WorldWideScience

Sample records for policy duke university

  1. Duke University High Energy Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1993-03-01

    The research program of the Duke High Energy Physics Group is described in this Progress Report and a separate Proposal containing their plans for 1994. These two documents are supplemented by compilations of selected publications, thesis abstracts, and the curriculum vitae of the eleven Ph.D. physicists who are carrying out this research program. This Progress Report contains a review of the research which has been done over the first half (1992 and 1993 to date) of the current three-year DOE grant, plus some earlier research to establish a broader perspective of the research interests. High energy physics research at Duke has three components. The first, Task A, is based upon experiments carried out at Fermilab's Tevatron Collider. The group is finishing the analysis of data from their first collider experiment (E735), a study of inclusive particle production from bar p p collisions at √ bar s = 1.8 TeV. The second component of the research, Task B, deals primarily with heavy flavor physics. The third part of the research program, Task D, deals with preparation for research at the SSC. The authors have been active in the development of tracking detectors for the SSC since 1989, and are now concentrating on the design and construction of straw tube drift chambers for the solenoid detector

  2. Duke University high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and Χ meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report

  3. Duke University: Licensing and Real Estate Joint Ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene J.

    1984-01-01

    Joint ventures undertaken by Duke University with industry are reported that illustrate the imaginative arrangements and economic and otherwise advantageous structures possible in co-ventures. They include patent and trademark licensing, travel agency commissions, a racquetball and health club, a hotel, and an office building. (MSE)

  4. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V. [PI; Goshaw, Al [Co-PI; Kruse, Mark [Co-PI; Oh, Seog [Co-PI; Scholberg, Kate [Co-PI; Walter, Chris [Co-PI

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, ve postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the ! e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detec- tor. This water- lled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  5. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goshaw, Alfred; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, five postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the {mu} {yields} e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detector. This water-filled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  6. Information Needs and Bibliographic Problems of the Anthropology Departments at U. N. C. and Duke University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurling, Norman Kent

    Research was conducted on information needs and bibliographic problems of anthropologists at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Sixty-four faculty members and graduate students were surveyed, and twenty faculty members were interviewed. Many areas of information retrieval problems and the different ways…

  7. How Nan Keohane Is Changing Duke: With a Focus on Building Consensus, She Is Transforming the University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinger, Julianne

    2000-01-01

    Nannerl Keohane became president of Duke University in 1993, one of the first women to lead a top research university. This article details some of the changes that have taken place during her tenure as president. (JM)

  8. Phased implementation of AT and T PACS at Duke University Medical Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockbridge, C.; Ravin, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    ''Help me communicate more quickly and more effectively with referring clinicians''. This request was the driving behind the installation of the AT and T CommView System at Duke. The CommView System is a type of Digital Image Management System and Picture Archival Communication System whose chief purpose is to deliver interpolated diagnostic images to referring clinicians and attending physicians. The system acquires electronic images from modalities in a diagnostic imaging facility, stores these images in computer managed patient files and distributes these on demand over fiber optic cable to Display Consoles. The CommView System was designed at AT and T Bell Labs; it uses fiber optic ribbon cable between buildings fused to multistrand lightguide building cables to distribute images, typically around a medical center or campus at data transfer rates of 40 Mbps. This paper gives the rationale used in designing a start-up network and placing the initial equipment for a field of the AT and T CommView System in the Radiology Department of Duke University Medical Center

  9. Production of Astatine-211 at the Duke University Medical Center for its regional distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, Michael [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Systemic targeted radiation therapy and radioimmunotherapy continue to be important tools in the treatment of certain cancers. Because of their high energy and short path length, alpha particle emitters such as 211At are more effective than either external beam x- ray or in vivo beta radiation in delivering potentially curative doses of radiation. The limited clinical trials that have been conducted to date have yielded encouraging responses in some patients, e.g., malignant brain tumors. In order to escalate the additional necessary research and development in radiochemistry, radiobiology and efficacy evaluation of alpha particle radiotherapeutics, it is universally agreed that access to an affordable, reliable supply of 211At is warranted. In conjunction with the Department of Energy's intent to enhance stable and radioactive isotope availability for research applications, it is the primary objective of this project to improve 211At production and purification capabilities at Duke so that this radionuclide can be supplied to researchers at other institutions throughout the US.The most widely used 211At production method involves the α,2n reaction on Bismuth using a cyclotron with beams ≤ 28 MeV. Yields can be enhanced with use of an internal target that allows for a higher alpha fluence plus efficient heat dissipation in the target. Both of these items are in place at Duke; however, in order to support production for multi-institutional use, irradiation campaigns in excess of 50 µAp and four hours duration will be needed. Further, post-irradiation processing equipment is lacking that will enable the distribution process. Financial support is sought for i) a shielded, ventilated processing/containment hood; ii) development of a post-irradiation target retrieval system; iii) fabrication of a 211At distillation and recovery module and iv) a performance review and, where needed, an enhancement of seven

  10. When the library is located in prime real estate: a case study on the loss of space from the Duke University Medical Center Library and Archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Patricia L

    2010-01-01

    The Duke University Medical Center Library and Archives is located in the heart of the Duke Medicine campus, surrounded by Duke Hospital, ambulatory clinics, and numerous research facilities. Its location is considered prime real estate, given its adjacency to patient care, research, and educational activities. In 2005, the Duke University Library Space Planning Committee had recommended creating a learning center in the library that would support a variety of educational activities. However, the health system needed to convert the library's top floor into office space to make way for expansion of the hospital and cancer center. The library had only five months to plan the storage and consolidation of its journal and book collections, while working with the facilities design office and architect on the replacement of key user spaces on the top floor. Library staff worked together to develop plans for storing, weeding, and consolidating the collections and provided input into renovation plans for users spaces on its mezzanine level. The library lost 15,238 square feet (29%) of its net assignable square footage and a total of 16,897 (30%) gross square feet. This included 50% of the total space allotted to collections and over 15% of user spaces. The top-floor space now houses offices for Duke Medicine oncology faculty and staff. By storing a large portion of its collection off-site, the library was able to remove more stacks on the remaining stack level and convert them to user spaces, a long-term goal for the library. Additional space on the mezzanine level had to be converted to replace lost study and conference room spaces. While this project did not match the recommended space plans for the library, it underscored the need for the library to think creatively about the future of its facility and to work toward a more cohesive master plan.

  11. The Primary Care Leadership Track at the Duke University School of Medicine: creating change agents to improve population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheline, Barbara; Tran, Anh N; Jackson, Joseph; Peyser, Bruce; Rogers, Susan; Engle, Deborah

    2014-10-01

    Physicians need training in community engagement, leadership, and population health to prepare them to work with partners within the community and to adapt medical care to address population health needs. With an overall goal of training primary care practitioners to be change agents for improving population health, the Duke University School of Medicine launched the Primary Care Leadership Track (PCLT) in 2011. The four-year PCLT curriculum requires students to contribute to existing community health initiatives, perform community-engaged research, and participate in leadership training. The clinical curriculum incorporates a longitudinal approach to allow students to follow patient outcomes. In addition, students regularly interact with faculty to explore population health issues, review patient cases, and adjust individual learning opportunities as needed. The first cohort of PCLT students will graduate in 2015. Prospective comparisons with traditional track students are planned on performance on standardized tests and career choices. The authors created the PCLT as a laboratory in which students can engage with the community and explore solutions to address the health of the public and the future delivery of health care. To meet the goal of training change agents, PCLT leaders need to expand opportunities for students to learn from providers and organizations that are successfully bridging the gap between medical care and public health.

  12. Lauren Berlant and Lee Edelman, Sex, Or The Unbearable (Durham: Duke University Press, 2014, pp. 168, ISBN: 9780822355946, £13.99, paperback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Proctor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 'So few colleges and universities bother to teach human sexuality...so much stigma adheres even to scholarly investigation of sex,' Gayle Rubin lamented in her 1984 essay 'Thinking Sex'. But it was an academic conference on Rubin's work - 'Rethinking Sex', a lavish threeday event, held at the University of Pennsylvania in 2009 - that provided the initial impetus for Lauren Berlant and Lee Edelman to enter into a dialogue on sexuality. The result is Sex, or the Unbearable, published by Duke University Press, the first in a series on queer theory edited by the authors.

  13. Universal service policy in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do Manh, Thai; Falch, Morten; Von Salakpi, Simeon

    2016-01-01

    Universal service provision is a key to bridge the digital divide. This paper provides an empirical examination of the Vietnamese universal policy introduced in 2015 for implementation up to 2020. Using the framework of King et al. (1994) the paper analyses the universal services policy in Vietna...

  14. Giving The Duke His Due.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    The centennial year of Edward K. "Duke" Ellington's birth has inspired many American colleges and universities to convene tribute concerts and conferences. However, few schools offer majors in jazz-related studies; those that do often maintain strict separation between jazz and classical music instruction. Many in the jazz-education…

  15. Psychometric Evaluation of the Filipino Versions of the Duke University Religion Index and the Spiritual Coping Strategies Scale in Filipino Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Reyes, Ralph Warren P; Colet, Paolo C; Estacio, Joel C; Caldeira, Sílvia; Vitorino, Luciano Magalhães; Koenig, Harold G

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Filipino versions of the Duke University Religion Index (DUREL-F) and the Spiritual Coping Strategies scale (SCS-F) for hemodialysis (HD) patients in the Philippines. A convenient sample of 162 HD patients was included in this descriptive, cross-sectional study. The DUREL-F and SCS-F exhibited acceptable internal consistency and stability reliability, as well as excellent content and construct validity. The findings confirmed the soundness of the psychometric properties of the two scales. Thus, they can be used for timely and accurate assessment of religiosity and spiritual coping utilization among Filipino patients receiving HD.

  16. Attitudes of Mississippi college students toward David Duke before and after seeing the film Who is David Duke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, R; Girdner, E J; Burroughs, R G; Routman, M

    1993-01-01

    The attitudes of 211 students at a university in Mississippi were investigated both before and after seeing the Public Broadcasting Film Who Is David Duke? The film provided evidence of Duke's current racism, anti-Semitism, and pro-Nazi leanings. In a previous study with university students in Louisiana, the majority did not change their attitudes after watching the film (Eisenman, 1993). However, in the present study, students' attitudes showed change in an anti-Duke direction. The findings are discussed and reasons given for the differences between the two samples, and for the popularity of Duke, a former leader of the Ku Klux Klan.

  17. THE TROUBLE WITH NIGERIAN UNIVERSITIES: BOGUS POLICY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    coupled with policy mis-match and ideology are responsible for the problems in the University sub- system and ... KEYWORDS: Moral Education, Indiscipline, University, Virtue Ethics, Policy. INTRODUCTION. There is ...... business of the state.

  18. Institutional Responsibility and the Flawed Genomic Biomarkers at Duke University: A Missed Opportunity for Transparency and Accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMets, David L; Fleming, Thomas R; Geller, Gail; Ransohoff, David F

    2017-08-01

    When there have been substantial failures by institutional leadership in their oversight responsibility to protect research integrity, the public should demand that these be recognized and addressed by the institution itself, or the funding bodies. This commentary discusses a case of research failures in developing genomic predictors for cancer risk assessment and treatment at a leading university. In its review of this case, the Office of Research Integrity, an agency within the US Department of Health and Human Services, focused their report entirely on one individual faculty member and made no comment on the institution's responsibility and its failure to provide adequate oversight and investigation. These actions missed an important opportunity to emphasize the institution's critical responsibilities in oversight of research integrity and the importance of institutional transparency and accountability.

  19. Intellectual Property Policies at Canadian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Hen, M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the Intellectual Property policies at schools selected from Research Infosource’s Canada’s Top 50 research universities 2009 (http://www.researchinfosource.com/). This work is a continuation and extension of Dr. Bruce P. Clayman’s original idea and piece University intellectual property policies.

  20. Universities and Development: Global Cooperation. Policy Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Universities UK, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This policy briefing aims to demonstrate that universities are key organisations in international development. Universities are involved in a wide range of international development activities, including collaborative research projects, developing entrepreneurial and employability skills and the evaluation of non-governmental organisation (NGO)…

  1. Trade Union Participation in University Research Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    1984-01-01

    The recent development of Dutch research coordination agencies, the Science Shops, forms the context for a description of the relationship between university research and policy at Amsterdam University and the national trade union organization. Management tools such as project financing and other elements of this system are discussed. (MSE)

  2. University/Hospital fetal dose policy experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.M.; Vinson, W.R.; Deforest, W.W.; Washburn, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Since at least 1981, an informal policy has existed at the authors research university and teaching hospital institution to interview, inform and assure appropriate personnel monitoring for pregnant radiation workers. Events, such as popular and technical publications (NCRP 87) and the maturation of NRC's proposed changes in 10 CFR 20 (NRC 88), brought increased attention to the subject of fetal radiation dose. The need for a formal approach to the subject became evident. By 1987, a concerted effort to promulgate a formal policy was launched. A draft policy statement was presented to each institutional radiation safety committee for review and action. There was immediate strong interest. A thorough, multilevel review, comment and redraft process developed. Well tested policy statements were then approved in 1988

  3. The Monocular Duke of Urbino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Leffler, Christopher T; Chavis, Pamela S; Khan, Faraaz; Bermudez, Dennis; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    Federico da Montefeltro (1422-1482), the Duke of Urbino, was a well-known historical figure during the Italian Renaissance. He is the subject of a famous painting by Piero della Francesca (1416-1492), which displays the Duke from the left and highlights his oddly shaped nose. The Duke is known to have lost his right eye due to an injury sustained during a jousting tournament, which is why the painting portrays him from the left. Some historians teach that the Duke subsequently underwent nasal surgery to remove tissue from the bridge of his nose in order to expand his visual field in an attempt to compensate for the lost eye. In theory, removal of a piece of the nose may have expanded the nasal visual field, especially the "eye motion visual field" that encompasses eye movements. In addition, removing part of the nose may have reduced some of the effects of ocular parallax. Finally, shifting of the visual egocenter may have occurred, although this seems likely unrelated to the proposed nasal surgery. Whether or not the Duke actually underwent the surgery cannot be proven, but it seems unlikely that this would have substantially improved his visual function.

  4. Distributed generation - customer owned generation - Duke Energy case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iung, Anderson M. [Duke Energy International, Geracao Paranapanema S.A., SP (Brazil). Market Analysis Dept.; Ribeiro, Paulo F. [Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Oliveira, A.R. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Distributed generation (DG) is getting more attractive. Although unit costs show strong economies of scale for all generation technology types, there is a potential niche market for DG technology to drive growth in addition to environmental concern issues. Duke Energy encourages the installation of cost effective small scale costumer owned generation. The objective of this article is to evaluate some aspects of DG connection in the Duke's distribution system regarding power quality, voltage stability, system protection, power balance control policy and the economical viability. (author)

  5. Wireless Infrared Networking in the Duke Paperless Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetten, George D.; Guthrie, Scott D.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses wireless (diffuse infrared) networking technology to link laptop computers in a computer programming and numerical methods course at Duke University (North Carolina). Describes products and technologies, and effects on classroom dynamics. Reports on effective instructional strategies for lecture, solving student problems, building shared…

  6. Financial policies and performance of line managers in Universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study analysed the effect of financial policies on the performance of line managers in Ugandan Universities. The field research was carried out in private and public universities. Every university had a financial policies so their line managers were expected to perform their duties effectively. The objectives of the study ...

  7. Universal Basic Education Policy: Impact on Enrolment and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iddrisu, Issah

    2016-01-01

    The universal basic education policy enshrined in the constitution of Ghana is aimed at making education accessible and affordable for all Ghanaian citizens. This paper sought to assess whether the universal basic education policy really have an impact on access at the basic level. The study was carried out on the premise that the universal basic…

  8. Starting the Conversation: University-Wide Research Data Management Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erway, Ricky

    2013-01-01

    This call for action addresses the high-level benefits of adopting a university-wide policy regarding research data management. It identifies the various university stakeholders and suggests that the library initiate a conversation among them in order to get buy-in for a proactive, rather than reactive, high-level policy for responsible data…

  9. University Mergers in Russia: Four Waves of Educational Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, K. R.; Lisyutkin, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    This article is aimed at identifying distinctive features of the educational policy of university mergers--their main stages, types, and declared goals. We analyzed cases of university mergers and acquisitions (M&A) from the 1990s to the present, which allowed us to identify and describe four Russia-specific waves of educational policy. Based…

  10. Legalistic or Inspirational? Comparing University Conflict of Interest Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elise; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2009-01-01

    In response to growing public and policy concern about conflicts of interest (COI) in university research, academic institutions in North America and Europe have introduced policies to manage COI. However, depending on their form and content, COI policies can be more or less helpful in the effective management of COI. In this paper, we examine and…

  11. Investment Policies for College and University Endowments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, William T.

    1999-01-01

    College trustees have a responsibility to institute investment policies that preserve real endowment value. The chief financial officer's responsibility varies, but at a minimum should provide the board with essential information and ensure that trustees understand the importance of policy decisions. Critical tasks include establishing and…

  12. Checklist "Open Access Policies": Analysis of the Open Access Policies of Public Universities in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bauer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This checklist provides an overview of the Open Access policies implemented at Austrian universities and extramural research institutions. Furthermore, the polices adopted at nine public universities are analyzed and the respective text modules are categorized thematically. The second part of the checklist presents measures for the promotion of Open Access following the implementation of an Open Access policy.

  13. University Policies and Procedures on Sexual Harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Jerilyn S.

    Sexual harassment complaints are challenges to the abuse of power in certain kinds of communicative relationships, and sexual harassment policies and procedures are ways of defining the responsible exercise of power and providing the means to address grievances that result from irresponsible and potentially harmful uses of power in those…

  14. Language Policy and Planning: Challenges for Latin American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Rainer Enrique; Álvarez López, Elisa; Carvalhal, Tatiana Pereira

    2016-01-01

    This article starts with an overview of the sociolinguistic situation in Latin America as a context for language policy and planning (LPP) decisions in the academic field. Then it gives a brief overview of the language policy challenges faced by universities to cope with neoliberal internationalisation. A conceptualisation of the domain as a…

  15. Alumni access policies in public university libraries | Burclaff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the current library access policies for alumni at a public university system using document analysis, observations and interviews. We found that alumni are specifically addressed in only two library access policies, and borrowing privileges through cards, on-site access and restricted access to electronic ...

  16. Revenue Sharing: An Assessment of Current Policies at UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzard, James; Brown, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of academic technologies to industry is an important process underpinning innovation and economic development. Various approaches have been adopted by universities to encourage academics to participate in commercial activities. Many have implemented revenue sharing policies, through which the revenues generated from university-owned…

  17. European University Students' Experiences and Attitudes toward Campus Alcohol Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hal, Guido; Tavolacci, Marie-Pierre; Stock, Christiane

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many studies indicate that a substantial part of the student population drinks excessively, yet most European universities do not have an alcohol policy. In the absence of an alcohol guideline at universities and the easy access to alcohol sold at the student cafeteria, for instance, ...

  18. University museums: problems, policy and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Merriman

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available There are some 400 university museums and collections in the United Kingdom. During the 1990s their often neglected state came under close scrutiny and as a result their future role is now being re-assessed. A member of the Institute's staff has recently been appointed to the new position of Curator of UCL Museums and Collections, and he comments here on the national situation and describes some of the initiatives under way at UCL.

  19. The Duke of York visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Duke of York chats before inaugurating the UK@CERN exhibition. From left to right: Robert Aymar, CERN's Director General, the Duke of York, and leading UK scientists at CERN: Jim Virdee, CMS deputy spokeman; theorist John Ellis ; and Steve Myers, head of the AB Department. On 23 November, the Duke of York visited CERN and, in his capacity as the UK's Special Representative for International Trade and Investment, inaugurated the UK@CERN Exhibition. This biennial trade show was initially held in 1968, the first such exhibition by a CERN member state. This year 22 companies displayed goods and services that could be of interest to CERN scientists. In his inaugural speech, the Duke emphasized that business between companies and CERN "is a two-way information flow with mutual benefits." The companies make sales but also benefit from technologies that CERN transfers to them. CERN benefits from the exchange, the Duke said, addressing CERN's scientists, because it "frees your time for what you do best: science....

  20. Translating language policy into practice: Language and culture policy at a Dutch university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haines, Kevin; Dijk, Anje

    2016-01-01

    The CEFR will only achieve its potential in higher education if it is embedded in a meaningful way in the wider processes of the university. One means of embedding the CEFR is through policy, and in this article we report the development of a language policy in the broader context of

  1. Gender diversity policies in universities: a multi-perspective framework of policy measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, T.M.; Willemsen, T.M.; Tijdens, K.G.

    2009-01-01

    Are policies to increase women’s share among university professors effective? The importance of gender equality on the labor market has been well established, but our understanding of what kind of policy is effective to increase the share of women is still unclear. Three sets of factors explain

  2. Preventing Childhood Obesity: Policy and Practice Strategies for North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jenni, Ed.; Rosch, Joel, Ed.; Smith, Shannon, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    North Carolina Family Impact Seminars (NCFIS) include annual seminars, briefing reports and follow-up activities designed specifically for state policymakers, including legislators and legislative staff, the governor and executive branch staff, and state agency representatives. The Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University convenes the…

  3. IMPACT OF ROMANIAN HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING POLICY ON UNIVERSITY EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRETAN Georgiana Camelia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The issues of higher education funding policy and university operating efficiency are hot points on the actual public agenda worldwide as the pressures exercised upon the public resources increased, especially in the aftermath of the last economic crisis. Concerned with the improvement of the funding mechanism through which government allocates the public funds in order to meet the national core objectives within the area of higher education, the policy makers adjusted the funding policy by diversifying the criteria used in distributing the funds to public universities. Thus, the aim of this research is to underline both the impact and the consequences the public funding patterns of higher education have on the relative efficiency of public funded higher education institutions, across time. Moreover, the research conducted aims to determine whether the changes occurred within the Romanian public funding methodology of higher education institutions improved the relative efficiency scores of public funded universities, before and after the economic crisis of 2008. Thus, on one hand we have underlined the changes brought to the Romanian public funding mechanism of higher education during the years of 2007, 2009 and 2010 compared to the year of 2006, using the content analysis, and on the other hand we assessed and compared the relative efficiency scores of each selected public funded university using a multiple input - multiple output linear programming model, by employing the Data Envelopment Analysis technique. The findings of the research undertaken emphasized that a more performance oriented funding mechanism improves the efficiency scores of public universities. The results of the research undertaken could be used either by the policy makers within the area of higher education or by the administrative management of public universities in order to correlate the funding with the results obtained and/or the objectives assumed by both the

  4. Stanford, Duke, Rice,... and Gates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an open letter to Bill Gates. In his letter, the author suggests that Bill Gates should build a brand-new university, a great 21st-century institution of higher learning. This university will be unlike anything the world has ever seen. He asks Bill Gates not to stop helping existing colleges create the higher-education system…

  5. Academic Freedom and University Autonomy: A Higher Education Policy Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kai; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    This article reflects upon three seminal articles published in "Higher Education Policy" ("HEP") on academic freedom and university autonomy. The reflections indicate that "HEP" research contributes to a sophisticated and systematic understanding of the complexity of academic freedom, addressing both the original…

  6. UV-VUV FEL program at DUKE storage ring with OK-4 optical klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.; Vinokurov, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    A 1 GeV electron storage ring dedicated for UV-VUV FEL operation is under construction at the Duke University Free Electron Laser Laboratory. The UV-VUV-FEL project, based on the collaboration of the Duke FEL Laboratory and Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics is described. The main parameters of the DFELL storage ring, of the OK-4 optical klystron, and the experimental set-up are presented. The parameters of UV-VUV FEL are given and the possible future upgrades to this system are discussed

  7. Advantages of a Universal and Generous Family Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    allowances, child and elderly care and tax policies towards families. The Scandinavian region is a for-runner because of a combined effort of generous universal transfers and services, which has led a family (or women) friendly welfare state. The result is a high female labor market participation rate since...... generous policies allow women both to be mothers and workers and has resulted in a relatively high absolute fertility rate of 1.9; up from 1.4 in 1983 when the expansion of social services for families took off. The family welfare package has also resulted in low child poverty. Unfortunately, Scandinavian...

  8. HESS opinions : Repeatable research: What hydrologists can learn from the Duke cancer research scandal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fienen, Michael N.; Bakker, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, difficulties encountered in reproducing the results of a cancer study at Duke University resulted in a scandal and an investigation which concluded that tools used for data management, analysis, and modeling were inappropriate for the documentation of the study, let alone the

  9. The Department That Fell to Earth: The Deflation of Duke English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, David

    1999-01-01

    Recounts the rapid rise and recent decline of the once highly regarded Duke University (North Carolina) English department, characterized by disaffection and defection to other institutions of a large proportion of the faculty, disorganized teaching, and an unsettled curriculum. The perceptions of a number of the faculty involved are presented.…

  10. Prospective Health: Duke's Approach to Improving Employee Health and Managing Health Care Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, H. Clint, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    If developing a healthy workforce is critical to reining in the skyrocketing cost of health care, then why have so many attempts at preventive health or disease management fallen short? How can employers connect with employees to engage them in changing unhealthy habits or lifestyles? Duke University has launched an innovative new approach called…

  11. Sprogpolitik for Roskilde Universitet/Language Policy for Roskilde University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karsten; Klitgård, Ida; Hvidtfeldt, Susanne

    Med vedtagelsen af den Internationale Uddannelsesstrategi i 2012 blev det også vedtaget at Roskilde Universitet skulle udarbejde en ny sprogpolitik. Sprogpolitikken skal være med til at sikre at Roskilde Universitet bliver en arbejdsplads med plads til mennesker fra forskellige kulturer og steder....... Politikken fastslår at dansk er hovedsproget på RUC (svensk og norsk er ligestillet med dansk), at engelsk er det fælles andetsprog som universitetet bruger til sin egen interne kommunikation og til at kommunikere med sin ikke dansktalende omverden med, og at andre sprog kan og bør benyttes i de relevante...... sammenhænge. Roskilde University’s International Education Strategy was passed in 2012. Part of the strategy said the Roskilde University must implement a new language policy. The language policy will contribute to Roskilde University as a workplace with room for people from various cultures and places...

  12. Duke Power Company's control rod wear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culp, D.C.; Kitlan, M.S. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Recent examinations performed at several foreign and domestic pressurized water reactors have identified significant control rod cladding wear, leading to the conclusion that previously believed control rod lifetimes are not attainable. To monitor control rod performance and reduce safety concerns associated with wear, Duke Power Company has developed a comprehensive control rod wear program for Ag-In-Cd and boron carbide (B 4 C) rods at the McGuire and Catawba nuclear stations. Duke Power currently uses the Westinghouse 17 x 17 Ag-In-Cd control rod design at McGuire Unit 1 and the Westinghouse 17 x 17 hybrid B 4 C control rod design with a Ag-In-Cd tip at McGuire Unit 2 and Catawba Units 1 and 2. The designs are similar, with the exception of the absorber material and clad thickness. There are 53 control rods per unit

  13. Duke Power's liquid radwaste processing improvement efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.E. Jr.; Bramblett, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    The rising cost of processing liquid radwaste and industry efforts to reduce offsite isotopic contributions has drawn greater attention to the liquid radwaste area. Because of economic pressures to reduce cost and simultaneously improve performance, Duke Power has undertaken a wide ranging effort to cost effectively achieve improvements in the liquid radwaste processing area. Duke Power has achieved significant reductions over recent years in the release of curies to the environment from the Liquid Radwaste Treatmentt systems at its Catawba, McGuire, and Oconee stations. System wide site curie reductions of 78% have been achieved in a 3 year period. These curie reductions have been achieved while simultaneously reducing the amount of media used to accomplish treatment. The curie and media usage reductions have been achieved at low capital cost expenditures. A large number of approaches and projects have been used to achieve these curie and media usage reductions. This paper will describe the various projects and the associated results for Duke Power's processing improvement efforts. The subjects/projects which will be described include: (1) Cooperative philosophy between stations (2) Source Control (3) Processing Improvements (4) Technology Testing

  14. Politics, Policies and Practice: Assessing the Impact of Sexual Harassment Policies in UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alison M.

    2004-01-01

    Since sexual harassment was first named and identified as an obstacle to women's equality in the mid 1970s, concern about both its prevalence and its damaging effects has resulted in the widespread introduction of anti-harassment policies in UK universities, as in other work and educational settings. The study reported here sought to assess the…

  15. Analysis of selected policies towards universal health coverage in Uganda: the policy implementation barometer protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoro, Charles; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Twalo, Thembinkosi; Mwendera, Chikondi; Douglas, Mbuyiselo; Mukuru, Moses; Kasasa, Simon; Ssengooba, Freddie

    2018-01-01

    Policy implementation remains an under researched area in most low and middle income countries and it is not surprising that several policies are implemented without a systematic follow up of why and how they are working or failing. This study is part of a larger project called Supporting Policy Engagement for Evidence-based Decisions (SPEED) for Universal Health Coverage in Uganda. It seeks to support policymakers monitor the implementation of vital programmes for the realisation of policy goals for Universal Health Coverage. A Policy Implementation Barometer (PIB) is proposed as a mechanism to provide feedback to the decision makers about the implementation of a selected set of policy programmes at various implementation levels (macro, meso and micro level). The main objective is to establish the extent of implementation of malaria, family planning and emergency obstetric care policies in Uganda and use these results to support stakeholder engagements for corrective action. This is the first PIB survey of the three planned surveys and its specific objectives include: assessment of the perceived appropriateness of implementation programmes to the identified policy problems; determination of enablers and constraints to implementation of the policies; comparison of on-line and face-to-face administration of the PIB questionnaire among target respondents; and documentation of stakeholder responses to PIB findings with regard to corrective actions for implementation. The PIB will be a descriptive and analytical study employing mixed methods in which both quantitative and qualitative data will be systematically collected and analysed. The first wave will focus on 10 districts and primary data will be collected through interviews. The study seeks to interview 570 respondents of which 120 will be selected at national level with 40 based on each of the three policy domains, 200 from 10 randomly selected districts, and 250 from 50 facilities. Half of the respondents at

  16. A glossary of policy frameworks: the many forms of 'universalism' and policy 'targeting'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Gemma; Crammond, Brad

    2017-03-01

    The recognition that certain characteristics (such as poverty, disadvantage or membership of marginalised social or cultural groups) can make individuals more susceptible to illness has reignited interest in how to combine universal programmes and policies with ones targeted at specific groups. However, 'universalism' and 'targeting' are used in different ways for different purposes. In this glossary, we define different types and approaches to universalism and targeting. We anticipate that greater clarity in relation to what is meant by 'universalism' and 'targeting' will lead to a more nuanced debate and practice in this area. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Transforming the Duke Power work control process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulin, R.

    1996-01-01

    Faced with rising operating and maintenance costs, Duke Power initiated a Work Control Project to provide fundamental rethinking, dramatic quality improvements, and a dramatic reduction in inefficiencies. Other aims were: to do more better with less, to improve coordination between work groups, reduce paperwork, increase effectiveness and utilization of station personnel, and achieve consistent implementation between sites. The existing electronic work management scheme needed some modifications to its software, especially, the programming of a screen to allow simple entry of corrective problems, and the implementation of the new scheduling process. The project has been successful in speeding up the resolution of problems, and in reducing backlogs of maintenance work

  18. Scale model helps Duke untie construction snags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear power plant model, only 60 percent complete, has helped Duke Power identify over 150 major design interferences, which, when resolved, will help cut capital expense and eliminate scheduling problems that normally crop up as revisions are made during actual plant construction. The model has been used by construction, steam production, and design personnel to recommend changes that should improve material handling, operations, and maintenance procedures as well as simplifying piping and cabling. The company has already saved many man-hours in material take-off, material management, and detailed drafting and expects to save even more with greater use of, and improvement in, its modeling program. Duke's modeling program was authorized and became operational in November 1974, with the first model to be the Catawba Nuclear Station. This plant is a two-unit station using Westinghouse nuclear steam supply systems in tandem with General Electric turbine-generators, horizontal feedwater heaters, and Foster Wheeler triple pressure condensers. Each unit is rated 1142 MWe

  19. Actions for the Construction of a University Policy in Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Yaneth González Pinzón

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17227/01234870.41folios143.155 This article aims at reporting some of the findings of a research study conducted at Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Bogotá (PUJ-Bogotá, as part of a multi-case study carried out by thirteen universities in Colombia which belong to the academic group Red de Lectura y Escritura en Educación Superior (REDLESS. In this study, students’ initial preparation in reading and writing is characterized in order to identify its impact on their subsequent academic development. To do so, student’s development during the final two years at high school (Educación Media was first analyzed along with their preparation during the first year at university and its possible impact on their academic development during their majors. In addition to these data, the contents of a university course designed to prepare students in literacy was analyzed along with the perceptions of the teachers in charge of it and those of disciplinary courses. The results offered by the intersection of such diverse sources of information are used to make some proposals aimed at consolidating an institutional policy for literacy and other derived factors such as orality and the transformation and construction of knowledge.

  20. When Academics Become Parents: An Overview of Family Leave Policies at Canadian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Susan; Pankratz, Curtis J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews family leave policies in Canadian universities through March 2002. Analysis of pregnancy, adoption, and partner (paternity) leave policies reveal that most Canadian university policies produce income loss and disruption and are characterized by gender regulation and familialism. The paper proposes that improving faculty family leave…

  1. Effect of Fees Policies on the Quality of University Education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on the findings of a study that was undertaken to analyse the effect of fees policy on the quality of university education in Uganda. It reports that every university in Uganda has a fees policy and that these fees policies differ in content and implementation. The paper confirms a significant relationship ...

  2. Duke storage rink UV/VUV FEL: Status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The 1 GeV Duke storage ring was successfully commissioned with parameters exceeding initial specification. The OK-4 FEL has arrived at the Duke FEL laboratory from the Novosibirsk Institute of Nuclear Physics. The OK-4 installation and commissioning is in progress. In this paper we describe the up-to-date status of the Duke storage ring and the OK-4 FEL. The projected performance of the OK-4 UV/VUV FEL is presented based on the electron beam parameters achieved. Initial plans to operate the OK-4 UV/VUV FEL at the Duke 1 GeV storage ring are outlined. Future plans and prospects of both the OK-4 FEL and the Duke storage ring are discussed.

  3. Attitudes of Mississippi College Students toward David Duke before and after Seeing the Film "Who Is David Duke?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, Russell; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated attitudes of 211 college students in Mississippi before and after viewing film "Who Is David Duke?" which provided evidence of Duke's current racism, anti-Semitism, and pro-Nazi leanings. Previous study with students in Louisiana, majority did not change attitudes after viewing film. In present study, students' attitudes…

  4. Applications of MAAP at Duke Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) is a fast running, easy to use code for modeling accidents at nuclear power plants. These attributes make MAAP ideal for a number of applications. At Duke Power Company, MAAP has been used extensively in the performance of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Applications have also been found in the areas of emergency preparedness, training, and severe accident management. Specific applications of MAAP are presented in this paper with special attention to examples in the area of PRA success criteria development and severe accident management strategies selection. The application of MAAP to developing success criteria for ECCS performance during a large LOCA is presented. Additionally, an example of how MAAP has been used in the assessment of an alternative feed and bleed strategy is provided

  5. Community Learning and University Policy: An Inner-City University Goes Back to School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Axworthy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available For at least a decade now, the University of Winnipeg (U of W, an urban institution on Treaty One land in the heart of the Métis Nation, has challenged existing academic models and practices, and has incorporated strategies that address the social divide between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in order to more effectively serve the learning needs of its surrounding community. This article demonstrates how an inner-city university has used internal policies and programs to help support the self-determination of Indigenous peoples. Six community learning initiatives were recently evaluated for impact. This article will provide an overview of the positive outcomes of these learning initiatives on a community of underrepresented learners.

  6. A Case Study of Gender Neutral Policies in University Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chave, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Gender neutral housing is an innovative new policy being developed in colleges around the country. One reason to create these policies is an attempt to meet the unique needs and challenges of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students. As the number of gender neutral housing policies in the United States continues to rise, research has been…

  7. B.C. Hydro drops Duke Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    The abandonment of the proposed natural gas-fired Duke Point Power Project on Vancouver Island was discussed. It was suggested that the continuing appeal process increases the risk that the plant will not be built in time. The news followed a decision by the British Columbia (BC) Court of Appeal to hear an appeal of the project by a number of intervenors. Over $170 million has been spent on the project to date. The decision will impact the BC treasury, as the amount is being deducted from the dividends that BC Hydro would have paid to the government. A coalition of individuals and environmental groups, as well as local industry, are opposed to the plant on the basis of increased greenhouse (GHG) emissions and higher natural gas prices. The project would have required a natural gas pipeline to be built under Georgia Strait. The project was thought necessary due to the deteriorating condition of high voltage direct current cables running under the strait. BC Hydro's fallback plan for the island is load reduction. A new transmission line is also planned

  8. The Surveillance of Learning: A Critical Analysis of University Attendance Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Universities have recently strengthened their class attendance policies along with associated practices that intensify the surveillance of learning: a series of administrative and pedagogic strategies that monitor the extent to which students conform with behavioural expectations associated with learning. Drawing on university policy statements,…

  9. Comparative Analysis of Institutional Policy Definitions of Plagiarism: A Pan-Canadian University Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2017-01-01

    This article shares the findings of a study investigating institutional policy definitions of plagiarism at twenty English-speaking Canadian universities. The types of primary sources consulted for this study included: (1) university academic calendars for 2016-2017, (2) institutional policies on academic misconduct, and (3) student academic codes…

  10. State Tuition, Fees, and Financial Assistance Policies: For Public Colleges and Universities, 2010-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Allison C.; Carnahan, Julie; L'Orange, Hans P.

    2011-01-01

    This report, "State Tuition, Fees, and Financial Assistance Policies for Public Colleges and Universities: 2010-11", examines the philosophies, policies, and procedures that influence decision-making regarding public college and university tuition, student fees, and student financial aid programs. This report also provides information…

  11. Implementing Gender Equity Policies in a University Sport Organization: Competing Discourses from Enthusiasm to Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Susanna; Prat, Maria; Puig, Núria; Flintoff, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Gender policies in sports have expanded considerably in most countries in recent decades. Nevertheless, the implementation of these policies in sports organizations is by no means an automatic process. This article explores what happens when gender equity policies are applied in an university sports organization. Participatory action research over…

  12. Work/Life Satisfaction Policy in ADVANCE Universities: Assessing Levels of Flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Leslie E.; Dilks, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Work/life satisfaction policies are seen as key to recruiting, retaining, and advancing high quality faculty. This article explores the work/life policies prevalent at NSF ADVANCE institutions (PAID, Catalyst, and IT). We systematically review ADVANCE university websites (N = 124) and rank 9 categories of work/life policy including dual career…

  13. Radwaste minimization successes at Duke Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, C.D.; Johnson, G.T.; Groves, D.C.; Smith, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    At Duke Power Company, open-quotes Culture Changeclose quotes is a common term that we have used to describe the incredible transformation. We are becoming a cost conscious, customer driven, highly competitive business. Nowhere has this change been more evident then in the way we process and dispose of our solid radioactive waste. With top-down management support, we have used team-based, formalized problem solving methods and have implemented many successful waste minimization programs. Through these programs, we have dramatically increased employees' awareness of the importance of waste minimization. As a result, we have been able to reduce both our burial volumes and our waste processing and disposal costs. In June, 1994, we invited EPRI to conduct assessments of our waste minimization programs at Oconee and Catawba nuclear stations. Included in the assessments were in-depth looks at contamination control, an inventory of items in the plant, the volume of waste generated in the plant and how it was processed, laundry reject data, site waste-handling operations, and plant open-quotes housekeepingclose quotes routines and process. One of the most important aspects of the assessment is the open-quotes dumpster dive,close quotes which is an evaluation of site dry active waste composition by sorting through approximately fifteen bags of radioactive waste. Finally, there was an evaluation of consumable used at each site in order to gain knowledge of items that could be standardized at all stations. With EPRI recommendations, we made several changes and standardized the items used. We have made significant progress in waste reduction. We realize, however, that we are aiming at a moving target and we still have room for improvement. As the price of processing and disposal (or storage) increases, we will continue to evaluate our waste minimization programs

  14. The trouble with Nigerian universities: bogus policy and speculative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no gainsaying the fact that Nigerian public universities and no less privately owned universities are facing a lot of challenges. Such problems that now characterise our universities include indiscipline, poor funding and inadequate facilities, examination malpractices, demonstration and rioting, secret cult activities, ...

  15. University-community engagement in the wider policy environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Charles, David; Benneworth, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This chapter seeks to place the idea of university–community engagement in terms of the way that is regarded by public policy managers, who are increasingly adopting the mind-sets and policy paradigms of New Public Management (NPM). This chapter firstly argues that one unintended consequence of the

  16. Theory, Practice and Policy: A Longitudinal Study of University Knowledge Exchange in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiantao

    2018-01-01

    This article examines the progress of university knowledge exchange in the United Kingdom over a decade, linking theory, practice and policy. As indicated by the literature, the performance of university knowledge exchange is influenced by institutional and locational characteristics. Data on 133 UK universities between 2003-2004 and 2012-2013 are…

  17. From universal health insurance to universal healthcare? The shifting health policy landscape in Ireland since the economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sara Ann; Normand, Charles; Barry, Sarah; Thomas, Steve

    2016-03-01

    Ireland experienced one of the most severe economic crises of any OECD country. In 2011, a new government came to power amidst unprecedented health budget cuts. Despite a retrenchment in the ability of health resources to meet growing need, the government promised a universal, single-tiered health system, with access based solely on medical need. Key to this was introducing universal free GP care by 2015 and Universal Health Insurance from 2016 onwards. Delays in delivering universal access and a new health minister in 2014 resulted in a shift in language from 'universal health insurance' to 'universal healthcare'. During 2014 and 2015, there was an absence of clarity on what government meant by universal healthcare and divergence in policy measures from their initial intent of universalism. Despite the rhetoric of universal healthcare, years of austerity resulted in poorer access to essential healthcare and little extension of population coverage. The Irish health system is at a critical juncture in 2015, veering between a potential path to universal healthcare and a system, overwhelmed by years of austerity, which maintains the status quo. This papers assesses the gap between policy intent and practice and the difficulties in implementing major health system reform especially while emerging from an economic crisis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lack of knowledge and access to current clinical practice guidelines were identified as barriers to integration of evidence-based practice into clinical and didactic teaching. Perceived barriers in the clinical setting included perspectives of clinicians and lack of interprofessional and organizational collaboration. Conclusions.

  19. One goal, many paths: Policy proposals for universal access to broadband in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, André Moura; Cordeiro, Pedro Antero Braga; Araújo, Pedro Lucas da Cruz Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The purpose is to introduce policy proposals for universal access to broadband, assessing the hypothetical implementation of instruments suggested by the sectoral literature to Brazil. The methodology is based on the analysis of the literature on policies for universal access and broadband plans in the context of Latin America and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the discussion of its effects on related sectoral indicators. Then, the impact of the applicati...

  20. Institutional Diversity in Ontario's University Sector: A Policy Debate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piché, Pierre G.; Jones, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet the demands in a cost-effective manner of an emerging knowledge society that is global in scope, structural higher education policy changes have been introduced in many countries with a focus on systemic and programmatic diversity. There has been an ongoing debate about institutional diversity in Ontario higher education,…

  1. The development of a research data policy at Wageningen University & Research: best practices as a framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeland, van Hilde; Ringersma, J.

    2017-01-01

    The current case study describes the development of a Research Data Management policy at Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands. To develop this policy, an analysis was carried out of existing frameworks and principles on data management (such as the FAIR principles), as well as of

  2. "It's Not Fair": Policy Discourses and Students' Understandings of Plagiarism in a New Zealand University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Lee; Anderson, Vivienne; Spronken-Smith, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Plagiarism is a concept that is difficult to define. Although most higher education institutions have policies aimed at minimising and addressing student plagiarism, little research has examined the ways in which plagiarism is discursively constructed in university policy documents, or the connections and disconnections between institutional and…

  3. Impact of Smoke-Free Residence Hall Policies: The Views of Administrators at 3 State Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Megan

    2005-01-01

    Nationwide efforts to protect the public against the health effects of secondhand smoke have prompted college and university administrators to adopt more restrictive smoking policies. Some campus officials are concerned that new policies will lead to student backlash, increased staff workloads, and an increased economic burden. To understand the…

  4. The Policy-Making Process of the State University System of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sandra M.

    The policy-making process of the State University System of Florida is described using David Easton's model of a political system as the conceptual framwork. Two models describing the policy-making process were developed from personal interviews with the primary participants in the governance structure and from three case studies of policy…

  5. A Moral Economy of Patents: Case of Finnish Research Universities' Patent Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of the concept of moral economy for higher education studies through a study of Finnish research universities' patent policies. Patent policies not only stimulate the commercialization of research, they also set norms for behavior and aim to clarify how to distribute rights and…

  6. Whose Parallellingualism? Overt and Covert Ideologies in Danish University Language Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Anna Kristina

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the study of multilingualism in the workplace by analysing top-down language policies advocating parallellingualism at Denmark's eight universities. Parallellingualism, a key concept in Nordic language policy, has been suggested as a way to ensure an equitable balance between English and the Nordic language(s)…

  7. Language Ideology or Language Practice? An Analysis of Language Policy Documents at Swedish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Beyza

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an analysis and interpretation of language policy documents from eight Swedish universities with regard to intertextuality, authorship and content analysis of the notions of language practices and English as a lingua franca (ELF). The analysis is then linked to Spolsky's framework of language policy, namely language…

  8. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Resected Mesothelioma: The Duke Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, Edward F.; Larrier, Nicole A.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Ma Jinli; Yoo, Sua; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) after extrapleural pneumonectomy for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients underwent IMRT after extrapleural pneumonectomy between July 2005 and February 2007 at Duke University Medical Center. The clinical target volume was defined as the entire ipsilateral hemithorax, chest wall incisions, including drain sites, and involved nodal stations. The dose prescribed to the planning target volume was 40-55 Gy (median, 45). Toxicity was graded using the modified Common Toxicity Criteria, and the lung dosimetric parameters from the subgroups with and without pneumonitis were compared. Local control and survival were assessed. Results: The median follow-up after IMRT was 9.5 months. Of the 13 patients, 3 (23%) developed Grade 2 or greater acute pulmonary toxicity (during or within 30 days of IMRT). The median dosimetric parameters for those with and without symptomatic pneumonitis were a mean lung dose (MLD) of 7.9 vs. 7.5 Gy (p = 0.40), percentage of lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V 20 ) of 0.2% vs. 2.3% (p = 0.51), and percentage of lung volume receiving 5 Gy (V 20 ) of 92% vs. 66% (p = 0.36). One patient died of fatal pulmonary toxicity. This patient received a greater MLD (11.4 vs. 7.6 Gy) and had a greater V 20 (6.9% vs. 1.9%), and V 5 (92% vs. 66%) compared with the median of those without fatal pulmonary toxicity. Local and/or distant failure occurred in 6 patients (46%), and 6 patients (46%) were alive without evidence of recurrence at last follow-up. Conclusions: With limited follow-up, 45-Gy IMRT provides reasonable local control for mesothelioma after extrapleural pneumonectomy. However, treatment-related pulmonary toxicity remains a significant concern. Care should be taken to minimize the dose to the remaining lung to achieve an acceptable therapeutic ratio

  9. Introduction of a Science Policy Course at the University of Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S.; Parsons, D.

