WorldWideScience

Sample records for policy awarded 3-year

  1. AID awards 3-year Guatemala contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The US Agency for International Development (USAID) has awarded a 3-year US$593,036 grant to the Los Angeles firm of Juarez and Associates, Inc. to help implement a contraceptive social marketing project in Guatemala. The firm will provide marketing assistance to the for-profit organization. Importadora de Productos Farmaceuticos (PROFA), an offshoot of the nonprofit International Planned Parenthood Federation affiliate, Asociacion Pro-Bienestar de la Familia de Guatemala (APROFAM), created specifically to conduct the social marketing project. Juarez and Associates has previous market research experience in family planning in Guatemala. Contraceptive social marketing sales are projected to begin in early 1985.

  2. Research Award: Policy and Evaluation

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    government, supports the implementation of IDRC's Strategic Plan, stewards IDRC's evaluation system, leads strategic evaluations, and coordinates annual planning and reporting. While the Policy and Evaluation Division welcomes a range of potential research topics, strong preference will be given to proposals that are ...

  3. 29 CFR 95.11 - Pre-award policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... policies. Public Notice and Priority Setting. Federal awarding agencies shall notify the public of its... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Pre-award policies. 95.11 Section 95.11 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON...

  4. Research Award: Policy and Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Deadline: September 7, 2016 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh ...

  5. Research award: Policy and Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-14

    Jan 14, 2018 ... What are the opportunities to integrate big data and artificial intelligence into strategy and evaluation for research for development? ... Applications must be submitted via email directly to the Policy and Evaluation Division at poev@idrc.ca and may consist only of a resume and cover letter, including an ...

  6. 77 FR 38338 - Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide; Comments Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide; Comments Request AGENCY: National Science Foundation... Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide. The original comment date was to end on June 25, 2012...

  7. Lonnie R. Snowden Jr.: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy is given to a psychologist who has made a distinguished empirical and/or theoretical contribution to research in public policy, either through a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of work. The 2014 recipient of this award is Lonnie R. Snowden Jr. "Over the past several decades, Lonnie R. Snowden Jr. has systematically built a research agenda on the financing and organization of mental health services that has driven much of our current health policy reform efforts." Snowden Jr.'s award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. The Journal of Consumer Policy Outstanding Reviewer Award 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisch, Lucia A.

    2016-01-01

    The article announces the Outstanding Reviewer Award 2016 to be given by the journal to Wencke Gwozdz, Associate Professor at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.......The article announces the Outstanding Reviewer Award 2016 to be given by the journal to Wencke Gwozdz, Associate Professor at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark....

  9. Research Award: Policy and Planning Group (PPG) Deadline: 12 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... IDRC's Research Awards are a unique opportunity for master's and doctoral-level students, as well as recent graduates to enhance their research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. This one-year, paid in-house program of training and mentorship in research, research ...

  10. 78 FR 55091 - Fair Housing Initiatives Program-Fiscal Year 2013 Application and Award Policies and Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... on the Applications and Awards Procedures and Policies (AAPP) Guide, which can be found at: http... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Fair Housing Initiatives Program--Fiscal Year 2013 Application and Award Policies and Procedures--Solicitation of Comment AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal...

  11. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy: Charlotte J. Patterson

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Charlotte J. Patterson, winner of the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy, is cited as the world's expert on psychological research on children and youths raised by lesbian and gay parents. Her early analytic syntheses of the literature on the subject greatly influenced other researchers in child and family…

  12. TRMM 3-Year Anniversary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Ever wonder about the rain? Beyond the practicality of needing an umbrella, climate researchers have wondered about the science of rainfall for a long time. But it's only in the past few years that they've begun to roll back some of its secrets. One of their tools for doing so is a powerful satellite called the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, or TRMM. Now, after three years of continual operation, project scientists have released dramatic new maps of rainfall patterns gathered across a wide band of the Earth. And with measurements from one of the satellite's advanced sensors, meteorologists are now able to calibrate ground-based rain monitoring systems with greater precision than ever before. A complete accounting of the world's total rainfall has long been a major goal of climate researchers. Rain acts as the atmosphere's fundamental engine for heat exchange; every time a raindrop falls, the atmosphere gets churned up and latent heat flows back into the total climate system. Considering that rainfall is the primary driving force of heat in the atmosphere, and that two thirds of all rain falls in the tropics, these measurements are significant for our understanding of overall climate. The above image shows a one month average of rainfall measurements taken by the TRMM's unique precipitation radar during January of 1998. Areas of low rainfall are colored light blue, while regions with heavy rainfal are colored orange and red. TRMM began collecting data in December of 1997, and continues today. For more information about TRMM's 3-year anniversary, read Maps of Falling Water To learn more about the TRMM mission or order TRMM data, see the TRMM Home Page. Image courtesy TRMM Science team and the NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  13. Accessibility to primary health care in Belgium: an evaluation of policies awarding financial assistance in shortage areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewulf, Bart; Neutens, Tijs; De Weerdt, Yves; Van de Weghe, Nico

    2013-08-22

    In many countries, financial assistance is awarded to physicians who settle in an area that is designated as a shortage area to prevent unequal accessibility to primary health care. Today, however, policy makers use fairly simple methods to define health care accessibility, with physician-to-population ratios (PPRs) within predefined administrative boundaries being overwhelmingly favoured. Our purpose is to verify whether these simple methods are accurate enough for adequately designating medical shortage areas and explore how these perform relative to more advanced GIS-based methods. Using a geographical information system (GIS), we conduct a nation-wide study of accessibility to primary care physicians in Belgium using four different methods: PPR, distance to closest physician, cumulative opportunity, and floating catchment area (FCA) methods. The official method used by policy makers in Belgium (calculating PPR per physician zone) offers only a crude representation of health care accessibility, especially because large contiguous areas (physician zones) are considered. We found substantial differences in the number and spatial distribution of medical shortage areas when applying different methods. The assessment of spatial health care accessibility and concomitant policy initiatives are affected by and dependent on the methodology used. The major disadvantage of PPR methods is its aggregated approach, masking subtle local variations. Some simple GIS methods overcome this issue, but have limitations in terms of conceptualisation of physician interaction and distance decay. Conceptually, the enhanced 2-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA) method, an advanced FCA method, was found to be most appropriate for supporting areal health care policies, since this method is able to calculate accessibility at a small scale (e.g., census tracts), takes interaction between physicians into account, and considers distance decay. While at present in health care research

  14. District Awards for Teacher Excellence (D.A.T.E.) Program: Year One Evaluation Report. Policy Evaluation Report. [Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Matthew G.; Lewis, Jessica L.; Podgursky, Michael J.; Ehlert, Mark W.; Taylor, Lori L.; Lopez, Omar S.; Ghoshdastidar, Bonnie; Peng, Art

    2010-01-01

    The District Awards for Teacher Excellence's (D.A.T.E.'s) first year of implementation in 2008-09 occurred at a time when Texas was operating several state-funded performance pay programs. The three-year Governor's Educator Excellence Grant (G.E.E.G.) program was coming to its expected completion, while the Texas Educator Excellence Grant…

  15. CMS Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Ali Mohammad Rafiee receives the CMS Gold Award from Michel Della Negra of CMS. As part of the fifth annual CMS Awards, Iranian contractor HEPCO, located in Arak, an industrial town 200 km west of Tehran, received their Gold Award in a ceremony held on 14 June 2004 (the other award winners were reported in bulletin 13/2004). The Awards are given each year to a small number of the approximately one thousand contractors working on the CMS project. Gold Awards are given for outstanding technical achievement in work carried out for the detector. HEPCO received the Award for the excellent quality of their work in constructing two 25 tonne support tables, two 75 tonne shields (FCS) and eight supporting brackets to lower the HF into the cavern. Welds and machining obtained tolerances that were very difficult in structures of that size. Mr. A. M. Rafiee, the General Manager of the company, acknowledged the benefits of this collaboration, and thanked the efforts and skills of the many staff involved.

  16. 43 CFR 12.2 - What policies are financial assistance awards and subawards in the form of grants and cooperative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... capacity the proprietary products or processes of manufacturers or the services of commercial firms for...-the-job seat belt use policies and programs for your employees when operating company-owned, rented... programs for their employees when operating company-owned, rented, or personally owned vehicles. These...

  17. Hero Award

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-07

    This podcast is a lecture given by William H. Foege, MD, MPH when he was honored October 7, 2009 as the 2009 CDC Foundation Hero Award Recipient.  Created: 10/7/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/22/2009.

  18. Albatross awarded

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Albatross Award was presented by the American Miscellaneous Society to Sir George Deacon at the Joint Oceanographic Assembly held in Halifax in August 1982. The presentation speech by Warren Wooster and acceptance speech by Sir George Deacon follow.I have been asked by the governing board of the American Miscellaneous Society to present the Albatross Award this evening. But I hasten to point out that the Board is certainly mythical, and there is even some doubt about the existence of the Society. We know that the American Miscellaneous Society, AMSOC, has had several important committees—the committee to greet visitors from outer space and the committee to teach animals their Latin names, for example—but we know little of their success. On the other hand, the triumphs of AMSOC's Project MOHOLE are al ready inscribed in history.

  19. CMS AWARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Lowette

    Working under great time pressure towards a common goal in gradual steps can sometimes cause us to forget to take a step back, and celebrate what marvels have been achieved. A general need was felt within CMS to expand the recognition for our young scientists that made outstanding, well recognized and creative contributions to CMS, which served to significantly advance the performance of CMS as a complete and powerful experiment. Therefore, the Collaboration Board endorsed in March 2009 a proposal from the CB Chair and Advisory Group to award each year the newly created "CMS Achievement Award" to fourteen graduate students and postdocs that made exceptional contributions to the Tracker, ECAL, HCAL and Muon subdetectors as well as the TriDAS project, the Commissioning of CMS and the Offline Software and Computing projects. It was also agreed that there was a need to go back in time, and retroactively attribute awards for the years 2007 and 2008 when CMS went from a bare cavern to a detect...

  20. How Grammatical Are 3-Year-Olds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Sarita L.; Guo, Ling-Yu; Germezia, Mor

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the level of grammatical accuracy in typically developing 3-year-olds and the types of errors they produce. Method: Twenty-two 3-year-olds participated in a picture description task. The percentage of grammatical utterances was computed and error types were analyzed. Results: The mean level of grammatical accuracy…

  1. Research Award: Non-Communicable Disease Prevention

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    In 2015,. NCDP invites research award proposals that advance our program by exploring the challenges of adopting and implementing policies that prevent NCDs and reduce the major risk factors, such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet, alcohol misuse, and physical inactivity. This includes evidence for policies and laws that:.

  2. The John Muir Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Graham

    2002-01-01

    The John Muir Award was established in the United Kingdom to respond to minimal environmental awareness, especially among youth. The Award has three levels of effort; all involve discovering a wild place, exploring its wildness, helping to conserve it, and sharing the experience with a wider audience. There is an effort to establish the award in…

  3. Body Composition at 3-years of Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlerskov, Katrine Tschentscher

    Background: Birth weight and high weight gain the first years of life is associated with later body composition and increased risk of obesity. A detailed description of body composition at 3 years of age and factors related to the distribution of fat and fat-free mass is interesting, since body...... with later increased adiposity risk. Growth in early childhood is highly related to the levels of insulin-like growth factor-I. Objectives: Data used in this thesis is from the prospective cohort study SKOT which includes 330 children examined at 9, 18 and 36 months of age. The main objective with this Ph......D study was to look at which factors were related to body composition at 3 years of age with a special focus on factors related to later obesity risk. A methodological objective was to be able to predict body composition by using bioelectrical impedance and anthropometry. Secondly, an objective...

  4. 2004 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Jeneil Biosurfactant Company, makes biobased, rhamnolipid surfactants by fermentation that are less toxic and more biodegradable than conventional surfactants.

  5. Research Award: Think Tank Initiative | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. The Think Tank Initiative is a global program that supports independent policy research organizations – or "think tanks" ...

  6. Research award: Think Tank Initiative | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. The Think Tank Initiative is a global program that supports independent policy research organizations, or “think tanks”, ...

  7. Clean Cities National Partner Awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-05-01

    U. S. DOE Clean Cities Program has awarded its National Partner awards for 2002, and the awards will be presented at the Clean Cities Conference in May 2002. This fact sheets describe the winners and their contributions.

  8. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  9. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    Example of the letter required by IDRC: Reference: IDRC Awards competition: John Smith (Please indicate the title of the award.) a) As research supervisor of Mr. John Smith, I confirm that I approve and support the research proposal submitted by the candidate. b) Mr. Smith has successfully completed the following course(s):.

  10. Awards aplenty in Krakow

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    CERN will be well represented this year at the award ceremony organized by the European Physical Society (EPS) in Krakow. The Gargamelle Collaboration is being awarded the High Energy and Particle Physics prize, while Maurizio Pierini shares the Young Physicist Prize. Both Mick Storr and Andrzej Siemko will be awarded the Medal of the Polish Commission of National Education.This year’s EPS-High Energy and Particle Physics Prize is being awarded to the Gargamelle Collaboration for the discovery of the weak neutral current. Gargamelle’s large bubble chamber is now displayed in the Microcosm garden at CERN in commemoration of the discovery that led to the acceptance of the electroweak theory and the award of the Noble prize to Glashow, Salam and Weinberg in 1979. On 3 September 1973 the collaboration published two papers in the same issue of Physics Letters, one on neutral currents involving electrons, the other on neutral current interactions with hadrons (protons and neut...

  11. Pension Fund award

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Pension Fund won the Investments & Pensions Europe (IPE) 2013 Gold Award in the Medium Real-Estate Investor category. IPE is the leading European publication on the subject of pensions. The awards were judged by a panel of 22 members, which included leading European investment consultants and pension fund executives.     Théodore Economou (left), the CERN Pension Fund’s Chief Executive Officer, receives the IPE 2013 Gold Award.   The award recognised the “fresh thinking” behind the CERN Pension Fund’s updated real-estate strategy, which has brought it “focus” on “high-quality assets and diversification.” The jury also noted the Fund’s “streamlined and cost-efficient” management, and noted that CERN is “running a tight ship”. While the awards are given by a European institution, they have a worldwide scope, and winners in ot...

  12. Joseph A. Burton Forum Award Talk: How a Physics Education has Influenced Practice and Graduate Education in Technically-Focused Quantitative Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger Morgan, M.

    2011-04-01

    In a book for the general public published a year before his death, Carl Sagan wrote, "Every time a scientific paper presents a bit of data, it's accompanied by an error bar---a quiet but instant reminder that no knowledge is complete or perfect." For those of us educated in experimental natural science such an observation seems so obvious as to hardly need saying. Yet when, after completing a PhD in experimental radio physics, I began to work on problems in environmental and energy risk and policy analysis in the early 1970s, I was amazed to find that the characterization and treatment of uncertainty was almost completely lacking in the analysis of that day. In the first part of this talk, I will briefly summarize how I, and a number of my physics-educated colleagues, have worked to rectify this situation. Doctoral education in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy (EPP) at Carnegie Mellon University has also been shaped by a number of ideas and problem-solving styles that derive from physics. These have been strengthened considerably through integration with a number of ideas from experimental social science -- a field that too many in physics ignore or even belittle. In the second part of the talk, I will describe the PhD program in EPP, talk a bit about some of its unique features, and describe a few of the problems we address.

  13. RACE, ETHNICITY, AND NIH RESEARCH AWARDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginther, Donna K.; Schaffer, Walter T.; Schnell, Joshua; Masimore, Beth; Liu, Faye; Haak, Laurel L.; Kington, Raynard

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the association between a U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 applicant’s self-identified race or ethnicity and the probability of receiving an award by using data from the NIH IMPAC II grant database, the Thomson Reuters Web of Science, and other sources. Although proposals with strong priority scores were equally likely to be funded regardless of race, we find that Asians are 4 percentage points and black or African-American applicants are 13 percentage points less likely to receive NIH investigator-initiated research funding compared with whites. After controlling for the applicant’s educational background, country of origin, training, previous research awards, publication record, and employer characteristics, we find that black or African-American applicants remain 10 percentage points less likely than whites to be awarded NIH research funding. Our results suggest some leverage points for policy intervention. PMID:21852498

  14. Great Indoors Awards 2007

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Hollandis Maastrichtis jagati 17. XI esimest korda rahvusvahelist auhinda The Great Indoors Award. Aasta sisekujundusfirmaks valiti Masamichi Katayama asutatud Wonderwall. Auhinna said veel Zaha Hadid, Heatherwick Studio, Ryui Nakamura Architects ja Item Idem

  15. CPD Allocations and Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The CPD Allocation and Award database provides filterable on-screen and exportable reports on select programs, such as the Community Development Block Grant Program,...

  16. FY11 Coc Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the renewal homeless assistance projects being awarded by HUD under the 2011 Continuum of Care (CoC) competitive grants process. Approximately...

  17. 2015 Gulf Guardian Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  18. Tectonics wins AAP Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    AGU's newest journal, Tectonics, won the 1983 award for excellence in journal design and production given by the Association of American Publishers, Inc. (AAP), in the eighth annual professional and scholarly publishing awards competition. Edited by John F. Dewey, the bimonthly journal is a joint publication of AGU and the European Geophysical Society. Paul E. Tapponnier is the European editor and B.C. Burchfiel is the North American editor. The journal is now in its third year of publication.

  19. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...... addresses and draws upon two sets of sociological writings: one concerned with prizes and awards; the other with evaluative practices....

  20. Using EIKEN, TOEFL, and TOEIC to Award EFL Course Credits in Japanese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    In'nami, Yo; Koizumi, Rie

    2017-01-01

    Despite the wide use of language tests as a basis for awarding English language course credits at Japanese universities, little has been published about how universities set policies on awarding credits according to external test scores. To narrow this gap, the characteristics of such policies were investigated in relation to the EIKEN Test in…

  1. Closing Remarks and Awards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, M.; Van der Meer, K.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-01-01

    M. Whitaker: On behalf of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management, we are grateful for the opportunity to support this symposium. The number of symposium events-presentations, posters, technical demonstrations, panel discussions, and receptions - has been completely overwhelming and truly impressive. My compliments to the IAEA organization staff for a spectacular event. I have gained a much better appreciation for why these are only once every four years. This symposium has provided an important opportunity to reengage with friends and colleagues from around the globe to discuss international safeguards topics. The theme this year is very appropriate. So much of our work relies upon people. Together we work to develop the strategies that ensure that international safeguards are effectively implemented to provide the world the assurances that they expect from us. Thank you for this opportunity to share in the organization and execution of this symposium. K. Van der Meer: It is my pleasure to give the last poster awards. We have had two award ceremonies already this week on Wednesday and Thursday to recognize the best posters in those sessions. Today it will be two parts. First we will give the award for the best posters for this morning's sessions, and then we have four special awards: Gold, Silver, Bronze and the New Generation Symposium Award. These are the awards for the best posters for the whole week. The New Generation Symposium Award is for recognition of a younger participant and the prize is also for a younger participant. The full list of award winners is available under the symposium website. The IAEA recognizes the generous donations by INMM and ESARDA of the following prizes given as awards for the best posters: · Best e-poster advertisement per session: free subscription to the ESARDA Bulletin; · Best e-poster per session: free membership in INMM; · Best poster of the week ''Bronze'': free registration for the 8th INMM

  2. Acute epididymitis in Greek children: a 3-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellaris, George S; Charissis, Giorgos C

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the study was to compare historical features, physical examination findings, and testicular color Doppler ultrasound in pediatric patients with epididymitis compared to testicular torsion and torsion of the appendix testes. A retrospective review of the medical records of 66 boys presenting with clinical aspects of acute scrotum over a 3-year period was performed. Sixty-six patients were included in the study (29 with epididymitis, 8 with testicular torsion and 12 with torsion of the appendix testis, 4 with scrotal abscesses, 5 with scrotal swelling, and 1 with inflamed epididymal cyst). The duration of symptoms ranged from 6 h to 4 days with a peak on the second day. Urine cultures and viral testes were negative in all patients. Color Doppler ultrasound was diagnostic for epididymitis in 28 patients (96.6%). Systemic intravenous antibiotics were given in all 29 patients with epididymitis. No patient showed signs of testicular atrophy in the follow-up. The increasing incidence of epididymitis should question the policy of routine exploration of the acute scrotum in children. The history and physical examination cannot reliably identify those boys who can be managed conservatively. Color Doppler ultrasound is a useful adjunct in the evaluation of the acute scrotum when physical findings are equivocal but it can also be misleading.

  3. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...

  4. Award Winning Science Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Victor M.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    This is a collection of reports of student award winning science projects that have appeared in "The Science Teacher." Grade levels 7-12 are represented with projects categorized as follows: biology, chemistry and physics, earth-space science, and miscellaneous. In each section the abstracts are arranged in order of increasing complexity…

  5. Research Award: Networked Economies

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    2015-08-06

    Aug 6, 2015 ... have completed a master's or doctoral degree at a recognized university. These awards may be part of an academic requirement. • Your proposed research must focus on a developing country. The research awardee should have the following qualifications: • Master's degree in social sciences, media ...

  6. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  7. FAQs for Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    Visit the Grants page for details on the positions offered by IDRC's programs. 9) How do you select Research Awardees? You can find out more about the Research Awards evaluation process in the Call for Application and Checklist documents under the Grants Web page. 10) Can someone at IDRC review my research ...

  8. Global Cancer Humanitarian Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat Garcia-Gonzalez of the Max Foundation accepted the first annual NCI Global Cancer Medicine Humanitarian Award for her work in chronic myeloid leukemia at the NCI, Center for Global Health Symposium for Global Cancer Research, held in Boston on March 25, 2015.

  9. Awards and honours

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS

    2009-01-01

    On the occasion of the international woman day, on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded “Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana” by the Italian President for her “scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project”.

  10. ATLAS Thesis Award 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on 22 February, 2018. They are pictured here with Karl Jakobs (ATLAS Spokesperson), Max Klein (ATLAS Collaboration Board Chair) and Katsuo Tokushuku (ATLAS Collaboration Board Deputy Chair).

  11. International Humanitarian Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The International Humanitarian Award recognizes extraordinary humanitarian services and activism by psychologists, including professional and volunteer work conducted primarily in the field with underserved populations. Award recipients are psychologists who, by their extraordinary service at a difficult time, improve the lives and contribute to the well-being of people in a large or small geographic area anywhere in the world. The 2017 recipient of the APA International Humanitarian Award was selected by the 2016 Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP). The members of the 2016 CIRP were Melissa Morgan Consoli, PhD, and Arpana G. Inman, PhD (Co-chairs); Rehman Abdulrehman, PhD; Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD; Frederic Bemak, EdD; Brigitte Khoury, PhD; Susan Nolan, PhD; Nancy Sidun, PsyD; and Danny Wedding, PhD. Dr. Morgan Consoli, Dr. Inman, Dr. Nolan, and Doctor Sidun were members of the subcommittee for the 2017 award. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. In Brief: Awards for best geoscience publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-01-01

    Four Earth science publications were honored by the Geoscience Information Society (GSIS) at its meeting held in conjunction with the 2007 meeting of the Geological Society of America. The four-volume Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science, published by Elsevier in 2007, received the Mary B. Ansari Best Reference Work Award as an outstanding reference work in the field of geoscience information published during the previous 3 years. Lura E. Joseph, associate professor of administration and geology librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, received the GSIS Best Paper Award for her article, ``Image and figure quality: A study of Elsevier's Earth and Planetary Sciences electronic journal back file package,'' published in the September-December 2006 issue of Library Collections, Acquisitions, and Technical Services. The Best Guidebook Award recognized two books: Geology of the Chama Basin, published by the New Mexico Geological Society in 2005, and 1906 San Francisco Earthquake Centennial Field Guides, published by the Geological Society of America in 2006. For more information, visit the Web site: http://www.geoinfo.org.

