Mitochondrial extracts derived from heterozygous Polβ mouse tissue and KO cells had lower nucleotide incorporation...

  10. Modulation of the maladaptive stress response to manage diseases of protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Martino Roth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of protein folding arise because of the inability of an altered peptide sequence to properly engage protein homeostasis components that direct protein folding and function. To identify global principles of misfolding disease pathology we examined the impact of the local folding environment in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD, Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and cystic fibrosis (CF. Using distinct models, including patient-derived cell lines and primary epithelium, mouse brain tissue, and Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that chronic expression of misfolded proteins not only triggers the sustained activation of the heat shock response (HSR pathway, but that this sustained activation is maladaptive. In diseased cells, maladaptation alters protein structure-function relationships, impacts protein folding in the cytosol, and further exacerbates the disease state. We show that down-regulation of this maladaptive stress response (MSR, through silencing of HSF1, the master regulator of the HSR, restores cellular protein folding and improves the disease phenotype. We propose that restoration of a more physiological proteostatic environment will strongly impact the management and progression of loss-of-function and gain-of-toxic-function phenotypes common in human disease.

  11. Conformational Dynamics of Thermus aquaticus DNA Polymerase I during Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that DNA polymerases have been investigated for many years and are commonly used as tools in a number of molecular biology assays, many details of the kinetic mechanism they use to catalyze DNA synthesis remain unclear. Structural and kinetic studies have characterized a rapid, pre-catalytic open-to-close conformational change of the Finger domain during nucleotide binding for many DNA polymerases including Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I (Taq Pol), a thermostable enzyme commonly used for DNA amplification in PCR. However, little has been done to characterize the motions of other structural domains of Taq Pol or any other DNA polymerase during catalysis. Here, we used stopped-flow Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to investigate the conformational dynamics of all five structural domains of the full-length Taq Pol relative to the DNA substrate during nucleotide binding and incorporation. Our study provides evidence for a rapid conformational change step induced by dNTP binding and a subsequent global conformational transition involving all domains of Taq Pol during catalysis. Additionally, our study shows that the rate of the global transition was greatly increased with the truncated form of Taq Pol lacking the N-terminal domain. Finally, we utilized a mutant of Taq Pol containing a de novo disulfide bond to demonstrate that limiting protein conformational flexibility greatly reduced the polymerization activity of Taq Pol. PMID:24931550

  12. Diagnostic approach and management of cow's milk protein allergy in infants and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koletzko, S; Niggemann, B; Arato, A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: This position paper provides recommendations for the diagnosis and management of suspected cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) in Europe. It presents a practical approach with a diagnostic algorithm and is based on recently published evidence based guidelines on CMPA. DIAGNOSIS:: If CMPA...... is suspected by history and examination, strict allergen avoidance is initiated. In certain circumstances (e.g. a clear history of immediate symptoms or a life threatening reaction with a positive test for cow's milk protein (CMP) specific IgE) the diagnosis can be made without a milk challenge. In all other...

  13. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase and effect on polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L-P; Wang, S; Zhang, Z-W; Ma, Y-Y; Lai, Y-Q; Weng, J; Zhang, Q-Q

    2011-03-01

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase has been investigated by a number of biological, optical and electronic spectroscopic techniques. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to show gold nanoparticles' biological effect. Ultraviolet-visible and circular dichroism spectra analysis were applied to character the structure of Pfu DNA polymerase after conjugation with gold nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the bond properties of the polymerase-gold nanoparticles complex. The authors demonstrate that gold nanoparticles do not affect the amplification efficiency of polymerase chain reaction using Pfu DNA polymerase, and Pfu DNA polymerase displays no significant changes of the secondary structure upon interaction with gold nanoparticles. The adsorption of Pfu DNA polymerase to gold nanoparticles is mainly through Au-NH(2) bond and electrostatic interaction. These findings may have important implications regarding the safety issue as gold nanoparticles are widely used in biomedical applications.

  14. Effect of γ-irradiated DNA on the activity of DNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.; Ward, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    A cell-free assay was developed to measure the effect of γ-irradiated DNA template on the ability of DNA polymerase to copy unirradiated template. Doses as low as 1 krad were able to decrease (approx. 15%) the activity of both bacterial and mammalian DNA polymerases in the assay. The percentage of polymerase activity decreased as the dose received by the template increased. The reduction in DNA polymerase activity was shown to be due to an inhibition of the enzyme by the irradiated DNA. Irradiated poly(dA-dT) was more effective in reducing polymerase activity than calf thymus DNA. Thus the polymerase-inhibition site(s) appears to be associated with base damage, specifically adenine or thymine. Using a free-radical scavenger, OH radicals were found to be involved in producing the damage sites. The interaction between irradiated DNA and DNA polymerase was found to be specific for the enzyme and not for other proteins present in the assay. The inhibition of DNA polymerase occurred prior to or during the initiation of DNA synthesis rather than after initiation of synthesis, i.e., during elongation

  15. Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Attenuates the Translocation of Mitochondrion-Specific Proteins of Caspase-Independent Pathway, Poly [ADP-Ribose] Polymerase 1 Up-regulation and Oxidative DNA Fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Gupta, Sonam; Biswas, Joyshree; Joshi, Neeraj; Sivarama Raju, K; Wahajuddin, Mu; Singh, Sarika

    2018-03-12

    Piracetam, a nootropic drug, has been clinically used for decades; however, its mechanism of action still remains enigmatic. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the role of mitochondrion-specific factors of caspase-independent pathway like apoptotic-inducing factor (AIF) and endonuclease-G (endo-G) in piracetam-induced neuroprotection. N2A cells treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exhibited significant cytotoxicity, impaired mitochondrial activity, and reactive oxygen species generation which was significantly attenuated with piracetam co-treatment. Cells co-treated with LPS and piracetam exhibited significant uptake of piracetam in comparison to only piracetam-treated cells as estimated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS). LPS treatment caused significant translocation of AIF and endonuclease-G in neuronal N2A cells which were significantly attenuated with piracetam co-treatment. Significant over-expression of proinflammatory cytokines was also observed after treatment of LPS to cells which was inhibited with piracetam co-treatment demonstrating its anti-inflammatory property. LPS-treated cells exhibited significant oxidative DNA fragmentation and poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase-1 (PARP-1) up-regulation in nucleus, both of which were attenuated with piracetam treatment. Antioxidant melatonin but not z-VAD offered the inhibited LPS-induced DNA fragmentation indicating the involvement of oxidative DNA fragmentation. Further, we did not observe the altered caspase-3 level after LPS treatment initially while at a later time point, significantly augmented level of caspase-3 was observed which was not inhibited with piracetam treatment. In total, our findings indicate the interference of piracetam in mitochondrion-mediated caspase-independent pathway, as well as its anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract indicating the novel interference of metabolic enhancer piracetam (P) in neuronal death

  16. Viral RNA polymerase scanning and the gymnastics of Sendai virus RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolakofsky, Daniel; Le Mercier, Philippe; Iseni, Frederic; Garcin, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    mRNA synthesis from nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus (NNV) genomes is unique in that the genome RNA is embedded in an N protein assembly (the nucleocapsid) and the viral RNA polymerase does not dissociate from the template after release of each mRNA, but rather scans the genome RNA for the next gene-start site. A revised model for NNV RNA synthesis is presented, in which RNA polymerase scanning plays a prominent role. Polymerase scanning of the template is known to occur as the viral transcriptase negotiates gene junctions without falling off the template

  17. Eukaryotic RNA polymerase subunit RPB8 is a new relative of the OB family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapp, S; Kelly, G; Reischl, J; Weinzierl, R O; Matthews, S

    1998-02-01

    RNA polymerase II subunit RPB8 is an essential subunit that is highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution and is present in all three types of nuclear RNA polymerases. We report the first high resolution structural insight into eukaryotic RNA polymerase architecture with the solution structure of RPB8 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It consists of an eight stranded, antiparallel beta-barrel, four short helical regions and a large, unstructured omega-loop. The strands are connected in classic Greek-key fashion. The overall topology is unusual and contains a striking C2 rotational symmetry. Furthermore, it is most likely a novel associate of the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide (OB) binding protein class.

  18. Polymerase Gamma Disease through the Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saneto, Russell P.; Naviaux, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    The most common group of mitochondrial disease is due to mutations within the mitochondrial DNA polymerase, polymerase gamma 1 ("POLG"). This gene product is responsible for replication and repair of the small mitochondrial DNA genome. The structure-function relationship of this gene product produces a wide variety of diseases that at times, seems…

  19. DNA Polymerase Fidelity: Beyond Right and Wrong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, M Todd

    2016-11-01

    Accurate DNA replication depends on the ability of DNA polymerases to discriminate between correctly and incorrectly paired nucleotides. In this issue of Structure, Batra et al. (2016) show the structural basis for why DNA polymerases do not efficiently add correctly paired nucleotides immediately after incorporating incorrectly paired ones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae; Markley, John L

    2012-10-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  1. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woonghee, E-mail: whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, and Biochemistry Department (United States); Yu, Wookyung [Center for Proteome Biophysics, Pusan National University, Department of Physics (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suhkmann [Pusan National University, Department of Chemistry and Chemistry Institute for Functional Materials (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Iksoo [Center for Proteome Biophysics, Pusan National University, Department of Physics (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Weontae, E-mail: wlee@spin.yonsei.ac.kr [Yonsei University, Structural Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry (Korea, Republic of); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, and Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2012-10-15

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.eduhttp://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  2. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo

    2012-01-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu. PMID:22903636

  3. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae; Markley, John L.

    2012-01-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.eduhttp://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  4. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaneuf, Christopher R; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D Curtis; Holst, Gregory L; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R

    2015-07-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously-each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel.

  5. DNA polymerase preference determines PCR priming efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenjing; Byrne-Steele, Miranda; Wang, Chunlin; Lu, Stanley; Clemmons, Scott; Zahorchak, Robert J; Han, Jian

    2014-01-30

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of the most important developments in modern biotechnology. However, PCR is known to introduce biases, especially during multiplex reactions. Recent studies have implicated the DNA polymerase as the primary source of bias, particularly initiation of polymerization on the template strand. In our study, amplification from a synthetic library containing a 12 nucleotide random portion was used to provide an in-depth characterization of DNA polymerase priming bias. The synthetic library was amplified with three commercially available DNA polymerases using an anchored primer with a random 3' hexamer end. After normalization, the next generation sequencing (NGS) results of the amplified libraries were directly compared to the unamplified synthetic library. Here, high throughput sequencing was used to systematically demonstrate and characterize DNA polymerase priming bias. We demonstrate that certain sequence motifs are preferred over others as primers where the six nucleotide sequences at the 3' end of the primer, as well as the sequences four base pairs downstream of the priming site, may influence priming efficiencies. DNA polymerases in the same family from two different commercial vendors prefer similar motifs, while another commercially available enzyme from a different DNA polymerase family prefers different motifs. Furthermore, the preferred priming motifs are GC-rich. The DNA polymerase preference for certain sequence motifs was verified by amplification from single-primer templates. We incorporated the observed DNA polymerase preference into a primer-design program that guides the placement of the primer to an optimal location on the template. DNA polymerase priming bias was characterized using a synthetic library amplification system and NGS. The characterization of DNA polymerase priming bias was then utilized to guide the primer-design process and demonstrate varying amplification efficiencies among three commercially

  6. Genomic localization, sequence analysis, and transcription of the putative human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbronn, T.; Jahn, G.; Buerkle, A.; Freese, U.K.; Fleckenstein, B.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced DNA polymerase has been well characterized biochemically and functionally, but its genomic location has not yet been assigned. To identify the coding sequence, cross-hybridization with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) polymerase gene was used, as suggested by the close similarity of the herpes group virus-induced DNA polymerases to the HCMV DNA polymerase. A cosmid and plasmid library of the entire HCMV genome was screened with the BamHI Q fragment of HSF-1 at different stringency conditions. One PstI-HincII restriction fragment of 850 base pairs mapping within the EcoRI M fragment of HCMV cross-hybridized at T/sub m/ - 25/degrees/C. Sequence analysis revealed one open reading frame spanning the entire sequence. The amino acid sequence showed a highly conserved domain of 133 amino acids shared with the HSV and putative Esptein-Barr virus polymerase sequences. This domain maps within the C-terminal part of the HSV polymerase gene, which has been suggested to contain part of the catalytic center of the enzyme. Transcription analysis revealed one 5.4-kilobase early transcript in the sense orientation with respect to the open reading frame identified. This transcript appears to code for the 140-kilodalton HCMV polymerase protein

  7. RPPAML/RIMS: a metadata format and an information management system for reverse phase protein arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislaus, Romesh; Carey, Mark; Deus, Helena F; Coombes, Kevin; Hennessy, Bryan T; Mills, Gordon B; Almeida, Jonas S

    2008-12-22

    Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA) are convenient assay platforms to investigate the presence of biomarkers in tissue lysates. As with other high-throughput technologies, substantial amounts of analytical data are generated. Over 1,000 samples may be printed on a single nitrocellulose slide. Up to 100 different proteins may be assessed using immunoperoxidase or immunoflorescence techniques in order to determine relative amounts of protein expression in the samples of interest. In this report an RPPA Information Management System (RIMS) is described and made available with open source software. In order to implement the proposed system, we propose a metadata format known as reverse phase protein array markup language (RPPAML). RPPAML would enable researchers to describe, document and disseminate RPPA data. The complexity of the data structure needed to describe the results and the graphic tools necessary to visualize them require a software deployment distributed between a client and a server application. This was achieved without sacrificing interoperability between individual deployments through the use of an open source semantic database, S3DB. This data service backbone is available to multiple client side applications that can also access other server side deployments. The RIMS platform was designed to interoperate with other data analysis and data visualization tools such as Cytoscape. The proposed RPPAML data format hopes to standardize RPPA data. Standardization of data would result in diverse client applications being able to operate on the same set of data. Additionally, having data in a standard format would enable data dissemination and data analysis.

  8. The interplay between polymerase organization and nucleosome occupancy along DNA : How dynamic roadblocks on the DNA induce the formation of RNA polymerase pelotons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    During transcription RNA polymerase (RNAP) moves along a DNA molecule to copy the information on the DNA to an RNA molecule. Many textbook pictures show an RNAP sliding along empty DNA, but in reality it is crowded on the DNA and RNAP competes for space with many proteins such as other RNAP’s and

  9. Evolving a polymerase for hydrophobic base analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loakes, David; Gallego, José; Pinheiro, Vitor B; Kool, Eric T; Holliger, Philipp

    2009-10-21

    Hydrophobic base analogues (HBAs) have shown great promise for the expansion of the chemical and coding potential of nucleic acids but are generally poor polymerase substrates. While extensive synthetic efforts have yielded examples of HBAs with favorable substrate properties, their discovery has remained challenging. Here we describe a complementary strategy for improving HBA substrate properties by directed evolution of a dedicated polymerase using compartmentalized self-replication (CSR) with the archetypal HBA 5-nitroindole (d5NI) and its derivative 5-nitroindole-3-carboxamide (d5NIC) as selection substrates. Starting from a repertoire of chimeric polymerases generated by molecular breeding of DNA polymerase genes from the genus Thermus, we isolated a polymerase (5D4) with a generically enhanced ability to utilize HBAs. The selected polymerase. 5D4 was able to form and extend d5NI and d5NIC (d5NI(C)) self-pairs as well as d5NI(C) heteropairs with all four bases with efficiencies approaching, or exceeding, those of the cognate Watson-Crick pairs, despite significant distortions caused by the intercalation of the d5NI(C) heterocycles into the opposing strand base stack, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Unlike Taq polymerase, 5D4 was also able to extend HBA pairs such as Pyrene: varphi (abasic site), d5NI: varphi, and isocarbostyril (ICS): 7-azaindole (7AI), allowed bypass of a chemically diverse spectrum of HBAs, and enabled PCR amplification with primers comprising multiple d5NI(C)-substitutions, while maintaining high levels of catalytic activity and fidelity. The selected polymerase 5D4 promises to expand the range of nucleobase analogues amenable to replication and should find numerous applications, including the synthesis and replication of nucleic acid polymers with expanded chemical and functional diversity.

  10. Serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/ protein isolate: postulated mechanism of action for management of enteropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petschow BW

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bryon W Petschow, Bruce Burnett, Audrey L Shaw, Eric M Weaver, Gerald L Klein Entera Health, Inc., Cary, NC, USA Abstract: The health and performance of the gastrointestinal tract is influenced by the interaction of a variety of factors, including diet, nutritional status, genetics, environment, stress, the intestinal microbiota, immune status, and gut barrier. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to enteropathy or intestinal disorders that are known to occur in concert with certain disease states or conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. Nutritional support in the form of a medical food along with current therapies could help manage the adverse effects of enteropathy, which include effects on nutrient digestion, absorption, and metabolism, as well as utilization of nutrients from foodstuffs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight management, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animals. Recent trials in humans provide preliminary evidence that a serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate is safe and improves symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. This review summarizes data from preclinical and clinical studies with immunoglobulin-containing plasma/serum protein concentrates, with a focus on the postulated mode of action of serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate for patients with enteropathy. Keywords: bovine immunoglobulins, nutrient, gut barrier, microbiota

  11. Structure of a Complete Mediator-RNA Polymerase II Pre-Initiation Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip J; Trnka, Michael J; Bushnell, David A; Davis, Ralph E; Mattei, Pierre-Jean; Burlingame, Alma L; Kornberg, Roger D

    2016-09-08

    A complete, 52-protein, 2.5 million dalton, Mediator-RNA polymerase II pre-initiation complex (Med-PIC) was assembled and analyzed by cryo-electron microscopy and by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry. The resulting complete Med-PIC structure reveals two components of functional significance, absent from previous structures, a protein kinase complex and the Mediator-activator interaction region. It thereby shows how the kinase and its target, the C-terminal domain of the polymerase, control Med-PIC interaction and transcription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jácome

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, "fingertips" that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection.

  13. Chromosomal loop/nuclear matrix organization of transcriptionally active and inactive RNA polymerases in HeLa nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, M; Dahmus, M E; Bradbury, E M

    1988-06-05

    The relative distribution of transcriptionally active and inactive RNA polymerases I and II between the nuclear matrix/scaffold and chromosomal loops of HeLa cells was determined. Total RNA polymerase was assessed by immunoblotting and transcribing RNA polymerase by a photoaffinity labeling technique in isolated nuclei. Nuclear matrix/scaffold was isolated by three methods using high-salt, intermediate-salt or low-salt extraction. The distribution of RNA polymerases I and II were very similar within each of the methods, but considerable differences in distributions were found between the different preparation methods. Either intermediate-salt or high-salt treatment of DNase I-digested nuclei showed significant association of RNA polymerases with the nuclear matrix. However, intermediate-salt followed by high-salt treatment released all transcribing and non-transcribing RNA polymerases. Nuclear scaffolds isolated with lithium diiodosalicylate (low-salt) contained very little of the RNA polymerases. This treatment, however, caused the dissociation of RNA polymerase II transcription complexes. These results show unambiguously that RNA polymerases, both in their active and inactive forms, are not nuclear matrix proteins. The data support models in which the transcriptional machinery moves around DNA loops during transcription.

  14. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Chris; Pajon, Anne; Griffiths, Susanne L; Daniel, Ed; Savitsky, Marc; Lin, Bill; Diprose, Jonathan M; da Silva, Alan Wilter; Pilicheva, Katya; Troshin, Peter; van Niekerk, Johannes; Isaacs, Neil; Naismith, James; Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard; Wilson, Keith S; Stuart, David I; Henrick, Kim; Esnouf, Robert M

    2011-04-01

    The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service.