    2012-12-01

    In modern society, science and policy are two processes that have a symbiotic relationship to each other; wherein policy dictates the direction of science while science shapes the future of policy. Although the policy side is often ignored in scientific environments, the rate of scientific advancement is heavily influenced by policy. Science policy is very different from the conduct of science itself and future scientists need to be aware of the issues and factors that dictate the present and future direction of science. Based on the intricate relationship between science and policy, it is essential to introduce an overview of the policy process to future scientists and decision makers. In the context of climate change, policy implications are extensive and critical owing to their large socio-economic impacts. Hence, knowledge of the policy process is even more relevant to earth scientists. In this regard, the proposal to start an introductory course in science policy is currently being discussed in the department of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma. If such a course is approved, an interactive graduate level class will be introduced for students pursuing a career in science. Such a course will be cross- disciplinary and will be offered to a wide audience across the university. Since the American Meteorological Society's (AMS) Summer Policy Colloquium has been a very successful program in educating scientists about the policy process, a format similar to the colloquium may be adopted. The primary topics will include the understanding of policy fundamentals, effective communication, ethics and integrity in the conduct of scientific research, executive leadership in science and the responsibilities of a scientific leader, impact of science on globalization and international diplomacy, etc. The AMS policy program office will be consulted to help design the course curriculum. An overview of the steps involved in introducing the class will be presented at the

  10. The New Cannabis Policy Taxonomy on APIS: Making Sense of the Cannabis Policy Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzner, Michael D; Thomas, Sue; Schuler, Jonathan; Hilton, Michael; Mosher, James

    2017-06-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism's Alcohol Policy Information System (APIS) is, for the first time, adding legal data pertaining to recreational cannabis use to its current offerings on alcohol policy. Now that Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Alaska, and the District of Columbia have legalized aspects of recreational cannabis, and more states are considering it, there is an urgency to provide high-quality, multi-dimensional legal data to the public health community. This article introduces the Cannabis Policy Taxonomy recently posted on APIS, and explores its theoretical and empirical contributions to the substance abuse literature and its potential for use in policy research. We also present results of interviews with public health experts in alcohol and cannabis policy, which sought to determine the most important variables to address in the initial release of cannabis policy data. From this process, we found that pricing controls emerged as the variable singled out by the largest number of experts. This analysis points to a host of vital policies that are of increasing importance to public health policy scholars and their current and future research.

  11. Entrepreneurship Policy for University Students: A Case Study of Zhejiang Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Weihui

    2012-01-01

    Cultivating university students' entrepreneurial skills has become a worldwide common interest. Taking Zhejiang Province, China as a case, this paper firstly analyses the push and the pull forces of cultivating innovative and entrepreneurial talents. Then the contents of Zhejiang's entrepreneurship policy for university students are systematically…

  12. Universities' Expectations for Study-Abroad Programs Fostering Internationalization: Educational Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Take, Hiroko; Shoraku, Ai

    2018-01-01

    Because internationalization in higher education has recently received significant attention within the context of globalization, universities in Japan have begun to develop study-abroad programs to support their students in gaining international experience. This article explores those university policies designed to support the…

  13. An Examination of Social Media Policy Usage of South Central United States' Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Virginia J.; Luse, Donna W.; Hodge, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Since the use of social media tools by universities has expanded exponentially, a university can easily find itself in a precarious situation in a moment's notice because social media tools have been used inadvertently. This study investigated the social media policies of AACSB-International accredited schools in the SREB South Central Region of…

  14. Australian Early Childhood Educators: From Government Policy to University Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sharon; Trinidad, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the Australian Federal Government initiatives in the area of early childhood with regard to the provision of early childhood education and care. These changes have influenced a Western Australian university to develop an innovative birth to 8 years preservice educator education curriculum. Using an ecological…

  15. Patenting productivity and intellectual property policies at Research I universities: An exploratory comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mendoza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 1980s, the US government encouraged the cooperation of industries with universities in order to bridge funding gaps and cope with global competitive markets through legislations that allow universities to start spin-off businesses and to generate profits from patents. At the turn of the century, university partnerships with the private sector have greatly increased through research grants, licensing patents, and in some cases, the formation of new firms'mainly at research universities and in the hard sciences. In response to these entrepreneurial opportunities, university administrators developed intellectual property policies to facilitate the commercialization of research. The purpose of this study is to explore the differences across IP policies among nine research universities as potential sources of influence on faculty engagement in for-profit research ventures according to existing models of faculty role performance and achievement.

  16. Shielding for the upgraded duke free electron laser laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vylet, V.

    2005-01-01

    The Duke FEL Laboratory is undergoing a series of upgrades staggered over time that will greatly increase the capabilities of the machines and by the same token the importance of radiation safety issues. In this paper, we present the scope of the planned upgrades and provide several specific examples of shielding calculations. We also present our effort to correlate calculations with experimental measurements. (authors)

  17. Competing health policies: insurance against universal public systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa Ebba Cristina Laurell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This article analyzes the content and outcome of ongoing health reforms in Latin America: Universal Health Coverage with Health Insurance, and the Universal and Public Health Systems. It aims to compare and contrast the conceptual framework and practice of each and verify their concrete results regarding the guarantee of the right to health and access to required services. It identifies a direct relationship between the development model and the type of reform. The neoclassical-neoliberal model has succeeded in converting health into a field of privatized profits, but has failed to guarantee the right to health and access to services, which has discredited the governments. The reform of the progressive governments has succeeded in expanding access to services and ensuring the right to health, but faces difficulties and tensions related to the permanence of a powerful, private, industrial-insurance medical complex and persistence of the ideologies about medicalized 'good medicine'. Based on these findings, some strategies to strengthen unique and supportive public health systems are proposed.

  18. ECONOMIC THOUGHT ABOUT PRIVATE SECTOR EDUCATION: POLICY IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT OF UNIVERSITIES IN AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. AYENI

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study provides relevant economic ideas that can assist Nigeria and other Africancountries in making innovative policies at privatizing university education. A review of the education market scene on the continent provides an imperfect market with adverse consequences occasioned by inadequate information and unbridled competition.Advocating a joint role for sharing the costs and benefits of university education between government and private sectors, the study suggests a four-policy option for adoption by Nigeria and other African countries. These are, in ascending order of importance: regulated private, subsidized private, competitive private, and complementary private systems of iversity educationUsing the Backcock University in Nigeria as an example, this paper demonstrates thepositive managerial influence of a competitive and complementary system of private university. Nevertheless, to forestall market failure, this study rounds off by pointing out the reformatory, regulatory and redemptive roles of government in the management ofprivate universities in Nigeria and other African countries.

  19. Funds for the Future. Report of the Twentieth Century Fund Task Force on College and University Endowment Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J. Peter

    The Task Force on College and University Endowment Policy examines endowment policy in a broad context. They feel that it is important to preserve private colleges and universities and develop a sense of mission about how best to pursue this objective. The Task Force reviews policy issues faced by managers of endowment funds for institutions of…

  20. Perspectives on Genetic and Genomic Technologies in an Academic Medical Center: The Duke Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanis, Sara Huston; Minear, Mollie A.; Vorderstrasse, Allison; Yang, Nancy; Reeves, Jason W.; Rakhra-Burris, Tejinder; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2015-01-01

    In this age of personalized medicine, genetic and genomic testing is expected to become instrumental in health care delivery, but little is known about its actual implementation in clinical practice. Methods. We surveyed Duke faculty and healthcare providers to examine the extent of genetic and genomic testing adoption. We assessed providers’ use of genetic and genomic testing options and indications in clinical practice, providers’ awareness of pharmacogenetic applications, and providers’ opinions on returning research-generated genetic test results to participants. Most clinician respondents currently use family history routinely in their clinical practice, but only 18 percent of clinicians use pharmacogenetics. Only two respondents correctly identified the number of drug package inserts with pharmacogenetic indications. We also found strong support for the return of genetic research results to participants. Our results demonstrate that while Duke healthcare providers are enthusiastic about genomic technologies, use of genomic tools outside of research has been limited. Respondents favor return of research-based genetic results to participants, but clinicians lack knowledge about pharmacogenetic applications. We identified challenges faced by this institution when implementing genetic and genomic testing into patient care that should inform a policy and education agenda to improve provider support and clinician-researcher partnerships. PMID:25854543

  1. Perspectives on Genetic and Genomic Technologies in an Academic Medical Center: The Duke Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Huston Katsanis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this age of personalized medicine, genetic and genomic testing is expected to become instrumental in health care delivery, but little is known about its actual implementation in clinical practice. Methods. We surveyed Duke faculty and healthcare providers to examine the extent of genetic and genomic testing adoption. We assessed providers’ use of genetic and genomic testing options and indications in clinical practice, providers’ awareness of pharmacogenetic applications, and providers’ opinions on returning research-generated genetic test results to participants. Most clinician respondents currently use family history routinely in their clinical practice, but only 18 percent of clinicians use pharmacogenetics. Only two respondents correctly identified the number of drug package inserts with pharmacogenetic indications. We also found strong support for the return of genetic research results to participants. Our results demonstrate that while Duke healthcare providers are enthusiastic about genomic technologies, use of genomic tools outside of research has been limited. Respondents favor return of research-based genetic results to participants, but clinicians lack knowledge about pharmacogenetic applications. We identified challenges faced by this institution when implementing genetic and genomic testing into patient care that should inform a policy and education agenda to improve provider support and clinician-researcher partnerships.

  2. Québec's Childcare Universal Low Fees Policy 10 Years After: Effects, Costs and Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Lefebvre; Philip Merrigan; Francis Roy-Desrosiers

    2011-01-01

    More than ten years ago the province of Québec implemented a universal early childhood education and care policy. This paper examines if the two objectives pursued, to increase mothers’ participation in the labour market (balance the needs of workplace and home) and to enhance child development and equality of opportunity for children, were reasonable meet. A non-experimental evaluation framework based on multiple pre- and post-treatment periods is used to estimate the policy effects. First, ...

  3. Smoking and attitudes toward smoking policy at a University in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forden, Carie L; Carrillo, Amy M

    2016-01-01

    To assess smoking behavior, knowledge of smoking harm, and attitudes toward campus smoking policy at an Egyptian university, an online survey of students, staff, and faculty was conducted (N = 992). The smoking prevalence of 38% among men was in line with Egypt's national average, but the smoking prevalence among women of 20% was much higher than the national average. Smoking status influenced beliefs about smoking harm and attitudes toward smoking policy, with nonsmokers having stronger beliefs about the harm of smoking and showing stronger support for smoking regulations than smokers. Smokers were more knowledgeable about smoking policy than were nonsmokers and differed slightly in their preferences for smoking policy enforcement strategies. These findings contribute to our understanding of how to tailor college smoking policy and programs to an Egyptian context.

  4. The Battle for Knowledge Management. The Booming Economy in the Spanish University Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Belén Espejo Villar; Luján Lázaro Herrero

    2016-01-01

    Starting from the collaborative framework established by Community policy in matters of higher education in this paper the objective is to review the changing functions that traditional universities face in the context of a capitalist economy. The article examines from a critical perspective the role that corporate universities have in the construction of a common area of knowledge, and we posit an analysis of the identities established between these two types of organizations. Above all, how...

  5. College and University Mergers: Recent Trends. Policy Matters: A Higher Education Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Given the current economic turbulence characterized, in part, by unprecedented business consolidations, talk of mergers has spread to higher education. At first glance, merger discussions may seem more appropriate to the corporate world than academe because American colleges and universities were not created in accordance with a centralized…

  6. Aligning Practice to Policies: Changing the Culture to Recognize and Reward Teaching at Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennin, Michael; Schultz, Zachary D.; Feig, Andrew; Finkelstein, Noah; Greenhoot, Andrea Follmer; Hildreth, Michael; Leibovich, Adam K.; Martin, James D.; Moldwin, Mark B.; O’Dowd, Diane K.; Posey, Lynmarie A.; Smith, Tobin L.; Miller, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for improvement in undergraduate education within STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines are hampered by the methods used to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Faculty members at research universities are commonly assessed and promoted mainly on the basis of research success. To improve the quality of undergraduate teaching across all disciplines, not only STEM fields, requires creating an environment wherein continuous improvement of teaching is valued, assessed, and rewarded at various stages of a faculty member’s career. This requires consistent application of policies that reflect well-established best practices for evaluating teaching at the department, college, and university levels. Evidence shows most teaching evaluation practices do not reflect stated policies, even when the policies specifically espouse teaching as a value. Thus, alignment of practice to policy is a major barrier to establishing a culture in which teaching is valued. Situated in the context of current national efforts to improve undergraduate STEM education, including the Association of American Universities Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative, this essay discusses four guiding principles for aligning practice with stated priorities in formal policies: 1) enhancing the role of deans and chairs; 2) effectively using the hiring process; 3) improving communication; and 4) improving the understanding of teaching as a scholarly activity. In addition, three specific examples of efforts to improve the practice of evaluating teaching are presented as examples: 1) Three Bucket Model of merit review at the University of California, Irvine; (2) Evaluation of Teaching Rubric, University of Kansas; and (3) Teaching Quality Framework, University of Colorado, Boulder. These examples provide flexible criteria to holistically evaluate and improve the quality of teaching across the diverse institutions comprising modern higher education. PMID:29196430

  7. Association of American Universities Policy Recommendations for President-Elect Obama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Universities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In this document, the Association of American Universities offers a series of research and technology policy recommendations that would help our nation to continue its global pre-eminence in science and high technology, improve the quality of life and national security of our citizens, and speed our nation's economic recovery. After policy…

  8. Change in Language Policy in Malaysia: The Reality of Implementation in Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saran Kaur

    2006-01-01

    In Malaysia, a sudden change in language policy, from Bahasa Melayu to English, has been instituted for the disciplines of science and technology at varying levels of the educational system. For this paper, it will be the domain of higher education that will be focused on. In 2005, the students who had their pre-university courses in English would…

  9. Internationalization of Higher Education and Language Policy: The Case of a Bilingual University in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ken; Lin, Chia-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Universities worldwide, in placing a greater emphasis on global mobility, have recently seen a growing number of in- and outbound students. Parallel to this development has been the need to internationalize individual campuses, an important aspect of which is to have a common language (or languages) used for communication. The language policies in…

  10. Language Policy as a Sociocultural Tool: Insights from the University of Cape Town

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Magda

    2016-01-01

    This theoretically oriented article draws on the author's previous research, which examined language policy and planning (LPP) of the University of Cape Town within the context of post-apartheid transformation driven by need to redress inequalities of the past, and demands of globalization. Drawing on critical linguistics, but indicating…

  11. Collection Development Policy: Federal Government Publications at Eastern Washington University Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselle, Ann; Chan, Karen

    This collection development policy serves as a guide for the selection and retention of depository government documents by the Government Publications Unit of the Kennedy Memorial Library of Eastern Washington University (EWU) in Cheney, Washington. The library selects approximately 65 percent of the depository items distributed by the U.S.…

  12. The Impact of a University Policy on the Sexual Harassment of Female Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Elizabeth A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Comparison of undergraduate student survey results of 1983, 1986, and 1989 at the University of Massachusetts (Amherst) indicate that reports of faculty/staff sexual harassment of female undergraduates have declined over the past six years. Analysis suggests that the sexual harassment policy and grievance procedure established in 1982 have been…

  13. Health financing for universal coverage and health system performance: concepts and implications for policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzin, Joseph

    2013-08-01

    Unless the concept is clearly understood, "universal coverage" (or universal health coverage, UHC) can be used to justify practically any health financing reform or scheme. This paper unpacks the definition of health financing for universal coverage as used in the World Health Organization's World health report 2010 to show how UHC embodies specific health system goals and intermediate objectives and, broadly, how health financing reforms can influence these. All countries seek to improve equity in the use of health services, service quality and financial protection for their populations. Hence, the pursuit of UHC is relevant to every country. Health financing policy is an integral part of efforts to move towards UHC, but for health financing policy to be aligned with the pursuit of UHC, health system reforms need to be aimed explicitly at improving coverage and the intermediate objectives linked to it, namely, efficiency, equity in health resource distribution and transparency and accountability. The unit of analysis for goals and objectives must be the population and health system as a whole. What matters is not how a particular financing scheme affects its individual members, but rather, how it influences progress towards UHC at the population level. Concern only with specific schemes is incompatible with a universal coverage approach and may even undermine UHC, particularly in terms of equity. Conversely, if a scheme is fully oriented towards system-level goals and objectives, it can further progress towards UHC. Policy and policy analysis need to shift from the scheme to the system level.

  14. Alcohol Practices, Policies, and Potentials of American Colleges and Universities. An OSAP White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigen, Lewis D.

    This white paper describes the extent of drinking on college campuses; the health, social, academic, and economic costs thereof; means of education and intervention available to schools; and the relationship of many university policies and practices to this problem. The paper is organized into two major sections. The first describes the nature of…

  15. Policy Compliance of Smokers on a Tobacco-Free University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russette, Helen C.; Harris, Kari Jo; Schuldberg, David; Green, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To explore factors influencing compliance with campus tobacco policies and strategies to increase compliance. Participants: Sixty tobacco smokers (April 2012). Methods: A 22-item intercept-interview with closed-and open-ended questions was conducted with smokers in adjacent compliant and noncompliant areas at 1 university with a 100%…

  16. Determining the Influence of Heterogeneity in Graduate Institutions on University-Industry Collaboration Policy in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hung-Jen; Chang, Dian-Fu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we assumed that organizational heterogeneity is a key factor influencing the effects of university-industry cooperation policy in higher education institutes. Gender difference, faculty position, faculty member nationality, and diversity in academic expertise were considered as the indicators of heterogeneity. One-hundred graduate…

  17. Exposing Ideology within University Policies: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Faculty Hiring, Promotion and Remuneration Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuner-Smith, Sedef; Englander, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Using critical discourse analysis (CDA), this paper exposes the neoliberal ideology of the knowledge-based economy embedded within university policies, specifically those that regulate faculty hiring, promotion, and remuneration in two national contexts: Turkey and Mexico. The paper follows four stages of CDA: (1) focus upon a social wrong in its…

  18. The National Energy Policy Institute (NEPI) at The University of Tulsa (F INAL REPORT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blais, Roger [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2013-10-31

    NEPI, a non-profit organization located at The University of Tulsa (TU), was established to develop and disseminate national energy policy recommendations. Research under this grant covered a wide variety of projects, including research into the future of nuclear power, oil market pricing, and the feasibility of biofuels.

  19. Universities, Public Policy and Economic Development in Latin America: The Cases of Mexico and Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorey, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Since establishment of national university systems in Mexico and Venezuela, three principal demands have dominated policy formation: government ideological demand; economic demand for expertise; and political and social demand for upward mobility through education. Tensions between these demands have stemmed from economic inability to sustain…

  20. Bridging Water Resources Policy and Environmental Engineering in the Classroom at Cornell University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, M. T.; Shaw, S. B.; Seifert, S.; Schwarz, T.

    2006-12-01

    Current university undergraduate students in environmental sciences and engineering are the next generation of environmental protection practitioners. Recognizing this, Cornell's Biological and Environmental Engineering department has developed a popular class, Watershed Engineering (BEE 473), specifically designed to bridge the too-common gap between water resources policy and state-of-art science and technology. Weekly homework assignments are to design real-life solutions to actual water resources problems, often with the objective of applying storm water policies to local situations. Where appropriate, usually in conjunction with recent amendments to the Federal Clean Water Act, this course introduces water resource protection tools and concepts developed in the Cornell Soil and Water Lab. Here we present several examples of how we build bridges between university classrooms and the complex world of water resources policy.

  1. Impact of Quota System and Catchment Area Policy on the University Admissions in North Central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Chinweike Omeje

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The quota system and the catchment areas are federal government policies formulated to bridge the gap between the educationally developed states and the educationally less developed states. Sequel to the enactment of these policies, government established several universities across the country to create equal opportunity for all candidates. In spite of the astronomical growth of the universities in Nigeria, both the federal and the state governments have not been able to contend with the surging demand for the university education, hence the adoption of the quota system and catchment area policies. Serious concerns were expressed by relevant stakeholders on their perceived impact of the quota system and the catchment area on admissions into the federal and state universities in North Central Nigeria. This study therefore examined the impact of the quota system and catchment area policies on students’ admissions in North Central Nigeria. A research question and a null hypothesis guided the study. Descriptive survey design was adopted for the study. The population for the study was 14,347 staff in the federal and state universities in North Central Nigeria. A sample of 1,435 was drawn through stratified proportionate sampling technique. Data were collected using questionnaire and interviews. Mean scores and standard deviations were used to answer the research question, whereas t-test statistics were used to test the hypothesis at 0.05 level of significance. The findings of the results showed, among others, that the impact of the quota system and catchment area policies on students’ admission was to a high extent.

  2. Evaluating the impact of strategic personnel policies using a MILP model: The public university case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torre, R. de la; Lusa, A.; Mateo, M.

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of the paper is to evaluate the impact of diverse personnel policies around personnel promotion in the design of the strategic staff plan for a public university. The strategic staff planning consists in the determination of the size and composition of the workforce for an organization. Design/methodology/approach: The staff planning is solved using a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) model. The MILP model represents the organizational structure of the university, the personnel categories and capacity decisions, the demand requirements, the required service level and budget restrictions. All these aspects are translated into a set of data, as well as the parameters and constraints building up the mathematical model for optimization. The required data for the model is adopted from a Spanish public university. Findings: The development of appropriate policies for personnel promotion can effectively reduce the number of dismissals while proposing a transition towards different preferable workforce structures in the university. Research limitations/implications: The long term staff plan for the university is solved by the MILP model considering a time horizon of 8 years. For this time horizon, the required input data is derived from current data of the university. Different scenarios are proposed considering different temporal trends for input data, such as in demand and admissible promotional ratios for workers. Originality/value: The literature review reports a lack of formalized procedures for staff planning in universities taking into account, at the same time, the regulations on hiring, dismissals, promotions and the workforce heterogeneity, all considered to optimize workforce size and composition addressing not only an economic criteria, but also the required workforce expertise and the quality in the service offered. This paper adopts a formalized procedure developed by the authors in previous works, and exploits it to assess the

  3. Evaluating the impact of strategic personnel policies using a MILP model: The public university case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre, R. de la; Lusa, A.; Mateo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of the paper is to evaluate the impact of diverse personnel policies around personnel promotion in the design of the strategic staff plan for a public university. The strategic staff planning consists in the determination of the size and composition of the workforce for an organization. Design/methodology/approach: The staff planning is solved using a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) model. The MILP model represents the organizational structure of the university, the personnel categories and capacity decisions, the demand requirements, the required service level and budget restrictions. All these aspects are translated into a set of data, as well as the parameters and constraints building up the mathematical model for optimization. The required data for the model is adopted from a Spanish public university. Findings: The development of appropriate policies for personnel promotion can effectively reduce the number of dismissals while proposing a transition towards different preferable workforce structures in the university. Research limitations/implications: The long term staff plan for the university is solved by the MILP model considering a time horizon of 8 years. For this time horizon, the required input data is derived from current data of the university. Different scenarios are proposed considering different temporal trends for input data, such as in demand and admissible promotional ratios for workers. Originality/value: The literature review reports a lack of formalized procedures for staff planning in universities taking into account, at the same time, the regulations on hiring, dismissals, promotions and the workforce heterogeneity, all considered to optimize workforce size and composition addressing not only an economic criteria, but also the required workforce expertise and the quality in the service offered. This paper adopts a formalized procedure developed by the authors in previous works, and exploits it to assess the

  4. The Role of Foundation Universities in the Higher Education Policy After 1980

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ozdem

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The higher education system which entered a new period with the 1980s has in the last five years entered a phase of numerical enlargement and structural transformation. Having only 19 public universities in the early 1980s, the higher education system today have turned into a broad system with 85 public and 30 foundation universities. The research aims to discuss the role of foundation universities in the higher education policies implemented between the years 1980-2007. Among the five development plans prepared between 1980 and 2008, it was suggested for the first time with the sixth five-year development plan that foundations should be supported to establish private universities and policies was formulated accordingly. Mesut Yılmaz was the prime minister and Süleyman Demirel was the president who opened the highest number of foundation universities between 1980 and 2008. While the number of students between 1986-1987 was 426 in foundation universities, this number in foundation universities reached 109.903 in the 2006-2007 aca-demic year. The annual growth rate of the number of students in foundation universities within the twenty-year period is 32%. In the 2006-2007 academic year, the number of academic staff in foundation universities is 7766, of academic fellows is 2502, and of students is 109,903. The number of students per academic staff in foundation universities in the 2006-2007 academic year is 21, whereas the number of students per academic fellow is 44.

  5. Attitudes of students of a health sciences university towards the extension of smoke-free policies at the university campuses of Barcelona (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Martínez

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: The students supported indoor smoke-free policies for universities. However, support for extending smoke-free regulations to outdoor areas of university campuses was limited. It is necessary to educate students about tobacco control and emphasise their importance as role models before extending outdoor smoke-free legislation at university campuses.

  6. Comparison of Duke ergo-metric score and of the classification based on scintigraphic data in the stratification of coronaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouhayoun, E.; Coca, F.J.; Payoux, P.; Tafani, J.A.M.; Esquerre, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Stratification of risk (sudden death and infarction) remains a major problem of the way the coronaries are cared. Since 1987, a score based on the test-to-effort data was proposed by Mark and coll. of 'Duke University' team. They tried to demonstrate that this score provides a reliable classification of patients. We have compared the results obtained by using this score with those issued from the simultaneous analysis of the left ventricle (LV) function and LV perfusion. A hundred patients afflicted with coronaries (stenoses > 50%) benefited by a coupled study of the LV function and perfusion at rest and under effort made by means of MIBI scintigraphy. The effort test allowed calculating the 'Duke' score by means of a formula in terms of the angor index defined as follows: 0 for absence, 1 for angor and 2 for angor motivating cessation. According to Duke score three classes can be defined: patients of low risk, score ≥ 5; patients of intermediate risk, score in between 5 and -10; patients of high risk, score ≤ -10. Ejection fraction at effort acme was measured in every patient as well as the extension of perfusion defect, evaluated semi-quantitatively at effort and rest on the basis of bull's eye. Three groups of patients were created according to the results of perfusion+function couple): (A)- normal perfusion and function, the case of good prognostication; (B)- patients slightly afflicted (FEV effort > 50% and in-effort defect extension effort 50%). The last criteria were proved by several studies as bad prognostication. A table presents the risks according the Duke score for the three classes. One can observe that one third of the patients severely afflicted by confirmed ischemia are classified in the low-risk class. Besides, the majority of patients are ranked with intermediary risk, independently of scintigraphic results. In conclusion, these results concerning the stratification of coronaries show the superiority of the criteria based on scintigraphy over

  7. Partnering Healthy@Work: an Australian university-government partnership facilitating policy-relevant research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Kim; Venn, Alison; Jarman, Lisa; Seal, Judy; Teale, Brook; Scott, Jennifer; Sanderson, Kristy

    2017-12-01

    Research funding is increasingly supporting collaborations between knowledge users and researchers. Partnering Healthy@Work (pH@W), an inaugural recipient of funding through Australia's Partnership for Better Health Grants scheme, was a 5-year partnership between the Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania and the Tasmanian State Service (TSS). The partnerships purpose was to evaluate a comprehensive workplace health promotion programme (Healthy@Work) targeting 30 000 public sector employees; generating new knowledge and influencing workplace health promotion policy and decision-making. This mixed methods study evaluates the partnership between policy-makers and academics and identifies strategies that enabled pH@W to deliver key project outcomes. A pH@W document review was conducted, two partnership assessment tools completed and semi-structured interviews conducted with key policy-makers and academics. Analysis of the partnership assessment tools and interviews found that pH@W had reached a strong level of collaboration. Policy-relevant knowledge was generated about the health of TSS employees and their engagement with workplace health promotion. Knowledge exchange of a conceptual and instrumental nature occurred and was facilitated by the shared grant application, clear governance structures, joint planning, regular information exchange between researchers and policy-makers and research student placements in the TSS. Flexibility and acknowledgement of different priorities and perspectives of partner organizations were identified as critical factors for enabling effective partnership working and research relevance. Academic-policy-maker partnerships can be a powerful mechanism for improving policy relevance of research, but need to incorporate strategies that facilitate regular input from researchers and policy-makers in order to achieve this. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  8. The Battle for Knowledge Management. The Booming Economy in the Spanish University Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Espejo Villar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the collaborative framework established by Community policy in matters of higher education in this paper the objective is to review the changing functions that traditional universities face in the context of a capitalist economy. The article examines from a critical perspective the role that corporate universities have in the construction of a common area of knowledge, and we posit an analysis of the identities established between these two types of organizations. Above all, however, we attempt to dismantle the idea of the subordination of traditional universities to the growing international tensions that could lead us to think that the Spanish university system is facing the search for innovation based on models of academic superiority. Far from showing resistance to corporate practices, the university system of governance is playing a very active role in the consolidation of global economic policies. This study shows that the dynamics of reinforcement and compensation between Bologna and corporate universities not only does not question the new market formulas that these centres of learning make use of, but they are even contributing tools that foster the discursive and managerial confluence of both types of institution.

  9. India's Proposed Universal Health Coverage Policy: Evidence for Age Structure Transition Effect and Fiscal Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Muttur Ranganathan

    2016-12-01

    India's High Level Expert Group on Universal Health Coverage in 2011 recommended a universal, public-funded and national health coverage policy. As a plausible forward-looking macroeconomic reform in the health sector, this policy proposal on universal health coverage (UHC) needs to be evaluated for age structure transition effect and fiscal sustainability to strengthen its current design and future implementation. Macroeconomic analyses of the long-term implications of age structure transition and fiscal sustainability on India's proposed UHC policy. A new measure of age-specific UHC is developed by combining the age profile of public and private health consumption expenditure by using the National Transfer Accounts methodology. Different projections of age-specific public health expenditure are calculated over the period 2005-2100 to account for the age structure transition effect. The projections include changes in: (1) levels of the expenditure as gross domestic product grows, (2) levels and shape of the expenditure as gross domestic product grows and expenditure converges to that of developed countries (or convergence scenario) based on the Lee-Carter model of forecasting mortality rates, and (3) levels of the expenditure as India moves toward a UHC policy. Fiscal sustainability under each health expenditure projection is determined by using the measures of generational imbalance and sustainability gap in the Generational Accounting methodology. Public health expenditure is marked by age specificities and the elderly population is costlier to support for their healthcare needs in the future. Given the discount and productivity growth rates, the proposed UHC is not fiscally sustainable under India's current fiscal policies except for the convergence scenario. However, if the income elasticity of public expenditure on social welfare and health expenditure is less than one, fiscal sustainability of the UHC policy is attainable in all scenarios of projected public

  10. European University Students' Experiences and Attitudes toward Campus Alcohol Policy: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hal, Guido; Tavolacci, Marie-Pierre; Stock, Christiane; Vriesacker, Bart; Orosova, Olga; Kalina, Ondrej; Salonna, Ferdinand; Lukacs, Andrea; Ladekjaer Larsen, Eva; Ladner, Joël; Jacobs, Liezille

    2018-01-24

    Many studies indicate that a substantial part of the student population drinks excessively, yet most European universities do not have an alcohol policy. In the absence of an alcohol guideline at universities and the easy access to alcohol sold at the student cafeteria, for instance, this has the potential to place students at risk of overconsumption, which has adverse health consequences. Therefore, our study objectives were to explore and compare university students' experiences and attitudes toward alcohol policy on their campus using a qualitative approach. 29 focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted among students from universities in five European countries: Belgium (4 FGDs), Denmark (6 FGDs), France (5 FGDs), Hungary (6 FGDs), and the Slovak Republic (8 FGDs), with a total number of 189 participants. Across the five European countries, students recognized that alcohol was a big problem on their campuses yet they knew very little, if any, about the rules concerning alcohol on their campus. Students will not support an on campus alcohol restriction and a policy should therefore focus on prevention initiatives.

  11. The institutionalization of gender equality policies at the Spanish university. Advances and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inma Pastor Gosalbez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The path to eliminating gender gaps moves between advances and promises. Its pace is determined by the combination of policies, legislation and social changes. Despite the measures taken, gender inequality persists in scientific, technological and academic fields. Equality Plans, which must be implemented at Spanish universities since the adoption of the Organic Law 3/2007 of 22 March for the effective equality of women and men, constitute an important, but not sufficient, step to achieve equality in this area. A key factor can be the structures and networks for the implementation of equality policies (intra- and interuniversity ones, as well as those with other agencies and institutions, which are not sufficiently developed at present. This article describes the process of institutionalization of equality policies at Spanish universities and presents an analysis of the legislation applicable to university level. Furthermore, data about equality units and their characteristics are shown. The article concludes with a reflection upon the elements that can increase the impact of university equality structures as well as the remaining challenges.

  12. Structuring injustice: partisan politics in the making and unmaking of James Madison University's equal opportunity policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christine M; Spivey, Sue E

    2011-01-01

    This analysis contributes to LGBT campus climate research on the quality of campus life in higher education in the United States. We argue that public education institutions in different states face divergent impediments to improving campus climate, and that more research is needed identifying structural factors affecting campus climate. Using a social systems analysis of policymaking at one university as a case study, we illustrate how partisan politics and state regulation make Virginia colleges and universities more vulnerable to political scrutiny and control. Finally, we propose a social justice-oriented policy agenda to address structural inequalities.

  13. Contract employment policy and research productivity of knowledge workers: An analysis of Spanish universities

    OpenAIRE

    Lafuente González, Esteban Miguel; Berbegal-Mirabent, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates how contract employment practices adopted by universities—fixed-term contracts and permanent contracts—impact research productivity measured in terms of publications in scholarly journals. The empirical application considers the Spanish public higher education system for the period 2002-2008. We report an inverse U-shaped relationship between the rate fixed-term contracts and the research productivity of Spanish universities. That is, contract policies based on fixed...

  14. Aligning Practice to Policies: Changing the Culture to Recognize and Reward Teaching at Research Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennin, Michael; Schultz, Zachary D; Feig, Andrew; Finkelstein, Noah; Greenhoot, Andrea Follmer; Hildreth, Michael; Leibovich, Adam K; Martin, James D; Moldwin, Mark B; O'Dowd, Diane K; Posey, Lynmarie A; Smith, Tobin L; Miller, Emily R

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for improvement in undergraduate education within STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines are hampered by the methods used to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Faculty members at research universities are commonly assessed and promoted mainly on the basis of research success. To improve the quality of undergraduate teaching across all disciplines, not only STEM fields, requires creating an environment wherein continuous improvement of teaching is valued, assessed, and rewarded at various stages of a faculty member's career. This requires consistent application of policies that reflect well-established best practices for evaluating teaching at the department, college, and university levels. Evidence shows most teaching evaluation practices do not reflect stated policies, even when the policies specifically espouse teaching as a value. Thus, alignment of practice to policy is a major barrier to establishing a culture in which teaching is valued. Situated in the context of current national efforts to improve undergraduate STEM education, including the Association of American Universities Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative, this essay discusses four guiding principles for aligning practice with stated priorities in formal policies: 1) enhancing the role of deans and chairs; 2) effectively using the hiring process; 3) improving communication; and 4) improving the understanding of teaching as a scholarly activity. In addition, three specific examples of efforts to improve the practice of evaluating teaching are presented as examples: 1) Three Bucket Model of merit review at the University of California, Irvine; (2) Evaluation of Teaching Rubric, University of Kansas; and (3) Teaching Quality Framework, University of Colorado, Boulder. These examples provide flexible criteria to holistically evaluate and improve the quality of teaching across the diverse institutions comprising modern higher education. © 2017 M. Dennin et

  15. Access and Definition: Exploring how STEM Faculty, Department Heads, and University Policy Administrators Navigate the Implementation of a Parental Leave Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Schimpf, Corey T; Santiago, Marisol Mercado; Pawley, Alice L.

    2012-01-01

    Access and Definition: Exploring how STEM Faculty, Department Heads and University Policy Administrators Navigate the Enactment of a Parental Leave Policy A key feature in various reports exploring women’s persisting underrepresentation in STEM faculty positions in the US is the need to disseminate policy information to all stakeholders involved in issues relating to women STEM faculty underrepresentation and retention. Indeed, the National Academies of Science Beyond Barriers and Bias: Fulfi...

  16. Promoting universal financial protection: a policy analysis of universal health coverage in Costa Rica (1940-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Juan Rafael; Muiser, Jorine

    2013-08-21

    This paper explores the implementation and sustenance of universal health coverage (UHC) in Costa Rica, discussing the development of a social security scheme that covered 5% of the population in 1940, to one that finances and provides comprehensive healthcare to the whole population today. The scheme is financed by mandatory, tri-partite social insurance contributions complemented by tax funding to cover the poor. The analysis takes a historical perspective and explores the policy process including the key actors and their relative influence in decision-making. Data were collected using qualitative research instruments, including a review of literature, institutional and other documents, and in-depth interviews with key informants. Key lessons to be learned are: i) population health was high on the political agenda in Costa Rica, in particular before the 1980s when UHC was enacted and the transfer of hospitals to the social security institution took place. Opposition to UHC could therefore be contained through negotiation and implemented incrementally despite the absence of real consensus among the policy elite; ii) since the 1960s, the social security institution has been responsible for UHC in Costa Rica. This institution enjoys financial and managerial autonomy relative to the general government, which has also facilitated the UHC policy implementation process; iii) UHC was simultaneously constructed on three pillars that reciprocally strengthened each other: increasing population coverage, increasing availability of financial resources based on solidarity financing mechanisms, and increasing service coverage, ultimately offering comprehensive health services and the same benefits to every resident in the country; iv) particularly before the 1980s, the fruits of economic growth were structurally invested in health and other universal social policies, in particular education and sanitation. The social security institution became a flagship of Costa Rica

  17. Sour and duke cherry viruses in South-West Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo PÉREZ-SÁNCHEZ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the phytosanitary status of sour and duke cherry genetic resources in the Iberian Peninsula, and the incidence and leaf symptoms induced by the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV, Prune dwarf virus (PDV and Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV. Young leaf samples were taken from 204 sour and duke cherry trees belonging to ten cultivars, and were assayed by DAS-ELISA. Samples positive for any of the three viruses were also tested by RT-PCR. To associate the leaf symptoms with virus presence, 50 mature leaves from each infected tree were visually inspected during the summer. The ELISA and RT-PCR results indicated that 63% of the cherry trees were infected by at least one of these viruses. PNRSV occurred in all cultivars sampled and presented the highest infection rate (46%, followed by PDV (31% and ACLSV (6%. Many trees, (60 to 100%, were asymptomatic while harbouring single and mixed virus infections. The leaf symptoms associated with the viruses included chlorotic and dark brown necrotic ringspots on secondary veins and interveinal regions, for PNRSV, generalized chlorosis around the midveins, for PDV, chlorotic and reddish necrotic ringspots, for ACLSV, and generalized interveinal chlorosis, for mixed PNRSV and PDVinfections.

  18. Quality surveillance at Duke Power operating nuclear stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Duke Power quality assurance (QA) program originally had three levels of QA audits that reported results to different levels of management and in different time frames. It soon became obvious that although problems were being identified, considerable confusion was being created by reporting them to different levels. Additionally, it was recognized that all audits were dealing in history: events that had already occurred and therefore could not be averted. What was needed was a problem identification system focused on current activities. The Duke quality surveillance program was created by dropping the first level of audits and replacing it with an on-the-scene review system to identify current problems. The quality surveillance program is a success and will be even more so after surveillance personnel acquire additional technical expertise. To that end, a training program has been initiated that will stop just short of operator licensing in the operations area and will also include other areas such as health physics and chemistry

  19. Ocean Filmmaking Camp @ Duke Marine Lab: Building Community with Ocean Science for a Better World

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oca, M.; Noll, S.

    2016-02-01

    A democratic society requires that its citizens are informed of everyday's global issues. Out of all issues those related to ocean conservation can be hard to grasp for the general public and especially so for disadvantaged racial and ethnic groups. Opportunity-scarce communities generally have more limited access to the ocean and to science literacy programs. The Ocean Filmmaking Camp @ Duke Marine Lab (OFC@DUML) is an effort to address this gap at the level of high school students in a small coastal town. We designed a six-week summer program to nurture the talents of high school students from under-represented communities in North Carolina with training in filmmaking, marine science and conservation. Our science curriculum is especially designed to present the science in a locally and globally-relevant context. Class discussions, field trips and site visits develop the students' cognitive abilities while they learn the value of the natural environment they live in. Through filmmaking students develop their voice and their media literacy, while connecting with their local community, crossing class and racial barriers. By the end of the summer this program succeeds in encouraging students to engage in the democratic process on ocean conservation, climate change and other everyday affairs affecting their local communities. This presentation will cover the guiding principles followed in the design of the program, and how this high impact-low cost program is implemented. In its first year the program was co-directed by a graduate student and a local high school teacher, who managed more than 20 volunteers with a total budget of $1,500. The program's success was featured in the local newspaper and Duke University's Environment Magazine. This program is an example of how ocean science can play a part in building a better world, knitting diverse communities into the fabric of the larger society with engaged and science-literate citizens living rewarding lives.

  20. 76 FR 28023 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 2232-522; Project No. 516-459] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Meetings On March 18, 2011, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) requested a meeting with Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC...

  1. 76 FR 56242 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Establishment of Atomic Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 52-018-COL, 52-019-COL, 52-025-COL, 52-026-COL; ASLBP No. 11-913-01-COL-BD01] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Establishment... following captioned cases: Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, (William States Lee III Nuclear Station, Units 1 and...

  2. 78 FR 43197 - Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Florida Power & Light Company; Tampa Electric Company; Orlando...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [ER13-1922-000; ER13-1929-000; ER13-1932-000; NJ13-11-000] Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Florida Power & Light Company; Tampa Electric Company; Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Compliance Filings Take notice that on July 10, 2013, Duke Energy...

  3. Astronauts Young and Duke participate in training with Lunar Roving Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Astronauts John W. Young (right) and Charles M. Duke Jr., participate in simulation training with the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) during Apollo 16 pre-launch activity at the Kennedy Space Center. All systems on the LRV-2 were activated and checked for trouble-free operation during the simulations. Young is the Apollo 16 commander; and Duke is the lunar module pilot.

  4. New Public Management, science policy and the orchestration of university research – academic science the loser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aant Elzinga

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In many countries - during the past three decades - there has been increasing alignment of public administration with neoliberal modes of governance driven by processes of globalization and privatization. Key is New Public Management (NPM as an instrument for applying private sector or market-based techniques to public services. The paper concerns the implications and impact of these developments as they relate to the university sector where we are seeing an influx of bibliometrics to assess performativity with measures that are frequently far from adequate. These changes are related to the broader context of a globalized privatization doctrine of science policy that has gained currency in many countries. The analysis presented here probes and discusses a nexus between NPM, bibliometric performance audits, and a new paradigm in science policy. As such the paper seeks to fill an important gap in science policy studies and the literature on New Public Management more generally. It summarizes various characteristics associated with NPM, and expl icates the connection with methods of research evaluation now being introduced in academic ins titutions . It also takes up varying responses evoked within academe by the use of bibliometrics and current methods of ranking of tertiary educational institutions. Apart from gaining a better understanding of significant changes in the higher educational and research landscapes or disciplines and the interplay of these with broader economic and political trends in society at large, the aim of the paper is also to stimulate discussion and debate on current priorities, perceptions and policies governing knowledge production. Keywords: New Public management; research policy; transdisciplinarity; postnormal science; Audit Society Agencification; Accountingization; peer review evaluation Disciplines:Public Management and Governance; Management Studies and Research Management. Science Policy; Science Studies

  5. An Investigation of Creative Climate of University R&D Centers and Policy Implications for Innovation in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Rasmussen, Palle; Chemi, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    The chapter focuses on the influences of science and technology (S&T) policies on creative climate of university R&D centers in China that provide policy implications for improving roles of university R&D in innovation system. The empirical data came from two questionnaire surveys, one...... is with members from R&D centers, another with leaders of S&T fund management sectors in universities. The results demonstrate both strengths and weaknesses of creative climate of university R&D centers. This leads to implications such as to improve a more comprehensive innovation Measurement system and to build...

  6. A fraud prevention policy: Its relevance and implication at a university of technology in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Rorwana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Using research grants administrators and their clients (academic researchers as the lens, this paper investigated the relevance and implication of a fraud prevention policy at a University of Technology (UoT in South Africa. The paper adopted a quantitative approach in which closed-ended questions were complemented by open-ended questions in the survey questionnaire in the attempt to capture the perceptions of both research grants administrators and their clients on the relevance and implications of a fraud and irregularity prevention policy. The results indicate that both research grants administrators (71.4 %, and their clients (73% do not know if UoTx has a fraud and irregularity policy. While only 36% of research grants administrators indicated that they would feel safe reporting deceitful activities, a slight majority (59% of the clients reported same. With regards to the steps to follow to report fraudulent activity, it was noted that while all (100% the research grants administrators noted that they were clueless, ironically an overwhelming majority of their clients indicated otherwise. Notwithstanding, both research grants administrators and their clients (93% and 95% respectively concurred that a fraud prevention policy was necessary for UoTx. The implication is that having phenomenal controls that are not effectively publicized, monitored or worse still overridden by someone are useless.