  13. CMS Industries awarded gold, crystal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CMS collaboration honoured 10 of its top suppliers in the seventh annual awards ceremony The representatives of the firms that recieved the CMS Gold and Crystal Awards stand with their awards after the ceremony. The seventh annual CMS Awards ceremony was held on Monday 13 March to recognize the industries that have made substantial contributions to the construction of the collaboration's detector. Nine international firms received Gold Awards, and General Tecnica of Italy received the prestigious Crystal Award. Representatives from the companies attended the ceremony during the plenary session of CMS week. 'The role of CERN, its machines and experiments, beyond particle physics is to push the development of equipment technologies related to high-energy physics,'said CMS Awards Coordinator Domenico Campi. 'All of these industries must go beyond the technologies that are currently available.' Without the involvement of good companies over the years, the construction of the CMS detector wouldn't be possible...

  14. Awards and honours

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    President of the Italian Republic, Giorgio Napolitano, presenting Fabiola Gianotti with her award on 7 March.On the occasion of International Woman’s Day on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded "Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana" by the Italian President for her "scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project". Gianotti received the honorary title also for "her contribution to the prestige of the Italian scientific community in the field of nuclear physics." Further reading (in Italian only): http://www.quirinale.it/Comunicati/Comunicato.asp?id=38192 An article about the beginning of Gianotti’s term of office as ATLAS spokesperson is available from the latest issue of the CERN Courier: http://cerncourier.com/cws/article/cern/38709

  15. Langley Medal awarded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Robert Thomas Jones, senior scientist at the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, Calif., was awarded the distinguished Langley Medal by the Smithsonian Institution for his ‘extensive contributions in theoretical aerodynamics, particularly with regard to development of the swept wing, supersonic area rule and, more recently, the oblique wing.’ Jones is an internationally acclaimed expert on aerodynamics, optics, and biomechanics as well as an applied mathematician, astronomer, inventor, author, and violin maker.The Langley award has been given to just 16 recipients since it was established 73 years ago. Past recipients include Wilbur and Orville Wright, Charles Lindbergh, and Richard Byrd. Named for Samuel Pierpont Langley, aeronautical pioneer and third secretary of the Smithsonian, the medal honors ‘especially meritorious investigations in the field of aerospace science.’

  16. CMS Thesis Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 CMS thesis award was presented to Riccardo Ranieri on 15 March for his Ph.D. thesis "Trigger Selection of WH → μ ν b bbar with CMS" where 'WH → μ ν b bbar' represents the associated production of the W boson and the Higgs boson and their subsequent decays. Riccardo received his Ph.D. from the University of Florence and was supervised by Carlo Civinini. In total nine thesis were nominated for the award, which was judged on originality, impact within the field of high energy physics, impact within CMS and clarity of writing. Gregory Snow, secretary of the awarding committee, explains why Riccardo's thesis was chosen, ‘‘The search for the Higgs boson is one of the main physics goals of CMS. Riccardo's thesis helps the experiment to formulate the strategy which will be used in that search.'' Lorenzo Foà, Chairperson of the CMS Collaboration Board, presented Riccardo with an commemorative engraved plaque. He will also receive the opportunity to...

  17. Fitness and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Fitness and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old KidsHealth / ... to be active in a safe environment. Family Fitness Tips Kids who like to engage in active ...

  18. 1993 architectural design awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The 10th annual architectural design awards sponsored by Contemporary Long Term Care salute nursing homes and retirement communities that combine a flair for innovative living environments with a sensitivity to the needs of aging residents. These facilities represent the very best in elderly housing that prolongs independence while enhancing efficient operation. The 1993 winners are: King Health Center, U.S. Soldiers' and Airmen's Home, Washington, DC; The Terrace of Los Gatos, Los Gatos, CA; Walker Elder Suites, Edina, MN; The Jefferson, Ballston, VA; The Forum at Rancho San Antonio, Cupertino, CA.

  19. Award for Steve Myers

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Last Thursday Steve Myers, Leader of the Accelerator and Beams Division, received one of the UK Institute of Physics awards. He is the recipient of the 2003 Duddel Medal and Prize for his contributions to the development of major charged-particle accelerator projects at CERN. As head of the commissioning group for the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider, says the citation, his contributions have had «a direct impact on the results from LEP, which have reached a precision and extent far beyond expectation and are key in defining the Standard Model of particle physics».

  20. Table Summarizing Awards Supported by Fellowships and Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Liliane Castets-Poupart

    developing country university. Support is for doctoral research awards, full study degrees, post-doc fellowships, internships and sabbaticals in sub-Saharan. Africa, Asia and Latin. America and the Caribbean. Variable. Managed by various developing country institutions. Variable. Fellowships · http://www.idrc.ca/awards.

  1. Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2011: Technology All-Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David

    2011-01-01

    Out of a total of 393 entries for the 2011 Campus Technology Innovators award, 10 winners rose to the top in six categories: (1) Leadership, Governance, and Policy; (2) Teaching and Learning; (3) Student Systems and Services; (4) Administrative Systems; (5) IT Infrastructure and Systems; and (6) Education Futurists. These innovative IT leaders…

  2. Award Recipient Final Report Form

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC Doctoral Research Awards. Name: Research Topic: Institution(s) of Affiliation: Supervisor: Program of Study in: Duration of Award: From: ... Please give the title of the thesis or dissertation you are preparing. 4. If any paper or book resulting from your work during tenure is to be published, please indicate by whom and ...

  3. Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David

    2010-01-01

    Each year in judging the Campus Technology Innovators awards, the authors have the privilege of reading through hundreds of fascinating examples of technology innovation on campus. Nominated projects cover the gamut of technology areas, from assessment and advising to wireless and web 2.0. This article presents 11 innovator award winners of this…

  4. Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before a grant can be awarded and accepted, several pre-award activities must happen to formalize the partnership. Ensuring compliance with federal laws, a review of costs and a negotiation of the appropriate funding level must all happen in order to rece

  5. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  6. AN ANNULLED AWARD CANNOT BE ENFORCED UNDER THE NEW YORK CONVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizal Kurniawan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Arbitral award is final and binding. A concept of “binding” is fundamental in International arbitral award. Nevertheless, the focus commonly concerns about the annulment and/or deferment of International arbitral award so that it could not be implemented. However, the New York Convention does not govern this issue.  In addition, international arbitral awards must meet the following requirements: the award is made in the territory other than conflicting countries, and/ or it is not considered a domestic awards in the State where recognition and enforcement is sought. This is important because the enforcement proceedings between foreign and domestic awards are different. This article elaborates the principles of the recognition and enforcement of a foreign award and the grounds or criteria for refusing to enforce an award are limited to the specific defenses i.e. public policy. The party opposing enforcement bears the burden of proofin the existence of the enumerated defenses. Keywords: binding, annullment, deferment, acknowledgement and enforcement of arbitral award.

  7. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  8. Award for Lise Meitner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    It is a matter of history that the work in the 1930's of Lise Meitner, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann played a great part in pointing the way to exploiting the possibilities of fission. One of the most interesting occasions the Agency has known came in 1963 when Lise Meitner paid a visit to talk about her life as a scientist, thus returning to the city where she had started her university career in 1901. Her account of a career which had brought her into contact with scientists such as Einstein, Planck, Rutherford, Bohr and many others took her listeners back to the birth of the atomic age. A photograph is shown taken at Dr. Meitner's home in Cambridge, UK, when she received the Enrico Fermi award for 1966, shared with Hahn and Strassmann

  9. Awards and Honours

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Graphene collects the Nobel prize   Nobel Prize winners Andre Geim (left) and Konstantin Novoselov (right). © Sergeom, Wikimedia Commons, and University of Manchester, UK. The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2010 has been awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, both from the University of Manchester, for their “groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene”. Graphene has exceptional properties that have made it a micro-laboratory for quantum physics. Not only is graphene the thinnest material ever made, it is also the strongest, as well as being an excellent conductor and almost completely transparent. At a time when many researchers believed that it was impossible for such thin materials to be stable, Geim and Novoselov extracted graphene from a piece of graphite using only normal adhesive tape. Novoselov, 36, first worked with Andre Geim, 51, as a PhD student in the Netherlands. He subsequentl...

  10. Surgical management of chronic suppurative otitis media: A 3-year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objective: To determine the outcome of surgery for chronic suppurative otitis media at our department over 3 years, between 2001 and 2003. The outcome measures were; achievement of dry ear, closure of tympanic membrane perforation and improvement in hearing for patients who had myringoplasty.

  11. Prestigious award for SOHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    SOHO spacecraft artist's impression hi-res Size hi-res: 451 Kb Credits: ESA SOHO spacecraft SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA. SOHO's science ranges from the Sun's hot interior, through its visible surface and stormy atmosphere, and out to distant regions where the wind from the Sun battles with a breeze of atoms coming from among the stars. The award recognises both the outstanding achievements in designing, building and operating the mission, as well as the science it has performed. It is a tribute to a team that has contributed to one of the most successful space missions in history. The International Academy of Astronautics presents this award in recognition of extraordinary performance and achievement by teams of scientists, engineers and managers in the field of astronautics. This honour has been awarded only twice before - to the Russian Mir Space Station Team and the US Space Shuttle Team. Now the SOHO team joins this select group. The citation of the award for the SOHO team reads: "To the team of scientists, engineers and managers for the development and operation of a world-class mission leading to substantial advancements in understanding the Sun and the solar-terrestrial relationship." SOHO has an impressive and unique list of achievements. For instance, it produced the first ever images of the turbulent outer shell of the Sun and of the structure below sunspots. It gave the most precise measurements of the solar temperature structure, the interior rotation and the gas flows inside the Sun. It measured the acceleration of the fast and slow solar winds and discovered new solar phenomena, such as solar tornadoes. It revolutionised our ability to forecast space weather, and helped our understanding of the impact of solar variability on Earth's climate. During eight years of operation, the team has had to face several heart-stopping moments, but with extraordinary team spirit, skill and competence, they turned these

  12. Health Blogging and Social Support: A 3-Year Panel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, David M; Rains, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    The reported study explored the implications of informal computer-mediated social support for the well-being of individuals coping with illness over the course of 3 years. A panel study was conducted in which respondents--bloggers writing about their experiences living with a health condition--reported on their perceptions of social support and well-being during 2010 and again during 2013. Among respondents who completed both questionnaires (n = 49), increases in support availability from family and friends were related to improvements in bloggers' health self-efficacy as well as improvements in bloggers' loneliness, particularly among those who also experienced increased support availability from blog readers. Increased blog reader support availability was associated with improvements in bloggers' health-related uncertainty. Among respondents who completed the initial questionnaire (N = 121), a survival analysis showed that neither support available from family and friends nor support from blog readers predicted continued health blogging over the 3-year period.

  13. [Dermatobia hominis infection in a 3-year-old child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, M; Kippenberger, S; Valesky, E M; Kaufmann, R

    2012-04-01

    In the context of increasing travel to the tropics, outpatient services are more frequently confronted with non-domestic diseases in Europe. A 3-year old child presented with a painful tumor of the scalp. After incision of the furuncle-like lesion, we extracted a larva of the botfly Dermatobia hominis. Botflies are mainly encountered in Central and South America; they should be considered if patients demonstrate a furuncle-like lesion and have returned from a holiday in these endemic regions.

  14. 20 CFR 439.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 439.605 Award. Award means an award of financial assistance by the SSA or other... administrative requirements. (b) The term award does not include: (1) Technical assistance that provides services...

  15. 32 CFR 22.610 - Award instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award instruments. 22.610 Section 22.610 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Award § 22.610 Award instruments. (a) Each...

  16. Call for Applications IDRC Research Awards 2016

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Carole Labrie

    2015-08-06

    Call for Applications. IDRC Research Awards 2016. Deadline: August 6, 2015. The award. IDRC offers these awards to graduate-level Canadians, permanent residents of Canada, and citizens of developing countries. Research award recipients will undertake a one-year paid program of research on the topic they have ...

  17. 2002 Institute of Physics awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The IOP Rutherford Medal and prize was awarded to P Dornan, W Venus and D Plane for their major contributions to the detectors and leadership of the LEP, ALEPH, OPAL and DELPHI experiments (4 paragraphs).

  18. Institute of Physics Awards 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The IOP Physics Awards for 2002 include: Prof. M Lockwood, Univ. Southhampton and Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Chree Medal and Prize; Dr. S Myers, CERN, Duddell Medal and Prize; Dr S Langridge, Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Vernon Boys Medal and Prize.

  19. Climate Leadership Awards and Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seventh annual Climate Leadership Awards Dinner will be held during the 2018 Climate Leadership Conference; the event publicly recognize individuals and organizations for their outstanding leadership in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  20. Climate Leadership Awards Frequent Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides answers to frequently asked questions regarding the Climate Leadership Awards, sponsored by EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership with co-sponsorship from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions and The Climate Registry.

  1. Materials Best Paper Award 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Tabrizian

    2015-01-01

    Materials has established an annual award for the best article and for the best review published in Materials in order to acknowledge the outstanding contributions of our authors in the area of materials science and engineering.[...

  2. Plascore receives awards from CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Plascore recently was awarded two honors from CERN, European High Energy Physics Lab, for its involvement in the manufacture of Thermoplastic Honeycomb panels for their large superconducting super collider (1/2 page).

  3. 2015 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  4. 2017 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  5. Outstanding student paper awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hydrology Section presented five outstanding student paper awards at the 1999 Spring Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, last June.Maneesha Joshi presented a poster titled “Estimation of the Extent and Duration of Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet using an Edge Detection Technique on Passive Microwave Data.” She received her B.Tech. in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay in 1991, and a M.S. in environmental engineering from State University of New York, Buffalo in 1994. Maneesha expects to complete her Ph.D. in civil engineering (remote sensing) in September 1999, under the supervision of Carolyn Merry (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering & Geodetic Science), Ken Jezek, and John Bolzan (Byrd Polar Research Center) at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Her thesis focuses on estimating the extent of melt, melt season, and duration, and absorbed radiation on the Greenland ice sheet from passive microwave and SAR data. Maneesha's other interests include image processing, issues related to global climate change, and photogrammetry.

  6. CERN apprentice receives award

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Another CERN apprentice has received an award for the quality of his work. Stéphane Küng (centre), at the UIG ceremony last November, presided over by Geneva State Councillor Pierre-François Unger, Head of the Department of Economics and Health. Electronics technician Stéphane Küng was honoured in November by the Social Foundation of the Union Industrielle Genevoise (UIG) as one of Geneva’s eight best apprentices in the field of mechatronics. The 20-year-old Genevan obtained his Federal apprentice’s certificate (Certificat fédéral de capacité - CFC) in June 2007, achieving excellent marks in his written tests at the Centre d’Enseignement Professionnel Technique et Artisanal (CEPTA). Like more than 200 youngsters before him, Stéphane Küng spent part of his four-year sandwich course working at CERN, where he followed many practical training courses and gained valuable hands-on experience in various technical groups and labs. "It’ always very gr...

  7. Research Award: Climate Change

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    Civil engineering. • Water resource management. Priority will be given to proposals outlining focused and feasible objectives, and clearly defined methodology. Further, the proposal should demonstrate the relevance of the proposed research to local, national, and/or regional policy debates in at least one of the following ...

  8. First AGU Climate Communication Prize awarded

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Christine

    2012-02-01

    Gavin Schmidt, a climate scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and cofounder of the RealClimate blog (http://www.realclimate.org/), received the first AGU Climate Communication Prize at the honors ceremony. The prize recognizes excellence in climate communication as well as the promotion of scientific literacy, clarity of messaging, and efforts to foster respect and understanding for science-based values related to climate change. Sponsored by Nature's Own—a Boulder, Colo.-based company specializing in the sale of minerals, fossils, and decorative stone specimens—the prize comes with a $25,000 cash award. "AGU created this award to raise the visibility of climate change as a critical issue facing the world today, to demonstrate our support for scientists who commit themselves to the effective communication of climate change science, and to encourage more scientists to engage with the public and policy makers on how climate research can contribute to the sustainability of our planet," said AGU president Michael Mc Phaden. "That's why we are so pleased to recognize Gavin for his dedicated leadership and outstanding scientific achievements. We hope that his work will serve as an inspiration for others."

  9. Outcome of pregnancy in one Norwegian county 3 years prior to and 3 years subsequent to the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulstein, M.; Skeie Jensen, T.; Irgens, L.M.; Lie, R.T.; Sivertsen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Pregnancy outcome was studied in a county in Norway 3 years prior to and 3 years subsequent to the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident on 26th April 1986. More detailed analyses have been performed for the 12 months prior to and subsequent to the accident. A significant increase in the spontaneous abortion rate the first year after the accident was followed by a slight decrease during the second and third years, but figures were still higher than the period prior to the accident. The rate of legal abortions was unchanged. During the entire observation period the number of births increased continuously, with the exception of a decrease in the last 2 months of 1986 and the first month of 1987. A higher incidence of spontaneous abortions was found for pregnancies conceived during the first 3 months after the accident. This increase in the spontaneous abortion rate is noteworthy, and more especially its long-term persistence, which cannot be the results of external radiation. The internal radiation from food polluted by radioactive fallout is a possible explanation. Changes in nutrition in order to avoid polluted food may also be of importance. (authors)

  10. Outcome of pregnancy in one Norwegian county 3 years prior to and 3 years subsequent to the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulstein, M.; Skeie Jensen, T.; Irgens, L.M.; Lie, R.T.; Sivertsen, E. (Univ. of Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Medical Birth Registry)

    1990-01-01

    Pregnancy outcome was studied in a county in Norway 3 years prior to and 3 years subsequent to the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident on 26th April 1986. More detailed analyses have been performed for the 12 months prior to and subsequent to the accident. A significant increase in the spontaneous abortion rate the first year after the accident was followed by a slight decrease during the second and third years, but figures were still higher than the period prior to the accident. The rate of legal abortions was unchanged. During the entire observation period the number of births increased continuously, with the exception of a decrease in the last 2 months of 1986 and the first month of 1987. A higher incidence of spontaneous abortions was found for pregnancies conceived during the first 3 months after the accident. This increase in the spontaneous abortion rate is noteworthy, and more especially its long-term persistence, which cannot be the results of external radiation. The internal radiation from food polluted by radioactive fallout is a possible explanation. Changes in nutrition in order to avoid polluted food may also be of importance. (authors).

  11. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week. On 23 March the Russian company ORPE Technologiya and its subcontractor, RSP Khrunitchev, were jointly presented with an ATLAS Supplier Award. Since 1998, ORPE Technologiya has been actively involved in the development of the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic elements of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure. After three years of joint research and development, CERN and ORPE Technologiya launched the manufacturing contract. It had a tight delivery schedule and very demanding specifications in terms of mechanical tolerance and stability. The contract was successfully completed with the arrival of the last element of the structure at CERN on 8 January 2004. The delivery of this key component of the Inner Detector deserves an ATLAS Award given the difficulty of manufacturing the end-frames, which very few companies in the world would have been able to do at an ...

  12. The Defencelessness and Inmotivation as Causes of Invalidity of the Arbitration Award in the Venezuelan Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Candelaria Domínguez Guillén

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article tackles on the defencelessness as a cause of invalidity of the arbitration award in the Venezuelan law and other legal systems. Also, the “immotivation” is analyzed as a cause of invalidity of the arbitration award. Although Venezuelan law seems to clarify the requirement with the intervention of party autonomy, it is concluded that the motivation of the arbitration award is part of the public policy, including decisions of equity as a manifestation of due process, of the right to defense and for the sake of social peace.

  13. Horton Grantee gets AAG Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey McDonnell, an assistant professor of forest hydrology at Utah State University, Logan, received the J. Warren Nystrom Award from the Association of American Geographers for his doctoral dissertation, “The Age, Origin and Pathway of Subsurface Stormflow in a Steep Humid Headwater Catchment.” In 1987, McDonnell was awarded AGU's Horton Research Grant for his thesis proposal.McDonnell received his Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. His dissertation was supervised by I. F. Owens, Department of Geography, University of Canterbury and A. J. Pearce, New Zealand Forest Research Institute.

  14. SMOS Instrument Performance and Calibration after 3 Years in Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Neira, Manuel; Corbella, Ignasi; Torres, Francesc; Kainulainen, Juha; Oliva, Roger; Closa, Josep; Cabot, François; Castro, Rita; Barbosa, Jose; Gutierrez, Antonio; Anterrieu, Eric; Tenerelli, Joe; Martin-Porqueras, Fernando; Buenadicha, Guillermo; Delwart, Steven; Crapolicchio, Raffaele; Suess, Martin

    2013-04-01

    ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission has been in orbit for already over 3 years which has allowed the calibration and data processing team consolidating both the calibration strategy and the Level-1 processor which transforms the raw visibility samples into polarimetric brightness temperature images. The payload on board SMOS, MIRAS, is quite unique in that it is the first microwave radiometer in space ever capable to generate wide field of view images at every snapshot measurement. This means that most of the calibration as well as image processing techniques are being developed for the first time with little heritage from any previous space mission. Issues intrinsically attached to its wide field of view such as spatial ripples across the snapshot images are particular to MIRAS and to no other earlier radiometer. Even the fundamental theory behind the instrument was put at test, first on ground inside an electromagnetic compatibility chamber, and now in orbit when imaging the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation of the cold sky. A groundbreaking effort is being carried out by the SMOS project team to understand and master all calibration and image reconstruction issues of this novel microwave interferometer payload. MIRAS in-orbit performance is driven by the amplitude of spatial ripples across the image and orbital and seasonal radiometer stability. Spatial ripples are unique to interferometric radiometers and are produced by (a) a limited knowledge of the antenna patterns and, in general, of the model of the instrument, (b) some fundamental limitations related to the inverse problem of image reconstruction in undetermined conditions and (c) subtle data processing inconsistencies which are discovered and corrected. To reduce the spatial ripples sea surface salinity retrievals are performed by first removing the brightness temperature spatial errors using a uniform region of the Pacific Ocean. However soil moisture retrievals cannot benefit of

  15. MedlinePlus: Awards and Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... winner of the 2005 World Summit on the Information Society Awards for e-health. Winner of the Thomas Reuters/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award in 2014 for MedlinePlus Connect and ...

  16. Research Award: Innovation for Inclusive Development program

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2011-09-12

    Research Award: Innovation for Inclusive Development program. Deadline: September 12, 2011. Note that all applications must be sent electronically. IDRC offers Research Awards annually to Canadians, permanent residents of. Canada, and citizens of developing countries pursuing master's or doctoral studies.

  17. CoC Awards by Program Component

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CoC Awards by Program Component reports provide snapshots of award data broken down by eligible program component types for the year selected. The reports, which can...

  18. Gordon F. Kirkbright bursary award, 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The Gordon F. Kirkbright bursary award is a prestigious annual award that enables a promising student/non-tenured young scientist of any nation to attend a recognised scientific meeting or visit a place of learning.

  19. Natural inflation: Status after WMAP 3-year data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, Christopher; Freese, Katherine; Kinney, William H.

    2006-01-01

    The model of natural inflation is examined in light of recent 3-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and shown to provide a good fit. The inflaton potential is naturally flat due to shift symmetries, and in the simplest version takes the form V(φ)=Λ 4 [1±cos(Nφ/f)]. The model agrees with WMAP3 measurements as long as f>0.7m Pl (where m Pl =1.22x10 19 GeV) and Λ∼m GUT . The running of the scalar spectral index is shown to be small--an order of magnitude below the sensitivity of WMAP3. The location of the field in the potential when perturbations on observable scales are produced is examined; for f>5m Pl , the relevant part of the potential is indistinguishable from a quadratic, yet has the advantage that the required flatness is well-motivated. Depending on the value of f, the model falls into the large field (f≥1.5m Pl ) or small field (f Pl ) classification scheme that has been applied to inflation models. Natural inflation provides a good fit to WMAP3 data

  20. Homeland Security Master's Degrees Awarded

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2011-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES MONTEREY, Calif. – Twenty-nine professionals who work in the homeland security field were awarded master’s degrees March 25 at the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security. The...