  15. RPPAML/RIMS: A metadata format and an information management system for reverse phase protein arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennessy Bryan T

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA are convenient assay platforms to investigate the presence of biomarkers in tissue lysates. As with other high-throughput technologies, substantial amounts of analytical data are generated. Over 1000 samples may be printed on a single nitrocellulose slide. Up to 100 different proteins may be assessed using immunoperoxidase or immunoflorescence techniques in order to determine relative amounts of protein expression in the samples of interest. Results In this report an RPPA Information Management System (RIMS is described and made available with open source software. In order to implement the proposed system, we propose a metadata format known as reverse phase protein array markup language (RPPAML. RPPAML would enable researchers to describe, document and disseminate RPPA data. The complexity of the data structure needed to describe the results and the graphic tools necessary to visualize them require a software deployment distributed between a client and a server application. This was achieved without sacrificing interoperability between individual deployments through the use of an open source semantic database, S3DB. This data service backbone is available to multiple client side applications that can also access other server side deployments. The RIMS platform was designed to interoperate with other data analysis and data visualization tools such as Cytoscape. Conclusion The proposed RPPAML data format hopes to standardize RPPA data. Standardization of data would result in diverse client applications being able to operate on the same set of data. Additionally, having data in a standard format would enable data dissemination and data analysis.

  16. Protective effect of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitor PJ34 on mitochondrial depolarization-mediated cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma cells involves attenuation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase-2 and protein kinase B/Akt activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radnai Balazs

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 2,4-Dimethoxyphenyl-E-4-arylidene-3-isochromanone (IK11 was previously described to induce apoptotic death of A431 tumor cells. In this report, we investigated the molecular action of IK11 in the HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line to increase our knowledge of the role of poly (ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP, protein kinase B/Akt and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK activation in the survival and death of tumor cells and to highlight the possible role of PARP-inhibitors in co-treatments with different cytotoxic agents in cancer therapy. Results We found that sublethal concentrations of IK11 prevented proliferation, migration and entry of the cells into their G2 phase. At higher concentrations, IK11 induced reactive oxygen species (ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2, and substantial loss of HepG2 cells. ROS production appeared marginal in mediating the cytotoxicity of IK11 since N-acetyl cysteine was unable to prevent it. However, the PARP inhibitor PJ34, although not a ROS scavenger, strongly inhibited both IK11-induced ROS production and cell death. JNK2 activation seemed to be a major mediator of the effect of IK11 since inhibition of JNK resulted in a substantial cytoprotection while inhibitors of the other kinases failed to do so. Inhibition of Akt slightly diminished the effect of IK11, while the JNK and Akt inhibitor and ROS scavenger trans-resveratrol completely protected against it. Conclusions These results indicate significant involvement of PARP, a marginal role of ROS and a pro-apoptotic role of Akt in this system, and raise attention to a novel mechanism that should be considered when cancer therapy is augmented with PARP-inhibition, namely the cytoprotection by inhibition of JNK2.

  17. RNA polymerase of the killer virus of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgopoulos, D.E.; Leibowitz, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The L/sub A/ and M double-stranded (ds) RNA segments of the cytoplasmically inherited killer virus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are encapsidated in virions that contain a DNA-independent transcriptase activity. This enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of full-length (+) stranded copies of the genomic dsRNA segments, denoted l/sub A/ and m. The L/sub A/ dsRNA segment appears to encode the major capsid protein in which both dsRNA molecules are encapsidated, while M dsRNA encodes products responsible for the two killer phenotypes of toxin production and resistance to toxin. Proteins extracted from transcriptionally active virions fail to cross-react with antibody to yeast DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, suggesting that none of the subunits of the host cell polymerases are active in viral transcription. Sequence analysis of the in vitro transcripts reveals neither to be 3'-terminally polyadenylated, although m contains an apparent internal polyA-like tract. In the presence of any three ribonucleoside triphosphates (0.5 mM), the fourth ribonucleoside triphosphate shows an optimal rate of incorporation into transcript at a concentration of 20 μM. However, in a 3-hour reaction, the yield of a product RNA increases with the concentration of the limiting ribonucleotide up to 0.5 mM. Gel electrophoresis of the reaction products reveals that increasing the substrate concentration accelerates the appearance of radioactivity in full-length l/sub A/ and m transcripts

  18. Towards the molecular bases of polymerase dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela Flores, J.

    1991-03-01

    One aspect of the strong relationship that is known to exist between the processes of DNA replication and transcription is manifest in the coupling of the rates of movement of the replication fork (r f ) and RNA polymerase (r t ). We address two issues concerning the largely unexplored area of polymerase dynamics: (i) The validity of an approximate kinematic formula linking r f and r t suggested by experiments in which transcription is initiated in some prokaryotes with the antibiotic streptolydigin, and (ii) What are the molecular bases of the kinematic formula? An analysis of the available data suggests possible molecular bases for polymerase dynamics. In particular, we are led to a hypothesis: In active chromatin r t may depend on the length (λ t ) of the transcript of the primary messenger RNA (pre-mRNA). This new effect is subject to experimental verification. We discuss possible experiments that may be performed in order to test this prediction. (author). Refs, 6 tabs

  19. DNA polymerase hybrids derived from the family-B enzymes of Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermococcus kodakarensis: improving performance in the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshawadfy, Ashraf M; Keith, Brian J; Ee Ooi, H'Ng; Kinsman, Thomas; Heslop, Pauline; Connolly, Bernard A

    2014-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is widely applied across the biosciences, with archaeal Family-B DNA polymerases being preferred, due to their high thermostability and fidelity. The enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu-Pol) is more frequently used than the similar protein from Thermococcus kodakarensis (Tkod-Pol), despite the latter having better PCR performance. Here the two polymerases have been comprehensively compared, confirming that Tkod-Pol: (1) extends primer-templates more rapidly; (2) has higher processivity; (3) demonstrates superior performance in normal and real time PCR. However, Tkod-Pol is less thermostable than Pfu-Pol and both enzymes have equal fidelities. To understand the favorable properties of Tkod-Pol, hybrid proteins have been prepared. Single, double and triple mutations were used to site arginines, present at the "forked-point" (the junction of the exonuclease and polymerase channels) of Tkod-Pol, at the corresponding locations in Pfu-Pol, slightly improving PCR performance. The Pfu-Pol thumb domain, responsible for double-stranded DNA binding, has been entirely replaced with that from Tkod-Pol, again giving better PCR properties. Combining the "forked-point" and thumb swap mutations resulted in a marked increase in PCR capability, maintenance of high fidelity and retention of the superior thermostability associated with Pfu-Pol. However, even the arginine/thumb swap mutant falls short of Tkod-Pol in PCR, suggesting further improvement within the Pfu-Pol framework is attainable. The significance of this work is the observation that improvements in PCR performance are easily attainable by blending elements from closely related archaeal polymerases, an approach that may, in future, be extended by using more polymerases from these organisms.

  20. DNA Polymerases Drive DNA Sequencing-by-Synthesis Technologies: Both Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yao eChen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have revolutionized modern biological and biomedical research. The engines responsible for this innovation are DNA polymerases; they catalyze the biochemical reaction for deriving template sequence information. In fact, DNA polymerase has been a cornerstone of DNA sequencing from the very beginning. E. coli DNA polymerase I proteolytic (Klenow fragment was originally utilized in Sanger's dideoxy chain terminating DNA sequencing chemistry. From these humble beginnings followed an explosion of organism-specific, genome sequence information accessible via public database. Family A/B DNA polymerases from mesophilic/thermophilic bacteria/archaea were modified and tested in today's standard capillary electrophoresis (CE and NGS sequencing platforms. These enzymes were selected for their efficient incorporation of bulky dye-terminator and reversible dye-terminator nucleotides respectively. Third generation, real-time single molecule sequencing platform requires slightly different enzyme properties. Enterobacterial phage ⱷ29 DNA polymerase copies long stretches of DNA and possesses a unique capability to efficiently incorporate terminal phosphate-labeled nucleoside polyphosphates. Furthermore, ⱷ29 enzyme has also been utilized in emerging DNA sequencing technologies including nanopore-, and protein-transistor-based sequencing. DNA polymerase is, and will continue to be, a crucial component of sequencing technologies.

  1. Conformational Selection and Induced Fit for RNA Polymerase and RNA/DNA Hybrid Backtracked Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng eChen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15 and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS P test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein.

  2. A Structural Overview of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases from the Flaviviridae Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiqin Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs from the Flaviviridae family are representatives of viral polymerases that carry out RNA synthesis through a de novo initiation mechanism. They share a ≈ 600-residue polymerase core that displays a canonical viral RdRP architecture resembling an encircled right hand with palm, fingers, and thumb domains surrounding the active site. Polymerase catalytic motifs A–E in the palm and motifs F/G in the fingers are shared by all viral RdRPs with sequence and/or structural conservations regardless of the mechanism of initiation. Different from RdRPs carrying out primer-dependent initiation, Flaviviridae and other de novo RdRPs utilize a priming element often integrated in the thumb domain to facilitate primer-independent initiation. Upon the transition to the elongation phase, this priming element needs to undergo currently unresolved conformational rearrangements to accommodate the growth of the template-product RNA duplex. In the genera of Flavivirus and Pestivirus, the polymerase module in the C-terminal part of the RdRP protein may be regulated in cis by the N-terminal region of the same polypeptide. Either being a methyltransferase in Flavivirus or a functionally unclarified module in Pestivirus, this region could play auxiliary roles for the canonical folding and/or the catalysis of the polymerase, through defined intra-molecular interactions.

  3. Global conformational dynamics of a Y-family DNA polymerase during catalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuiling Xu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Replicative DNA polymerases are stalled by damaged DNA while the newly discovered Y-family DNA polymerases are recruited to rescue these stalled replication forks, thereby enhancing cell survival. The Y-family DNA polymerases, characterized by low fidelity and processivity, are able to bypass different classes of DNA lesions. A variety of kinetic and structural studies have established a minimal reaction pathway common to all DNA polymerases, although the conformational intermediates are not well defined. Furthermore, the identification of the rate-limiting step of nucleotide incorporation catalyzed by any DNA polymerase has been a matter of long debate. By monitoring time-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET signal changes at multiple sites in each domain and DNA during catalysis, we present here a real-time picture of the global conformational transitions of a model Y-family enzyme: DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4 from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Our results provide evidence for a hypothetical DNA translocation event followed by a rapid protein conformational change prior to catalysis and a subsequent slow, post-chemistry protein conformational change. Surprisingly, the DNA translocation step was induced by the binding of a correct nucleotide. Moreover, we have determined the directions, rates, and activation energy barriers of the protein conformational transitions, which indicated that the four domains of Dpo4 moved in a synchronized manner. These results showed conclusively that a pre-chemistry conformational change associated with domain movements was too fast to be the rate-limiting step. Rather, the rearrangement of active site residues limited the rate of correct nucleotide incorporation. Collectively, the conformational dynamics of Dpo4 offer insights into how the inter-domain movements are related to enzymatic function and their concerted interactions with other proteins at the replication fork.

  4. Crowding-induced transcriptional bursts dictate polymerase and nucleosome density profiles along genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, A.A.; Depken, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    During eukaryotic transcription, RNA polymerase (RNAP) translocates along DNA molecules covered with nucleosomes and other DNA binding proteins. Though the interactions between a single nucleosome and RNAP are by now fairly well understood, this understanding has not been synthesized into a

  5. Nuclear DNA polymerase beta from Leishmania infantum. Cloning, molecular analysis and developmental regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taladriz, Soraya; Hanke, Tobias; Ramiro, María J.; García-Díaz, Miguel; Lacoba, Mario García de; Blanco, Luis; Larraga, Vicente

    2001-01-01

    We have identified a novel polymerase beta (Pol β)-like enzyme from Leishmania infantum, a parasite protozoon causing disease in humans. This protein, named Li Pol β, shows a nuclear localization that contrasts with the mitochondrial localization of Pol β from Crithidia fasciculata, a closely related parasite, the only polymerase β described so far in Trypanosomatidae. Li Pol β, that belongs to the DNA polymerase X family, displays an evolutionarily conserved Pol β-type DNA polymerase core, in which most of the key residues involved in DNA binding, nucleotide binding, dRPase and polymerization catalysis are conserved. In agreement with this, Li Pol β, overproduced in Escherichia coli, displayed intrinsic DNA polymerase activity. Cell synchronization experiments showed a correlation between both Li Pol β mRNA and protein levels along the parasite cell cycle. Analysis of these parameters at the different growth phases of the parasite, from the proliferative (non-infective) logarithmic phase to the non-dividing (highly infectious) stationary phase, showed high levels of Li Pol β at the infective phase of the parasite. The data suggest a role of Li Pol β in base excision repair in L.infantum, a parasite usually affected by oxygen stress environments into the macrophage host cells. PMID:11557814

  6. Insertion of the T3 DNA polymerase thioredoxin binding domain enhances the processivity and fidelity of Taq DNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, John F.; Fox, Richard; Harris, Dawn D.; Lyons-Abbott, Sally; Loeb, Lawrence A.

    2003-01-01

    Insertion of the T3 DNA polymerase thioredoxin binding domain (TBD) into the distantly related thermostable Taq DNA polymerase at an analogous position in the thumb domain, converts the Taq DNA polymerase from a low processive to a highly processive enzyme. Processivity is dependent on the presence of thioredoxin. The enhancement in processivity is 20–50-fold when compared with the wild-type Taq DNA polymerase or to the recombinant polymerase in the absence of thioredoxin. The recombinant Taq...

  7. RNA Polymerase II–The Transcription Machine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 3. RNA Polymerase II – The Transcription Machine - Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2006. Jiyoti Verma Aruna Naorem Anand Kumar Manimala Sen Parag Sadhale. General Article Volume 12 Issue 3 March 2007 pp 47-53 ...

  8. Determining Annealing Temperatures for Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Angela R.; Enners, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis. In this molecular biology laboratory, students learn the steps of PCR with an…

  9. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...

  10. Challenges in the local delivery of peptides and proteins for oral mucositis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, João C; Cunha, João D; Ferreira, Domingos C; Reis, Salette; Costa, Paulo J

    2018-04-24

    Oral mucositis, a common inflammatory side effect of oncological treatments, is a disorder of the oral mucosa that can cause painful ulcerations, local motor disabilities, and an increased risk of infections. Due to the discomfort it produces and the associated health risks, it can lead to cancer treatment restrains, such as the need for dose reduction, cycle delays or abandonment. Current mucositis management has low efficiency in prevention and treatment. A topical drug application for a local action can be a more effective approach than systemic routes when addressing oral cavity pathologies. Local delivery of growth factors, antibodies, and anti-inflammatory cytokines have shown promising results. However, due to the peptide and protein nature of these novel agents, and the several anatomic, physiological and environmental challenges of the oral cavity, their local action might be limited when using traditional delivering systems. This review is an awareness of the issues and strategies in the local delivery of macromolecules for the management of oral mucositis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Chris; Pajon, Anne; Griffiths, Susanne L.; Daniel, Ed; Savitsky, Marc; Lin, Bill; Diprose, Jonathan M.; Wilter da Silva, Alan; Pilicheva, Katya; Troshin, Peter; Niekerk, Johannes van; Isaacs, Neil; Naismith, James; Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard; Wilson, Keith S.; Stuart, David I.; Henrick, Kim; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is described together with a discussion of how its features make it well suited to laboratories of all sizes. The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service

  12. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Chris [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Pajon, Anne [Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Griffiths, Susanne L. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Daniel, Ed [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Savitsky, Marc [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Lin, Bill [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Diprose, Jonathan M. [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Wilter da Silva, Alan [Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Pilicheva, Katya [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Troshin, Peter [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Niekerk, Johannes van [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Isaacs, Neil [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Naismith, James [University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST, Scotland (United Kingdom); Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wilson, Keith S. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Stuart, David I. [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Henrick, Kim [Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Esnouf, Robert M., E-mail: robert@strubi.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is described together with a discussion of how its features make it well suited to laboratories of all sizes. The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service.

  13. RELATIVE DOSING OF PHOSPHATE BINDERS FOR EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF PHOSPHATE AND PROTEIN INTAKE IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Copley, J; Heise, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing haemodialysis have a maximum recommended dietary phosphate (P) intake of 1000 mg/day and a recommended protein intake of 1.2 g/kg/day. Achieving this level of protein intake is associated with the best patient outcomes. However, protein-containing foods also contain P, and elevated serum P is associated with increased all-cause mortality. It is therefore important to manage the levels of serum P while maintaining adequate levels of nutrition. ...

  14. An all-atom, active site exploration of antiviral drugs that target Flaviviridae polymerases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valdés, James J.; Gil, V.A.; Butterill, Philip T.; Růžek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 97, OCT (2016), s. 2552-2565 ISSN 0022-1317 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA ČR GB14-36098G; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-34238A EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 - MODBIOLIN Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : dependent RNA-polymerase * c virus polymerase * de-novo initiation * hepatitis C * allosteric inhibitors * nucleoside inhibitors * molecular dynamics * encephalitis virus * protein-structure * cluster-analysis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.838, year: 2016

  15. A deep phylogeny of viral and cellular right-hand polymerases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Jiří; Černá Bolfíková, B.; Zanotto, P. M. de A.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 36, 2015-Dec (2015), s. 275-286 ISSN 1567-1348 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/11/2116; GA ČR GA15-03044S; GA ČR GAP302/12/2490; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278976 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Right-hand polymerase * Polymerase evolution * Virus evolution * Structural evolution * Protein tertiary structure Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.591, year: 2015

  16. Inhibition of herpesvirus and influenza virus replication by blocking polymerase subunit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palù, Giorgio; Loregian, Arianna

    2013-09-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a key role in many biological processes, including virus replication in the host cell. Since most of the PPIs are functionally essential, a possible strategy to inhibit virus replication is based on the disruption of viral protein complexes by peptides or small molecules that interfere with subunit interactions. In particular, an attractive target for antiviral drugs is the binding between the subunits of essential viral enzymes. This review describes the development of new antiviral compounds that inhibit herpesvirus and influenza virus replication by blocking interactions between subunit proteins of their polymerase complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. PCR fidelity of pfu DNA polymerase and other thermostable DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, J; Braman, J C; Hogrefe, H H

    1996-09-15

    The replication fidelities of Pfu, Taq, Vent, Deep Vent and UlTma DNA polymerases were compared using a PCR-based forward mutation assay. Average error rates (mutation frequency/bp/duplication) increased as follows: Pfu (1.3 x 10(-6)) Pfu and UlTma (approximately 5 x 10(-5)). Buffer optimization experiments indicated that Pfu fidelity was highest in the presence of 2-3 mM MgSO4 and 100-300 microM each dNTP and at pH 8.5-9.1. Under these conditions, the error rate of exo- Pfu was approximately 40-fold higher (5 x 10(-5)) than the error rate of Pfu. As the reaction pH was raised from pH 8 to 9, the error rate of Pfu decreased approximately 2-fold, while the error rate of exo- Pfu increased approximately 9-fold. An increase in error rate with pH has also been noted for the exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerases Taq and exo- Klenow, suggesting that the parameters which influence replication error rates may be similar in pol l- and alpha-like polymerases. Finally, the fidelity of 'long PCR' DNA polymerase mixtures was examined. The error rates of a Taq/Pfu DNA polymerase mixture and a Klentaq/Pfu DNA polymerase mixture were found to be less than the error rate of Taq DNA polymerase, but approximately 3-4-fold higher than the error rate of Pfu DNA polymerase.