  7. Health physics practices and experience at Duke Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, L.

    1986-01-01

    The history and development of the health physics and as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) program at Duke Power Company's Oconee Nuclear Station is described as are the fundamental elements of the program and how the program works. The benefits of this health physics/ALARA program have been determined to be (a) improved quality of manpower planning and scheduling, (b) increased efficiency of shutdown activities, (c) reduced cost of shutdown, (d) immediate awareness of adverse job exposure trends, (e) better management information on exposure-related problems, (f) improved accuracy of personnel and job dose records, and (g) in general, improved outage performance and subsequent plant operation. Experience with the health physics/ALARA program is discussed in terms of (a) savings of critical path time, (b) maintaining ALARA personnel doses, and (c) record capacity factors

  8. Excellence and Diversity: Selective Admission Policies in Dutch Higher Education. A Case Study on Amsterdam University College.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reumer, Christoffel; van der Wende, Marijk

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the emergence of selective admission policies in Dutch university education. Such policies are being developed to promote excellence in a higher education system that is generally known to be “egalitarian” and increasingly criticized for a lack of differentiation. The changing

  9. REGION NORTH OF TEACHER EDUCATION POLICY AND EVALUATION OF POLES OPEN UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso José da Costa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This text aims to present, in general, the north region and policies for teacher training implemented in the last 5 years, locating in this context the importance of the Brazil Open University system and its supporting poles face as methodology research linked to the project "Institutionalization of Distance Education in Brazil." Greater emphasis will be given to data from the states of Pará and Acre, given that two authors of this text act as coordinators of the poles supporting attendance System Open University of Brazil in these states. We design the text, based on testimony of poles coordinators who participated in participatory research, conducted by the Research Group "Teacher education and information and communication technologies", LANTE / UFF. We aim also to identify the structure and functioning of the Poles face Supporting UAB in the North as well as the assessment tool applied in this region.

  10. The Concept of a Single-sex Optional Discussion Session in Introductory Astronomy at a Publicly Funded University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawl, S.

    1996-12-01

    The concept of single-sex education for science and mathematics has recently received renewed discussion in both the popular and professional literature. So important is the topic within higher education that the Duke Journal of Gender Law and Policy sponsored a symposium called "Gender & The Higher Education Classroom: Maximizing the Learning Environment" in February 1996 (http://www.duke.edu/ jrd4/djgcnf96.htm). The concept is especially controversial in publicly supported educational institutions. The idea of offering an optional discussion session limited to a single sex in a university-level introductory astronomy course at a State-supported school was considered through discussions with a number of faculty and administrators, and through a questionnaire aimed at determining student attitudes toward the concept. The results of the student questionnaire will be presented. (While the questionnaire results will be seen to be in favor of such an optional discussion session, such sessions have not been offered.)

  11. The power of the university in public administration. participation of national university of Colombia campus Manizales, in building public policy for the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Albeiro Castaño Duque

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The current research aims to investigate the power of the University and its contribution to the public administration through participation in public policy. It examines what has been the role of academia in taking clear and decisive way finding solutions to the problems of communities and how extension programs have influenced the action of the state to lay the foundation of social development. The research methodology is approached from a casual type qualitative perspective, which aims to demonstrate the contribution and participation of the National University of Colombia Campus Manizales in the construction of public policies in its geographical influence area and the coordination with communities immersed in those territories. It is intended that this case study be as an input to generate parameters for the participation of universities in building public policies that contribute to addressing the needs and questions of citizens.

  12. The European Cohesion Policy and Structural Funds in Sparsely Populated Areas: A Case Study of the University of Oulu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eija-Riita Niinikoski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The regional policy is one of the European Union’s main investment policies to support regional equality and convergence, cohesion policy being one of its key policy areas and aiming to support job creation, business competitiveness, economic growth, sustainable development and citizens’ quality of life. As education, research and innovation are amongst the main objectives of these policies, universities play an important role in regional development, research and education being their main tasks, while interaction with society the third one. The aim of this study is to examine how universities participate in cohesion policy and regional development by utilising structural funds in fulfilling their third task (RQ1 and how do the closest stakeholder groups view the regional role of the university (RQ2. A single case study was conducted having the Oulu Southern Institute (OSI of the University of Oulu as the case study unit. The data was collected using an adapted Delphi method in a workshop with OSI staff, from an online questionnaire to OSI’s closest stakeholders and from in-depth interviews to examine the themes that arose in the questionnaire answers. In the findings, the importance of the university unit for regional development is clearly evident. Structural funds are the main tools for universities to stimulate development, the university was seen as a crucial actor, knowledge creator, collaboration partner and regional developer, as well as a fundamental part of the regional innovation system.According to the findings, the university should participate in recommending development areas for cohesion policy guidelines for the next structural fund period.

  13. Implications for Equity and Diversity of Increasing International Student Numbers in European Universities: Policies and Practice in Four National Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapakoski, Jani; Pashby, Karen

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the main rationales for and possible implications of the policy of increasing international student numbers in higher education (HE). Drawing on critical discourse analysis, we map key themes emerging from two sets of data--university strategy documents and interviews with staff--collected at eight universities in four national…

  14. Preventing hospital malnutrition: a survey on nutritional policies in an Italian University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annetta, M G; Pittiruti, M; De Rosa, S; Franchi, P; Pintaudi, G; Caricato, A; Antonelli, M

    2015-11-01

    A proper strategy for fighting hospital malnutrition should include nutritional screening of all hospitalized patients, adequate utilization of the Hospital facilities - such as Clinical Nutrition Services or Nutrition Teams - and an adequate algorithm for the adoption of proper nutrition support (oral, enteral or parenteral) with proper timing. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the current policies of different non-intensive wards of our institution (a 1100 beds University Hospital) in terms of prevention of hospital malnutrition. We conducted a one-day survey to verify the current policies of nutritional screening and the indication to nutritional support in adult patients, interviewing nurses and physicians of our non-intensive hospital wards. A total of 29 wards were considered, which sum up to 755 hospitalized patients. We found that nutritional screening at admission is routinely assessed only in 41% of wards and that oral nutrient intake is controlled regularly only in 72%. Indication to clinical nutrition support and specifically to artificial nutrition is not consistent with the current international guidelines. Only 14% of patients were receiving artificial nutrition at the moment of the survey and the majority of them were given parenteral nutrition rather than enteral feeding. Our survey confirmed that in large hospitals the main barriers to the fight against hospital malnutrition are the lack of knowledge and/or commitment by nurses and physicians as well as the lack of well-defined hospital policies on early nutritional screening, surveillance of nutritional status and indication to nutrition support.

  15. Students? attitude and smoking behaviour following the implementation of a university smoke-free policy: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Chaaya, Monique; Alameddine, Maysam; Nakkash, Rima; Afifi, Rima A; Khalil, Joanna; Nahhas, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Objective In view of the high-smoking rate among university students in Lebanon and the known adverse effects of second-hand smoking, the American University of Beirut (AUB) decided to implement a non-smoking policy on campus. This study sought to examine the students? compliance and attitudes following the ban. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting A private university in Lebanon. Participants 545 randomly selected students were approached. A stratified cluster sample of classes offered in t...

  16. Can policy ameliorate socioeconomic inequities in obesity and obesity-related behaviours? A systematic review of the impact of universal policies on adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olstad, D L; Teychenne, M; Minaker, L M; Taber, D R; Raine, K D; Nykiforuk, C I J; Ball, K

    2016-12-01

    This systematic review examined the impact of universal policies on socioeconomic inequities in obesity, dietary and physical activity behaviours among adults and children. PRISMA-Equity guidelines were followed. Database searches spanned from 2004 to August 2015. Eligible studies assessed the impact of universal policies on anthropometric, dietary or physical activity-related outcomes in adults or children according to socioeconomic position. Thirty-six studies were included. Policies were classified as agentic, agento-structural or structural, and their impact on inequities was rated as positive, neutral, negative or mixed according to the dominant associations observed. Most policies had neutral impacts on obesity-related inequities regardless of whether they were agentic (60% neutral), agento-structural (68% neutral) or structural (67% neutral). The proportion of positive impacts was similar across policy types (10% agentic, 18% agento-structural and 11% structural), with some differences for negative impacts (30% agentic, 14% agento-structural and 22% structural). The majority of associations remained neutral when stratified by participant population, implementation level and socioeconomic position measures and by anthropometric and behavioural outcomes. Fiscal measures had consistently neutral or positive impacts on inequities. Findings suggest an important role for policy in addressing obesity in an equitable manner and strengthen the case for implementing a broad complement of policies spanning the agency-structure continuum. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  17. Five-factor personality measures in Chinese university students: effects of one-child policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Du, Wuying; Liu, Ping; Liu, Jianhui; Wang, Yehan

    2002-01-31

    Since the one-child policy was implemented in China in 1979, many investigators have studied the psychological consequences to children without siblings. Although the results are not conclusive, there is evidence that children who have siblings, rather than only children, have increased anxiety and depression. Whether the differences between students with and without siblings would continue when they reached university age is an interesting question. We used the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire to assess personality traits and the Plutchik-van Praag Depression Inventory to measure depressed mood in 134 university students with and 126 university students without siblings. Most students without siblings (93.7%) were reared in urban areas, while 90.3% of students with siblings came from rural areas. Parental professions were higher in social status and annual family incomes were higher in students without siblings. Increased neuroticism-anxiety, aggression-hostility, and depressed mood were found in students with siblings. Gender and annual family income were not significantly related to personality in the two groups, and birth-order position was not related to personality in the students with siblings. In contrast, the depression score was positively correlated with neuroticism-anxiety and aggression-hostility, but negatively correlated with parental occupation and annual family income. The greater competition to receive high education, reduced benefits from society, and lower level of social respect might nurture these personality traits in students with siblings. These findings might, in some limited aspects, indicate that the one-child policy affects personality traits and depressed mood in students with siblings.

  18. The Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute at Texas A&M University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A. Gariazzo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute (NSSPI is a multidisciplinary organization at Texas A&M University and was the first U.S. academic institution focused on technical graduate education, research, and service related to the safeguarding of nuclear materials and the reduction of nuclear threats. NSSPI employs science, engineering, and policy expertise to: (1 conduct research and development to help detect, prevent, and reverse nuclear and radiological proliferation and guard against nuclear terrorism; (2 educate the next generation of nuclear security and nuclear nonproliferation leaders; (3 analyze the interrelationships between policy and technology in the field of nuclear security; and (4 serve as a public resource for knowledge and skills to reduce nuclear threats. Since 2006, over 31 Doctoral and 73 Master degrees were awarded through NSSPI-sponsored research. Forty-one of those degrees are Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering with a specialization in Nuclear Nonproliferation and 16 were Doctorate of Philosophy degrees with a specific focus on nuclear nonproliferation. Over 200 students from both technical and policy backgrounds have taken classes provided by NSSPI at Texas A&M. The model for creating safeguards and security experts, which has in large part been replicated worldwide, was established at Texas A&M by NSSPI faculty and staff. In addition to conventional classroom lectures, NSSPI faculty have provided practical experiences; advised students on valuable research projects that have contributed substantially to the overall nuclear nonproliferation, safeguards and security arenas; and engaged several similar academic and research institutes around the world in activities and research for the benefit of Texas A&M students. NSSPI has had an enormous impact on the nuclear nonproliferation workforce (across the international community in the past 8 years, and this paper is an attempt to summarize the activities

  19. Local and Regional Authorities as Resources for Implementing Universal Design Policy in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Einar

    2016-01-01

    The municipalities and regional authorities are in general resources for achieving national goals. Their management and works are crucial to the development and implementation of Universal Design. Through several programmes, national authorities have worked for activating the local and regional levels. The results are visible. We can see a long-term national strategy to help make society accessible to everyone and prevent discrimination. Participating municipalities and regional authorities are now able to create their own policy and strategies and implement solutions. The national programs have involved interested and motivated municipalities. All the 18 counties in Norway have been involved more or less in different periods and the same with up to a third of the about good 400 municipalities.

  20. Students' drinking behavior and perceptions towards introducing alcohol policies on university campus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Eva Ladekjær; Andsager Smorawski, Gitte; Lund Krabak, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    . The aim of this study is to explore students’ perceptions of alcohol policies on campus in relation to attitudes and practices of alcohol consumption. Methods We conducted six focus group interviews with students from the University of Southern Denmark at two different campuses. The interviews discussed...... topics such as experiences and attitudes towards alcohol consumption among students, regulations, and norms of alcohol use on campus. The analysis followed a pre-determined codebook. Results Alcohol consumption is an integrated practice on campus. Most of the participants found it unnecessary to make...... major restrictions. Instead, regulations were socially controlled by students themselves and related to what was considered to be appropriate behavior. However students were open minded towards smaller limitations of alcohol availability. These included banning the sale of alcohol in vending machines...

  1. The equity impact of the universal coverage policy: lessons from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakongsai, Phusit; Limwattananon, Supon; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2009-01-01

    This chapter assesses health equity achievements of the Thai health system before and after the introduction of the universal coverage (UC) policy. It examines five dimensions of equity: equity in financial contributions, the incidence of catastrophic health expenditure, the degree of impoverishment as a result of household out-of-pocket payments for health, equity in health service use and the incidence of public subsidies for health. The standard methods proposed by O'Donnell, van Doorslaer, and Wagstaff (2008b) were used to measure equity in financial contribution, healthcare utilization and public subsidies, and in assessing the incidence of catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment. Two major national representative household survey datasets were used: Socio-Economic Surveys and Health and Welfare Surveys. General tax was the most progressive source of finance in Thailand. Because this source dominates total financing, the overall outcome was progressive, with the rich contributing a greater share of their income than the poor. The low incidence of catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment before UC was further reduced after UC. Use of healthcare and the distribution of government subsidies were both pro-poor: in particular, the functioning of primary healthcare (PHC) at the district level serves as a "pro-poor hub" in translating policy into practice and equity outcomes. The Thai health financing reforms have been accompanied by nationwide extension of PHC coverage, mandatory rural health service by new graduates and systems redesign, especially the introduction of a contracting model and closed-ended provider payment methods. Together, these changes have led to a more equitable and more efficient health system. Institutional capacity to generate evidence and to translate it into policy decisions, effective implementation and comprehensive monitoring and evaluation are essential to successful system-level reforms.

  2. Universal Health Insurance Coverage in Vietnam: A Stakeholder Analysis From Policy Proposal (1989) to Implementation (2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Chi K; Hill, Peter; Nguyen, Huong T

    In 1989, health insurance (HI) was introduced in Vietnam and began to be implemented in 1992. There was limited progress until the 2014 Law on HI that was revised with the aim of universal health insurance coverage (UHIC) by 2020. This article explores stakeholder roles and positions from the initial introduction of HI to the implementation of the Master Plan accelerating UHIC. To better understand the influence of stakeholders in accelerating UHIC to achieve equity in health care. Using a qualitative study design, we conducted content analysis of HI-related documents and interviewed social security and health system key informants, government representatives, and community stakeholders to determine their positions and influence on UHIC. Our findings demonstrate different levels of support of stakeholders that influence in the HI formulation and implementation, from opposition when HI was first introduced in 1989 to collaboration of stakeholders from 2013 when the Master Plan for UHIC was implemented. Despite an initial failure to secure the support of the Parliament for a Law on HI, a subsequent series of alternative legislative strategies brought limited increases in HI coverage. With government financial subsidization, the involvement of multiple stakeholders, political commitment, and flexible working mechanisms among stakeholders have remained important, with an increasing recognition that HI is not only a technical aspect of the health system but also a broader socioeconomic and governance issue. The different levels of power and influence among stakeholders, together with their commercial and political interests and their different perceptions of HI, have influenced stakeholders' support or opposition to HI policies. Despite high-level policy support, stakeholders' positions may vary, depending on their perceptions of the policy implications. A shift in government stakeholder positions, especially at the provincial level, has been necessary to accelerate

  3. Plasma homocysteine level in cardiac syndrome X and its relation with duke treadmill score

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timurkaynak, T.; Balcioglu, S.; Arslan, U.; Kocaman, Sinan A.; Cengel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to investigate the plasma homocysteine level and relationship between plasma homocysteine level and duke treadmill score (DTS) in cardiac syndrome X (CSX) patients. Seventy-nine patients (36 male, 43 female, mean age: 50+-8.8 years) admitted to Gazi University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey with typical effort angina, positive stress test and angiographically normal coronary arteries between January and September 2006 were included in this prospective and controlled study. Thirty asymptomatic patients (11 male, 19 female, mean age: 47.6+-8.3 years) with two cardiovascular risk factors were chosen as a control group. Plasma homocysteine level was measured in both groups and DTS was calculated in the CSX group. Plasma homocysteine was measured with AxSYM homocysteine immunoassay method in both groups. Plasma homocysteine level was higher in the CSx group compared to the control group 16.5+-4.9 umol/L, n=79, versus 12.4+-4.1 umol/L, n=30, p<0.001). The DTS was -2.7+-5.3 in the CSX group. There was a negative correlation between the DTS and homocysteine levels in the CSX group. (r=-0.506, p<0.001). Plasma homocysteine level, which is known to cause endothelial dysfunction and microvascular ischemia were higher in CSX patients. Also, this increase in homocysteine level correlated with the DTS, which represents the magnitude of ischemia. (author)

  4. HESS Opinions: Repeatable research: what hydrologistscan learn from the Duke cancer research scandal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienen, Michael; Bakker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, difficulties encountered in reproducing the results of a cancer study at Duke University resulted in a scandal and an investigation which concluded that tools used for data management, analysis, and modeling were inappropriate for the documentation of the study, let alone the reproduction of the results. New protocols were developed which require that data analysis and modeling be carried out with scripts that can be used to reproduce the results and are a record of all decisions and interpretations made during an analysis or a modeling effort. In the hydrological sciences, we face similar challenges and need to develop similar standards for transparency and repeatability of results. A promising route is to start making use of open-source languages (such as R and Python) to write scripts and to use collaborative coding environments (such as Git) to share our codes for inspection and use by the hydrological community. An important side-benefit to adopting such protocols is consistency and efficiency among collaborators.

  5. Students' drinking behavior and perceptions towards introducing alcohol policies on university campus in Denmark: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladekjær Larsen, Eva; Smorawski, Gitte Andsager; Kragbak, Katrine Lund; Stock, Christiane

    2016-04-29

    High alcohol consumption among university students is a well-researched health concern in many countries. At universities in Denmark, policies of alcohol consumption are a new phenomenon if existing at all. However, little is known of how students perceive campus alcohol policies. The aim of this study is to explore students' perceptions of alcohol policies on campus in relation to attitudes and practices of alcohol consumption. We conducted six focus group interviews with students from the University of Southern Denmark at two different campuses. The interviews discussed topics such as experiences and attitudes towards alcohol consumption among students, regulations, and norms of alcohol use on campus. The analysis followed a pre-determined codebook. Alcohol consumption is an integrated practice on campus. Most of the participants found it unnecessary to make major restrictions. Instead, regulations were socially controlled by students themselves and related to what was considered to be appropriate behavior. However students were open minded towards smaller limitations of alcohol availability. These included banning the sale of alcohol in vending machines and limiting consumption during the introduction week primarily due to avoiding social exclusion of students who do not drink. Some international students perceived the level of consumption as too high and distinguished between situations where they perceived drinking as unusual. The study showed that alcohol is a central part of students' lives. When developing and implementing alcohol policies on campus, seeking student input in the process and addressing alcohol policies in the larger community will likely improve the success of the policies.

  6. Spatial distribution and polarization of gamma-rays generated via Compton backscattering in the Duke/OK-4 storage ring FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S H; Tornow, W; Montgomery, C

    2001-01-01

    Beams of nearly monochromatic gamma-rays are produced via intracavity Compton backscattering in the OK-4/Duke storage ring FEL, the high-intensity gamma-ray source (HI gamma S). Presently, HI gamma S generates gamma-ray beams with an energy tunable from 2 to 58 MeV and a maximum flux of 5x10 sup 7 gamma-rays per second. The gamma-rays are linearly polarized with a degree of polarization close to 100% (V.N. Litvinenko, et al., Predictions and expected performance for the VUV OK-5/Duke Storage Ring FEL with variable polarization, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A, to be published in this proceeding) and they are collimated to pencil-like semi-monoenergetic beams with RMS energy spreads as low as 0.2%. The detailed theoretical and experimental studies of the gamma-ray beam quality were conducted during the last two years (S.H. Park, Thesis, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 2000). In this paper, we present the theoretical analysis and the experimental results on the spatial distribution and polarization of gamma-rays fro...

  7. Spatial distribution and polarization of {gamma}-rays generated via Compton backscattering in the Duke/OK-4 storage ring FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.H. E-mail: shpark@nanum.kaeri.re.kr; Litvinenko, V.N.; Tornow, W.; Montgomery, C

    2001-12-21

    Beams of nearly monochromatic {gamma}-rays are produced via intracavity Compton backscattering in the OK-4/Duke storage ring FEL, the high-intensity {gamma}-ray source (HI{gamma}S). Presently, HI{gamma}S generates {gamma}-ray beams with an energy tunable from 2 to 58 MeV and a maximum flux of 5x10{sup 7} {gamma}-rays per second. The {gamma}-rays are linearly polarized with a degree of polarization close to 100% (V.N. Litvinenko, et al., Predictions and expected performance for the VUV OK-5/Duke Storage Ring FEL with variable polarization, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A, to be published in this proceeding) and they are collimated to pencil-like semi-monoenergetic beams with RMS energy spreads as low as 0.2%. The detailed theoretical and experimental studies of the {gamma}-ray beam quality were conducted during the last two years (S.H. Park, Thesis, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 2000). In this paper, we present the theoretical analysis and the experimental results on the spatial distribution and polarization of {gamma}-rays from the HI{gamma}S facility.

  8. Spatial distribution and polarization of γ-rays generated via Compton backscattering in the Duke/OK-4 storage ring FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.H.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Tornow, W.; Montgomery, C.

    2001-01-01

    Beams of nearly monochromatic γ-rays are produced via intracavity Compton backscattering in the OK-4/Duke storage ring FEL, the high-intensity γ-ray source (HIγS). Presently, HIγS generates γ-ray beams with an energy tunable from 2 to 58 MeV and a maximum flux of 5x10 7 γ-rays per second. The γ-rays are linearly polarized with a degree of polarization close to 100% (V.N. Litvinenko, et al., Predictions and expected performance for the VUV OK-5/Duke Storage Ring FEL with variable polarization, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A, to be published in this proceeding) and they are collimated to pencil-like semi-monoenergetic beams with RMS energy spreads as low as 0.2%. The detailed theoretical and experimental studies of the γ-ray beam quality were conducted during the last two years (S.H. Park, Thesis, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 2000). In this paper, we present the theoretical analysis and the experimental results on the spatial distribution and polarization of γ-rays from the HIγS facility

  9. Attitudes of students of a health sciences university towards the extension of smoke-free policies at the university campuses of Barcelona (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Cristina; Méndez, Carlos; Sánchez, María; Martínez-Sánchez, José María

    To assess attitudes towards the extension of outdoor smoke-free areas on university campuses. Cross-sectional study (n=384) conducted using a questionnaire administered to medical and nursing students in Barcelona in 2014. Information was obtained pertaining to support for indoor and outdoor smoking bans on university campuses, and the importance of acting as role models. Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine agreement. Most of the students agreed on the importance of health professionals and students as role models (74.9% and 64.1%, respectively) although there were statistically significant differences by smoking status and age. 90% of students reported exposure to smoke on campus. Students expressed strong support for indoor smoke-free policies (97.9%). However, only 39.3% of participants supported regulation of outdoor smoking for university campuses. Non-smokers (OR=12.315; 95% CI: 5.377-28.204) and students ≥22 years old (OR=3.001; 95% CI: 1.439-6.257) were the strongest supporters. The students supported indoor smoke-free policies for universities. However, support for extending smoke-free regulations to outdoor areas of university campuses was limited. It is necessary to educate students about tobacco control and emphasise their importance as role models before extending outdoor smoke-free legislation at university campuses. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Technology Performance Report: Duke Energy Notrees Wind Storage Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, Jeff [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Mohler, David [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Gibson, Stuart [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Clanin, Jason [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Faris, Don [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Hooker, Kevin [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Rowand, Michael [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Duke Energy Renewables owns and operates the Notrees Wind Farm in west Texas’s Ector and Winkler counties. The wind farm, which was commissioned in April 2009, has a total capacity of 152.6 MW generated by 55 Vestas V82 turbines, one Vestas 1-V90 experimental turbine, and 40 GE 1.5-MW turbines. The Vestas V82 turbines have a generating capacity of 1.65 MW each, the Vestas V90 turbine has a generating capacity of 1.86 MW, and the GE turbines have a generating capacity of 1.5 MW each. The objective of the Notrees Wind Storage Demonstration Project is to validate that energy storage increases the value and practical application of intermittent wind generation and is commercially viable at utility scale. The project incorporates both new and existing technologies and techniques to evaluate the performance and potential of wind energy storage. In addition, it could serve as a model for others to adopt and replicate. Wind power resources are expected to play a significant part in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from electric power generation by 2030. However, the large variability and intermittent nature of wind presents a barrier to integrating it within electric markets, particularly when competing against conventional generation that is more reliable. In addition, wind power production often peaks at night or other times when demand and electricity prices are lowest. Energy storage systems can overcome those barriers and enable wind to become a valuable asset and equal competitor to conventional fossil fuel generation.

  11. Whose University is it anyway? The complex world(s) of lifelong (higher) learning, government policy and institutional habitus

    OpenAIRE

    Marr, Liz; Harvey, Morag

    2012-01-01

    At a time of worldwide economic recession, policy decisions at governmental and institutional level have to balance the basic human rights of access to education with the skills needs for economic competitiveness. This is playing out across Europe in a myriad of ways, as social problems exacerbated by lack of opportunity, add to the complexity of funding decisions.\\ud As part of the OPULL (Opening up Universities to Lifelong Learning) project, four European universities have been conducting r...

  12. Attitudes of students and employees towards the implementation of a totally smoke free university campus policy at King Saud University in Saudi Arabia: a cross sectional baseline study on smoking behavior following the implementation of policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Khalid M

    2014-10-01

    Tobacco smoking is the preventable health issue worldwide. The harmful consequences of tobacco smoking and exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke are well documented. The aim of this study is to compares the prevalence of smoking among students, faculty and staff and examines their interest to quit. Study also determines the difference on perceptions of smoking and non-smoking students, faculty and staff with regard to implementation of a smoke-free policy. A cross-sectional survey was administered to one of the largest universities in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during the academic year of 2013. A Likert scale was used on questionnaires towards attitude to smoking and smoking free policy. The Chi squared test was used to determine the difference of support on completely smoke free campus for smokers and non-smokers. Smoking rates were highest among staff members (36.8 %) followed by students (11.2 %) and faculty (6.4 %). About half of the smokers (53.7 %) within the university attempted to quit smoking. Students (OR 3.10, 95 % CI 1.00-9.60) and faculty (OR 4.06, 95 % CI 1.16-14.18) were more likely to make quit smoking than staff members. Majority of the respondents (89.6 %) were supportive of a smoking--free policy and indicated that should be strictly enforced especially into public places. Results also showed that smokers were more likely to support a smoke-free policy if there are no fines or penalties. These baseline findings will provide information among administrators in formulating and carrying out a total smoke free policy. Although the majority of people within the King Saud University demonstrate a high support for a smoke-free policy, administrators should consider difference between smokers and non-smokers attitudes when implementing such a policy.

  13. The Impact of "Tuition-Paying" Policy on Retention and Graduation Rates at the University of Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atuahene, Francis

    2013-01-01

    African universities over the past decade have developed new modes of financial mobilization in search for fiscal solutions to the declining public support for higher education. The creation of the "tuition-paying" ("dual track" or "fee-paying") admission track policy, a variant of cost sharing, is one of such…

  14. Sustainable Development Policies as Indicators and Pre-Conditions for Sustainability Efforts at Universities: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal Filho, Walter; Brandli, Luciana Londero; Becker, Deisi; Skanavis, Constantina; Kounani, Aristea; Sardi, Chrysoula; Papaioannidou, Dimitra; Paço, Arminda; Azeiteiro, Ulisses; de Sousa, Luiza Olim; Raath, Schalk; Pretorius, Rudi Wessel; Shiel, Christine; Vargas, Valeria; Trencher, Gregory; Marans, Robert W.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: There is a widely held belief that sustainable development (SD) policies are essential for universities to successfully engage in matters related to sustainability, and are an indicator of the extent to which they are active in this field. This paper aims to examine the evidence which currently exists to support this assumption. It…

  15. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Acceptability and Effectiveness of University Smoke-Free Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, Joshua R.; Townsend, Joy L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Systematically review studies of support for, and effectiveness of, university campuses' smoke-free policies. Participants/Methods: A search was carried out for studies in English related to campus smoking bans through June 2013. Eligible studies had outcomes for student or faculty attitudes, or measures of smoking prevalence or…

  16. Burden's on U! the Impact of the "Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin" Decision on K-16 Admissions Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, David H. K.

    2014-01-01

    Using race as a factor in admissions policies was contested in "Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin." Although the U.S. Supreme Court firmly held in "Grutter v. Bollinger" that race can be considered among many factors in admitting students, the recent decision in "Fisher" has posed many questions and challenges…

  17. Discursive Mechanisms and Human Agency in Language Policy Formation: Negotiating Bilingualism and Parallel Language Use at a Swedish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källkvist, Marie; Hult, Francis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the enactment of Sweden's Language Act in 2009 and in the face of the growing presence of English, Swedish universities have been called upon by the Swedish Higher Education Authority to craft their own language policy documents. This study focuses on the discursive negotiation of institutional bilingualism by a language policy…

  18. A Study of the Relationship between Institutional Policy, Organisational culture and E-Learning Use in Four South African Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniewicz, Laura; Brown, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between policy (conceptualised as goals, values and resources), organisational culture and e-learning use. Through both qualitative and quantitative research methods, we gathered data about staff and student perspectives from four diverse South African universities representing a selection of ICT in…

  19. Managing the Risky Humanity of Academic Workers: Risk and Reciprocity in University Work-Life Balance Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltmarsh, Sue; Randell-Moon, Holly

    2015-01-01

    University work-life balance policies increasingly offer academic workers a range of possible options for managing the competing demands of work, family, and community obligations. Flexible work arrangements, family-friendly hours and campus facilities, physical well-being and mental health programs typify strategies for formally acknowledging the…

  20. The Policy Cycle and Vernacular Globalization: A Case Study of the Creation of Vietnam National University--Hochiminh City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh Ngo, Thanh; Lingard, Bob; Mitchell, Jane

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the policy cycle and vernacular globalization in the context of higher education reform in Vietnam. Through an analysis of the development of the Vietnam National University--Hochiminh City as part of the post-1986 reconstruction of Vietnamese higher education, the article considers the complex interrelationship between…

  1. Returns to Investment in Ontario University Education, 1960-1990, and Implications for Tuition Fee Policy. Discussion Series, Issue 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stager, David A. A.

    This analysis of Ontario's returns to investment and implications for tuition fee policy updates a 1989 publication titled "Focus on Fees." The paper examines: data on public and private return on investment (ROI) from university education, pattern of ROI rates over time, and impact of tuition fee levels on estimated ROI for various…

  2. How federal government and university policies need to change to achieve more and better research and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, Carl

    2011-04-01

    The Obama administration has repeatedly emphasized that the economic future of the country will depend heavily on the future success of both its scientific research and its science education. Research universities play a vital role in both of these activities. Unfortunately, universities are facing increasing difficulties in maintaining and enhancing the quality of their research and educational activities. There are some particularly notable unmet opportunities for improving science education. I will offer some ideas for how federal and university policies on research funding and education might be modified in tandem to enhance both research and educational outputs.

  3. Working with Policy and Regulatory Factors to Implement Universal Design in the Built Environment: The Australian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Helen; Hitch, Danielle; Watchorn, Valerie; Ang, Susan

    2015-07-15

    Built environments that are usable by all provide opportunities for engagement in meaningful occupations. However, enabling them in day to day design processes and practice is problematic for relevant professions. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain greater understanding of the policy and regulatory influences that promote or hinder the uptake of universal design in built environments, to inform better future design. Focus groups or telephone interviews were undertaken with 28 key building industry and disability stakeholders in Australia. Four themes were identified: the difficulties of definition; the push or pull of regulations and policy; the role of formal standards; and, shifting the focus of design thinking. The findings highlight the complexity of working within policy and regulatory contexts when implementing universal design. Occupational therapists working with colleagues from other professions must be aware of these influences, and develop the skills to work with them for successful practice.

  4. SLC summer 2010 university - The ocean in the climate-energy problem, urban policies. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the summer 2010 university of the SLC (save the climate) organization on the topics of the ocean in the climate-energy problem, and of the urban policies. Nine presentations (slides) are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Biofuels made from micro-algae: stakes and challenges (Olivier Bernard, Comore - INRIA /CNRS/UPMC); 2 - The energy of waves (Alain Clement, Ecole Centrale de Nantes); 3 - The sea, new source of renewable energies? (J.J. Herou, EDF CIH); 4 - Oceans acidification: the other CO 2 problem (James Orr, Pierre Simon Laplace Institute - IPSL, Laboratory of climate and environmental Sciences - LSCE, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ); 5 - Oceans and carbon cycle (Laurent Bopp, IPSL/LSCE); 6 - Renewable marine energies (Yann-Herve De Roeck, France Energies Marines); 7 - Energy renovation of buildings (Jean-Claude Terrier, Mesac Europe); 8 - Modevur research project - Modeling of urban development, sketch of a development typology of chinese cities (Clement-Noel Douady); 9 - Urban areas in the fight against climate change: stakes, knowledge and controversies (Francois Menard, PUCA)

  5. School-University Partnerships: A Means for the Inclusion of Policy Studies in Music Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    The need for music educators to become more actively involved in policy issues, including analysis, design, implementation, and research, is critical to the future of music education. Bridging the gap between policy and practice requires a collaborative effort among music professionals. This article explores the inclusive use of policy studies in…

  6. No smoking here: examining reasons for noncompliance with a smoke-free policy in a large university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancey, Jonine; Bowser, Nicole; Burns, Sharyn; Crawford, Gemma; Portsmouth, Linda; Smith, Jennifer

    2014-07-01

    A large Australian university introduced a campuswide smoke-free policy in 2012. Almost 1 year after implementation, reasons for noncompliance among people observed smoking on campus were examined. Six smoking locations on campus were identified after a campuswide audit of smoking indicators (i.e., discarded cigarette butts packets and people observed smoking). At these locations, those observed smokers were interviewed. Interview responses were examined to elicit underlying themes. Fifty people were seen smoking during the observation period. Those smokers interviewed comprised staff (27%) and students (73%) aged between 18 and 24 (45.9%). The majority of the students were international students (51.8%). All respondents acknowledged their awareness of the smoke-free policy. Five explanatory themes for noncompliance emerged: defiance against the policy's perceived threat to self-governance; inconvenience to travel off campus to smoke; smoking as a physiological necessity; unintentional noncompliance through unawareness or confusion of policy boundaries; and ease of avoidance of detection or exposing others to cigarette smoke. Creating a culture of compliance at the university remains a significant challenge, especially considering the size of the campus, the high proportion of international students, and the logistics associated with monitoring smoking behavior in outdoor areas and on-campus student housing. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Normal maintenance costs drop at Duke Power: Impact of Hurricane Hugo being assessed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    William S. Lee, chairman and president of Duke Power Company, said that a third-quarter earnings increase was primarily due to lower plant maintenance costs, but that figures aren't in yet on the damages related to Hurricane Hugo, which ripped through the Carolinas in late September. The severity of this storm is unprecedented in the company's history, he said. Lee also announced that Duke Power has entered into a new partnership with the Fluor Corporation, of Irvine, California. The two companies, operating under the name Duke/Fluor Daniel, will offer the power industry a single source of design, engineering, construction, and operation services for new and existing coal-fired plants

  8. Gout in Duke Federico of Montefeltro (1422-1482): a new pearl of the Italian Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaciari, Antonio; Giuffra, Valentina; Armocida, Emanuele; Caramella, Davide; Rühli, Frank J; Galassi, Francesco Maria

    2018-01-01

    The article examines the truthfulness of historical accounts claiming that Renaissance Duke Federico of Montefeltro (1422-1482) suffered from gout. By direct paleopathological assessment of the skeletal remains and by the philological investigation of historical and documental sources, primarily a 1461 handwritten letter by the Duke himself to his personal physician, a description of the symptoms and Renaissance therapy is offered and a final diagnosis of gout is formulated. The Duke's handwritten letter offers a rare testimony of ancient clinical self-diagnostics and Renaissance living-experience of gout. Moreover, the article also shows how an alliance between historical, documental and paleopathological methods can greatly increase the precision of retrospective diagnoses, thus helping to shed clearer light onto the antiquity and evolution of diseases.

  9. Conflict of Interest Policies at Canadian Universities and Medical Schools: Some Lessons from the AMSA PharmFree Scorecard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu, Ghislaine

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Launched in 2007, the American Medical Students Association (AMSA PharmFree Scorecard is an annual ranking of conflict of interest (COI policies at American medical centres; it focuses on COIs that may occur when medical education seems likely to be influenced by university-industry relationships, especially those with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. The PharmFree Scorecard has proven influential in stimulating changes in policy regarding the management of COI at American medical institutions, thus it provides a useful jumping off point for reflection on how and why medical education institutions in other countries – and for our purposes, Canada – should pay more attention to the appropriate identification and management of COI. The PharmFree Scorecard methodology examines a diversity of factors and interests that could influence medical education; as such, it is an interesting approach to analysing the COI policies of medical schools. To test its utility or applicability outside the US, we decided to apply the PharmFree Scorecard to the COI policies of the 16 Canadian universities hosting medical schools. Overall, Canadian institutions rank very poorly, especially in ensuring that education and training tools are provided to staff, students and faculty members to enable the identification and management of COI. However, differences between the US and Canadian medical education contexts, e.g., with regards to the governance and funding of universities, limit to some extent the direct applicability of the AMSA ranking. Canadian medical schools – and their host universities – nonetheless have much to learn from insights provided by the AMSA PharmFree Scorecard ranking, although they can and should go further in developing their own COI policies and procedures.

  10. Students' attitude and smoking behaviour following the implementation of a university smoke-free policy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaya, Monique; Alameddine, Maysam; Nakkash, Rima; Afifi, Rima A; Khalil, Joanna; Nahhas, Georges

    2013-01-01

    In view of the high-smoking rate among university students in Lebanon and the known adverse effects of second-hand smoking, the American University of Beirut (AUB) decided to implement a non-smoking policy on campus. This study sought to examine the students' compliance and attitudes following the ban. Cross-sectional study. A private university in Lebanon. 545 randomly selected students were approached. A stratified cluster sample of classes offered in the spring semester of the 2008/2009 academic year was selected. Students completed a self-administered paper and pencil survey during class time. The main outcomes were compliance with and attitudes towards the ban. Other secondary outcomes were the perception of barriers to implementation of the ban and attitudes towards tobacco control in general. 535 students participated in the study. Smokers were generally compliant with the ban (72.7%) and for some (20%) it led to a decrease in their smoking. Students' attitude towards the ban and the enforcement of a non-smoking policy in public places across Lebanon varied according to their smoking status whereby non-smokers possessed a more favourable attitude and strongly supported such policies compared with smokers; overall, the largest proportions of students were satisfied to a large extent with the ban and considered it justified (58.6% and 57.2%, respectively). While much smaller percentages reported that the ban would help in reducing smoking to a large extent (16.7%) or it would help smokers quit (7.4%). Perceived barriers to implementation of the non-smoking policy in AUB included the lack of compliance with and strict enforcement of the policy as well as the small number and crowdedness of the smoking areas. An education campaign, smoking cessation services and strict enforcement of the policy might be necessary to boost its effect in further reducing students' cigarette use.

  11. Students’ attitude and smoking behaviour following the implementation of a university smoke-free policy: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaya, Monique; Alameddine, Maysam; Nakkash, Rima; Afifi, Rima A; Khalil, Joanna; Nahhas, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Objective In view of the high-smoking rate among university students in Lebanon and the known adverse effects of second-hand smoking, the American University of Beirut (AUB) decided to implement a non-smoking policy on campus. This study sought to examine the students’ compliance and attitudes following the ban. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting A private university in Lebanon. Participants 545 randomly selected students were approached. A stratified cluster sample of classes offered in the spring semester of the 2008/2009 academic year was selected. Students completed a self-administered paper and pencil survey during class time. Primary and secondary outcome measures The main outcomes were compliance with and attitudes towards the ban. Other secondary outcomes were the perception of barriers to implementation of the ban and attitudes towards tobacco control in general. Results 535 students participated in the study. Smokers were generally compliant with the ban (72.7%) and for some (20%) it led to a decrease in their smoking. Students' attitude towards the ban and the enforcement of a non-smoking policy in public places across Lebanon varied according to their smoking status whereby non-smokers possessed a more favourable attitude and strongly supported such policies compared with smokers; overall, the largest proportions of students were satisfied to a large extent with the ban and considered it justified (58.6% and 57.2%, respectively). While much smaller percentages reported that the ban would help in reducing smoking to a large extent (16.7%) or it would help smokers quit (7.4%). Perceived barriers to implementation of the non-smoking policy in AUB included the lack of compliance with and strict enforcement of the policy as well as the small number and crowdedness of the smoking areas. Conclusions An education campaign, smoking cessation services and strict enforcement of the policy might be necessary to boost its effect in further reducing students

  12. Increasing Internal Stakeholder Consensus about a University Science Center's Outreach Policies and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Richard D.

    For decades the United States has tried to increase the number of students pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and careers. Educators and policy makers continue to seek strategies to increase the number of students in the STEM education pipeline. Public institutions of higher education are involved in this effort through education and public outreach (EPO) initiatives. Arizona State University opened its largest research facility, the new Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV (ISTB4) in September, 2012. As the new home of the School of Earth & Space Exploration (SESE), ISTB4 was designed to serve the school's dedication to K-12 education and public outreach. This dissertation presents a menu of ideas for revamping the EPO program for SESE. Utilizing the Delphi method, I was able to clarify which ideas would be most supported, and those that would not, by a variety of important SESE stakeholders. The study revealed that consensus exists in areas related to staffing and expansion of free programming, whereas less consensus exist in the areas of fee-based programs. The following most promising ideas for improving the SESE's EPO effort were identified and will be presented to SESE's incoming director in July, 2013: (a) hire a full-time director, theater manager, and program coordinator; (b) establish a service-learning requirement obligating undergraduate SESE majors to serve as docent support for outreach programs; (c) obligate all EPO operations to advise, assist, and contribute to the development of curricula, activities, and exhibits; (d) perform a market and cost analysis of other informational education venues offering similar programming; (3) establish a schedule of fee-based planetarium and film offerings; and (f) create an ISTB4 centric, fee-based package of programs specifically correlated to K12 education standards that can be delivered as a fieldtrip experience.

  13. Constraints and changes in the development of science and technology policies in Argentina's University of Buenos Aires and the National Autonomous University of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Armando

    1999-06-01

    This dissertation is a comparison of the effects of structural adjustment on scientific and technological policies in two of the largest and most important universities of Latin America, UBA and UNAM. In its broadest sense, scientific and technological policies encompass a set of interventions, decisions, and activities of different institutions within a given society aimed to hinder or stimulate the progress of scientific research, and the application of its products to socioeconomic, political, cultural or military objectives. The methodological approach for this dissertation aimed to combine data collected at both the macro and micro levels. First, a profound examination of different bibliographical sources such as books, articles, and documents of different kinds (policy papers, national plans, and working papers), was carried out. Secondly, a series of interviews were conducted with scientists in some of the natural sciences' research centers and institutes, academic administrators and top officials of the S&T government agencies, in Argentina and Mexico, The main goal of these interviews was to understand the institutional dynamics as it was shaped by actors and processes, outside and within the two universities. This study found that the structural adjustment process in Argentina and Mexico has negatively affected the S&T policies in both UBA and UNAM. Local S&T played a original role in the two universities under scrutiny. Investments in science and technology have remained significantly low in Argentina and Mexico. In addition to this, the small amount of scientific personnel, the predominantly public characteristic of S&T funds, and the reduced number of doctoral graduates resulted in low levels of scientific output as compared with the number of publications in international scientific literature. A predominant academic orientation with few contributions to societal needs, either related to the productive sectors or to social problems such as pollution

  14. Health: Policy or Law? A Population-Based Analysis of the Supreme Court's ACA Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmet, Wendy E

    2016-12-01

    This essay argues that it matters for the fate of health policies challenged in court whether courts consider health merely as a policy goal that must be subordinate to law, or as a legal norm warranting legal weight and consideration. Applying population-based legal analysis, this article demonstrates that courts have traditionally treated health as a legal norm. However, this norm appears to have weakened in recent years, a trend evident in the Supreme Court's first two decisions concerning the Affordable Care Act, NFIB v. Sebelius and Burwell v. Hobby Lobby However, in its more recent Affordable Care Act decision, King v. Burwell , the health legal norm is once again evident. Whether the Court will continue to treat health as a legal norm will prove critical to the deference and weight it grants health policies in the future. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  15. AN ANSWER TO DIVERSITY: AFFIRMATIVE ACTION POLICIES FOR TRADITIONAL PEOPLE -- THE UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DO PARÁ (FEDERAL UNIVERSITY OF PARÁ EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Felipe Beltrão

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Research analyzes the Admissions Program and the new reality of affirmative action measures at the Federal University of Pará, its context and implications. A special interest regards higher education and cultural diversity. Study reflects upon the goals of such policy; the different arguments among actors involved; the institutional conduct; and the benefits and difficulties faced to implement the program. The principle that guides the study understands the rights of indigenous populations in their access to University and sees the measures as a victory of the indigenous movement. Challenges remain, though, at two levels: first, it is necessary to develop policy to face institutional and social resistance to the implementation of the program; second, it is paramount to support the indigenous students in their needs in their new academic life.

  16. In the Shadow of Celebrity? World-Class University Policies and Public Value in Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremonini, Leon; Westerheijden, Donald F.; Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Dauncey, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    The growing popularity of the concept of world-class universities raises the question of whether investing in such universities is a worthwhile use of public resources. Does concentrating public resources on the most excellent universities improve the overall quality of a higher education system,

  17. Is Drop-Out from University Dependent on National Culture and Policy? The Case of Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troelsen, Rie; Laursen, Per F.

    2014-01-01

    National cultures are known to influence educational institutions and practices in many ways. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that drop-out from university is also influenced by differences in national cultures. In this article, we compare drop-out from Danish universities with drop-out from European universities. Based on Danish national…

  18. Patenting Productivity and Intellectual Property Policies at Research I Universities: An Exploratory Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pilar; Berger, Joseph B.

    2005-01-01

    In the 1980s, the US government encouraged the cooperation of industries with universities in order to bridge funding gaps and cope with global competitive markets through legislations that allow universities to start spin-off businesses and to generate profits from patents. At the turn of the century, university partnerships with the private…

  19. Effects of Class Size and Attendance Policy on University Classroom Interaction in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yin; Chang, Te-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Classroom interaction experience is one of the main parts of students' learning lives. However, surprisingly little research has investigated students' perceptions of classroom interaction with different attendance policies across different class sizes in the higher education system. To elucidate the effects of class size and attendance policy on…

  20. University Language Policies, Internationalism, Multilingualism, and Language Development in South Africa and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines legislation concerning language policy and language choice in the UK and South Africa. In particular an account of the pressures and imperatives to which such policy development must respond is provided. The paper suggests that the comparison between South Africa and the UK is relevant and compelling, not least because both…

  1. VUV optical ring resonator for Duke storage ring free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.H.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The conceptual design of the multifaceted-mirror ring resonator for Duke storage ring VUV FEL is presented. The expected performance of the OK-4 FEL with ring resonator is described. We discuss in this paper our plans to study reflectivity of VUV mirrors and their resistivity to soft X-ray spontaneous radiation from OK-4 undulator.