  1. Research Award: Information and Networks

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or ... governance, education, entrepreneurship, as well as collaborative models for participation and organization. ... What role do collaborative technologies (e.g., social media) play in social innovation and change?

  2. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 8. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 12 Issue 8 August 2007 pp 5-5. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/08/0005-0005. Author Affiliations.

  3. Two awards for Herwig Schopper

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Former CERN Director-General Herwig Schopper has received two prestigious awards, from UNESCO and from the American Institute of Physics. Herwig Schopper receives the UNESCO Albert Einstein Gold Medal from Koïchiro Matsuura, Director-General of UNESCO. Without any great fanfare, Herwig Schopper has just received two major awards. UNESCO awarded him the Albert Einstein Gold Medal in Paris on 15 April, while on 2 May in Denver the American Institute of Physics (AIP) presented him with the Tate Medal for International Leadership in Physics (together with a USD 10 000 prize). Both awards were in recognition of Herwig Schopper's pivotal role in the construction of international scientific cooperation. Today President of the SESAME Council - the International Centre for Synchrotron Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (see Bulletin No. 26/2003) - Herwig Schopper was Director-General of CERN from 1981 to 1988. President of the European Physical Society from 1994 to 1996, he wa...

  4. Materials Best Paper Award 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Ophelia Han; Maryam Tabrizian

    2013-01-01

    Materials is instituting an annual award to recognize the outstanding papers in the area of materials science and engineering published in Materials. We are pleased to announce the first “Materials Best Paper Award” for 2013. Nominations were selected by the Section Editor-in-Chiefs and Editorial Board members of Materials from all papers published in 2009.

  5. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 8. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 12 Issue 8 August 2007 pp ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  6. Research Award: IDRC Challenge Fund

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  7. Impact on Learning Award, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Planning and Management, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents the 1998 winners of Impact on Learning Awards, recognition given to K-12 public schools that have solved real-world problems with design, engineering, and technology solutions. Categories represented include auditoriums, cafeterias, classrooms, commons areas, early-childhood learning centers, libraries, lobbies, and science and computer…

  8. Award Recipient Final Report Form

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    7. a) Were you in contact with other IDRC staff (aside from Centre Awards staff) during the. course of your research? Please indicate who you were in contact with and if this contact assisted you in any way. b) Please indicate the names and contact information of individuals from other organizations (departments, institutes, ...

  9. 76 FR 16630 - Announcement of an Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... Development announces the award of a cooperative agreement with the Congressional Hunger Center (CHC) in Washington, DC, to work with ACF programs on hunger and obesity issues for young children. An award in the... Children and Families (ACF) announces the award of a cooperative agreement to the Congressional Hunger...

  10. 46 CFR 502.409 - Arbitration awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Arbitration awards. 502.409 Section 502.409 Shipping... Alternative Dispute Resolution § 502.409 Arbitration awards. (a)(1) The award in an arbitration proceeding... arbitration proceeding may not serve as an estoppel in any other proceeding for any issue that was resolved in...

  11. Late Established Mutans Streptococci in Children over 3 Years Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsugi Okada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of mutans streptococci has been reported to most commonly occur at approximately 26 months of age. In the present study, we detected Streptococcus mutans and S. sobrinus using polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays in children, then re-examined the subjects to determine the time of acquisition of these bacteria over a 1-year period. The subjects were 57 children ranging in age from 3 to 5 years old, each with primary dentition. Plaque samples were collected from all erupted tooth sites using a sterile toothbrush. PCR assays were performed to detect the targeted mutans streptococci at the beginning of the study (baseline and after 1 year. At the baseline examination, the prevalence of S. mutans and S. sobrinus was 61.4% and 54.4%, respectively, in all subjects, of whom 14 (24.6% were positive for S. mutans alone, 10 (17.5% for S. sobrinus alone, and 21 (36.8% for both S. mutans and S. sobrinus, with 12 (21.1% negative for both. After 1 year, 4 of 22 (18.2% subjects newly had acquired S. mutans and 15 of 26 (57.7% had aquired S. sobrinus, while 5 (8.8% remained negative for both bacteria. The age of the first positive S. mutans finding ranged from 49 to 71 months, while that for S. sobrinus ranged from 49 to 81 months old. Our results suggest that S. sobrinus becomes established later than S. mutans in the oral cavities of children over the age of 3 years old.

  12. Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Steven Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This is an exceptional moment in my career, and so I want to thank all of my teachers, colleagues and mentors who have made this possible. From my co-authors and myself, many thanks to the International Atomic Energy Agency, IOP Publishing, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, and the selection committee for the great honor of receiving this award. Also gratitude to Kikuchi-sensei, not only for the inventive and visionary creation of this award, but also for being a key mentor dating back to his efforts in producing high neutron output in JT-60U. It was also a great honor to receive the award directly from IAEA Deputy Director General Burkart during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. Receiving the award at this venue is particularly exciting as Daejeon is home to the new, next-generation KSTAR tokamak device that will lead key magnetic fusion research areas going forward. I would also like to thank the mayor of Daejeon, Dr Yum Hong-Chul, and all of the meeting organizers for giving us all a truly spectacular and singular welcoming event during which the award was presented. The research leading to the award would not have been possible without the support of the US Department of Energy, and I thank the Department for the continued funding of this research. Special mention must be made to a valuable co-author who is no longer with us, Professor A. Bondeson, who was a significant pioneer in resistive wall mode (RWM) research. I would like to thank my wife, Mary, for her infinite patience and encouragement. Finally, I would like to personally thank all of you that have approached and congratulated me directly. There are no units to measure how important your words have been in this regard. When notified that our paper had been shortlisted for the 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award, my co-authors responded echoing how I felt—honored to be included in such a fine collection of research by colleagues. It was unfathomable—would this paper follow the brilliant work

  13. Clinical 3-year follow-up of uterine fibroid embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeleff, B.A.; Satzl, S.; Eiers, M.; Fechtner, K.; Hakim, A.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Richter, G.M.; Rimbach, S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term success of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in patients with symptomatic fibroids using spherical particles (Embosphere). Materials and Methods: 34 consecutive patients treated with UAE were initially enrolled in the study which had the following study goals (1) 1-year follow-up MRI evaluation of the fibroid behavior and (2) clinical long-term success due to standardized assessment of the main fibroid-related symptoms (hypermenorrhoea, dysmenorrhoea and dysuria) of the patients' individual overall health status and their therapy satisfaction at 1-year, 2- year and 3-year intervals after UAE. Results: Technical success was achieved in all procedures. Four patients had to be excluded from the long-term evaluation schedule: one because of a hysterectomy due to bleeding after 6 weeks, 3 patients were not available for the designated minimum follow-up interval. The preinterventional severe hypermenorrhoea (n = 27) with a score of 4.4 ± 0.7 (5 = extreme menstrual bleeding) decreased after one year to 2.1 ± 0.5 (p = 0.0001), after two years to 1.7 ± 0.5 (p = 0.0042) and after three years to 1.3 ± 0.6 (p = 0.0001). The preinterventional dysmenorrhoea (n = 15) with a score of 3.1 ± 1.5 (3 = distinctly increased dysmenorrhoea) decreased after one year to 1.1 ± 0.3 (p = 0.0001), after two years to 1.2 ± 0.2 and after three years to 1.2 ± 0.4 (p = 0.148). The pretreatment dysuria (n = 12) with a preinterventional score of 3.1 ± 1.5 (3 = distinctly increased dysuria) decreased after one year to 1.1 ± 0.3 (p 0.0069) and remained after two years at 1.1 ± 0.2 and after three years at 1.2 ± 0.4 (p = 0.905). The initial overall health status was 54.7 ± 20.1 (maximal value 100). After one year it rose to 90.5 ± 15.4 (p = 0.0001), was 91.8 ± 5.6 after two years and was 91.3 ± 8.5 (p = 0.8578) after three years. The satisfaction with the therapy was 2.9 ± 0.2 after one year, 2.6 ± 0.3 after two

  14. New awards for CERN science

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Earlier this week, the European Physical Society (EPS) announced its High Energy and Particle Physics prizes for 2013, and I’m pleased to say that the LHC featured highly. With all that has been happening in the last few years, that’s perhaps not too surprising, but these awards nevertheless constitute a great honour for our community.   The High Energy and Particle Physics Prize went to the ATLAS and CMS collaborations “for the discovery of a Higgs boson, as predicted by the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism”, and to Michel Della Negra, Peter Jenni and Tejinder Virdee “for their pioneering and outstanding leadership roles in the making of the ATLAS and CMS experiments”. Among the other awards, the Young Experimental Physicist Prize went to Diego Martinez Santos “for his outstanding contributions to the trigger and commissioning of the LHCb experiment, and the analyses leading to first evidence for the rare decay B0s→ ...

  15. John Cherry wins Horton Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, Robert W.; Cherry, John

    The recipient of the 1985 Robert T. Horton Award is John Cherry. As John's colleague and friend for the past 12 years, it is a great privilege and honor for me to have been asked to prepare the citation for this award.John received his bachelor's degree in geological engineering from the University of Saskatchewan and his M.S., also in geological engineering, from the University of California at Berkeley. After earning his Ph.D. in geology at the University of Illinois, John spent 1 year in postdoctoral study at the University of Bordeaux, France, before returning to Canada in 1967 as an assistant professor of geology at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg. John joined the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Waterloo as an associate professor in 1971. At Waterloo he is currently a full professor and Director of the Institute for Groundwater Research.

  16. LHCb Early Career Scientist Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrick Koppenburg for the LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    On 15 September 2016, the LHCb collaboration awarded the first set of prizes for outstanding contributions of early career scientists.   From left to right: Guy Wilkinson (LHCb spokesperson), Sascha Stahl, Kevin Dungs, Tim Head, Roel Aaij, Conor Fitzpatrick, Claire Prouvé, Patrick Koppenburg (chair of committee) and Sean Benson. Twenty-five nominations were submitted and considered by the committee, and 5 prizes were awarded to teams or individuals for works that had a significant impact within the last year. The awardees are: Roel Aaij, Sean Benson, Conor Fitzpatrick, Rosen Matev and Sascha Stahl for having implemented and commissioned the revolutionary changes to the LHC Run-2 high-level-trigger, including the first widespread deployment of real-time analysis techniques in High Energy Physics;   Kevin Dungs and Tim Head for having launched the Starterkit initiative, a new style of software tutorials based on modern programming methods. “Starterkit is a group of ph...

  17. 1986 James B. Macelwane Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyllie, Peter J.; Stolper, Edward M.

    I can think of few things more pleasurable than introducing a young scientist whose research has enhanced his visibility to such an extent that his or her image is clearly distinguishable from among the large number of young scientists publishing excellent research these days.Normally, the recipient of a young scientist award is in a state approaching shock, with mixed feelings of pride and humility and appreciation for all those who guided him or her on the way. For Ed Stolper, however, the situation is different, and he is sitting here quite calmly. Although he is only 33 years old, his image shines brightly enough that it has received attention previously—He was awarded the Clarke Medal of the Geochemical Society in 1985, and he shared the Newcomb Cleveland Prize in 1985 with Sally Rigden and Tom Ahrens for the best 1984 paper in Science. Today it is the Macelwane Award of the American Geophysical Union, and there are still several tomorrows before his age disqualifies him as a young scientist, making it necessary for him to start getting down to serious, mature research.

  18. 10 years of Elsevier/JQSRT awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, José; Bernath, Peter F.; Mengüç, M. Pinar; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2017-10-01

    The Elsevier award program administered by the Editorial Board of the Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer (JQSRT) was conceived in June of 2006 at the 9th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia. Initially the program included three annual Elsevier/JQSRT awards for exceptional early-career scientists working in the main research fields covered by JQSRT: quantitative spectroscopy, radiative transfer, and electromagnetic scattering. In June of 2010 at the 12th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in Helsinki, Finland, it was decided to expand the award program to include three biennial Elsevier awards intended to celebrate fundamental life-time achievements of internationally recognized leaders in the same research fields. Finally, in 2013 the Elsevier award program was augmented to include a fourth annual early-career award in the category of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing.

  19. Climate Leadership Award for Excellence in GHG Management (Goal Achievement Award)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Excellence in GHG Management (Goal Achievement Award), which publicly recognizes organizations that achieve publicly-set aggressive greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals.

  20. Notification: Evaluation of EPA's Green Chemistry Challenge Awards and Use of Data from the Award Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY18-0003, January 9, 2018. The OIG plans to begin preliminary research to evaluate the agency's Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards and how the agency uses the data from the award nominations.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, developed Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization to make polymers with copper catalysts and environmentally friendly reducing agents.

  2. Daily Public Assistance Grants Award Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Daily activity of Public Assistance Grant Awards, including FEMA Region, State, Disaster Declaration Number, Event description, Mission Assigned agency, Assistance...

  3. Parimad suhtekorraldusteod konkursil Baltic PR Awards

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2012-01-01

    Balti riikide suhtekorraldusliidud koostöös Rahvusvahelise Avalike Suhete Assotsiatsiooniga (IPRA) korraldavad 2001. aastast iga aasta kommunikatsioonijuhtimisalast auhinnakonkurssi Baltic PR Awards

  4. Climate Leadership Award for Organizational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Organizational Leadership, which publicly recognizes organizations for their comprehensive greenhouse gas inventories and aggressive emissions reduction goals.

  5. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adloff, J.P. [Strasbourg Univ. (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50{sup th} anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  6. Gedeon Dagan wins Horton Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Shlomo; Dagan, Gedeon

    One of the most challenging problems of groundwater hydrology is the effect that spatial variations in the properties of geologic materials have on fluid flow and solute transport through the subsurface. In recent years, there has been a general recognition among hydrologists that such spatial variations are best described by treating the hydrologic properties of these materials as random processes. The effect of spatial variability on the movement of fluids and solutes through the subsurface is then governed by stochastic differential equations. Much of what we currently know about the stochastic nature of this movement is due to the pioneering work of Gedeon Dagan, this year's recipient of the Robert E. Horton Award.

  7. Why some awards are more effective signals of quality than others : A study of movie awards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemser, G.; Leenders, M.A.A.M.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    In this article, the authors develop and empirically test a conceptual framework that predicts which types of awards have the biggest impact on the competitive performance of the award winners. The empirical setting is an industry where awards proliferate, namely, the U. S. motion picture industry.

  8. NOTE receives the prestigious ALICE Industrial Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "NOTE Lund has been given the ALICE Industrial Award due to good co-operation, great capacity for innovation and high quality of work, as a PCB manufacturer in the CERN project ALICE. Only a small number of awards have so far been conferred to a select number of companies."

  9. 46 CFR Sec. 6 - Awarding of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Awarding of work. Sec. 6 Section 6 Shipping MARITIME... of work. (a) Those portions of all bids reflecting the total aggregate cost of the work involved shall be opened publicly. The work shall be awarded to the contractor submitting the lowest qualified...

  10. 1966 Architectural Awards. Buildings With Fallout Shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Award winning designs are presented demonstrating that economical dual-use shelter space can be incorporated in the designs of new buildings without sacrifice of either function or aesthetic values. The eight award winning designs are discussed, and graphic illustration is provided of the nature of dual-use shelter, which contributes to…

  11. Research award: Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's ...

  12. 1987 NRSSC Exemplary Program Awards Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Rural and Small Schools, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Identifies ten recipients of exemplary program awards and describes each program. Award categories include educational technology, cross-cultural services, preserve/inservice training, special education, family/school/community partnerships, innovative and creative programs, secondary curriculum and instruction, at-risk services, elementary…

  13. Judicial Review of Labor Arbitration Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Reynolds C.

    The review of grievance arbitration awards in public education constitutes the topic of this second chapter in a book on school law. A discussion of landmark cases outside of education underscores the general principles that have motivated courts to undertake review of arbitration awards. Supreme Court decisions in three cases known as the…

  14. Research Award: Communications Division Deadline: 12 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... program, media, web and social media strategies, as well as other outreach programs. As a Communications Research Award recipient, you will undertake a one-year program of research on the topic you submitted when competing for the award. Your proposals should address one or more aspects of ...

  15. Research Award: Agriculture and Food Security Program

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2014-08-06

    Research Award: Agriculture and Food Security. Program. Deadline: August 6, 2014. Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance ...

  16. Contract policy for CERN staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Public information meeting on Monday 28 September 2009 at 10.00 a.m. With effect from 1 August 2009, new provisions regarding staff employment contract policy have entered into force. These provisions are set out in: The Staff Rules and Regulations and Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 4). Further details are available in: Frequently Asked Questions. The new provisions are outlined below: Limited-duration contracts From 1 August 2009, limited-duration contracts will be awarded for a maximum period of five years (instead of four years previously) and no extensions beyond five years will be granted. Contracts for periods shorter than five years can be exceptionally awarded, e.g. for a project whose mission or financial resources are time-limited. Indefinite contracts : award procedure A number of changes have been introduced regarding the procedure for the award of indefinite contracts. From now on, posts leading to the award of an indefinite contract will be opened at le...

  17. Research Award: Employment and Growth

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    IDRC's Employment and Growth program supports policy-oriented research that generates new insights and options for promoting policies that facilitate inclusive growth. This is growth that enhances access of the poor to opportunities and reduces inequalities. Women's economic empowerment and youth employment are ...

  18. The social context of parenting 3-year-old children with developmental delay in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, E; Graham, H; McCulloch, A; Blacher, J; Hatton, C; Llewellyn, G

    2009-01-01

    Children with intellectual or developmental disability have significantly poorer health and mental health than their non-disabled peers and are at high risk of social exclusion. The aim of the present paper is to provide information on the circumstances in which 3-year-old children at risk of intellectual or developmental disability are growing up in the UK. Secondary analysis of data on 12 689 families in English-speaking monolingual households from the first two waves of the UK's Millennium Cohort Study. A total of 440 children (3% of the weighted sample) were identified as being developmentally delayed. When compared with other children, children with developmental delays were more disadvantaged on every indicator of social and economic disadvantage examined. Two out of three children with developmental delays had been exposed to repeated disadvantage as measured by income poverty, material hardship, social housing and receipt of means-tested benefits. The effect of repeated disadvantage on the risk of developmental delay remained after account was taken of parental education and occupational status. Young children with delayed development in the UK are likely to be exposed to repeated socio-economic disadvantage. Implications for policy and understanding the nature of the link between poverty and child disability are discussed.

  19. Influencing Policy with Social Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Thomas F.

    1988-01-01

    According to this acceptance speech delivered by the recipient of the 1987 Kurt Lewin Award, social psychological contributions should be placed within an interdisciplinary framework and an institutional structure in order to make it more relevant for public policy. Recommendations for doing this are offered. (BJV)

  20. We won a National award

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meciarova, A.; Cicova, V.

    2011-01-01

    On the occasion of the 43 rd conference for water management in the industry results of the 3 rd competition were announced for the National Business Award for Environment in the Slovak Republic 2011 organized by the Association of Industrial Ecology in Slovakia (ASPEK). The first prize in the category 'product; went to the hands of Slovenske elektrarne representatives for providing the energy self-sufficiency of Tery Chalet, High Tatras, all year round with installing photovoltaic system. 'We have a complex programme of five energies through which we support culture, sports, humanity, education and environmental protection. Hence we try to support constant sustainability of biodiversity,' underlined Alena Meciarova, Manager of Environment at Slovenske elektrarne. (author)

  1. Three steps to better flood risk policies in India | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Three steps to better flood risk policies in India. Jyotiraj Patra. Research Awards. 2014. @patrajyotiraj. The gap between research and policy can be wide, but 2014 IDRC Research Award recipient Jyotiraj Patra has identified three steps for bridging it: trust, time, and transition. “I came to IDRC with limited understanding of ...

  2. 22 CFR 21.1 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Policy. 21.1 Section 21.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL INDEMNIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES § 21.1 Policy. (a) The Department of State may indemnify an employee for any verdict, judgment, or other monetary award which is rendered against such...

  3. 48 CFR 1403.570-1 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Policy. 1403.570-1 Section 1403.570-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Other Improper Business Practices 1403.570-1 Policy. Award of a...

  4. Family Policy in the USSR Since 1944.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Frank, April A.

    This study examines Soviet family policies since 1944 concerning family allowances, abortion and contraception, divorce and illegitimacy, child care facilities and maternity benefits, and motherhood awards. The problems of Soviet society which brought about these policies are discussed and their use in encouraging fertility and promoting female…

  5. ANALISIS PERBANDINGAN PENGHARGAAN KUALITAS MALCOLM BALDRIGE NATIONAL QUALITY AWARD DENGAN EUROPEAN QUALITY AWARD (MBNQA vs EQA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arfan Bakhtiar Amalia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Persaingan bisnis global saat ini makin ketat. Dengan adanya Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA dan juga European Quality Award (EQA diharapkan mampu mendorong dan memotivasi perusahaan-perusahaan, baik yang sudah sukses maupun yang sedang berkembang, untuk selalu meningkatkan mutu dan kinerja, serta sebagai kunci daya saing. Dalam makalah ini, kita akan membahas penghargaan kualitas mengenai tujuan, manfaat dan perkembangan, dan trend saat ini, terutama untuk MBNQA dan EQM (European Quality Model. Kita akan membandingkan antara MBNQA dan EQM melalui pengertian, latar belakang, metode-metode, dan kriteria-kriteria, serta aplikasinya, sehingga dapat kita lakukan analisa perbandingan untuk keduanya. Kata Kunci  : Penghargaan Kualitas, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA, European Quality Award (EQA   Emulation of global business in this time more and more to tighten. With existence of Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA as well as European Quality Award (EQA expected can push and motivate companies, both for have successful and also which is expanding, to always increase the quality and performance, and also as competitiveness key. In this paper, we will discuss about national quality award concerning target, benefit, growth, and trend in this time, especially MBNQA and EQM (European Quality Model. We will compare between MBNQA and EQM through congeniality, background, method, and criterions, and also its application,  so that earn us to analyse comparison to both of its. Keyword        : Quality Award, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA, European Quality Award (EQA

  6. Cross-Cutting public policy requirements applicable to federal grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are cross-cutting public policy requirements applicable to Federal grants, including those awarded by the EPA. Some of those requirements are included here because they have been part of appropriations acts for several years without change.

  7. 12 CFR 1806.204 - Applications for Bank Enterprise Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications for Bank Enterprise Awards. 1806... OF THE TREASURY BANK ENTERPRISE AWARD PROGRAM Awards § 1806.204 Applications for Bank Enterprise... Enterprise Awards in accordance with this section and the applicable NOFA. After receipt of an application...

  8. recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards in civil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    Thus, award-creditors may need to move across borders looking for a forum within which ... award-creditor in a foreign arbitral award may seek only for its recognition or its recognition and enforcement.5 The purpose of ..... electionis), the award may face the risk of being set aside. The Ethiopian courts may examine that the ...