  18. A polymerase chain reaction strategy for the diagnosis of camelpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, Vinayagamurthy; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Hosamani, Madhusudhan; Jayappa, Kallesh Danappa; Venkatesan, Gnanavel; Chauhan, Bina; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2009-03-01

    Camelpox is a contagious viral skin disease that is mostly seen in young camels. The disease is caused by the Camelpox virus (CMLV). In the present study, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on the C18L gene (encoding ankyrin repeat protein) and a duplex PCR based on the C18L and DNA polymerase (DNA pol) genes were developed. The former assay yields a specific amplicon of 243 bp of the C18L gene, whereas the duplex PCR yields 243- and 96-bp products of the C18L and DNA pol genes, respectively, in CMLV, and only a 96-bp product of the DNA pol gene in other orthopoxviruses. The limit of detection was as low as 0.4 ng of viral DNA. Both PCR assays were employed successfully for the direct detection and differentiation of CMLV from other orthopoxviruses, capripoxviruses, and parapoxviruses in both cell culture samples and clinical material. Furthermore, a highly sensitive SYBR Green dye-based, real-time PCR was optimized for quantitation of CMLV DNA. In the standard curve of the quantitative assay, the melting temperature of the specific amplicon at 77.6 degrees C with peak measured fluorescence in dissociation plot was observed with an efficiency of 102%. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report to describe a C18L gene-based PCR for specific diagnosis of camelpox infection.

  19. Architecture of the RNA polymerase II-TFIIF complex revealed by cross-linking and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhuo Angel; Jawhari, Anass; Fischer, Lutz

    2010-01-01

    Higher-order multi-protein complexes such as RNA polymerase II (Pol II) complexes with transcription initiation factors are often not amenable to X-ray structure determination. Here, we show that protein cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) has now sufficiently advanced as a tool to ex...

  20. Functional roles of DNA polymerases β and γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebscher, U.; Kuenzle, C.C.; Spadari, S.

    1979-01-01

    The physiological functions of DNA polymerases (deoxynucleosidetriphosphate:DNA deoxynucleotidyltransferase, EC2.7.7.7)β and γ were investigated by using neuronal nuclei and synaptosomes isolated from rat brain. uv irradiation of neuronal nuclei from 60-day-old rats resulted in a 7- to 10-fold stimulation of DNA repair synthesis attributable to DNA polymerase β which, at this developmental stage, is virtually the only DNA polymerase present in the nuclei. No repair synthesis could be elicited by treating the nuclei with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, but this was probably due to the inability of brain tissue to excise alkylated bases from DNA. The role of DNA polymerase γ was studied in synaptosomes by using a system mimicking in vivo mitochondrial DNA synthesis. By showing that under these conditions, DNA replication occurs in miatochondria, and exploiting the fact that DNA polymerase γ is the only DNA polymerase present in mitochondria, evidence was obtained for a role of DNA polymerase γ in mitochondrial DNA replication. Based on these results and on the wealth of literature on DNA polymerase α, we conclude that DNA polymerase α is mainly responsible for DNA replication in nuclei, DNA polymerase β is involved in nuclear DNA repair, and DNA polymerase γ is the mitochondrial replicating enzyme. However, minor roles for DNA polymerase α in DNA repair or for DNA polymerase β in DNA replication cannot be excluded

  1. The Role of Dietary Protein and Fat in Glycaemic Control in Type 1 Diabetes: Implications for Intensive Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Megan; Bell, Kirstine J; O'Connell, Susan M; Smart, Carmel E; Shafat, Amir; King, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    A primary focus of the management of type 1 diabetes has been on matching prandial insulin therapy with carbohydrate amount consumed. However, even with the introduction of more flexible intensive insulin regimes, people with type 1 diabetes still struggle to achieve optimal glycaemic control. More recently, dietary fat and protein have been recognised as having a significant impact on postprandial blood glucose levels. Fat and protein independently increase the postprandial glucose excursions and together their effect is additive. This article reviews how the fat and protein in a meal impact the postprandial glycaemic response and discusses practical approaches to managing this in clinical practice. These insights have significant implications for patient education, mealtime insulin dose calculations and dosing strategies.

  2. Single molecule imaging of RNA polymerase II using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodin, Thor; Fu Jianhua; Umemura, Kazuo; Gad, Mohammed; Jarvis, Suzi; Ishikawa, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of the shape, orientation and surface topology of RNA polymerase II supported on silanized freshly cleaved mica was made. The overall aim is to define the molecular topology of RNA polymerase II in appropriate fluids to help clarify the relationship of conformational features to biofunctionality. A Nanoscope III atomic force microscope was used in the tapping mode with oxide-sharpened (8-10 nm) Si 3 N 4 probes in aqueous zinc chloride buffer. The main structural features observed by AFM were compared to those derived from electron-density plots based on X-ray crystallographic studies. The conformational features included a bilobal silhouette with an inverted umbrella-shaped crater connected to a reaction site. These studies provide a starting point for constructing a 3D-AFM profiling analysis of proteins such as RNA polymerase complexes

  3. A structural role for the PHP domain in E. coli DNA polymerase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Tiago; Guenther, Joel; Kelch, Brian; Anaya, Jordan; Prabhakar, Arjun; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John; Lamers, Meindert H

    2013-05-14

    In addition to the core catalytic machinery, bacterial replicative DNA polymerases contain a Polymerase and Histidinol Phosphatase (PHP) domain whose function is not entirely understood. The PHP domains of some bacterial replicases are active metal-dependent nucleases that may play a role in proofreading. In E. coli DNA polymerase III, however, the PHP domain has lost several metal-coordinating residues and is likely to be catalytically inactive. Genomic searches show that the loss of metal-coordinating residues in polymerase PHP domains is likely to have coevolved with the presence of a separate proofreading exonuclease that works with the polymerase. Although the E. coli Pol III PHP domain has lost metal-coordinating residues, the structure of the domain has been conserved to a remarkable degree when compared to that of metal-binding PHP domains. This is demonstrated by our ability to restore metal binding with only three point mutations, as confirmed by the metal-bound crystal structure of this mutant determined at 2.9 Å resolution. We also show that Pol III, a large multi-domain protein, unfolds cooperatively and that mutations in the degenerate metal-binding site of the PHP domain decrease the overall stability of Pol III and reduce its activity. While the presence of a PHP domain in replicative bacterial polymerases is strictly conserved, its ability to coordinate metals and to perform proofreading exonuclease activity is not, suggesting additional non-enzymatic roles for the domain. Our results show that the PHP domain is a major structural element in Pol III and its integrity modulates both the stability and activity of the polymerase.

  4. DNA structure in human RNA polymerase II promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Chauvin, Yves

    1998-01-01

    with a very low level of sequence similarity. The sequences, which include both TATA-containing and TATA-less promoters, are aligned by hidden Markov models. Using three different models of sequence-derived DNA bendability, the aligned promoters display a common structural profile with bendability being low...... protein in a manner reminiscent of DNA in a nucleosome. This notion is further supported by the finding that the periodic bendability is caused mainly by the complementary triplet pairs CAG/CTG and GGC/GCC, which previously have been found to correlate with nucleosome positioning. We present models where......The fact that DNA three-dimensional structure is important for transcriptional regulation begs the question of whether eukaryotic promoters contain general structural features independently of what genes they control. We present an analysis of a large set of human RNA polymerase II promoters...

  5. Biochemical and genetic analysis of the role of the viral polymerase in enterovirus recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Andrew; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Evans, David J

    2016-08-19

    Genetic recombination in single-strand, positive-sense RNA viruses is a poorly understand mechanism responsible for generating extensive genetic change and novel phenotypes. By moving a critical cis-acting replication element (CRE) from the polyprotein coding region to the 3' non-coding region we have further developed a cell-based assay (the 3'CRE-REP assay) to yield recombinants throughout the non-structural coding region of poliovirus from dually transfected cells. We have additionally developed a defined biochemical assay in which the only protein present is the poliovirus RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which recapitulates the strand transfer events of the recombination process. We have used both assays to investigate the role of the polymerase fidelity and nucleotide turnover rates in recombination. Our results, of both poliovirus intertypic and intratypic recombination in the CRE-REP assay and using a range of polymerase variants in the biochemical assay, demonstrate that RdRp fidelity is a fundamental determinant of recombination frequency. High fidelity polymerases exhibit reduced recombination and low fidelity polymerases exhibit increased recombination in both assays. These studies provide the basis for the analysis of poliovirus recombination throughout the non-structural region of the virus genome and provide a defined biochemical assay to further dissect this important evolutionary process. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Recognition and management of common, rare, and novel serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation interferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCudden, Christopher R; Jacobs, Joannes F M; Keren, David

    2018-01-01

    Protein electrophoresis and immunofixation are subject to a variety of analytical interferences that may affect monoclonal protein diagnostics performed in the context of monoclonal gammopathies. Interferences include endogenous substances, such as hemoglobin and fibrinogen, and exogenous compounds...

  7. Prediction of Active Site and Distal Residues in E. coli DNA Polymerase III alpha Polymerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasuram, Ramya; Coulther, Timothy A; Hollander, Judith M; Keston-Smith, Elise; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Beuning, Penny J

    2018-02-20

    The process of DNA replication is carried out with high efficiency and accuracy by DNA polymerases. The replicative polymerase in E. coli is DNA Pol III, which is a complex of 10 different subunits that coordinates simultaneous replication on the leading and lagging strands. The 1160-residue Pol III alpha subunit is responsible for the polymerase activity and copies DNA accurately, making one error per 10 5 nucleotide incorporations. The goal of this research is to determine the residues that contribute to the activity of the polymerase subunit. Homology modeling and the computational methods of THEMATICS and POOL were used to predict functionally important amino acid residues through their computed chemical properties. Site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical assays were used to validate these predictions. Primer extension, steady-state single-nucleotide incorporation kinetics, and thermal denaturation assays were performed to understand the contribution of these residues to the function of the polymerase. This work shows that the top 15 residues predicted by POOL, a set that includes the three previously known catalytic aspartate residues, seven remote residues, plus five previously unexplored first-layer residues, are important for function. Six previously unidentified residues, R362, D405, K553, Y686, E688, and H760, are each essential to Pol III activity; three additional residues, Y340, R390, and K758, play important roles in activity.

  8. Role of low protein diet in management of different stages of chronic kidney disease - practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bharat V; Patel, Zamurrud M

    2016-10-21

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem and more so in India. With limited availability and high cost of therapy, barely 10 % of patients with incident end stage renal disease (ESRD) cases get treatment in India. Therefore, all possible efforts should be made to retard progression of CKD. This article reviews the role of low protein diet (LPD) in management of CKD subjects and suggests how to apply it in clinical practice. The role of LPD in retarding progression of CKD is well established in animal experimental studies. However, its role in human subjects with CKD is perceived to be controversial based on the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) study. We believe that beneficial effect of LPD could not be appreciated due to shorter duration of follow-up in the MDRD study. Had the study been continued longer, it may have been possible to appreciate beneficial effect of LPD. It is our contention that in all cases of CKD that are slowly progressive, LPD can significantly retard progression of CKD and delay the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). To be able to apply LPD for a long period, it is important to prescribe LPD at earlier stages (1,2,3) of CKD and not at late stage as recommended by KDIGO guidelines. Many clinicians are concerned about worsening nutritional status and hence reluctant to prescribe LPD. This actually is true for patients with advanced CKD in whom there is spontaneous decrease in calorie and protein intake. In our experience, nutritional status of patients in early stages (1,2,3) of CKD is as good as that of healthy subjects. Prescribing LPD at an early stage is unlikely to worsen status. The role of LPD in retarding progression of CKD is well established in animal experimental studies. Even in human subjects, there is enough evidence to suggest that LPD retards progression of CKD in carefully selected subjects. It should be prescribed to those with good appetite, good nutritional status and a slowly

  9. DNA polymerase ι: The long and the short of it!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Ekaterina G; McLenigan, Mary P; McDonald, John P; Huston, Donald; Mead, Samantha; Woodgate, Roger

    2017-10-01

    The cDNA encoding human DNA polymerase ι (POLI) was cloned in 1999. At that time, it was believed that the POLI gene encoded a protein of 715 amino acids. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies led to the realization that there is an upstream, in-frame initiation codon that would encode a DNA polymerase ι (polι) protein of 740 amino acids. The extra 25 amino acid region is rich in acidic residues (11/25) and is reasonably conserved in eukaryotes ranging from fish to humans. As a consequence, the curated Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database identified polι as a 740 amino acid protein. However, the existence of the 740 amino acid polι has never been shown experimentally. Using highly specific antibodies to the 25 N-terminal amino acids of polι, we were unable to detect the longer 740 amino acid (ι-long) isoform in western blots. However, trace amounts of the ι-long isoform were detected after enrichment by immunoprecipitation. One might argue that the longer isoform may have a distinct biological function, if it exhibits significant differences in its enzymatic properties from the shorter, well-characterized 715 amino acid polι. We therefore purified and characterized recombinant full-length (740 amino acid) polι-long and compared it to full-length (715 amino acid) polι-short in vitro. The metal ion requirements for optimal catalytic activity differ slightly between ι-long and ι-short, but under optimal conditions, both isoforms exhibit indistinguishable enzymatic properties in vitro. We also report that like ι-short, the ι-long isoform can be monoubiquitinated and polyubiuquitinated in vivo, as well as form damage induced foci in vivo. We conclude that the predominant isoform of DNA polι in human cells is the shorter 715 amino acid protein and that if, or when, expressed, the longer 740 amino acid isoform has identical properties to the considerably more abundant shorter isoform. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Chemical fidelity of an RNA polymerase ribozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwater, J.; Tagami, S.; Kimoto, M.

    2013-01-01

    for function. Here we have explored the chemical fidelity, i.e. substrate selectivity and specificity for both single and multiple catalytic steps of the Z RNA polymerase ribozyme-a modern day analogue of the primordial RNA replicase. Using a wide range of nucleotide analogues and ionic conditions, we observe......The emergence of catalytically active RNA enzymes (ribozymes) is widely believed to have been an important transition in the origin of life. In the context of a likely heterogeneous chemical environment, substrate specificity and selectivity of these primordial enzymes would have been critical...

  11. Bordetella pertussis diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Heron, I; Skjødt, K

    1994-01-01

    The object of this work was to test the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for demonstration of Bordetella pertussis (BP) in nasopharyngeal secretions. The method was applied to patients with recently diagnosed pertussis, as verified by BP culture. In order to test the sensitivity and specificity...... in 25 patients in whose nasopharyngeal secretions BP had been demonstrated after 4-7 days of culture. The detection limit of PCR in aqueous solution was 1-2 BP bacteria per reaction tube. PCR was 100% specific for BP, showing no response with other Bordetella species or other bacteria known to colonize...

  12. RPPAML/RIMS: A metadata format and an information management system for reverse phase protein arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Stanislaus, Romesh; Carey, Mark; Deus, Helena F; Coombes, Kevin; Hennessy, Bryan T; Mills, Gordon B; Almeida, Jonas S

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA) are convenient assay platforms to investigate the presence of biomarkers in tissue lysates. As with other high-throughput technologies, substantial amounts of analytical data are generated. Over 1000 samples may be printed on a single nitrocellulose slide. Up to 100 different proteins may be assessed using immunoperoxidase or immunoflorescence techniques in order to determine relative amounts of protein expression in the samples of inter...

  13. RNA polymerase activity of Ustilago maydis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yie, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ustilago maydis virus has an RNA polymerase enzyme which is associated with virion capsids. In the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ ion and ribonucleotide triphosphate, the enzyme catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of mRNA by using dsRNA as a template. The products of the UmV RNA polymerase were both ssRNA and dsRNA. The dsRNA was determined by characteristic mobilities in gel electrophoresis, lack of sensitivity to RNase, and specific hybridization tests. The ssRNAs were identified by elution from a CF-11 column and by their RNase sensitivity. On the basis of the size of ssRNAs, it was concluded that partial transcripts were produced from H dsRNA segments, and full length transcripts were produced from M and L dsRNA segments. The following observations indicates that transcription occurs by strand displacement; (1) Only the positive strand of M2 dsRNA was labeled by the in vitro reaction. (2) The M2 dsRNA which had been labeled with /sup 32/''P-UTP in vitro could be chased from dsRNA with unlabeled UTP. The transcription products of three UmV strains were compared, and the overall pattern of transcription was very similar among them.

  14. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases — Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ — are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson–Crick base pairing and 3′exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to ‘polymerase proofreading associated polyposis’ (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an ‘ultramutator’ phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. PMID:24583393

  15. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Solving the RNA polymerase I structural puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Morcillo, María [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Taylor, Nicholas M. I. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gruene, Tim [Georg-August-University, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Legrand, Pierre [SOLEIL Synchrotron, L’Orme de Merisiers, Saint Aubin, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rashid, Umar J. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruiz, Federico M. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Steuerwald, Ulrich; Müller, Christoph W. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fernández-Tornero, Carlos, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    Details of the RNA polymerase I crystal structure determination provide a framework for solution of the structures of other multi-subunit complexes. Simple crystallographic experiments are described to extract relevant biological information such as the location of the enzyme active site. Knowing the structure of multi-subunit complexes is critical to understand basic cellular functions. However, when crystals of these complexes can be obtained they rarely diffract beyond 3 Å resolution, which complicates X-ray structure determination and refinement. The crystal structure of RNA polymerase I, an essential cellular machine that synthesizes the precursor of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus of eukaryotic cells, has recently been solved. Here, the crucial steps that were undertaken to build the atomic model of this multi-subunit enzyme are reported, emphasizing how simple crystallographic experiments can be used to extract relevant biological information. In particular, this report discusses the combination of poor molecular replacement and experimental phases, the application of multi-crystal averaging and the use of anomalous scatterers as sequence markers to guide tracing and to locate the active site. The methods outlined here will likely serve as a reference for future structural determination of large complexes at low resolution.

  17. Affinity isolation and I-DIRT mass spectrometric analysis of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai RNA polymerase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David J; Busby, Stephen J W; Westblade, Lars F; Chait, Brian T

    2008-02-01

    Bacteria contain a single multisubunit RNA polymerase that is responsible for the synthesis of all RNA. Previous studies of the Escherichia coli K-12 laboratory strain identified a group of effector proteins that interact directly with RNA polymerase to modulate the efficiency of transcription initiation, elongation, or termination. Here we used a rapid affinity isolation technique to isolate RNA polymerase from the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7 Sakai. We analyzed the RNA polymerase enzyme complex using mass spectrometry and identified associated proteins. Although E. coli O157:H7 Sakai contains more than 1,600 genes not present in the K-12 strain, many of which are predicted to be involved in transcription regulation, all of the identified proteins in this study were encoded on the "core" E. coli genome.

  18. Affinity Isolation and I-DIRT Mass Spectrometric Analysis of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai RNA Polymerase Complex▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David J.; Busby, Stephen J. W.; Westblade, Lars F.; Chait, Brian T.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria contain a single multisubunit RNA polymerase that is responsible for the synthesis of all RNA. Previous studies of the Escherichia coli K-12 laboratory strain identified a group of effector proteins that interact directly with RNA polymerase to modulate the efficiency of transcription initiation, elongation, or termination. Here we used a rapid affinity isolation technique to isolate RNA polymerase from the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7 Sakai. We analyzed the RNA polymerase enzyme complex using mass spectrometry and identified associated proteins. Although E. coli O157:H7 Sakai contains more than 1,600 genes not present in the K-12 strain, many of which are predicted to be involved in transcription regulation, all of the identified proteins in this study were encoded on the “core” E. coli genome. PMID:18083804

  19. DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts requires DNA polymerase delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, C.; Reinhard, P.; Linn, S.