  2. Digitizing and Preserving Law School Recordings: A Duke Law Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Hollie; Bordo, Miguel; Chen, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Written as a case study, this article outlines Duke Law School Information Services' video digitization, preservation, and access initiative. This article begins with a discussion of the case study environment and the cross-departmental evaluation of in-house video production and processing workflows. The in-house preservation reformatting process…

  3. 77 FR 50092 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    .... e. Name of Project: Catawba-Wateree Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: Lake Norman in Iredell..., Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC authorized modifications to the marina, which now consists of two multi-slip... layout is mostly similar to the originally-approved design except that the docks have shifted location...

  4. Psychometric Characteristics of the Duke Social Support Index in a Young Rural Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Cunxian; Zhang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    The study is aimed to examine the psychometric characteristics of the Duke Social Support Scale (DSSI) in young rural Chinese individuals (379 suicides, 411 controls) aged 15-34 years. Social support was measured by 23-item DSSI, which included Social Interaction Scale, Subjective Social Support, and Instrumental Social Support. DSSI had high…

  5. 78 FR 29364 - Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc., and Florida Municipal Power Agency v. Duke Energy Florida...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL13-63-000] Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc., and Florida Municipal Power Agency v. Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Notice of... of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206 and sections 206, 306, and...

  6. Dropout Policy in Czech Higher Education: Can Universities Serve Several Masters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Švec Václav

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore the way higher education institutions adapt to environmental pressures. These pressures can be represented either by various demands or by specific policies. Dropout policy is examined on a Czech case study in order to demonstrate that at the end of the day, higher education institutions respond mainly to the most pressing challenges of an economic nature in the most rational way. As a result, their traditional mission (teaching, research, the third mission, and mainly the social function of the higher education system, may be at stake. At the same time, this study illustrates how difficult it is to introduce any higher education policy without thorough evaluation of other policies in place and of various factors affecting institutional behaviour.

  7. The Effectiveness of Academic Dismissal Policies in Dutch University Education: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Ivo J. M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses national data on 450 Dutch bachelor programs to measure the effect of the introduction of academic dismissal policies on study progress and first-year drop-out. Our results show that these policies increase first-year drop-out on average by 6-7%. They also have the effect of improving the study progress of first-year survivors by…

  8. Water and sanitation policies in Argentina: the challenge of universalizing services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica L. Cáceres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed at contributing to the reflection and debate on the water and sanitation policies in Argentina. For this purpose, regulatory and institutional aspects are discussed regarding services management in the country. The paper also includes a characterization of the five stages of such policies that have marked the progress of the sector. Finally, the main challenges faced by the sector are mentioned as a conclusion.

  9. An Analysis of the Quality Assurance Policies in a Ghanian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seniwoliba, Joseph Attiah; Yakubu, Richard Nalarb

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the implementation challenges of quality assurance in public universities in Ghana with a focus on University for Development Studies (UDS). The study adopted a qualitative case study design. The data for the study was collected through in-depth interviews, document analysis and participants observation. The study revealed that…

  10. China's Recruitment of African University Students: Policy Efficacy and Unintended Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Heidi Østbø

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how Sino-African relations are affected by the growing number of Africans who pursue higher education in China. China actively recruits African university students in order to increase soft power and generate income from the export of education services. Semi-structured interviews with African university students suggest that…

  11. The Impact of Institutional Culture, Policy and Process on Student Engagement in University Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Philip

    2018-01-01

    There is a strong focus on the importance of student engagement in higher education, with increasing attention on how students can participate in their university's decision-making processes. Yet, although the concept appears to be almost universally accepted, it is rarely problematised. This has led some commentators to conclude that student…

  12. Universal jurisdiction: state of affairs and ways ahead. : A policy paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zegveld (Liesbeth); J.D. Handmaker (Jeff)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOn 17 September 2010, the International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Leiden University and ICCO organised an expert meeting at the ISS on universal jurisdiction (UJ). The meeting was chaired in the morning by Professor John Dugard and in the afternoon by Professor Karin Arts. The

  13. Incoherent policies on universal coverage of health insurance and promotion of international trade in health services in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachanee, Cha-aim; Wibulpolprasert, Suwit

    2006-07-01

    The Thai government has implemented universal coverage of health insurance since October 2001. Universal access to antiretroviral (ARV) drugs has also been included since October 2003. These two policies have greatly increased the demand for health services and human resources for health, particularly among public health care providers. After the 1997 economic crisis, private health care providers, with the support of the government, embarked on new marketing strategies targeted at attracting foreign patients. Consequently, increasing numbers of foreign patients are visiting Thailand to seek medical care. In addition, the economic recovery since 2001 has greatly increased the demand for private health services among the Thai population. The increasing demand and much higher financial incentives from urban private providers have attracted health personnel, particularly medical doctors, from rural public health care facilities. Responding to this increasing demand and internal brain drain, in mid-2004 the Thai government approved the increased production of medical doctors by 10,678 in the following 15 years. Many additional financial incentives have also been applied. However, the immediate shortage of human resources needs to be addressed competently and urgently. Equity in health care access under this situation of competing demands from dual track policies is a challenge to policy makers and analysts. This paper summarizes the situation and trends as well as the responses by the Thai government. Both supply and demand side responses are described, and some solutions to restore equity in health care access are proposed.

  14. College Drinking and Drug Use. The Duke Series in Child Development and Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Helene Raskin, Ed.; Rabiner, David L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Substance use among college students can result in serious academic and safety problems and have long-term negative repercussions. This state-of-the-art volume draws on the latest research on students' alcohol and drug use to provide useful suggestions for how to address this critical issue on college campuses. Leading researchers from multiple…

  15. University commercialization policies and their implementation in the Netherlands and the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leisyte, Liudvika

    2011-01-01

    The article explores how the US and Dutch governments have attempted to bolster research commercialization in their respective research systems and discusses the institutionalization of linkages between universities and industrial firms. First, the article shows how the institutional framework

  16. Dancing with Global Trends: Higher Education Policy and University Governance in Hong Kong, 1997-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, William Yat Wai; Tang, Hei-Hang Hayes

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the significance of global trends in higher education (HE) development in Hong Kong between 1997 and 2012. Two trends, massification and internationalisation, are considered key driving forces that shaped Hong Kong's HE policy during the period. The former refers to government measures to widen participation in HE. The latter…

  17. Leadership Styles of College and University Athletic Directors and the Presence of NCAA Transgender Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Randall; McCauley, Kayleigh

    2016-01-01

    In September 2011, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) announced the "Policy on Transgender Inclusion." It provides guidelines for transgender student athletes to participate in sex-separated athletic teams according to their gender identity. The "2012 LGBTQ National College Athlete Report," the first of its…

  18. Putting Parenting First: Why It's Time for Universal Paid Leave. PPI Policy Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Robert D.

    Although the Family and Medical Leave Act enabled some parents to take unpaid parental leave in order to fulfill family responsibilities, it did not cover all workers and did not provide workers the financial support to do so. This policy report calls for Congress to: require states to allow new parents who have been working to collect…

  19. Internationalization Policies of Jesuit Universities: A Case Study of Japan and the U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kang-Yup

    2009-01-01

    In the wake of globalization, higher education institutions almost inevitably have adopted and implemented internationalization policies as their primary strategy for responding to the challenges and opportunities brought about by globalization. This study concerns the comparison of the motivations, program strategies, and organization strategies…

  20. English for University Administrative Work: English Officialization Policy and Foreign Language Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongyeon; Choi, Jinsook

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how the English officialization policy of higher education in an EFL context interplays with administrative workers' motivational orientations towards English learning. The data consisted of questionnaire responses of 117 administrative members with undergraduate degrees and qualitative interviews with 9 who answered the…

  1. Copyright Policies and the Deciphering of Fair Use in the Creation of Reserves at University Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Thomas H. P.; Lipinski, Tomas A.; Buchanan, Elizabeth A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper stems from the results of a systematic study of research library policy regarding application and interpretation of copyright law to reserves and electronic reserves. A thorough legal framework is provided from which the study's results are interpreted, and suggestions for research library compliance are provided.

  2. Managing and Mobilising Talent in Malaysia: Issues, Challenges and Policy Implications for Malaysian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Norzaini; Sirat, Morshidi; Pang, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The future of Malaysia as a high-income and competitive nation largely depends on its pool of highly skilled human capital. Hence, the issue of human capital development has taken centre stage in numerous reform agendas of Malaysia. This paper seeks to provide examples of policy initiatives aimed at facilitating the management of highly educated…

  3. The role of the University in the context of Inclusive Education Policy: reflections about human resources formation and knowledge production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Glat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present text aims to discuss and present, briefly action lines about the role of University in the promotion of psicossocial and educational development of people with handicap and other special needs. Taking the framework of specialized literature, it brings different questions dealing with human resources formation, specially, teacher formation, and the production of knowledge in the area of Special Education, obtained through research and extension projects, done, preferentially, in partnership with the educational agents that work in the field. It also analyses how these actions may influence the implementation of policies regarding school, labor, and social inclusion of people with handicap and other developmental disorders.

  4. Illusory Facets of Sport: The Case of the Duke University Basketball Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniowski Łukasz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the society of the spectacle, illusion is an omnipresent phenomenon. It is used to distract the masses from issues crucial to their existence and to support a system of oppression. However, there is also a “lighter” side of illusion: it creates celebrities and helps sell products (films, music albums, sneakers, etc.. While the connotation is that spectacle uses illusion in order to present the ordinary or negative as extraordinary and positive (e.g., promiscuous athletes talking about family values, it is also possible for a reverse illusory process to take place, resulting in the regular being presented as irregular (e.g., a physical player presented as “aggressive”, such as Kermit Washington. Unlike the deliberate use of illusion by the architects of the spectacle, this reverse process happens spontaneously.

  5. Avoiding to Fit a Square Peg into a Round Hole: A Policy Framework for Operationalising Open Distance Education in Dual-Mode Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoe, Mpine

    2018-01-01

    Although education policies in many African countries refer to the need for distance education to widen participation in universities, they have not articulated guidelines on how they plan to develop systems and structures that will support it. The purpose of this study was to develop a policy framework specific for distance education provision in…

  6. Universal approximators for multi-objective direct policy search in water reservoir management problems: a comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Matteo; Mason, Emanuele; Castelletti, Andrea; Pianosi, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    The optimal operation of water resources systems is a wide and challenging problem due to non-linearities in the model and the objectives, high dimensional state-control space, and strong uncertainties in the hydroclimatic regimes. The application of classical optimization techniques (e.g., SDP, Q-learning, gradient descent-based algorithms) is strongly limited by the dimensionality of the system and by the presence of multiple, conflicting objectives. This study presents a novel approach which combines Direct Policy Search (DPS) and Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithms (MOEAs) to solve high-dimensional state and control space problems involving multiple objectives. DPS, also known as parameterization-simulation-optimization in the water resources literature, is a simulation-based approach where the reservoir operating policy is first parameterized within a given family of functions and, then, the parameters optimized with respect to the objectives of the management problem. The selection of a suitable class of functions to which the operating policy belong to is a key step, as it might restrict the search for the optimal policy to a subspace of the decision space that does not include the optimal solution. In the water reservoir literature, a number of classes have been proposed. However, many of these rules are based largely on empirical or experimental successes and they were designed mostly via simulation and for single-purpose reservoirs. In a multi-objective context similar rules can not easily inferred from the experience and the use of universal function approximators is generally preferred. In this work, we comparatively analyze two among the most common universal approximators: artificial neural networks (ANN) and radial basis functions (RBF) under different problem settings to estimate their scalability and flexibility in dealing with more and more complex problems. The multi-purpose HoaBinh water reservoir in Vietnam, accounting for hydropower

  7. Assessment of capacity for Health Policy and Systems Research and Analysis in seven African universities: results from the CHEPSAA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoev, Tolib; Lê, Gillian; Green, Andrew; Orgill, Marsha; Komba, Adalgot; Esena, Reuben K; Nyapada, Linet; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Amde, Woldekidan K; Nxumalo, Nonhlanhla; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    The importance of health policy and systems research and analysis (HPSR+A) is widely recognized. Universities are central to strengthening and sustaining the HPSR+A capacity as they teach the next generation of decision-makers and health professionals. However, little is known about the capacity of universities, specifically, to develop the field. In this article, we report results of capacity self- assessments by seven universities within five African countries, conducted through the Consortium for Health Policy and Systems Analysis in Africa (CHEPSAA). The capacity assessments focused on both capacity ‘assets’ and ‘needs’, and covered the wider context, as well as organizational and individual capacity levels. Six thematic areas of capacity were examined: leadership and governance, organizations’ resources, scope of HPSR+A teaching and research, communication, networking and getting research into policy and practice (GRIPP), demand for HPRS+A and resource environment. The self-assessments by each university used combinations of document reviews, semi-structured interviews and staff surveys, followed by comparative analysis. A framework approach, guided by the six thematic areas, was used to analyse data. We found that HPSR+A is an international priority, and an existing activity in Africa, though still neglected field with challenges including its reliance on unpredictable international funding. All universities have capacity assets, such as ongoing HPSR+A teaching and research. There are, however, varying levels of assets (such as differences in staff numbers, group sizes and amount of HPSR+A teaching and research), which, combined with different capacity needs at all three levels (such as individual training, improvement in systems for quality assurance and fostering demand for HPSR+A work), can shape a future agenda for HPSR+A capacity strengthening. Capacity assets and needs at different levels appear related. Possible integrated strategies for

  8. Promoting Youth Development Worldwide: The Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva van Baren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award is a youth achievement Award program that aims to engage young people in purposeful activities focused on gaining knowledge, broadening horizons and accumulating a diversity of experiences. The program promotes positive youth development through an experienced based learning approach and is known to play a vital role in providing opportunities for young people to develop essential life skills, complementing their formal education. Comprised of three levels (Bronze, Silver and Gold and four sections (Service, Skills, Physical Recreation and Adventurous Journey the Award is designed to provide a balanced programme of personal development. The Award operates worldwide in over 140 countries and territories, through the International Award Association. This article will discuss The Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award program and its non-formal educational framework. Participants reported that it has enabled them to grow in confidence and in their ability to contribute positively to their communities.

  9. Alignment of Duke free electron laser storage ring and optical beam delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emamian, M.; Hower, N.

    1999-01-01

    Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL) hosts a 1.1 GeV electron beam storage ring facility which is capable of generating beams in the range of nearly monochromatic gamma rays to high peak power infra red (IR) laser. In this report specifications and procedures for alignment of OK-4 /Duke storage ring FEL wiggler and optical cavity mirrors will be discussed. The OK-4 FEL lasing has demonstrated a series of world record in the last few years. In August of this year the OK-4 FEL successfully commissioned to laser at 193.7 nm. Also in this article, alignment of the γ-ray and UV optical beam delivery system that is currently in progress will be described. (authors)

  10. From bibliometric analysis to research policy: the use of SIGAPS in Lille University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Patrick; Lefranc, Helene; Dufresne, Eric; Beuscart, Regis

    2006-01-01

    In French hospitals, the progressive setting up of the new rating systems has obliged the university hospitals to justify a certain amount of activities such as research, training or moreover recourse, which are specific missions of the university hospitals. In order to justify research activities, the Lille University Hospital has developed for now three years SIGAPS, a full-web bibliometric software which census and analyse, the scientific publications referenced in the Medline database. After data downloading, each article is classified on a 6 levels "quality scale derived from the impact factors. The system then performs, for a researcher or a team, a report allowing a quantitative and qualitative analysis. Started in Lille in November 2004, the inventory and analysis of data is now ending. For the period 2001-2004, 2814 articles have been published in 700 different journals. The total number of articles increased from 688 in 2001 to 757 in 2004. The mean impact factor was equal to 2.26 and 15.5 % of articles were classified as A, 20.9% as B. Those results confirm the high level of research of the University Hospital of Lille, in agreement with two other national studies which ranks our establishment at the 6th position for medical research activities among the French University Hospitals. Currently a similar evaluation has now began in the 9 other university hospital which have subscribed to the SIGAPS project. We works currently on new indicators as patents, thesis or conferences, or access to other databases as Sciencedirect or Scopus via the RIS format. The next step in the project is the implementation of a meta-base which will federate the information provided by each SIGAPS system. This meta-base will then allow us to perform comparisons between different hospitals, determine the national "sites of excellence" and create some clinical and research networks.

  11. Universal Health Coverage in Francophone Sub-Saharan Africa: Assessment of Global Health Experts' Confidence in Policy Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Elisabeth; Fecher, Fabienne; Meloni, Remo; van Lerberghe, Wim

    2018-05-29

    Many countries rely on standard recipes for accelerating progress toward universal health coverage (UHC). With limited generalizable empirical evidence, expert confidence and consensus plays a major role in shaping country policy choices. This article presents an exploratory attempt conducted between April and September 2016 to measure confidence and consensus among a panel of global health experts in terms of the effectiveness and feasibility of a number of policy options commonly proposed for achieving UHC in low- and middle-income countries, such as fee exemptions for certain groups of people, ring-fenced domestic health budgets, and public-private partnerships. To ensure a relative homogeneity of contexts, we focused on French-speaking sub-Saharan Africa. We initially used the Delphi method to arrive at expert consensus, but since no consensus emerged after 2 rounds, we adjusted our approach to a statistical analysis of the results from our questionnaire by measuring the degree of consensus on each policy option through 100 (signifying total consensus) minus the size of the interquartile range of the individual scores. Seventeen global health experts from various backgrounds, but with at least 20 years' experience in the broad region, participated in the 2 rounds of the study. The results provide an initial "mapping" of the opinions of a group of experts and suggest interesting lessons. For the 18 policy options proposed, consensus emerged only on strengthening the supply of quality primary health care services (judged as being effective with a confidence score of 79 and consensus score of 90), and on fee exemptions for the poorest (judged as being fairly easy to implement with a confidence score of 66 and consensus score of 85). For none of the 18 common policy options was there consensus on both potential effectiveness and feasibility, with very diverging opinions concerning 5 policy options. The lack of confidence and consensus within the panel seems to

  12. What Else after Behavior Was Changed? the Effects of a University's Policy on Student Participation in Motorcycle Emission Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Long

    2014-01-01

    With an attempt to realize the effectiveness of a university's policy on motorcycle emission, this study compared its students' participation behavior, associated knowledge, and attitudes toward relevant environmental issues with those of three other universities without similar measures. The results of a survey on a total of 504 students revealed…

  13. Practical Recommendations for the Development and Implementation of Youth Policy in the University as a Tool for Development of Student Public Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhov, Sergey G.; Komarova, Nataliya M.; Khairullina, Elmira R.; Rapatskaia, Liudmila, A.; Miftakhov, Radik R.; Khusainova, Liana R.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by the increase of social responsibility of universities for improvement of the quality of higher education and development of students' socio-professional values. In terms of the conflicting realities of modern society the youth policy at the University is the most important tool to form students' commitment to…

  14. Loose Coupling, Conflict, and Resistance: The Case of IPR Policy Conflict in an Israeli University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Adi; Oliver, Amalya

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates a conflict that erupted during the years 2003-2005 between faculty and management at an Israeli research university, over the introduction of new intellectual property rights (IPR) regulations. The introduction of new IPR regulations triggered contention and resistance among faculty members and raised debates over questions…

  15. Aligning Practice to Policies: Changing the Culture to Recognize and Reward Teaching at Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennin, Michael; Schultz, Zachary D.; Feig, Andrew; Finkelstein, Noah; Greenhoot, Andrea Follmer; Hildreth, Michael; Leibovich, Adam K.; Martin, James D.; Moldwin, Mark B.; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Posey, Lynmarie A.; Smith, Tobin L.; Miller, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for improvement in undergraduate education within STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines are hampered by the methods used to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Faculty members at research universities are commonly assessed and promoted mainly on the basis of research success. To improve the quality of…

  16. Transition Communities and the Glass Ceiling of Environmental Sustainability Policies at Three Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardellas Santiago, Miguel; Meira Cartea, Pablo; Iglesias da Cunha, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper deals with the experiences of three European universities that have implemented transition initiatives, using the Transition Network's methodology to promote their sustainability plans. The Transition Communities' model for change is presented from a socio-educational perspective as an effective methodology for encouraging…

  17. State-Funded "Eminent Scholars" Programs: University Faculty Recruitment as an Emerging Policy Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, James C.; McLendon, Michael K.; Lacy, T. Austin

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, state governments have increasingly invested in programs to recruit accomplished scientists from elsewhere to university positions. This event history analysis suggests that an intriguing mix of comparative state disadvantage and leveragable existing research resources is associated with the likelihood of states adopting…

  18. Race-Conscious Academic Policy in Higher Education: The University of Maryland Benneker Scholars Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Walter R.; Hunt, Darnell M.; Gilbert, Derrick I. M.

    1997-01-01

    This study, which evaluates the Benjamin Banneker Scholars Program, was undertaken in response to litigation challenging the University of Maryland's right to operate a scholarship reserved exclusively for high-achieving African Americans. Using varied data sources, the study found that the Banneker scholarship program continues to be necessary as…

  19. Policy Analyses on the Effectiveness of the National University Corporation Act: What Has Changed since 2004?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Kensuke; Yanagiura, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    (Purpose) While numerous data and research indicate that the fiscal practice of institutions has been influenced by National University Corporation Act (NUCA), what exactly the effect NUCA has had on institutions is not known beyond anecdotal experiences and stories. The contribution of this paper is to provide hard evidence on such institutional…

  20. Universities' Conflict-of-Interest Policies Are Doomed to Fail, Scholar Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Lila

    2008-01-01

    Kevin C. Elliott, an assistant professor of philosophy at the University of South Carolina at Columbia, asserts in the January issue of the journal "Accountability in Research" that the three pillars of academe's attempts to police conflict of interest--disclosure, management, and elimination of conflicts--are beset by serious flaws. Charges of…

  1. Ethanol Values During College Football Season: University Policy Change and Emergency Department Blood Ethanol Values From 2006 Through 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro-Fine, Amelia C; Harland, Karisa; House, Hans R; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2016-11-01

    Tailgating is popular at many college football games. However, it is known to contribute to binge drinking and alcohol intoxication, which are common public health challenges. To use laboratory data to measure changes in plasma ethanol levels observed in a large state university emergency department after a series of reforms were enacted to reduce binge drinking. We performed a retrospective chart review on all serum ethanol levels measured at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics on weekends from 2006 through 2014. Data were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression after controlling for significant covariates. A total of 5437 patients had ethanol levels recorded on weekends. After the implementation of policy changes, there was a significant reduction in the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of ethanol values reported in the severe intoxication range (≥240 mg/dL; AOR = 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64-0.92). The policy changes implemented in 2009 in an attempt to reduce binge drinking are associated with a decreased likelihood of an ethanol result being in the severe intoxication range. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The Politics of Universal Health Coverage in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Framework for Evaluation and Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ashley M; Reich, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    Universal health coverage has recently become a top item on the global health agenda pressed by multilateral and donor organizations, as disenchantment grows with vertical, disease-specific health programs. This increasing focus on universal health coverage has brought renewed attention to the role of domestic politics and the interaction between domestic and international relations in the health reform process. This article proposes a theory-based framework for analyzing the politics of health reform for universal health coverage, according to four stages in the policy cycle (agenda setting, design, adoption, and implementation) and four variables that affect reform (interests, institutions, ideas, and ideology). This framework can assist global health policy researchers, multilateral organization officials, and national policy makers in navigating the complex political waters of health reforms aimed at achieving universal health coverage. To derive the framework, we critically review the theoretical and applied literature on health policy reform in developing countries and illustrate the framework with examples of health reforms moving toward universal coverage in low- and middle-income countries. We offer a series of lessons stemming from these experiences to date. Copyright © 2015 by Duke University Press.

  3. Cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrino, Flávia M; Dantas, Rosana A S; Corbi, Inaiara S A; da Silva Carvalho, Ariana R; Schmidt, André; Pazin Filho, Antônio

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the internal reliability and validity of the Brazilian-Portuguese version of Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale (DASS) among cardiovascular patients. Oral anticoagulation is widely used to prevent and treat thromboembolic events in several conditions, especially in cardiovascular diseases; however, this therapy can induce dissatisfaction and reduce the quality of life. Methodological and cross-sectional research design. The cultural adaptation of the DASS included the translation and back-translation, discussions with healthcare professionals and patients to ensure conceptual equivalence, semantic evaluation and instrument pretest. The Brazilian-Portuguese version of the DASS was tested among subjects followed in a university hospital anticoagulation outpatient clinic. The psychometric properties were assessed by construct validity (convergent, known groups and dimensionality) and internal consistency/reliability (Cronbach's alpha). A total of 180 subjects under oral anticoagulation formed the baseline validation population. DASS total score and SF-36 domain correlations were moderate for General health (r=-0.47, pDASS score and most of the subscales, except Limitation (r=-0.375, pscale, and it ranged from 0.76 (hassles and burdens)-0.46 (psychological impact) among the domains, confirming the internal consistency reliability. The Brazilian-Portuguese version of the DASS has shown levels of reliability and validity comparable with the original English version. Healthcare practitioners and researchers need internationally validated measurement tools to compare outcomes of interventions in clinical management and research tools in oral anticoagulation therapy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Considerations on the Current Universal Vaccination Policy against Hepatitis A in Greece after Recent Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellou, Kassiani; Sideroglou, Theologia; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Katsiaflaka, Anna; Bitsolas, Nikolaos; Verykouki, Eleni; Triantafillou, Eleni; Baka, Agoritsa; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Greece is the only European Union member state that in 2008 included hepatitis A (HAV) vaccine in the routine national childhood immunization program (NCIP). Given that the resources allocated to public health have dramatically decreased since 2008 and that Greece is a low endemicity country for the disease, the benefit from universal vaccination has been questioned. The aim of this paper is to summarize the available epidemiological data of the disease for 1982-2013, and discuss the effects of universal vaccination on disease morbidity. Descriptive analysis, ARIMA modeling and time series intervention analysis were conducted using surveillance data of acute HAV. A decreasing trend of HAV notification rate over the years was identified (pa progressive increase of the average age of infection in the general population. The mean age of cases before the inclusion of the vaccine to NCIP (24.1 years, SD = 1.5) was significantly lower than the mean age of cases after 2008 (31.7 years, SD = 2.1) (pa population accounting for 1.5% of the country’s total population) and in 2013 three outbreaks with 16, 9 and 25 Roma cases respectively, were recorded, indicating the decreased effectiveness of the current immunization strategy in this group. Data suggest that universal vaccination may need to be re-considered. Probably a more cost effective approach would be to implement a program that will include: a) vaccination of high risk groups, b) universal vaccination of Roma children and improving conditions at Roma camps, c) education of the population and travel advice, and d) enhancement of the control measures to increase safety of shellfish and other foods. PMID:25590132

  5. Unequal Marriages within the Russian Imperial Home and the 1911 Meeting of the Grand Dukes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav V. Dumin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In celebrating the 400th anniversary of the Russian Imperial Household in 2013, it is important to remember that the historic dynasty did not disappear in 1917 and, as with the earlier ruling dynasties, it still retains its status and its structure based on the Law on Succession and the Provision on the Imperial Family. These documents, in part, define that the dynasty includes just the Romanov descendants born from marital unions with the ruling or previously ruling dynasties. The rest of the Romanov descendants that were born from unequal, morganatic marriages, did not belong to the Russian Imperial Family and, correspondingly, did not have the right to the throne. Until 1911, these marriages were simply forbidden for all members of the dynasty. In mentioning representatives of the Romanov family, popular literature and the media often do not mention this circumstance and instead include individuals who were not part of the dynasty, even though they were descended from the Russian Emperors through the paternal or the maternal line. Representatives of the so-called “Association of the Romanov Household”, descendants of Grand Dukes or Dukes of Imperial Blood from unequal marriages, would often point to a decree made by Nicholas II in 1911. The decree stated that the lesser Romanovs, dukes and duchesses of imperial blood, that is, great grandchildren and more distant descendants of Emperors, could enter into unequal marriages with Royal Permission. However, the theory stating that this decree somehow still gave these descendants dynastic rights is refuted through the materials that we have uncovered in the State Archives of the Russian Federation detailing the meeting of the Grand Dukes, called together by the order of Nicholas II and the resolution of the Emperor at the end of this meeting that is published in the article. As such, out of all the Romanov descendants still alive today, the status of being a true member of the dynasty only

  6. Revisiting policy on chronic HCV treatment under the Thai Universal Health Coverage: An economic evaluation and budget impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavipapong, Waranya; Anothaisintawee, Thunyarat; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2018-01-01

    Thailand is encountering challenges to introduce the high-cost sofosbuvir for chronic hepatitis C treatment as part of the Universal Health Care's benefit package. This study was conducted in respond to policy demand from the Thai government to assess the value for money and budget impact of introducing sofosbuvir-based regimens in the tax-based health insurance scheme. The Markov model was constructed to assess costs and benefits of the four treatment options that include: (i) current practice-peginterferon alfa (PEG) and ribavirin (RBV) for 24 weeks in genotype 3 and 48 weeks for other genotypes; (ii) Sofosbuvir plus peginterferon alfa and ribavirin (SOF+PEG-RBV) for 12 weeks; (iii) Sofosbuvir and daclatasvir (SOF+DCV) for 12 weeks; (iv) Sofosbuvir and ledipasvir (SOF+LDV) for 12 weeks for non-3 genotypes and SOF+PEG-RBV for 12 weeks for genotype 3 infection. Given that policy options (ii) and (iii) are for pan-genotypic infection, the cost of genotype testing was applied only for policy options (i) and (iv). Results reveal that all sofosbuvir-based regimens had greater quality adjusted life years (QALY) gains compared with the current treatment, therefore associated with lower lifetime costs and more favourable health outcomes. Additionally, among the three regimens of sofosbuvir, SOF+PEG-RBV for genotype 3 and SOF+LDV for non-3 genotype are the most cost-effective treatment option with the threshold of 160,000 THB per QALY gained. The results of this study had been used in policy discussion which resulted in the recent inclusion of SOF+PEG-RBV for genotype 3 and SOF+LDV for non-3 genotype in the Thailand's benefit package.

  7. Universalization of access to modern energy services in Indian households. Economic and policy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, B. Sudhakara; Nathan, Hippu Salk Kristle; Balachandra, P.

    2009-01-01

    Provision of modern energy services for cooking (with gaseous fuels) and lighting (with electricity) is an essential component of any policy aiming to address health, education or welfare issues; yet it gets little attention from policy-makers. Secure, adequate, low-cost energy of quality and convenience is core to the delivery of these services. The present study analyses the energy consumption pattern of Indian domestic sector and examines the urban-rural divide and income energy linkage. A comprehensive analysis is done to estimate the cost for providing modern energy services to everyone by 2030. A public-private partnership-driven business model, with entrepreneurship at the core, is developed with institutional, financing and pricing mechanisms for diffusion of energy services. This approach, termed as EMPOWERS (entrepreneurship model for provision of wholesome energy-related basic services), if adopted, can facilitate large-scale dissemination of energy-efficient and renewable technologies like small-scale biogas/biofuel plants, and distributed power generation technologies to provide clean, safe, reliable and sustainable energy to rural households and urban poor. It is expected to integrate the processes of market transformation and entrepreneurship development involving government, NGOs, financial institutions and community groups as stakeholders. (author)

  8. Building new university hospital--what citizens know and policy makers should be aware of.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oresković, S; Letica, S; Mastilica, M; Babić-Bosanac, S; Civljak, M; Bozicević, I; Borovecki, A

    2002-12-01

    Survey of citizens' attitudes in the process of strategic decision making is one of the most important methods for determining health care priorities. We describe the results of a survey carried out in December 2001, with an aim to collect and analyze the attitudes of the citizens and health care professionals toward the possibilities and strategies of construction of the University Hospital in Blato, Zagreb. The first referendum on the construction of the new hospital was conducted among Zagreb citizens in 1982, when they agreed that the new University Hospital was much needed. Zagreb citizens confirmed once again their attitudes toward and opinions on the need to continue the construction of new hospital in the city outskirts. By 1992, when the construction of the hospital was halted due to insufficient financial means, Zagreb citizens had already invested over 150 epsilon million in the project. It is interesting that today, 89.4% of the citizens and 74.5% of physicians agree that the new hospital building should be completed. Also, 66.7% of the citizens and 88% of physicians think that this hospital should be a University hospital that could offer the most complex treatments and medical education. To finish the construction of the new hospital further 200 epsilon million needs to be invested. Survey showed that 71% of citizens and 82.2% of physicians think that funds should be raised from some form of credit or budget rather than by special local tax, additional tax or voluntary tax. This project will significantly determine the future of hospital and health care system in Croatia due to its capacities in terms of space, technology, and staff. Before the decision to continue with the new hospital construction be made, the expected future needs, demands, and supply of the health care services in hospital sector in Zagreb and Croatia should be provided using SWOT analysis for each of existing the facilities.

  9. The Maastricht-Duke bridge: An era of mentoring in clinical research - A model for mentoring in clinical research - A tribute to Dr. Galen Wagner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijs, Loek; Zusterzeel, Robbert; Wellens, Hein Jj; Gorgels, Anton Pm

    With the passing of Dr. Galen Wagner, an exceptional collaboration between Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands, and Duke Clinical Research Institute, USA, has come to an end. This article focuses on the background of what Galen coined the Maastricht-Duke bridge (MD-bridge), its merits, limitations and development throughout the years, and his special role. Between 2004 and 2015, 23 Maastricht University medical students and post-graduate students were enrolled in the 4-month research elective, mentored by Galen and the Maastricht co-mentor. They were asked to complete a survey about their MD-bridge experience. Sixteen out of the 23 students responded. None but 1 participant had prior research experience. Following their MD bridge-program most participants published 1 or more manuscripts and/or presented their research in an international setting. They felt they had full responsibility as a leader of their project with all participants developing meaningful skills useful in their current job. Fourteen out of 16 would recommend the MD-bridge experience to others. Participants considered the program of great value for their personal growth and independence, giving a feeling of achievement. In addition, for some participants it led to careers in foreign countries including medical practice and research, or obtaining PhDs. With Galen's impressive career of mentoring students, including the 23 MD-bridge participants, he has left behind an amazing concept of self-development in research and personal life. The successes of the MD-bridge prove that it is possible for students to be young investigators during or just after medical school with the potential to contribute to developing meaningful skills and noteworthy careers. Collaborations between international universities, such as the MD-bridge, are feasible and should be embraced by other institutions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Retaining the older workforce: social policy considerations for the universally designed workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Jaimie Ciulla; Hall, Allison Cohen; Fesko, Sheila Lynch; Migliore, Alberto

    2011-04-01

    Even in the midst of massive layoffs that come with an economic downturn, employers must remain aware of the pending impact of their aging workforce. Losing older employees to retirement drains knowledge and expertise. In response, employers are looking at new ways to retain older workers at the same time that older workers are reevaluating the traditional approach to retirement. This article presents findings from case study research consisting of interviews with key employees at 18 companies in 13 states. Five of those companies subsequently participated in in-person site visits. Interviews were held with a wide range of informants, including company leadership, supervisors, and older workers. Findings include a description of the cultural context within which the development of formal and informal older worker retention strategies occurred, as well as the retention strategies themselves. The discussion section explores the universal nature of these retention initiatives and how consideration of universality benefits not only older workers but a range of diverse groups as well.

  11. How to characterize the efficiency of policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions? A method of analysis in an uncertain universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amant, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    For ADEME (the French Agence de l'Environnement et de la Maitrise de l'Energie), Carbone 4, a consulting firm, has developed several tools that apply a methodology for assessing the efficiency of policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This methodology is based on two criteria: the 'full cost per ton of avoided CO 2 equivalent' and the 'potential of avoided emissions'. It is original in that it compares measurements in quite different socioeconomic contexts and thus yields elements that are useful for making choices in an uncertain universe, as shall be increasingly necessary. This methodology brings to light the key factors determining a measure's efficiency and thus identifies the conditions for its success or failure. It is a precious tool for decision-making

  12. College and university environmental programs as a policy problem (Part 1): Integrating Knowledge, education, and action for a better world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.G.; Rutherford, M.B.; Auer, M.R.; Cherney, D.N.; Wallace, R.L.; Mattson, D.J.; Clark, D.A.; Foote, L.; Krogman, N.; Wilshusen, P.; Steelman, T.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental sciences/studies movement, with more than 1000 programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, is unified by a common interest-ameliorating environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. Unfortunately, environmental programs have struggled in their efforts to integrate knowledge across disciplines and educate students to become sound problem solvers and leaders. We examine the environmental program movement as a policy problem, looking at overall goals, mapping trends in relation to those goals, identifying the underlying factors contributing to trends, and projecting the future. We argue that despite its shared common interest, the environmental program movement is disparate and fragmented by goal ambiguity, positivistic disciplinary approaches, and poorly rationalized curricula, pedagogies, and educational philosophies. We discuss these challenges and the nature of the changes that are needed in order to overcome them. In a subsequent article (Part 2) we propose specific strategies for improvement. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  14. The educational policy field origins in Argentina: the case of Buenos Aires and La Plata Federal Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Susana Garcias Franco

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents partial results of an ongoing study whose objective is to map the approaches and theoretical trends in the educational policy theoretical field. More specifically, this study characterizes and describes the theoretical trends of the subject Educational Policy contents in the 50s of the last century in the Buenos Aires and La Plata Federal Universities. 46 programs were analyzed in the period 1917-1959, as well as the bibliography and theoretical background linked to the professors who were responsible for the subject. Surveying professors’ biographies, it was observed that in the period prior to the institutionalization of this field, the debate focused on the positivism or anti-positivism theoretical trends. Later on, the theoretical trends that permeated the programs from 1953 to 1954 had more distinct shades of positivism and anti-positivism than those of the beginning of the century, and three axes were observed: the national tradition, the pedagogical progressivism and the Spanish Krausism.

  15. Drink driving and risky behavior among university students in southwestern Nigeria-Implications for policy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayomi, O; Babalola, O R; Olakulehin, O A; Ighoroje, M

    2016-05-18

    Drink driving contributes significantly to road traffic injuries. Little is known about the relationship between drink driving and other high-risk behaviors in non-Western countries. The study aimed to assess the relationship between drink driving and other risky behaviors including making phone calls, sending text messages, nonuse of protective gear, and driving against traffic. A cross-sectional survey of risky behavior among undergraduates was conducted. A stratified random sampling method was used to identify young undergraduates who had driven a motorized vehicle in the past year. The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) and other tools developed by researchers were used to identify the risky behaviors. Of 431 respondents, 10.7% had engaged in drink driving in the past 12 months. The most common risky behavior was making phone calls (63.7%), followed by nonuse of helmets (54.7%), driving against traffic (49.2%), nonuse of seat belts (46.8%), and sending text messages (26.1%). Alcohol use was significantly associated with making phone calls (U = 1.148; P < .0001), sending text messages (U = 1.598; P = .021), nonuse of helmets (U = 1.147; P < .0001), driving against traffic (U = 1.234; P < .0001), and nonuse of seat belts (U = 3.233; P = .001). Drink driving was associated with all risky behaviors except nonuse of seat belts (U = 1.842; P = .065). Alcohol use and drink driving were associated with multiple risky driving behaviors. This provides useful insight for policy development and presents additional challenges for traffic injury prevention.

  16. Radiotherapy alone for medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer: The Duke experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibley, Gregory S.; Jamieson, Timothy A.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To review our experience treating clinical Stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma with radiotherapy alone using modern techniques and staging. The effect of dose and volume on outcome is to be analyzed. Methods: Between January 1980 and December 1995, 156 patients with Stage I medically inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer were irradiated at Duke University Medical Center and the Durham Veterans Administration Medical Center. Fifteen patients were excluded from analysis (7 treated with palliative intent, and 8 lost to follow-up immediately following radiation). Characteristics of the 141 evaluable patients were as follows: Median age 70 years (range 46-95); gender: male 83%, female 17%; institution: DUMC 65%, DVAMC 35%; T1N0 54%, T2N0 46%; median size 3 cm (range 0.5 to 8); pathology: squamous cell carcinoma 52%, adenocarcinoma 18%, large cell carcinoma 19%, not otherwise specified 11%; presenting symptoms: weight loss 26%, cough 23%, none (incidental diagnosis) 57%. All patients underwent simulation prior to radiotherapy using linear accelerators of ≥4 MV. No patients received surgery or chemotherapy as part of their initial treatment. The median dose of radiotherapy (not reflecting lung inhomogeneity corrections) was 64 Gy (50 to 80 Gy) given in 1.2 bid to 3 Gy qid fractionation. The majority of cases included some prophylactic nodal regions (73%). Results: Of the 141 patients, 108 have died; 33% of intercurrent death, 35% of cancer, and 7% of unknown causes. At last follow-up, 33 patients were alive (median 24 months, range 7-132 months). The 2- and 5-year overall survival was 39% and 13%, respectively (median 18 months). The corresponding cause-specific survival was 60%, and 32% (median 30 months). On multivariate analysis, significant factors influencing overall and/or cause-specific survival were age, squamous cell histology, incidental diagnosis, and pack-years of smoking. There was a nonsignificant trend towards improved cause-specific survival

  17. Socioeconomic inequality in self-reported oral health status: the experience of Thailand after implementation of the universal coverage policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkotra, Tewarit

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to quantify the extent to which socioeconomic-related inequality in self-reported oral health status among Thais is present after the country implemented the Universal Coverage policy and to decompose the determinants and their associations with inequality in self-reported oral health status in particular with the worse condition. The study employed a concentration index to measure socioeconomic-related inequality in self-reported oral health status, and the decomposition method to identify the determinants and their associations with inequality in oral health-related measures. Data from 32,748 Thai adults aged 15-75 years from the nationally representative Health &Welfare Survey and Socio-Economic Survey 2006 were used in analyses. Reports of worse oral health status of the lower socioeconomic-status group were more common than their higher socioeconomic-status counterparts. The concentration index (equaling -0.208) corroborates the finding of pro-poor inequality in self-reported worse oral health. Decomposition analysis demonstrated certain demographic-, socioeconomic-, and geographic characteristics are particularly associated with poor-rich differences in self-reported oral health status among Thai adults. This study demonstrated socioeconomic-related inequality in oral health is discernable along the entire spectrum of socioeconomic status. Inequality in perceived oral health status among Thais is present even while the country has virtually achieved universality of health coverage. The study also indicates population subgroups, particularly the poor, should receive consideration for improving oral health status as revealed by underlying determinants.

  18. Towards Universal Health Coverage via Social Health Insurance in China: Systemic Fragmentation, Reform Imperatives, and Policy Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Alex Jingwei; Wu, Shaolong

    2017-12-01

    China's remarkable progress in building a comprehensive social health insurance (SHI) system was swift and impressive. Yet the country's decentralized and incremental approach towards universal coverage has created a fragmented SHI system under which a series of structural deficiencies have emerged with negative impacts. First, contingent on local conditions and financing capacity, benefit packages vary considerably across schemes, leading to systematic inequity. Second, the existence of multiple schemes, complicated by massive migration, has resulted in weak portability of SHI, creating further barriers to access. Third, many individuals are enrolled on multiple schemes, which causes inefficient use of government subsidies. Moral hazard and adverse selection are not effectively managed. The Chinese government announced its blueprint for integrating the urban and rural resident schemes in early 2016, paving the way for the ultimate consolidation of all SHI schemes and equal benefits for all. This article proposes three policy alternatives to inform the consolidation: (1) a single-pool system at the prefectural level with significant government subsidies, (2) a dual-pool system at the prefectural level with risk-equalization mechanisms, and (3) a household approach without merging existing pools. Vertical integration to the provincial level is unlikely to happen in the near future. Two caveats are raised to inform this transition towards universal health coverage.

  19. College and University Environmental Programs as a Policy Problem (Part 2): Strategies for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan G.; Rutherford, Murray B.; Auer, Matthew R.; Cherney, David N.; Wallace, Richard L.; Mattson, David J.; Clark, Douglas A.; Foote, Lee; Krogman, Naomi; Wilshusen, Peter; Steelman, Toddi

    2011-05-01

    Environmental studies and environmental sciences programs in American and Canadian colleges and universities seek to ameliorate environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. In a companion article (Part 1) we describe the environmental program movement (EPM) and discuss factors that have hindered its performance. Here, we complete our analysis by proposing strategies for improvement. We recommend that environmental programs re-organize around three principles. First, adopt as an overriding goal the concept of human dignity—defined as freedom and social justice in healthy, sustainable environments. This clear higher-order goal captures the human and environmental aspirations of the EPM and would provide a more coherent direction for the efforts of diverse participants. Second, employ an explicit, genuinely interdisciplinary analytical framework that facilitates the use of multiple methods to investigate and address environmental and social problems in context. Third, develop educational programs and applied experiences that provide students with the technical knowledge, powers of observation, critical thinking skills and management acumen required for them to become effective professionals and leaders. Organizing around these three principles would build unity in the EPM while at the same time capitalizing on the strengths of the many disciplines and diverse local conditions involved.