  9. Reforming the Israeli health system: findings of a 3-year evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, R; Rosen, B; Shirom, A

    2001-04-01

    Israel, like many other European countries, has recently reformed its health care system. The regulated market created by the National Health Insurance (NHI) law embodies many of the principles of managed competition. The purpose of this paper is to present initial findings from an evaluation of the first 3 years of the reform (1995-1997) regarding the implementation of the reform and the extent to which it has achieved its main goals. The evaluation was conducted using multiple quantitative and qualitative research tools: interviews with key informants; analysis of documents and sick fund financial statements; analysis of trends in sick fund membership; and population surveys conducted in 1995 and 1997 to assess the impact of the reform on outcome measures related to level of services to the public. Data from the evaluation show that the NHI law achieved a considerable number of its goals: to provide insurance coverage for the entire population, to ensure freedom of movement among sick funds, and to standardize the way resources are allocated to sick funds. The incentives that are embodied in the law have encouraged the sick funds to improve the level of services provided to the average insuree, and to develop services in the periphery and for some of the weaker populations. From the financial perspective, concerns that NHI would lead to a rise in the national health expenditure were not realized as of 1997. In the wake of NHI, there has been a decline in the age adjusted per capita expenditure in three sick funds, with no reports by insurees, at least through 1997, on a decline in satisfaction or level of service. However, the Israeli experience shows that regulating competition does not necessarily lead to economic stability and equality. Regulating the competition also did not solve some of the major policy issues in the Israeli health system including level of resources allocated to health, organizational structure of the hospital system, manpower planning and

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, Professor Michael J. Krische, developed selective C-C bond-forming hydrogenation without organometallic reagents, eliminating hazardous reagents and hazardous waste.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Professor Robin D. Rogers, used ionic liquids to dissolve and process cellulose from wood, cloth, or paper to make new biorenewable or biocompatible materials.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Prof Richard P. Wool of the University of Delaware, created high-performance materials using vegetable oils, feathers, and flax. Can be used as adhesives, composites, foams, and circuit boards.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Professor Chirik, discovered a class of catalysts used to produce silicones for consumer goods without using hard-to-mine platinum (less mining, reduces costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and waste).

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Professor Joseph M. DeSimone, developed surfactants that allow carbon dioxide to be a solvent for chemical manufacturing, replacing hazardous chemical solvents.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, Professor Galen J. Suppes, developed a process to convert waste glycerin from biodiesel production into propylene glycol to replace ethylene glycol in antifreeze.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Professor Bruce H. Lipshutz, designed a novel, second-generation surfactant called TPGS-750-M. It is a designer surfactant composed of safe, inexpensive ingredients.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Professor Terry Collins, developed a series of TAML oxidant activators that work with hydrogen peroxide to replace chlorine bleaches for paper making and laundry.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Professor Mark Holtzapple, developed methods to convert waste biomass (e.g., sewage sludge, agricultural wastes), into animal feed, industrial chemicals, or fuels.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, Professor Richard A. Gross, developed a transesterification to make polyol-containing polyesters using lipase, replacing heavy metal catalysts and hazardous solvents.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winners, Professors Robert E. Maleczka, Jr. and Milton R. Smith, III, developed halogen-free, catalytic C-H activation/borylation to make aryl and heteroaryl boronic esters.

  1. Connecticut Environmental Chapter Awarded EPA Education Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Audubon Society has been awarded a $91,000 Environmental Education Grant by the US Environmental Protection Agency to support its work in addressing a range of topics in classrooms to support schoolyard habitats.

  2. Engineers win award for Swiss tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A Derby engineering consultancy has won the Tunnelling Industry Award 2003 for Excellence in Tunnel Design, offered by the British Tunnelling Society, for its work on the LHC in Geneva, Switzerland (1/2 page).

  3. Global pest management program wins international award

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, Miriam Sommers

    2009-01-01

    An agricultural research program managed at Virginia Tech has won an international award for its work with pest-management practices that show economic benefits with minimal impact on health and the environment.

  4. ALICE gives its first thesis awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    For the first time the ALICE collaboration has given two of its doctoral students awards for their outstanding theses. Winners Christian Holm Christensen and Zaida Conesa del Valle holding their awards.On 29 October the ALICE collaboration honoured two students for their outstanding theses at a ceremony held at CERN. The two awards, one of which was given for a physics thesis and the other for a technical thesis, went to Zaida Conesa Del Valle (Laboratoire de physique subatomique et des technologies associées) and Christian Holm Christensen (Niels Bohr Institute) respectively. "It is very gratifying to see that the collaboration appreciates our work," said Zaida Conesa del Valle, winner of the physics award for her thesis: Performance of the ALICE Muon Spectrometer. Weak Boson Production and Measurement in Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC. "I also feel specially thankful to all the people who worked with me," she added. "It was pl...

  5. Climate Leadership Award for Supply Chain Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Supply Chain Leadership, which publicly recognizes organizations that are are at the leading edge of managing greenhouse gas emissions in their organizational supply chains.

  6. 48 CFR 922.608-5 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITION Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act 922.608-5 Award. The... Office in which the contractors place of business is located. Regional Office locations are specified at...

  7. 5 CFR 451.104 - Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... efficiency, economy, or other improvement of Government operations or achieves a significant reduction in... and is not basic pay for any purpose. (c) An award is subject to applicable tax rules, such as...

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, Professor Chi-Huey Wong, developed reactions with enzymes and safer solvents that can replace traditional reactions done with toxic metals and hazardous solvents.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winners, Professors Charles A. Eckert and Charles L. Liotta, use supercritical CO2 as a solvent to combine reactions and separations, improve efficiency, and reduce waste.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, Professor Chao-Jun Li, uses metal catalysts in water to carry out chemical reactions that used to need both an oxygen-free atmosphere and hazardous organic solvents.

  11. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes the data structures to be implemented to provide the A59 Waste Repackaging Database (AWARD); a Computer System for the in-cave Bertha waste sorting and LLW repackaging operations in A59. (Author)

  12. The BINP receives its Golden Hadron award

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    On Thursday, 14 September, the LHC Project Leader, Lyn Evans, handed over a Golden Hadron award to Alexander Skrinsky of Russia's Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP). The prize is awarded in recognition of exceptional performances by suppliers and this year prizes were awarded to two firms, Cockerill-Sambre (Belgium) and Wah-Chang (United States), and to the Budker Institute, which was unable to receive the award at the same time as the two other recipients (see Bulletin No 34/2002, of 19 August 2002). The Russian institute has been rewarded for the particularly high-quality production of 360 dipole magnets and 185 quadrupole magnets for the LHC proton beam transfer lines.

  13. 42 CFR 59a.15 - Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Establishment of Regional Medical Libraries § 59a.15 Awards. (a) General. The Secretary, with the advice of the... medical library. The Secretary, in determining the priority assigned an applicant, must consider: (1) The...

  14. National Environmental Leadership Award in Asthma Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Asthma Awards recognizes health plans, healthcare providers and communities in action that demonstrate an environmental component to address asthma triggers, collaborate with others and save healthcare dollars with their programming.

  15. And the winners were... Innovation Awards

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The winners of the 2003 Economist innovation awards included Tim Berners-Lee for the WWW and Dr. Damadian for his suggestion that NMR could be used as a medical detection device for cancer (1/2 page).

  16. Functional Capacity and Levels of Physical Activity in Aging: A 3-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, Maria Teresa; Galán-Mercant, Alejandro; Carnero, Elvis Alvarez; Fernandes, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decades, the world elderly population has increased exponentially and this tendency will continue during the coming years; from 2000 to 2050, people over 60 will double and those over 80 will quadruple. Loss of independence occurs as people age due to mobility restrictions, frailty, and decreased functional fitness and cognitive abilities. Evidence has shown that appropriate programs and policies contribute to keep older adults healthy and independent over time. The purpose of this chapter is to report the results of our 3-year follow-up study designed to characterize functional physical fitness in a sample of Portuguese community-dwelling older adults to propose a set of functional parameters that decline the most. We studied a group of 43 elderly people, aged 60 and over. Variables assessed on the participants were anthropometric measurements, functional capacity with the Senior Fitness Test battery (muscle strength, aerobic endurance, flexibility, agility, and dynamic balance), handgrip strength, levels of physical activity, and balance. Three years after the first assessment, a second assessment of the same variables was conducted. We analyzed what were the variables that, for this group, were related with a healthier aging and the relation with different physical activity levels. Our study showed that the distance covered in 6-min walk test and handgrip strength seem to explain a great amount of variability on functional variables that have changed on this period (68% of balance, lower and upper functional strength, respectively) and the active participants showed less decrements with aging in anthropometric and functional variables than those inactive or insufficiently active ( p  activities should be given more attention as components of a community exercise program.

  17. Functional Capacity and Levels of Physical Activity in Aging: A 3-Year Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Tomás

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, the world elderly population has increased exponentially and this tendency will continue during the coming years; from 2000 to 2050, people over 60 will double and those over 80 will quadruple. Loss of independence occurs as people age due to mobility restrictions, frailty, and decreased functional fitness and cognitive abilities. Evidence has shown that appropriate programs and policies contribute to keep older adults healthy and independent over time. The purpose of this chapter is to report the results of our 3-year follow-up study designed to characterize functional physical fitness in a sample of Portuguese community-dwelling older adults to propose a set of functional parameters that decline the most. We studied a group of 43 elderly people, aged 60 and over. Variables assessed on the participants were anthropometric measurements, functional capacity with the Senior Fitness Test battery (muscle strength, aerobic endurance, flexibility, agility, and dynamic balance, handgrip strength, levels of physical activity, and balance. Three years after the first assessment, a second assessment of the same variables was conducted. We analyzed what were the variables that, for this group, were related with a healthier aging and the relation with different physical activity levels. Our study showed that the distance covered in 6-min walk test and handgrip strength seem to explain a great amount of variability on functional variables that have changed on this period (68% of balance, lower and upper functional strength, respectively and the active participants showed less decrements with aging in anthropometric and functional variables than those inactive or insufficiently active (p < 0.05. Greater importance should be given to prescription of exercise targeting older adults and, specifically, walking and manual activities should be given more attention as components of a community exercise program.

  18. CERNois wins prestigious accelerator award

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference, CERN’s Rogelio Tomás García became the first Spaniard to receive the Frank Sacherer Prize for his work in particle beam optics.   Rogelio Tomás García at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference. The Frank Sacherer Prize is awarded to physicists who have made a “significant, original contribution to the accelerator field" early on in their career. This year the prize was given to Rogelio Tomás García who, at only 35 years of age, has made important contributions to the optics design, optics measurement, and correction techniques applied at both the LHC and Brookhaven’s RHIC. “Tomás has had a vital impact on CERN’s beam optics studies and has made very impressive achievements in the field of beam optics,” says Oliver Brüning, Head of the Accelerators and Beam Physics...

  19. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  20. LHC suppliers win Golden Hadron awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    In a ceremony on 30 July, three of the 200 suppliers for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) were presented with Golden Hadron awards. It is the third year that the awards have been presented to suppliers, not only for their technical and financial achievements but also for their compliance with contractual deadlines. This year the three companies are all involved in the supplies for the LHC's main magnet system.

  1. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This paper sets out the requirements for AWARD (the A59 Waste Repackaging Database); a computer-based system to record LLW sorting and repacking information from the North Cave Line in A59. A solution will be developed on the basis of this document. AWARD will record and store details entered from waste sorting and LLW repackaging operations. This document will be used as the basis of the development of the host computer system. (Author)

  2. Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John

    2011-01-01

    Alex Ince-Cushman, John deGrassie, Lars-Goran Eriksson, Yoshiteru Sakamoto, Andrea Scarabosio and Yuri Podpaly, as well as the other coauthors. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to Earl Marmar, Martin Greenwald and Miklos Porkolab at MIT for continued support of this work, as well as to the entire C-Mod team. This award was made possible due to the insight of Mitsuru Kikuchi and the support of the IAEA through Werner Burkhart, and I am truly grateful to both of them. Many thanks as well to the outstanding staff at Nuclear Fusion. It is a distinct honor to be included in the group of previous winners: Tim Luce, Clemente Angioni, Todd Evans and Steve Sabbagh. It is also a great honor to be considered alongside the 2010 nominees: Phil Snyder, Sibylle Guenter, Maiko Yoshida, Hajime Urano, Fulvio Zonca, Erik Garcia, Costanza Maggi, Hartmut Zohm, Thierry Loarer and Bruce Lipschultz. Finally, I would like to thank the readers of Nuclear Fusion for the many citations. John Rice 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award winner Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA

  3. Pre-Award Administrators Are from Pluto: Post-Award Administrators Are from Saturn, Or Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Mary T.

    2000-01-01

    An experienced research administrator who has worked in both pre-award and post-award administrative roles offers her perspectives of both sides and suggests that a smooth relationship between pre-award and post-award research administrators is critical to the conduct of research. (DB)

  4. Examining Faculty Awards for Gender Equity and Evolving Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbuhl, Stephanie; Bristol, Mirar N.; Ashfaq, Hera; Scott, Patricia; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Cappola, Anne R.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Awards given to medical school faculty are one important mechanism for recognizing what is valued in academic medicine. There have been concerns expressed about the gender distribution of awards, and there is also a growing appreciation for the evolving accomplishments and talents that define academic excellence in the 21st century and that should be considered worthy of award recognition. OBJECTIVE Examine faculty awards at our institution for gender equity and evolving values. METHODS Recipient data were collected on awards from 1996 to 2007 inclusively at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (SOM). Descriptions of each award also were collected. The female-to-male ratio of award recipients over the time span was reviewed for changes and trends. The title and text of each award announcement were reviewed to determine if the award represented a traditional or a newer concept of excellence in academic medicine. MAIN RESULTS There were 21 annual awards given to a total of 59 clinical award recipients, 60 research award recipients, and 154 teaching award recipients. Women received 28% of research awards, 29% of teaching awards and 10% of clinical awards. Gender distribution of total awards was similar to that of SOM full-time faculty except in the clinical awards category. Only one award reflected a shift in the culture of individual achievement to one of collaboration and team performance. CONCLUSION Examining both the recipients and content of awards is important to assure they reflect the current composition of diverse faculty and the evolving ideals of leadership and excellence in academic medicine. PMID:19727968

  5. Research Award: Think Tank Iniave

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... ons with a mix of long‐term general support grants (core funding) and access to training and technical assistance to allow them to improve research quality, expand policy linkages, and address other key aspects of organizaonal de‐ velopment. One important dimension of the Iniave is to capture and share ...

  6. Research Award: Think Tank Initiative

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    achieve its mission, the Initiative provides organizations with a mix of long‐term general support grants. (core funding) and ... Research proposals should address one or more key dimensions of “success” for policy research organizations ... What is the nature of the applied research market in (some) developing countries?

  7. Research Award: Informaon and Networks

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... What are the limitaons of openness models in reducing poverty or achieving networked sociees? • What role do collaborave technologies (e.g., social media) play in social innovaon and change? • Which policies and regulaons are needed to sustain inclusive and innovave network sociees? The Research ...

  8. Research Award: Foundations for Innovation

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    ... technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) that address development challenges, to submit a research proposal on one of the following topic areas: • Innovation and legal/regulatory frameworks: what programs, policies and practices in place in LMICs influence innovation actors' (e.g., government, civil society,.

  9. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  10. Development of atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Liselotte Brydensholt; Loland, Lotte; Buchvald, Frederik F

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life and identify the localization of the early skin lesions that predicts the development of AD. DESIGN: Prospective, longitudinal, birth cohort study of children born to mothers with a history of asthma....... Predictive odds ratios of early skin lesions for those who developed AD vs those who did not were calculated. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of AD by age 3 years was 44% (155/356). The prevalence rate peaked at age 2 years for boys and at age 2.5 years for girls, but there were no other sex differences...... predicted AD at age 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Atopic dermatitis begins at the scalp, forehead, ear, and neck in a balaclava-like pattern. Eczema at the arms and joints provides the highest predictive value for the development of AD at age 3 years. This may be used for early prediction and intervention of AD....

  11. Social class variation, the effect of the economic recession and childhood obesity at 3 years of age in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabakhanji, Samira Barbara; Pavlova, Milena; Groot, Wim; Boland, Fiona; Biesma, Regien

    2017-04-01

    Many studies have reported a social class gradient within overweight prevalence ( 1-4 ). Additionally, cross-country comparisons report high overweight trends and a change in food consumption patterns in countries affected by an economic crisis ( 5-11 ). The aim of this study was to assess the association between social class and recession on obesity levels in 3-year-old Irish children. The population-based infant cohort of the national Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) study was used. Prevalence rates of overweight and obesity were calculated and logistic regression models, adjusting for confounders, were used to examine the relationship between social class, effects of the recession and childhood obesity. In 2008, 19.5% of 9-month-olds were obese and 19.4% overweight increasing to 22.7% and 20.4%, respectively by 2011 when the infants were 3 years old (World Health Organization (WHO) criteria). The prevalence of obesity increased by 2.3% to 10.1% for various social classes (unadjusted). However, adjusting for confounders, there was no evidence of a difference in obesity of 3-year-old children across social classes. There was evidence that obesity was 22-27% higher for families who perceived a very significant crisis effect on their family, compared with those significantly affected. Increases in obesity were found to be significantly associated with perceived recession effects on the family, but not with social class. Policy makers should be aware that in times of economic downturn, public health efforts to promote healthy weight are needed at a population level rather than for specific social classes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  12. Sullivan Award recognizes Outstanding Science Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifert, Harvey

    If you have ever read a science report in your daily newspaper, or heard one on radio or TV, that made you sit up and say, “That's darn good! They got this complicated story exactly right,” you probably wanted to congratulate the author. Actually, you can do better than that: you can nominate him or her for AGU's Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism.Nominations are now open for the 1999 Sullivan Award, which will be presented at the Spring Meeting next May in Boston, Mass. Any AGU member may nominate a journalist, and journalists may also nominate themselves. The award is made for a single report in any medium that is accessible to the general public and published in 1998; it carries a prize of $2000 along with a plaque.

  13. Prestigious US awards for CERN computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    On 4 June in the distinguished surroundings of Washington's National Building Museum, IT Deputy Division Leader Les Robertson accepted a 21st Century Achievement Award from the Computerworld Honors Program on behalf of CERN. This prestigious award was made to CERN for its innovative application of information technology to the benefit of society. Members of the team that initiated the SHIFT project with the Computerworld trophy. The team was a collaboration between the Information Technology Division, the OPAL experiment and Indiana University. From left to right, Ben Segal, Matthias Schroeder, Gail Hanson, Bernd Panzer, Jean-Philippe Baud, Les Robertson and Frédéric Hemmer. CERN's award followed the Laboratory's nomination by Lawrence Ellison, Chairman and CEO of the Oracle Corporation. Ellison nominated CERN in recognition of 'pioneering work in developing a large scale data warehouse' - an innovative computing architecture that responds precisely to the global particle physics commun...

  14. CERN Press Office receives award from Euroscience

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Communication group has received an award for its efforts in communicating the LHC first beam to the media and the public. James Gillies, head of the Communication group was presented the AlphaGalileo Research Public Relations Award on Wednesday, 14 October during the Euroscience Media Award Ceremony in Hannover. "It’s great to receive this recognition," said Gillies. "Of course, we had great material to work with: the LHC is a fantastic story and one that is going to get even better. Angels, Demons and black holes also had their roles to play, but behind the media interest there’s been a lot of hard work by my team. This is for them." The CERN Communication group also works with communication professionals in all the CERN Member States and major physics labs around the world through the European Particle Physics Communication Network, and the InterAction collaboration. "Without them," says Gillies, &am...

  15. Gold awards for CERN's top suppliers!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN's awards to the LHC project's best suppliers are now into their second year. Three companies received 'Golden Hadrons' for 2003. The Golden Hadron awards were presented to the delighted representatives of the winning firms by LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans on Friday 16 May. Only three out of the LHC's four hundred suppliers were lucky enough to receive a gold award. The consortium IHI (Japan)-Linde Kryotechnik (Switzerland), the Belgian company JDL Technologies and the Japanese firm Furukawa Electric Company were rewarded not only for their technical and financial achievements but also for their compliance with contractual deadlines. The 2003 Golden Hadron winners with Lyn Evans. From left to right: Armin Senn, Thomas Voigt, Kirkor Kurtcuoglu of LINDE KRYOTECHNIK ; Tadaaki Honda, Project Leader and Motoki Yoshinaga, Associate Director of IHI Corporation ; Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader; Shinichiro Meguro, Managing Director of FURUKAWA ELECTRIC COMPANY ; Nobuyoshi Saji, Consulting Engineer of IHI Corporatio...

  16. Awards for Lyn Evans and Philippe Lebrun

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    Lyn Evans has received the American Physical Society’s Robert R. Wilson Prize, while Philippe Lebrun has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the Wrocław University of Technology in Poland. Lyn Evans in front of an LHC dipole magnet. Philippe Lebrun (centre) with the Dean of the Faculty of mechanical and power engineering of the Wrocław University during the ceremony (courtesy of Laurent Tavian).Numerous honours are going to the LHC and those behind it even before this exceptional machine begins operation. The LHC Project Leader, Lyn Evans, has recently been awarded the "Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators" by the American Physical Society (APS). According to the citation, the prize was awarded "for a sustained career of technical innovation and leadership in the SPS proton-antiproton collider, culminating in the construction and commissioning of the LHC&am...

  17. Recounting the History of the Albatross Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauss, John; Lill, Gordon; Maxwell, Arthur

    The origin of the Albatross Award can be traced directly to a dinner party in early 1959 at the home of Gordon and Mildred Lill in the Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C. Guests were Arthur Maxwell and his wife and John Knauss. Lill and Maxwell worked at the Office of Naval Research (ONR). Knauss was visiting from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in LaJolla, California. During the evening the subject of the lack of awards and prizes for oceanographers arose. The three decided that perhaps this was a situation that could be remedied by the American Miscellaneous Society (AMSOC).

  18. Faculty receives Excellence in Geophysical Education Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Sarah; Baldridge, W. Scott; Biehler, Shawn; Braile, Lawrence W.; Ferguson, John F.; Gilpin, Bernard E.; Jiracek, George R.

    “The second AGU Excellence in Geophysical Education Award was presented to the faculty of the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE): Scott Baldridge, Shawn Biehler, Larry Braile, John Ferguson, Bernard Gilpin, and George Jiracek. The persistence and commitment of this group has provided the geophysical community with a superb educational program for over 16 years, reaching nearly 400 students, including undergraduates, graduates, and professionals. The award was presented at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on December 8, 1998, in San Francisco, California.

  19. Research Brief. Punitive Damage Awards in Financial Injury Verdicts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moller, E

    1997-01-01

    .... While punitive damages are awarded in less than 4 percent of all civil jury verdicts, there is a 1-in-7 chance of a punitive award in disputes arising from contractual or commercial relationships...

  20. 2011 Awards Gala | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. 2011 Awards Gala Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents Donald West King, M.D. FNLM Chairman Photo: Library of Congress 2011 Awards Gala Celebrating Leadership in Health and Medicine & 175 th Anniversary of ...

  1. CMS rewards its best suppliers with the Crystal Award

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    A. Ingman of the Finnish company Outokumpu Pori Oy, F. Krähenbuhl of the Swiss firm Nexans Suisse and M. Niemerski of the American company Plascore receive the highest distinction in the CMS supplier awards - the Crystal Award.

  2. 45 CFR 63.17 - Amount of award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... award. Federal assistance shall be provided only to meet allowable costs incurred by the award recipient in carrying out an approved project in accordance with the authorizing legislation and the...

  3. [More than 3 hours and less than 3 years: Safety of anaesthetic procedures in infants less than 3 years old subected to surgery for more the 3 hours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Escudero, Julián; Paredes Esteban, Rosa María; Cambra Lasaosa, Francisco José; Vento, Máximo; López Gil, Maite; de Agustín Asencio, Juan Carlos; Moral Pumarega, María Teresa

    2017-10-01

    An FDA alert in December 2016 on the safety of general anesthesia and sedations in patients less than 3 years of age and pregnant women has raised doubts in relation to the attitude that professionals implicated in these procedures should adopt in relation to these specific group of patients. Confronted with this situation, the following medical scientific societies: Sociedad Española de Anestesia y Reanimación (SEDAR), Sociedad Española de Cirugía Pediátrica (SECP), Sociedad Española de Cuidados Intensivos Pediátricos (SECIP) y Sociedad Española de Neonatología (SENeo), have established a working group to analyze and clarify the safety of these techniques. In the present article we conclude that at present both general anesthesia and profound sedation are considered safe procedures because there is no evidence of the opposite in studies with human beings. However, this ascertained safety should not obviate the problem which still needs to be followed with attention, especially in patients less than 3 years of age undergoing anesthetic procedures for more than 3 hours or prolonged sedation in the Neonatal or Pediatric Intensive Care Units. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Parental Involvement in Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Children with Anxiety Disorders: 3-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Monika; Esbjørn, Barbara H; Breinholst, Sonja; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2017-06-01

    Parental factors have been linked to childhood anxiety, hence, parental involvement in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxious children has been examined. However, findings do not consistently show added effects of parent-enhanced CBT, longitudinal investigations are scarce and long-term effects unclear. In the present study, 40 out of 54 families who, 3 years previously, completed one of two types of CBT treatment: with limited or active parental involvement, were assessed using semi-structured diagnostic interviews. Diagnostic status at 3-years follow-up was compared between groups. Changes in diagnostic status across assessment points: posttreatment, 6-month and 3-year follow-up were analyzed within groups. Diagnostic change from 6-month to 3-year follow-up was compared between groups. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed no significant difference in diagnostic status between groups at 3-year follow-up. Nonetheless, children whose parents actively participated in treatment showed significantly more remission from 6-month to 3-year follow-up than children with limited parental participation.