    1988-01-01

    When UV-irradiated cultured diploid human fibroblasts were permeabilized with Brij-58 then separated from soluble material by centrifugation, conservative DNA repair synthesis could be restored by a soluble factor obtained from the supernatant of similarly treated HeLa cells. Extensive purification of this factor yielded a 10.2 S, 220,000-dalton polypeptide with the DNA polymerase and 3'- to 5'-exonuclease activities reported for DNA polymerase delta II. Monoclonal antibody to KB cell DNA polymerase alpha, while binding to HeLa DNA polymerase alpha, did not bind to the HeLa DNA polymerase delta. Moreover, at micromolar concentrations N2-(p-n-butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (BuPdGTP) and 2-(p-n-butylanilino)-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate (BuAdATP) were potent inhibitors of DNA polymerase alpha, but did not inhibit the DNA polymerase delta. Neither purified DNA polymerase alpha nor beta could promote repair DNA synthesis in the permeabilized cells. Furthermore, under conditions which inhibited purified DNA polymerase alpha by greater than 90%, neither monoclonal antibodies to DNA polymerase alpha, BuPdGTP, nor BuAdATP was able to inhibit significantly the DNA repair synthesis mediated by the DNA polymerase delta. Thus, it appears that a major portion of DNA repair synthesis induced by UV irradiation might be catalyzed by DNA polymerase delta. When xeroderma pigmentosum human diploid fibroblasts were utilized, DNA repair synthesis dependent upon ultraviolet light could be restored by addition of both T4 endonuclease V and DNA polymerase delta, but not by addition of either one alone

  20. Identifying of meat species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foong, Chow Ming; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Meat has been widely consumed as an important protein source in daily life of human. Furthermore, with busy and intense urban lifestyle, processed food is now one of the main protein sources of one’s diet. Consumers rely on the food labeling to decide if the meat product purchased is safe and reliable. Therefore, it is important to ensure the food labeling is done in a correct manner to avoid consumer fraud. More consumers are now concern about the food quality and safety as compared to before. This study described the meat species identification and detection method using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 8 types of meats (cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, chicken, duck, pork and horse). The objective of this study is to decide on the specificity of oligonucleotide sequences obtained from previous study. There were 5 proposed oligonucleotide primer in this study. The main important finding in this work is the specificity of oligonucleotide primers to raw meats. It if found that the oligonucleotide primers proposed were not specific to the local raw meat species. Therefore, further study is needed to obtain a species-specific oligonucletide primers for PCR, in order to be applied in food product testing

  1. Identifying of meat species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foong, Chow Ming; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Meat has been widely consumed as an important protein source in daily life of human. Furthermore, with busy and intense urban lifestyle, processed food is now one of the main protein sources of one’s diet. Consumers rely on the food labeling to decide if the meat product purchased is safe and reliable. Therefore, it is important to ensure the food labeling is done in a correct manner to avoid consumer fraud. More consumers are now concern about the food quality and safety as compared to before. This study described the meat species identification and detection method using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 8 types of meats (cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, chicken, duck, pork and horse). The objective of this study is to decide on the specificity of oligonucleotide sequences obtained from previous study. There were 5 proposed oligonucleotide primer in this study. The main important finding in this work is the specificity of oligonucleotide primers to raw meats. It if found that the oligonucleotide primers proposed were not specific to the local raw meat species. Therefore, further study is needed to obtain a species-specific oligonucletide primers for PCR, in order to be applied in food product testing.

  2. The evolution of the protein synthesis system. I - A model of a primitive protein synthesis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, H.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1977-01-01

    A model is developed to describe the evolution of the protein synthesis system. The model is comprised of two independent autocatalytic systems, one including one gene (A-gene) and two activated amino acid polymerases (O and A-polymerases), and the other including the addition of another gene (N-gene) and a nucleotide polymerase. Simulation results have suggested that even a small enzymic activity and polymerase specificity could lead the system to the most accurate protein synthesis, as far as permitted by transitions to systems with higher accuracy.

  3. RNA polymerase II interacts with the promoter region of the noninduced hsp70 gene in Drosophila melanogaster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, D.S.; Lis, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    By using a protein-DNA cross-linking method, we examined the in vivo distribution of RNA polymerase II on the hsp70 heat shock gene in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider line 2 cells. In heat shock-induced cells, a high level of RNA polymerase II was detected on the entire gene, while in noninduced cells, the RNA polymerase II was confined to the 5' end of the hsp70 gene, predominantly between nucleotides -12 and +65 relative to the start of transcription. This association of RNA polymerase II was apparent whether the cross-linking was performed by a 10-min UV irradiation of chilled cells with mercury vapor lamps or by a 40-microsecond irradiation of cells with a high-energy xenon flash lamp. We hypothesize that RNA polymerase II has access to, and a high affinity for, the promoter region of this gene before induction, and this poised RNA polymerase II may be critical in the mechanism of transcription activation

  4. Novel Polymerase Gene Mutations for Human Adaptation in Clinical Isolates of Avian H5N1 Influenza Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuha Arai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A major determinant in the change of the avian influenza virus host range to humans is the E627K substitution in the PB2 polymerase protein. However, the polymerase activity of avian influenza viruses with a single PB2-E627K mutation is still lower than that of seasonal human influenza viruses, implying that avian viruses require polymerase mutations in addition to PB2-627K for human adaptation. Here, we used a database search of H5N1 clade 2.2.1 virus sequences with the PB2-627K mutation to identify other polymerase adaptation mutations that have been selected in infected patients. Several of the mutations identified acted cooperatively with PB2-627K to increase viral growth in human airway epithelial cells and mouse lungs. These mutations were in multiple domains of the polymerase complex other than the PB2-627 domain, highlighting a complicated avian-to-human adaptation pathway of avian influenza viruses. Thus, H5N1 viruses could rapidly acquire multiple polymerase mutations that function cooperatively with PB2-627K in infected patients for optimal human adaptation.

  5. Pathogen detection by the polymerase chain reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitpatima, S T; Settachan, D; Pornsilpatip, J; Visawapoka, U [Pramongkutklao College of Medicine, Bangkok (Thailand). Molecular Biology Lab.; Dvorak, D R [Amersham International Ltd., Singapore (Singapore)

    1994-05-01

    In recent years, significant advances in the knowledge of DNA and its make up have led to the development of a powerful technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Since the advent of PCR, laboratories around the globe have been exploiting this technology to bridge limitations or to overcome common problems encountered in molecular biology techniques. In addition, this technology has been employed successfully in diagnostic and basic scientific research and development. The true potentials of this technology is realized in early detection of pathogens and genetic abnormalities. In this paper two PCR protocols are described. The first is for detection of HIV-1 DNA in blood, the other for detection of rabies virus RNA in brain cells. 6 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab.

  6. Polymerase chain reaction methods (PCR in agrobiotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taški-Ajduković Ksenija

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural biotechnology applies polymerase chain reaction (PCR technology at numerous steps throughout product development. The major uses of PCR technology during product development include gene discovery and cloning, vector construction, transformant identification, screening and characterization as well as seed quality control. Commodity and food companies as well as testing laboratories rely on PCR technology to verify the presence or absence of genetically modification (GM in a product or to quantify the amount of GM material present in the product. This article describes the fundamental elements of PCR analysis and its application to the testing of grains and highlights some of areas to which attention must be paid in order to produce reliable test results. The article also discuses issues related to the analysis of different matrixes and the effect they may have on the accuracy of the PCR analytical results.

  7. Conformational Dynamics of Thermus aquaticus DNA Polymerase I during Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Cuiling; Maxwell, Brian A.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that DNA polymerases have been investigated for many years and are commonly used as tools in a number of molecular biology assays, many details of the kinetic mechanism they use to catalyze DNA synthesis remain unclear. Structural and kinetic studies have characterized a rapid, pre-catalytic open-to-close conformational change of the Finger domain during nucleotide binding for many DNA polymerases including Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I (Taq Pol), a thermostable enzyme c...

  8. DNA Polymerases λ and β: The Double-Edged Swords of DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Mentegari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA is constantly exposed to both endogenous and exogenous damages. More than 10,000 DNA modifications are induced every day in each cell’s genome. Maintenance of the integrity of the genome is accomplished by several DNA repair systems. The core enzymes for these pathways are the DNA polymerases. Out of 17 DNA polymerases present in a mammalian cell, at least 13 are specifically devoted to DNA repair and are often acting in different pathways. DNA polymerases β and λ are involved in base excision repair of modified DNA bases and translesion synthesis past DNA lesions. Polymerase λ also participates in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, recent data have revealed that, depending on their relative levels, the cell cycle phase, the ratio between deoxy- and ribo-nucleotide pools and the interaction with particular auxiliary proteins, the repair reactions carried out by these enzymes can be an important source of genetic instability, owing to repair mistakes. This review summarizes the most recent results on the ambivalent properties of these enzymes in limiting or promoting genetic instability in mammalian cells, as well as their potential use as targets for anticancer chemotherapy.

  9. DNA Polymerases λ and β: The Double-Edged Swords of DNA Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentegari, Elisa; Kissova, Miroslava; Bavagnoli, Laura; Maga, Giovanni; Crespan, Emmanuele

    2016-08-31

    DNA is constantly exposed to both endogenous and exogenous damages. More than 10,000 DNA modifications are induced every day in each cell's genome. Maintenance of the integrity of the genome is accomplished by several DNA repair systems. The core enzymes for these pathways are the DNA polymerases. Out of 17 DNA polymerases present in a mammalian cell, at least 13 are specifically devoted to DNA repair and are often acting in different pathways. DNA polymerases β and λ are involved in base excision repair of modified DNA bases and translesion synthesis past DNA lesions. Polymerase λ also participates in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, recent data have revealed that, depending on their relative levels, the cell cycle phase, the ratio between deoxy- and ribo-nucleotide pools and the interaction with particular auxiliary proteins, the repair reactions carried out by these enzymes can be an important source of genetic instability, owing to repair mistakes. This review summarizes the most recent results on the ambivalent properties of these enzymes in limiting or promoting genetic instability in mammalian cells, as well as their potential use as targets for anticancer chemotherapy.

  10. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the full-length 40 kDa S. acidocaldarius Y-family DNA polymerase, dinB homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Sean L; Cocco, Melanie J

    2015-10-01

    The dinB homolog (Dbh) is a member of the Y-family of translesion DNA polymerases, which are specialized to accurately replicate DNA across from a wide variety of lesions in living cells. Lesioned bases block the progression of high-fidelity polymerases and cause detrimental replication fork stalling; Y-family polymerases can bypass these lesions. The active site of the translesion synthesis polymerase is more open than that of a replicative polymerase; consequently Dbh polymerizes with low fidelity. Bypass polymerases also have low processivity. Short extension past the lesion allows the high-fidelity polymerase to switch back onto the site of replication. Dbh and the other Y-family polymerases have been used as structural models to investigate the mechanisms of DNA polymerization and lesion bypass. Many high-resolution crystal structures of Y-family polymerases have been reported. NMR dynamics studies can complement these structures by providing a measure of protein motions. Here we report the (15)N, (1)H, and (13)C backbone resonance assignments at two temperatures (35 and 50 °C) for Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Dbh polymerase. Backbone resonance assignments have been obtained for 86 % of the residues. The polymerase active site is assigned as well as the majority of residues in each of the four domains.

  11. In vitro gap-directed translesion DNA synthesis of an abasic site involving human DNA polymerases epsilon, lambda, and beta

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Villani, G.; Hübscher, U.; Gironis, N.; Parkkinen, S.; Pospiech, H.; Shevelev, Igor; di Cicco, G.; Markennen, E.; Syvaaja, J.E.; Le Gac, N.T.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 37 (2011), s. 32094-32104 ISSN 0021-9258 Grant - others:Academy of Finland(FI) 106986; Academy of Finland(FI) 123082 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : DNA damage * DNA polymerase * DNA repair * DNA replication * DNA -protein interaction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.773, year: 2011

  12. Analysis of UV-induced mutation spectra in Escherichia coli by DNA polymerase {eta} from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, Maria Jesus [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain); Alejandre-Duran, Encarna [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain); Ruiz-Rubio, Manuel [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain)]. E-mail: ge1rurum@uco.es

    2006-10-10

    DNA polymerase {eta} belongs to the Y-family of DNA polymerases, enzymes that are able to synthesize past template lesions that block replication fork progression. This polymerase accurately bypasses UV-associated cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers in vitro and therefore may contributes to resistance against sunlight in vivo, both ameliorating survival and decreasing the level of mutagenesis. We cloned and sequenced a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana which encodes a protein containing several sequence motifs characteristics of Pol{eta} homologues, including a highly conserved sequence reported to be present in the active site of the Y-family DNA polymerases. The gene, named AtPOLH, contains 14 exons and 13 introns and is expressed in different plant tissues. A strain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deficient in Pol{eta} activity, was transformed with a yeast expression plasmid containing the AtPOLH cDNA. The rate of survival to UV irradiation in the transformed mutant increased to similar values of the wild type yeast strain, showing that AtPOLH encodes a functional protein. In addition, when AtPOLH is expressed in Escherichia coli, a change in the mutational spectra is detected when bacteria are irradiated with UV light. This observation might indicate that AtPOLH could compete with DNA polymerase V and then bypass cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers incorporating two adenylates.

  13. Interaction of amatoxins with plant cells and RNA polymerases II: selection of amanitin-resistant cell lines and synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments directed toward deriving basic information regarding plant RNA polymerase II is presented. The experiments described relate to the potential of isolating RNA polymerase II mutants in plants, using carrot cell cultures as models. Additionally, the synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands to immobilize isolated plant RNA polymerase II and associated transcriptional complexes is described. RNA polymerase II activities have been isolated from suspension cultures of carrot and compared to other plant RNA polymerases II with respect to subunit analysis and inhibition with α-amanitin. RNA polymerase II purified by polymin P absorption, DE52, phosphocellulose, and RNA-agarose chromatography is shown to copurify with proteins of 175 (and 200), 135, 70, 43, 28, 22, and 17 kdaltons apparent molecular weights. Conditions for accurate determination of amanitin inhibition of the enzyme are established using 3 H-amanitin and are presented for the first time for plant RNA polymerase II; RNA polymerase II from these cultures is shown to be inhibited by 50% at 3-5 nM by α-amanitin, a value 10-50 times lower than previously reported

  14. Are oral protein supplements helpful in the management of malnutrition in dialysis patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T K Jeloka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A randomized study was planned to compare the effects of whey and egg albumin protein supplements in dialysis patients. Fifty adult patients were randomized to receive either whey protein or egg albumin as per their deficit calculated from K/DOQI recommendations. Actual intake was calculated from three-day dietary diary. Assessment of nutritional status was done by serum albumin and bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA. Repeat evaluation was done after 6 months. The mean initial intake of protein in whey and egg albumin group was 0.74 ± 0.3 vs. 0.69 ± 0.2 g/kg/day, ( P = 0.5 and calorie intake was 20 ± 5.6 vs. 20.5 ± 5.1 kcal/kg/day, ( P = 0.8, respectively. Out of 50 patients, two died within 2 months and were excluded from the study and 14 (28% dropped out within one month because of side effects. The most common side effect in drop-outs was nausea and vomiting (43%. Out of remaining 34 patients who completed the study, 80% could not consume >50% of the recommended supplement because of side effects. The protein and calorie intake remained similar at baseline and 6 months in both the groups. The main side effects in whey group were bloating and nausea with vomiting, and in egg protein group were nausea with vomiting, bloating and anorexia. Oral protein supplements were not tolerated in dialysis patients and side effects resulted in high degree of non-compliance.

  15. Accurate Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction Quantification of Challenging Samples Applying Inhibitor-Tolerant DNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidstedt, Maja; Romsos, Erica L; Hedell, Ronny; Ansell, Ricky; Steffen, Carolyn R; Vallone, Peter M; Rådström, Peter; Hedman, Johannes

    2017-02-07

    Digital PCR (dPCR) enables absolute quantification of nucleic acids by partitioning of the sample into hundreds or thousands of minute reactions. By assuming a Poisson distribution for the number of DNA fragments present in each chamber, the DNA concentration is determined without the need for a standard curve. However, when analyzing nucleic acids from complex matrixes such as soil and blood, the dPCR quantification can be biased due to the presence of inhibitory compounds. In this study, we evaluated the impact of varying the DNA polymerase in chamber-based dPCR for both pure and impure samples using the common PCR inhibitor humic acid (HA) as a model. We compared the TaqMan Universal PCR Master Mix with two alternative DNA polymerases: ExTaq HS and Immolase. By using Bayesian modeling, we show that there is no difference among the tested DNA polymerases in terms of accuracy of absolute quantification for pure template samples, i.e., without HA present. For samples containing HA, there were great differences in performance: the TaqMan Universal PCR Master Mix failed to correctly quantify DNA with more than 13 pg/nL HA, whereas Immolase (1 U) could handle up to 375 pg/nL HA. Furthermore, we found that BSA had a moderate positive effect for the TaqMan Universal PCR Master Mix, enabling accurate quantification for 25 pg/nL HA. Increasing the amount of DNA polymerase from 1 to 5 U had a strong effect for ExTaq HS, elevating HA-tolerance four times. We also show that the average Cq values of positive reactions may be used as a measure of inhibition effects, e.g., to determine whether or not a dPCR quantification result is reliable. The statistical models developed to objectively analyze the data may also be applied in quality control. We conclude that the choice of DNA polymerase in dPCR is crucial for the accuracy of quantification when analyzing challenging samples.

  16. Efficient cell-free expression with the endogenous E. Coli RNA polymerase and sigma factor 70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireaux Vincent

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli cell-free expression systems use bacteriophage RNA polymerases, such as T7, to synthesize large amounts of recombinant proteins. These systems are used for many applications in biotechnology, such as proteomics. Recently, informational processes have been reconstituted in vitro with cell-free systems. These synthetic approaches, however, have been seriously limited by a lack of transcription modularity. The current available cell-free systems have been optimized to work with bacteriophage RNA polymerases, which put significant restrictions to engineer processes related to biological information. The development of efficient cell-free systems with broader transcription capabilities is required to study complex informational processes in vitro. Results In this work, an efficient cell-free expression system that uses the endogenous E. coli RNA polymerase only and sigma factor 70 for transcription was prepared. Approximately 0.75 mg/ml of Firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein were produced in batch mode. A plasmid was optimized with different regulatory parts to increase the expression. In addition, a new eGFP was engineered that is more translatable in cell-free systems than the original eGFP. The protein production was characterized with three different adenosine triphosphate (ATP regeneration systems: creatine phosphate (CP, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP, and 3-phosphoglyceric acid (3-PGA. The maximum protein production was obtained with 3-PGA. Preparation of the crude extract was streamlined to a simple routine procedure that takes 12 hours including cell culture. Conclusions Although it uses the endogenous E. coli transcription machinery, this cell-free system can produce active proteins in quantities comparable to bacteriophage systems. The E. coli transcription provides much more possibilities to engineer informational processes in vitro. Many E. coli promoters/operators specific to sigma

  17. Engineering of DNA polymerase I from Thermus thermophilus using compartmentalized self-replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Seaim Lwin; Fujiwara, Kei; Ueki, Asuka; Doi, Nobuhide

    2018-05-05

    Although compartmentalized self-replication (CSR) and compartmentalized partnered replication (CPR) are powerful tools for directed evolution of proteins and gene circuits, limitations remain in the emulsion PCR process with the wild-type Taq DNA polymerase used so far, including long run times, low amounts of product, and false negative results due to inhibitors. In this study, we developed a high-efficiency mutant of DNA polymerase I from Thermus thermophilus HB27 (Tth pol) suited for CSR and CPR. We modified the wild-type Tth pol by (i) deletion of the N-terminal 5' to 3' exonuclease domain, (ii) fusion with the DNA-binding protein Sso7d, (iii) introduction of four known effective point mutations from other DNA polymerase mutants, and (iv) codon optimization to reduce the GC content. Consequently, we obtained a mutant that provides higher product yields than the conventional Taq pol without decreased fidelity. Next, we performed four rounds of CSR selection with a randomly mutated library of this modified Tth pol and obtained mutants that provide higher product yields in fewer cycles of emulsion PCR than the parent Tth pol as well as the conventional Taq pol. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An In Vitro RNA Synthesis Assay for Rabies Virus Defines Ribonucleoprotein Interactions Critical for Polymerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Benjamin; Liang, Bo; Gardner, Erica; Ross, Robin A; Whelan, Sean P J

    2017-01-01

    We report an in vitro RNA synthesis assay for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) of rabies virus (RABV). We expressed RABV large polymerase protein (L) in insect cells from a recombinant baculovirus vector and the phosphoprotein cofactor (P) in Escherichia coli and purified the resulting proteins by affinity and size exclusion chromatography. Using chemically synthesized short RNA corresponding to the first 19 nucleotides (nt) of the rabies virus genome, we demonstrate that L alone initiates synthesis on naked RNA and that P serves to enhance the initiation and processivity of the RdRP. The L-P complex lacks full processivity, which we interpret to reflect the lack of the viral nucleocapsid protein (N) on the template. Using this assay, we define the requirements in P for stimulation of RdRP activity as residues 11 to 50 of P and formally demonstrate that ribavirin triphosphate (RTP) inhibits the RdRP. By comparing the properties of RABV RdRP with those of the related rhabdovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), we demonstrate that both polymerases can copy the heterologous promoter sequence. The requirements for engagement of the N-RNA template of VSV by its polymerase are provided by the C-terminal domain (CTD) of P. A chimeric RABV P protein in which the oligomerization domain (OD) and the CTD were replaced by those of VSV P stimulated RABV RdRP activity on naked RNA but was insufficient to permit initiation on the VSV N-RNA template. This result implies that interactions between L and the template N are also required for initiation of RNA synthesis, extending our knowledge of ribonucleoprotein interactions that are critical for gene expression. The current understanding of the structural and functional significance of the components of the rabies virus replication machinery is incomplete. Although structures are available for the nucleocapsid protein in complex with RNA, and also for portions of P, information on both the structure and function of the L

  19. Polymerase chain reaction to search for Herpes viruses in uveitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To analyse aqueous polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results in patients diagnosed with undifferentiated uveitis ... Cite as: Laaks D, Smit DP, Harvey J. Polymerase chain reaction to search for Herpes viruses in uveitic and healthy eyes: a South African ... may be mild and patients do not seek medical attention.