  20. College and university environmental programs as a policy problem (Part 2): Strategies for improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.G.; Rutherford, M.B.; Auer, M.R.; Cherney, D.N.; Wallace, R.L.; Mattson, D.J.; Clark, D.A.; Foote, L.; Krogman, N.; Wilshusen, P.; Steelman, T.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental studies and environmental sciences programs in American and Canadian colleges and universities seek to ameliorate environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. In a companion article (Part 1) we describe the environmental program movement (EPM) and discuss factors that have hindered its performance. Here, we complete our analysis by proposing strategies for improvement. We recommend that environmental programs re-organize around three principles. First, adopt as an overriding goal the concept of human dignity-defined as freedom and social justice in healthy, sustainable environments. This clear higher-order goal captures the human and environmental aspirations of the EPM and would provide a more coherent direction for the efforts of diverse participants. Second, employ an explicit, genuinely interdisciplinary analytical framework that facilitates the use of multiple methods to investigate and address environmental and social problems in context. Third, develop educational programs and applied experiences that provide students with the technical knowledge, powers of observation, critical thinking skills and management acumen required for them to become effective professionals and leaders. Organizing around these three principles would build unity in the EPM while at the same time capitalizing on the strengths of the many disciplines and diverse local conditions involved. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  1. Fostering creativity: how the Duke Graduate Medical Education Quasi-Endowment encourages innovation in GME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolsek, Kathryn M; Murphy, Gwendolyn; Nagler, Alisa; Moore, Peggy R; Schlueter, Joanne; Weinerth, John L; Cuffe, Michael S; Dzau, Victor J

    2013-02-01

    The Duke Medicine Graduate Medical Education Quasi-Endowment, established in 2006, provides infrastructure support and encourages educational innovation. The authors describe Duke's experience with the "grassroots innovation" part of the fund, the Duke Innovation Fund, and discuss the Innovation Fund's processes for application, review, and implementation, and also outcomes, impact, and intended and unintended consequences.In the five years of the Innovation Fund described (2007-2011), 105 projects have been submitted, and 78 have been funded. Thirty-seven projects have been completed. Approved funding ranged from $2,363 to $348,750, with an average award of $66,391. This represents 42% of funding originally requested. Funding could be requested for a period of 6 months to 3 years. The average duration of projects was 27 months, with a range from 6 months to 36 months. Eighty percent of projects were completed on time. Two projects were closed because of lack of progress and failure to adhere to reporting requirements. Thirty-nine are ongoing.Program directors report great success in meeting project outcomes and concrete impacts on resident and faculty attitudes and performance. Ninety-two percent report that their projects would have never been accomplished without this funding. Projects have resulted in at least 68 posters, abstracts, and peer-reviewed presentations. At least 12 peer-reviewed manuscripts were published.There has been tremendous diversity of projects; all 13 clinical departments have been represented. Interdepartmental and intradepartmental program cooperation has increased. This modest seed money has resulted in demonstrable sustainable impacts on teaching and learning, and increased morale and scholarly recognition.

  2. Nuclear-station post-accident liquid-sampling system: developed by Duke Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, D.A.; Birch, M.L.; Orth, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island showed that means must be provided to determine the radioactivity levels in high activity liquid and gaseous systems of a nuclear power plant without undue radiation exposure to personnel. The Duke Power Post Accident Liquid Sampling System provides the means for obtaining diluted liquid samples and diluted dissolved gas samples following a reactor accident involving substantial core damage. Their approach yields a straightforward engineering solution at a fraction of the cost of other systems. A description of the system, general design criteria, and color coded flow diagrams are included

  3. TNM and Modified Dukes staging along with the demographic characteristics of patients with colorectal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoca, Ayşe Neslin; Yanık, Serdar; Özdemir, Zeynep Tuğba; Cihan, Fatma Gökşin; Sayar, Süleyman; Cincin, Tarık Gandi; Çam, Akın; Özer, Cahit

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Colon adenocarcinoma, is the most common cancer in gastrointesinal system (GIS). The whole world is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. TNM and modified Dukes classification which has great importance in the diagnosis and treatment of Colorectal cancer (CRC). TNM and Modified Dukes classification results of histopathological examination and the demographic characteristics of patients and their relation were investigated. Materials and methods: Lower gastrointestinal operation results of 85 patients were examined accepted to clinical Pathology between January 1997-November 2013. Colon cancer had been diagnosed at 85 patients with pathology materials and staging was done according to the TNM and Modified Duke classification. The demographic characteristics of patients, differentiation grade, lymph node involvement, serous involvement were evaluated retrospectively. Results: In this study 37 patients (43.52%) were men and 48 (56.47%) were women. Ages of patients were between 19 and 87 with a mean age of 57.31 ± 15.31. Lymph node, differentiation, serosa involvement, Modified Dukes and TNM classification was assessed according to sex and age. TNM classification by sex was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). There was no statistically significant relationship between age and differentiation (p = 0.085). Value of differentiation increased towards from 1 to 3 inversely proportional to age. So young patients defined as well-differentiated at the conclusion. Negative relationship was evaluated between age and TNM Class variables. As a result, the relationship between age and TNM was not significant (p > 0.05). However, with increasing age the degree of staging was also found to increase. TNM classification was associated with the differentiation and it was significant (p = 0.043). Conclusion: Colon cancer, when contracted at an early stage, it is suitable for surgery and curative treatment can be done with minimal morbidity and mortality. However

  4. Brazilian policy of universal access to AIDS treatment: sustainability challenges and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Dirceu B; Simão, Mariangela

    2007-07-01

    The Brazilian AIDS Programme success is recognized worldwide, due to its integrated approach of prevention, respect for human rights and to free of charge universal access to state of the art antiretrovirals. As of 2006, 180,000 people living with AIDS are on HAART with 17 drugs available, receiving medical and laboratory care through the public health system. Costs for ART drugs reached US$ 400 million in 2006 and will increase steeply if the current trends are maintained: uptake of approximately 20,000 new patients/year and the need for more expensive, patent-protected second and third line drugs. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the programme, budgetary pressures, the need for more intense preventive efforts, for boosting local production of new drugs, for more investment in research and development and the issue of voluntary and compulsory licensing. There are many hurdles in pursuing long-term sustainability, which depends on country driven initiatives and international collaboration and participation. We conclude that the Brazilian experience demonstrated the capability of a developing country to treat people with equity, independently of race, gender or economic power and that this equality "seed" has already spread to other countries. Internally this experience must be used to tackle other endemic diseases, such as leprosy, malaria, dengue and leishmania. The Brazilian political will has been proven but, once again, there will be the need for concerted action by civil society, researchers, health professionals, people living with HIV/AIDS and the government to convince the world that health needs should not be treated as commercial issues, and that progress in research and development must be shared throughout the world if we expect to survive as a civilization.

  5. Selling Pre-K: Media, Politics, and Policy in the Case of Universal Pre-Kindergarten in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Katherine K.; Neuman, Susan B.

    2018-01-01

    Background/Context: Educational policy is informed by multiple stakeholders and actors. Research has focused on understanding how policy decisions are informed and made, as well as how teachers and school leaders take up these policies in their practice. However, few researchers have examined how educational policy is framed for the larger public…

  6. From Visions to Practical Policy: The Universal Design Journey in Norway. What Did We Learn? What Did We Gain? What Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Einar; Bringa, Olav Rand

    2016-01-01

    The national policy in Norway have since the last part of the 1990-ies been organized in programs that erected actions including national authorities, municipalities, regional authorities and private enterprises. What have we gained by our national activities to mainstream inclusive and accessibility policy for persons with reduced capability through the principles of Universal Design? Have we made society accessible to everyone and prevented discrimination. Are the results visible? We can measure results on several sectors, inter alia public buildings, outdoor areas, central communication hubs, public transport and the occurrence plans for Universal Design in municipalities and regions. Through several programs and action plans the Norwegian government has developed a sectoral approach for including persons with disabilities in the society. The majority of ministries have participated in these plans. Local initiatives, local councils for disabled people, and later on municipalities and county administrations were supported by national authorities as complements to regulations and laws. In addition, guidelines and assisting funds were used. The main objective was to redefine the national policy, using better defined national goals and introducing Universal Design to replace accessibility as the basic tool. The mainstreaming of the accessibility policy, where Universal Design was included in relevant sectors and activities, was a crucial part of the strategy. The national policy was organized in programs that erected actions focusing on how to reach, inspire and include municipalities and regional authorities in their own struggle for Universal Design. Through the mainstream approach ministries have both earmarked economic transfers to their own agencies and used steering documents guide to these agencies how to implement Universal Design in their advisory services, in practicing laws and regulations and in their own planning and building activities.

  7. Probabilistic safety assessment support for the maintenance rule at Duke Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, H. Duncan; Canady, Ken S.

    1999-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the Maintenance Rule on July 10, 1991 with an implementation date of July 10, 1996 . Maintenance rule implementation at the Duke Power Company has used probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) insights to help focus the monitoring of structures, systems and components (SSC) performance and to ensure that maintenance is effectively performed. This paper describes how the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) group at the Duke Power Company provides support for the maintenance rule by performing the following tasks: (1) providing a member of the expert panel; (2) determining the risk-significant SSCs; (3) establishing SSC performance criteria for availability and reliability; (4) evaluating past performance and its impact on core damage risk as part of the periodic assessment; (5) providing input to the PRA matrix; (6) providing risk analyses of combinations of SSCs out of service; (7) providing support for the SENTINEL program; and (8) providing support for PSA training. These tasks are not simply tied to the initial implementation of the rule. The maintenance rule must be kept consistent with the current design and operation of the plant. This will require that the PRA models and the many PSA calculations performed to support the maintenance rule are kept up-to-date. Therefore, support of the maintenance rule will be one of the primary roles of the PSA group for the remainder of the life of the plant

  8. The global and domestic politics of health policy in emerging nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Eduardo J; Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, several emerging nations with burgeoning economies and in transition to democracy have pursued health policy innovations. As these nations have integrated into the world economy through bilateral trade and diplomacy, they have also become increasingly exposed to international pressures and norms and focused on more effective, equitable health care systems. There are several lessons learned from the case studies of Brazil, Ghana, India, China, Vietnam, and Thailand in this special issue on the global and domestic politics of health policy in emerging nations. For the countries examined, although sensitive to international preferences, domestic governments preferred to implement policy on their own and at their own pace. During the policy-making and implementation process, international and domestic actors played different roles in health policy making vis-à-vis other reform actors -- at times the state played an intermediary role. In several countries, civil society also played a central role in designing and implementing policy at all levels of government. International institutions also have a number of mechanisms and strategies in their tool box to influence a country's domestic health governance, and they use them, particularly in the context of an uncertain state or internal discordance within the state. Copyright © 2015 by Duke University Press.

  9. A survey of the effective factors in students' adherence to university dress code policy, using the theory of reasoned action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaveh, Mohammad Hossein; Moradi, Leila; Hesampour, Maryam; Hasan Zadeh, Jafar

    2015-07-01

    Recognizing the determinants of behavior plays a major role in identification and application of effective strategies for encouraging individuals to follow the intended pattern of behavior. The present study aimed to analyze the university students' behaviors regarding the amenability to dress code, using the theory of reasoned action (TRA). In this cross sectional study, 472 students were selected through multi-stage random sampling. The data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire whose validity was confirmed by specialists. Besides, its reliability was confirmed by conducting a pilot study revealing Cronbach's alpha coefficients of 0.93 for attitude, 0.83 for subjective norms, 0.94 for behavioral intention and 0.77 for behavior. The data were entered into the SPSS statistical software and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics (Mann-Whitney, correlation and regression analysis). Based on the students' self-reports, conformity of clothes to the university's dress code was below the expected level in 28.87% of the female students and 28.55% of the male ones. The mean scores of attitude, subjective norms, and behavioral intention to comply with dress code policy were 28.78±10.08, 28.51±8.25 and 11.12±3.84, respectively. The students of different colleges were different from each other concerning TRA constructs. Yet, subjective norms played a more critical role in explaining the variance of dress code behavior among the students. Theory of reasoned action explained the students' dress code behaviors relatively well. The study results suggest paying attention to appropriate approaches in educational, cultural activities, including promotion of student-teacher communication.

  10. An Evaluation of the National Information Communication and Technology (ICT) Policy at the University of Namibia in the Faculty of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Albert; Kazembe, Lawrence; Kazondovi, Collins

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this evaluation study was to determine the extent to which the teacher educators in the Faculty of Education at the University of Namibia implemented the national Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Policy for Education. This study employed both the quantitative method in the form of questionnaires and the qualitative…

  11. Amassing power in a northern landscape: J. B. Duke and the development of the Saguenay River, 1897-1927

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massell, David Perera

    Beginning at the turn of the century, Chapter One reconstructs the process by which the Provincial Government of Quebec sold--individually, outright, and cheaply--the waterfalls and rapids strung out along the length of the Saguenay River. The small-scale Canadian power projects stalled, however, for want of capital or power customers in a remote North American region. A major shift in developmental scale ensues in Chapter Two as a Canadian who owned riparian rights, Thomas "Carbide" Willson, uncorks a genie of American capital in industrialist J. B. Duke. While Duke was invited to participate in the Saguenay's development as a third party, Chapter Three describes how the aggressive New York trader seizes the entire length of the river for his exclusive use. Chapter Four recounts the unexpectedly stiff resistance to the industrial plans of Duke's lieutenants by a young French-Canadian engineer named Arthur Amos, head of Quebec's newly established Hydraulic Service. Stymied in Quebec City, Duke nonetheless proves remarkably agile in the broader theater of multinational enterprise. As Chapter Five documents, Duke succeeds in rounding up an array of industrial power customers to justify the enormous cost of his dams, most notably Delaware-based explosives manufacturer E. I du Pont de Nemours Powder Company. Ultimately Du Pont gets cold feet, and Duke's giant electrochemical scheme collapses around him at the end of 1915. Only after 1920, in Chapter Six, is Duke able to proceed with his project in a changed political and business climate of the postwar period. Contemplating aluminum manufacture by his own company, in Chapter Seven, he attempts to procure the requisite supply of high grade bauxite. But he encounters ferocious competition for possession of the essential raw material. Choosing to merge rather than fight, Duke and Alcoa's President Arthur Vining Davis ally in 1925. Their deal sealed, the two businessmen send their Canadian lawyer to Quebec City to sidestep

  12. Universal financial protection through National Health Insurance: a stakeholder analysis of the proposed one-time premium payment policy in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiiro, Gilbert Abotisem; McIntyre, Di

    2013-05-01

    Extending coverage to the informal sector is a key challenge to achieving universal coverage through contributory health insurance schemes. Ghana introduced a mandatory National Health Insurance system in 2004 to provide financial protection for both the formal and informal sectors through a combination of taxes and annual premium payments. As part of its election promise in 2008, the current government (then in opposition) promised to make the payment of premiums 'one-time'. This has been a very controversial policy issue in Ghana. This study sought to contribute to assessing the feasibility of the proposed policy by exploring the understandings of various stakeholders on the policy, their interests or concerns, potential positions, power and influences on it, as well as the general prospects and challenges for its implementation. Data were gathered from a review of relevant documents in the public domain, 28 key informant interviews and six focus group discussions with key stakeholders in Accra and two other districts. The results show that there is a lot of confusion in stakeholders' understanding of the policy issue, and, because of the uncertainties surrounding it, most powerful stakeholders are yet to take clear positions on it. However, stakeholders raised concerns that revolved around issues such as: the meaning of a one-time premium within an insurance scheme context, the affordability of the one-time premium, financing sources and sustainability of the policy, as well as the likely impact of the policy on equity in access to health care. Policy-makers need to clearly explain the meaning of the one-time premium policy and how it will be funded, and critically consider the concerns raised by stakeholders before proceeding with further attempts to implement it. For other countries planning universal coverage reforms, it is important that the terminology of their reforms clearly reflects policy objectives.

  13. The addition of low-dose leucovorin to the combination of 5-fluorouracil-levamisole does not improve survival in the adjuvant treatment of Dukes' C colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, WA; Mulder, NH; Hermans, J; Otter, R; Plukker, JT

    Purpose: To assess the effect of the addition of leucovorin to the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-levamisole on recurrence risk and overall survival in patients after a resection with curative intent of a Dukes' C colon cancer. Patients and methods: Five hundred patients with Dukes' C colon

  14. Classification of Dukes' B and C colorectal cancers using expression arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, C.M.; Knudsen, Steen; Laurberg, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose. Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies. Substaging of the cancer is of importance not only to prognosis but also to treatment. Classification of substages based on DNA microarray technology is currently the most promising approach. We therefore investigated if gene...... expression microarrays could be used to classify colorectal tumors. Methods. We used the Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the expression of more than 5,000 genes in samples from the sigmoid and upper rectum of the left colon. Five samples were from normal mucosa and five samples from each...... expression of one of the most common malignancies, colorectal cancer, now seems to be within reach. The data indicates that it is possible at least to classify Dukes' B and C colorectal tumors with microarrays....

  15. Duke Power's William Lee says INPO's purpose is solving industry problems, not educating the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Former Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) head, William Lee thinks that nuclear critics could misuse institute reports on investigations of nuclear plant construction and operation. If so, that would outweigh any public relations benefits of using the reports to inform and educate the public. Lee thinks the best way to gain public confidence is for the industry to perform well. The four-year-old institute was originally formed to improve operations, but recent problems with unfinished plants led to a system of construction audits. By offering guidance to companies building nuclear plants, INPO is meeting competition from utilities such as Duke Power, which is now marketing its expertise in designing and building plants. Lee emphasizes the importance of asking the right questions that will lead to quality control

  16. 78 FR 38028 - Duke Energy Progress, Inc.; Notice of Video Conference To Discuss Yadkin-Pee Dee Hydroelectric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 2206-030] Duke Energy Progress, Inc.; Notice of Video Conference To Discuss Yadkin-Pee Dee Hydroelectric Project Biological Opinion On April 29, 2013, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) of the National Oceanic and...

  17. 75 FR 43572 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-369 and 50-370; NRC-2010-0259] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant... Energy Carolinas, LLC (the licensee), for operation of the McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2...

  18. 78 FR 79709 - Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant Post-Shutdown...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-302; NRC-2013-0283] Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION: Notice of receipt; availability; public meeting; and request...

  19. 76 FR 79228 - Combined Licenses at William States Lee III Nuclear Station Site, Units 1 and 2; Duke Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 52-018 and 52-019; NRC-2008-0170] Combined Licenses at William States Lee III Nuclear Station Site, Units 1 and 2; Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC AGENCY: Nuclear.... SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Army Corps...

  20. 78 FR 77508 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; William States Lee III Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Combined...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 52-018 and 52-019; NRC-2008-0170] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; William States Lee III Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Combined Licenses Application Review AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final environmental impact statement; availability...

  1. 75 FR 43571 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment And...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414; NRC-2010-0260] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment And Finding of No Significant... Energy Carolinas, LLC (the licensee), for operation of the Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2...

  2. 78 FR 40200 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2, and 3; Independent Spent Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 72-1004, 72-40, 50-269, 50-270, and 50-287; NRC-2013-0135] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2, and 3; Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY: Nuclear...

  3. 78 FR 45575 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2, and 3; Independent Spent Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos.: 72-1004, 72-40, 50-269, 50-270, 50-287; and NRC-2013- 0135] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2, and 3; Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Exemption; issuance. SUMMARY: The NRC...

  4. 76 FR 51026 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service List for a Programmatic Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Highway, Seneca, SC 29672. 29223-4905. Rebekah Dobrasko, South Carolina Tyler B. Howe, Eastern Band of... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 2503-147--South Carolina and North Carolina Keowee- Toxaway Hydroelectric Project] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Notice of...

  5. Inverse Compton gamma-ray source for nuclear physics and related applications at the Duke FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, P.G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years the development of intense, short-wavelength FEL light sources has opened opportunities for the development new applications of high-energy Compton-backscattered photons. These applications range from medical imaging with X-ray photons to high-energy physics with γγ colliders. In this paper we discuss the possibilities for nuclear physics studies using polarized Compton backscattered γ-rays from the Duke storage-ring-driven UV-FEL. There are currently a number of projects that produce polarized γ-rays for nuclear physics studies. All of these facilities operate by scattering conventional laser-light against electrons circulating in a storage ring. In our scheme, intra-cavity scattering of the UV-FEL light will produce a γ-flux enhancement of approximately 10 3 over existing sources. The Duke ring can operate at energies up to 1.2 GeV and can produce FEL photons up to 12.5 eV. We plan to generate γ-rays up to 200 MeV in energy with an average flux in excess of 10 7 /s/MeV, using a modest scattering beam of 10-mA average stored current. The γ-ray energy may be tuned by varying the FEL wavelength or by adjusting the stored electron beam energy. Because of the intense flux, we can eliminate the need for photon energy tagging by collimating of the γ-ray beam. We will discuss the characteristics of the device and its research opportunities

  6. How Intense Policy Demanders Shape Postreform Politics: Evidence from the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Philip; Haeder, Simon F

    2018-04-01

    The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been a politically volatile process. The ACA's institutional design and delayed feedback effects created a window of opportunity for its partisan opponents to launch challenges at both the federal and state level. Yet as recent research suggests, postreform politics depends on more than policy feedback alone; rather, it is shaped by the partisan and interest-group environment. We argue that "intense policy demanders" played an important role in defining the policy alternatives that comprised congressional Republicans' efforts to repeal and replace the ACA. To test this argument, we drew on an original data set of bill introductions in the House of Representatives between 2011 and 2016. Our analysis suggests that business contributions and political ideology affected the likelihood that House Republicans would introduce measures repealing significant portions of the ACA. A secondary analysis shows that intense policy demanders also shaped the vote on House Republicans' initial ACA replacement plan. These findings highlight the role intense policy demanders can play in shaping the postreform political agenda. Copyright © 2018 by Duke University Press.

  7. The Politics of Prevention: Lessons from the Neglected History of US HIV/AIDS Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padamsee, Tasleem J

    2017-02-01

    The history of government action on HIV/AIDS has much to teach us about the dynamics and possibilities of US public health policy, but it has been insufficiently studied by social scientists of the epidemic. This article draws on a large set of original interviews with policy makers, thousands of news articles, and extensive documentation to reconstruct the history of three areas of debate and decision making about HIV prevention since 1990: needle exchange, HIV testing, and sex education for at-risk groups. These histories illuminate three key lessons. First, scientific evidence has less power to drive public health policy in the United States than in the United Kingdom, which is used as a comparison case to contextualize US choices within a broader range of options. Second, moral concerns weigh so heavily in the United States that a publicly articulated moral argument can countermand the dictates of solid scientific evidence, the voices of experts, and practical considerations to push public health policy in entirely oppositional directions. Third, having the ear of the presidential administration is usually a necessary-although not always sufficient-condition for the success of advocates trying to move US policy in the public health-indicated direction. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  8. A survey of the effective factors in students’ adherence to university dress code policy, using the theory of reasoned action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD HOSSEIN KAVEH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recognizing the determinants of behavior plays a major role in identification and application of effective strategies for encouraging individuals to follow the intended pattern of behavior. The present study aimed to analyze the university students’ behaviors regarding the amenability to dress code, using the theory of reasoned action (TRA. Methods: In this cross sectional study, 472 students were selected through multi-stage random sampling. The data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire whose validity was confirmed by specialists. Besides, its reliability was confirmed by conducting a pilot study revealing Cronbach’s alpha coefficients of 0.93 for attitude, 0.83 for subjective norms, 0.94 for behavioral intention and 0.77 for behavior. The data were entered into the SPSS statistical software and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics (Mann-Whitney, correlation and regression analysis. Results: Based on the students’ self-reports, conformity of clothes to the university’s dress code was below the expected level in 28.87% of the female students and 28.55% of the male ones. The mean scores of attitude, subjective norms, and behavioral intention to comply with dress code policy were 28.78±10.08, 28.51±8.25 and 11.12±3.84, respectively. The students of different colleges were different from each other concerning TRA constructs. Yet, subjective norms played a more critical role in explaining the variance of dress code behavior among the students. Conclusion: Theory of reasoned action explained the students’ dress code behaviors relatively well. The study results suggest paying attention to appropriate approaches in educational, cultural activities, including promotion of student-teacher communication.

  9. Descriptive Analysis on the Impacts of Universal Zero-Markup Drug Policy on a Chinese Urban Tertiary Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tian

    Full Text Available Universal Zero-Markup Drug Policy (UZMDP mandates no price mark-ups on any drug dispensed by a healthcare institution, and covers the medicines not included in the China's National Essential Medicine System. Five tertiary hospitals in Beijing, China implemented UZMDP in 2012. Its impacts on these hospitals are unknown. We described the effects of UZMDP on a participating hospital, Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing, China (JST.This retrospective longitudinal study examined the hospital-level data of JST and city-level data of tertiary hospitals of Beijing, China (BJT 2009-2015. Rank-sum tests and join-point regression analyses were used to assess absolute changes and differences in trends, respectively.In absolute terms, after the UZDMP implementation, there were increased annual patient-visits and decreased ratios of medicine-to-healthcare-charges (RMOH in JST outpatient and inpatient services; however, in outpatient service, physician work-days decreased and physician-workload and inflation-adjusted per-visit healthcare charges increased, while the inpatient physician work-days increased and inpatient mortality-rate reduced. Interestingly, the decreasing trend in inpatient mortality-rate was neutralized after UZDMP implementation. Compared with BJT and under influence of UZDMP, JST outpatient and inpatient services both had increasing trends in annual patient-visits (annual percentage changes[APC] = 8.1% and 6.5%, respectively and decreasing trends in RMOH (APC = -4.3% and -5.4%, respectively, while JST outpatient services had increasing trend in inflation-adjusted per-visit healthcare charges (APC = 3.4% and JST inpatient service had decreasing trend in inflation-adjusted per-visit medicine-charges (APC = -5.2%.Implementation of UZMDP seems to increase annual patient-visits, reduce RMOH and have different impacts on outpatient and inpatient services in a Chinese urban tertiary hospital.

  10. Descriptive Analysis on the Impacts of Universal Zero-Markup Drug Policy on a Chinese Urban Tertiary Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Yuan, Jiangfan; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Lanjing

    2016-01-01

    Universal Zero-Markup Drug Policy (UZMDP) mandates no price mark-ups on any drug dispensed by a healthcare institution, and covers the medicines not included in the China's National Essential Medicine System. Five tertiary hospitals in Beijing, China implemented UZMDP in 2012. Its impacts on these hospitals are unknown. We described the effects of UZMDP on a participating hospital, Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing, China (JST). This retrospective longitudinal study examined the hospital-level data of JST and city-level data of tertiary hospitals of Beijing, China (BJT) 2009-2015. Rank-sum tests and join-point regression analyses were used to assess absolute changes and differences in trends, respectively. In absolute terms, after the UZDMP implementation, there were increased annual patient-visits and decreased ratios of medicine-to-healthcare-charges (RMOH) in JST outpatient and inpatient services; however, in outpatient service, physician work-days decreased and physician-workload and inflation-adjusted per-visit healthcare charges increased, while the inpatient physician work-days increased and inpatient mortality-rate reduced. Interestingly, the decreasing trend in inpatient mortality-rate was neutralized after UZDMP implementation. Compared with BJT and under influence of UZDMP, JST outpatient and inpatient services both had increasing trends in annual patient-visits (annual percentage changes[APC] = 8.1% and 6.5%, respectively) and decreasing trends in RMOH (APC = -4.3% and -5.4%, respectively), while JST outpatient services had increasing trend in inflation-adjusted per-visit healthcare charges (APC = 3.4%) and JST inpatient service had decreasing trend in inflation-adjusted per-visit medicine-charges (APC = -5.2%). Implementation of UZMDP seems to increase annual patient-visits, reduce RMOH and have different impacts on outpatient and inpatient services in a Chinese urban tertiary hospital.

  11. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 17. Development of Education Programs at Indonesian Universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. All five Indonesian partner universities managed to develop and implement an education program within the timeline of the CASINDO project. UMY (Muhammadiyah University of Yogyakarta, Indonesia), UNRAM (University of Mataram, Mataram, Indonesia) and UNCEN (Cenderawasih University, Jayapura, Papua, Indonesia) have chosen to develop a certificate program. UNDIP (Diponegoro University in Semarang, Java, Indonesia) and USU (University of Sumatra Utara, Medan, Indonesia) have both developed a master program in sustainable energy. UNDIP has already discussed the proposal of their master program with the Ministry of Education and will have to make some improvements. USU will first start the program as a specialisation within the Mechanical Engineering department and in some time continues to make it an independent master program. At all universities both contact persons and lecturers have put a lot of effort in developing the programs and succeeded. Additionally, through CASINDO a network of lecturers between the universities has developed, which will ease future cooperation, after the CASINDO project will have finished.

  12. The University of Texas at Austin's Defense of Affirmative Action in "Fisher v. University of Texas": Lessons for Institutional Policies and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Liliana M.

    2015-01-01

    In "Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin" (2013), the U.S. Supreme Court most recently recognized the right of universities to pursue a mission-centered interest in the educational benefits of student body diversity. The decision, however, also reminded institutions of the limited ways they are allowed to consider race in admissions…

  13. Policy training teachers of higher education and training quality: a study on the pedagogy university program as qualifying the possibility of teachers in educational-teaching perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina de Almeida Mantovani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reflections presented in this article are by theme pedagogical-didactic training policies for higher education teachers and quality of education and result of a research developed a Community University interior of Rio Grande do Sul, involving teachers, graduates who sought to answer : "You can establish relationships between the absence of pedagogical-didactic training of teachers and defining policies of training and the quality of teaching in higher education" To answer the research question, we sought to investigate whether the university pedagogy program, service developed can be considered as a space, which meets the lack of didactic-educational training, and is a positive factor as regards the possibility to supply the deficiency in this field.

  14. Improving knowledge, awareness, and use of flexible career policies through an accelerator intervention at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villablanca, Amparo C; Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia P

    2013-06-01

    The challenges of balancing a career and family life disproportionately affect women in academic health sciences and medicine, contributing to their slower career advancement and/or their attrition from academia. In this article, the authors first describe their experiences at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine developing and implementing an innovative accelerator intervention designed to promote faculty work-life balance by improving knowledge, awareness, and access to comprehensive flexible career policies. They then summarize the results of two faculty surveys--one conducted before the implementation of their intervention and the second conducted one year into their three-year intervention--designed to assess faculty's use and intention to use the flexible career policies, their awareness of available options, barriers to their use of the policies, and their career satisfaction. The authors found that the intervention significantly increased awareness of the policies and attendance at related educational activities, improved attitudes toward the policies, and decreased perceived barriers to use. These results, however, were most pronounced for female faculty and faculty under the age of 50. The authors next discuss areas for future research on faculty use of flexible career policies and offer recommendations for other institutions of higher education--not just those in academic medicine--interested in implementing a similar intervention. They conclude that having flexible career policies alone is not enough to stem the attrition of female faculty. Such policies must be fully integrated into an institution's culture such that faculty are both aware of them and willing to use them.

  15. Improving Knowledge, Awareness, and Use of Flexible Career Policies through an Accelerator Intervention at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villablanca, Amparo C.; Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia P.

    2013-01-01

    The challenges of balancing a career and family life disproportionately affect women in academic health sciences and medicine, contributing to their slower career advancement and/or their attrition from academia. In this article, the authors first describe their experiences at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine developing and implementing an innovative accelerator intervention designed to promote faculty work-life balance by improving knowledge, awareness, and access to comprehensive flexible career policies. They then summarize the results of two faculty surveys--one conducted before the implementation of their intervention and the second conducted one year into their three-year intervention--designed to assess faculty’s use and intention to use the flexible career policies, their awareness of available options, barriers to their use of the policies, and their career satisfaction. The authors found that the intervention significantly increased awareness of the policies and attendance at related educational activities, improved attitudes toward the policies, and decreased perceived barriers to use. These results however were most pronounced for female faculty and faculty under the age of 50. The authors next discuss areas for future research on faculty use of flexible career policies and offer recommendations for other institutions of higher education, not just those in academic medicine, interested in implementing a similar intervention. They conclude that having flexible career policies alone is not enough to stem the attrition of female faculty. Such policies must be fully integrated into an institution’s culture such that faculty are both aware of them and willing to use them. PMID:23619063

  16. Current Practice in Research Ethics: Global Trends and New Opportunities for African Universities. Research and Innovation Policy Series. Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Liam

    2007-01-01

    Research Ethics has emerged as one of the most well-developed policy areas within the sphere of Research and Innovation Management. As such, for African institutions looking to strengthen their policy frameworks, develop increased collaborations, and increase research outputs, a thorough understanding of global trends in Ethics will be vital.…

  17. The Post-War British "Re-Education" Policy for German Universities and Its Application at the Universities of Göttingen and Cologne (1945-1947)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euros, Glesni

    2016-01-01

    The crux of British aims for Germany following the Second World War focused on "re-education" and democratisation. Well aware that the victors' policies following World War One had failed to prevent Germany from pursuing an expansionist path once again, the plan was to help Germany learn from her problematic past. These aims extended to…

  18. Realities of and perspectives for languages in the globalised world: Can language teaching survive the inadequacies of policies implemented today at Leeds Beckett University?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadia Gamir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Various newspaper articles report that British ministers, university representatives, exam chiefs and business bodies agree that foreign languages skills in primary, secondary and tertiary UK education are in crisis. Lower funding and policy changes have caused language skills deficiencies felt gravely in the business sectors. Funding and support initiatives pledged by policy makers appear to be election-driven, barely outliving newly elected governments. Others blame secondary school language curriculum for failing to inspire students to take up a language when they reach 13 or 14. Others still argue that severe A-level examinations marking deters students from taking up a foreign language at 6th form level, producing fewer prospective language learners for university departments. Community languages are also undervalued as small-entry languages could soon be axed from GCSE and A-level examinations. In a world increasingly interconnected, it is essential the importance of language learning be reinstated in all our educational institutions. This paper reviews two decades of the conditions of language provision in the UK in general, with an emphasis on Leeds Beckett University. It also attempts to answer two questions emerging form the author’s personal teaching experience and reflections: What are the realities and challenges language teaching faces at Leeds Beckett University? And, how may we support language learners in fulfilling their ambition to acquire the required skills to communicate effectively in this globalised world?

  19. Project H.O.P.E.: Effective University Engagement with Community Afterschool Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara C. Jentleson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Implemented in 2002 by the Duke-Durham Neighborhood Partnership, Project H.O.P.E. has improved the quantity and quality of afterschool programs for the youth of Durham, NC. Project H.O.P.E. provides tutoring programs, enrichment resources, and evaluation support to non-profit community partner organizations located in the low income Durham neighborhoods surrounding Duke University. Duke University undergraduates who provide tutoring services to the Durham youth in the afterschool programs gain from valuable reciprocal service learning experiences. Project H.O.P.E. is an effective model of the mutual benefits that can be gained from effective university and community engagement in the service of at-risk students.

  20. Applying ethical and legal principles to new technology: the University of Auckland Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences' policy 'Taking and Sharing Images of Patients.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Monique; Malpas, Phillipa; Kersey, Kate; Merry, Alan; Bagg, Warwick

    2017-01-27

    To develop a policy governing the taking and sharing of photographic and radiological images by medical students. The Rules of the Health Information Privacy Code 1994 and the Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers' Rights were applied to the taking, storing and sharing of photographic and radiological images by medical students. Stakeholders, including clinicians, medical students, lawyers at district health boards in the Auckland region, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and the Health and Disability Commissioner were consulted and their recommendations incorporated. The policy 'Taking and Sharing Images of Patients' sets expectations of students in relation to: photographs taken for the purpose of providing care; photographs taken for educational or professional practice purposes and photographic or radiological images used for educational or professional practice purposes. In addition, it prohibits students from uploading images of patients onto image-sharing apps such as Figure 1. The policy has since been extended to apply to all students at the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland. Technology-driven evolutions in practice necessitate regular review to ensure compliance with existing legal regulations and ethical frameworks. This policy offers a starting point for healthcare providers to review their own policies and practice, with a view to ensuring that patients' trust in the treatment that their health information receives is upheld.

  1. Duke Activity Status Index for Cardiovascular Diseases: Validation of the Portuguese Translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho-Myrrha, Mariana A.; Dias, Rosângela C.; Fernandes, Aline A.; Araújo, Christiano G.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Pereira, Danielle G.; Britto, Raquel R.

    2014-01-01

    The Duke Activity Status Index (DASI) assesses the functional capacity of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but there is no Portuguese version validated for CVD. To translate and adapt cross-culturally the DASI for the Portuguese-Brazil language, and to verify its psychometric properties in the assessment of functional capacity of patients with CVD. The DASI was translated into Portuguese, then checked by back-translation into English and evaluated by an expert committee. The pre-test version was first evaluated in 30 subjects. The psychometric properties and correlation with exercise testing was performed in a second group of 67 subjects. An exploratory factor analyses was performed in all 97 subjects to verify the construct validity of the DASI. The intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.87 and for the inter-rater reliability was 0.84. Cronbach's α for internal consistency was 0.93. The concurrent validity was verified by significant positive correlations of DASI scores with the VO 2 max (r = 0.51, p < 0.001). The factor analysis yielded two factors, which explained 54% of the total variance, with factor 1 accounting for 40% of the variance. Application of the DASI required between one and three and a half minutes per patient. The Brazilian version of the DASI appears to be a valid, reliable, fast and easy to administer tool to assess functional capacity among patients with CVD

  2. De minimis applications for alternative disposal of very low level radioactive waste at Duke Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, C.

    1986-01-01

    Existing NRC regulations provide no minimum level of radioactivity in waste from a licensee's facility that may be disposed of in a manner other than as radioactive waste. With one exception, in 10CFRsection20.306, licensees may dispose of certain levels of tritium and carbon-14 in liquid-scintillation and animal-carcass waste without regard to its radioactivity. In the interim, before specific or generic provisions for disposing of very low level radioactive wastes are adopted through rule making, licensees have another alternative for obtaining approval to dispose of large volumes of materials contaminated with very low levels of radioactivity under provision 10CFRsection20.302(a) ''Method for obtaining approval of proposed disposal procedures.'' This paper provides the experiences of obtaining both NRC and states (North Carolina and South Carolina) approval for disposing of very low-level radioactive wastes from Duke Power Company's nuclear stations. The approved disposal procedures include landfarming of water treatment residues, on-site disposal (burial) of sand and feedwater heaters, and include offsite release for treatment and disposal of sanitary sewage sludge. In summary, users of radioactive materials should not exclude this approach in their quest to reduce the volume of radioactive waste. It is expected that such submittals could provide a data base for further development of generic limits for radioactive wastes

  3. Duke Activity Status Index for Cardiovascular Diseases: Validation of the Portuguese Translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho-Myrrha, Mariana A. [Ciências da Reabilitação Programa de Pós-Graduação - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG) (Brazil); Dias, Rosângela C. [Ciências da Reabilitação Programa de Pós-Graduação - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG) (Brazil); Departamento de Fisioterapia - UFMG (Brazil); Fernandes, Aline A. [Ciências da Reabilitação Programa de Pós-Graduação - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG) (Brazil); Araújo, Christiano G. [Setor de Cardiologia do Hospital das Clínicas da UFMG (Brazil); Hlatky, Mark A. [Standford University School of Medicine (United States); Pereira, Danielle G.; Britto, Raquel R., E-mail: r3britto@gmail.com [Ciências da Reabilitação Programa de Pós-Graduação - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG) (Brazil); Departamento de Fisioterapia - UFMG (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    The Duke Activity Status Index (DASI) assesses the functional capacity of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but there is no Portuguese version validated for CVD. To translate and adapt cross-culturally the DASI for the Portuguese-Brazil language, and to verify its psychometric properties in the assessment of functional capacity of patients with CVD. The DASI was translated into Portuguese, then checked by back-translation into English and evaluated by an expert committee. The pre-test version was first evaluated in 30 subjects. The psychometric properties and correlation with exercise testing was performed in a second group of 67 subjects. An exploratory factor analyses was performed in all 97 subjects to verify the construct validity of the DASI. The intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.87 and for the inter-rater reliability was 0.84. Cronbach's α for internal consistency was 0.93. The concurrent validity was verified by significant positive correlations of DASI scores with the VO{sub 2}max (r = 0.51, p < 0.001). The factor analysis yielded two factors, which explained 54% of the total variance, with factor 1 accounting for 40% of the variance. Application of the DASI required between one and three and a half minutes per patient. The Brazilian version of the DASI appears to be a valid, reliable, fast and easy to administer tool to assess functional capacity among patients with CVD.

  4. Shining the light on smart grid investments : a Duke energy case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.

    2010-01-01

    Utilities and other agencies must fully consider the costs, benefits, and strategies required for smart grid implementation. While pilot programs are useful for evaluating the features of utility smart grid applications, they do not provide an accurate account of peak period load savings for utility service areas over time. In addition, many factors are likely to influence peak hour electricity in the future, and may also influence smart grid savings projections. In this study, the market analysis and information system (MAISY) residential agent-based model was used to simulate a smart grid program at the individual customer level by smoothing individual central air conditioner and heating hourly loads over peak hours. The model was developed to reflect utility and customer-sited control technologies as well as reductions in electricity use based on price responsiveness. The model provided a more reliable simulation approach than aggregate elasticity modelling methods as it was able to estimate hourly load reductions based on real end use data. A case study of the Duke Energy Indiana service area was used to demonstrate the model. 3 figs.

  5. Westinghouse power distribution monitoring experience at Duke Power's McGuire Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobmyer, L.R.; Cash, M.T.; Kitlan, M.S.; Impink, A.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    In the evolution of the Westinghouse methodology of assuring safe core power distributions, emphasis was placed on analysis and not on continuous detailed core monitoring. Power distribution monitoring is currently achieved by periodic surveillances using the movable in-core detector system (MIDS) and by continuous observations of the two-section excore power range detectors. Control of the power distribution is regulated by limits on the indications from these systems, by limits on control rod insertion, and by operational constraints on the position indication systems. As more plants come on line and as more utilities take over the fuel design function for themselves, the desire for better core monitoring becomes evident. Also, the need and desire by the utilities to have more control over their operating margin has motivated the industry to offer and/or upgrade core monitoring systems. Westinghouse and Duke Power are participants in a joint development program to finalize the development of the core on-line surveillance monitoring and operations system (COSMOS). This final stage of development consists of prototype field trials at the McGuire Nuclear Plant. The purpose of the prototype program is to determine how well the design objectives are met and how to improve the system based on the operating experience at McGuire. Another purpose of this prototype program is to generate the necessary experience and information to develop a topical report for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to obtain a licensing basis for technical specification relaxation

  6. Fractional flow reserve in patients with intermediate values of Duke Treadmill Score and borderline coronary lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić I.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the wide usage of exercise ECG tests and Duke Treadmill Score (DTS in clinical practice, no comparison between this scoring system and Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR has yet been made, particularly in cases of angiographically verified borderline lesions. Thirty patients with single coronary lesions and angiographically assessed borderline stenosis (between 30-70% and previously calculated intermediate values of DTS between -10 to +4 were examined using FFR. Adequate specificity and sensitivity (0.769 and 0.556, respectively were in a more narrow range of -0.5 to -10. Sex and age did not have an influence on the DTS values. There was a correlation between the values of FFR and age (r=0.395, p=0.031 and between angiographic assessment of stenosis and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA (r=0.648, p<0.0001. In the study population, a decision on revascularization could not be based solely on angiographic or QCA assessment of the artery or on the values of DTS.

  7. 76 FR 40754 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station, Units...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0100; Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414; Docket Nos. 50-369 and 50-370; Docket Nos. 50-269, 50-270, And 50-287] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3; Notice...

  8. 76 FR 24538 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414; NRC-2011-0100; Docket Nos. 50-369 and 50-370; Docket Nos. 50-269, 50-270, and 50-287] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3...

  9. Environmental Assessment for Aviation Foreign Internal Defense Beddown (AvFID) at Duke Field, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    stability, and topography. The term soil, in general, refers to unconsolidated materials overlying bedrock or other parent material. Soil structure...influence on human activities. 3.3.2 Existing Conditions 3.3.2.1 Duke Field and Eglin AFB Geology The area that encompasses Eglin AFB consists of...southwestern Okaloosa County (Becker et al. 1989). This impermeable confining bed, composed of clays and clayey sands with some limestone and shell fragments

  10. No longer the sparkling new idea : anchoring university entrepreneurship programmes in academic, entrepreneurial and regional policy networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Groen, Arend J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with what makes a good university entrepreneurship programme (UEP), in particular with which features are necessary to allow UEPs to thrive within university settings. The paper begins from the paradox that UEPs are part of university’s extended development periphery, and

  11. An Exploration of Policies Governing Faculty-to-Student Consensual Sexual Relationships on University Campuses: Current Strategies and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Tara N.; Crittenden, Courtney; Garland, Tammy S.; McGuffee, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Consensual sexual relationships between students and faculty have traditionally been viewed as private matters and have been ignored by university administrators except in cases that resulted in sexual harassment claims. Due to increasing sexual harassment litigation and the liabilities associated with such relationships, universities have…

  12. Incomplete Markets and Imperfect Institutions: Some Challenges Posed by Trust for Contemporary Health Care and Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Mark; Gray, Bradford H

    2016-08-01

    As contemporary health policy promotes evidence-based practices using targeted incentives, policy makers may lose track of vital aspects of care that are difficult to measure. For more than a half century, scholars have recognized that these latter aspects play a crucial role in high-quality care and equitable health system performance but depend on the potentially frail reed of providers' trustworthiness: that is, their commitment to facets and outcomes of care not easily assessed by external parties. More recently, early experience with pay for performance in health settings suggests that enhancing financial rewards for the measurable undermines providers' commitment to the unmeasurable, degrading the trustworthiness of their practices. Reformers have looked to revised professional norms or reorganized practice arrangements to bolster the intrinsic motivations required for trustworthiness. We suggest here that these responses are likely to prove inadequate. We propose that they be complemented by a renewed policy-making commitment to nonprofit ownership among health care providers, insurers, and integrated delivery systems. We identify some of the concerns raised in the past with ownership-based policies and propose a set of responses. If these are pursued in combination, they hold the promise of a sustainable ownership-based policy reform for the United States. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  13. Postsecondary Pathways Out of Poverty: City University of New York Accelerated Study in Associate Programs and the Case for National Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Strumbos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A postsecondary education holds the promise of higher lifetime earnings and social mobility, but too many low-income students never complete their degrees. We propose a set of policy recommendations based on the highly effective Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP at the City University of New York (CUNY. CUNY ASAP is a comprehensive and integrated program that addresses multiple barriers to student success by providing students with enhanced advising as well as academic and career services, financial support, and a highly structured degree pathway. ASAP has been shown to have large positive effects on associate degree graduation rates and to cost less per graduate than regular college services. A national policy based on the ASAP model could serve as a highly effective anti-poverty strategy.

  14. Methods University Health System Can Use to Expand Medicaid Coverage to Uninsured Poor Parents with Medicaid Eligible Children: Policy Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMahon, III, Robert T

    2006-01-01

    ... and the continuing reduction in local employer-sponsored insurance. The cost for providing health care to this population has fallen to Bexar County residents through local taxes in support of the county hospital, University Health System...

  15. Chaos Theory & Higher Education: Leadership, Planning, & Policy. Higher Education: Questions about the Purpose(s) of Colleges & Universities. Volume 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutright, Marc, Ed.