  5. Father involvement, paternal sensitivity, and father-child attachment security in the first 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Geoffrey L; Mangelsdorf, Sarah C; Neff, Cynthia

    2012-06-01

    To reach a greater understanding of the early father-child attachment relationship, this study examined concurrent and longitudinal associations among father involvement, paternal sensitivity, and father-child attachment security at 13 months and 3 years of age. Analyses revealed few associations among these variables at 13 months of age, but involvement and sensitivity independently predicted father-child attachment security at age 3. Moreover, sensitivity moderated the association between involvement and attachment security at 3 years. Specifically, involvement was unrelated to attachment security when fathers were highly sensitive, but positively related to attachment security when fathers were relatively less sensitive. Father involvement was also moderately stable across the two time points, but paternal sensitivity was not. Furthermore, there was significant stability in father-child attachment security from 13 months to 3 years. Secure attachment at 13 months also predicted greater levels of paternal sensitivity at 3 years, with sensitivity at age 3 mediating the association between 13 month and 3 year attachment security. In sum, a secure father-child attachment relationship (a) was related to both quantity and quality of fathering behavior, (b) remained relatively stable across early childhood, and (c) predicted increased paternal sensitivity over time. These findings further our understanding of the correlates of early father-child attachment, and underscore the need to consider multiple domains of fathers' parenting and reciprocal relations between fathering behavior and father-child attachment security. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Dietary energy density and body weight changes after 3 years in the PREDIMED study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razquin, Cristina; Sanchez-Tainta, Ana; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; Corella, Dolores; Fito, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Estruch, Ramón; Arós, Fernando; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Lapetra, José; Serra-Majem, Luis; Pinto, Xavier; Schröder, Helmut; Tur, Josep; Sorlí, José V; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M; Bulló, Mónica; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A

    2017-11-01

    The association of dietary energy density (ED) and overweight is not clear in the literature. Our aim was to study in 4259 of the PREDIMED trial whether an increase in dietary ED based on a higher adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern was associated with 3-year weight gain. A validated 137-item food-frequency questionnaire was administered. Multivariable-adjusted models were used to analyze the association between 3-year ED change and the subsequent 3-year body weight change. The most important weight reduction after 3-year follow-up was observed in the two lowest quintiles and the highest quintile of ED change. The highest ED increase was characterized by an increased intake of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and nuts and a decreased intake of other oils, vegetable and fruit consumption (p < .001). In conclusion, increased 3-year ED in the PREDIMED study, associated with a higher EVOO and nuts consumption, was not associated with weight gain.

  7. Ferox is awarded another contract by CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Ferox, manufacturer of equipment for the chemical industry, has been awarded a second contract by the physical research centre CERN (Switzerland). The contract regards the delivery of 10 pcs of stainless containers for liquid nitrogen and argon with a capacity of 50 cu mt (1 paragraph).

  8. Emerging Researcher Awards encourages innovation and leadership

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-05-10

    EcoHealth Student: Emerging Researcher Awards encourages innovation and leadership. May 10, 2011. Ecosystems and Human Health. Addressing critical population health and environment issues through an ecohealth approach is a common vision shared by four individuals from vastly different parts of the world.

  9. HEP meets ML award talk : XGBoost

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; CHEN, Tianqi

    2015-01-01

    Tianqi Chen and Tong He (team crowwork) have provided very early in the challenge to all participants XGBoost (for eXtreme Gradient Boosted). It is a parallelised software to train boost decision trees, which has been effectively used by many participants to the challenge. For this, they have won the "HEP meets ML" award which is the invitation to CERN happening today.

  10. Research Award: Ecosystems and Human Health (Ecohealth ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... IDRC's Research Awards are a unique opportunity for master's and doctoral-level students, as well as recent graduates to enhance their research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. This one-year, paid in-house program of training and mentorship in research, research ...

  11. 40 CFR 791.37 - The award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true The award. 791.37 Section 791.37 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED... address or to its attorney, or by personal service. ...

  12. Research Award: Governance, Security, and Justice

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on ... and results, participating in project development, monitoring and evaluation, communication, networking and ... Proficiency in a second official language (English or French) is an asset. ▫ Proficiency in ...

  13. Research Award: Food, Environment and Health

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to ... Field experience in a developing country. • Demonstrated ability to work independently. • Strong verbal and written communications skills.

  14. Grant Application Development, Submission, Review, & Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    This infographic shows the National Cancer Institute general timeline progression through Grant Application Development, Submission, Review, and Award Infographic. In the first month, Applicant prepares and submits Grant Application to Grants.gov in response to FOA. In month two, The Center for Scientific Review (CSR) assigns applications that fall under the category of R01s, etc. to a Scientific Review Group (SRG) or the CSR assigns applications that fall under the category of Program Projects and Center Grants to NCI Division of Extramural Activities (DEA). Months four through five: First-level review by Scientific Review Group (SRG) for Scientific Merit: SRG assigns Impact Scores. Month five Summary Sstatements are prepared and are available to NCI Program staff and applicants. Month six, second-level review by National Cancer Advisory board (NCAB) for NCI Funding determination begins. NCAB makes recommendation to NCI Director, NCI develops funding plan, Applications selected for Funding, “Paylists” forwarded to Office of Grant Administration (OGA). Month ten, Award Negotiations and Issuance: Award issued, Award received by Institution, and Investigator begins work. www.cancer.gov Icons made by Freepik from http://www.flaticon.com is licensed by CC BY3.0

  15. 40 CFR 35.718 - Award limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... included in the Performance Partnership Grant work plan. Hazardous Waste Management Program Grants (Pub.L... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Toxic Substances Compliance Monitoring (section 28) § 35.718 Award limitation. If the Toxic Substances Compliance Monitoring grant funds are included in a...

  16. 2 CFR 175.15 - Award term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... in effect; ii. Procure a commercial sex act during the period of time that the award is in effect; or... of any information you receive from any source alleging a violation of a prohibition in paragraph a.1.... Includes: A. A nonprofit organization, including any nonprofit institution of higher education, hospital...

  17. 42 CFR 52d.6 - Grant awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grant awards. 52d.6 Section 52d.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL... cancer biology, epidemiology, detection, diagnosis, prevention, treatment and control; (ii) To interest...

  18. DPD 2015-Research Award ENG1

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jacinthe Marcil

    IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills ... Knowledge of French and/or Spanish is an asset. It is highly desirable that the candidate is enrolled in (or has recently completed) a ...

  19. Research Award: Global Health Research Iniave

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance ... Strong research and analycal skills;. • Knowledge of research for development;. • Field experience in an LMIC would be an asset;.

  20. Research award: Agriculture and Food Security | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... AFS is looking for a research award recipient to conduct research on the opportunities and benefits of climate smart agriculture to smallholder farmers in the context of the climate change/agriculture/water nexus. The research will contribute to knowledge on how climate smart agricultural practices and ...

  1. Round Two for Three ALICE Industrial Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Excellency in industrial collaboration with the LHC experimental teams is one important contribution to the successful development and realization of the experiments. A few weeks ago the ALICE collaboration presented a second round of awards to industrial collaborators for their novel and remarkable contributions to major detector systems.

  2. Research Award: Communications Deadline: September 12, 2011 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... stakeholders. These initiatives include a very active book publishing program, media, web and social media strategies, as well as other outreach programs. As a Communications Research Award recipient, you will undertake a one- year program of research on the topic you submitted when competing for.

  3. Tables Summarizing Awards Supported by IDRC

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Carole Labrie

    2013-04-04

    Apr 4, 2013 ... international development and the alleviation of global poverty. Once a year: APRIL. Up to CAD20,000. 1 or 2 per year. II. Canadian Window on · International Development · Awards. Doctoral. Masters'. X. X. Must be enrolled in a Canadian. University. Explore a problem common to First Nations or Inuit.

  4. Baldridge award criteria structure encourages strategic innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Guided by the criteria established for the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award, St. Luke's Hospital in Kansas City, MO, and Baptist Hospital, in Pensacola, FL, have regularly sustained industry leading successes in reduced employee turnover, increased patient satisfaction, improved outcomes, and financial stability over the last five years.

  5. Research Award: Supporting Inclusive Growth program Deadline ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    HEAD OFFICE / SIÈGE : 150 Kent Street / 150, rue Kent PO Box / CP 8500 Ottawa ON Canada K1G 3H9. Phone / Tél. : +1 613 236 6163 Email / Courriel : info@idrc.ca / info@crdi.ca. Research Award: Supporting Inclusive Growth program. Deadline: 12 September 2012. Please note that all applications must be sent ...

  6. Research Awards: Canadian Partnerships Program Deadline: 12 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... This award provides young and upcoming professionals with a unique opportunity to strengthen their research skills and gain a fresh perspective on the Canadian community – both in universities and civil society organizations (CSOs) – that is actively engaged in creating, sharing, and using knowledge to ...

  7. eParticipatie Awards 2009, Informatie shortlist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2009 heeft TNO voor ICTU Programma Burgerlink de voorselectie verzorgd voor de eParticipatie Awards. Meer dan 300 eParticipatie initiatieven zijn ingevoerd in de eParticipatie Monitor (www.eparticipatiemonitor.tno.nl) en geanalyseerd op een aantal eParticipatie variabelen. Op basis van deze

  8. 13 CFR 307.4 - Award requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of the RLF organization to manage lending activities, create networks between the business community... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Award requirements. 307.4 Section 307.4 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  9. WIRED magazine announces rave awards nominees

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    WIRED Magazine has anounced the nominees for its fourth annual WIRED Rave Awards, celebrating innovation and the individuals transforming commerce and culture. Jeffrey Hangst of the University of Aarhus has been nominated in the science category, for his work on the ATHENA Experiment, CERN (1/2 page).

  10. Research Award: Climate Change and Water

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. IDRC's Climate Change and Water (CCW) program supports research that reduces vulnerability to the water‐related impacts of climate change, including drought, flooding, and sea‐level rise.

  11. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes the software modules to be implemented to provide the user interface for the A59 Waste Repackaging Database (AWARD). The modules will consist of a front end menu with options giving access to the various screen forms and printed reports. (Author)

  12. Balts show strong notes in Grammy Awards

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Los Angeleses 8. veebr. Grammy Awards nominantide seas läti laulja Elina Garanca, dirigendid Paavo Järvi (Schumann "Cello Concerto" and Bloch's "Schelomo") ja Maris Jansons. Eelmisel aastal pälvis Grammy teos Sibelius "Cantatas" (esitajad Ellerheina tütarlastekoor Ester Loitme juhatusel, Eesti Rahvusmeeskoor, ERSO, dirigendid Ants Soots ja Paavo Järvi)

  13. Research Award: Employment and Growth | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... The successful candidate will allocate 50% of their time to their own research project under the guidance of a Senior Program Officer, and will be expected to present their research plan and provide progress updates during the year. In the remaining 50% of their time, the Research Award Recipient will ...

  14. Research award: Governance and Justice | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... In the remaining 50% of the time, the research award recipient will contribute to the management of the program through a variety of tasks, which may include ... in the Latin America and the Caribbean region, and to proposals outlining focused and feasible objectives and clearly defined methodology.

  15. Research Award: Governance and Justice | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. IDRC's Governance and Justice program funds research that addresses development challenges posed by insecurity, ...

  16. 48 CFR 452.214-70 - Award by Lot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Award by Lot. 452.214-70... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 452.214-70 Award by Lot. As prescribed in 414.201-6, insert a provision substantially as follows: Award by Lot (NOV 1996) Subject to the...

  17. 50 CFR 296.8 - Amount of award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... An award may also include compensation for any damage or loss (except personal injury) that is... gear. (d) Attorney, CPA, consultant fees. An award may also include compensation for reasonable fees... claim. (e) Negligence of claimant. (1) An award will be reduced to the extent that the loss or damage...

  18. Coed Trecastell: A Personal Experience of the John Muir Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collister, Rob

    1999-01-01

    A John Muir Award participant describes his satisfying experience cleaning up a wooded gorge near his home in Wales. Sidebar explains how the British award achieves its purpose of empowering people to conserve wild places through four challenges: discover a wild place, explore it, conserve it, and share the experience with others. The award has…

  19. Three scientists to receive presidential Enrico Fermi award

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today named John Bahcall, Raymond Davis, Jr. and Seymour Sack as winners of the Enrico Fermi Award. ... Drs. Bahcall and Davis will receive the award for their research in neutrino physics. Dr. Sack will receive the award for his contributions to national security" (1 page).

  20. 48 CFR 836.213-4 - Notice of award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Special Aspects of Contracting for Construction 836.213-4 Notice of award. The contracting officer must provide to the contractor a notice of award (letter of acceptance) for any contract award in excess of $25,000. ...

  1. 13 CFR 305.11 - Contract awards; early construction start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contract awards; early construction start. 305.11 Section 305.11 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION... § 305.11 Contract awards; early construction start. EDA must determine that the award of all contracts...

  2. 48 CFR 3452.227-72 - Advertising of awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advertising of awards... Clauses 3452.227-72 Advertising of awards. As prescribed in 3427.472, insert the following clause in all solicitations and contracts other than purchase orders: Advertising of Awards (AUG 1987) The contractor agrees...

  3. 48 CFR 3427.472 - Advertising of awards clause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advertising of awards... Copyrights 3427.472 Advertising of awards clause. The contracting officer shall insert the clause in 3452.227-72, Advertising of Awards, in all solicitations and contracts other than purchase orders. ...

  4. 40 CFR 35.1650-2 - Limitations on awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... that are not identified in the approved project scope of work. (EPA may allow additional costs for... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limitations on awards. 35.1650-2... Freshwater Lakes § 35.1650-2 Limitations on awards. (a) Before awarding assistance, the Regional...

  5. 48 CFR 752.216-70 - Award fee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... award-fee contract is contemplated. Award Fee (MAY 1997) (a) The Government shall pay the Contractor for... Officer shall release 75 percent of all fee withholds under this contract after receipt of the certified... FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 752.216-70 Award fee...

  6. Clinical evaluation of resin-based composites in posterior restorations: a 3-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Çiğdem; Arhun, Neslihan; Yamanel, Kivanc

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of a nanohybrid and a microhybrid composite in class I and II restorations after 3 years. A total of 82 class I and class II restorations were performed in 31 patients (10 males and 21 females) using Grandio and QuiXfil with self-etch adhesives (Futurabond and Xeno III). The restorations were clinically evaluated by 2 operators 1 week after placement (baseline) and at 6 months and 1, 2, and 3 years using modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. At the 3-year follow-up, 62 class I and class II cavities were reevaluated in 23 patients (7 males and 16 females). Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's χ(2) and Fisher's exact tests (p Grandio restorations started to deteriorate in terms of marginal adaptation. At the end of 2 years, 9 Grandio restorations showed significant deterioration of the surface properties, demonstrating Bravo scores. At the end of 3 years, no significant differences were observed regarding color match, marginal adaptation, secondary caries, marginal discoloration, and anatomic form loss between the evaluated materials in 25 class I and 37 class II restorations. At the 3-year follow-up, Grandio restorations had 21% Bravo scores and showed significant deterioration of the surface properties, which were still clinically acceptable according to USPHS criteria. Three QuiXfil and 1 Grandio restorations were replaced because of secondary caries and loss of retention. Both the nanohybrid (Grandio) and the microhybrid (QuiXfil) composites were clinically functional after 3 years. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Clinical Evaluation of Resin-Based Composites in Posterior Restorations: A 3-Year Study

    OpenAIRE

    Çelik, Çiğdem; Arhun, Neslihan; Yamanel, Kivanc

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of a nanohybrid and a microhybrid composite in class I and II restorations after 3 years. Subjects and Methods A total of 82 class I and class II restorations were performed in 31 patients (10 males and 21 females) using Grandio and QuiXfil with self-etch adhesives (Futurabond and Xeno III). The restorations were clinically evaluated by 2 operators 1 week after placement (baseline) and at 6 months and 1, 2, and 3 years ...

  8. Changes in skin test reactivity among adults with atopic disease: a 3-year prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslund, N.; Thomsen, S.F.; Molgaard, E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Our knowledge about longtudinal predictors of atopy is limited. Objectives: To describe changes in skin test reactivity during a 3-year period in a sample of adolescents and adults with atopic disease and to identify factors of importance for these changes. Methods: From a sample of 1...... sensitizations, and 12 (4%) both gained and lost sensitizations. Female sex (odds ratio = 1.90 [1.02-3.57] P =.04) significantly predicted incidence of 1 or more sensitizations. Conclusions: Four of 10 adults with atopic disease will have changes in SPT status during a 3-year period, and most will gain new...

  9. Elsevier/Spectrochimica Acta atomic spectroscopy award 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenetto, Nicolo; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha

    2016-12-01

    This is to announce the 2015 Elsevier/Spectrochimica Acta award, the annual award honoring the most significant article(s) published in a volume. Elsevier makes this award on behalf of Spectrochimica Acta, Part B, to encourage the publication of top articles in this journal. All papers published during one year are considered for this award and the Editorial Advisory Board and the Guest Editor(s) of the special issue(s) are responsible for the selection. The award consists of a monetary prize of 1000 together with a presentation certificate.

  10. Elsevier/Spectrochimica Acta Atomic Spectroscopy Award 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenetto, Nicolo'; de Loos, Greet

    2016-03-01

    This is to announce the 2014 Elsevier/Spectrochimica Acta Award, the annual award honoring the most significant article(s) published in a volume. Elsevier makes this award on behalf of Spectrochimica Acta, Part B, to encourage the publication of top articles in this journal. All papers published during one year are considered for this award and the Editorial Advisory Board and the Guest Editor(s) of the special issue(s) are responsible for the selection. The award consists of a monetary prize of 1000 together with a presentation certificate.

  11. A new award for the CERN Pension Fund

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the CERN Pension Fund was awarded the 2013 Investment and Pensions Europe (IPE) Award for “Best Use of Equities”. IPE is the leading European Pension Fund industry publication.   The award recognized CERN’s implementation of capital preservation principles in equities, referring in particular to CERN’s innovation with the development of “asymmetric” equity strategies. The awards were judged by a panel of 65 European pension fund executives, experts and consultants. In addition, CERN was selected by the judges as a finalist for “Best Public Pension Fund” in Europe.  This award was won by the UK government’s Pension Protection Fund.

  12. A Field Training Model for Creative Arts Therapies: Report from a 3-Year Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkibi, Hod

    2012-01-01

    Clinical field training is an essential component of educating future therapists. This article discusses a creative arts therapies field training model in Israel as designed and modified from 3 years of program evaluation in a changing regulatory context. A clinical seminar structure puts beginning students in the role of participant-observer in…

  13. Mortality and incident vertebral fractures after 3 years of follow-up among geriatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Jagt-Willems, H.C.; Vis, M.; Tulner, C.R.; van Campen, J.P.C.M.; Woolf, A.D.; van Munster, B.C.; Lems, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    In a prospective cohort study of 395 geriatric outpatients, mortality after 3 years was associated with prevalent vertebral fractures at baseline. The mortality risk was independently associated with the presence of three or more vertebral fractures at baseline. In the surviving patients, the risk

  14. Odontogenic myxoma involving the orbit in a 3-year-old boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjals Hansen, Teis; Danielsson, Lina Isabella; Fast, Søren

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of a 3-year-old boy with an odontogenic myxoma (OM) involving the orbita. Including our case, only nine cases of OM have been reported to involve the eye in children.There is no gold standard for treatment of OM in children with orbital involvement. The recurrence rate of OM...

  15. Pain and somatosensory findings in patients 3 years after total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Lone; Kristensen, Anders D; Thillemann, Theis M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic hip pain after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a significant problem, but the aetiology remains unclear. AIMS: To determine sensory function in patients with chronic hip pain 3 years after THA. Patients without hip pain after THA served as controls. METHODS: Eighteen patients ...

  16. Basic Facts about Low-Income Children: Children under 3 Years, 2013. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yang; Ekono, Mercedes; Skinner, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 33 percent of all people in poverty. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (22 percent) live in poor families. Our very youngest children--infants and toddlers under age 3 years--appear to be particularly…

  17. Giant recurrent infantile myofi bromatosis of the leg in a 3 year-old ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infantile myofi bromatosis is a rare mesenchymal disorder of infancy and childhood characterised by the formation of tumours in the soft tissues, muscles, bones and viscera. Only 61 cases have been reported in the literature. This paper describes the management of a 3 year-old boy with extensive IMF of the right leg.

  18. Emotional and Personality-Related Career Decision-Making Difficulties: A 3-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gati, Itamar; Asulin-Peretz, Lisa; Fisher, Ahinoam

    2012-01-01

    This study tests the temporal stability and the concurrent and predictive validity of the Emotional and Personality-related Career decision-making Difficulties (EPCD) model and questionnaire. Five hundred forty-three participants filled out the EPCD twice, 3 years apart. The Anxiety cluster was the most stable of the three, followed by the…

  19. Paternal Psychosocial Characteristics and Corporal Punishment of Their 3-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shawna J.; Perron, Brian E.; Taylor, Catherine A.; Guterman, Neil B.

    2011-01-01

    This study uses data from 2,309 biological fathers who participated in the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study (FFCWS) to examine associations between psychosocial characteristics and levels of corporal punishment (CP) toward their 3-year-old children over the past month. Results indicate that 61% of the fathers reported no CP over the…

  20. Perinatal Risk Factors for Feeding and Eating Disorders in Children Aged 0 to 3 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Carolina; Hansen, Bo Mølholm; Koch, Susanne Vinkel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence, age at diagnosis, and associations between perinatal risk factors of feeding and eating disorders (FED) diagnosed at hospital in children aged 0 to 3 years. METHODS: A nationwide cohort of 901 227 children was followed until 48 months of age in the national...

  1. Systemic activity of inhaled steroids in 1- to 3-year-old children with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anhøj, Jacob; Bisgaard, Anne Marie; Bisgaard, Hans

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the systemic activity of inhaled steroids in young children. METHODS: Forty children with mild asthma aged 1 to 3 years were studied in a 3-way crossover, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Treatment with inhaled fluticasone propionate, 200 microg twice daily...

  2. Leadership Coaching in an Induction Program for Novice Principals: A 3-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochmiller, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents results from a study of leadership coaches who worked with novice principals in a university-based induction program for a 3-year period. The qualitative case study describes how the support the coaches provided to the novice principals changed over time. The study reveals that coaches adapted their leadership coaching…

  3. Trajectories of Maternal Harsh Parenting in the First 3 Years of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoun K.; Pears, Katherine C.; Fisher, Philip A.; Connelly, Cynthia D.; Landsverk, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Despite the high prevalence rates of harsh parenting, the nature of developmental change in this domain early in life and the factors that contribute to changes in harsh parenting over time are not well understood. The present study examined developmental patterns in maternal harsh parenting behavior from birth to age 3 years and their…

  4. Words, Shape, Visual Search and Visual Working Memory in 3-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vales, Catarina; Smith, Linda B.