  20. A Double Polymerase Chain Reaction Method for Detecting African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: African swine fever, Swine vesicular disease, Polymerase chain reaction, Recombinant plasmids ... included 5 μL of 10×Pfu DNA polymerase buffer,. 1 μL of Pfu DNA .... Garcia-Barreno B, Sanz A, Nogal ML, Vinuela E,. Enjuanes L.

  1. Polymerase chain reaction for the detection of Mycobacterium leprae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartskeerl, R. A.; de Wit, M. Y.; Klatser, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using heat-stable Taq polymerase is described for the specific detection of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy. A set of primers was selected on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of a gene encoding the 36 kDa antigen of M. leprae. With this set

  2. Reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a highly specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method that allows one to detect very low transcription levels of functional gene(s) in soil. RT-qPCR helps us to know the active members of the microbial community, and their activities can be ...

  3. Orphan G protein receptor GPR55 as an emerging target in cancer therapy and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva-Illades, Dinorah; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate a vast array of cellular processes. The current review gives an overview of the general characteristics of GPCRs and their role in physiological conditions. In addition, it describes the current knowledge of the physiological and pathophysiological functions of GPR55, an orphan GPCR, and how it can be exploited as a therapeutic target to combat various cancers

  4. Gastrointestinal hyperplasia with altered expression of DNA polymerase beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Yoshizawa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Altered expression of DNA polymerase beta (Pol beta has been documented in a large percentage of human tumors. However, tumor prevalence or predisposition resulting from Pol beta over-expression has not yet been evaluated in a mouse model.We have recently developed a novel transgenic mouse model that over-expresses Pol beta. These mice present with an elevated incidence of spontaneous histologic lesions, including cataracts, hyperplasia of Brunner's gland and mucosal hyperplasia in the duodenum. In addition, osteogenic tumors in mice tails, such as osteoma and osteosarcoma were detected. This is the first report of elevated tumor incidence in a mouse model of Pol beta over-expression. These findings prompted an evaluation of human gastrointestinal tumors with regard to Pol beta expression. We observed elevated expression of Pol beta in stomach adenomas and thyroid follicular carcinomas, but reduced Pol beta expression in esophageal adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas.These data support the hypothesis that balanced and proficient base excision repair protein expression and base excision repair capacity is required for genome stability and protection from hyperplasia and tumor formation.

  5. Role of multiplex polymerase chain reaction in diagnosing tubercular meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Berwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis (TBM is one of the most serious manifestations of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Timely and accurate diagnosis provides a favorable prognosis in patients with TBM. The study evaluated the use of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR in the diagnosis of TBM. A study was conducted on 74 patients clinically suspected with TBM. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF specimens were processed for smear microscopy, middle brook 7H9 culture, and multiplex PCR using primers directed against IS6110 gene and 38 kD protein for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The results were analyzed to assess the role of multiplex PCR in the diagnosis of TBM. A total of 26 (35.1% patients were diagnosed with TBM. Microscopy was negative in all while culture was positive in two cases only. Comparing with clinical diagnosis and CSF adenosine deaminase levels of ≥10 U/L, multiplex PCR showed sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 71.4%, 89.6%, 83.3%, and 81.2%, respectively, in the diagnosis of TBM.

  6. Archaeal RNA polymerase arrests transcription at DNA lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Alexandra M; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Transcription elongation is not uniform and transcription is often hindered by protein-bound factors or DNA lesions that limit translocation and impair catalysis. Despite the high degree of sequence and structural homology of the multi-subunit RNA polymerases (RNAP), substantial differences in response to DNA lesions have been reported. Archaea encode only a single RNAP with striking structural conservation with eukaryotic RNAP II (Pol II). Here, we demonstrate that the archaeal RNAP from Thermococcus kodakarensis is sensitive to a variety of DNA lesions that pause and arrest RNAP at or adjacent to the site of DNA damage. DNA damage only halts elongation when present in the template strand, and the damage often results in RNAP arresting such that the lesion would be encapsulated with the transcription elongation complex. The strand-specific halt to archaeal transcription elongation on modified templates is supportive of RNAP recognizing DNA damage and potentially initiating DNA repair through a process akin to the well-described transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) pathways in Bacteria and Eukarya.

  7. Role of polymerase η in mitochondrial mutagenesis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Pabla, Ritu [Dept. of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Siede, Wolfram, E-mail: wolfram.siede@unthsc.edu [Dept. of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► DNA polymerase η is detectable in mitochondria of budding yeast. ► Pol η reduces UV-induced mitochondrial base pair substitutions and frameshifts. ► For UV-induced base pair substitutions, Pol η and Pol ζ interact epistatically. -- Abstract: DNA polymerase η mostly catalyzes an error-free bypass of the most frequent UV lesions, pyrimidine dimers of the cyclobutane-type. In addition to its nuclear localization, we show here for the first time its mitochondrial localization in budding yeast. In mitochondria, this polymerase improves bypass replication fidelity opposite UV damage as shown in base pair substitution and frameshift assays. For base pair substitutions, polymerase η appears to be related in function and epistatic to DNA polymerase ζ which, however, plays the opposite role in the nucleus.

  8. CDK9-dependent RNA polymerase II pausing controls transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressel, Saskia; Schwalb, Björn; Decker, Tim Michael; Qin, Weihua; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Eick, Dirk; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-10-10

    Gene transcription can be activated by decreasing the duration of RNA polymerase II pausing in the promoter-proximal region, but how this is achieved remains unclear. Here we use a 'multi-omics' approach to demonstrate that the duration of polymerase pausing generally limits the productive frequency of transcription initiation in human cells ('pause-initiation limit'). We further engineer a human cell line to allow for specific and rapid inhibition of the P-TEFb kinase CDK9, which is implicated in polymerase pause release. CDK9 activity decreases the pause duration but also increases the productive initiation frequency. This shows that CDK9 stimulates release of paused polymerase and activates transcription by increasing the number of transcribing polymerases and thus the amount of mRNA synthesized per time. CDK9 activity is also associated with long-range chromatin interactions, suggesting that enhancers can influence the pause-initiation limit to regulate transcription.

  9. Cloning and identification of the gene coding for the 140-kd subunit of Drosophila RNA polymerase II

    OpenAIRE

    Faust, Daniela M.; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate; Falkenburg, Dieter; Gasch, Alexander; Bialojan, Siegfried; Young, Richard A.; Bautz, Ekkehard K. F.

    1986-01-01

    Genomic clones of Drosophila melanogaster were isolated from a λ library by cross-hybridization with the yeast gene coding for the 150-kd subunit of RNA polymerase II. Clones containing a region of ∼2.0 kb with strong homology to the yeast gene were shown to code for a 3.9-kb poly(A)+-RNA. Part of the coding region was cloned into an expression vector. A fusion protein was obtained which reacted with an antibody directed against RNA polymerase II of Drosophila. Peptide mapping of the fusion p...

  10. Kinetic mechanism of DNA polymerase I (Klenow)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchta, R.D.; Mizrahi, V.; Benkovic, P.A.; Johnson, K.A.; Benkovic, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The minimal kinetic scheme for DNA polymerization catalyzed by the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I (KF) from Escherichia coli has been determined with short DNA oligomers of defined sequence, labeled with [ 32 P]-nucleotides. A key feature of this scheme is a minimal two-step sequence that interconverts the ternary KF-DNA/sub n/-dNTP and KF-DNA/sub n+1/-PP/sub i/ complexes. The rate is not limited by the actual polymerization but by a separate step, possibly important in ensuring fidelity. Evidence for this sequence is supplied by the observation of biphasic kinetics in single-turnover pyrophosphorolysis experiments (the microscopic reverse of polymerization). Data analysis then provides an estimate of the internal equilibrium constant. The dissociations of DNA, dNTP, and PP/sub i/ from the various binary and ternary complexes were measured by partitioning (isotope-trapping) experiments. The rate constant for DNA dissociation from KF is sequence dependent and is rate limiting during nonprocessive DNA synthesis. The combination of single-turnover (both directions) and isotope-trapping experiments provides sufficient information to permit a quantitative evaluation of the kinetic scheme for specific DNA sequences

  11. Evidence that the respiratory syncytial virus polymerase complex associates with lipid rafts in virus-infected cells: a proteomic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Terence P.; Pitt, Andrew R.; Brown, Gaie; Rixon, Helen W. McL.; Sugrue, Richard J.

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) polymerase complex and lipid rafts was examined in HEp2 cells. Lipid-raft membranes were prepared from virus-infected cells and their protein content was analysed by Western blotting and mass spectrometry. This analysis revealed the presence of the N, P, L, M2-1 and M proteins. However, these proteins appeared to differ from one another in their association with these structures, with the M2-1 protein showing a greater partitioning into raft membranes compared to that of the N, P or M proteins. Determination of the polymerase activity profile of the gradient fractions revealed that 95% of the detectable viral enzyme activity was associated with lipid-raft membranes. Furthermore, analysis of virus-infected cells by confocal microscopy suggested an association between these proteins and the raft-lipid, GM1. Together, these results provide evidence that the RSV polymerase complex is able to associate with lipid rafts in virus-infected cells

  12. High-Resolution Phenotypic Landscape of the RNA Polymerase II Trigger Loop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxi Qiu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The active sites of multisubunit RNA polymerases have a "trigger loop" (TL that multitasks in substrate selection, catalysis, and translocation. To dissect the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II TL at individual-residue resolution, we quantitatively phenotyped nearly all TL single variants en masse. Three mutant classes, revealed by phenotypes linked to transcription defects or various stresses, have distinct distributions among TL residues. We find that mutations disrupting an intra-TL hydrophobic pocket, proposed to provide a mechanism for substrate-triggered TL folding through destabilization of a catalytically inactive TL state, confer phenotypes consistent with pocket disruption and increased catalysis. Furthermore, allele-specific genetic interactions among TL and TL-proximal domain residues support the contribution of the funnel and bridge helices (BH to TL dynamics. Our structural genetics approach incorporates structural and phenotypic data for high-resolution dissection of transcription mechanisms and their evolution, and is readily applicable to other essential yeast proteins.

  13. A Two-Way Street: Regulatory Interplay between RNA Polymerase and Nascent RNA Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinwei; Landick, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The vectorial (5'-to-3' at varying velocity) synthesis of RNA by cellular RNA polymerases (RNAPs) creates a rugged kinetic landscape, demarcated by frequent, sometimes long-lived, pauses. In addition to myriad gene-regulatory roles, these pauses temporally and spatially program the co-transcriptional, hierarchical folding of biologically active RNAs. Conversely, these RNA structures, which form inside or near the RNA exit channel, interact with the polymerase and adjacent protein factors to influence RNA synthesis by modulating pausing, termination, antitermination, and slippage. Here, we review the evolutionary origin, mechanistic underpinnings, and regulatory consequences of this interplay between RNAP and nascent RNA structure. We categorize and rationalize the extensive linkage between the transcriptional machinery and its product, and provide a framework for future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Interaction between DNA Polymerase β and BRCA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Masaoka

    Full Text Available The breast cancer 1 (BRCA1 protein is a tumor suppressor playing roles in DNA repair and cell cycle regulation. Studies of DNA repair functions of BRCA1 have focused on double-strand break (DSB repair pathways and have recently included base excision repair (BER. However, the function of BRCA1 in BER is not well defined. Here, we examined a BRCA1 role in BER, first in relation to alkylating agent (MMS treatment of cells and the BER enzyme DNA polymerase β (pol β. MMS treatment of BRCA1 negative human ovarian and chicken DT40 cells revealed hypersensitivity, and the combined gene deletion of BRCA1 and pol β in DT40 cells was consistent with these factors acting in the same repair pathway, possibly BER. Using cell extracts and purified proteins, BRCA1 and pol β were found to interact in immunoprecipitation assays, yet in vivo and in vitro assays for a BER role of BRCA1 were negative. An alternate approach with the human cells of immunofluorescence imaging and laser-induced DNA damage revealed negligible BRCA1 recruitment during the first 60 s after irradiation, the period typical of recruitment of pol β and other BER factors. Instead, 15 min after irradiation, BRCA1 recruitment was strong and there was γ-H2AX co-localization, consistent with DSBs and repair. The rapid recruitment of pol β was similar in BRCA1 positive and negative cells. However, a fraction of pol β initially recruited remained associated with damage sites much longer in BRCA1 positive than negative cells. Interestingly, pol β expression was required for BRCA1 recruitment, suggesting a partnership between these repair factors in DSB repair.

  15. Association with Aurora-A Controls N-MYC-Dependent Promoter Escape and Pause Release of RNA Polymerase II during the Cell Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büchel, Gabriele; Carstensen, Anne; Mak, Ka-Yan

    2017-01-01

    MYC proteins bind globally to active promoters and promote transcriptional elongation by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). To identify effector proteins that mediate this function, we performed mass spectrometry on N-MYC complexes in neuroblastoma cells. The analysis shows that N-MYC forms complexes...

  16. cisPath: an R/Bioconductor package for cloud users for visualization and management of functional protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Likun; Yang, Luhe; Peng, Zuohan; Lu, Dan; Jin, Yan; McNutt, Michael; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    With the burgeoning development of cloud technology and services, there are an increasing number of users who prefer cloud to run their applications. All software and associated data are hosted on the cloud, allowing users to access them via a web browser from any computer, anywhere. This paper presents cisPath, an R/Bioconductor package deployed on cloud servers for client users to visualize, manage, and share functional protein interaction networks. With this R package, users can easily integrate downloaded protein-protein interaction information from different online databases with private data to construct new and personalized interaction networks. Additional functions allow users to generate specific networks based on private databases. Since the results produced with the use of this package are in the form of web pages, cloud users can easily view and edit the network graphs via the browser, using a mouse or touch screen, without the need to download them to a local computer. This package can also be installed and run on a local desktop computer. Depending on user preference, results can be publicized or shared by uploading to a web server or cloud driver, allowing other users to directly access results via a web browser. This package can be installed and run on a variety of platforms. Since all network views are shown in web pages, such package is particularly useful for cloud users. The easy installation and operation is an attractive quality for R beginners and users with no previous experience with cloud services.

  17. The Dichotomy of the Poly(ADP-Ribose Polymerase-Like Thermozyme from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Faraone Mennella

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The first evidence of an ADP-ribosylating activity in Archaea was obtained in Sulfolobus solfataricus(strain MT-4 where a poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-like thermoprotein, defined with the acronymous PARPSso, was found. Similarly to the eukaryotic counterparts PARPSso cleaves beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide to synthesize oligomers of ADP-ribose; cross-reacts with polyclonal anti-PARP-1 catalytic site antibodies; binds DNA. The main differences rely on the molecular mass (46.5 kDa and the thermophily of PARPSso which works at 80 °C. Despite the biochemical properties that allow correlating it to PARP enzymes, the N-terminal and partial amino acid sequences available suggest that PARPSso belongs to a different group of enzymes, the DING proteins, an item discussed in detail in this review.This finding makes PARPSso the first example of a DING protein in Archaea and extends the existence of DING proteins into all the biological kingdoms. PARPSsohas a cell peripheral localization, along with the edge of the cell membrane. The ADP-ribosylation reaction is reverted by a poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase-like activity, able to use the eukaryotic poly(ADP-ribose as a substrate too. Here we overview the research of (ADP-ribosylation in Sulfolobus solfataricus in the past thirty years and discuss the features of PARPSso common with the canonical poly(ADP-ribose polymerases, and the structure fitting with that of DING proteins.

  18. Low-protein diet for conservative management of chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Connie M; Ahmadi, Seyed-Foad; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2018-04-01

    Recent data pose the question whether conservative management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by means of a low-protein diet can be a safe and effective means to avoid or defer transition to dialysis therapy without causing protein-energy wasting or cachexia. We aimed to systematically review and meta-analyse the controlled clinical trials with adequate participants in each trial, providing rigorous contemporary evidence of the impact of a low-protein diet in the management of uraemia and its complications in patients with CKD. We searched MEDLINE (PubMed) and other sources for controlled trials on CKD to compare clinical management of CKD patients under various levels of dietary protein intake or to compare restricted protein intake with other interventions. Studies with similar patients, interventions, and outcomes were included in the meta-analyses. We identified 16 controlled trials of low-protein diet in CKD that met the stringent qualification criteria including having 30 or more participants. Compared with diets with protein intake of >0.8 g/kg/day, diets with restricted protein intake (disease, and a trend towards lower rates of all-cause death. In addition, very-low-protein diets (protein intake kidney function and reduction in the rate of progression to end-stage renal disease. Safety and adherence to a low-protein diet was not inferior to a normal protein diet, and there was no difference in the rate of malnutrition or protein-energy wasting. In this pooled analysis of moderate-size controlled trials, a low-protein diet appears to enhance the conservative management of non-dialysis-dependent CKD and may be considered as a potential option for CKD patients who wish to avoid or defer dialysis initiation and to slow down the progression of CKD, while the risk of protein-energy wasting and cachexia remains minimal. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia

  19. Food Products Made With Glycomacropeptide, a Low Phenylalanine Whey Protein, Provide a New Alternative to Amino Acid-Based Medical Foods for Nutrition Management of Phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Calcar, Sandra C.; Ney, Denise M.