    This anthology considers some ways that chaos theory might be not only a descriptive metaphor for the conditions of leadership, planning, and policy in higher education, but also a prescriptive metaphor that might be used to improve these functions and others. The essays are: (1) "Introduction: Metaphor, Chaos Theory, and This Book" (Marc…

  16. The Academic Game. A Simulation of Policy-Making in a University For 8 to 20 Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaques, David

    The Academic Game, considered a valuable exercise for academics and administrators in investigating some of the problems of decision-making and possible ways of facilitating organizational decisions, is described. The major objective of the game is to achieve on agreed promotion policy. The roles and organization structure are designed to ensure…

  17. The Final Rule: Implementing New Policies for Financial Conflict of Interest at the University of Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Andrea; McClellan, Tammie; Miner, John

    2013-01-01

    Academic institutions modified their financial conflict of interest policies (FCOI) in response to the Public Health Service's (PHS) 2011 revised regulations (42 CFR 50 Subpart F) on "Responsibility of Applicants for Promoting Objectivity in Research and Responsible Prospective Contractors" (45 CFR 94), which were to go into effect on…

  18. Research Self-Efficacy Sources and Research Motivation in a Foreign Language University Faculty in Mexico: Implications for Educational Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Cruz, María del Rosario; Perales-Escudero, Moisés Damián

    2016-01-01

    The research self-efficacy and motivation of foreign language (FL) faculty in periphery countries is under-researched, yet there is a need to understand the impact of public policies that drive such faculty to conduct research. This paper reports a qualitative case study investigating research self-efficacy and research motivation in a group of…

  19. Modeling cost-effectiveness and health gains of a "universal" versus "prioritized" hepatitis C virus treatment policy in a real-life cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondili, Loreta A; Romano, Federica; Rolli, Francesca Romana; Ruggeri, Matteo; Rosato, Stefano; Brunetto, Maurizia Rossana; Zignego, Anna Linda; Ciancio, Alessia; Di Leo, Alfredo; Raimondo, Giovanni; Ferrari, Carlo; Taliani, Gloria; Borgia, Guglielmo; Santantonio, Teresa Antonia; Blanc, Pierluigi; Gaeta, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Chessa, Luchino; Erne, Elke Maria; Villa, Erica; Ieluzzi, Donatella; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Andreone, Pietro; Vinci, Maria; Coppola, Carmine; Chemello, Liliana; Madonia, Salvatore; Verucchi, Gabriella; Persico, Marcello; Zuin, Massimo; Puoti, Massimo; Alberti, Alfredo; Nardone, Gerardo; Massari, Marco; Montalto, Giuseppe; Foti, Giuseppe; Rumi, Maria Grazia; Quaranta, Maria Giovanna; Cicchetti, Americo; Craxì, Antonio; Vella, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of two alternative direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment policies in a real-life cohort of hepatitis C virus-infected patients: policy 1, "universal," treat all patients, regardless of fibrosis stage; policy 2, treat only "prioritized" patients, delay treatment of the remaining patients until reaching stage F3. A liver disease progression Markov model, which used a lifetime horizon and health care system perspective, was applied to the PITER cohort (representative of Italian hepatitis C virus-infected patients in care). Specifically, 8,125 patients naive to DAA treatment, without clinical, sociodemographic, or insurance restrictions, were used to evaluate the policies' cost-effectiveness. The patients' age and fibrosis stage, assumed DAA treatment cost of €15,000/patient, and the Italian liver disease costs were used to evaluate quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) of policy 1 versus policy 2. To generalize the results, a European scenario analysis was performed, resampling the study population, using the mean European country-specific health states costs and mean treatment cost of €30,000. For the Italian base-case analysis, the cost-effective ICER obtained using policy 1 was €8,775/QALY. ICERs remained cost-effective in 94%-97% of the 10,000 probabilistic simulations. For the European treatment scenario the ICER obtained using policy 1 was €19,541.75/QALY. ICER was sensitive to variations in DAA costs, in the utility value of patients in fibrosis stages F0-F3 post-sustained virological response, and in the transition probabilities from F0 to F3. The ICERs decrease with decreasing DAA prices, becoming cost-saving for the base price (€15,000) discounts of at least 75% applied in patients with F0-F2 fibrosis. Extending hepatitis C virus treatment to patients in any fibrosis stage improves health outcomes and is cost-effective; cost-effectiveness significantly increases

  20. Fame and Infamy of Duke of Braganza in the Spanish Golden Age Theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Domínguez Matito

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available «Portuguese matter» is a subject that inspired a large amount of plays of the Spanish Golden Age. This is especially the case in the period of the dual monarchy, in which the outstanding episodes in the history of Portugal and their main protagonists are dealt, in general, from a Castilian-centered perspective. This article specifically focuses on the events involving the dukes of Braganza. These events were of great importance not only for the history of Portugal but for the Austrian monarchy. They also served as the source of a number of comedies of the theatre in the Golden Age. Several of Lope de Vega’s plays are analyzed including El duque de Viseo, El más galán portugués, with the intention of contrasting them with the Granada playwright Cubillo de Aragón’s La tragedia del duque de Berganza. The analysis of the dramatizations evidences the different attitudes of both playwrights towards the house of Braganza. It also evidences the different assessment of Portuguese nobility in relation to the historical circumstances that they experienced during the reign of John II of Portugal. In the case of Lope de Vega, during the same time period as the dual monarchy, the plays are written in order to ennoble his image and, in the case of Cubillo, to validate his reputation as a traitor, following the uprise against the monarchy of Phillip IV, which lead to the secession of Portugal.

  1. LI, Fabiana. Unearthing conflict: corporate mining, activism, and expertise in Peru. Durham: Duke University Press, 2015. 265 p.

    OpenAIRE

    Peñafiel, Adriana Paola Paredes

    2015-01-01

    Este livro é o produto da pesquisa de mestrado e doutorado da antropóloga Fabiana Li em dois lugares emblemáticos na questão de conflitos mineiros no Peru: La Oroya no centro andino e Cajamarca ao norte dos Andes peruanos. O primeiro é um complexo metalúrgico que funciona desde os inícios do século XX e que a partir de 1997 está sob o comando da empresa americana Doe Run. O segundo é a cidade de Cajamarca, onde está localizada a maior jazida de ouro da América do Sul, Yanacocha, operada pela ...

  2. Policy Choices for Progressive Realization of Universal Health Coverage Comment on "Ethical Perspective: Five Unacceptable Trade-offs on the Path to Universal Health Coverage".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Patcharanarumol, Walaiporn; Panichkriangkrai, Warisa; Sommanustweechai, Angkana

    2016-07-31

    In responses to Norheim's editorial, this commentary offers reflections from Thailand, how the five unacceptable trade-offs were applied to the universal health coverage (UHC) reforms between 1975 and 2002 when the whole 64 million people were covered by one of the three public health insurance systems. This commentary aims to generate global discussions on how best UHC can be gradually achieved. Not only the proposed five discrete trade-offs within each dimension, there are also trade-offs between the three dimensions of UHC such as population coverage, service coverage and cost coverage. Findings from Thai UHC show that equity is applied for the population coverage extension, when the low income households and the informal sector were the priority population groups for coverage extension by different prepayment schemes in 1975 and 1984, respectively. With an exception of public sector employees who were historically covered as part of fringe benefits were covered well before the poor. The private sector employees were covered last in 1990. Historically, Thailand applied a comprehensive benefit package where a few items are excluded using the negative list; until there was improved capacities on technology assessment that cost-effectiveness are used for the inclusion of new interventions into the benefit package. Not only cost-effectiveness, but long term budget impact, equity and ethical considerations are taken into account. Cost coverage is mostly determined by the fiscal capacities. Close ended budget with mix of provider payment methods are used as a tool for trade-off service coverage and financial risk protection. Introducing copayment in the context of fee-for-service can be harmful to beneficiaries due to supplier induced demands, inefficiency and unpredictable out of pocket payment by households. UHC achieves favorable outcomes as it was implemented when there was a full geographical coverage of primary healthcare coverage in all districts and sub

  3. Neoliberal Policy in the Higher Education Sector in Bangladesh: Autonomy of Public Universities and the Role of the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Ariful Haq

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1990s, enormous changes have been made in the higher education sector in Bangladesh. The government promulgated the Private University Act in 1992, and formulated a 20-year Strategic Plan for Higher Education: 2006-2026 (SPHE). A critical review shows that the objective of the plan is to connect education with market-driven economic…

  4. Ad-Hoc Numbers Forming Provision and Policy: Round and Round of Universal Access in an Australian Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millei, Zsuzsa; Gallagher, Jannelle

    2017-01-01

    Australian early childhood education still labours with the achievement of universal access and the production of comprehensive and consistent data to underpin a national evidence base. In this article, we attend to the processes led by numbers whereby new practices of quantification, rationalization and reporting are introduced and mastered in a…

  5. Benefit Incidence Analysis of Government Spending on Public-Private Partnership Schooling under Universal Secondary Education Policy in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokadala, J.; Barungi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The study establishes whether government spending on private universal secondary education (USE) schools is equitable across quintiles disaggregated by gender and by region in Uganda. The study employs benefit incidence analysis tool on the Uganda National Panel Survey (UNPS 2009/10) data to establish the welfare impact of public subsidy on…

  6. Access to antiretroviral treatment, issues of well-being and public health governance in Chad: what justifies the limited success of the universal access policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azétsop, Jacquineau; Diop, Blondin A

    2013-08-01

    Universal access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Chad was officially declared in December 2006. This presidential initiative was and is still funded 100% by the country's budget and external donors' financial support. Many factors have triggered the spread of AIDS. Some of these factors include the existence of norms and beliefs that create or increase exposure, the low-level education that precludes access to health information, social unrest, and population migration to areas of high economic opportunities and gender-based discrimination. Social forces that influence the distribution of dimensions of well-being and shape risks for infection also determine the persistence of access barriers to ART. The universal access policy is quite revolutionary but should be informed by the systemic barriers to access so as to promote equity. It is not enough to distribute ARVs and provide health services when health systems are poorly organized and managed. Comprehensive access to ART raises many organizational, ethical and policy problems that need to be solved to achieve equity in access. This paper argues that the persistence of access barriers is due to weak health systems and a poor public health leadership. AIDS has challenged health systems in a manner that is essentially different from other health problems.

  7. A difficult balancing act: policy actors' perspectives on using economic evaluation to inform health-care coverage decisions under the Universal Health Insurance Coverage scheme in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerawattananon, Yot; Russell, Steve

    2008-03-01

    In Thailand, policymakers have come under increasing pressure to use economic evaluation to inform health-care resource allocation decisions, especially after the introduction of the Universal Health Insurance Coverage (UC) scheme. This article presents qualitative findings from research that assessed a range of policymakers' perspectives on the acceptability of using economic evaluation for the development of health-care benefit packages in Thailand. The policy analysis examined their opinions about existing decision-making processes for including health interventions in the UC benefit package, their understanding of health economic evaluation, and their attitudes, acceptance, and values relating to the use of the method. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 36 policy actors who play a major role or have some input into health resource allocation decisions within the Thai health-care system. These included 14 senior policymakers at the national level, 5 hospital directors, 10 health professionals, and 7 academics. Policy actors thought that economic evaluation information was relevant for decision-making because of the increasing need for rationing and more transparent criteria for making UC coverage decisions. Nevertheless, they raised several difficulties with using economic evaluation that would pose barriers to its introduction, including distrust in the method, conflicting philosophical positions and priorities compared to that of "health maximization," organizational allegiances, existing decision-making procedures that would be hard to change, and concerns about political pressure and acceptability.

  8. Health-related quality of life in French adolescents and adults: norms for the DUKE Health Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin Jean-François

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continual monitoring of population health-related quality of life (HRQoL with validated instruments helps public health agencies assess, protect, and promote population health. This study aimed to determine norms for the French adolescent and adult general population for the Duke Health Profile (DUKE questionnaire in a large representative community sample. Methods We randomly selected 17,733 French people aged 12 to 75 years old in 2 steps, by households and individuals, from the National Health Barometer 2005, a periodic population study by the French National Institute for Prevention and Health Education. Quality of life and other data were collected by computer-assisted telephone interview. Results Normative data for the French population were analyzed by age, gender and self-reported chronic disease. Globally, function scores (best HRQoL=100 for physical, mental, social, and general health, as well as perceived health and self-esteem, were 72.3 (SEM 0.2, 74.6 (0.2, 66.8 (0.1, 71.3 (0.1, 71.3 (0.3, 76.5 (0.1, respectively. Dysfunction scores (worst HRQoL=100 for anxiety, depression, pain and disability domains were 30.9 (0.1, 27.6 (0.2, 34.3 (0.3, 3.1 (0.1, respectively. Conclusion The French norms for adolescents and adults for the DUKE could be used as a reference for other studies assessing HRQoL, for specific illnesses, in France and for international comparisons.

  9. Evaluation of effective and organ dose using PCXMC program in Duke phantom and added filter for computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byung Sam; Park, Min Joo; Kim, Seung Chul

    2014-01-01

    By using a Chest Phantom(DUKE Phantom) focusing on dose reduction of diagnostic radiation field with the most use of artificial radiation, and attempt to reduce radiation dose studies technical radiation. Publisher of the main user of the X-ray Radiological technologists, Examine the effect of reducing the radiation dose to apply additional filtering of the X-ray generator. In order to understand the organ dose and effective dose by using the PC-Based Monte Carlo Program(PCXMC) Program, the patient receives, was carried out this research. In this experiment, by applying a complex filter using a copper and Al(aluminum,13) and filtered single of using only aluminum with the condition set, and measures the number of the disk of copper indicated by DUKE Phantom. The combination of the composite filtration and filtration of a single number of the disk of the copper is the same, with the PCXMC 2.0. Program looking combination of additional filtration fewest absorbed dose was calculated effective dose and organ dose. Although depends on the use mAs, The 80 kVp AP projection conditions, it is possible to reduce the effective amount of about 84 % from about 30 % to a maximum at least. The 120 kVp PA projection conditions, it is possible to reduce the effective amount of about 71 % from about 41 % to a maximum of at least. The organ dose, dose reduction rate was different in each organ, but it showed a decrease of dose rate of 30 % to up 100 % at least. Additional filtration was used on the imaging conditions throughout the study. There was no change in terms of video quality at low doses. It was found that using the DUKE Phantom and PCXMC 2.0 Program were suitable to calculate the effect of reducing the effective dose and organ dose

  10. Policy Choices for Progressive Realization of Universal Health Coverage; Comment on “Ethical Perspective: Five Unacceptable Trade-offs on the Path to Universal Health Coverage”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Tangcharoensathien

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In responses to Norheim’s editorial, this commentary offers reflections from Thailand, how the five unacceptable trade-offs were applied to the universal health coverage (UHC reforms between 1975 and 2002 when the whole 64 million people were covered by one of the three public health insurance systems. This commentary aims to generate global discussions on how best UHC can be gradually achieved. Not only the proposed five discrete tradeoffs within each dimension, there are also trade-offs between the three dimensions of UHC such as population coverage, service coverage and cost coverage. Findings from Thai UHC show that equity is applied for the population coverage extension, when the low income households and the informal sector were the priority population groups for coverage extension by different prepayment schemes in 1975 and 1984, respectively. With an exception of public sector employees who were historically covered as part of fringe benefits were covered well before the poor. The private sector employees were covered last in 1990. Historically, Thailand applied a comprehensive benefit package where a few items are excluded using the negative list; until there was improved capacities on technology assessment that cost-effectiveness are used for the inclusion of new interventions into the benefit package. Not only costeffectiveness, but long term budget impact, equity and ethical considerations are taken into account. Cost coverage is mostly determined by the fiscal capacities. Close ended budget with mix of provider payment methods are used as a tool for trade-off service coverage and financial risk protection. Introducing copayment in the context of feefor-service can be harmful to beneficiaries due to supplier induced demands, inefficiency and unpredictable out of pocket payment by households. UHC achieves favorable outcomes as it was implemented when there was a full geographical coverage of primary healthcare coverage in all

  11. Duke FACE -- Forest-Atmosphere Carbon Transfer and Storage (FACTS I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oren, Ram [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-02-08

    The Duke FACE experiment increases atmospheric [CO2] to a height of 25 m in four 30-m diameter plots, each containing ~100 canopy trees and many sub-canopy individuals. The experiment was initiated in 1994 with CO2 fumigation of the prototype plot, and reached full CO2-fumigation capacity in 1996 when three additional FACE plots came on line. All elevated plots enriched the atmospheric CO2 concentration by 200 ppmv relative to paired, ambient-CO2 plots. Formalizing the analysis of CO2 x N interactions, in March of 2005 each of the six FACE plots established in 1996 was trenched in half, and one half plot fertilized with nitrogen (N) at a rate of 11 g m-2 yr-1, following the approach established in 1998 in the prototype and its reference plot. The δ 13C of the fumigated plots’ atmosphere was -42.6‰, and while the 15N of the fertilizer did not affect the δ 15N of tissues directly it greatly reduced the effect of a 15N tracer study on tissue δ 15N. The CO2 enrichment was completed in early November, 2010. Prior to termination of fumigation, 1-8 branches from 4-5 Pinus taeda individuals in each half plot were harvested, as well as most Juniperus occidentalis and broadleaved individuals <2 cm in diameter (1.4 m aboveground), including vine and herbaceous individuals. Following the termination, all individuals <8 cm in diameter, followed by all remaining individuals were harvested in half of each plot (a quarter in each CO2 X N treatment). In all, 189 m3 of dry material and 826 m3 of wet material, or a total of 1014 m3 of material is stored in various suited settings. The project quantified the effect of CO2 X N on carbon uptake, allocation to various pools, accumulation of carbon in these pools, the release of carbon to the atmosphere, and factors

  12. Spatial analysis of Carbon-14 dynamics in a wetland ecosystem (Duke Swamp, Chalk River Laboratories, Canada)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yankovich, T.L.; King-Sharp, K.J.; Carr, J.; Robertson, E.; Killey, R.W.D.; Beresford, N.A.; Wood, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    A detailed survey was conducted to quantify the spatial distribution of 14 C in Sphagnum moss and underlying soil collected in Duke Swamp. This wetland environment receives 14 C via groundwater pathways from a historic radioactive Waste Management Area (WMA) on Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL)'s Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site. Trends in 14 C specific activities were evaluated with distance from the sampling location with the maximum 14 C specific activity (DSS-35), which was situated adjacent to the WMA and close to an area of groundwater discharge. Based on a spatial evaluation of the data, an east-to-west 14 C gradient was found, due to the influence of the WMA on 14 C specific activities in the swamp. In addition, it was possible to identify two groups of sites, each showing significant exponential declines with distance from the groundwater source area. One of the groups showed relatively more elevated 14 C specific activities at a given distance from source, likely due to their proximity to the WMA, the location of the sub-surface plume originating from the WMA, the presence of marsh and swamp habitat types, which facilitated 14 C transport to the atmosphere, and possibly, 14 C air dispersion patterns along the eastern edge of the swamp. The other group, which had lower 14 C specific activities at a given distance from the groundwater source area, included locations that were more distant from the WMA and the sub-surface plume, and contained fen habitat, which is known to act as barrier to groundwater flow. The findings suggest that proximity to source, groundwater flow patterns and habitat physical characteristics can play an important role in the dynamics of 14 C being carried by discharging groundwater into terrestrial and wetland environments. - Highlights: • Groundwater represents an important source of volatile radionuclides to wetlands. • Habitat type influenced 14 C transport from sub-surface to surface environments. • C-14 specific

  13. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 20. Installation of Demonstration Units at the Indonesian Universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. Each of the five Indonesian partner universities has managed to choose, purchase and install demonstration equipment within the timeline of the Casindo project. This equipment will be presented to students, visitors, lecturers, government personnel and staff of other organizations. Next to this, researchers made research proposals in which use of the demonstration equipment is presented according to the research agenda of the university. The procedure of purchasing and installing equipment has been delayed in several ways, but all universities have managed to finalise the procedure and install the equipment. First research results have been presented and more results will follow in the next months.

  14. [Comparison of biomedical engineering education between Southeast University (China) and American universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Huang Ningping; Sun Xiao; Gu Ning

    2011-06-01

    Taking Duke University as an example, this article makes a comparison between the major of biomedical engineering in the Southeast University and that in American universities in term of subject direction, faculty, teaching principle and status of publishing academic papers. Through the comparison and analysis, the problems we face were explored. From the comparison and summary the future improvements in four aspects, such as strengthening the interdisciplinary among different majors, etc. so as to provide an inspiration on the future perspectives of research and teaching in biomedical engineering in China.

  15. Why Advocacy and Policy Matter: Promoting Research and Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen V. Sigal, PhD, is Chairperson and Founder of Friends of Cancer Research (Friends), a think tank and advocacy organization based in Washington, DC. Friends drives collaboration among partners from every healthcare sector to power advances in science, policy and regulation that speed life-saving treatments to patients. During the past 20 years, Friends has been instrumental in the creation and implementation of policies ensuring patients receive the best treatments in the fastest and safest way possible. Dr. Sigal is Chair of the inaugural board of directors of the Reagan-Udall Foundation, a partnership designed to modernize medical product development, accelerate innovation and enhance product safety in collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. She serves on the Board of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, where she chairs its Public Private Partnerships Committee. In 2001, Dr. Sigal was appointed to a six-year term on the Board of Governors of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) as a representative of patients and health consumers. Additionally, in 2016 Dr. Sigal was named to Vice President Biden’s Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel, to the Parker Institute for Immunotherapy Advisory Group and joined the inaugural board of advisors for the George Washington University’s Milken Institute of Public Health. She also holds leadership positions with a broad range of cancer advocacy, public policy organizations and academic health centers including: MD Anderson Cancer Center External Advisory Board, the Duke University Cancer Center Board of Overseers, and The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center Advisory Council.

  16. Política de medicamentos: da universalidade de direitos aos limites da operacionalidade Drugs policy: from the universality of rights to the limits of operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Aparecida Baumgratz de Paula

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo discute os motivos que levaram à adoção de uma política de medicamentos no Brasil. Para tanto busca, através de uma revisão bibliográfica, fazer um resgate histórico dos múltiplos fatores que interferiram na construção dessa política. Além de traçar a trajetória deste processo, o artigo procura assinalar algumas de suas características no Brasil contemporâneo. Enfatiza-se, aqui, a política de saúde como uma política universalista e igualitária, reclamando a responsabilidade do Estado na efetivação do direito à saúde preconizado na Constituição de 1988. Nesse contexto, apontam-se as razões para que a política de medicamentos seja parte integrante da política de saúde, com o objetivo de se obter um acesso mais próximo do integral, entendendo que o campo da saúde é também um espaço onde a cidadania deva ser buscada de modo pleno.This article discusses the reasons that led to the adoption of a drug policy in Brazil. For this, through a literature review, it aims to make a historic rescue of multiple factors that interfered in the construction of this policy. Besides showing the trajectory of this process, it aims to identify its characteristics in the contemporary Brazil. The article also emphasizes the health policy as universal and egalitarian, claiming the responsibility of the State in order to accomplish the right to health advocated in the 1988 Constitution. In this context, this paper outlines the reasons why the policy of medicines is an integral part of health policy, aiming to get a more full access for the whole population. Therefore, it is intended to assist the understanding that health care is also an area where citizenship should be sought fully.

  17. The Duke, the Soldier of Fortune, and a Rosicrucian Legacy: Exploring the Roles of Manuscripts in Early-Modern Alchemy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Mike A

    2018-05-19

    By the time it was published in 1705, the Speculum Sapientiae claimed to have had a long history going back to 1672. However, the fact that exaggerated stories were commonplace in alchemical literature leads us to question its credibility. This paper explores the secret lives of this alchemical text prior to its print publication to clarify the roles of manuscripts in early-modern alchemy. Specifically, I argue that there were three aspects that could distinguish manuscript from print: provenance, materiality, and exclusivity. These can be seen at work in the fate of Johann Heinrich Vierordt, an itinerant alchemist and cavalry captain whose career is inextricably linked to the scribal dissemination of the Speculum Sapientiae. In addition to manuscript copies of that text at libraries across Europe, a significant cache of correspondence preserved in Gotha documents Vierordt's dealings with Duke Friedrich I of Saxe-Gotha. The verisimilitudinous provenance of Vierordt's alchemical secrets and tincture played a crucial role in allowing him to gain Friedrich's trust. Yet it was only after Vierordt presented him with a precious parchment manuscript of the Speculum Sapientiae that he truly succeeded in gaining the duke's patronage. Subsequently, reports of multiple conflicting copies surfacing in Amsterdam sealed Vierordt's fall from favour.

  18. Factors affecting catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment from medical expenses in China: policy implications of universal health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Wu, Qunhong; Xu, Ling; Legge, David; Hao, Yanhua; Gao, Lijun; Ning, Ning; Wan, Gang

    2012-09-01

    To assess the degree to which the Chinese people are protected from catastrophic household expenditure and impoverishment from medical expenses and to explore the health system and structural factors influencing the first of these outcomes. Data were derived from the Fourth National Health Service Survey. An analysis of catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment from medical expenses was undertaken with a sample of 55 556 households of different characteristics and located in rural and urban settings in different parts of the country. Logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of catastrophic health expenditure. The rate of catastrophic health expenditure was 13.0%; that of impoverishment was 7.5%. Rates of catastrophic health expenditure were higher among households having members who were hospitalized, elderly, or chronically ill, as well as in households in rural or poorer regions. A combination of adverse factors increased the risk of catastrophic health expenditure. Families enrolled in the urban employee or resident insurance schemes had lower rates of catastrophic health expenditure than those enrolled in the new rural corporative scheme. The need for and use of health care, demographics, type of benefit package and type of provider payment method were the determinants of catastrophic health expenditure. Although China has greatly expanded health insurance coverage, financial protection remains insufficient. Policy-makers should focus on designing improved insurance plans by expanding the benefit package, redesigning cost sharing arrangements and provider payment methods and developing more effective expenditure control strategies.

  19. Comparison of Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients With Versus Without Diabetes Mellitus and With Versus Without Angina Pectoris (from the Duke Databank for Cardiovascular Disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Adam; Broderick, Samuel; Chiswell, Karen; Shaw, Linda; Devore, Adam; Fiuzat, Mona; O'Connor, Christopher; Felker, Gary Michael; Velazquez, Eric; Mentz, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Angina pectoris (AP) has different prognostic implications in various populations. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) may experience neuropathy such that AP may not be perceived in the setting of coronary artery disease (CAD). The prognostic utility of AP in DM patients with CAD is not well known. We analyzed patients with CAD who underwent coronary angiography at Duke University from 2002 to 2011 and compared patients with and without AP within the previous 6 weeks stratified by DM status. We used multivariable Cox regression to assess the association between AP and the outcomes of cardiovascular (CV) hospitalization/revascularization, all-cause mortality/myocardial infarction/revascularization, and all-cause mortality. Of 17,211 patients with CAD, 5,284 (31%) had DM and AP was present in 69% of DM and 67% of non-DM. After risk adjustment, the risk of CV hospitalization/revascularization and all-cause mortality/myocardial infarction/revascularization in patients with and without AP was similar regardless of DM status (all p ≥0.05). In patients with or without DM, AP was associated with lower all-cause mortality compared with no AP (adjusted hazard ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 0.97, p = 0.005 for DM patients). The relation between AP status and clinical outcomes was not dependent on DM status (all interaction p >0.10). In conclusion, in patients with CAD, AP was associated with similar risk for CV hospitalization and revascularization and lower all-cause mortality compared with patients without AP regardless of DM status. Future studies are needed to assess whether these findings are related to increased severity of disease in those without AP or whether AP leads to differential management that improves survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Duke of Wellington and the Supply System During the Peninsula War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    three main supply depots, of some 600 carts upon an improved pattern , which were to be entrusted to drivers and conductors employed directly by the...Russell F. The Age of Banles. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1991. Young, G. M. Victorian England. London: Oxford University Press

  1. Policy-Relevant Context of Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking among University Students in Six Countries Across the Eastern Mediterranean Region: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Ramzi G; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen; Hamadeh, Randah; Thomas, Justin; Mostafa, Aya; Yusufali, Afzalhussein; Kheirallah, Khalid A; Macauda, Mark M; Theis, Ryan P; Kadi, Lama El; Johnson, Evan J; Darawad, Muhammad W; Nakkash, Rima

    2017-01-01

    Background: Waterpipe tobacco smoking rates in the Eastern Mediterranean region are some of the highest worldwide, especially among young people. This study aimed to improve our knowledge of the policy-relevant context of waterpipe smoking among six countries in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted in Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, and the United Arab Emirates. Participants were young adult university students (18-29 years) from both genders who had ever smoked the waterpipe, recruited from universities participating in this study. Directed content analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. Results: A total of 53 in-depth interviews were conducted in Arabic in 2016. Findings were organized around 5 themes: waterpipe product characteristics; patterns of waterpipe smoking; the waterpipe café setting; perceived health consequences; and health warning labels. Waterpipe smoking was commonly perceived as a safe alternative to cigarettes. Waterpipe tobacco was reported to be widely accessible and affordable to young participants. There is a lack of knowledge among waterpipe smokers about the associated health effects. Warning labels are effective at communicating health risks associated with waterpipe smoking. Conclusions: Regulatory frameworks for waterpipe tobacco smoking should be developed and enforced, including waterpipe-specific health warning labels that elucidate the harmful effects of waterpipe smoking. PMID:28952296

  2. Corporate coalitions and policy making in the European Union: how and why British American Tobacco promoted "Better Regulation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine Elizabeth; Fooks, Gary; Gilmore, Anna B; Collin, Jeff; Weishaar, Heide

    2015-04-01

    Over the past fifteen years, an interconnected set of regulatory reforms, known as Better Regulation, has been adopted across Europe, marking a significant shift in the way that European Union policies are developed. There has been little exploration of the origins of these reforms, which include mandatory ex ante impact assessment. Drawing on documentary and interview data, this article discusses how and why large corporations, notably British American Tobacco (BAT), worked to influence and promote these reforms. Our analysis highlights (1) how policy entrepreneurs with sufficient resources (such as large corporations) can shape the membership and direction of advocacy coalitions; (2) the extent to which "think tanks" may be prepared to lobby on behalf of commercial clients; and (3) why regulated industries (including tobacco) may favor the use of "evidence tools," such as impact assessments, in policy making. We argue that a key aspect of BAT's ability to shape regulatory reform involved the deliberate construction of a vaguely defined idea that could be strategically adapted to appeal to diverse constituencies. We discuss the theoretical implications of this finding for the Advocacy Coalition Framework, as well as the practical implications of the findings for efforts to promote transparency and public health in the European Union. Copyright © 2015 by Duke University Press.

  3. Enhanced, rapid occlusion of carotid and vertebral arteries using the AMPLATZER Vascular Plug II device: the Duke Cerebrovascular Center experience in 8 patients with 22 AMPLATZER Vascular Plug II devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihlon, Frank; Agrawal, Abishek; Nimjee, Shahid M; Ferrell, Andrew; Zomorodi, Ali R; Smith, Tony P; Britz, Gavin W

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic embolization of the common carotid artery (CCA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and vertebral artery (VA) is necessary in the treatment of a subset of chronic arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), hemorrhages, highly vascularized neoplasms before resection, and giant aneurysms. There are currently no reports of the use of the AMPLATZER Vascular Plug II (AVP II) device to occlude the CCA, ICA, or VA. The objective of this article is to present the Duke Cerebrovascular Center experience using the AVP II device in neurointerventional applications. This case series is a retrospective review of all of the cases at Duke University Hospital in which an AVP II device was used in the CCA, ICA, or VA up to September 2012. The AVP II device was often used in conjunction with embolization coils or as multiple AVP II devices deployed in tandem. During 2010-2012, 8 cases meeting criteria were performed. These included 2 chronic VA to internal jugular AVFs, 1 hemorrhagic CCA to internal jugular AVF secondary to invasive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, 1 ICA hemorrhage secondary to invasive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, 1 ICA hemorrhage secondary to trauma, 1 ruptured ICA aneurysm, 1 giant petrous ICA aneurysm, and 1 case of cervical vertebral sarcoma requiring preoperative VA embolization. Successful occlusion of the target vessel was achieved in all 8 cases. There was 1 major complication that consisted of a watershed distribution cerebral infarct; however, this was related to emergent occlusion of the ICA in the setting of intracranial hemorrhage and was not a problem intrinsic to the AVP II device. The AVP II device is relatively large, self-expanding vascular occlusion device that safely allows enhanced, rapid take-down of the CCA, ICA, and VA with low risk of distal migration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Barriers to universal health coverage in Republic of Moldova: a policy analysis of formal and informal out-of-pocket payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vian, Taryn; Feeley, Frank G; Domente, Silviu; Negruta, Ala; Matei, Andrei; Habicht, Jarno

    2015-08-11

    Universal Health Coverage seeks to assure that everyone can obtain the health services they need without financial hardship. Countries which rely heavily on out-of-pocket (OOP) payments, including informal payments (IP), to finance total health expenditures are not likely to achieve universal coverage. The Republic of Moldova is committed to promoting universal coverage, reducing inequities, and expanding financial protection. To achieve these goals, the country must reduce the proportion of total health expenditures paid by households. This study documents the extent of OOP payments and IP in Moldova, analyses trends over time, and identifies factors which may be driving these payments. The study includes analysis of household budget survey data and previous research and policy documents. The team also conducted a review of administrative law intended to control OOP payments and IPs. Focus groups, interviews, and a policy dialogue with key stakeholders were held to validate and discuss findings. OOP payments account for 45% of total health expenditures. Sixteen percent of outpatients and 30% of inpatients reporting that they made OOP payments when seeking care at a health facility in 2012, more than two-thirds of whom also reported paying for medicines at a pharmacy. Among those who paid anything, 36% of outpatients and 82% of inpatients reported paying informally, with the proportion increasing over time for inpatient care. Although many patients consider these payments to be gifts, around one-third of IPs appear to be forced, posing a threat to health care access. Patients perceive that payments are driven by the limited list of reimbursable medicines, a desire to receive better treatment, and fear or extortion. Providers suggested irrational prescribing and ordering of tests as drivers. Providers may believe that IPs are gifts and do not cause harm for patients and the health system in general. Efforts to expand financial protection should focus on reducing

  5. A Corporate Veto on Health Policy? Global Constitutionalism and Investor-State Dispute Settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Benjamin; Holden, Chris

    2016-10-01

    The importance of trade and investment agreements for health is now widely acknowledged in the literature, with much attention now focused on the impact of investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanisms. However, much of the analysis of such agreements in the health field remains largely descriptive. We theorize the implications of ISDS mechanisms for health policy by integrating the concept of global constitutionalism with veto point theory. It is argued that attempts to constitutionalize investment law, through a proliferation of International Investment Agreements (IIAs), has created a series of new veto points at which corporations may seek to block new policies aimed at protecting or enhancing public health. The multiplicity of new veto points in this global "spaghetti bowl" of IIAs creates opportunities for corporations to venue shop; that is, to exploit the agreements, and associated veto points, through which they are most likely to succeed in blocking or deterring new regulation. These concepts are illustrated with reference to two case studies of investor-state disputes involving a transnational tobacco company, but the implications of the analysis are of equal relevance for a range of other industries and health issues. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  6. On 23 November, the Duke of York visited CERN and, in his capacity as the UK's Special Representative for International Trade and Investment, inaugurated the UK@CERN Exhibition.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    Pictures 01 & 02 : The Duke of York chats before inaugurating the UK@CERN exhibition. From left to right: Robert Aymar, CERN's Director General, the Duke of York, and leading UK scientists at CERN: Jim Virdee, CMS deputy spokeman; theorist John Ellis ; and Steve Myers, head of the AB Department.

  7. On 23 November, the Duke of York visited CERN and, in his capacity as the UK's Special Representative for International Trade and Investment, inaugurated the UK@CERN Exhibition.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    In his inaugural speech, the Duke emphasized that business between companies and CERN "is a two-way information flow with mutual benefits." The companies make sales but also benefit from technologies that CERN transfers to them. CERN benefits from the exchange, the Duke said, addressing CERN's scientists, because it "frees your time for what you do best: science."

  8. Street-level workers' inadequate knowledge and application of exemption policies in Burkina Faso jeopardize the achievement of universal health coverage: evidence from a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridde, Valéry; Leppert, Gerald; Hien, Hervé; Robyn, Paul Jacob; De Allegri, Manuela

    2018-01-08

    Street-level workers play a key role in public health policies in Africa, as they are often the ones to ensure their implementation. In Burkina Faso, the State formulated two different user-fee exemption policies for indigents, one for deliveries (2007), and one for primary healthcare (2009). The objective of this study was to measure and understand the determinants of street-level workers' knowledge and application of these exemption measures. We used cross-sectional data collected between October 2013 and March 2014. The survey targeted 1521 health workers distributed in 498 first-line centres, 18 district hospitals, 5 regional hospitals, and 11 private or other facilities across 24 districts. We used four different random effects models to identify factors associated with knowledge and application of each of the above-mentioned exemption policies. Only 9.2% of workers surveyed knew of the directive exempting the worst-off, and only 5% implemented it. Knowledge and application of the delivery exemption were higher, with 27% of all health workers being aware of the delivery exemption directive and 24.2% applying it. Mobile health workers were found to be consistently more likely to apply both exemptions. Health workers who were facility heads were significantly more likely to know about the indigent exemption for primary health care and to apply it. Health workers in districts with higher proportions of very poor people were significantly more likely to know about and apply the delivery exemption. Nearly 60% of respondents indicated either 5% or 10% as the percentage of people they would deem adequate to target for exemption. This quantitative study confirmed earlier qualitative results on the importance of training and informing health workers and monitoring the measures targeting equity, to ensure compliance with government directives. The local context (e.g., hierarchy, health system, interventions) and the ideas that street-level workers have about the policy

  9. Imparting carrier status results detected by universal newborn screening for sickle cell and cystic fibrosis in England: a qualitative study of current practice and policy challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulph Fiona

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Universal newborn screening for early detection of children affected by sickle cell disorders and cystic fibrosis is currently being implemented across England. Parents of infants identified as carriers of these disorders must also be informed of their baby's result. However there is a lack of evidence for most effective practice internationally when doing so. This study describes current or proposed models for imparting this information in practice and explores associated challenges for policy. Methods Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with Child Health Coordinators from all English Health Regions. Results Diverse methods for imparting carrier results, both within and between regions, and within and between conditions, were being implemented or planned. Models ranged from result by letter to in-person communication during a home visit. Non-specialists were considered the best placed professionals to give results and a similar approach for both conditions was emphasised. While national guidance has influenced choice of models, other factors contributed such as existing service structures and lack of funding. Challenges included uncertainty about guidance specifying face to face notification; how best to balance allaying parental anxiety by using familiar non-specialist health professionals with concerns about practitioner competence; and extent of information parents should be given. Inadequate consideration of resource and service workload was seen as the main policy obstacle. Clarification of existing guidance; more specific protocols to ensure consistent countrywide practice; integration of the two programmes; and 'normalising' carrier status were suggested as improvements. Conclusion Differing models for communicating carrier results raise concerns about equity and clinical governance. However, this variation provides opportunity for evaluation. Timely and more detailed guidance on protocols with

  10. Characteristics and determinants of knowledge transfer policies at universities and public institutions in medical research--protocol for a systematic review of the qualitative research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Rosa; Müller, Olaf; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan

    2015-08-19

    Universities, public institutions, and the transfer of knowledge to the private sector play a major role in the development of medical technologies. The decisions of universities and public institutions regarding the transfer of knowledge impact the accessibility of the final product, making it easier or more difficult for consumers to access these products. In the case of medical research, these products are pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, or medical procedures. The ethical dimension of access to these potentially lifesaving products is apparent and distinguishes the transfer of medical knowledge from the transfer of knowledge in other areas. While the general field of technology transfer from academic and public to private actors is attracting an increasing amount of scholarly attention, the specifications of knowledge transfer in the medical field are not as well explored. This review seeks to provide a systematic overview and analysis of the qualitative literature on the characteristics and determinants of knowledge transfer in medical research and development. The review systematically searches the literature for qualitative studies that focus on knowledge transfer characteristics and determinants at medical academic and public research institutions. It aims at identifying and analyzing the literature on the content and context of knowledge transfer policies, decision-making processes, and actors at academic and public institutions. The search strategy includes the databases PubMed, Web of Science, ProQuest, and DiVa. These databases will be searched based on pre-specified search terms. The studies selected for inclusion in the review will be critically assessed for their quality utilizing the Qualitative Research Checklist developed by the Clinical Appraisal Skills Programme. Data extraction and synthesis will be based on the meta-ethnographic approach. This review seeks to further the understanding of the kinds of transfer pathways that exist in medical

  11. Placenta accreta spectrum disorder trends in the context of the universal two-child policy in China and the risk of hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chanjuan; Yang, Mengyuan; Ding, Yiling; Duan, Siqi; Zhou, Yang

    2018-03-01

    To identify both the trends in placenta accreta spectrum (PAS) disorders in the context of the universal two-child policy in China and risk factors for hysterectomy. The present retrospective analysis included confirmed PAS disorders during cesarean delivery at a tertiary hospital in Changsha, Hunan, China, from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2016. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of hysterectomy. During the 10-year study period, the overall incidence of cesarean delivery was 51.6% (13 530/26 214) and that of PAS disorders was 1.2% (302/26 214). The PAS rate increased from 0.1% (5/4617) in 2007-2008 to 2.1% (133/6351) in 2015-2016, alongside a rise in elective repeat cesarean delivery from 5.0% (106/2124) to 38.4% (1385/3603). Previous cesarean delivery greatly increased the likelihood of PAS disorders (odds ratio [OR] 97.4; PChina. The main predictor of hysterectomy was invasive depth. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  12. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 16. Development and execution of pilot research projects at the CASINDO partner universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. Each of the five Indonesian universities managed to develop pilot research projects and wrote research proposals to outline and strengthen their ideas. All of the universities also purchased equipment for the purpose of executing this research. UNCEN (Cenderawasih University, Jayapura, Papua, Indonesia) and UNDIP (Diponegoro University in Semarang, Java, Indonesia) managed to finalize their research within the project period and wrote reports on their results. The other universities could not yet present results due to delay in one or several of the steps within the procedure.

  13. Duke Surgery Patient Safety: an open-source application for anonymous reporting of adverse and near-miss surgical events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobon, Ricardo; Lima, Raquel; Shah, Anand; Jacobs, Danny O; Harker, Matthew; McCready, Mariana; Martins, Henrique; Richardson, William

    2007-05-01

    Studies have shown that 4% of hospitalized patients suffer from an adverse event caused by the medical treatment administered. Some institutions have created systems to encourage medical workers to report these adverse events. However, these systems often prove to be inadequate and/or ineffective for reviewing the data collected and improving the outcomes in patient safety. To describe the Web-application Duke Surgery Patient Safety, designed for the anonymous reporting of adverse and near-miss events as well as scheduled reporting to surgeons and hospital administration. SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE: DSPS was developed primarily using Java language running on a Tomcat server and with MySQL database as its backend. Formal and field usability tests were used to aid in development of DSPS. Extensive experience with DSPS at our institution indicate that DSPS is easy to learn and use, has good speed, provides needed functionality, and is well received by both adverse-event reporters and administrators. This is the first description of an open-source application for reporting patient safety, which allows the distribution of the application to other institutions in addition for its ability to adapt to the needs of different departments. DSPS provides a mechanism for anonymous reporting of adverse events and helps to administer Patient Safety initiatives. The modifiable framework of DSPS allows adherence to evolving national data standards. The open-source design of DSPS permits surgical departments with existing reporting mechanisms to integrate them with DSPS. The DSPS application is distributed under the GNU General Public License.

  14. CARACTHERIZATION OF BIOMASS ENERGY AND CARBONIZATION OF COFFEE GRAINS (Coffea arabica, L AND (Cedrelinga catenaeformis, DUKE WOOD RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailton Teixeira do Vale

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Brazil produces annually two million tons of coffee s husks from farms or industrial processing units. This wastematerial can be used for energy production; currently it is mainly used in agricultural practices as field straw cover up. This paperdeals with coffee s (Coffea arabica, L husks biomass energy characteristics, including wood carbonization. As a reference, the samestudy was performed with a wood species regularly used for building construction named Cedrorana (Cedrelinga catenaeformis,Duke. Coffee s husks was obtained from a farm 150 km far from Brasilia city and cedrorana sawdust from a local saw mill. Thispaper presents results from energy and biomass variables like moisture content, bulk density, lower and superior heating power, ashcontent, fixed carbon, volatile matter and volumetric energy. It has also studied carbonization, charcoal, pyroligneous licqor and noncondensablegases. A comparison between Coffee s husk with 0% moisture content and Cedrorana sawdust portrays the followingresults: bulk density 144.41 kg/m3, fixed carbon 10.31%, superior heating power 4.57 kWh (or 16.46 MJ or 3.933 Mcal/kg, charcoalcontent 40,64% and heating value per cubic meter 2,179 MJ/m3

  15. Peer review CALMET/CALPUFF dispersion modelling analysis : Proposed Duke Point generation facility Georgia Strait Crossing pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A peer review of the air quality dispersion modeling analysis for the proposed gas-fired plant at Duke Point in the vicinity of Nanaimo, British Columbia was required, and SENES Consultants Limited (SENES) was commissioned to perform it. British Columbia Hydro had requested that Levelton Engineering Ltd. prepare an air quality impact assessment, and it was submitted to be included in Vancouver Island Generation Project (VIGP) permit application. This permit application was for the Joint Panel Review of the Georgia Strait Crossing Pipeline (GSX) Project and the British Columbia Environmental Assessment Office. The CALMET/CALPUFF Modelling System had been used by Levelton to conduct the air quality dispersion modelling analysis. Copies of the input and output files that had been used for the conduct of the modelling analysis were provided to SENES. The ability for SENES to reproduce the modelling results that had been published in the GSX application represented the first step in the peer review. This was accomplished by running the files received from Levelton into the CALMET/CALPUFF models. A detailed review of the methodology selected by Levelton during the conduct of the dispersion modelling analysis was then initiated by SENES. Some deficiencies were identified by SENES, despite concurrence with the overall conceptual approach adopted by Levelton. The deficiencies concerned meteorological data; startup, partial load and upset conditions; pollutant emissions; health risk assessment; cumulative impact on ambient particulate matter 10 concentrations; and collateral environmental impacts. refs., 2 tabs., 21 figs

  16. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 05 February 1992 to 28 February 1992 (NODC Accession 0000888)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from the POLAR DUKE. Data were collected from 05...

  17. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 08 October 1996 to 06 November 1996 (NODC Accession 0000894)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from POLAR DUKE. Data were collected from 08 October...

  18. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE and NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 08 April 1997 to 05 May 1997 (NODC Accession 0000897)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from the POLAR DUKE and NATHANIEL B. PALMER. Data were...

  19. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 06 September 1996 to 12 September 1996 (NODC Accession 0000890)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from POLAR DUKE. Data were collected from 06 September...

  20. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE and NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 10 November 1997 to 12 December 1997 (NODC Accession 0000898)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from the POLAR DUKE and NATHANIEL B. PALMER. Data were...