    2015-01-01

    Do words cue children's visual attention, and if so, what are the relevant mechanisms? Across four experiments, 3-year-old children (N = 163) were tested in visual search tasks in which targets were cued with only a visual preview versus a visual preview and a spoken name. The experiments were designed to determine whether labels facilitated…

  5. Two-and 3-Year-Olds Know What Others Have and Have Not Heard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Henrike; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have established that even infants can determine what others know based on previous visual experience. In the current study, we investigated whether 2-and 3-year-olds know what others know based on previous auditory experience. A child and an adult heard the sound of one object together, but only the child heard the sound of another…

  6. [Neurodevelopmental outcome at 3 years of age of infants born at less than 26 weeks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, O; Garcia, P; Bernard, V; Fabre, M; Vialet, R; Boubred, F; Fayol, L

    2016-09-01

    To describe the neurodevelopmental outcome and perinatal factors associated with favorable outcome among extremely preterm children at 3 years of age. All infants born before 26 weeks of gestation between 2007 and 2011, admitted to intensive care units participating in a French regional network (western PACA-southern Corsica) were included. Perinatal data were collected to assess the main neonatal morbidities. At 3 years of age, the children's neurodevelopment was assessed by trained physicians participating in the follow-up network. Children were classified according to their disability: none, moderate, or severe. Using logistic regression, we determined the perinatal factors associated with the absence of disability at 3 years of age. One hundred and sixty-two very preterm newborns were admitted to neonatal intensive care units. At discharge the survival rate was 62% (101). Rates of survival increased with gestational age (33% at 23 weeks, 57% at 24 weeks and 68% at 25 weeks). Among the 101 surviving extremely preterm children, 66 were evaluated at 3 years. The perinatal characteristics were not significantly different from those of the children lost to follow-up. Overall, 56% of extremely preterm children had no disability and 6% had severe disability. Cerebral palsy was diagnosed in 13% of children. At 3 years of age, the main perinatal factors associated with no disability were short duration of mechanical ventilation (OR=0.96 [0.93-0.99]; P=0.03) and complete course of prenatal corticosteroids (OR=4.7 [1.2-17.7]; P=0.02). As mortality rates continue to decrease for very preterm infants, concerns are rising about their long-term outcome. In this high-risk population, improving perinatal care remains a challenge to improve long-term outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Apprenticeships at CERN: a host of awards

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This year again, two CERN apprentices have received awards at the end of their training. CERN’s broad range of technical skills means that it can provide training in a wide variety of trades and professions. Denis Fernier receives congratulations from Pierre-François Unger, Counsel state of the canton of Geneva in charge of the department of economics and health. Denis Fernier and Coralie Husi (right) at the prize-giving ceremony of the Union Industrielle de Genève.Every year, CERN hosts six technical apprentices for a four-year period: three electronics technicians and three physics lab technicians. And every year, at the end of their apprenticeships, one or more of them receives an award for being among the best apprentices in Geneva. On 23 September, two young apprentices were honoured by the Union industrielle genevoise (UIG) on passing their exams: Coralie Husi, a physics lab apprentice...

  8. AMSOC's Albatross Award to Joe Reid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Robert E.

    Joseph L. Reid, premier physical oceanographer at Scripps Institiution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif., received the highly prized Albatross Award at the recent Joint Oceanographic Assembly in Acapulco. The presentation was by Robert E. Stevenson, Secretary General, International Association for the Physical Sciences of the Ocean, San Diego, Calif. Reid was honored “for his outrageous insistence that ocean circulation models should bear some resemblance to reality.”

  9. Designing and implementing a state quality award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, E. N.

    1993-02-01

    To remain competitive in today's global economy, businesses need to ensure customer satisfaction by offering high-quality products and services. Governors and state governments can play a critical role in ensuring the economic health of the business in their state by encouraging the adoption of quality practices and recognizing successful efforts by firms to improve quality and productivity. The manual is intended to help state government officials and other individuals implement a state quality award program.

  10. 2011 EnergyValue Housing Award Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagan, D. [NAHB Research Center, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Del Bianco, M. [NAHB Research Center, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Wood, A. [NAHB Research Center, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This report details the simulation tool(s) and energy modeling methodology followed in making the energy efficiency estimates, and documents the estimated performance of the EVHA award-winning houses in comparison with the Building America Benchmark and the associated House Simulation Protocols. A summary of each building and its features is included with a brief description of the project and the judges’ comments.

  11. eParticipatie Awards 2009, Informatie shortlist

    OpenAIRE

    Slot, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2009 heeft TNO voor ICTU Programma Burgerlink de voorselectie verzorgd voor de eParticipatie Awards. Meer dan 300 eParticipatie initiatieven zijn ingevoerd in de eParticipatie Monitor (www.eparticipatiemonitor.tno.nl) en geanalyseerd op een aantal eParticipatie variabelen. Op basis van deze analyse is een voorselectie gemaakt van 15 overheidsinitiatieven en 15 burger/ samenlevingsinitiatieven. Onder deze 30 geselecteerde initiatieven is vervolgens een aanvullend onderzoek uitgevoerd. Door ...

  12. Russian institute receives CMS Gold Award

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The Snezhinsk All-Russian Institute of Scientific Research for Technical Physics (VNIITF) of the Russian Federal Nuclear Centre (RFNC) is one of twelve CMS suppliers to receive awards for outstanding performance this year. The CMS Collaboration took the opportunity of the visit to CERN of the Director of VNIITF and his deputy to present the CMS Gold Award, which the institute has received for its exceptional performance in the assembly of steel plates for the CMS forward hadronic calorimeter. This calorimeter consists of two sets of 18 wedge-shaped modules arranged concentrically around the beam-pipe at each end of the CMS detector. Each module consists of steel absorber plates with quartz fibres inserted into them. The institute developed a special welding technique to assemble the absorber plates, enabling a high-quality detector to be produced at relatively low cost.RFNC-VNIITF Director Professor Georgy Rykovanov (right), is seen here receiving the Gold Award from Felicitas Pauss, Vice-Chairman of the CMS ...

  13. ATLAS book wins the IPPY awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Abha Eli Phoboo

    2014-01-01

    Hunting the Higgs, published by Papadakis Publishers in collaboration with the ATLAS experiment has won the Bronze prize in the Science category of the Independent Publisher Book Awards (see here). The Award ceremony will be held on 28 May in New York on the eve of the BookExpo America (see here).   “Ours is a souvenir book that gives viewers a glimpse of the discovery of the Higgs boson and the collaborative effort behind it of thousands of scientists in ATLAS,” says Claudia Marcelloni, communications officer of the ATLAS Experiment, who worked on the book with freelance science writer Colin Barras. “The science is noble and the collaboration heartwarming, and the IPPY Award is a great way to celebrate the mind-blowing story of human achievement.” Hunting the Higgs is the inside story of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. It tells the journey of the experiment, from before the detector was born to the announcement of the discovery of t...

  14. A 3 Year-Old Male Child Ingested Approximately 750 Grams of Elemental Mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Uysalol

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The oral ingestion of elemental mercury is unlikely to cause systemic toxicity, as it is poorly absorbed through the gastrointestinal system. However, abnormal gastrointestinal function or anatomy may allow elemental mercury into the bloodstream and the peritoneal space. Systemic effects of massive oral intake of mercury have rarely been reported. Case Report: In this paper, we are presenting the highest ingle oral intake of elemental mercury by a child aged 3 years. A Libyan boy aged 3 years ingested approximately 750 grams of elemental mercury and was still asymptomatic. Conclusion: The patient had no existing disease or abnormal gastrointestinal function or anatomy. The physical examination was normal. His serum mercury level was 91 μg/L (normal: <5 μg/L, and he showed no clinical manifestations. Exposure to mercury in children through different circumstances remains a likely occurrence.

  15. Parental styles and religious values among teenagers: a 3-year prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaven, Patrick C L; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Leeson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the effect of Grade 7 parental styles on Grade 10 religious values. The authors surveyed 784 participants (382 boys, 394 girls; 8 unreported) in Grade 7. The mean age of the group at Time 1 was 12.3 years (SD = 0.5 years). Time 2 occurred 3 years later when students were in Grade 10 (372 boys, 375 girls). In addition to assessing parental styles at Time 1, we also controlled for a number of Time 1 variables thought to possibly influence Time 2 religious values, namely, self-esteem, trait hope, and students' levels of conscientiousness. Time 1 measures (except self-esteem) were significantly correlated with Time 2 religious values, but only parental authoritativeness and hope significantly predicted religious values. The authors discuss these results with reference to the nature of parental styles and hope and their impact on religious values.

  16. A 3 Year-Old Male Child Ingested Approximately 750 Grams of Elemental Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysalol, Metin; Parlakgül, Güneş; Yılmaz, Yasin; Çıtak, Agop; Uzel, Nedret

    2016-07-01

    The oral ingestion of elemental mercury is unlikely to cause systemic toxicity, as it is poorly absorbed through the gastrointestinal system. However, abnormal gastrointestinal function or anatomy may allow elemental mercury into the bloodstream and the peritoneal space. Systemic effects of massive oral intake of mercury have rarely been reported. In this paper, we are presenting the highest single oral intake of elemental mercury by a child aged 3 years. A Libyan boy aged 3 years ingested approximately 750 grams of elemental mercury and was still asymptomatic. The patient had no existing disease or abnormal gastrointestinal function or anatomy. The physical examination was normal. His serum mercury level was 91 µg/L (normal: <5 µg/L), and he showed no clinical manifestations. Exposure to mercury in children through different circumstances remains a likely occurrence.

  17. FEEDING PATTERN TOWARD THE INCREASING OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN CHILDREN AGED 1–3 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Subarkah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of nutritional status problems with underweight in Indonesia at the moments is (19,6%. Data showed that children with less nutritional status aged 1-3 years in Kalijudan, Surabaya are existed. Provide feeding pattern properly is one effort to improve the nutritional status by fulfilling the needs of the child nutrition. The purpose of this study was to explain the relationship of feeding pattern and nutritional status in children aged 1-3 years in the Kalijudan district, Surabaya. Methods: The research design used was cross-sectional study with dietary habit as the independent variable and nutritional status as dependent variable. The sample was taken from 154 mothers and children. Consecutive sampling was deployed. Data collection by questionnaires, and then data analysis using the Spearman’s Rho in level  of significance α≤0.05. Result and Analysis: There was strong relationship between feeding pattern and nutritional status (r=0.640. The result showed that inappropriate feeding patterns with nutritional status is very thin (44.4% a proper feeding patterns with normal nutritional status (89.7%.  Discussion and Conclussion: The efforts to improve nutritional status of children aged 1-3 years related to feeding patterns should be improved in order to achieve a normal nutritional status. Further research may explore on the feeding patterns based on dietary allowances. Keywords: feeding pattern, nutritional status, 1-3 years old children

  18. Traumatic posterior dislocation of the hip in a 3-year-old child.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, James C

    2012-02-01

    We report the case of a traumatic posterior dislocation of the hip in a 3-year-old boy. After a fall in the garden, the boy was brought to our emergency department where an x-ray confirmed a posterior dislocation of his right hip. A successful prompt reduction was performed in the operating room under general anesthesia. This uncommon injury represents an orthopedic emergency and requires prompt reduction to lessen the risk of complications including avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  19. Association between umbilical cord glucocorticoids and blood pressure at age 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rich-Edwards Janet W

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal data show that decreased activity of placental 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2, which potently inactivates glucocorticoids (e.g. cortisol to inert forms (cortisone, allows increased access of maternal glucocorticoids to the fetus and 'programs' hypertension. Data in humans are limited. We examined in humans the association between venous umbilical cord blood glucocorticoids, a potential marker for placental 11β-HSD2 enzyme activity, and blood pressure at age 3 years. Methods Among 286 newborns in Project Viva, a prospective pre-birth cohort study based in eastern Massachusetts, we measured cortisol (F and cortisone (E in venous cord blood and used the ratio of F/E as a marker for placental 11β-HSD2 activity. We measured blood pressure (BP when the offspring reached age 3 years. Using mixed effects regression models to control for BP measurement conditions, maternal and child characteristics, we examined the association between the F/E ratio and child BP. Results At age 3 years, each unit increase in the F/E ratio was associated with a 1.6 mm Hg increase in systolic BP (95% CI 0.0 to 3.1. The F/E ratio was not associated with diastolic blood pressure or birth weight for gestational age z-score. Conclusion A higher F/E ratio in umbilical venous cord blood, likely reflecting reduced placental 11β-HSD2 activity, was associated with higher systolic blood pressure at age 3 years. Our data suggest that increased fetal exposure to active maternal glucocorticoids may program later systolic blood pressure.

  20. Effects of Testosterone Supplementation for 3 Years on Muscle Performance and Physical Function in Older Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaria, Shehzad; Traustadottir, Tinna; Harman, S. Mitchell; Pencina, Karol; Li, Zhuoying; Travison, Thomas G.; Miciek, Renee; Tsitouras, Panayiotis; Hally, Kathleen; Huang, Grace; Bhasin, Shalender

    2017-01-01

    Context: Findings of studies of testosterone’s effects on muscle strength and physical function in older men have been inconsistent; its effects on muscle power and fatigability have not been studied. Objective: To determine the effects of testosterone administration for 3 years in older men on muscle strength, power, fatigability, and physical function. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of healthy men ≥60 years old with total testosterone levels of 100 to 400 ng/dL or free testosterone levels testosterone or placebo gel daily for 3 years. Outcome Measures: Loaded and unloaded stair-climbing power, muscle strength, power, and fatigability in leg press and chest press exercises, and lean mass at baseline, 6, 18, and 36 months. Results: The groups were similar at baseline. Testosterone administration for 3 years was associated with significantly greater performance in unloaded and loaded stair-climbing power than placebo (mean estimated between-group difference, 10.7 W [95% confidence interval (CI), −4.0 to 25.5], P = 0.026; and 22.4 W [95% CI, 4.6 to 40.3], P = 0.027), respectively. Changes in chest-press strength (estimated mean difference, 16.3 N; 95% CI, 5.5 to 27.1; P testosterone than in those randomized to placebo. Lean body mass significantly increased more in the testosterone group. Conclusion: Compared with placebo, testosterone replacement in older men for 3 years was associated with modest but significantly greater improvements in stair-climbing power, muscle mass, and power. Clinical meaningfulness of these treatment effects and their impact on disability in older adults with functional limitations remains to be studied. PMID:27754805

  1. Suspected disseminated histiocytic sarcoma in a 3-year-old Perro de Presa Canario dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denstedt, Emily

    2014-02-01

    A 3-year-old intact male Perro de Presa Canario dog was presented with acutely inflamed and edematous right hind limb, scrotum, prepuce, and an enlarged left carpus. Two weeks later the dog returned with weight loss, draining tracts in the right hind limb, dermal nodules, a palpable abdominal mass, and uveitis in the left eye. The dog succumbed to his illness 2 days later and a widely disseminated round cell tumor compatible with histiocytic sarcoma was diagnosed following postmortem examination.

  2. Evaluation of analytical errors in a clinical chemistry laboratory: a 3 year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakyi, As; Laing, Ef; Ephraim, Rk; Asibey, Of; Sadique, Ok

    2015-01-01

    Proficient laboratory service is the cornerstone of modern healthcare systems and has an impact on over 70% of medical decisions on admission, discharge, and medications. In recent years, there is an increasing awareness of the importance of errors in laboratory practice and their possible negative impact on patient outcomes. We retrospectively analyzed data spanning a period of 3 years on analytical errors observed in our laboratory. The data covered errors over the whole testing cycle including pre-, intra-, and post-analytical phases and discussed strategies pertinent to our settings to minimize their occurrence. We described the occurrence of pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical errors observed at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital clinical biochemistry laboratory during a 3-year period from January, 2010 to December, 2012. Data were analyzed with Graph Pad Prism 5(GraphPad Software Inc. CA USA). A total of 589,510 tests was performed on 188,503 outpatients and hospitalized patients. The overall error rate for the 3 years was 4.7% (27,520/58,950). Pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical errors contributed 3.7% (2210/58,950), 0.1% (108/58,950), and 0.9% (512/58,950), respectively. The number of tests reduced significantly over the 3-year period, but this did not correspond with a reduction in the overall error rate (P = 0.90) along with the years. Analytical errors are embedded within our total process setup especially pre-analytical and post-analytical phases. Strategic measures including quality assessment programs for staff involved in pre-analytical processes should be intensified.

  3. Spatial but not verbal cognitive deficits at age 3 years in persistently antisocial individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Yaralian, P.S.; Raine, A.; Reynolds, C.; Venables, P.H.; Mednick, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have repeatedly shown verbal intelligence deficits in adolescent antisocial individuals, but it is not known whether these deficits are in place prior to kindergarten or, alternatively, whether they are acquired throughout childhood. This study assesses whether cognitive deficits occur as early as age 3 years and whether they are specific to persistently antisocial individuals. Verbal and spatial abilities were assessed at ages 3 and 11 years in 330 male and female children, ...

  4. The effectiveness of finasteride and dutasteride used for 3 years in women with androgenetic alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ids H Boersma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effectiveness of finasteride and dutasteride in women with androgenetic alopecia has been the subject of debate. Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of finasteride and dutasteride on hair loss in women with androgenetic alopecia over a period of 3 years. Methods: From a database containing systematically retrieved data on 3500 women treated for androgenetic alopecia between 2002 and 2012 with finasteride 1.25 mg or dutasteride 0.15 mg, a random sample stratified for age and type of medication was taken to yield 30 women in two age categories: below and above 50 years, and for both medications. Hair thickness of the three thinnest hairs was measured from standardized microscopic images at three sites of the scalp at the start of the treatment and after 3 years of continuous medication intake. The macroscopic images were evaluated independently by three European dermatologists/hair experts. The diagnostic task was to identify the image displaying superior density of the hair. Results: Both age categories showed a statistically significant increase in hair thickness from baseline over the 3-year period for finasteride and dutasteride (signed rank test, P = 0.02. Hair thickness increase was observed in 49 (81.7% women in the finasteride group and in 50 (83.3% women in the dutasteride group. On average, the number of post-treatment images rated as displaying superior density was 124 (68.9% in the finasteride group, and 118 (65.6% in the dutasteride group. Dutasteride performed statistically significantly better than finasteride in the age category below 50 years at the central and vertex sites of the scalp. Conclusions: Finasteride 1.25 mg and dutasteride 0.15 mg given daily for 3 years effectively increased hair thickness and arrested further deterioration in women with androgenetic alopecia.

  5. Pediatric dentists' perspective of general dentists' role in treating children aged 0-3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Julie M; Razdan, Shinjni; Best, Al M; Brickhouse, Tegwyn H

    2017-01-01

    This study examined pediatric dentists' perspectives on the types of dental services general dentists provide to children who are 0-3 years old. A web-based survey was sent to 5185 pediatric dentists and 769 (14.8%) responded. Among the respondents, 58% agreed with general dentists' providing an age 1 dental visit. Only 24% agreed with general dentists' performing complex behavior management techniques, such as sedation, to patients aged 0-3 years. Those respondents who taught pediatric dentistry full time were more likely to agree with general dentists' providing an age 1 dental visit (P = 0.0088). Those who reported that their own dental school had adequately prepared them for this type of age 1 visit were also more in agreement (P pediatric dentists' perceptions of the level of collaboration between general dentists and pediatric dentists; the types of oral health services general dentists can provide for children aged 0-3 years; and the anticipated level of competency of entry-level general dentists.

  6. [Bilateral dorsal sympathectomy for the treatment of primary hyperhidrosis: effects on lung function at 3 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Laura; Calaf, Núria; Feixas, Teresa; Casan, Pere

    2010-01-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis is characterized by excessive sweating of the palms, soles, and axillae due to overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system at the level of the second and third sympathetic thoracic ganglia. The treatment of choice is bilateral dorsal sympathectomy performed using video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). The objective of our study was to determine whether lung function changes observed in a group of patients prior to bilateral dorsal sympathectomy performed using VATS were still evident 3 years after surgery. Of the 20 patients studied at baseline, we were able to obtain data for 18 (3 men and 15 women; mean age, 35 y). They underwent spirometry and a bronchial challenge test with methacholine, and the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) was measured. The results were compared with those of the tests performed before surgery. At 3 years from baseline, we detected a statistically significant increase in forced vital capacity from a mean (SD) of 96% (10%) to 101% (11%) (P=.008), and a statistically significant decrease in midexpiratory flow rate from 3.8 (0.9)L/s to 3.5 (0.9)L/s (P=.01). The results of the bronchial challenge test with methacholine and the FE(NO) remained unchanged. The lung function changes detected point toward minimal, clinically insignificant small airway alterations due to sympathetic denervation following bilateral dorsal sympathectomy performed 3 years earlier. Copyright (c) 2008 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Joint action coordination in 2½- and 3-year old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene eMeyer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When acting jointly with others, adults can be as proficient as when acting individually. However how young children coordinate their actions with another person and how their action coordination develops during early childhood is not well understood. By means of a sequential button-pressing game, which could be played jointly or individually, the action coordination of 2½- and 3-year-old children was examined. Performance accuracy and variability of response timing were taken as indicators of coordination ability. Results showed substantial improvement in joint action coordination between the age of 2½- and 3, but both age groups performed equally well when acting individually. Interestingly, 3-year-olds performed equally well in the joint and the individual condition, whereas 2½-year-olds did not yet show this adult-like pattern as indicated by less accurate performance in the joint action. The findings suggest that in contrast to 3-year-olds, 2½-year-olds still have difficulties in establishing well-coordinated joint action with an adult partner. Possible underlying cognitive abilities such as action planning and action control are discussed.

  8. Prediction model for 3-year rupture risk of unruptured cerebral aneurysms in Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominari, Shinjiro; Morita, Akio; Ishibashi, Toshihiro; Yamazaki, Tomosato; Takao, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Yuichi; Sonobe, Makoto; Yonekura, Masahiro; Saito, Nobuhito; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Date, Isao; Tominaga, Teiji; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Kirino, Takaaki; Hashi, Kazuo; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-06-01

    To build a prediction model that estimates the 3-year rupture risk of unruptured saccular cerebral aneurysms. Survival analysis was done using each aneurysm as the unit for analysis. Derivation data were from the Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Study (UCAS) in Japan. It consists of patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms enrolled between 2000 and 2004 at neurosurgical departments at tertiary care hospitals in Japan. The model was presented as a scoring system, and aneurysms were classified into 4 risk grades by predicted 3-year rupture risk: I, 9%. The discrimination property and calibration plot of the model were evaluated with external validation data. They were a combination of 3 Japanese cohort studies: UCAS II, the Small Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysm Verification study, and the study at Jikei University School of Medicine. The derivation data include 6,606 unruptured cerebral aneurysms in 5,651 patients. During the 11,482 aneurysm-year follow-up period, 107 ruptures were observed. The predictors chosen for the scoring system were patient age, sex, and hypertension, along with aneurysm size, location, and the presence of a daughter sac. The 3-year risk of rupture ranged from 15% depending on the individual characteristics of patients and aneurysms. External validation indicated good discrimination and calibration properties. A simple scoring system that only needs easily available patient and aneurysmal information was constructed. This can be used in clinical decision making regarding management of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. © 2015 American Neurological Association.