    2012-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU), an inborn error in phenylalanine (phe) metabolism, requires lifelong nutrition management with a low-phe diet, which includes a phe-free amino acid-based medical formula to provide the majority of an individual’s protein needs. Compliance with this diet is often difficult for older children, adolescents and adults with PKU. The whey protein glycomacropeptide (GMP) is ideally suited for the PKU diet since it is naturally low in phe. Nutritionally complete, acceptable medical foods and beverages can be made with GMP to increase the variety of protein sources for the PKU diet. As an intact protein, GMP improves protein utilization and increases satiety compared with amino acids. Thus, GMP provides a new, more physiologic source of low-phe dietary protein for those with PKU. PMID:22818728

  20. Translesion DNA polymerases Pol ζ, Pol η, Pol ι, Pol κ and Rev1 are ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MADU

    Specialized DNA polymerases called translesion polymerases are among the major determinants of spontaneous and DNA damage-induced mutation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. (Livneh 2001). The classical replicative DNA polymerases can synthesize DNA with remarkable efficiency and fidelity.

  1. Missed opportunities in the diagnosis and management of protein energy malnutrition among children under 5 years in Wakiso district, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akugizibwe, Roselyne; Kasolo, Josephine; Makubuya, Duncan B; Damani, Ali M

    2013-11-30

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is one of the leading causes of death among children below 5 years in Uganda. It develops after acute childhood illnesses despite children having received treatment from health facilities. This study assessed knowledge and practices of health workers in the diagnosis and management of PEM, which was used to establish missed opportunities to prevent severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in its management. This was a cross sectional descriptive study that used questionnaires and observation of health workers at Health Center IV (HCIV) in Wakiso district, Uganda. The clinical nutrition diagnosis of the children was then obtained. There were 44 health workers that assessed 225 children. Most of the health workers 32 (72.7%) had education in PEM management and over 60% of them knew the forms of PEM, clinical signs of kwashiorkor and marasmus and the factors that predispose to PEM. Health workers did not weigh 56 (24.9%) of the children, 193 (86%) children had no height taken and only 32 (14.2%) had mid upper arm circumference measured. The weight for height of 223 (99.2%) and weight for age of 109 (93%) children was not calculated. Only 38 (16.89%) were examined for edema and 40 (17.78%) for muscle wasting. Health workers diagnosed only 21 (9%) children with malnutrition, while researchers found 94 (31.9%) with malnutrition. Children who missed opportunity to have malnutrition diagnosed at the health facility were 73 (32.9%). The knowledge of health workers on PEM is adequate, but their practice is inadequate. There is missed opportunity to diagnose and manage PEM among children who present with acute illnesses at the health centers, hence missed opportunity to prevent SAM.

  2. Orphan G protein receptor GPR55 as an emerging target in cancer therapy and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyva-Illades D

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dinorah Leyva-Illades,1–3 Sharon DeMorrow1–3 1Digestive Disease Research Center, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, TX, USA; 2Department of Internal MedicineTexas A&M Health Science Center, Temple, TX, USA; 3Research Service, Central Texas Veterans Health Care System, Temple, TX, USA Abstract: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs modulate a vast array of cellular processes. The current review gives an overview of the general characteristics of GPCRs and their role in physiological conditions. In addition, it describes the current knowledge of the physiological and pathophysiological functions of GPR55, an orphan GPCR, and how it can be exploited as a therapeutic target to combat various cancers. Keywords: GPR55, cancer, GPCR, endocannabinoids

  3. Reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zino

    2014-02-05

    Feb 5, 2014 ... ecological studies - A review ... The objective of this review is to assess the importance of RT-qPCR in soil related ... phenol extraction step with heat inactivation of the added .... Real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

  4. The application of polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-05-23

    May 23, 2011 ... dominance in microbial ecology if the corresponding environment samples had been provided. This ... yeast peptone dextrose; PCR, polymerase chain reaction. method, DGGE method ..... Two nuclear mutations that block.

  5. Inhibiting DNA Polymerases as a Therapeutic Intervention against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Berdis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibiting DNA synthesis is an important therapeutic strategy that is widely used to treat a number of hyperproliferative diseases including viral infections, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. This chapter describes two major categories of therapeutic agents used to inhibit DNA synthesis. The first category includes purine and pyrmidine nucleoside analogs that directly inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The second category includes DNA damaging agents including cisplatin and chlorambucil that modify the composition and structure of the nucleic acid substrate to indirectly inhibit DNA synthesis. Special emphasis is placed on describing the molecular mechanisms of these inhibitory effects against chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA polymerases. Discussions are also provided on the mechanisms associated with resistance to these therapeutic agents. A primary focus is toward understanding the roles of specialized DNA polymerases that by-pass DNA lesions produced by DNA damaging agents. Finally, a section is provided that describes emerging areas in developing new therapeutic strategies targeting specialized DNA polymerases.

  6. Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based prediction of genotypes in chronic HBV patients from Western India. Yashwant G. Chavan, Sharad R. Pawar, Minal Wani, Amol D. Raut, Rabindra N. Misra ...

  7. Fission yeast shelterin regulates DNA polymerases and Rad3(ATR kinase to limit telomere extension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ting Chang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies in fission yeast have previously identified evolutionarily conserved shelterin and Stn1-Ten1 complexes, and established Rad3(ATR/Tel1(ATM-dependent phosphorylation of the shelterin subunit Ccq1 at Thr93 as the critical post-translational modification for telomerase recruitment to telomeres. Furthermore, shelterin subunits Poz1, Rap1 and Taz1 have been identified as negative regulators of Thr93 phosphorylation and telomerase recruitment. However, it remained unclear how telomere maintenance is dynamically regulated during the cell cycle. Thus, we investigated how loss of Poz1, Rap1 and Taz1 affects cell cycle regulation of Ccq1 Thr93 phosphorylation and telomere association of telomerase (Trt1(TERT, DNA polymerases, Replication Protein A (RPA complex, Rad3(ATR-Rad26(ATRIP checkpoint kinase complex, Tel1(ATM kinase, shelterin subunits (Tpz1, Ccq1 and Poz1 and Stn1. We further investigated how telomere shortening, caused by trt1Δ or catalytically dead Trt1-D743A, affects cell cycle-regulated telomere association of telomerase and DNA polymerases. These analyses established that fission yeast shelterin maintains telomere length homeostasis by coordinating the differential arrival of leading (Polε and lagging (Polα strand DNA polymerases at telomeres to modulate Rad3(ATR association, Ccq1 Thr93 phosphorylation and telomerase recruitment.

  8. Trans-Lesion DNA Polymerases May Be Involved in Yeast Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbel-Eden, Ayelet; Joseph-Strauss, Daphna; Masika, Hagit; Printzental, Oxana; Rachi, Eléanor; Simchen, Giora

    2013-01-01

    Trans-lesion DNA polymerases (TLSPs) enable bypass of DNA lesions during replication and are also induced under stress conditions. Being only weakly dependent on their template during replication, TLSPs introduce mutations into DNA. The low processivity of these enzymes ensures that they fall off their template after a few bases are synthesized and are then replaced by the more accurate replicative polymerase. We find that the three TLSPs of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rev1, PolZeta (Rev3 and Rev7), and Rad30 are induced during meiosis at a time when DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are formed and homologous chromosomes recombine. Strains deleted for one or any combination of the three TLSPs undergo normal meiosis. However, in the triple-deletion mutant, there is a reduction in both allelic and ectopic recombination. We suggest that trans-lesion polymerases are involved in the processing of meiotic double-strand breaks that lead to mutations. In support of this notion, we report significant yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) associations in meiosis-arrested cells between the TLSPs and DSB proteins Rev1-Spo11, Rev1-Mei4, and Rev7-Rec114, as well as between Rev1 and Rad30. We suggest that the involvement of TLSPs in processing of meiotic DSBs could be responsible for the considerably higher frequency of mutations reported during meiosis compared with that found in mitotically dividing cells, and therefore may contribute to faster evolutionary divergence than previously assumed. PMID:23550131

  9. Two Family B DNA Polymerases From Aeropyrum pernix, Based on Revised Translational Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Daimon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are divided into three domains, Bacteria, Eukarya, and Archaea. Comparative studies in the three domains have provided useful information to understand the evolution of the DNA replication machinery. DNA polymerase is the central enzyme of DNA replication. The presence of multiple family B DNA polymerases is unique in Crenarchaeota, as compared with other archaeal phyla, which have a single enzyme each for family B (PolB and family D (PolD. We analyzed PolB1 and PolB3 in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix, and found that they are larger proteins than those predicted from the coding regions in our previous study and from public database annotations. The recombinant larger PolBs exhibited the same DNA polymerase activities as previously reported. However, the larger PolB3 showed remarkably higher thermostability, which made this enzyme applicable to PCR. In addition, the high tolerance to salt and heparin suggests that PolB3 will be useful for amplification from the samples with contaminants, and therefore it has a great potential for diagnostic use in the medical and environmental field.

  10. SAF-A forms a complex with BRG1 and both components are required for RNA polymerase II mediated transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzeneta Vizlin-Hodzic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A participates in the regulation of gene expression by organizing chromatin into transcriptionally active domains and by interacting directly with RNA polymerase II. METHODOLOGY: Here we use co-localization, co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP and in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA to identify Brahma Related Gene 1 (BRG1, the ATP-driven motor of the human SWI-SNF chromatin remodeling complex, as another SAF-A interaction partner in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells. We also employ RNA interference to investigate functional aspects of the SAF-A/BRG1 interaction. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We find that endogenous SAF-A protein interacts with endogenous BRG1 protein in mES cells, and that the interaction does not solely depend on the presence of mRNA. Moreover the interaction remains intact when cells are induced to differentiate. Functional analyses reveal that dual depletion of SAF-A and BRG1 abolishes global transcription by RNA polymerase II, while the nucleolar RNA polymerase I transcription machinery remains unaffected. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that SAF-A interacts with BRG1 and that both components are required for RNA Polymerase II Mediated Transcription.

  11. Vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in the Octopus vulgaris brain: a regulatory factor of actin polymerization dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Anna; Natale, Emiliana; Rotondo, Sergio; Di Cosmo, Anna; Faraone-Mennella, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Our previous behavioural, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses conducted in selected regions (supra/sub oesophageal masses) of the Octopus vulgaris brain detected a cytoplasmic poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (more than 90% of total enzyme activity). The protein was identified as the vault-free form of vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. The present research extends and integrates the biochemical characterization of poly-ADP-ribosylation system, namely, reaction product, i.e., poly-ADP-ribose, and acceptor proteins, in the O. vulgaris brain. Immunochemical analyses evidenced that the sole poly-ADP-ribose acceptor was the octopus cytoskeleton 50-kDa actin. It was present in both free, endogenously poly-ADP-ribosylated form (70kDa) and in complex with V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase and poly-ADP-ribose (260kDa). The components of this complex, alkali and high salt sensitive, were purified and characterized. The kind and the length of poly-ADP-ribose corresponded to linear chains of 30-35 ADP-ribose units, in accordance with the features of the polymer synthesized by the known vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. In vitro experiments showed that V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase activity of brain cytoplasmic fraction containing endogenous actin increased upon the addition of commercial actin and was highly reduced by ATP. Anti-actin immunoblot of the mixture in the presence and absence of ATP showed that the poly-ADP-ribosylation of octopus actin is a dynamic process balanced by the ATP-dependent polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein, a fundamental mechanism for synaptic plasticity. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancement of DNA polymerase activity in potato tuber slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Akira; Imaseki, Hidemasa

    1977-01-01

    DNA polymerase was extracted from potato (Soleum tuberosum L.) tuber discs and the temporal correlation of its activity change to DNA synthesis in vivo was examined during aging of the discs. Most of the DNA polymerase was recovered as a bound form in the 18,000 x g precipitate. Reaction with the bound-form enzyme was dependent on the presence of four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, Mg 2+ , and a template. ''Activated'' DNA and heat-denatured DNA, but not native DNA, were utilized as templates. The polymerase activity was sensitive to SH reagents. Fresh discs, which do not synthesize DNA in vivo, contained a significant amount of DNA polymerase and its activity increased linearly with time until 48 hr after slicing and became four times that of fresh discs after 72 hr, whereas the activity of DNA synthesis in vivo increased with time and decreased after reaching a maximum at 30 hr. Cycloheximide inhibited the enhancement of polymerase activity. DNA polymerase from aged and fresh discs had identical requirements for deoxynucleotides and a template in their reactions, sensitivity to SH reagent, and affinity to thymidine triphosphate. (auth.)

  13. Identification of a patient with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia and meningitis by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacman, D J; Zhang, Y; Rydquist-White, J; Wadowsky, R M; Post, J C; Ehrlich, G D

    1995-06-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on the penicillin-binding protein gene PBP2B identified the presence of DNA specific for Streptococcus pneumoniae in the serum and CSF of a patient with culture-proven bacteremia and meningitis. Positive signals were seen to dilutions of 1:125 and 1:390,625 for the blood and CSF specimens, respectively. Potential advantages of PCR over conventional culture include exquisite sensitivity, faster results and the ability to identify the organisms by the presence of species-specific DNA even in patients pretreated with antibiotics.

  14. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Karen L.; Dashner, Erica J. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Tsosie, Ranalda [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States); Cho, Young Mi [Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lewis, Johnnye [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Community Environmental Health Program, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center College of Pharmacy, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Hudson, Laurie G., E-mail: lhudson@salud.unm.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; < 10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low micromolar concentration of uranium inhibits polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activity. • Uranium causes zinc loss from multiple DNA repair proteins. • Uranium enhances retention of DNA damage caused by ultraviolet radiation. • Zinc reverses the effects of uranium on PARP activity and DNA damage repair.

  15. Structural Transformation of Wireframe DNA Origami via DNA Polymerase Assisted Gap-Filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nayan P; Matthies, Michael; Joffroy, Bastian; Schmidt, Thorsten L

    2018-03-27

    The programmability of DNA enables constructing nanostructures with almost any arbitrary shape, which can be decorated with many functional materials. Moreover, dynamic structures can be realized such as molecular motors and walkers. In this work, we have explored the possibility to synthesize the complementary sequences to single-stranded gap regions in the DNA origami scaffold cost effectively by a DNA polymerase rather than by a DNA synthesizer. For this purpose, four different wireframe DNA origami structures were designed to have single-stranded gap regions. This reduced the number of staple strands needed to determine the shape and size of the final structure after gap filling. For this, several DNA polymerases and single-stranded binding (SSB) proteins were tested, with T4 DNA polymerase being the best fit. The structures could be folded in as little as 6 min, and the subsequent optimized gap-filling reaction was completed in less than 3 min. The introduction of flexible gap regions results in fully collapsed or partially bent structures due to entropic spring effects. Finally, we demonstrated structural transformations of such deformed wireframe DNA origami structures with DNA polymerases including the expansion of collapsed structures and the straightening of curved tubes. We anticipate that this approach will become a powerful tool to build DNA wireframe structures more material-efficiently, and to quickly prototype and test new wireframe designs that can be expanded, rigidified, or mechanically switched. Mechanical force generation and structural transitions will enable applications in structural DNA nanotechnology, plasmonics, or single-molecule biophysics.

  16. Deuterium incorporation into Escherichia-coli proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lederer, H.; May, R. P.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1986-01-01

    Neutron small-angle scattering studies of single protein subunits in a protein-DNA complex require the adjustment of the neutron scattering-length densities of protein and DNA, which is attainable by specific deuteration of the protein. The neutron scattering densities of unlabelled DNA and DNA......-dependent RNA polymerase of Escherichia coli match when RNA polymerase is isolated from cells grown in a medium containing 46% D2O and unlabelled glucose as carbon source. Their contrasts vanish simultaneously in a dialysis buffer containing 65% D2O. An expression was evaluated which allows the calculation...... of the degree of deuteration and match point of any E. coli protein from the D2O content of the growth medium, taking the 2H incorporation into RNA polymerase amino acids to be representative for all amino acids in E. coli proteins. The small-angle scattering results, on which the calculation of the degree...

  17. PCR fidelity of pfu DNA polymerase and other thermostable DNA polymerases.

    OpenAIRE

    Cline, J; Braman, J C; Hogrefe, H H

    1996-01-01

    The replication fidelities of Pfu, Taq, Vent, Deep Vent and UlTma DNA polymerases were compared using a PCR-based forward mutation assay. Average error rates (mutation frequency/bp/duplication) increased as follows: Pfu (1.3 x 10(-6)) < Deep Vent (2.7 x 10(-6)) < Vent (2.8 x 10(-6)) < Taq (8.0 x 10(-6)) < < exo- Pfu and UlTma (approximately 5 x 10(-5)). Buffer optimization experiments indicated that Pfu fidelity was highest in the presence of 2-3 mM MgSO4 and 100-300 microM each dNTP and at p...

  18. Transcription Profiling of Bacillus subtilis Cells Infected with AR9, a Giant Phage Encoding Two Multisubunit RNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavysh, Daria; Sokolova, Maria; Slashcheva, Marina; Förstner, Konrad U; Severinov, Konstantin

    2017-02-14

    Bacteriophage AR9 is a recently sequenced jumbo phage that encodes two multisubunit RNA polymerases. Here we investigated the AR9 transcription strategy and the effect of AR9 infection on the transcription of its host, Bacillus subtilis Analysis of whole-genome transcription revealed early, late, and continuously expressed AR9 genes. Alignment of sequences upstream of the 5' ends of AR9 transcripts revealed consensus sequences that define early and late phage promoters. Continuously expressed AR9 genes have both early and late promoters in front of them. Early AR9 transcription is independent of protein synthesis and must be determined by virion RNA polymerase injected together with viral DNA. During infection, the overall amount of host mRNAs is significantly decreased. Analysis of relative amounts of host transcripts revealed notable differences in the levels of some mRNAs. The physiological significance of up- or downregulation of host genes for AR9 phage infection remains to be established. AR9 infection is significantly affected by rifampin, an inhibitor of host RNA polymerase transcription. The effect is likely caused by the antibiotic-induced killing of host cells, while phage genome transcription is solely performed by viral RNA polymerases. IMPORTANCE Phages regulate the timing of the expression of their own genes to coordinate processes in the infected cell and maximize the release of viral progeny. Phages also alter the levels of host transcripts. Here we present the results of a temporal analysis of the host and viral transcriptomes of Bacillus subtilis infected with a giant phage, AR9. We identify viral promoters recognized by two virus-encoded RNA polymerases that are a unique feature of the phiKZ-related group of phages to which AR9 belongs. Our results set the stage for future analyses of highly unusual RNA polymerases encoded by AR9 and other phiKZ-related phages. Copyright © 2017 Lavysh et al.

  19. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-independent potentiation of nitrosourea cytotoxicity by 3-aminobenzamide in human malignant glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S; Weller, M

    2000-06-16

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is a zinc-finger DNA-binding protein that detects specifically DNA strand breaks generated by genotoxic agents and is thought to be involved in DNA repair. Here, we examined the effects of 3-aminobenzamide, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, on the chemosensitivity of human malignant glioma cells. 3-Aminobenzamide selectively potentiated the cytotoxicity of the nitrosoureas, nimustine, carmustine and lomustine in 10 of 12 human malignant glioma cell lines. In contrast, 3-aminobenzamide did not modulate the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicine, teniposide, vincristine, camptothecin or cytarabine. The nitrosoureas did not induce poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity in the glioma cells. Ectopic expression of truncated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase containing the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase DNA-binding domain, which acts as a dominant-negative mutant, in LN-18 or LN-229 cells did not alter the 3-aminobenzamide effect on nitrosourea-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, 3-aminobenzamide may target another nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-requiring enzyme, but not poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, when enhancing nitrosourea cytotoxicity in human malignant glioma cells. Carmustine cytotoxicity was associated with a G2/M arrest. Coexposure to carmustine and 3-aminobenzamide overcame this G2/M arrest in T98G cells, which are sensitized to carmustine by 3-aminobenzamide, but not in U251MG cells, which are refractory to 3-aminobenzamide-mediated sensitization to carmustine. Thus, 3-aminobenzamide-mediated sensitization to carmustine cytotoxicity may result from interference with the stable G2/M arrest response to carmustine in human glioma cells.