  1. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 13 November 1996 to 26 November 1996 (NODC Accession 0000895)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from the POLAR DUKE. Data were collected from 13...

  2. Návštěvy slezských knížat v rezidenci Jana Zhořeleckého / The visits of Silesian dukes in the residence of John of Görlitz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlada Holá

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the contacts between John of Görlitz and the dukes of Silesia. Due to the character of the preserved resources, it focuses primarily on their stays in his town of residence, Görlitz. To follow the chosen theme, we may use the accounts preserved there — they inform us about the important people who visited John’s court there. These include a number of Silesian dukes.

  3. Higher Education in the Republic of Yemen: The University of Sana'a. Policy, Research, and External Affairs Working Papers Series. Education and Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaratnam, Viswanathan; Regel, Omporn L.

    This analytical report reviews higher education in Yemen, specifically at Yemen's national university, the University of Sana'a. It finds that university enrollment has been increasing very rapidly from 17,000 students in 1987 to a projected enrollment of 79,000 students by 2000. This explosive growth has resulted in overcrowded classrooms,…

  4. Ideology, Policy and Implementation: Comparative Perspectives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper provides an exposition and interpretation of the language policies of two African universities, namely the University of Yaoundé 1 in Cameroon and the University of the Western ... Keywords: Language Ideologies, Language Attitudes, Language Policy, University of the Western Cape, University of Yaoundé 1 ...

  5. The University Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  6. Responding to obesity in Brazil: understanding the international and domestic politics of policy reform through a nested analytic approach to comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Eduardo J

    2015-02-01

    Why do governments pursue obesity legislation? And is the case of Brazil unique compared with other nations when considering the politics of policy reform? Using a nested analytic approach to comparative research, I found that theoretical frameworks accounting for why nations implement obesity legislation were not supported with cross-national statistical evidence. I then turned to the case of Brazil's response to obesity at three levels of government, national, urban, and rural, to propose alternative hypotheses for why nations pursue obesity policy. The case of Brazil suggests that the reasons that governments respond are different at these three levels. International forces, historical institutions, and social health movements were factors that prompted national government responses. At the urban and rural government levels, receiving federal financial assistance and human resource support appeared to be more important. The case of Brazil suggests that the international and domestic politics of responding to obesity are highly complex and that national and subnational political actors have different perceptions and interests when pursuing obesity legislation. Copyright © 2015 by Duke University Press.

  7. Spiritual Fitness for Military Veterans: A Curriculum Review and Impact Evaluation Using the Duke Religion Index (DUREL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kate H; McDaniel, Justin T; Albright, David L; Fletcher, Kari L; Koenig, Harold G

    2018-06-01

    Suicide rates among military veterans exceed those found in the general population. While the exact reasons for these high rates are unknown, contributing factors may include the military's perceived rejection of patient identities, creating barriers to mental health care within the clinical sector and a mandate for prevention programs. Spiritual fitness has emerged over the last decade as an important concept in human performance optimization and is included among holistic approaches to developing and maintaining mentally fit fighting forces. In attempts to better understand the role that spiritual fitness and religion play in mitigating and/or reducing suicide risk among veterans, the aims of this study were twofold (1) to assess the utility of the Duke Religion Index as a psychometric instrument for use with veterans completing spiritual fitness training and (2) to offer a post-intervention process evaluation of the spiritual fitness module from one resilience program offered to military veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan in 2016. Twenty-eight attendees at the JRWI Wellness Resilient Leadership Retreat completed post-retreat surveys to assess their satisfaction with the coursework and specifically, to assess the spiritual fitness module of the resiliency retreat's curriculum. In total, the research team reviewed 25 completed post-intervention survey responses (89.3% response rate). Descriptive statistics indicated that respondents (n = 25) were subjectively religious, defined as belief in a higher power practiced in ritualized ways. Over half of program participants indicated they (a) attended religious meetings at least once a week and (b) engaged in private religious activity-such as meditation-at least once a day. Results showed that most program participants reported that the spiritual fitness skills learned during the resilient leadership program were useful (88%) (Z = 3.000, p fitness are indicated for use in veteran outreach and well

  8. Duke Surgery Research Central: an open-source Web application for the improvement of compliance with research regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobon, Ricardo; Shah, Anand; Kuo, Paul; Harker, Matthew; McCready, Mariana; Butler, Christeen; Martins, Henrique; Moorman, C T; Jacobs, Danny O

    2006-07-27

    Although regulatory compliance in academic research is enforced by law to ensure high quality and safety to participants, its implementation is frequently hindered by cost and logistical barriers. In order to decrease these barriers, we have developed a Web-based application, Duke Surgery Research Central (DSRC), to monitor and streamline the regulatory research process. The main objective of DSRC is to streamline regulatory research processes. The application was built using a combination of paper prototyping for system requirements and Java as the primary language for the application, in conjunction with the Model-View-Controller design model. The researcher interface was designed for simplicity so that it could be used by individuals with different computer literacy levels. Analogously, the administrator interface was designed with functionality as its primary goal. DSRC facilitates the exchange of regulatory documents between researchers and research administrators, allowing for tasks to be tracked and documents to be stored in a Web environment accessible from an Intranet. Usability was evaluated using formal usability tests and field observations. Formal usability results demonstrated that DSRC presented good speed, was easy to learn and use, had a functionality that was easily understandable, and a navigation that was intuitive. Additional features implemented upon request by initial users included: extensive variable categorization (in contrast with data capture using free text), searching capabilities to improve how research administrators could search an extensive number of researcher names, warning messages before critical tasks were performed (such as deleting a task), and confirmatory e-mails for critical tasks (such as completing a regulatory task). The current version of DSRC was shown to have excellent overall usability properties in handling research regulatory issues. It is hoped that its release as an open-source application will promote improved

  9. Duke Surgery Research Central: an open-source Web application for the improvement of compliance with research regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Henrique

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although regulatory compliance in academic research is enforced by law to ensure high quality and safety to participants, its implementation is frequently hindered by cost and logistical barriers. In order to decrease these barriers, we have developed a Web-based application, Duke Surgery Research Central (DSRC, to monitor and streamline the regulatory research process. Results The main objective of DSRC is to streamline regulatory research processes. The application was built using a combination of paper prototyping for system requirements and Java as the primary language for the application, in conjunction with the Model-View-Controller design model. The researcher interface was designed for simplicity so that it could be used by individuals with different computer literacy levels. Analogously, the administrator interface was designed with functionality as its primary goal. DSRC facilitates the exchange of regulatory documents between researchers and research administrators, allowing for tasks to be tracked and documents to be stored in a Web environment accessible from an Intranet. Usability was evaluated using formal usability tests and field observations. Formal usability results demonstrated that DSRC presented good speed, was easy to learn and use, had a functionality that was easily understandable, and a navigation that was intuitive. Additional features implemented upon request by initial users included: extensive variable categorization (in contrast with data capture using free text, searching capabilities to improve how research administrators could search an extensive number of researcher names, warning messages before critical tasks were performed (such as deleting a task, and confirmatory e-mails for critical tasks (such as completing a regulatory task. Conclusion The current version of DSRC was shown to have excellent overall usability properties in handling research regulatory issues. It is hoped that its

  10. Swedish Disarmament Policy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    NPIHP Partners Host Conference on Swedish Disarmament Policy Dec 05, 2012 The Nuclear Proliferation International History Project is pleased to announce a conference on Swedish nuclear disarmament policy, organized and hosted by Stockholm University on 26 november 2012. Organized by Stockholm University Professor Thomas Jonter, Emma Rosengren, Goran Rydeberg, and Stellan Andersson under the aegis of the Swedish Disarmament Resaerch Project, the conference featured keynote addresses by Hans Bl...

  11. Achieving Universal Access to Broadband

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten FALCH

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses appropriate policy measures for achieving universal access to broadband services in Europe. Access can be delivered by means of many different technology solutions described in the paper. This means a greater degree of competition and affects the kind of policy measures to be applied. The paper concludes that other policy measure than the classical universal service obligation are in play, and discusses various policy measures taking the Lisbon process as a point of departure. Available policy measures listed in the paper include, universal service obligation, harmonization, demand stimulation, public support for extending the infrastructure, public private partnerships (PPP, and others.

  12. Prognostic significance of smoking in addition to established risk factors in patients with Dukes B and C colorectal cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantis, N; Xynos, I D; Amptulah, S; Karadima, M; Skopelitis, H; Tsavaris, N

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the prognostic significance of smoking in addition to established risk factors in patients with Dukes stage B and C colorectal cancer (CRC). 291 consecutive non-selected CRC patients were studied retrospectively. Twenty-three variables were examined using a regression statistical model to identify relevant prognostic factors related to disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). On multivariate analysis DFS was found to be negatively affected in patients with a smoking history of ≤10 pack-years vs. non-smokers (p<0.016). Additionally, performance status (PS)<90 (p<0.001), Dukes stage C (p<0.001) and elevated tumor markers (p<0.001) at the time of diagnosis were found to adversely affect DFS. Smoking also had a significant association with relapse. Patients with a smoking history of ≤10 pack-years had 2.45 (p<0.018) higher risk of recurrence compared to patients with no smoking history. OS was influenced by Karnofsky performance status (PS), Dukes stage, and elevated tumor markers. In particular patients with PS< 90 had a 4.69-fold higher risk of death (p<0.001) than patients with better PS. Stage C disease was associated with 2.27-fold higher risk of death (p<0.001) than stage B disease, and patients with elevated tumor markers at the time of diagnosis had 2.74-fold higher risk of death (p<0.014) when compared to those whose tumor markers were normal at presentation. Our study associates smoking and relapse incidence in non-clinical- trial CRC patients and reiterates the prognostic significance of PS, stage and tumor markers at the time of diagnosis.

  13. Repeated applications of CPPU on highbush blueberry cv. Duke increase yield and enhance fruit quality at harvest and during postharvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge B Retamales

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl-N'-phenylurea (CPPU can increase blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. yield and fruit size, but their impact on postharvest is unknown. We studied repeated CPPU applications effects on yield and quality (harvest, postharvest, over 2 yr on mature 'Duke' plants in South-Central Chile. The first year, 5 or 10 mL L-1 CPPU was applied at 3, 10, and/or 17 d after full bloom (DAFB plus a non-sprayed control. The second year, 5 or 10 mL L-1 CPPU were sprayed 10 and 17 DAFB plus a control. The first year, only 10 mL L-1 CPPU sprayed 3+17 DAFB increased yield (32.5% > control; 10 mL L-1 CPPU applied 10 or 3+17 DAFB had highest fruit diameter; and 10 mL L-1 CPPU at 17 DAFB or at 3+10+17 DAFB had highest soluble solids. Overall, 10 mL L-1 CPPU applied 3+17 DAFB, was the best treatment for year one, since it increased fruit yield and diameter, while soluble solids and postharvest weight loss were similar to control. The second year, 10 mL L-1 CPPU reduced fruit coloration (blue color coverage index: BCCI and soluble solids, but not firmness at harvest. This rate increased berry weight (24.2% and fruit wax (59% > wax coverage index: WCI at harvest. Harvest and postharvest WCI increased consistently as CPPU rate increased. CPPU reduced fruit rotting (15% at 45+5 evaluation. During storage, CPPU-treated-fruit had a slower decrease in firmness (30.5% < control at 30+1, but no difference at 30+5. CPPU-treated-fruit usually had higher post harvest soluble solids. Ten mL L-1 CPPU retarded color evolution at harvest and at 30+1, but not at 30+5, 40+1 or 40+5.

  14. Performance of the Duke Religion Index and the spiritual well-being scale in online samples of men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, J Michael; Smolensk, Derek J; Brady, Sonya S; Rosser, B R Simon

    2013-06-01

    Religiosity is associated with behaviors that reduce the risk of HIV/STI infection among general-population and heterosexual-specific samples. Whether this association is similar to homosexual persons is unknown. Measures of religiosity have not been evaluated psychometrically among men who have sex with men (MSM), a population who, because of stigma, experience religiosity differently than heterosexual persons. We assessed the duke religion index and the spiritual well-being in two samples of MSM. Neither instrument produced adequate model fit. To study the association between religiosity and HIV/STI risk behaviors among MSM, scales are needed that measure the religious and spiritual experiences of MSM.

  15. Using Human Rights to Hold the US Accountable for its Anti-Sex Trafficking Agenda: The Universal Periodic Review and new directions for US policy

    OpenAIRE

    Kari Lerum; Kiesha McCurtis; Penelope Saunders; Stéphanie Wahab

    2012-01-01

    Since the passing of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, anti-trafficking efforts have grown in funding, political strength, and popular-culture appeal in the United States and globally. Particularly influential in shaping anti-trafficking policy in the United States are anti-prostitution advocates who are primarily concerned with rehabilitating sex workers and eradicating sexual commerce. Simultaneous to the development of prohibitionist anti-trafficking and anti-prostitution eff...

  16. Collaborative Approaches and Policy Opportunities for Accelerated Progress toward Effective Disease Prevention, Care, and Control: Using the Case of Poverty Diseases to Explore Universal Access to Affordable Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Laokri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThere is a massive global momentum to progress toward the sustainable development and universal health coverage goals. However, effective policies to health-care coverage can only emerge through high-quality services delivered to empowered care users by means of strong local health systems and a translational standpoint. Health policies aimed at removing user fees for a defined health-care package may fail at reaching desired results if not applied with system thinking.MethodSecondary data analysis of two country-based cost-of-illness studies was performed to gain knowledge in informed decision-making toward enhanced access to care in the context of resource-constraint settings. A scoping review was performed to map relevant experiences and evidence underpinning the defined research area, the economic burden of illness.FindingsOriginal studies reflected on catastrophic costs to patients because of care services use and related policy gaps. Poverty diseases such as tuberculosis (TB may constitute prime examples to assess the extent of effective high-priority health-care coverage. Our findings suggest that a share of the economic burden of illness can be attributed to implementation failures of health programs and supply-side features, which may highly impair attainment of the global stated goals. We attempted to define and discuss a knowledge development framework for effective policy-making and foster system levers for integrated care.DiscussionBottlenecks to effective policy persist and rely on interrelated patterns of health-care coverage. Health system performance and policy responsiveness have to do with collaborative work among all health stakeholders. Public–private mix strategies may play a role in lowering the economic burden of disease and solving some policy gaps. We reviewed possible added value and pitfalls of collaborative approaches to enhance dynamic local knowledge development and realize integration with the various

  17. Collaborative Approaches and Policy Opportunities for Accelerated Progress toward Effective Disease Prevention, Care, and Control: Using the Case of Poverty Diseases to Explore Universal Access to Affordable Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laokri, Samia

    2017-01-01

    There is a massive global momentum to progress toward the sustainable development and universal health coverage goals. However, effective policies to health-care coverage can only emerge through high-quality services delivered to empowered care users by means of strong local health systems and a translational standpoint. Health policies aimed at removing user fees for a defined health-care package may fail at reaching desired results if not applied with system thinking. Secondary data analysis of two country-based cost-of-illness studies was performed to gain knowledge in informed decision-making toward enhanced access to care in the context of resource-constraint settings. A scoping review was performed to map relevant experiences and evidence underpinning the defined research area, the economic burden of illness. Original studies reflected on catastrophic costs to patients because of care services use and related policy gaps. Poverty diseases such as tuberculosis (TB) may constitute prime examples to assess the extent of effective high-priority health-care coverage. Our findings suggest that a share of the economic burden of illness can be attributed to implementation failures of health programs and supply-side features, which may highly impair attainment of the global stated goals. We attempted to define and discuss a knowledge development framework for effective policy-making and foster system levers for integrated care. Bottlenecks to effective policy persist and rely on interrelated patterns of health-care coverage. Health system performance and policy responsiveness have to do with collaborative work among all health stakeholders. Public-private mix strategies may play a role in lowering the economic burden of disease and solving some policy gaps. We reviewed possible added value and pitfalls of collaborative approaches to enhance dynamic local knowledge development and realize integration with the various health-care silos. Despite a large political

  18. United States stock market performance and acute myocardial infarction rates in 2008-2009 (from the Duke Databank for Cardiovascular Disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuzat, Mona; Shaw, Linda K; Thomas, Laine; Felker, G Michael; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2010-12-01

    We sought to examine the relation between the United States economic decrease in 2008 and cardiovascular events as measured by local acute myocardial infarction (AMI) rates. Mental stress and traumatic events have been shown to be associated with increased risk of MI in patients with ischemic heart disease. This was an observational study of data from the Duke Databank for Cardiovascular Disease and includes patients undergoing angiography for evaluation of ischemic heart disease from January 2006 to July 2009. Patients with AMI occurring within 3 days before catheterization were used to calculate AMI rates. Stock market values were examined to determine the period of severe economic decrease, and time trends in AMI rates were examined over the same period. Time series models were used to assess the relation between United States stock market National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation (NASDAQ) and rates of AMI. Of 11,590 patients included in the study cohort, 2,465 patients had an AMI during this period. Time series analysis showed a significant increase in AMI rates during a period of stock market decrease from October 2008 to April 2009 (p = 0.003), which remained statistically significant when adjusted for seasons (p = 0.02). In conclusion, unadjusted and adjusted analyses of patients in the Duke Databank for Cardiovascular Disease indicated a significant correlation between a period of stock market decrease and increased AMI rates in our local cohort. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of prestorage UV-A, -B, and -C radiation on fruit quality and anthocyanin of 'Duke' blueberries during cold storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Chau T T; Kim, Jeongyun; Yoo, Kil Sun; Lim, Sooyeon; Lee, Eun Jin

    2014-12-17

    Ultraviolet (UV)-A, -B, and -C were radiated to full-ripe blueberries (cv. 'Duke'), and their effects on fruit qualities and phytonutrients during subsequent cold storage were investigated. The blueberries were exposed to each UV light at 6 kJ/m(2) and then stored at 0 °C for 28 days. Weight loss and decay of the fruits after UV treatment were significantly decreased during the cold storage. The total phenolics and antioxidant activities of blueberries after UV-B and -C treatments were always higher than those of the control and UV-A treatment. Individual anthocyanins were markedly increased during the 3 h after the UV-B and -C treatments. The correlation matrix between total phenolics, anthocyanins, and antioxidant activity measured by the 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) assay indicated a significantly close correlation with the individual anthocyanin contents. It was confirmed that the prestorage treatments of UV-B and -C increased the storability and phytochemical accumulation of the full-ripe 'Duke' blueberries during cold storage.

  20. Conditioning of BPM pickup signals for operations of the Duke storage ring with a wide range of single-bunch current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Li, Jing-Yi; Huang, Sen-Lin; Z. Wu, W.; Hao, H.; P., Wang; K. Wu, Y.

    2014-10-01

    The Duke storage ring is a dedicated driver for the storage ring based oscillator free-electron lasers (FELs), and the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS). It is operated with a beam current ranging from about 1 mA to 100 mA per bunch for various operations and accelerator physics studies. High performance operations of the FEL and γ-ray source require a stable electron beam orbit, which has been realized by the global orbit feedback system. As a critical part of the orbit feedback system, the electron beam position monitors (BPMs) are required to be able to precisely measure the electron beam orbit in a wide range of the single-bunch current. However, the high peak voltage of the BPM pickups associated with high single-bunch current degrades the performance of the BPM electronics, and can potentially damage the BPM electronics. A signal conditioning method using low pass filters is developed to reduce the peak voltage to protect the BPM electronics, and to make the BPMs capable of working with a wide range of single-bunch current. Simulations and electron beam based tests are performed. The results show that the Duke storage ring BPM system is capable of providing precise orbit measurements to ensure highly stable FEL and HIGS operations.

  1. Enriching the Preparation of Education Researchers and Practitioner-Scholars: Linking School District Research Priorities and University-Based Policy Evaluation Research Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malen, Betty

    2017-01-01

    This article analyzes a novel effort to strengthen the preparation of both practitioner-scholars and education researchers. It describes a university-district partnership that offers graduate students the opportunity to develop research understandings and skills through participation in a "real" research project and provides district…

  2. The Expansion of English-Medium Instruction in the Nordic Countries: Can Top-Down University Language Policies Encourage Bottom-Up Disciplinary Literacy Goals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, John; Lauridsen, Karen M.; Räsänen, Anne; Salö, Linus; Schwach, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Recently, in the wake of the Bologna Declaration and similar international initiatives, there has been a rapid increase in the number of university courses and programmes taught through the medium of English. Surveys have consistently shown the Nordic countries to be at the forefront of this trend towards English-medium instruction (EMI). In this…

  3. Popular Music Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Frith, Simon; Cloonan, Martin

    2008-01-01

    This special issue of Popular Music has its origins in a seminar organised at the University of Stirling in 2004. This meeting, one of a series on cultural policy, brought together researchers from a number of European countries who were asked to describe state music policy in their respective countries and to reflect on what differences, if any, such policies had made to recent national music history. As the seminar’s organisers, we were interested in a couple of issues: first, how policy ap...

  4. Progress report from Duke University - Cooperative Research and Training Program in Biological Oceanography from 01 July 1965 to 30 June 1966 (NODC Accession 7200405)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The progress report covers the period from 01 July 1965 to 30 June 1966. The main purpose of the report is to provide cooperating investigators with field and cruise...

  5. The Historical Legacy of a Secret Society at Duke University (1913-1971): Cultural Hegemony and the Tenacious Ideals of the "Big Man on Campus"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Krispin Wagoner

    2013-01-01

    Collegiate secret societies, as distinguished from Greek-letter fraternal organizations, enjoyed prominence within many American campus communities from the early nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth century (Baird, 1879; Hitchcock, 1863; Slosson, 1910; Veysey, 1965). The establishment of these elite groups preceded the maturation of…

  6. Improving Knowledge, Awareness, and Use of Flexible Career Policies through an Accelerator Intervention at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Villablanca, Amparo C.; Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia P.

    2013-01-01

    The challenges of balancing a career and family life disproportionately affect women in academic health sciences and medicine, contributing to their slower career advancement and/or their attrition from academia. In this article, the authors first describe their experiences at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine developing and implementing an innovative accelerator intervention designed to promote faculty work-life balance by improving knowledge, awareness, and access to c...

  7. African Journal of Economic Policy: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The primary aim of this journal, an offshoot of the Trade Policy Research and Training Programme in Economics Department, University of Ibadan, is to provide a forum for development and equity on the African continent. It, therefore, welcomes well researched papers on the implications of a specific ...

  8. DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

  9. The expansion of English-medium instruction in the Nordic countries: Can top-down university language policies encourage bottom-up disciplinary literacy goals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Airey, John; Lauridsen, Karen M.; Räsänen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    towards English-medium instruction (EMI). In this paper, we discuss the introduction of EMI in four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden). We present the educational setting and the EMI debate in each of these countries and summarize relevant research findings. We then make some tentative......Recently, in the wake of the Bologna Declaration and similar international initiatives, there has been a rapid increase in the number of university courses and programmes taught through the medium of English. Surveys have consistently shown the Nordic countries to be at the forefront of this trend...... the discussion of disciplinary literacy goals and require course syllabuses to detail disciplinaryspecific language-learning outcomes....

  10. Is proglacial field an important contributor to runoff in glacierized watershed? Lesson learned from a case study in Duke River watershed, Yukon, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, A.; Baraer, M.

    2017-12-01

    Sub-Arctic glacierized catchments are complex hydrological systems of paramount importance not only for water resources management but also for various ecosystem services. Those areas are environmentally fragile and host many climate-sensitive components of hydrological cycle. In a context of shifting from glacial to non-glacial regimes in Sub-Arctic, this study focuses on understanding hydrological role of proglacial field in runoff generation in headwaters of Duke River watershed, Canada, by comparing to that of alpine meadow (area that is not recently reworked by glacier). Duke Glacier, as many glaciers in St. Elias Mountains, is a surging glacier, and produced debris-charged dead-ice masses once the last surge has seized. In addition, such features as ice-cored moraines and taluses are found in proglacial field. Those features are hypothesised to cause high storage capacity and complex groundwater distribution systems which might affect significantly watershed hydrology. In order to estimate the contribution of different components of the alpine meadow and the proglacial field to runoff, HBCM, a multi-component distributed hydrochemical mixing model (Baraer et al., 2015) was applied. During field campaign in June 2016, 157 samples were taken from possible hydrological sources (end-members) and from main stream, and analysed for major ions, dissolved organic compounds and heavy stable water isotopes. End-members contribution was quantified based on tracer concentration at mixing points. Discharge was measured 6 km downstream from the glacier snout so that both proglacial field and alpine meadow occupy comparable areas of the catchment. Results show the difference between main water sources for the two hydrological systems: buried ice, ice-cored moraines and groundwater sources within proglacial field, and groundwater and supra-permafrost water within alpine meadow. Overall contribution of glaciers during June 2016 exceeded the contribution of the rest of the

  11. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 15. Research agendas of the Indonesian partner universities. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-09-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report provides an overview of the status of development of research agendas at the five partner universities. The research agendas consists of a research proposals, purchasing and installation of research equipment, cooperation with industries and conducting the research proposals. Start of the development of the agendas is determining the fields of interest and formulating research projects. Research development is an ongoing process and therefore by the end of 2011 part 2 of this report will be prepared which will present the new developments in the research agendas over the coming year.

  12. Supporting open access to clinical trial data for researchers: The Duke Clinical Research Institute-Bristol-Myers Squibb Supporting Open Access to Researchers Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencina, Michael J; Louzao, Darcy M; McCourt, Brian J; Adams, Monique R; Tayyabkhan, Rehbar H; Ronco, Peter; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-02-01

    There are growing calls for sponsors to increase transparency by providing access to clinical trial data. In response, Bristol-Myers Squibb and the Duke Clinical Research Institute have collaborated on a new initiative, Supporting Open Access to Researchers. The aim is to facilitate open sharing of Bristol-Myers Squibb trial data with interested researchers. Key features of the Supporting Open Access to Researchers data sharing model include an independent review committee that ensures expert consideration of each proposal, stringent data deidentification/anonymization and protection of patient privacy, requirement of prespecified statistical analysis plans, and independent review of manuscripts before submission for publication. We believe that these approaches will promote open science by allowing investigators to verify trial results as well as to pursue interesting secondary uses of trial data without compromising scientific integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adjuvant therapy of Dukes' C colon cancer by intra-arterial P-32 colloid for internal radiation therapy of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, E.D.

    1984-09-01

    To prevent probable occult metastatic liver cancer from progressing to clinical disease, the author used internal radiation therapy as an effective adjuvant to surgical excision of primary Dukes' C colonic cancer. A calculated radiation dose of 5000 rads was delivered to the liver by injecting radioactive 32-P chromic phosphate colloid through the superior mesenteric and celiac arteries. When this was done, the colloid passed through the intestines and was mixed thoroughly with the blood and delivered to the liver by the portal vein. The Kupffer cells in the liver trapped the colloid, and a minimum amount passed through the liver and got into the general circulation. This kept the amount of colloid deposited in the bone marrow to a minimum. In a phase-I pilot study in which nine patients were treated, no serious side effects were noted. In eight patients, the liver has remained free of cancer for more than 1 year.

  14. Re-assessment of plant carbon dynamics at the Duke free-air CO2 enrichment site: interactions of atmospheric [CO2] with nitrogen and water availability over stand development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather R. McCarthy; Ram Oren; Kurt H Johnsen; Anne Gallet-Budynek; Seth G. Pritchard; Charles W Cook; Shannon L. LaDeau; Robert B. Jackson; Adrien C. Finzi

    2010-01-01

    The potential for elevated [CO2]-induced changes to plant carbon (C) storage, through modifications in plant production and allocation of C among plant pools, is an important source of uncertainty when predicting future forest function. Utilizing 10 yr of data from the Duke free-air CO2 enrichment site, we evaluated the...

  15. Modular design, application architecture, and usage of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery: The Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M.; Rusincovitch, Shelley A.; Brinson, Stephanie; Shang, Howard C.; Evans, Steve; Ferranti, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data generated in the care of patients are widely used to support clinical research and quality improvement, which has hastened the development of self-service query tools. User interface design for such tools, execution of query activity, and underlying application architecture have not been widely reported, and existing tools reflect a wide heterogeneity of methods and technical frameworks. We describe the design, application architecture, and use of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery within Duke Medicine. Methods Our query platform, the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), supports enhanced data exploration, cohort identification, and data extraction from our enterprise data warehouse (EDW) using a series of modular environments that interact with a central keystone module, Cohort Manager (CM). A data-driven application architecture is implemented through three components: an application data dictionary, the concept of “smart dimensions”, and dynamically-generated user interfaces. Results DEDUCE CM allows flexible hierarchies of EDW queries within a grid-like workspace. A cohort “join” functionality allows switching between filters based on criteria occurring within or across patient encounters. To date, 674 users have been trained and activated in DEDUCE, and logon activity shows a steady increase, with variability between months. A comparison of filter conditions and export criteria shows that these activities have different patterns of usage across subject areas. Conclusions Organizations with sophisticated EDWs may find that users benefit from development of advanced query functionality, complimentary to the user interfaces and infrastructure used in other well-published models. Driven by its EDW context, the DEDUCE application architecture was also designed to be responsive to source data and to allow modification through alterations in metadata rather than programming, allowing an agile response to source

  16. Modular design, application architecture, and usage of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery: the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M; Rusincovitch, Shelley A; Brinson, Stephanie; Shang, Howard C; Evans, Steve; Ferranti, Jeffrey M

    2014-12-01

    Data generated in the care of patients are widely used to support clinical research and quality improvement, which has hastened the development of self-service query tools. User interface design for such tools, execution of query activity, and underlying application architecture have not been widely reported, and existing tools reflect a wide heterogeneity of methods and technical frameworks. We describe the design, application architecture, and use of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery within Duke Medicine. Our query platform, the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), supports enhanced data exploration, cohort identification, and data extraction from our enterprise data warehouse (EDW) using a series of modular environments that interact with a central keystone module, Cohort Manager (CM). A data-driven application architecture is implemented through three components: an application data dictionary, the concept of "smart dimensions", and dynamically-generated user interfaces. DEDUCE CM allows flexible hierarchies of EDW queries within a grid-like workspace. A cohort "join" functionality allows switching between filters based on criteria occurring within or across patient encounters. To date, 674 users have been trained and activated in DEDUCE, and logon activity shows a steady increase, with variability between months. A comparison of filter conditions and export criteria shows that these activities have different patterns of usage across subject areas. Organizations with sophisticated EDWs may find that users benefit from development of advanced query functionality, complimentary to the user interfaces and infrastructure used in other well-published models. Driven by its EDW context, the DEDUCE application architecture was also designed to be responsive to source data and to allow modification through alterations in metadata rather than programming, allowing an agile response to source system changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  17. Nanotechnology: A Policy Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    savings in the United States of 24 million barrels of oil.4 • Universal access to clean water. Nanotechnology water desalination and filtration...CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress Nanotechnology : A Policy Primer John F. Sargent Jr. Specialist...COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nanotechnology : A Policy Primer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  18. Prostitution Policy Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Stine Thidemann; Emerek, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    The Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit at London Metropolitan University is working with the European Commission and the European Network on Gender Equality (ENEGE) to produce a report on prostitution policy in member states. In this report the data from Denmark are presented.......The Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit at London Metropolitan University is working with the European Commission and the European Network on Gender Equality (ENEGE) to produce a report on prostitution policy in member states. In this report the data from Denmark are presented....

  19. Defining the role of University of Kentucky HealthCare in its medical market--how strategic planning creates the intersection of good public policy and good business practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpf, Michael; Lofgren, Richard; Bricker, Timothy; Claypool, Joseph O; Zembrodt, Jim; Perman, Jay; Higdon, Courtney M

    2009-02-01

    In response both to national pressures to reduce costs and improve health care access and outcomes and to local pressures to become a top-20 public research university, the University of Kentucky moved toward an integrated clinical enterprise, UK HealthCare, to create a common vision, shared goals, and an effective decision-making process. The leadership formed the vision and then embarked on a comprehensive and coordinated planning process that addressed financial, clinical, academic, and operational issues. The authors describe in depth the strategic planning process and specifically the definition of UK HealthCare's role in its medical marketplace. They began a rigorous process to assess and develop goals for the clinical programs and followed the progress of these programs through meetings driven by data and attended by the organization's senior leadership. They describe their approach to working with rural and community hospitals throughout central, eastern, and southern Kentucky to support the health care infrastructure of the state. They review the early successes of their strategic approach and describe the lessons they learned. The clinical successes have led to academic gains. The experience of UK HealthCare suggests that good business practices and good public policy are synergistic.

  20. How Australian and Indonesian Universities Treat Plagiarism: a Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Cahyono, Bambang Yudi

    2005-01-01

    This article is a part of a larger study comparing various aspects of policies on plagiarism in two university contexts. It compares policies on plagiarism in universities in Australia and Indonesia. The results of this comparative study showed that Australian and Indonesian universities treat plagiarism differently. Australian universities treat plagiarism explicitly in their university policies. In Australian universities, plagiarism is defined clearly and forms of plagiarism are explained ...

  1. Impact of patients' professional and educational status on perception of an antibiotic policy campaign: a pilot study at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Athanasia, Sofia; Plachouras, Diamantis; Kanellaki, Stavroula; Bobota, Fani; Tzepetzi, Georgia; Giamarellou, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are overused in many European countries, particularly Greece, leading to emerging antimicrobial resistance with sustained high mortality among hospitalised patients. Limited data are available regarding factors influencing people's knowledge and the impact of public campaigns on antibiotic misuse. Patients' beliefs regarding antibiotics were investigated in the outpatient clinic of a university hospital in Athens, Greece. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted to examine patients' opinions on antibiotic use in the waiting room of the outpatient clinic. All participants read an illustrated pocket-sized leaflet endorsed by official authorities on the European Antibiotic Awareness Day (EAAD). Volunteers then completed a questionnaire containing information on demographics, knowledge on antibiotic use and overuse, and remarks on the quality of the leaflet's content. In a logistic regression analysis including age, sex, educational level and professional status of 605 eligible participants, women were more aware [odds ratio (OR)=3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8-5.8; Peducation were less aware (OR=0.4, 95% CI 0.1-0.9; P=0.04) of antimicrobial misuse. Workers were also more aware than retired or unemployed people (P=0.007). However, only 16.0% of participants knew about the EAAD. All participants agreed on antibiotic misuse in Greece, mentioning patient accountability as the main cause (26.8%), an opinion more pronounced in highly educated individuals. In conclusion, targeted interventions taking into account variations in educational level and employee status should be considered in future scheduled educative campaigns on antibiotic overconsumption in highly prescribing antibiotic countries. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sustainability Policy and Environmental Policy

    OpenAIRE

    John C. V. Pezzey

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical, representative agent economy with a depletable resource stock, polluting emissions and productive capital is used to contrast environmental policy, which internalises externalised environmental values, with sustainability policy, which achieves some form of intergenerational equity. The obvious environmental policy comprises an emissions tax and a resource stock subsidy, each equal to the respective external cost or benefit. Sustainability policy comprises an incentive affectin...

  3. Sustainability Statement and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents nine resources that focus on environmental education and sustainability. These include: (1) "Sustainability Statement and Policy," Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, Canada, 2009, which is available at http://office.sustainability.dal.ca/Governance; (2) "Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate…

  4. Technology Policy and Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bruce

    1983-01-01

    Current social and economic problems in the United Kingdom are placed in the context of long-term trends in labor economics and the impact of new technology. The relationship of technological change and economic recovery is analyzed. Policy implications and the university's role are discussed. (MSE)

  5. 28 March 2014 - Italian Minister of Education, University and Research S. Giannini welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci in the ATLAS experimental cavern with Former Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti. Signature of the guest book with Belgian State Secretary for the Scientific Policy P. Courard.

    CERN Multimedia

    Gadmer, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    28 March 2014 - Italian Minister of Education, University and Research S. Giannini welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci in the ATLAS experimental cavern with Former Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti. Signature of the guest book with Belgian State Secretary for the Scientific Policy P. Courard.

  6. Privacy Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home → NLM Privacy Policy URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/privacy.html NLM Privacy Policy To ... out of cookies in the most popular browsers, http://www.usa.gov/optout_instructions.shtml. Please note ...

  7. Top 10 Higher Education State Policy Issues for 2011. Policy Matters: A Higher Education Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Presented here are the top 10 issues most likely to affect public higher education across the 50 states in 2011, in the view of the state policy staff at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU). This listing is informed by an environmental scan of the economic, political and policy landscape surrounding public higher…

  8. SLC summer 2010 university - The ocean in the climate-energy problem, urban policies. Proceedings; Universite d'ete 2010 SLC - L'Ocean dans la problematique Climat-Energie, politiques urbaines. Recueil des presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the summer 2010 university of the SLC (save the climate) organization on the topics of the ocean in the climate-energy problem, and of the urban policies. Nine presentations (slides) are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Biofuels made from micro-algae: stakes and challenges (Olivier Bernard, Comore - INRIA /CNRS/UPMC); 2 - The energy of waves (Alain Clement, Ecole Centrale de Nantes); 3 - The sea, new source of renewable energies? (J.J. Herou, EDF CIH); 4 - Oceans acidification: the other CO{sub 2} problem (James Orr, Pierre Simon Laplace Institute - IPSL, Laboratory of climate and environmental Sciences - LSCE, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ); 5 - Oceans and carbon cycle (Laurent Bopp, IPSL/LSCE); 6 - Renewable marine energies (Yann-Herve De Roeck, France Energies Marines); 7 - Energy renovation of buildings (Jean-Claude Terrier, Mesac Europe); 8 - Modevur research project - Modeling of urban development, sketch of a development typology of chinese cities (Clement-Noel Douady); 9 - Urban areas in the fight against climate change: stakes, knowledge and controversies (Francois Menard, PUCA)

  9. The policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laruelle, Ph.; Snegaroff, Th.; Moreau, S.; Tellenne, C.; Brunel, S.

    2005-01-01

    Fourth chapter of the book on the geo-policy of the sustainable development, this chapter deal with the different and international policies concerned by the problem. The authors analyze the american energy attitude and policy, the economical equilibrium facing the environmental equilibrium for the european policy, the sanctified and sacrificed nature and the japanese attitude, India and China, the great fear of the 21 century and the sustainable development in Africa. (A.L.B.)

  10. Trade Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Murray Gibbs

    2007-01-01

    In an otherwise insightful and thoughtful article, Sebastian Pfotenhauer (Trade Policy Is Science Policy,” Issues, Fall 2013) might better have entitled his contribution “Trade Policy Needs to Be Reconciled with Science Policy.” The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the agreements administered by the World Trade Organization, particularly the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT), were adopted to promote international trade and i...

  11. Relationship of the duke jeopardy score combined with minimal lumen diameter as assessed by computed tomography angiography to the hemodynamic relevance of coronary artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mengmeng; Zhao, Yonghong; Li, Wenbin; Lu, Zhigang; Wei, Meng; Zhou, Wenxiao; Zhang, Jiayin

    2018-03-02

    To study the diagnostic performance of the ratio between the Duke jeopardy score (DJS) and the minimal lumen diameter (MLD) (DJS/MLD CT ratio) as assessed by coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for differentiating functionally significant from non-significant coronary artery stenoses, with reference to invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). Patients who underwent both coronary CTA and FFR measurement during invasive coronary angiography (ICA) within 2 weeks were retrospectively included in the study. Invasive FFR measurement was performed in patients with intermediate to severe coronary stenoseis. DJS/MLD CT ratio and anatomical parameters were recorded. Lesions with FFR ≤0.80 were considered to be functionally significant. One hundred and sixty-one patients with 175 lesions were included into the analysis. Diameter stenosis in CT, area stenosis, plaque burden, lesion length (LL), ICA-based stenosis degree, DJS, LL/MLD 4 ratio, DJS/MLA ratio as well as DJS/MLD ratio were all significantly different between hemodynamically significant and non-significant lesions (pvalue for DJS/MLD CT ratio to be 1.96 (area under curve = 0.863, 95 % confidence interval = 0.803-0.910), yielding a high diagnostic accuracy (86.9%, 152/175). In coronary artery stenoses detected by coronary CTA, the DJS/MLD ratio is able to predict hemodynamic relevance. Copyright © 2018 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Feeder Voltage Regulation with High-Penetration PV Using Advanced Inverters and a Distribution Management System: A Duke Energy Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmintier, Bryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Giraldez, Julieta [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gotseff, Peter [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nagarajan, Adarsh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Harris, Tom [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bugbee, Bruce [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Baggu, Murali [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gantz, Jesse [GE Grid Solutions, Fairfield, CT (United States); Boardman, Ethan [GE Grid Solutions, Fairfield, CT (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Duke Energy, Alstom Grid, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory teamed up to better understand the impacts of solar photovoltaics (PV) on distribution system operations. The core goal of the project is to compare the operational - specifically, voltage regulation - impacts of three classes of PV inverter operations: 1.) Active power only (Baseline); 2.) Local inverter control (e.g., PF...not equal...1, Q(V), etc.); and 3.) Integrated volt-VAR control (centralized through the distribution management system). These comparisons were made using multiple approaches, each of which represents an important research-and-development effort on its own: a) Quasi-steady-state time-series modeling for approximately 1 year of operations using the Alstom eTerra (DOTS) system as a simulation engine, augmented by Python scripting for scenario and time-series control and using external models for an advanced inverter; b) Power-hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) testing of a 500-kVA-class advanced inverter and traditional voltage regulating equipment. This PHIL testing used cosimulation to link full-scale feeder simulation using DOTS in real time to hardware testing; c) Advanced visualization to provide improved insights into time-series results and other PV operational impacts; and d) Cost-benefit analysis to compare the financial and business-model impacts of each integration approach.

  13. Pictorial Real, Historical Intermedial. Digital Aesthetics and the Representation of History in Eric Rohmer’s The Lady and the Duke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagliani Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In The Lady and the Duke (2001, Eric Rohmer provides an unusual and “conservative” account of the French Revolution by recurring to classical and yet “revolutionary” means. The interpolation between painting and film produces a visual surface which pursues a paradoxical effect of immediacy and verisimilitude. At the same time though, it underscores the represented nature of the images in a complex dynamic of “reality effect” and critical meta-discourse. The aim of this paper is the analysis of the main discursive strategies deployed by the film to disclose an intermedial effectiveness in the light of its original digital aesthetics. Furthermore, it focuses on the problematic relationship between image and reality, deliberately addressed by Rohmer through the dichotomy simulation/illusion. Finally, drawing on the works of Louis Marin, it deals with the representation of history and the related ideology, in order to point out the film’s paradoxical nature, caught in an undecidability between past and present.

  14. Taiwan Universities: Where to Go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ying Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The dramatic expansion of Taiwan universities/colleges from about 100 to 160 from the late 1980s has encountered problems due to social and global changes. What should Taiwan universities move toward and how? This research relies on secondary data to explore the issues Taiwan universities currently face—a low birth rate and global competition. The decreasing number of incoming students will result in a lower registration rate and less tuition revenue, which will make some universities struggle to survive. Hence, government policies, proposed by the Ministry of Education, have been implemented to assist Taiwan universities to adjust to external changes. The Innovative Transformation Policy, adopted in 2015, consists of strategies for university–industry cooperation, university mergers, university closures, and a re-shaping of the university paradigm. This policy has begun to be implemented and its initial outcome will be continually evaluated. In accordance with the Innovative Transformation Policy, this study encourages Taiwan universities to improve governance, set prominent unique characteristics of development, and enhance global competitiveness.

  15. Achieving universal access to broadband

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Henten, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses appropriate policy measures for achieving universal access to broadband services in Europe. Access can be delivered by means of many different technology solutions described in the paper. This means a greater degree of competition and affects the kind of policy measures...

  16. Sexual Harassment Prevention Policies at Japanese Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Creaser, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, an accumulation of Japanese research about sexual harassment and a number of very public court cases involving prominent public figures placed the issue of sexual harassment in the media spotlight. Japan was forced to recognise sexual harassment as a national problem, and not an issue, which was confined to the Western world. In April 1999, the Japanese government realised the need to amend existing laws to include sexual harassment under article twenty-one of the Equal Oppor...

  17. University Rankings: The Web Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguillo, Isidro F.

    2012-01-01

    The publication in 2003 of the Ranking of Universities by Jiao Tong University of Shanghai has revolutionized not only academic studies on Higher Education, but has also had an important impact on the national policies and the individual strategies of the sector. The work gathers the main characteristics of this and other global university…

  18. Language Alternation in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the alternate use of Arabic and English in the context of a university classroom, where a policy to use the former language in place of the latter was being implemented. Analysis of a sample of recorded university lectures of English and Arabic medium classes in sciences and humanities reveals that teachers use code switching,…

  19. Policies promoting Biofuels in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmgren, Kristina [IVL Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Goeteborg (Sweden); Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Div. of Heat and Power Technology., Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    This report was written as part of a course in Environmental Economics and Policy Instruments at the University of Gothenburg. It aims at summarizing the policy instruments introduced to directly affect the production and use of biofuels in Sweden. Since Sweden is part of the EU also EU policies were included. There are additional policy instruments which affect the production and utilization of biofuels in a more indirect way that are not presented here. The economic analysis in this paper is limited and could be developed from the information presented in order to draw further conclusions on necessary changes in order to reach set targets.

  20. Behavioral medicine in Teikyo University and Toho University

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Takeaki; Hashizume, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral medicine has increased in importance to become a promising field in medical education. The Teikyo University Graduate School of Public Health and Toho University School of Medicine were evaluated in terms of their educational emphasis on behavioral medicine. The Teikyo University Graduate School of Public Health has the following five core requirements, as in the global standards: behavioral medicine, biostatistics, epidemiology, occupational health, and health policy management. B...

  1. University Students' Intentions to Report Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozencroft, Kelly; Campbell, Marilyn; Orel, Alexandria; Kimpton, Melanie; Leong, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of cyberbullying among university students and less about whether they utilise anti-bullying policies. However, failure to report cyberbullying incidents to authorities would lessen the efficacy of these policies. This study investigated the prevalence of cyberbullying among university students and their…

  2. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in 30 P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized γ-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary

  3. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in {sup 30}P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized {gamma}-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary.