  9. Preoperative factors and 3-year weight change in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courcoulas, Anita P; Christian, Nicholas J; O'Rourke, Robert W; Dakin, Greg; Patchen Dellinger, E; Flum, David R; Melissa Kalarchian, Ph D; Mitchell, James E; Patterson, Emma; Pomp, Alfons; Pories, Walter J; Spaniolas, Konstantinos; Steffen, Kristine; Wolfe, Bruce M; Belle, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Limited data guide the prediction of weight loss success or failure after bariatric surgery according to presurgery factors. There is significant variation in weight change after bariatric surgery and much interest in identifying preoperative factors that may contribute to these differences. This report evaluates the associations of a comprehensive set of baseline factors and 3-year weight change. Ten hospitals in 6 geographically diverse clinical centers in the United States. Adults undergoing a first bariatric surgical procedure as part of clinical care by participating surgeons were recruited between 2006 and 2009. Participants completed research assessments utilizing standardized and detailed data collection on over 100 preoperative and operative parameters for individuals undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). Weight was measured 3 years after surgery. Percent weight change for RYGB or LAGB from baseline to 3 years was analyzed as both a continuous and dichotomous outcome with cut points at 25% for RYGB and 10% for LAGB. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to identify independent baseline predictors of the continuous and categorical outcomes, respectively. The median weight loss 3 years after surgery for RYGB (n = 1513) participants was 31.5% (IQR: 24.6%-38.4%; range, 59.2% loss to .9% gain) of baseline weight and 16.0% (IQR: 8.1%-23.1%; range, 56.1% loss to 12.5% gain) for LAGB (n = 509) participants. The median age was 46 years for RYGB and 48 years for LAGB; 80% of RYGB participants and 75% of LAGB participants were female; and the median baseline body mass index (BMI) was 46 kg/m(2) for RYGB and 44 kg/m(2) for LAGB. For RYGB, black participants lost 2.7% less weight compared with whites and participants with diabetes at baseline had 3.7% less weight loss at year 3 than those without diabetes at baseline. There were small but statistically significant differences in weight

  10. Exenatide once weekly: sustained improvement in glycemic control and cardiometabolic measures through 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacConell L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh MacConell, Richard Pencek, Yan Li, David Maggs, Lisa PorterAmylin Pharmaceuticals, LLC, San Diego, CA, USABackground: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a progressive metabolic disease necessitating therapies with sustained efficacy and safety over time. Exenatide once weekly (ExQW, an extended-release formulation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist exenatide, has demonstrated improvements in glycemic and cardiometabolic measures from 30 weeks to 2 years of treatment. Here, the efficacy and safety of treatment with ExQW for 3 years are described.Methods: Patients were initially randomized to receive either ExQW (2 mg or exenatide twice daily for 30 weeks. Following the initial 30 weeks, all patients were treated with ExQW in an open-label extension. Analyses of primary glycemic endpoints, beta-cell function, and cardiometabolic measures were assessed for patients who completed 3 years of ExQW treatment and for the intention-to-treat population. Safety and tolerability analyses were provided for the intention-to-treat population.Results: Sixty-six percent of the intention-to-treat population (n = 295 completed 3 years of treatment (n = 194. At 3 years, a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c (least squares mean ± standard error of -1.6% ± 0.08% was observed, with 55% and 33% of patients achieving hemoglobin A1c targets of <7% and ≤6.5%, respectively. Consistent with a sustained reduction in hemoglobin A1c, improvements in beta-cell function were also observed. Body weight was significantly reduced by -2.3 ± 0.6 kg. Reductions in blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were also observed. Adverse events reported most frequently during both controlled and uncontrolled periods included diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting of mostly mild intensity. The incidence of these adverse events decreased over time. Incidence of minor hypoglycemia was low and no major hypoglycemia was observed

  11. Weight Loss and Health Status 3 Years after Bariatric Surgery in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inge, Thomas H; Courcoulas, Anita P; Jenkins, Todd M; Michalsky, Marc P; Helmrath, Michael A; Brandt, Mary L; Harmon, Carroll M; Zeller, Meg H; Chen, Mike K; Xanthakos, Stavra A; Horlick, Mary; Buncher, C Ralph

    2016-01-14

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly considered for the treatment of adolescents with severe obesity, but few prospective adolescent-specific studies examining the efficacy and safety of weight-loss surgery are available to support clinical decision making. We prospectively enrolled 242 adolescents undergoing weight-loss surgery at five U.S. centers. Patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (161 participants) or sleeve gastrectomy (67) were included in the analysis. Changes in body weight, coexisting conditions, cardiometabolic risk factors, and weight-related quality of life and postoperative complications were evaluated through 3 years after the procedure. The mean (±SD) baseline age of the participants was 17±1.6 years, and the mean body-mass index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) was 53; 75% of the participants were female, and 72% were white. At 3 years after the procedure, the mean weight had decreased by 27% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25 to 29) in the total cohort, by 28% (95% CI, 25 to 30) among participants who underwent gastric bypass, and by 26% (95% CI, 22 to 30) among those who underwent sleeve gastrectomy. By 3 years after the procedure, remission of type 2 diabetes occurred in 95% (95% CI, 85 to 100) of participants who had had the condition at baseline, remission of abnormal kidney function occurred in 86% (95% CI, 72 to 100), remission of prediabetes in 76% (95% CI, 56 to 97), remission of elevated blood pressure in 74% (95% CI, 64 to 84), and remission of dyslipidemia in 66% (95% CI, 57 to 74). Weight-related quality of life also improved significantly. However, at 3 years after the bariatric procedure, hypoferritinemia was found in 57% (95% CI, 50 to 65) of the participants, and 13% (95% CI, 9 to 18) of the participants had undergone one or more additional intraabdominal procedures. In this multicenter, prospective study of bariatric surgery in adolescents, we found significant improvements in weight

  12. A bioactive dental luting cement--its retentive properties and 3-year clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Steven R; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Appleby, David C; Boston, Daniel; Lööf, Jesper

    2013-02-01

    A clinical validation study was conducted to determine the performance of a new bioactive dental cement (Ceramir C&B, Doxa Dental AB) for permanent cementation. The cement is a new formulation class, which is a hybrid material comprised of calcium aluminate and glass-ionomer components. A total of 38 crowns and bridges were cemented in 17 patients; 31 of the abutment teeth were vital and seven were non-vital. Six restorations were bridges with a total of 14 abutment teeth (12 vital/ two non-vital). One fixed splint comprising two abutment teeth was also included. Preparation parameters were recorded, as well as cement characteristics such as working time, setting time, seating characteristics, and ease of cement removal. Baseline data were recorded for the handling of the cement, gingival inflammation, and pre-cementation sensitivity. Post-cementation parameters included post-cementation sensitivity, gingival tissue reaction, marginal integrity, and discoloration. All patients were seen for recall examinations at 30 days and 6 months. Fifteen of 17 subjects and 13 of 17 patients were also available for subsequent comprehensive 1- and 2-year recall examination, and 13 patients were available for a 3-year recall examination. Restorations available for the 3-year recall examination included 14 single-unit full-coverage crown restorations, four three-unit bridges comprising eight abutments, and one two-unit splint. Three-year recall data yielded no loss of retention, no secondary caries, no marginal discolorations, and no subjective sensitivity. All restorations rated excellent for marginal integrity. Average visual analogue scale (VAS) score for tooth sensitivity decreased from 7.63 mm at baseline to 0.44 mm at 6-month recall, 0.20 mm at 1-year recall, and 0.00 mm at 2- and 3-year recall. Average gingival index (GI) score for gingival inflammation decreased from 0.56 at baseline to 0.11 at 6-month recall, 0.16 at 1-year recall, 0.21 at 2-year recall, and 0.07 at 3

  13. 32 CFR 22.305 - General policy and requirement for competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General policy and requirement for competition... GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Competition § 22.305 General policy and requirement for competition. (a) It is DoD policy to maximize use of competition in the...

  14. The effects of harassment severity and organizational behavior on damage awards in a hostile work environment sexual harassment case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Stacie A; Levett, Lora M; Kovera, Margaret Bull

    2010-01-01

    Community members reporting for jury duty (N = 128) read a sexual harassment trial summary in which harassment severity and the organization's sexual harassment policy and response were manipulated. Jurors who read the severe harassment scenario were more likely to agree that the plaintiff had suffered and should be compensated for her suffering and that the organization should be punished than were jurors who read the mild harassment scenario. When the organization had and enforced a sexual harassment policy, jurors believed that the plaintiff had suffered little and the organization should not be punished compared with conditions in which the organization did not have an enforced sexual harassment policy. Harassment severity influenced jurors' compensatory awards, and organizational behavior influenced jurors' punitive awards. These results have implications for plaintiffs, who must decide whether to claim specific or garden-variety damages; organizations, which could create or modify sexual harassment policy to limit damages; and trial lawyers, who could tailor arguments to maximize or minimize awards. 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. A longitudinal test of video game violence influences on dating and aggression: a 3-year longitudinal study of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Christopher J; San Miguel, Claudia; Garza, Adolfo; Jerabeck, Jessica M

    2012-02-01

    In 2011 the field of video game violence experienced serious reversals with repudiations of the current research by the US Supreme Court and the Australian Government as non-compelling and fundamentally flawed. Scholars too have been calling for higher quality research on this issue. The current study seeks to answer this call by providing longitudinal data on youth aggression and dating violence as potential consequences of violent video game exposure using well-validated clinical outcome measures and controlling for other relevant predictors of youth aggression. A sample of 165, mainly Hispanic youth, were tested at 3 intervals, an initial interview, and 1-year and 3-year intervals. Results indicated that exposure to video game violence was not related to any of the negative outcomes. Depression, antisocial personality traits, exposure to family violence and peer influences were the best predictors of aggression-related outcomes. The current study supports a growing body of evidence pointing away from video game violence use as a predictor of youth aggression. Public policy efforts, including funding, would best be served by redirecting them toward other prevention programs for youth violence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Research Award: Ecosystems and Human Health (Ecohealth)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... Public Health or health policy. • Environmental Sciences or environmental policy with a focus on health‐related issues. • Knowledge of research for development and policy processes;. • Prior field work in a developing country an asset;. • Strong verbal and wrien communicaons skills; and. • Ability to work ...

  17. Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification and Insurance Process for the Electric Utility Industry (initial award through Award Modification 2); Energy & Risk Transfer Assessment (Award Modifications 3 - 6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Ebert

    2008-02-28

    This is the final report for the DOE-NETL grant entitled 'Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification & Insurance Processes for the Electric Utility Industry' and later, 'Energy & Risk Transfer Assessment'. It reflects work done on projects from 15 August 2004 to 29 February 2008. Projects were on a variety of topics, including commercial insurance for electrical utilities, the Electrical Reliability Organization, cost recovery by Gulf State electrical utilities after major hurricanes, and review of state energy emergency plans. This Final Technical Report documents and summarizes all work performed during the award period, which in this case is from 15 August 2004 (date of notification of original award) through 29 February 2008. This report presents this information in a comprehensive, integrated fashion that clearly shows a logical and synergistic research trajectory, and is augmented with findings and conclusions drawn from the research as a whole. Four major research projects were undertaken and completed during the 42 month period of activities conducted and funded by the award; these are: (1) Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification and Insurance Process for the Electric Utility Industry (also referred to as the 'commercial insurance' research). Three major deliverables were produced: a pre-conference white paper, a two-day facilitated stakeholders workshop conducted at George Mason University, and a post-workshop report with findings and recommendations. All deliverables from this work are published on the CIP website at http://cipp.gmu.edu/projects/DoE-NETL-2005.php. (2) The New Electric Reliability Organization (ERO): an examination of critical issues associated with governance, standards development and implementation, and jurisdiction (also referred to as the 'ERO study'). Four major deliverables were produced: a series of preliminary memoranda for the staff of the Office of Electricity Delivery and

  18. Awards for high-energy physics at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Dave Barney of CMS with the Outreach Prize awarded by the European Physical Society. The European Physical Society (EPS) has awarded two prizes to CERN physicists. Dave Barney of CMS shared his Outreach Prize with Peter Kalmus of Queen Mary, University of London. This prize is awarded for communicating particle physics to the public. The NA31 collaboration and its spokesman, Heinrich Wahl, received the 2005 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize for their work on CP violation undertaken at CERN.

  19. [Discitis in children less than 3 years old: a case series and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, I; Salom, M; Burguet, S

    2014-01-01

    Review of the cases of discitis treated in our unit in children under 3 years old. A retrospective medical record review was made of 10 cases with a diagnosis of discitis at discharge, in children hospitalized from January 1998 to December 2010. The most affected level was L5-S1 (4 cases), followed by L4-L5 (3 cases). The history at presentation was non-specific and caused a delay in the diagnosis of 3.7 weeks, and a wrong initial diagnosis in 7 patients. Most frequent symptoms were the refusal to sit (70%) and an alteration in gait or refusal to walk (50%), with pain at spinal palpation (80%), and stiffness (70%). All patients had unspecific laboratory test anomalies, and radiographs were normal in 6 patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 9 patients and was diagnostic in all of them. All patients were treated and remain asymptomatic after a mean follow-up of 24.2 months, but radiographic abnormalities persist in 80% of them. The diagnosis of discitis is difficult in patients under 3 years due to the absence of specific clinical and laboratory findings. Magnetic resonance is the tool of choice to make the diagnosis. Treatment consists of a combination of antibiotics and orthosis. Radiological abnormalities persist in the majority of cases. In patients under 3 years with the suspected diagnosis of discitis, MRI should be considered in the diagnosis of discitis. Symptoms resolve with antibiotics and immobilization. Because of the persistency of the radiographical abnormalities, a long-term period of follow-up is advised to detect long-term sequelae. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy Instead of Shunt Revision in Children Younger Than 3 Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui; Shi, Wei; Yang, Haowei; Li, Hao

    2016-04-01

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is a valuable option in the treatment of shunt failure, but no clinical data exist for young children. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of ETV in patients younger than 3 years of age with shunt malfunction. A cohort of 37 patients younger than 3 years of age with shunt malfunction underwent ETV instead of shunt revision. Patients' preoperative condition and medical history were studied to determine the impact of a number of variables on outcome. The Fisher exact test was used to assess differences among groups. Median age at ETV was 21.6 months (8-36 months). Diagnosis was obstructive hydrocephalus in 24 patients and communicating hydrocephalus in 13. Median age at initial shunt placement was 3.2 months (10 days to 30 months). The etiology of shunt malfunction was obstruction (n = 27) or infection (n = 10). Overall ETV failure rate was 40.5% (15/37). Patients whose age at initial shunt placement was <6 months and/or who had a preterm birth history had higher relative rates of ETV failure. Other variables, including type of hydrocephalus, interval between initial shunt placement and ETV, history of intraventricular bleeding and/or infection, and etiology of shunt malfunction, did not significantly affect the final outcome. Patients younger than 3 years with obstructive or communicating hydrocephalus may benefit from ETV in the event of shunt malfunction and have about a 60% probability of becoming shunt free. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Zolpidem increased cancer risk in patients with sleep disorder: A 3-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chiao Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zolpidem has been increasingly used in patients with sleep disorder due to its minimal respiratory depressor effects and short half-life. Materials and Methods: Recent case reports indicate that zolpidem usage may be associated with increased cancer mortality. This study aimed to determine the impact of zolpidem usage on the risk of incident cancer events in sleep disorder patients over a 3-year follow-up. Of the 6924 subjects diagnosed with sleep disorder in 2004, 1728 had used zolpidem. A Cox proportional hazard model was performed to estimate 3-year cancer event-free survival rates for patients using zolpidem and those not using it, after adjusting for confounding and risk factors. Results: At the end of follow-up, 56 patients had incident cancers, 26 (1.5% who used zolpidem, and 30 (0.6% who did not. After adjustments for gender, age, comorbidities, and other medications, patients using zolpidem had a 1.75 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–3 greater risk of cancer events than those not using zolpidem during the 3-year follow-up. Greater mean daily dose and longer use were associated with increased risk. Among patients with sleep disorder, mean daily dose >10 mg and length of drug use >2 months was associated with 3.74 times greater risk (95% CI, 1.42–9.83; P = 0.008 of incident cancer events. Conclusions: In this study, zolpidem use increased cancer events risk in sleep disorder patients. Risks and benefits of chronic zolpidem usage should be explained to sleep disorder patients, and long-term use should be monitored.

  2. 3-year survival rates of retained composite resin and ART sealants using two assessment criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Augusto HILGERT

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim was to test the null-hypothesis that there is no difference in the cumulative survival rate of retained composite resin (CR sealants and a high-viscosity glass-ionomer Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART sealant in first permanent molars calculated according to the traditional and the modified retention assessment criteria over a period of 3 years. This cluster-randomized controlled clinical trial consisted of 123 schoolchildren, 6–7-years-old. At baseline, high-caries risk pits and fissures of fully erupted first permanent molars were treated with CR and ART sealants. Evaluations were performed after 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 years. Retention was scored for free-smooth surface and for each of three sections into which the occlusal surface had been divided. The modified criterion differed from the traditional in that it determined an occlusal sealant to be a failure when at least one section contained no visible sealant material. Data were analysed according to the PHREG model with frailty correction, Wald-test, ANOVA and t-test, using the Jackknife procedure. The cumulative survival rates for retained CR and ART sealants in free-smooth and occlusal surfaces for both criteria were not statistically significantly different over the 3 years. A higher percentage of retained CR sealants on occlusal surfaces was observed at longer evaluations. Cumulative survival rates were statistically significantly lower for the modified criterion in comparison to the traditional. The modified retention assessment criterion should be used in future sealant-retention studies.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winner, Clarke, developed Natular, a plaster matrix that encapsulates the pesticide spinosad, slowly releasing it into water and effectively controlling mosquito larvae.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2014 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2014 award winner, The Solberg Company, replaced fluorinated surfactants in its firefighting foam concentrates with a blend of non-fluorinated surfactants and sugars.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, EDEN Bioscience, discovered and commercialized harpins: nontoxic, naturally occurring, biodegradable proteins that activate a plant's defense and growth mechanisms.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Archer Daniels Midland, developed Archer RC, a nonvolatile, biobased, reactive coalescent that replaces volatile organic coalescents in architectural latex paints.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2014 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2014 award winner, Solazyme, engineered microalgae to produce oils tailored to customers’ needs that can mimic or enhance properties of traditional vegetable oils.

  8. DATA Act File C Award Financial - Social Security

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The DATA Act Information Model Schema Reporting Submission Specification File C. File C includes the agency award information from the financial accounting system at...

  9. Climate Leadership Awards Application Process, Eligibility, and Evaluation Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about evaluation criteria and access applications for the 2018 Climate Leadership Awards, which publicly recognizes individuals and organizations for their outstanding leadership in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, Headwaters Technology Innovation, developed a metal nanocatalyst to synthesize hydrogen peroxide directly from hydrogen and oxygen, eliminating hazardous chemicals.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Buckman Laboratories International, developed Optimyze technology, which uses an esterase enzyme to remove sticky contaminants from paper products prior to recycling.

  12. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the bladder in a 3-year-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuona, Angus T; Van Wyk, Abraham C; Smit, Shaun G; Zarrabi, Amir D; Heyns, Chris F

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare neoplasm with unknown malignant potential that has been described in most organ systems. We present the case of a 3-year-old boy who was referred with lower urinary tract symptoms and macroscopic hematuria. An IMT was suspected after clinical, radiological, and surgical work-up, and the diagnosis was confirmed after a partial cystectomy was performed. A bladder-preserving approach is the treatment of choice, but close clinical follow-up is recommended because of the unknown biological behavior of these tumors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Ophthalmomyiasis caused by Oestrus ovis in a 3 year old boy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosl, Heinrich; Meyer, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Oestrus ovis larvae are obligatory parasites of the nasal and sinus cavities of sheep and goats. Oestrosis in small ruminants is prevalent in Mediterranean and tropical countries. Occasionally, humans are affected by ocular myiasis (ophthalmomyiasis) and more rarely, nasal myiasis. A case of human ophthalmomyiasis caused by first instar larvae of Oestrus ovis in a 3 year old boy was observed in Gran Canaria. Acute catarrhal conjunctivitis developed within few hours. During the inspection of the eye several larvae could be observed, moving quickly over the cornea to the conjunctival sac. Rinsing and mechanical removal of the larvae lead to an uncomplicated recovery.

  14. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and pulmonary embolism in a 3-year-old child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, Carine; Blondiaux, Eleonore; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Radiology, Rouen (France); Blanc, Thierry [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Neonatal Medicine, Rouen (France); Borg, Jeanne-Yvonne [University Hospital of Rouen, Haematology Laboratory, Rouen (France)

    2006-08-15

    We report a rare example of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) in a young child. A 3-year-old girl with no previous medical history presented with extensive and recurrent thromboses. The diagnosis of CAPS was based on the occurrence of cardiopulmonary embolism in the child with a high titre of autoantibodies directed against phospholipids and beta-2-glycoprotein 1. In spite of a relatively rapid diagnosis and multiple treatments, the outcome was unfavourable. Multimodality imaging, including both ultrasonography and spiral CT, allowed close follow-up of the thromboses. (orig.)

  15. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and pulmonary embolism in a 3-year-old child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, Carine; Blondiaux, Eleonore; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Blanc, Thierry; Borg, Jeanne-Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    We report a rare example of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) in a young child. A 3-year-old girl with no previous medical history presented with extensive and recurrent thromboses. The diagnosis of CAPS was based on the occurrence of cardiopulmonary embolism in the child with a high titre of autoantibodies directed against phospholipids and beta-2-glycoprotein 1. In spite of a relatively rapid diagnosis and multiple treatments, the outcome was unfavourable. Multimodality imaging, including both ultrasonography and spiral CT, allowed close follow-up of the thromboses. (orig.)

  16. New commercial dairy products in the feeding of children aged 1 to 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Abramova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition is of particular importance in young children who are characterized by exceptionally high growth rates in conjunction with scare resources of nutrients in their body. The physiological features of infants suggest that this active life period in the child requires adequate attitude towards his nutrition that largely differs from that during the first year of life. The paper considers the issues of organizing the nutrition of children aged 1 to 3 years, by using commercial infant dairy products — new combined products — sterilized milk- and fruit-milk-based desserts and milk cocktails for infant feeding. 

  17. Bariatric surgery versus intensive medical therapy for diabetes--3-year outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Philip R; Bhatt, Deepak L; Kirwan, John P; Wolski, Kathy; Brethauer, Stacy A; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Aminian, Ali; Pothier, Claire E; Kim, Esther S H; Nissen, Steven E; Kashyap, Sangeeta R

    2014-05-22

    In short-term randomized trials (duration, 1 to 2 years), bariatric surgery has been associated with improvement in type 2 diabetes mellitus. We assessed outcomes 3 years after the randomization of 150 obese patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes to receive either intensive medical therapy alone or intensive medical therapy plus Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy. The primary end point was a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.0% or less. The mean (±SD) age of the patients at baseline was 48±8 years, 68% were women, the mean baseline glycated hemoglobin level was 9.3±1.5%, and the mean baseline body-mass index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) was 36.0±3.5. A total of 91% of the patients completed 36 months of follow-up. At 3 years, the criterion for the primary end point was met by 5% of the patients in the medical-therapy group, as compared with 38% of those in the gastric-bypass group (Pmedications, including insulin, was lower in the surgical groups than in the medical-therapy group. Patients in the surgical groups had greater mean percentage reductions in weight from baseline, with reductions of 24.5±9.1% in the gastric-bypass group and 21.1±8.9% in the sleeve-gastrectomy group, as compared with a reduction of 4.2±8.3% in the medical-therapy group (Pmedical-therapy group. There were no major late surgical complications. Among obese patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, 3 years of intensive medical therapy plus bariatric surgery resulted in glycemic control in significantly more patients than did medical therapy alone. Analyses of secondary end points, including body weight, use of glucose-lowering medications, and quality of life, also showed favorable results at 3 years in the surgical groups, as compared with the group receiving medical therapy alone. (Funded by Ethicon and others; STAMPEDE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00432809.).