  20. Role of exonucleolytic processing and polymerase-DNA association in bypass of lesions during replication in vitro. Significance for SOS-targeted mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shwartz, H.; Shavitt, O.; Livneh, Z.

    1988-01-01

    The role of exonuclease activity in trans-lesion DNA replication with Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme was investigated. RecA protein inhibited the 3'----5' exonuclease activity of the polymerase 2-fold when assayed in the absence of replication and had no effect on turnover of dNTPs into dNMPs. In contrast, single-stranded DNA-binding protein, which had no effect on the exonuclease activity in the absence of replication, showed a pronounced 7-fold suppression of the 3'----5' exonuclease activity during replication. The excision of incorporated dNMP alpha S residues from DNA by the 3'----5' exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme was inhibited 10-20-fold; still no increase in bypass of pyrimidine photodimers was observed. Thus, in agreement with our previous results in which the exonuclease activity was inhibited at the protein level, inhibition at the DNA level also did not increase bypass of photodimers. Fractionation of the replication mixture after termination of DNA synthesis on a Bio-Gel A-5m column under conditions which favor polymerase-DNA binding yielded a termination complex which could perform turnover of dNTPs into dNMPs. Adding challenge-primed single-stranded DNA to the complex yielded a burst of DNA synthesis which was promoted most likely by DNA polymerase III holoenzyme molecules transferred from the termination complex to the challenge DNA thus demonstrating the instability of the polymerase-DNA association. Addition of a fresh sample of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme to purified termination products, which consist primarily of partially replicated molecules with nascent chains terminated at UV lesions, did not result in any net DNA synthesis as expected

  1. Identification of duck plague virus by polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, W.R.; Brown, Sean E.; Nashold, S.W.; Knudson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detecting duck plague virus. A 765-bp EcoRI fragment cloned from the genome of the duck plague vaccine (DP-VAC) virus was sequenced for PCR primer development. The fragment sequence was found by GenBank alignment searches to be similar to the 3a?? ends of an undefined open reading frame and the gene for DNA polymerase protein in other herpesviruses. Three of four primer sets were found to be specific for the DP-VAC virus and 100% (7/7) of field isolates but did not amplify DNA from inclusion body disease of cranes virus. The specificity of one primer set was tested with genome templates from other avian herpesviruses, including those from a golden eagle, bald eagle, great horned owl, snowy owl, peregrine falcon, prairie falcon, pigeon, psittacine, and chicken (infectious laryngotracheitis), but amplicons were not produced. Hence, this PCR test is highly specific for duck plague virus DNA. Two primer sets were able to detect 1 fg of DNA from the duck plague vaccine strain, equivalent to five genome copies. In addition, the ratio of tissue culture infectious doses to genome copies of duck plague vaccine virus from infected duck embryo cells was determined to be 1:100, making the PCR assay 20 times more sensitive than tissue culture for detecting duck plague virus. The speed, sensitivity, and specificity of this PCR provide a greatly improved diagnostic and research tool for studying the epizootiology of duck plague. /// Se desarroll?? una prueba de reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa para detectar el virus de la peste del pato. Un fragmento EcoRI de 765 pares de bases clonado del genoma del virus vacunal de la peste del pato fue secuenciado para la obtenci??n de los iniciadores de la prueba de la reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa. En investigaciones de alineaci??n en el banco de genes ('GenBank') se encontr?? que la secuencia del fragmento era similar a los extremos 3a?? de un marco de lectura abierto

  2. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications. PMID:24847315

  3. Repair of Clustered Damage and DNA Polymerase Iota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, E A; Lavrik, O I

    2015-08-01

    Multiple DNA lesions occurring within one or two turns of the DNA helix known as clustered damage are a source of double-stranded DNA breaks, which represent a serious threat to the cells. Repair of clustered lesions is accomplished in several steps. If a clustered lesion contains oxidized bases, an individual DNA lesion is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) mechanism involving a specialized DNA polymerase after excising DNA damage. Here, we investigated DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase iota using damaged DNA templates. Two types of DNA substrates were used as model DNAs: partial DNA duplexes containing breaks of different length, and DNA duplexes containing 5-formyluracil (5-foU) and uracil as a precursor of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP) in opposite DNA strands. For the first time, we showed that DNA polymerase iota is able to catalyze DNA synthesis using partial DNA duplexes having breaks of different length as substrates. In addition, we found that DNA polymerase iota could catalyze DNA synthesis during repair of clustered damage via the BER system by using both undamaged and 5-foU-containing templates. We found that hPCNA (human proliferating cell nuclear antigen) increased efficacy of DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase iota.

  4. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom eKillelea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR, cDNA cloning, genome sequencing and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3’ primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications.

  5. File list: Pol.Neu.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: Pol.Pup.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pup.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pupae SRX...013069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Pup.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Lng.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Embryo h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Lng.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Lng.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Gonad ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Embryo ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Pan.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Pancrea...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Adl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.PSC.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Pluripote...SRX213760,SRX213764 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Bone ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Epd.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Epidermis... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Epd.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Brs.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Breast SR...078990 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Spleen ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Dig.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Digestive... tract SRX112957,SRX143802 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Dig.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Spl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Spl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Spleen SR...X062981,SRX143838,SRX020253 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Spl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.PSC.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Pluripote...SRX213760,SRX213764 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Pup.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pup.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pupae SRX...013069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Pup.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Placenta... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Adp.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Dig.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Digest...ive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Dig.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Epider...mis SRX016997 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassif...ied SRX110774 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell ...013077,SRX050604,SRX050605 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Adp.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Adipocyt...e SRX682084,SRX682086,SRX682085,SRX682083 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell...3965,SRX043869,SRX043867,SRX043875,SRX043967,SRX043881,SRX043879 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Brs.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Brs.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All c...ell types http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo SR...7582,SRX050604,SRX050605,SRX013073 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Brs.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Brs.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Epidermi...248,SRX663247,SRX807622 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Placenta... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Kidney S...X1206068,SRX1206073,SRX1206074,SRX1206072,SRX1206071,SRX003882,SRX367323 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Oth.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Utr.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Uterus... SRX017001,SRX018606,SRX017002 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Utr.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Adl.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Prs.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Prostate...932,SRX020922,SRX022582 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.PSC.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pluripot...670820,SRX702057,SRX702061 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Utr.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Brs.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Brs.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Adl.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Adult SR...SRX554718,SRX043965,SRX043963,SRX043964 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Adl.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Kidney... SRX016996 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III All ce...ll types SRX331268,SRX331270,SRX395531,SRX395532 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo S...,SRX043867 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Dig.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Digestiv...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Dig.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Neu.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Liv.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Gon.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Gonad ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Blood ...SRX150560,SRX018610,SRX015143,SRX017006,SRX150396,SRX015144 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Prostate...363,SRX173198,SRX173197 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Lung S...RX016555,SRX150101,SRX150102 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Bone SRX...,SRX351408 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Muscle h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All c...ell types http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Oth.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Blood SR...,SRX153079,SRX017717,SRX103447,SRX386121,SRX038919,SRX038920,SRX080132 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Muscle h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Muscle h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo S...,SRX043866 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell...,SRX1013886,SRX1013900 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Liver SR...1013886 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bon.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Gonad ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.PSC.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Adl.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adult ...SRX395531,SRX331268,SRX331270,SRX395532 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Adl.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Kidney S...SRX128201,SRX128200,SRX003882,SRX1206065,SRX1206066,SRX1206067,SRX367323 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Placenta... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pancreas... SRX190244 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Bon.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Bone SRX...,SRX351408 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bon.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Blood SR...,SRX017986,SRX017985,SRX728781,SRX017717,SRX005163,SRX024360,SRX017718 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Epidermi...245,SRX663247,SRX807622 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Larvae... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo SR...7582,SRX050604,SRX050605,SRX013077 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Muscle h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Bon.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bon.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Oth.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell ...050605,SRX013073 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Kidney... SRX016996 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...fied http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pluripot...833412,SRX149642,SRX702059 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.YSt.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: Pol.Adl.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  2. File list: Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. File list: Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. Attenuation of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by Engineered Viral Polymerase Fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Devendra K; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Campagnola, Grace; Keith, Anna; Schafer, Elizabeth A; Kloc, Anna; de Los Santos, Teresa; Peersen, Olve; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2017-08-01

    fidelity. Recombinant FMDVs containing substitutions at 3D pol tryptophan residue 237 were genetically stable and displayed plaque phenotypes and growth kinetics similar to those of the wild-type virus in cell culture. We further demonstrate that viruses harboring either a W237F HF substitution or W237I LF and W237L LF mutations were highly attenuated in animals. Our study shows that obtaining 3D pol fidelity variants by protein engineering based on polymerase structure and function could be exploited for the development of attenuated FMDV vaccine candidates that are safer and more stable than strains obtained by selective pressure via mutagenic nucleotides or adaptation approaches. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. PCNA mono-ubiquitination and activation of translesion DNA polymerases by DNA polymerase {alpha}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Niimi, Atsuko; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Tomida, Shuta; Miao Huang, Qin; Izuta, Shunji; Usukura, Jiro; Itoh, Yasutomo; Hishida, Takashi; Akashi, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Pavlov, Youri; Murate, Takashi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2009-07-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) involves PCNA mono-ubiquitination and TLS DNA polymerases (pols). Recent evidence has shown that the mono-ubiquitination is induced not only by DNA damage but also by other factors that induce stalling of the DNA replication fork. We studied the effect of spontaneous DNA replication errors on PCNA mono-ubiquitination and TLS induction. In the pol1L868F strain, which expressed an error-prone pol alpha, PCNA was spontaneously mono-ubiquitinated. Pol alpha L868F had a rate-limiting step at the extension from mismatched primer termini. Electron microscopic observation showed the accumulation of a single-stranded region at the DNA replication fork in yeast cells. For pol alpha errors, pol zeta participated in a generation of +1 frameshifts. Furthermore, in the pol1L868F strain, UV-induced mutations were lower than in the wild-type and a pol delta mutant strain (pol3-5DV), and deletion of the RAD30 gene (pol eta) suppressed this defect. These data suggest that nucleotide misincorporation by pol alpha induces exposure of single-stranded DNA, PCNA mono-ubiquitination and activates TLS pols.

  6. Active RNA polymerases: mobile or immobile molecular machines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyris Papantonis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It is widely assumed that active RNA polymerases track along their templates to produce a transcript. We test this using chromosome conformation capture and human genes switched on rapidly and synchronously by tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha; one is 221 kbp SAMD4A, which a polymerase takes more than 1 h to transcribe. Ten minutes after stimulation, the SAMD4A promoter comes together with other TNFalpha-responsive promoters. Subsequently, these contacts are lost as new downstream ones appear; contacts are invariably between sequences being transcribed. Super-resolution microscopy confirms that nascent transcripts (detected by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization co-localize at relevant times. Results are consistent with an alternative view of transcription: polymerases fixed in factories reel in their respective templates, so different parts of the templates transiently lie together.

  7. Backtracking dynamics of RNA polymerase: pausing and error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Mamata; Klumpp, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerases is frequently interrupted by pauses. One mechanism of such pauses is backtracking, where the RNA polymerase translocates backward with respect to both the DNA template and the RNA transcript, without shortening the transcript. Backtracked RNA polymerases move in a diffusive fashion and can return to active transcription either by diffusive return to the position where backtracking was initiated or by cleaving the transcript. The latter process also provides a mechanism for proofreading. Here we present some exact results for a kinetic model of backtracking and analyse its impact on the speed and the accuracy of transcription. We show that proofreading through backtracking is different from the classical (Hopfield-Ninio) scheme of kinetic proofreading. Our analysis also suggests that, in addition to contributing to the accuracy of transcription, backtracking may have a second effect: it attenuates the slow down of transcription that arises as a side effect of discriminating between correct and incorrect nucleotides based on the stepping rates.

  8. Sensitivitas dan Spesifisitas Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction untuk Mendeteksi DNA Coxiella burnetii (SENSITIVITY AND SPECIFICITY OF NESTED POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FOR DETECTION OF COXIELLA BURNETII DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trioso Purnawarman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity and specificity of nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR to detect Coxiella burnetii(C. burnetii DNA were studied. The primer system which consists of external primers (OMP1 and OMP2and internal primers (OMP3 and OMP4, was designed from the nucleotide sequence of the com I geneencoding for 27 kDa outer membrane protein and used to specifically amplify a 501 bp and 438 bp fragment.This nested PCR assay was 50 fold more sensitive than that of using PCR external primer only. TheNested PCR has a detection limit as low as 300 pg/?l. Specificity studies showed that nested PCR onlydetected C. burnetii DNA and did not happened Brucella abortus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosaand Campylobacter Jejuni DNA. Nested PCR has high senstively and specificaly diagnostic method of C.burnetii as agent of Q fever disease.

  9. Colorimetric Detection of Specific DNA Segments Amplified by Polymerase Chain Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, David J.; Smith, Donald B.; Foote, Simon J.; Samaras, N.; Peterson, M. Gregory

    1989-04-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure has many potential applications in mass screening. We describe here a general assay for colorimetric detection of amplified DNA. The target DNA is first amplified by PCR, and then a second set of oligonucleotides, nested between the first two, is incorporated by three or more PCR cycles. These oligonucleotides bear ligands: for example, one can be biotinylated and the other can contain a site for a double-stranded DNA-binding protein. After linkage to an immobilized affinity reagent (such as a cloned DNA-binding protein, which we describe here) and labeling with a second affinity reagent (for example, avidin) linked to horseradish peroxidase, reaction with a chromogenic substrate allows detection of the amplified DNA. This amplified DNA assay (ADA) is rapid, is readily applicable to mass screening, and uses routine equipment. We show here that it can be used to detect human immunodeficiency virus sequences specifically against a background of human DNA.

  10. Bacillus subtilis DNA polymerases, PolC and DnaE, are required for both leading and lagging strand synthesis in SPP1 origin-dependent DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco, Elena M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Firmicutes have two distinct replicative DNA polymerases, the PolC leading strand polymerase, and PolC and DnaE synthesizing the lagging strand. We have reconstituted in vitro Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage SPP1 θ-type DNA replication, which initiates unidirectionally at oriL. With this system we show that DnaE is not only restricted to lagging strand synthesis as previously suggested. DnaG primase and DnaE polymerase are required for initiation of DNA replication on both strands. DnaE and DnaG synthesize in concert a hybrid RNA/DNA ‘initiation primer’ on both leading and lagging strands at the SPP1 oriL region, as it does the eukaryotic Pol α complex. DnaE, as a RNA-primed DNA polymerase, extends this initial primer in a reaction modulated by DnaG and one single-strand binding protein (SSB, SsbA or G36P), and hands off the initiation primer to PolC, a DNA-primed DNA polymerase. Then, PolC, stimulated by DnaG and the SSBs, performs the bulk of DNA chain elongation at both leading and lagging strands. Overall, these modulations by the SSBs and DnaG may contribute to the mechanism of polymerase switch at Firmicutes replisomes. PMID:28575448

  11. Atomic Structure and Nonhomologous End-Joining Function of the Polymerase Component of Bacterial DNA Ligase D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu,H.; Nandakumar, J.; Aniukwu, J.; Wang, L.; Glickman, M.; Lima, C.; Shuman, S.

    2006-01-01

    DNA ligase D (LigD) is a large polyfunctional protein that participates in a recently discovered pathway of nonhomologous end-joining in bacteria. LigD consists of an ATP-dependent ligase domain fused to a polymerase domain (Pol) and a phosphoesterase module. The Pol activity is remarkable for its dependence on manganese, its ability to perform templated and nontemplated primer extension reactions, and its preference for adding ribonucleotides to blunt DNA ends. Here we report the 1.5- Angstroms crystal structure of the Pol domain of Pseudomonas LigD and its complexes with manganese and ATP-dATP substrates, which reveal a minimized polymerase with a two-metal mechanism and a fold similar to that of archaeal DNA primase. Mutational analysis highlights the functionally relevant atomic contacts in the active site. Although distinct nucleoside conformations and contacts for ATP versus dATP are observed in the cocrystals, the functional analysis suggests that the ATP-binding mode is the productive conformation for dNMP and rNMP incorporation. We find that a mutation of Mycobacterium LigD that uniquely ablates the polymerase activity results in increased fidelity of blunt-end double-strand break repair in vivo by virtue of eliminating nucleotide insertions at the recombination junctions. Thus, LigD Pol is a direct catalyst of mutagenic nonhomologous end-joining in vivo. Our studies underscore a previously uncharacterized role for the primase-like polymerase family in DNA repair.

  12. Identification of Critical Residues for the Tight Binding of Both Correct and Incorrect Nucleotides to Human DNA Polymerase λ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jessica A.; Pack, Lindsey R.; Sherrer, Shanen M.; Kshetry, Ajay K.; Newmister, Sean A.; Fowler, Jason D.; Taylor, John-Stephen; Suo, Zucai

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymerase λ (Pol λ) is a novel X-family DNA polymerase that shares 34% sequence identity with DNA polymerase β (Pol β). Pre-steady state kinetic studies have shown that the Pol λ•DNA complex binds both correct and incorrect nucleotides 130-fold tighter on average than the Pol β•DNA complex, although, the base substitution fidelity of both polymerases is 10−4 to 10−5. To better understand Pol λ’s tight nucleotide binding affinity, we created single- and double-substitution mutants of Pol λ to disrupt interactions between active site residues and an incoming nucleotide or a template base. Single-turnover kinetic assays showed that Pol λ binds to an incoming nucleotide via cooperative interactions with active site residues (R386, R420, K422, Y505, F506, A510, and R514). Disrupting protein interactions with an incoming correct or incorrect nucleotide impacted binding with each of the common structural moieties in the following order: triphosphate ≫ base > ribose. In addition, the loss of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between the nucleotide and template base led to a moderate increase in the Kd. The fidelity of Pol λ was maintained predominantly by a single residue, R517, which has minor groove interactions with the DNA template. PMID:20851705

  13. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-01-01

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in ...

  14. Recent Insight into the Kinetic Mechanisms and Conformational Dynamics of Y-Family DNA Polymerases

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, Brian A.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    The kinetic mechanisms by which DNA polymerases catalyze DNA replication and repair have long been areas of active research. Recently discovered Y-family DNA polymerases catalyze the bypass of damaged DNA bases that would otherwise block replicative DNA polymerases and stall replication forks. Unlike DNA polymerases from the five other families, the Y-family DNA polymerases have flexible, solvent-accessible active sites that are able to tolerate various types of damaged template bases and all...