  4. The network approach for prevention of healthcare-associated infections: long-term effect of participation in the Duke Infection Control Outreach Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Deverick J; Miller, Becky A; Chen, Luke F; Adcock, Linda H; Cook, Evelyn; Cromer, A Lynn; Louis, Susan; Thacker, Paul A; Sexton, Daniel J

    2011-04-01

    To describe the rates of several key outcomes and healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) among hospitals that participated in the Duke Infection Control Outreach Network (DICON). Prospective, observational cohort study of patients admitted to 24 community hospitals from 2003 through 2009. The following data were collected and analyzed: incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), and HAIs caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); employee exposures to bloodborne pathogens (EBBPs); physician EBBPs; patient-days; central line-days; ventilator-days; and urinary catheter-days. Poisson regression was used to determine whether incidence rates of these HAIs and exposures changed during the first 5 and 7 years of participation in DICON; nonrandom clustering of each outcome was controlled for. Cost saved and lives saved were calculated on the basis of published estimates. In total, we analyzed 6.5 million patient-days, 4,783 EBPPs, 2,948 HAIs due to MRSA, and 2,076 device-related infections. Rates of employee EBBPs, HAIs due to MRSA, and device-related infections decreased significantly during the first 5 years of participation in DICON (Pprevented. Each hospital saved approximately $100,000 per year of participation, and collectively the hospitals may have prevented 52-105 deaths from CLABSI or VAP. The 7-year analysis demonstrated that these trends continued with further participation. Hospitals with long-term participation in an infection control network decreased rates of significant HAIs by approximately 50%, decreased costs, and saved lives.

  5. Meteorological and small scale internal ecosystem variability characterize the uncertainty of ecosystem level responses to elevated CO2. Insights from the Duke Forest FACE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, A.; Katul, G. G.; Fatichi, S.; Palmroth, S.; Way, D.

    2017-12-01

    One of the open questions in climate change research is the pathway by which elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration impacts the biogeochemical and hydrological cycles at the ecosystem scale. This impact leads to significant changes in long-term carbon stocks and the potential of ecosystems to sequester CO2, partially mitigating anthropogenic emissions. While the significance of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on instantaneous leaf-level processes such as photosynthesis and transpiration is rarely disputed, its integrated effect at the ecosystem level and at long-time scales remains a subject of debate. This debate has taken on some urgency as illustrated by differences arising between ecosystem modelling studies, and data-model comparisons using Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) sites around the world. Inherent leaf-to-leaf variability in gas exchange rates can generate such inconsistencies. This inherent variability arises from the combined effect of meteorological "temporal" variability and the "spatial" variability of the biochemical parameters regulating vegetation carbon uptake. This combined variability leads to a non-straightforward scaling of ecosystem fluxes from the leaf to ecosystems. To illustrate this scaling behaviour, we used 10 years of leaf gas exchange measurements collected at the Duke Forest FACE experiment. The internal variability of the ecosystem parameters are first quantified and then combined with three different leaf-scale stomatal conductance models and an ecosystem model. The main results are: (a) Variability of the leaf level fluxes is dependent on both the meteorological drivers and differences in leaf age, position within the canopy, nitrogen and CO2 fertilization, which can be accommodated in model parameters; (b) Meteorological variability plays the dominant role at short temporal scales while parameter variability is significant at longer temporal scales. (c) Leaf level results do not necessarily translate to similar ecosystem

  6. Stomatal conductance at Duke FACE: Leveraging the lessons from 11 years of scaled sap flux measurements for region-wide analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, E. J.; Bell, D.; Clark, J. S.; McCarthy, H. R.; Kim, H.; domec, J.; Noormets, A.; McNulty, D.; Sun, G.; Oren, R.

    2013-12-01

    A network of thermal dissipation probes (TDPs) monitoring sap flux density was used to estimate leaf-specific transpiration (EL) and canopy-averaged stomatal conductance (GS) in Pinus taeda (L.) exposed to +200 ppm atmospheric CO2 levels (eCO2) and nitrogen fertilization as part of the Duke FACE study. Data from scaling half-hourly measurements from hundreds of sensors over 11 years indicated that P. taeda in eCO2 intermittently (49% of monthly values) decreased stomatal conductance relative to the control, with a mean reduction of 13% in both total EL and mean daytime GS. This intermittent response was related to changes in a hydraulic allometry index (AH), defined as sapwood area per unit leaf area per unit canopy height, which was linearly related to GS at reference conditions (GSR) during the growing season across years (R2=0.67). Overall, AH decreased a mean of 15% with eCO2 over the course of the study, due mostly to a mean 19% increase in leaf area. Throughout the southeastern U.S., other P. taeda stands have been monitored with TDPs, such as the US-NC2 Ameriflux site and four fertilizer × throughfall displacement studies recently begun as part of the PINEMAP research network in VA, GA, FL and OK. We will also discuss the challenges and benefits of using a common modeling platform to combine FACE TDP data with that from a diversity of sites and treatments to draw inferences about EL and GS responses to environmental drivers and climate change, as well as their relation to AH, across the range of P. taeda.

  7. Language policy from below:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Janus

    2014-01-01

    . Not only is it at odds with the available empirical evidence, it also puts unnecessary constraints on the potential that transnational education holds for cultural and linguistic exchange and development. The article is based on a case study where the patterns of language choice of three student project......, to varying degrees, developed practice-based language policies ‘from below’ that allow for alternating and sometimes syncretic use of English and Danish....... internationalisation, and English is accordingly promoted as the ‘obvious’ language of instruction for international education in many university policies. This article argues that the idea that university internationalisation should equal the exclusive use of English as a lingua franca is essentially misguided...

  8. Public Policies of Solar Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouvier, Yves; Pehlivanian, Sophie; Teissier, Pierre; Chauvin-Michel, Marion; Forget, Marie; Raymond, Roland; Hyun Jin Yu, Julie; Popiolek, Nathalie; Guthleben, Denis

    2013-01-01

    This dossier about the Public Policies of Solar Energy brings together the presentations given in June 2013 at a colloquium organised by the Savoie university of Chambery (France): Introduction (Yves Bouvier, Sophie Pehlivanian); Passive solar energy in the shade of the French energy policy, 1945-1986 (Pierre Teissier); Solar architectures and energy policies in France: from oil crisis to solar crisis (Marion Chauvin-Michel); Sun in media, between promotion and contestation (Sophie Pehlivanian); Public policies of solar energy and territorial jurisdictions: the example of village photovoltaic power plants (Marie Forget); Energy social system and ordinary creative movement (Roland Raymond); The Historical Evolution of South Korea's Solar PV Policies since the 1970's (Julie Hyun Jin Yu, Nathalie Popiolek); Research on solar energy from yesterday to the present day: an historical project (Denis Guthleben); Photovoltaic power: public policies and economical consequences. The French choices in the international context - 1973-2013 (Alain Ricaud)

  9. ENERGY POLICY

    OpenAIRE

    Avrupa Topluluğu Enstitüsü, Marmara Üniversitesi

    2015-01-01

    John Mitchell considers EU policies on energy supply security; Tera Allas on energy security of supply in the UK: the way forward; Peter Odell assesses public/private partnerships on the UKCS; Olivier Appert provides an overview of French energy policy.

  10. Energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    The author places the energy problem in the context of world economy. The various obstacles encountered in the United States to spell out a viable national energy policy are cited. A certain number of practical proposals is given to lead to an 'effective policy' which would allow energy economy at the same time as energy development, that is, including nuclear energy [fr

  11. University Internationalization and University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gulieva, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability are d......, dissimilar, and sometimes conflicting dimensions of the financial, legal, organisational, staffing, and academic autonomy of the host country, are compromising key aspects of their own autonomy and core mission?......Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability...... are determined by the structure and exercise of university autonomy settings at home and in the host countries, and that the process itself cannot be successfully achieved and maintained without changes in the autonomy settings. The key question the authors ask is to what degree universities, in embracing new...

  12. Theories of the Family and Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Jacobsen; Lindy Fursman; John Bryant; Megan Claridge; Benedikte Jensen

    2004-01-01

    Policy interventions that affect or are mediated through the family typically assume a behavioural response. Policy analyses proceeding from different disciplinary bases may come to quite different conclusions about the effects of policies on families, depending how individuals within families behave. This paper identifies the implications of five theories of family and individual behaviour for the likely success of policy intervention. Anthropology documents not only the universality of the ...

  13. Analysis of Agromorphological Descriptors to Differentiate between Duke Cherry (Prunus x gondouinii (Poit. & TurpinRehd. and Its Progenitors: Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium L. and Sour Cherry (Prunus cerasus L. Análisis de Descriptores Agromorfológicos para Diferenciar entre Cerezo Duke (Prunus x gondouinii (Poit. & Turpin Rehd. y sus Progenitores: Cerezo (Prunus avium L. y Guindo (Prunus cerasus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pérez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid identification of the hybrids between sweet cherry (Prunus avium L. and sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L. is not easy. In order to resolve this problem, 18 Spanish sweet, sour and duke cherry cultivars were surveyed and characterized using 43 agromorphological descriptors evaluated in flowers, leaves, dormant 1-yr-old shoots, fruits, and trees during 2005 and 2006. Based on quantitative parameters, ANOVA and stepwise discriminant analysis (SDA were carried out. For qualitative descriptors, statistical comparisons were done by means of the chi-square (χ2 test. As result of the study, two quantitative (titratable acidity and number of lenticels and six qualitative descriptors (shape of the central and lateral lobes in the internal bracts of the flower fascicles, leaf shape and margin, pubescence in the veins of the lower side of the leaf, and type of sulci of the seed coat were identified as differential parameters in P. avium, P. cerasus and P. x gondouinii(Poit. & Turpin Rehd. Also, another four qualitative descriptors (petal coloration at the end of blooming, leaf stipule type, and seed shape and viability were found to be useful for easy differentiation between sour and duke cherry. None of these parameters has been employed previously to discriminate among sweet, sour and duke cherry.Los híbridos de cerezo (Prunus avium L. y guindo (Prunus cerasus L. no son fáciles de identificar. Para resolver este problema, 18 cultivares de cerezo, guindo y sus híbridos fueron prospectados y caracterizados agromorfológicamente mediante el estudio de 43 descriptores evaluados en flores, hojas, frutos, ramas de 1 año y árbol durante los años 2005 y 2006. En base a los resultados obtenidos del estudio de los diferentes parámetros cuantitativos se realizaron un ANDEVA y un análisis discriminante escalonado (SDA. Los descriptores cualitativos fueron analizados mediante el test de Chi-cuadrado (χ². Como resultado del estudio se identificaron

  14. EDITORIAL: Dialog on Science and Policy to Address the Climate Crisis to conclude the International Association of Research Universities Climate Congress, Copenhagen, Denmark Dialog on Science and Policy to Address the Climate Crisis to conclude the International Association of Research Universities Climate Congress, Copenhagen, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Paul; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2009-06-01

    This is not the usual Editor-in-Chief letter, namely one that focuses on the accomplishments of the journal—and for ERL they have been numerous this year—but a recognition of the critical time that we are now in when it comes to addressing not only global climate change, but also the dialog between science and politics. In recognition of the many 'tipping points' that we now confront—ideally some of them positive social moments—as well as the clear scientific conclusion that environmental tipping points are points of long-lasting disruption, this paper takes a different form than I might have otherwise written. While the scientific body of knowledge around global environmental change mounts, so too, do the hopeful signs that change can happen. The election of Barack Obama is unquestionably one such sign, witnessed by the exceptional interest that his story has brought not only to US politics, but also to global views of the potential of the United States, as well as to the potential role of science and investigation in addressing pressing issues. In light of these inter-related issues, reproduced here—largely due to the efforts of Paul Baer to transcribe a remarkable conversation—is a dialog not only on the science of global warming and the potential set of means to address this issue, but also on the interaction between research, science and the political process. The dialog itself is sufficiently important that I will dispense with the usual discussion of the exciting recognition that ERL has received with an ISI rating (a factor rapidly increasing), the high levels of downloads of our papers (for some articles over 5000 and counting), and the many news and scientific publications picking up ERL articles (in recent days alone Science, Environmental Science and Technology, and The Economist). This conversation was the concluding plenary session of the 10-12 March International Association of Research Universities (IARU) Conference on Climate Change

  15. The Impact of Vietnam's Globalization on National Education Policies and Teacher Training Programs for Teachers of English as an International Language: A Case Study of the University of Pedagogy in Ho Chi Minh City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tri Ly

    2011-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of Vietnam's globalization on national language education policies and teacher training programs for teachers of English to speakers of other languages. Specifically, this research explored the extent to which the new policies for English language training programs adopted by the…

  16. Data Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Parsons

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The first purpose of data policy should be to serve the objectives of the organization or project sponsoring the collection of the data. With research data, data policy should also serve the broader goals of advancing scientific and scholarly inquiry and society at large. This is especially true with government-funded data, which likely comprise the vast majority of research data. Data policy should address multiple issues, depending on the nature and objectives of the data. These issues include data access requirements, data preservation and stewardship requirements, standards and compliance mechanisms, data security issues, privacy and ethical concerns, and potentially even specific collection protocols and defined data flows. The specifics of different policies can vary dramatically, but all data policies need to address data access and preservation. Research data gain value with use and must therefore be accessible and preserved for future access. This article focuses on data access. While policy might address multiple issues, at a first level it must address where the data stand on what Lyon (2009 calls the continuum of openness. Making data as openly accessible as possible provides the greatest societal benefit, and a central purpose of data policy is to work toward ethically open data access. An open data regime not only maximizes the benefit of the data, it also simplifies most of the other issues around effective research data stewardship and infrastructure development.

  17. Towards a Model of a Critical Pedagogy in Malawian Universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality university education is important for achieving national aspirations as stated in higher education policy frameworks in Malawi. The major education policy documents in Malawi: The Policy and Investment Framework and the Malawi National Education Sector Plan recognise the importance of university education for ...

  18. How Australian and Indonesian Universities Treat Plagiarism: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Yudi Cahyono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is a part of a larger study comparing various aspects of policies on plagiarism in two university contexts. It compares policies on plagiarism in universities in Australia and Indonesia. The results of this comparative study showed that Australian and Indonesian universities treat plagiarism differently. Australian universities treat plagiarism explicitly in their university policies. In Australian universities, plagiarism is defined clearly and forms of plagiarism are explained thoroughly, policies on plagiarism are informed to all university academic members, and there are mechanisms to manage cases related to plagiarism. In contrast, not all Indonesian universities treat plagiarism directly. Some universities depend on religious morality and academic ethics in dealing with plagiarism. Accordingly, this article recommends the explicit treatment of plagiarism in Indonesian universities.

  19. Examining Policy Guidelines for Distance Education in Dual Mode ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study reports a case of distance education policy in the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), a dual mode University in Ghana. The interview method was used to obtain information from 21 purposively selected key informants in the University. Policy documents that addressed Distance ...

  20. Duke Forest Particle Nucleation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Particle size distribution expressed as number concentration per size bin. This dataset is associated with the following publications: Pillai, P., V. Aneja, J....

  1. Duke Orata and Segor Fred

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    catalyzes' the electropolyrnerization ... use in battery cells, electrolytic capacitors and in smart windows where their electrochrornic dismay ... wire as auxiliary electrode and carbon graphite (surface area 0.38 cmz) as the working electrode. The working ...

  2. Duke Activity Status Index em Doenças Cardiovasculares: Validação de Tradução em Português

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana A. Coutinho-Myrrha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentos: O Duke Activity Status Index (DASI avalia a capacidade funcional de pacientes com doença cardiovascular (DCV, mas não há versão validada em português para doenças cardiovasculares. Objetivos: Traduzir e adaptar culturalmente o DASI para o idioma português do Brasil, e verificar suas propriedades psicométricas na avaliação da capacidade funcional de pacientes com doenças cardiovasculares. Métodos: O DASI foi traduzido para o português, verificado pela retrotradução para o inglês e avaliado por um comitê de especialistas. A versão pré-teste foi avaliada pela primeira vez em 30 indivíduos. As propriedades psicométricas e a correlação com o teste de esforço foram verificadas em um segundo grupo de 67 indivíduos. Uma análise fatorial exploratória foi realizada em todos os 97 pacientes para verificar a validade de construto do DASI. Resultados: O coeficiente de correlação intraclasse para a confiabilidade teste-reteste foi de 0,87 e para a confiabilidade entre avaliadores foi de 0,84. O alfa de Cronbach para consistência interna foi de 0,93. A validade concorrente foi verificada por correlações positivas significativas de pontuações do DASI com o VO2 max (r = 0,51, p < 0,001. A análise fatorial mostrou dois fatores que explicaram 54% da variância total, com o fator 1 responsável por 40 % da variância. A aplicação do DASI requer entre um e três minutos e meio por paciente. Conclusão: A versão brasileira do DASI parece ser um instrumento válido, confiável, rápido e fácil de administrar para avaliar a capacidade funcional em pacientes com doenças cardiovasculares.

  3. Erasmus University Rotterdam Wrestles With Sustainability Strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Coughlan (Geraldine); T. Yue (Tao); F.H. Wijen (Frank)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractErasmus University Rotterdam (EUR) is in the midst of a sustainability dilemma. The university is in a stage of transition, shifting focus from the city to the world stage. EUR’s current environmental sustainability policy needs more impetus. The university wants to incorporate

  4. (Re)Discovering University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book challenges traditional approach to university autonomy which is based on four pillars: organisational, financial, human resource, and academic. The main thesis is that a fuller understanding of university autonomy can only be obtained through a more holistic view of the complex inter......-relationships between stakeholders and policies which can reinforce and equally pull in opposite directions. The holistic view is expressed in a model of institutional university autonomy that brings together the traditional basic four pillars of autonomy, and five interfaces: government–university; university......–university staff; academic staff–students; university–business; and university–internationalisation. This model is explored through international case studies that give new insights and reinforce our understanding that the issues relating to institutional university autonomy are complex, interactive and genuinely...

  5. Insurance Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahrmann, Harry; Harms, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    A 'Pay As You Speed' project, devised by the University of Aalborg, utilizes satellite technology and financial incentives to encourage a reduction in vehicle speeds. Udgivelsesdato: January......A 'Pay As You Speed' project, devised by the University of Aalborg, utilizes satellite technology and financial incentives to encourage a reduction in vehicle speeds. Udgivelsesdato: January...

  6. Policy Innovation in Innovation Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borras, Susana

    During the past two decades Europe has experienced important changes and transformations in the way in which governments approach the issue of science, technology and innovation, and their relation to economic growth and competitiveness. This has to do with the European Union level as well...... as with national and sub-national governments in Europe, all of them introducing interesting novelties in their innovation policy. These changes refer to different aspects of policy, mainly the content of policy initiatives towards science, technology and innovation; the instruments governments are using...... at the EU level, and mentions similar trends taking place at national and sub-national levels. The questions that guide the contents here are essentially three, namely, what are the main traits of innovation policies in Europe since the 1990s and how have the EU and different national governments approached...

  7. Armored glass university ceilings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guil Bozal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The barriers that women face to occupy the highest professional positions are well studied, yet they persist. The employment situation of women has improved, but the positions of power are still predominantly in male hands, as if men continually seek new mechanisms to keep, like viruses that change every year to survive the way vaccines. Barriers persist, although in recent decades women have managed to overcome in quantity and quality to men among university students. Women are still unable to access the best academic positions. Among university faculty only reach 40% and full professor position remain masculinized, having managed to reach the women -after many efforts and some policies- measures only 20%, which is seen clearly insufficient given their greater training. Against this background, the future is difficult, unless the university decided to endorse the cause of equality, going to assume its role of reference for the new generations and to other organizations and society in general.

  8. Universe symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The sky uniformity can be noticed in studying the repartition of objects far enough. The sky isotropy description uses space rotations. The group theory elements will allow to give a meaning at the same time precise and general to the word a ''symmetry''. Universe models are reviewed, which must have both of the following qualities: - conformity with the physic known laws; - rigorous symmetry following one of the permitted groups. Each of the models foresees that universe evolution obeys an evolution equation. Expansion and big-bang theory are recalled. Is universe an open or closed space. Universe is also electrically neutral. That leads to a work hypothesis: the existing matter is not given data of universe but it appeared by evolution from nothing. Problem of matter and antimatter is then raised up together with its place in universe [fr

  9. Policy Capacity Meets Politics: Comment on "Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fafard, Patrick

    2015-07-22

    It is difficult to disagree with the general argument that successful health reform requires a significant degree of policy capacity or that all players in the policy game need to move beyond self-interested advocacy. However, an overly broad definition of policy capacity is a problem. More important perhaps, health reform inevitably requires not just policy capacity but political leadership and compromise. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  10. Policy stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Carina Bregnholm; Rasmussen, Rasmus Kjærgaard

    This article uses Arctic Winter 2016 as an exploration site of values and futures in Greenland. By taking a valuation approach where the creation and interpretation of event values are seen as an ongoing and taxing accomplishment, we firstly expand the understanding of events beyond their actual...... present three central policy stories from the field. The stories tell of how the event was first interested, then activated and finally evaluated. Besides adding a new understanding to policy-driven events as a locus of value creation, we also argue that the AWG 2016 offer speculative bets for new...... planning and execution and of event outcomes beyond the narrow confines of bed nights and legacies. Second, we introduce policies as an entry point to unlock discussions and manifestations of value and futures which connect to AWG. In order to exemplify the workings of the AWG event in these domains, we...

  11. Population policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    Participants in the Seminar on Population Policies for Top-level Policy Makers and Program Managers, meeting in Thailand during January 1987, examined the challenges now facing them regarding the implementation of fertility regulation programs in their respective countries -- Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, and Thailand. This Seminar was organized to coincide with the completion of an Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) study investigating the impact and efficiency of family planning programs in the region. Country studies were reviewed at the Seminar along with policy issues about the status of women, incentive and disincentive programs, and socioeconomic factors affecting fertility. In Bangladesh the government recognizes population growth as its top priority problem related to the socioeconomic development of the country and is working to promote a reorientation strategy from the previous clinic-oriented to a multidimensional family welfare program. China's family planning program seeks to postpone marraige, space the births of children between 3-5 years, and promote the 1-child family. Its goal is to reduce the rate of natural increase from 12/1000 in 1978 to 5/1000 by 1985 and 0 by 2000. India's 7th Five-Year-Plan (1986-90) calls for establishing a 2-child family norm by 2000. In Indonesia the government's population policy includes reducing the rate of population growth, achieving a redistribution of the population, adjusting economic factors, and creating prosperous families. The government of Indonesia reversed its policy to reduce the population growth rate in 1984 and announced its goal of achieving a population of 70 million by 2100 in order to support mass consumption industries. It has created an income tax deduction system favoring large families and maternity benefits for women who have up to 5 children as incentives. Nepal's official policy is to

  12. Policy Reader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    This policy reader comprises: Correspondence; Memorandum of Understanding between the US Department of Transportation and the US Department of Energy for the Transportation of Radioactive Materials under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act; Internal Guidelines for Interactions with Communities and Local Governments; Statement by Ben C. Rusche before the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment, US House of Representatives, September 13, 1985; Speech presented by Ben C. Rusche before the ANS/CNS/AESJ/ENS Topical Meeting, Pasco, Washington, September 24, 1985 - ''Status of the United States' High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal Program''; and ''DOE Seeks Comments on Nuclear Transportation Planning,'' DOE News, September 30, 1985

  13. Language Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    2008-01-01

    Like any other text, instructive texts function within a given cultural and situational setting and may only be available in one language. However, the end users may not be familiar with that language and therefore unable to read and understand the instructions. This article therefore argues...... that instructive texts should always be available in a language that is understood by the end users, and that a corporate communication policy which includes a language policy should ensure that this is in fact the case for all instructive texts....

  14. Ethiopian Journal of Science and Technology: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Science and Technology: Editorial Policies ... Science and Technology (EJST) publishes high quality original research articles, reviews, short communications, ... Professor Afework Bekele, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia.

  15. Science policy up close

    CERN Document Server

    Marburger, John H

    2015-01-01

    In a career that included tenures as president of Stony Brook University, director of Brookhaven National Laboratory, and science advisor to President George W. Bush, John Marburger (1941 2011) found himself on the front line of battles that pulled science ever deeper into the political arena. From nuclear power to global warming and stem cell research, science controversies, he discovered, are never just about science. Science Policy Up Close" presents Marburger s reflections on the challenges science administrators face in the twenty-first century. In each phase of public service Marburger came into contact with a new dimension of science policy. The Shoreham Commission exposed him to the problem of handling a volatile public controversy over nuclear power. The Superconducting Super Collider episode gave him insights into the collision between government requirements and scientists expectations and feelings of entitlement. The Directorship of Brookhaven taught him how to talk to the public about the risks ...

  16. Danish Energy Efficiency Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togeby, Mikael; Larsen, Anders; Dyhr-Mikkelsen, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Ten groups of policy instruments for promoting energy efficiency are actively used in Denmark. Among these are the EU instruments such as the CO2 emissions trading scheme and labelling of appliances, labelling of all buildings, combined with national instruments such as high taxes especially...... of the entire Danish energy efficiency policy portfolio must be carried out before end 2008 and put forward for discussion among governing parties no later than February 2009. A consortium comprising Ea Energy Analyses, Niras, the Department of Society and Globalisation (Roskilde University) and 4-Fact...... on households and the public sector, obligations for energy companies (electricity, natural gas, district heating, and oil) to deliver documented savings, strict building codes, special instructions for the public sector, and an Electricity Saving Trust. A political agreement from 2005 states that an evaluation...

  17. CEP energy policy : Policy 917

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    Some of the environmental challenges facing the world in the twenty-first century are energy and global warming. Vital human needs such as warmth, light and transportation require energy, which is also required in the production of goods. Absent from the debate concerning the energy industry and its efforts to stop climate change is the voice of energy workers. Previous policies from the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada (CEP) were replaced by this policy document. After providing a brief introduction, the document tackled global challenge: climate change. The following section dealt with global challenge: corporate rule. Canada's energy industries were examined from the workers' perspective, and the state of Canada's energy reserves was discussed. From national policies to national betrayal was the title of the following section of the document. Energy de-regulation and privatization was discussed, and an argument was made for a Canadian energy policy. The industrial policy was explored, as was the environment. A transition to sustainability was examined. refs

  18. Prognóstico do duke-escore versus cintilografia em pacientes com fatores de risco para doença arterial coronariana: seguimento de um ano Prognosis of duke treadmill score versus scintilography in patients at risk for coronary artery disease: one year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Gasperin

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a sensibilidade, a especificidade e o risco de eventos cardiovasculares em pacientes com Duke-escore (DE baixo, intermediário e alto risco, em comparação com a presença (ou não de defeitos de perfusão à cintilografia do miocárdio. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo, consecutivo, com 173 pacientes com 2 ou mais fatores de risco para doença arterial coronariana (DAC, que foram submetidos à cintilografia de perfusão do miocárdio com tetrofosmin marcado com tecnécio-Tc 99m (CPM e ao teste ergométrico (aplicando-se o DE, de um bairro de Curitiba, entre janeiro de 2003 a fevereiro de 2004. Os pacientes tiveram seguimento de 13±1 meses e 162 completaram o acompanhamento. Foi avaliada a presença de morte, angina, infarto agudo do miocárdio, angioplastia coronariana e revascularização do miocárdio. RESULTADOS: A média do DE dos pacientes que apresentaram eventos (18 foi de -0,27 (95% IC= -3,97 a +3,91 e daqueles livres de eventos (144 foi de +4,92 (95% IC= +4,03 a +5,81, com pOBJECTIVE: The purpose was to determine the sensitivity, the specificity and a year-long risk of subsequent cardiovascular events in patients with low, intermediate and high risk prognostic Duke treadmill score (DTS in comparison with the presence (or not of the myocardial perfusion defects on radionuclide images. METHODS: A prospective study, with 173 consecutive patients with 02 or more risk factors to coronary artery disease (CAD, who underwent to exercise single photon - emission computed tomographic myocardial perfusion images using technetium-99m tetrophosmin (SPECT and treadmill test (with DTS, from one neighbourhood of Curitiba city, between January 2003 and February 2004, were followed up for cardiac-cause mortality and major cardiac events. Follow-up was performed in 13± 1 months and in 162 patients was complete. RESULTS: The DTS mean those patients with cardiac event (18 over a year was -0.27 (95% CI= -3.97 to +3.91 and those free

  19. Faultlines, Synergies and Frontiers of India’s Foreign Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    Paper and presentation for the International workshop “The Internal and External Constraints on Foreign Policy in India: Exploring Culture and Ethnic Sensitivities”. Jadavpur University, Kolkata in Collaboration with Political Science Department, Aalborg University and Nordic Institute for Asian...

  20. Technology Policy and Practice in Africa | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Osita M. Ogbu has a doctorate in economics from Howard University and was a ... Unit, University of Sussex, and also has a background in chemical engineering. ... on technology policy and industrial development in sub-Saharan Africa.

  1. Building policy research capacity in Myanmar | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Senior faculty from universities in Thailand (the Asian Institute of Technology and ... (the Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning-McGill University and the ... mentoring through the supervision of individual policy research projects.

  2. Our Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  3. African Journal of Economic Policy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primary aim of this journal, an offshoot of the Trade Policy Research and Training Programme in Economics Department, University of Ibadan, is to provide a forum for development and equity on the African continent. Vol 20, No 2 (2013). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or ...

  4. Informed policies

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH CENTRE. Informed ... more evidence-based policy on social ... Community involvement is key to the success of CBMS in reducing poverty. IDRC ... nationwide network of “telecentres” that ... and holidays for young people to use for ... National Conference on Youth led to the.

  5. Vaccination Policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination involves priming the immune system with an antigenic agent that mimics a virus or bacterium, which results in immunity against the “real” microorganism. Collective vaccination policies have played an important role in the control of infectious disease worldwide. They can serve the

  6. Un hombre llamado pez: la historia de Duke Kahanamoku, el nadador más rápido del mundo y el padre del surf moderno. [A Man Called Fish: the History of Duke Kahanamoku, the fastest swimmer of the World and the father of modern surfing].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Esparza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Duke Kahanamoku (1890-1968 forma parte del Salón de la Fama de la natación, y también del Salón de la Fama del surf. Es la única persona que tiene ese doble mérito. Las razones no son difíciles de entender: fue el nadador más rápido de entre los humanos hasta que llegó otro que no lo era: Tarzán, o mejor dicho, Johnny Weissmüller; y en cuanto al arte de montar las olas tuvo el mérito de expandir por otros mares y océanos esa actividad milenaria surgida en el Hawái arcaico hasta el punto de ser considerado por casi todos el padre del surf moderno. ¿Cuáles fueron sus éxitos en la natación? ¿Qué había de innovador en su técnica que le hizo el más rápido? ¿Cómo expandió el surf al mismo tiempo que realizaba exhibiciones de natación? ¿De qué energía carismática estaba dotado este hombre, que hasta el propio JFK en su visita a Honolulu en 1962 se saltó absolutamente todo el protocolo entre las autoridades norteamericanas para dirigirse directamente hacia él y saludarle efusivamente? He aquí su historia.

  7. Behavioral Insights for Federal Higher Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Ben

    2017-01-01

    The federal role in higher education has grown over the past two decades, and now a new administration has the opportunity to strengthen policies that support students and their colleges and universities. To help inform these decisions, the Urban Institute convened a bipartisan group of scholars and policy advisers to write a series of memos…

  8. IDRC and the University of Alberta

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC support enables University ... Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is one of the world's leading institutions in ... then PhD student in Educational Policy Studies, docu- ... nesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, and Taiwan.

  9. Intelligent Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, F

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: chance and the universe (synthesis of proteins; the primordial soup); the gospel according to Darwin (discussion of Darwin theory of evolution); life did not originate on earth (fossils from space; life in space); the interstellar connection (living dust between the stars; bacteria in space falling to the earth; interplanetary dust); evolution by cosmic control (microorganisms; genetics); why aren't the others here (a cosmic origin of life); after the big bang (big bang and steady state); the information rich universe; what is intelligence up to; the intelligent universe.

  10. Americans value happiness but block required policies. Book review of ‘‘The Politics of Happiness; what governments can learn from the new research on well-being’’ by Derek Bok, Princeton University Press, Princeton and Oxford, 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Ott (Jan Cornelis)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAbstract In his book ‘‘The Politics of Happiness’’ Derek Bok argues that happiness should be a goal in public policy. He presents an inventory of social problems in the US with negative effects on happiness, like inadequate education, chronic pain, sleep disorders, depressions, divorce,

  11. Entrepreneurship Education in Malaysian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Syed Zamberi; Buchanan, Robert Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Entrepreneurship education in the strongly emerging market of Malaysia was examined throughout the country's 20 public universities. A broad based interview process amongst multiple stakeholders profiled educational policies as well as revealing shortcomings in practice. Observers noted that students showed a preference for salaried jobs after…

  12. USAID University

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID University is USAID's learning management system. Features include 1) Access online courses 2) Register for instructor-led courses 3)Access your student...

  13. Runaway universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, P

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: the emerging universe (general introduction, history of astronomical and cosmological research, origins, the expanding universe, stars, galaxies, electromagnetic radiation); primeval fire (the big bang model, origin of the elements, properties of the elements and of sub-atomic particles); order out of chaos (galactic evolution, star formation, nuclear fusion, the solar system, origin of life on Earth); a star called Sol (properties of the sun and of other stars); life in the universe; the catastrophe principle (the rise and fall of cosmic order); stardoom (star evolution, neutron stars); black holes and superholes (gravitational collapse); technology and survival; the dying universe (second law of thermodynamics); worlds without end (cosmological models).

  14. Rhodes University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samridhi Sharma

    2013-10-29

    Oct 29, 2013 ... been taken may improve the reception, by the target audience, of the intended communication. This may ... alcohol marketing. Similarly .... of the intended users (Rhodes University support staff ..... Digital Human Modeling and.

  15. Energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Gasoline consumption by passenger cars and light trucks is a major source of air pollution. It also adds to the economy's dependence on petroleum and vulnerability to oil price shocks. Despite these environmental and other costs, called external cost, the price of gasoline, adjusted for inflation, has generally been declining since 1985, encouraging increased consumption. This paper reports that with these concerns in mind, the Chairman, Subcommittee on Environment, House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, requested that GAO assess policy options for addressing the external costs of gasoline consumption. To do this, GAO identified six major policy options and evaluated whether they addressed several relevant objectives, including economic growth, environmental quality, equity, petroleum conservation, visibility of costs, energy security, traffic congestion, competitiveness, and administrative feasibility

  16. Undulant Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  17. The Practice of Industrial Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Much of the information relevant to policy formulation for industrial development is held by the private sector, not by public officials. There is, therefore, fairly broad agreement in the development literature that some form of structured engagement—often referred to as close or strategic...... of poverty reduction. In 2014, the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) and United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER) launched a joint research project: The Practice of Industrial Policy. The aim is to help African policy makers develop better...... coordination between public and private sectors in order to identify the constraints to faster structural transformation and design, implement, and monitor policies to remove them. This book, written by national researchers and international experts, presents the results of that research by combining a set...

  18. Internet Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, William H.; Pupillo, Lorenzo Maria

    The Internet is now widely regarded as essential infrastructure for our global economy and society. It is in our homes and businesses. We use it to communicate and socialize, for research, and as a platform for E-commerce. In the late 1990s, much was predicted about what the Internet has become at present; but now, we have actual experience living with the Internet as a critical component of our everyday lives. Although the Internet has already had profound effects, there is much we have yet to realize. The present volume represents a third installment in a collaborative effort to highlight the all-encompassing, multidisciplinary implications of the Internet for public policy. The first installment was conceived in 1998, when we initiated plans to organize an international conference among academic, industry, and government officials to discuss the growing policy agenda posed by the Internet. The conference was hosted by the European Commission in Brussels in 1999 and brought together a diverse mix of perspectives on what the pressing policy issues would be confronting the Internet. All of the concerns identified remain with us today, including how to address the Digital Divide, how to modify intellectual property laws to accommodate the new realities of the Internet, what to do about Internet governance and name-space management, and how to evolve broadcast and telecommunications regulatory frameworks for a converged world.

  19. The Reform of Qatar University. Monograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moini, Joy S.; Bikson, Tora K.; Neu, C. Richard; DeSisto, Laura

    2009-01-01

    In 2003, the State of Qatar engaged the RAND-Qatar Policy Institute to assist Qatar University, the nation's first and only public higher education institution, with reform of its major administrative and academic structures, policies, and practices. This monograph summarizes that reform effort, which formally lasted from October 2003 through…

  20. Improving University Research Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley O’Reilly

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the current data management practices of university researchers at an Intermountain West land-grant research university in the United States. Key findings suggest that researchers are primarily focused on the collection and housing of research data. However, additional research value exists within the other life cycle stages for research data—specifically in the stages of delivery and maintenance. These stages are where most new demands and requirements exist for data management plans and policies that are conditional for external grant funding; therefore, these findings expose a “gap” in current research practice. These findings should be of interest to academics and practitioners alike as findings highlight key management gaps in the life cycle of research data. This study also suggests a course of action for academic institutions to coalesce campus-wide assets to assist researchers in improving research value.

  1. Creating spin-off : designing entrepreneurship conducive universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, van J.C.

    2010-01-01

    University spin-offs are companies founded to exploit university intellectual property. They serve to transform technological breakthroughs from university research, which would probably remain unexploited otherwise. Therefore, policy makers have become very interested in university spin-offs as a

  2. University Opinion Poll 9: Child Care, MPIRG, Lettuce. Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matross, Ronald; And Others

    The University Opinion Poll conducted a survey of student opinion on issues related to University-sponsored day care, the role of the Minnesota Public Interest Research Group (MPIRG) and the University's policy on buying lettuce for its food services. Four hundred fifty-two respondents, 76% of a random sample of University of Minnesota students,…

  3. The Challenge of University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilly, John; Turcan, Romeo V.; Bugaian, Larisa

    2016-01-01

    The authors introduce the reader to the book, providing a historical perspective and a current understanding of university autonomy. While appreciating the central role of the four dimensions of university autonomy – organisational, financial, human resource, and academic – the authors conjecture...... that a fuller understanding of university autonomy can only be obtained through a holistic view of the complex inter-relationships between stakeholders and policies which can reinforce and, equally, pull in opposite directions. This holistic view is represented in a model of institutional university autonomy......, which is discussed at length in the chapter. The authors conclude by presenting international case studies that give new insights and reinforce our understanding that the issues relating to institutional university autonomy are genuinely global....

  4. POPULATION POLICY OR SOCIAL POLICY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREI STANOIU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available After 1989, the demographic situation of Romania population experienced a dramatic, very concerning and dangerous evolution trend. One of the first measures of the new political power was to abolish the very restrictive, anti-human and abusive legal regulation adopted in 1966 by the communist regime concerning abortion and the whole old demographic policy. As a result of this measure and of the worsening economic and social situation of the great majority of Romanian population, the birth rate declined sharply and, from 1992, the natural demographic growth rate became a negative one. The absolute number of Romanian population decreased more and more and, if nothing changes, in the next few decades it will be no bigger than 15 million people. At the same time, the process of demographic ageing of population will accentuate, generating serious problems from demographic and social-economic point of view, Taking into account the present demographic situation and, especially, the foreseen trend of evolution, it is more than clear that there should be taken some urgent, coherent and consistent measures in order to stop this dangerous demographic evolution, until it is not too late, and to avoid, as much as possible, a potential demographic disaster. The problem is: what kind of measures should be taken and what kind of policy should be adopted? Some social scientists believe that a new population policy should be adopted; some others believe that rather a social policy should be adopted. The purpose of my paper is to analyze this different opinions and to show that, behind the dispute on the terminology, should be taken consistent measures, at governmental level, in order to assure a substantial improvement of demographic situation, not only from a quantitative, but from a qualitative point of view as well, and to identify some of these kind of measures.

  5. Plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-04-01

    Traditionally the views in our cosmic environment have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasma. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If we try to base a model of the universe on the plasma phenomena mentioned we find that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasma. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasma are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model we apply it to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4-5 bilions years ago with an accuracy of better than 1 percent

  6. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2. Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414, Duke Power Company, et al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Duke Power Company, North Carolina Municipal Power Agency Number 1, North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, and Saluda River Electric Cooperative, Inc. as applicants and owners, for licenses to operate the Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in York County, South Carolina, approximately 9.6 km (6 mi) north of Rock Hill and adjacent to Lake Wylie. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this report, the staff concludes that the facility can be operated by the applicant without endangering the health and safety of the public

  7. Agustín Sanz and Francisco de Goya: the Reform Project for the Palace of the Dukes of Híjar in Zaragoza and the Failed Pictorial Decoration of its Façade (1773-1774

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier MARTÍNEZ MOLINA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the project conceived at the end of 1773 by the well-known Aragonese architect Agustín Sanz Alós for the reform of the façade and the most important rooms of the main floor of the Palace of the Dukes of Híjar in Zaragoza, a project in which his good friend Francisco de Goya was included in order to decorate the façade with mural paintings. The paper addresses aspects such as the previous history of the building, its partial rehabilitation by Sanz, the ordering and design process of the reform project of the building, or the later evolution of the building until present day. The reform project of Agustín Sanz, including the failed participation of Francisco de Goya, is also analysed and interpreted from an artistic viewpoint.

  8. "Mind the Gap": Researchers Ignore Politics at Their Own Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Judith

    2016-02-01

    No matter how distasteful researchers find policy politics, effective policy requires that they engage. Drawing on her career bridging the research/politics gap in health care policy, the author makes a case for why and how researchers can do just that. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  9. Legitimizing policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Bak

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is on representations of irregular migration in a Scandinavian context and how irregular migrants are constructed as a target group. A common feature in many (Western-)European states is the difficult attempt to navigate between an urge for control and respecting......, upholding and promoting humanitarian aspects of migration management. Legitimizing policies therefore become extremely important as governments have to appease national voters to remain in power and have to respect European regulations and international conventions. Doing so raises questions of social...

  10. Book Review: Market Liquidity: Theory, Evidence, and Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boscan, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Review of: Market Liquidity: Theory, Evidence, and Policy / by Thierry Foucault, Marco Pagano and Ailsa Röell. Oxford University Press. April 2013.......Review of: Market Liquidity: Theory, Evidence, and Policy / by Thierry Foucault, Marco Pagano and Ailsa Röell. Oxford University Press. April 2013....

  11. Cyber-intrusion Auto-response and Policy Management System (CAPMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusk, Steve [ViaSat Inc., Boston, MA (United States); Lawrence, David [Duke Energy, Charlotte, NC (United States); Suvana, Prakash [Southern California Edison, Rosemead, CA (United States)

    2015-11-11

    The Cyber-intrusion Auto-response and Policy Management System (CAPMS) project was funded by a grant from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) program with contributions from two partner electric utilities: Southern California Edison (SCE) and Duke Energy. The goal of the project was to demonstrate protecting smart grid assets from a cyber attack in a way that “does not impede critical energy delivery functions.” This report summarizes project goals and activities for the CAPMS project and explores what did and did not work as expected. It concludes with an assessment of possible benefits and value of the system for the future.

  12. Baby universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses how the subject of baby universes and their effects on spacetime coupling constants is in its infancy and rapidly developing. The subject is based on the non-existent (even by physicists' standards) Euclidean formulation of quantum gravity, and it is therefore necessary to make a number of assumptions in order to proceed. Nevertheless, the picture which has emerged is quite appealing: all spacetime coupling constants become dynamical variables when the effects of baby universes are taken into account. This fact might even solve the puzzle of the cosmological constant. The subject therefore seems worth further investigation

  13. Change Leadership in Universities: The Confucian Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjeldvoll, Arild

    2011-01-01

    The intensified competition of the global, market-based knowledge economy requires change leadership in universities and colleges throughout the world. National policy makers increasingly see knowledge as a core resource of modern economies and a prerequisite for global competitiveness. By implication, the quality of university leadership becomes…

  14. Equitable multilingualism? The case of Stellenbosch University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reflects on Stellenbosch University Writing Lab's pedagogical approach to multilingualism and inclusivity within the complex and political nature of multilingual language policies at a South African university. The Writing Lab has always been promoted as a facility for all students, not just those in need of ...

  15. Japanese Flagship Universities at a Crossroads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Akiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The increasing pace and scope of global structural change has left Japanese flagship universities at a crossroads. Reflecting upon historical trends, current policy changes and respective institutional strategies for global marketing among Japanese top research universities, the author discusses possible future directions for these institutions…

  16. OWNERSHIP POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Branovitskiy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the ownership policy in Ukraine. It makes a survey of the following: the current situation at state-run enterprises and their efficiency; the key criteria of the classification of state-run enterprises for the privatization for the period of 2017-2020. The article evaluates the institutional changes coming from a new law on the privatization of state-owned property in Ukraine. It reveals the stages of making the ownership policy as a state strategy. It describes the measures meant to raise efficiency in the area of the public property management. The article assesses the state of play of the stock market in Ukraine as a mechanism to attract money to the real economy. It recommends attracting foreign investment to the public sector of economy following the restructuring process via IPO or sale to a strategic investor (Private equity. It considers the positive aspects in the completion of active privatization and the scope of the main privatization risks.

  17. Stiegler's University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Mark Featherstone proposes to explore Bernard Stiegler's work through the lens of the politics of education and in particular the idea of the university, which becomes a pharmacological space of, on the one hand, utopian possibility, and, on the other hand, dystopian limitation, destruction, and death in his recent "States of…

  18. Navigating Cuba’s Energy Choices: Design Variables and Insights from Duke University’s ‘Energy for Emerging Markets’ Case Competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeer, Daniel L.; Fernandez-Aballí Altamirano, Carlos; Masters, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Cuba’s energy decision makers are facing challenging choices as they consider the Country’s energy needs in coming decades. A shifting tide in domestic policy and international relations is ushering in new economic activity that will increase demand for electricity on the long run. Meanwhile, recent events with Cuba’s traditional energy partners have highlighted concerns around reliance on foreign fuel sources for electricity production. These factors create a compelling mandate for the government to chart a transition to cleaner sources of energy and greater resiliency of its energy system. Inherently, energy systems are technically complex, capital-intensive, highly regulated, and involve a wide variety of disciplines and stakeholders. While there are a multitude of questions to address, such topics can be distilled into several key design variables . These design variables broadly fall into three categories: technology, policy, and finance. The designers of Cuba’s energy system must decide which technologies to utilize, what policies are needed to enable new approaches, and how capital will be attracted to enable the required investment. By working with international academic partners, Cuba can benefit from new insights and innovative approaches to rapidly evolving its energy system to meet its future needs. (author)

  19. Universities, SMEs and Innovation Frameworks: Think Global, Act Local?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickernell, David; Clifton, Nick; Senyard, Julienne

    2009-01-01

    Universities are increasingly encouraged to take a leading role in economic development, particularly through innovation. Simultaneously, economic development policy itself is increasingly focused on small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), creating overlapping interactions in the roles of government policy, universities and SMEs and the…

  20. Original Research Article Second-Hand Smoke in a University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    staff and students concerning tobacco policies at a university campus in a ... to smoking and exposure to second-hand smoke on campus. A. 3-wave e-mailing was used to send the questionnaire. Results: ... smoke free policies on university campuses in North America. ... reported that cigarette smoking among fulltime.