  15. Characterization of the catalytic center of the Ebola virus L polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marie Luisa; Hoenen, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. While no licensed therapeutics are available, recently there has been tremendous progress in developing antivirals. Targeting the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) proteins, which facilitate genome replication and transcription, and particularly the polymerase L, is a promising antiviral approach since these processes are essential for the virus life cycle. However, until now little is known about L in terms of its structure and function, and in particular the catalytic center of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of L, which is one of the most promising molecular targets, has never been experimentally characterized. Using multiple sequence alignments with other negative sense single-stranded RNA viruses we identified the putative catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp. An L protein with mutations in this center was then generated and characterized using various life cycle modelling systems. These systems are based on minigenomes, i.e. miniature versions of the viral genome, in which the viral genes are exchanged against a reporter gene. When such minigenomes are coexpressed with RNP proteins in mammalian cells, the RNP proteins recognize them as authentic templates for replication and transcription, resulting in reporter activity reflecting these processes. Replication-competent minigenome systems indicated that our L catalytic domain mutant was impaired in genome replication and/or transcription, and by using replication-deficient minigenome systems, as well as a novel RT-qPCR-based genome replication assay, we showed that it indeed no longer supported either of these processes. However, it still showed similar expression to wild-type L, and retained its ability to be incorporated into inclusion bodies, which are the sites of EBOV genome replication. We have experimentally defined the catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp, and thus a promising antiviral target regulating an essential

  16. Characterization of the catalytic center of the Ebola virus L polymerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Luisa Schmidt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. While no licensed therapeutics are available, recently there has been tremendous progress in developing antivirals. Targeting the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP proteins, which facilitate genome replication and transcription, and particularly the polymerase L, is a promising antiviral approach since these processes are essential for the virus life cycle. However, until now little is known about L in terms of its structure and function, and in particular the catalytic center of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp of L, which is one of the most promising molecular targets, has never been experimentally characterized.Using multiple sequence alignments with other negative sense single-stranded RNA viruses we identified the putative catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp. An L protein with mutations in this center was then generated and characterized using various life cycle modelling systems. These systems are based on minigenomes, i.e. miniature versions of the viral genome, in which the viral genes are exchanged against a reporter gene. When such minigenomes are coexpressed with RNP proteins in mammalian cells, the RNP proteins recognize them as authentic templates for replication and transcription, resulting in reporter activity reflecting these processes. Replication-competent minigenome systems indicated that our L catalytic domain mutant was impaired in genome replication and/or transcription, and by using replication-deficient minigenome systems, as well as a novel RT-qPCR-based genome replication assay, we showed that it indeed no longer supported either of these processes. However, it still showed similar expression to wild-type L, and retained its ability to be incorporated into inclusion bodies, which are the sites of EBOV genome replication.We have experimentally defined the catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp, and thus a promising antiviral target

  17. Overproduction of the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase DNA-binding domain blocks alkylation-induced DNA repair synthesis in mammalian cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Molinete; W. Vermeulen (Wim); A. Bürkle; J. Mé nissier-de Murcia; J.H. Küpper; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G. de Murcia

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe zinc-finger DNA-binding domain (DBD) of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP, EC 2.4.2.30) specifically recognizes DNA strand breaks induced by various DNA-damaging agents in eukaryotes. This, in turn, triggers the synthesis of polymers of ADP-ribose linked to nuclear proteins during

  18. α,β-D-constrained nucleic acids are strong terminators of thermostable DNA polymerases in polymerase chain reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Martínez

    Full Text Available (S(C5', R(P α,β-D- Constrained Nucleic Acids (CNA are dinucleotide building blocks that can feature either B-type torsional angle values or non-canonical values, depending on their 5'C and P absolute stereochemistry. These CNA are modified neither on the nucleobase nor on the sugar structure and therefore represent a new class of nucleotide with specific chemical and structural characteristics. They promote marked bending in a single stranded DNA so as to preorganize it into a loop-like structure, and they have been shown to induce rigidity within oligonucleotides. Following their synthesis, studies performed on CNA have only focused on the constraints that this family of nucleotides introduced into DNA. On the assumption that bending in a DNA template may produce a terminator structure, we investigated whether CNA could be used as a new strong terminator of polymerization in PCR. We therefore assessed the efficiency of CNA as a terminator in PCR, using triethylene glycol phosphate units as a control. Analyses were performed by denaturing gel electrophoresis and several PCR products were further analysed by sequencing. The results showed that the incorporation of only one CNA was always skipped by the polymerases tested. On the other hand, two CNA units always stopped proofreading polymerases, such as Pfu DNA polymerase, as expected for a strong replication terminator. Non-proofreading enzymes, e.g. Taq DNA polymerase, did not recognize this modification as a strong terminator although it was predominantly stopped by this structure. In conclusion, this first functional use of CNA units shows that these modified nucleotides can be used as novel polymerization terminators of proofreading polymerases. Furthermore, our results lead us to propose that CNA and their derivatives could be useful tools for investigating the behaviour of different classes of polymerases.

  19. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of protein-energy wasting in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease: reconciling low protein intake with nutritional therapy1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kopple, Joel D; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), characterized by a decline in body protein mass and energy reserves, including muscle and fat wasting and visceral protein pool contraction, is an underappreciated condition in early to moderate stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a strong predictor of adverse outcomes. The prevalence of PEW in early to moderate CKD is ≥20–25% and increases as CKD progresses, in part because of activation of proinflammatory cytokines combined with superimposed hypercatabolic states and declines in appetite. This anorexia leads to inadequate protein and energy intake, which may be reinforced by prescribed dietary restrictions and inadequate monitoring of the patient's nutritional status. Worsening uremia also renders CKD patients vulnerable to potentially deleterious effects of uncontrolled diets, including higher phosphorus and potassium burden. Uremic metabolites, some of which are anorexigenic and many of which are products of protein metabolism, can exert harmful effects, ranging from oxidative stress to endothelial dysfunction, nitric oxide disarrays, renal interstitial fibrosis, sarcopenia, and worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Given such complex pathways, nutritional interventions in CKD, when applied in concert with nonnutritional therapeutic approaches, encompass an array of strategies (such as dietary restrictions and supplementations) aimed at optimizing both patients’ biochemical variables and their clinical outcomes. The applicability of many nutritional interventions and their effects on outcomes in patients with CKD with PEW has not been well studied. This article reviews the definitions and pathophysiology of PEW in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, examines the current indications for various dietary modification strategies in patients with CKD (eg, manufactured protein-based supplements, amino acids and their keto acid or hydroxyacid analogues), discusses the rationale behind their potential use in

  1. Management of protein-energy wasting in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease: reconciling low protein intake with nutritional therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kopple, Joel D; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-06-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), characterized by a decline in body protein mass and energy reserves, including muscle and fat wasting and visceral protein pool contraction, is an underappreciated condition in early to moderate stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a strong predictor of adverse outcomes. The prevalence of PEW in early to moderate CKD is ≥20-25% and increases as CKD progresses, in part because of activation of proinflammatory cytokines combined with superimposed hypercatabolic states and declines in appetite. This anorexia leads to inadequate protein and energy intake, which may be reinforced by prescribed dietary restrictions and inadequate monitoring of the patient's nutritional status. Worsening uremia also renders CKD patients vulnerable to potentially deleterious effects of uncontrolled diets, including higher phosphorus and potassium burden. Uremic metabolites, some of which are anorexigenic and many of which are products of protein metabolism, can exert harmful effects, ranging from oxidative stress to endothelial dysfunction, nitric oxide disarrays, renal interstitial fibrosis, sarcopenia, and worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Given such complex pathways, nutritional interventions in CKD, when applied in concert with nonnutritional therapeutic approaches, encompass an array of strategies (such as dietary restrictions and supplementations) aimed at optimizing both patients' biochemical variables and their clinical outcomes. The applicability of many nutritional interventions and their effects on outcomes in patients with CKD with PEW has not been well studied. This article reviews the definitions and pathophysiology of PEW in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, examines the current indications for various dietary modification strategies in patients with CKD (eg, manufactured protein-based supplements, amino acids and their keto acid or hydroxyacid analogues), discusses the rationale behind their potential use in patients

  2. Comparison of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and loop-mediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for diagnosis of Fusarium solani in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients. ... The test was carried out in 1 h reaction at 65°C in a heater block. The specificity of the test was 100% and its sensitivity was a ...

  3. Nucleosome Positioning and NDR Structure at RNA Polymerase III Promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Alexandra Søgaard; Lay, Fides D; Jones, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin is structurally involved in the transcriptional regulation of all genes. While the nucleosome positioning at RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters has been extensively studied, less is known about the chromatin structure at pol III promoters in human cells. We use a high...

  4. Rapid establishment of polymerase chain reaction-restriction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-30

    Mar 30, 2012 ... genome using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has made it possible to explore organelle DNA diversity for taxonomic and phylogenetic purposes. Because of its uniparental mode of inheritance and its low mutation rate related to the nuclear genome, chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) is considered to be an ideal ...

  5. Use of polymerase chain reaction for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars; Birkelund, Svend; Christiansen, Gunna

    1990-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis DNA. From the published sequence of the common C. trachomatis plasmid, two primer sets were selected. Detection of amplified sequences was done by agarose gel electrophoresis of cleaved or uncleaved...

  6. Role of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in the detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is mainly acquired from hospital infections and demonstrated the ability of developing resistance to many antibiotics. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was used to identify antibiotic-resistant isolates. This study was conducted in Al-Mujtahed, Al-Mouwasat and the Children Hospitals in ...

  7. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) provides a superior tool for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) provides a superior tool for the diagnosis of Pneumococcal Infection in Burkina Faso. Y Chaibou, M Congo/Ouedraogo, I Sanou, H Somlare, K Ouattara, CM Kienou, H Belem, E Sampo, SA Traore, R Traore/Ouedraogo, C Hatcher, L Mayer, X Wang, L Sangare ...

  8. EBV DNA polymerase inhibition of tannins from Eugenia uniflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M H; Chiou, J F; Yen, K Y; Yang, L L

    2000-06-30

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the high population malignant tumors among Chinese in southern China and southeast Asia. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human B lymphotropic herpes virus which is known to be closely associated with NPC. EBV DNA polymerase is a key enzyme during EBV replication and is measured by its radioactivity. The addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate to Raji cell cultures led to a large increase in EBV DNA polymerase, which was purified by sequential DEAE-cellulose, phosphocellulose and DNA-cellulose column chromatography. Four tannins were isolated from the active fractions of Eugenia uniflora L., which were tested for the inhibition of EBV DNA polymerase. The results showed the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of gallocatechin, oenothein B, eugeniflorins D(1) and D(2) were 26.5 62.3, 3.0 and 3.5 microM, respectively. Furthermore, when compared with the positive control (phosphonoacetic acid), an inhibitor of EBV replication, the IC(50) value was 16.4 microM. In view of the results, eugeniflorins D(1) and D(2) are the potency principles in the inhibition of EBV DNA polymerase from E. uniflora.

  9. Niacin, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and genomic stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, G.J.; Stierum, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA) and nicotinamide (NAM), commonly called niacin, are the dietary precursors for NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), which is required for DNA synthesis, as well as for the activity of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1; EC 2.4.2.30) for which NAD+ is the sole

  10. Estimation of the reaction efficiency in polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalam, N.

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is largely used in molecular biology for increasing the copy number of a specific DNA fragment. The succession of 20 replication cycles makes it possible to multiply the quantity of the fragment of interest by a factor of 1 million. The PCR technique has

  11. Polymerase chain reaction versus enzyme-linked immunosorbent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase chain reaction versus enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in detection of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among gynaecological patients in southwestern Nigeria. ... Socio-demographic bio-data and gynaecological history were obtained with questionnaire; data was analyzed using SPSS version 20.0.

  12. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  13. [Clinical characteristics and management of infants less than 1-year-old suspected with allergy to cow's milk protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errázuriz, Germán; Lucero, Yalda; Ceresa, Sergio; Gonzalez, Mónica; Rossel, Maureen; Vives, Andrés

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is highly prevalent in infants (2-5%). It has a wide clinical spectrum, and confirmation through an oral food challenge (OFC) is relevant for its differential diagnosis. Information on this topic is scarce in Chile. To describe the demographic and clinical features of infants with suspected CMPA. A retrospective study of patients<1 year-old, treated for suspected CMPA between 2009 and 2011. Demographic data, symptoms of atopy, nutrition at the time of diagnosis, CMPA symptoms, diagnostic studies, and response to treatment were recorded. Diet response at least 4 weeks after milk modification, and clinical behavior when suspected foods were added back to the diet were considered standard diagnostic criteria. Descriptive statistics were performed using Epiinfo ™ software. The study included 106 infants, of whom, 51% male, 80% term newborns, 74% with≥1 atopic parent, and 34% with ≥1 parent/sibling with food allergy. The median age at onset of symptoms was 1.5 months (range 1.5-2m). Almost half (46%) were breast-feeding≥6m, with 15% receiving formula milk since the neonatal period, and 49% before the third month. Common symptoms were: vomiting (63%), colic (49%), and bleeding on passing stools (41%). No anaphylaxis was identified, and 61% had≥2 symptoms at debut. Only 34% were subjected to OFC. The most frequently requested tests were, test patch (43%), prick test (40%), and blood in stools (37%). 43% breast feeding with exclusion diet, 24% extensively hydrolysed formula, 26% amino acid formula, and 7% others. Demographic characteristics and risk factors were similar to those previously described in international literature. Clinical presentation was early in life, and digestive symptoms predominated. OFC was underused for diagnosis, and most of the tests requested did not change management. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantum dots for a high-throughput Pfu polymerase based multi-round polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Fuming; Zhang, Zhizhou; Yuan, Lin; Liu, Deli

    2018-02-26

    Multi-round PCR is an important technique for obtaining enough target DNA from rare DNA resources, and is commonly used in many fields including forensic science, ancient DNA analysis and cancer research. However, multi-round PCR is often aborted, largely due to the accumulation of non-specific amplification during repeated amplifications. Here, we developed a Pfu polymerase based multi-round PCR technique assisted by quantum dots (QDs). Different PCR assays, DNA polymerases (Pfu and Taq), DNA sizes and GC amounts were compared in this study. In the presence of QDs, PCR specificity could be retained even in the ninth-round amplification. Moreover, the longer and more complex the targets were, the earlier the abortion happened in multi-round PCR. However, no obvious enhancement of specificity was found in multi-round PCR using Taq DNA polymerase. Significantly, the fidelity of Pfu polymerase based multi-round PCR was not sacrificed in the presence of QDs. Besides, pre-incubation at 50 °C for an hour had no impact on multi-round PCR performance, which further authenticated the hot start effect of QDs modulated in multi-round PCR. The findings of this study demonstrated that a cost-effective and promising multi-round PCR technique for large-scale and high-throughput sample analysis could be established with high specificity, sensibility and accuracy.

  15. Looking for inhibitors of the dengue virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase using a molecular docking approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galiano V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vicente Galiano,1 Pablo Garcia-Valtanen,2 Vicente Micol,3,4 José Antonio Encinar3 1Physics and Computer Architecture Department, Miguel Hernández University (UMH, Elche, Spain; 2Experimental Therapeutics Laboratory, Hanson and Sansom Institute for Health Research, School of Pharmacy and Medical Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; 3Molecular and Cell Biology Institute, Miguel Hernández University (UMH, Elche, Spain; 4CIBER: CB12/03/30038, Physiopathology of the Obesity and Nutrition, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Palma de Mallorca, Spain Abstract: The dengue virus (DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5 contains both an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain. Polymerase activity is responsible for viral RNA synthesis by a de novo initiation mechanism and represents an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The incidence of DENV has grown rapidly and it is now estimated that half of the human population is at risk of becoming infected with this virus. Despite this, there are no effective drugs to treat DENV infections. The present in silico study aimed at finding new inhibitors of the NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the four serotypes of DENV. We used a chemical library comprising 372,792 nonnucleotide compounds (around 325,319 natural compounds to perform molecular docking experiments against a binding site of the RNA template tunnel of the virus polymerase. Compounds with high negative free energy variation (ΔG <-10.5 kcal/mol were selected as putative inhibitors. Additional filters for favorable druggability and good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity were applied. Finally, after the screening process was completed, we identified 39 compounds as lead DENV polymerase inhibitor candidates. Potentially, these compounds could act as efficient DENV polymerase inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. Keywords: virtual screening, molecular

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis Mip-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemose, AG; Rousch, DA; Birkelund, Svend

    1992-01-01

    venereum (LGV) biovar) is presented. The sequence shows high similarity to the legionella Mip protein and its C-terminal region, like that of the legionella Mip, has high amino acid similarity to eukaryotic and prokaryotic FK506-binding proteins. The chlamydial mip-like gene was detected by polymerase...

  17. Mispairs with Watson-Crick base-pair geometry observed in ternary complexes of an RB69 DNA polymerase variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shuangluo; Konigsberg, William H

    2014-04-01

    Recent structures of DNA polymerase complexes with dGMPCPP/dT and dCTP/dA mispairs at the insertion site have shown that they adopt Watson-Crick geometry in the presence of Mn(2+) indicating that the tautomeric or ionization state of the base has changed. To see whether the tautomeric or ionization state of base-pair could be affected by its microenvironment, we determined 10 structures of an RB69 DNA polymerase quadruple mutant with dG/dT or dT/dG mispairs at position n-1 to n-5 of the Primer/Template duplex. Different shapes of the mispairs, including Watson-Crick geometry, have been observed, strongly suggesting that the local environment of base-pairs plays an important role in their tautomeric or ionization states. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  18. Real-time observation of the initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Furqan M; Meng, Cong A; Murakami, Kenji; Kornberg, Roger D; Block, Steven M

    2015-09-10

    Biochemical and structural studies have shown that the initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription proceeds in the following stages: assembly of the polymerase with general transcription factors and promoter DNA in a 'closed' preinitiation complex (PIC); unwinding of about 15 base pairs of the promoter DNA to form an 'open' complex; scanning downstream to a transcription start site; synthesis of a short transcript, thought to be about 10 nucleotides long; and promoter escape. Here we have assembled a 32-protein, 1.5-megadalton PIC derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and observe subsequent initiation processes in real time with optical tweezers. Contrary to expectation, scanning driven by the transcription factor IIH involved the rapid opening of an extended transcription bubble, averaging 85 base pairs, accompanied by the synthesis of a transcript up to the entire length of the extended bubble, followed by promoter escape. PICs that failed to achieve promoter escape nevertheless formed open complexes and extended bubbles, which collapsed back to closed or open complexes, resulting in repeated futile scanning.

  19. Involvement of the yeast DNA polymerase delta in DNA repair in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giot, L. [State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY. (United States); Chanet, R.; Simon, M.; Facca, C.; Faye, G.

    1997-08-15

    The POL3 encoded catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase delta possesses a highly conserved C-terminal cysteine-rich domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations in some of its cysteine codons display a lethal phenotype, which demonstrates an essential function of this domain. The thermosensitive mutant pol3-13, in which a serine replaces a cysteine of this domain, exhibits a range of defects in DNA repair, such as hypersensitivity to different DNA-damaging agents and deficiency for induced mutagenesis and for recombination. These phenotypes are observed at 24 degrees, a temperature at which DNA replication is almost normal; this differentiates the functions of POL3 in DNA repair and DNA replication. Since spontaneous mutagenesis and spontaneous recombination are efficient in pol3-13, we propose that POL3 plays an important role in DNA repair after irradiation, particularly in the error-prone and recombinational pathways. Extragenic suppressors of pol3-13 are allelic to sdp5-1, previously identified as an extragenic suppressor of pol3-11. SDP5, which is identical to HYS2, encodes a protein homologous to the p50 subunit of bovine and human DNA polymerase delta. SDP5 is most probably the p55 subunit of Pol delta of S. cerevisiae and seems to be associated with the catalytic subunit for both DNA replication and DNA repair. (author)

  20. Mechanism for Coordinated RNA Packaging and Genome Replication by Rotavirus Polymerase VP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaohui; McDonald, Sarah M.; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Tao, Yizhi Jane; Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Nibert, Max L.; Patton, John T.; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (NIH); (CH-Boston)

    2009-04-08

    Rotavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase VP1 catalyzes RNA synthesis within a subviral particle. This activity depends on core shell protein VP2. A conserved sequence at the 3' end of plus-strand RNA templates is important for polymerase association and genome replication. We have determined the structure of VP1 at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, as apoenzyme and in complex with RNA. The cage-like enzyme is similar to reovirus {lambda}3, with four tunnels leading to or from a central, catalytic cavity. A distinguishing characteristic of VP1 is specific recognition, by conserved features of the template-entry channel, of four bases, UGUG, in the conserved 3' sequence. Well-defined interactions with these bases position the RNA so that its 3' end overshoots the initiating register, producing a stable but catalytically inactive complex. We propose that specific 3' end recognition selects rotavirus RNA for packaging and that VP2 activates the autoinhibited VP1/RNA complex to coordinate packaging and genome replication.