  18. Bariatric Surgery versus Intensive Medical Therapy for Diabetes — 3-Year Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Philip R.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Kirwan, John P.; Wolski, Kathy; Brethauer, Stacy A.; Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Aminian, Ali; Pothier, Claire E.; Kim, Esther S.H.; Nissen, Steven E.; Kashyap, Sangeeta R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In short-term randomized trials (duration, 1 to 2 years), bariatric surgery has been associated with improvement in type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS We assessed outcomes 3 years after the randomization of 150 obese patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes to receive either intensive medical therapy alone or intensive medical therapy plus Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy. The primary end point was a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.0% or less. RESULTS The mean (±SD) age of the patients at baseline was 48±8 years, 68% were women, the mean baseline glycated hemoglobin level was 9.3±1.5%, and the mean baseline body-mass index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) was 36.0±3.5. A total of 91% of the patients completed 36 months of follow-up. At 3 years, the criterion for the primary end point was met by 5% of the patients in the medical-therapy group, as compared with 38% of those in the gastric-bypass group (Pmedications, including insulin, was lower in the surgical groups than in the medical-therapy group. Patients in the surgical groups had greater mean percentage reductions in weight from baseline, with reductions of 24.5±9.1% in the gastric-bypass group and 21.1±8.9% in the sleeve-gastrectomy group, as compared with a reduction of 4.2±8.3% in the medical-therapy group (Pmedical-therapy group. There were no major late surgical complications. CONCLUSIONS Among obese patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, 3 years of intensive medical therapy plus bariatric surgery resulted in glycemic control in significantly more patients than did medical therapy alone. Analyses of secondary end points, including body weight, use of glucose-lowering medications, and quality of life, also showed favorable results at 3 years in the surgical groups, as compared with the group receiving medical therapy alone. (Funded by Ethicon and others; STAMPEDE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00432809.) PMID:24679060

  19. Forensic state patients at Sterkfontein Hospital: A 3-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Marais

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. State patients are individuals who have been charged with offences involving serious violence and who have been declared unfit to stand trial and/or who are not criminally responsible because of their mental illness or defect. They are referred by the courts for treatment, rehabilitation and indefinite detention at a forensic psychiatric facility. However, many of these state patients may ultimately be released back into the community. As these individuals may be considered a high-risk group, their rates of relapse and recidivism are of importance. There is a paucity of South African literature on the long-term outcome of state patients.  Objective. To describe the profile of state patients, and to examine their outcomes after 3 years, including recidivism rates.  Methods. A descriptive, retrospective study of the clinical records of 114 state patients admitted to Sterkfontein Hospital in 2004 and 2005 was conducted, and their profile and 3-year outcomes were determined. Results. The majority of state patients were male, single, unemployed, had a past psychiatric history (59%, and substance abuse history (71%. A third reported a past criminal history. The most common offences were assault with the intention to do grievous bodily harm (19%, rape (18% and murder (13%. Psychotic disorders represented the most common diagnostic category (69%, with schizophrenia being the most frequent diagnosis (44%. Most state patients had been found unfit to stand trial (96% and not criminally responsible (89%. At the end of the 3-year follow-up, the majority were in the community (69%, of whom most (72% were out on leave of absence (LOA, while a quarter had absconded and a minority were reclassified (3%. Most absconders (83% were state patients who had not returned from LOA. The recidivism rate was 4%.  Conclusion. Most state patients were out in the community at the end of the 3-year period. The following recommendations are suggested: improved

  20. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in a 3-year-old with occult myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Randall M; Redfearn, Sharon P; Marangi, Don; Davenport, Joseph P; Kuntz, Sean T; Schowengerdt, Kenneth O

    2002-10-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a rare clinical entity in children. Occult myocarditis has not been previously implicated as an etiologic agent. A 3-year-old female presents with a presumed breath-holding spell and is found to have ventricular fibrillation requiring DC cardioversion. An invasive electrophysiological study was performed demonstrating the absence of inducible ventricular arrhythmias. Low dose epinephrine confirmed the presence CPVT. Right ventricular endomyocardial biopsies sent for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis demonstrated the presence of adenoviral DNA. The authors hypothesize that occult myocarditis may be the inciting agent for CPVT in children.

  1. 2011 EnergyValue Housing Award Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagan, D.; Del Bianco, M.; Wood, A.

    2012-10-01

    This report details the simulation tool(s) and energy modeling methodology followed in making the energy efficiency estimates and documents the estimated performance of the EVHA award winning houses in comparison with the Building America Benchmark and the associated House Simulation Protocols. A summary of each building and its features is included with a brief description of the project and the judges' comments. The purpose of this report is to assess the energy performance of the 2011 EVHA winners as well as align the EVHA Program with the Building America Program.

  2. CMS Young Researchers Award 2013 and Fundamental Physics Scholars Award from the CMS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, Marzena

    2014-01-01

    Photo 2: CMS Fundamental Physics Scholars (FPSs) 1st prize: Joosep Pata, from Estonian National Institue of Chemical Physics and Biophysics / Photo 1 and 3: CMS Young Researchers Award. From left to right: Guido Tonelli, Colin Bernet, Andre David, Oliver Gutsche, Dmytro Kovalskyi, Andrea Petrucci, Joe Incandela and Jim Virdee

  3. Awarding Teaching Excellence: "What Is It Supposed to Achieve?" Teacher Perceptions of Student-Led Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madriaga, Manuel; Morley, Krystle

    2016-01-01

    Although there is lack of agreement as to what constitutes teaching excellence, there remains a steady effort to make an intangible, ambiguous, multifaceted concept incarnate in the form of "student-led" teaching awards schemes within higher education institutions. What teaching staff say about such schemes have largely been ignored.…

  4. Pressure ulcer risk in spinal cord injury: predictors of ulcer status over 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, S L; Rintala, D H; Hart, K A; Fuhrer, M J

    2000-04-01

    To identify predictors of pressure ulcers in men with spinal cord injury over a 3-year period. Longitudinal, two-panel, cohort. Community. One hundred eighteen men with spinal cord injury. Interviews, questionnaires, and physical examinations were completed in two phases, 3 years apart. Information obtained included demographic and spinal cord injury characteristics; ulcer history; health beliefs and practices; measures of impairment, disability, and handicap; and skin integrity. Thirty-one percent of the participants reported having a pressure ulcer in the 12 months before Phase 2. Some Phase 1 predictors of self-reported ulcers in the year before Phase 2 were a younger age at onset of spinal cord injury, previous pressure ulcer surgery, and the presence of a pressure ulcer in the year before Phase 1. On examination at Phase 2, 59% presented with an ulcer. Phase 1 predictors of ulcer presence at Phase 2 examination were similar to predictors for self-reported ulcers. Individuals with the identified predictive characteristics are at greater risk for developing pressure ulcers. These individuals should receive additional interventions to reduce that risk. Potential interventions include more systematic and frequent follow-up, frequent review of pressure ulcer prevention and management strategies, and provision of needed personal assistance and relevant equipment.

  5. Pediatrician-recommended use of sports drinks and dental caries in 3-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashita, Y; Fukuda, H; Kawasaki, K; Kitamura, M; Hayashida, H; Furugen, R; Fukumoto, E; Iijima, Y; Saito, T

    2011-03-01

    To determine whether children advised by a pediatrician to take sports drinks consume them more frequently than do other children and whether these children have an increased risk of dental caries. The subjects were 522 mother/child pairs who attended a dental checkup for 3-year-olds at one of ten community health centers in Nagasaki, Japan. Pearson's chi-square test was used to compare the prevalence of children with or without dental caries according to child-related variables. Multiple logistic regression was performed to assess the relationship between the presence of dental caries and child-related variables taken from a dental checkup and a questionnaire. A high frequency of sports drink consumption was strongly associated with dental caries in children. The highest proportion of mothers answered that they were advised by a pediatrician to give sports drinks to their children. However, these children consumed sports drinks significantly less frequently than did children who did so for reasons other than pediatrician recommendations. In addition, these children were significantly less likely to have dental caries than were children who consumed sports drinks for otherreasons. Pediatrician-recommended consumption of sports drinks does not lead to more frequent consumption of these beverages or to dental caries in 3-year-old children.

  6. [Mandibular ameloblastic fibro-odontoma in 3-year-old patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, G; Lan, R; Garçonnet, J; Cheynet, F

    2016-12-01

    The ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (FOA) is a rare benign tumor representing 1-3% of odontogenic tumors. The FOA affects young patients before the age of 20. Surgical treatment allows usually for recovery. Recurrence and malignant transformation are possible. A 3-year-old patient, with no medical and surgical history, was referred for a painless swelling of the right cheek progressing for several months. Radiographic examination showed a large mixed lesion. Buccal and lingual cortices were blown out. Surgical resection was performed under general anesthesia. Microscopically, the lesion consisted of dental tissue composed of mature dentin and enamel and of an epithelial component. These elements allowed for the diagnosis of ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. The postoperative course was uneventful. The management of this 3-year-old patient was delayed due to late consultation. The size of the lesion, that included all dental structures of sector 4, was big considering the very young age of the patient. The primary conservative surgical treatment allowed for preservation of teeth and of the inferior alveolar nerve, the only sequelae being the removal of the germ of the tooth n o  44 directly involved in the tumor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. [Effect of parental feeding behavior on eating behavior of children aged 1-3 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Hua; Chen, Jin-Jin

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between the eating behavior of children aged 1-3 years and parental feeding behavior and the effect of family status on feeding behavior. With stratified random sampling, 2 324 children aged 1-3 years were selected from Shanghai. Questionnaires were filled out by their parents or feeders to investigate the basic family information, parental feeding behavior, the eating behavior of children, and the basic information on children. The eating behavior of children was positively correlated with eating environment (r=0.223) and parental monitoring behavior (r=0.245) but negatively correlated with parental compulsive behavior (r=-0.264) (Pparental compulsive behavior (r=-0.569) but positively correlated with parental monitoring behavior (r=0.615) and eating environment (r=0.621). The emotional undereating of children was positively correlated with parental emotional feeding (r=0.259) and parental compulsive behavior (r=0.279). Parental monitoring behavior showed significant differences between different families (PParental feeding behavior is closely related to the eating behavior of children. Parental feeding behavior may vary across different family status.

  8. Effects of prosthetic limb prescription on 3-year mortality among lower extremity veteran amputees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurichi, Jibby E.; Kwong, Pui; Vogel, W. Bruce; Xie, Dawei; Ripley, Diane Cowper; Bates, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the relationship between receipt of a prescription for a prosthetic limb and three-year mortality post-surgery among veterans with lower extremity amputation. We conducted a retrospective observational study that included 4,578 veterans hospitalized for lower extremity amputation and discharged in Fiscal Years 2003 and 2004. The outcome was time to all-cause mortality from the amputation surgical date up to the 3-year anniversary of the surgical date. There were 1,300 (28.4%) veterans with lower extremity amputations who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb within a year after the surgical amputation. About 46% (n=2086) died within three-years of the surgical anniversary. Among those who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb, only 25.2% died within 3 years of the surgical anniversary. After adjustment, veterans who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb were less likely to die after the surgery than veterans without a prescription with a hazard ratio of 0.68 (95% CI, 0.60-0.77). Findings demonstrated that veterans with lower extremity amputations who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb within a year after the surgical amputation were less likely to die within three years of the surgical amputation after controlling for patient-, treatment-, and facility-level characteristics. PMID:26348602

  9. Predictive value of alexithymia in patients with eating disorders: a 3-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranza, Mario; Loas, Gwenolé; Wallier, Jenny; Corcos, Maurice

    2007-10-01

    Several cross-sectional studies have reported high levels of alexithymia in populations with eating disorders. However, only few studies, fraught with multiple methodological biases, have assessed the prognostic value of alexithymic features in these disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the long-term prognostic value of alexithymic features in a sample of patients with eating disorders. Within the framework of a European research project on eating disorders (INSERM Network No. 494013), we conducted a 3-year longitudinal study exploring a sample of 102 DSM-IV eating disorder patients using the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and the Beck Depression Inventory. At the 3-year assessment, 74% (n=76) of the sample still presented a syndromal or subsyndromal eating disorder (unfavorable outcome: score of > or =3 on the Psychiatric Status Rating Scale for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa). In logistic and hierarchical regression analyses, the Difficulty Identifying Feelings factor of the TAS-20 emerged as a significant predictor of treatment outcome, independent of depressive symptoms and eating disorder severity. The results of this study indicate that difficulty in identifying feelings can act as a negative prognostic factor of the long-term outcome of patients with eating disorders. Professionals should carefully monitor emotional identification and expression in patients with eating disorders and develop specific strategies to encourage labeling and sharing of emotions.

  10. One Piece Immediately Loaded Implants Versus 1 Piece or 2 Pieces Delayed: 3 Years Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Mariusz; Matalon, Shlomo; Lewinstein, Israel; Harel, Noga; Block, Jonathan; Ormianer, Zeev

    2016-02-01

    To compare time-dependent outcome of immediately loaded 1-piece (1P) implants with delayed loaded 1P and 2-piece (2P) implants. A cohort of 33 patients divided into 3 groups: group A, 13 patients, 49 immediately placed and loaded 1P implants; group B, 11 patients, immediately placed and delayed loaded 1P implants; and group C, 10 patients, 39 2P implants delayed placed and loaded in a two-stage procedure. Marginal bone loss (MBL) was analyzed using x-ray radiography every 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years. A statistically significant mean MBL was observed between baseline, 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years in all groups. There was no statistical significant difference in MBL between immediate and delayed loaded 1P implants. MBL around mandibular implants was lower compared with maxillary implants. 2P implants showed less MBL compared with 1P implants in both maxilla and mandible. There was no statistical difference in MBL between immediate and delayed loaded 1P implants. Immediate loaded implants show more MBL in maxilla.

  11. Occlusal characteristics in 3-year-old children--results of a birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Yvonne; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha

    2015-08-07

    Aim of this prospective study was to determine prevalence of malocclusion and associated risk factors in 3-year-old Thuringian children. Subjects (n = 377) were participants in a regional oral health programme, a birth cohort study with the aim to prevent caries (German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00003438). Children received continuous dental care since birth. Occlusal characteristics (overjet, overbite, anterior open bite, canine relationship and posterior crossbite) were measured at the age of 3 years by one calibrated clinician using a vernier caliper (accuracy 0.1 mm; Münchner Modell 042-751-00, Germany). A regular parent survey was conducted to assess risk factors for development of malocclusion. Three hundred seventy seven children (mean age 3.31 ± 0.70 years; 52.5% male) were examined. Children had a mean overjet of 2.4 ± 0.8 mm and the mean overbite was 0.8 ± 1.2 mm; 58.8 % of the children had a normal overjet ≤ 3 mm and 88.8% a normal overbite with 0.05). Non-nutritive sucking habits were important risk factors for development of a malocclusion in the primary dentition.

  12. An Analysis of 3-Year Outcomes Following Canaloplasty for the Treatment of Open-Angle Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Khaimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report 3-year results investigating the safety and efficacy of canaloplasty for open-angle glaucoma. Setting. University of Oklahoma, Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma, United States of America. Design. Nonrandomized single-center retrospective chart review. Methods. Adult open-angle glaucoma eyes underwent canaloplasty or combined cataract-canaloplasty surgery. A tensioning suture was placed into Schlemm’s canal in all eyes. Primary endpoints included the mean IOP and mean number of glaucoma medications at each follow-up visit. Secondary endpoints included visual acuity and surgical/postsurgical complications. Results. The study cohort included 277 eyes (mean age, 72.8 years. Overall, the mean baseline IOP of 19.7 mmHg was reduced to 14.3 mmHg,14.0 mmHg, and 15.2 mmHg at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively (p<0.001. The average medicine use was reduced from 2.1 preoperatively to 0.4 at 12 months, and 0.5 and 0.6 at two and three years, respectively (p<0.001. The frequency of surgical and postsurgical complications was low with no serious adverse events recorded. Conclusion. Canaloplasty was safe and effective in achieving long-term IOP reductions and reduced dependence on antiglaucoma medications.

  13. Neurodevelopment of children under 3 years of age with Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Pamela L; Gropman, Andrea L; Martin, Staci C; Smith, Michaele R; Hildenbrand, Hanna L; Brewer, Carmen C; Smith, Ann C M

    2009-10-01

    Systematic data regarding early neurodevelopmental functioning in Smith-Magenis syndrome are limited. Eleven children with Smith-Magenis syndrome less than 3 years of age (mean, 19 months; range, 5-34 months) received prospective multidisciplinary assessments using standardized measures. The total sample scored in the moderately to severely delayed range in cognitive functioning, expressive language, and motor skills and exhibited generalized hypotonia, oral-motor abnormalities, and middle ear dysfunction. Socialization skills were average, and significantly higher than daily living, communication, and motor abilities, which were below average. Mean behavior ratings were in the nonautistic range. According to exploratory analyses, the toddler subgroup scored significantly lower than the infant subgroup in cognition, expressive language, and adaptive behavior, suggesting that the toddlers were more delayed than the infants relative to their respective peers. Infants aged approximately 1 year or younger exhibited cognitive, language, and motor skills that ranged from average to delayed, but with age-appropriate social skills and minimal maladaptive behaviors. At ages 2 to 3 years, the toddlers consistently exhibited cognitive, expressive language, adaptive behavior, and motor delays and mildly to moderately autistic behaviors. Combining age groups in studies may mask developmental and behavioral differences. Increased knowledge of these early neurodevelopmental characteristics should facilitate diagnosis and appropriate intervention.

  14. The relation between student motivation and student grades in physical education: A 3-year investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkoukis, V; Taylor, I; Chanal, J; Ntoumanis, N

    2014-10-01

    Enhancing students' academic engagement is the key element of the educational process; hence, research in this area has focused on understanding the mechanisms that can lead to increased academic engagement. The present study investigated the relation between motivation and grades in physical education (PE) employing a 3-year longitudinal design. Three hundred fifty-four Greek high school students participated in the study. Students completed measures of motivation to participate in PE on six occasions; namely, at the start and the end of the school year in the first, second, and third year of junior high school. Students' PE grades were also recorded at these time points. The results of the multilevel growth models indicated that students' PE grades increased over the 3 years and students had better PE grades at the end of each year than at the beginning of the subsequent year. In general, students and classes with higher levels of controlling motivation achieved lower PE grades, whereas higher levels of autonomous motivation were associated with higher PE grades. These findings provide new insight on the associations between class- and individual-level motivation with objectively assessed achievement in PE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The vocal quality in female student teachers during the 3 years of study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lierde, K M; Claeys, S; Dhaeseleer, E; Deley, S; Derde, K; Herregods, I; Strybol, I; Wuyts, F

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the objective vocal quality and the vocal characteristics (vocal risk factors, vocal and corporal complaints) in 143 female student teachers during the 3 years of study. The objective vocal quality was measured by means of the Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI). Perceptual voice assessment, the Voice Handicap Index, questionnaires addressing vocal risks, and vocal and corporal complaints during and/or after voice usage were performed. Student teachers have a normal perceptual and objective vocal quality corresponding with a DSI% of 76. The analysis of variance revealed a significant improvement of the vocal quality between the first and the third year of study. No psychosocial handicapping effect of the voice was observed, though there are some vocal complaints and almost all student teachers reported the presence of corporal pain during and/or after speaking. Especially sore throat and headache were mentioned as the most present corporal pain symptoms. Due to the decreased awareness and the multifactorial genesis of the potential vocal risk factors, the student teachers are at risk for developing an occupational dysphonia during their teaching career. Because teaching is a high-risk profession for the development of voice problems, the incorporation of a direct vocal training technique to increase vocal endurance during teaching together with a vocal hygiene program, dietetics, and a stress management training program during the 3 years of study is needed to prevent occupational dysphonia. 2010 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prospective analysis of the quality of Spanish health information web sites after 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conesa-Fuentes, Maria C; Hernandez-Morante, Juan J

    2016-12-01

    Although the Internet has become an essential source of health information, our study conducted 3 years ago provided evidence of the low quality of Spanish health web sites. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the quality of Spanish health information web sites now, and to compare these results with those obtained 3 years ago. For the original study, the most visited health information web sites were selected through the PageRank® (Google®) system. The present study evaluated the quality of the same web sites from February to May 2013, using the method developed by Bermúdez-Tamayo et al. and HONCode® criteria. The mean quality of the selected web sites was low and has deteriorated since the previous evaluation, especially in regional health services and institutions' web sites. The quality of private web sites remained broadly similar. Compliance with privacy and update criteria also improved in the intervening period. The results indicate that, even in the case of health web sites, design or appearance is more relevant to developers than quality of information. It is recommended that responsible institutions should increase their efforts to eliminate low-quality health information that may further contribute to health problems.

  17. Job embeddedness factors and retention of nurses with 1 to 3 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfer, Diana

    2011-10-01

    An aging work force, predictions of job growth in health care, and an eventual economic recovery suggest that the current reprieve from the national nursing shortage is temporary. New graduate nurses are an important part of the work force and are needed to replace nurses who will retire in the next decade. Organizational leaders can address the forecasted work force demand by proactively investing in programs for workplace development and retention. Recent literature reports an increased focus on understanding the work experience and career support needed for new graduate nurses. Several studies report improvements in job satisfaction and retention after implementation of structured mentoring programs for new graduate nurses. However, despite successful transition programs, turnover for these same nurses after 1 to 3 years of organizational tenure remains high. Studying factors that contribute to retention and supporting careers beyond the first year of practice may have a significant effect on improving retention and will contribute new knowledge to the nursing literature. This study, undertaken at a Midwestern pediatric academic medical center, examined job factors and career development support that lead to retention of nurses with 1 to 3 years of experience. Understanding these issues may guide nursing leaders and staff development educators in investing in focused retention and career development plans during an economic recession. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Spatial but not verbal cognitive deficits at age 3 years in persistently antisocial individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Adrian; Yaralian, Pauline S; Reynolds, Chandra; Venables, Peter H; Mednick, Sarnoff A

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have repeatedly shown verbal intelligence deficits in adolescent antisocial individuals, but it is not known whether these deficits are in place prior to kindergarten or, alternatively, whether they are acquired throughout childhood. This study assesses whether cognitive deficits occur as early as age 3 years and whether they are specific to persistently antisocial individuals. Verbal and spatial abilities were assessed at ages 3 and 11 years in 330 male and female children, while antisocial behavior was assessed at ages 8 and 17 years. Persistently antisocial individuals (N = 47) had spatial deficits in the absence of verbal deficits at age 3 years compared to comparisons (N = 133), and also spatial and verbal deficits at age 11 years. Age 3 spatial deficits were independent of social adversity, early hyperactivity, poor test motivation, poor test comprehension, and social discomfort during testing, and they were found in females as well as males. Findings suggest that early spatial deficits contribute to persistent antisocial behavior whereas verbal deficits are developmentally acquired. An early-starter model is proposed whereby early spatial impairments interfere with early bonding and attachment, reflect disrupted right hemisphere affect regulation and expression, and predispose to later persistent antisocial behavior.

  19. Changes in body composition in apparently healthy urban Indian women up to 3 years postpartum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha A Kajale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dietary and life style practices differ in postpartum (PP and nonpregnant Indian women. Effect of these practices on postpartum weight retention (PPWR and development of cardio-metabolic risk (CMR has been scarcely studied in urban women. Aims of this study were to (i compare anthropometry, biochemical parameters and body composition up to 3 years PP (ii effect of PPWR, dietary fat intake and physical activity on CMR factors. Methods: Design: Cross-sectional, 300-fullterm, apparently healthy primi-parous women (28.6 ± 3.4 years randomly selected. 128 women within 7-day of delivery (Group-A, 88 with 1-2 years (Group-B and 84 with 3-4-year-old-children (Group-C were studied. Anthropometry, sociodemographic status, physical activity, diet, clinical examination, biochemical tests, body composition, at total body (TB, by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (GE-Lunar DPX were collected. Results: Women at 3-year PP showed higher weight retention (6.5[10] kg than at 1-year (3.0[7] kg (median [IQR]. Android fat % (central obesity increased (P 0.1. Conclusion: Postdelivery, low physical activity and higher PPWR may increase CMR in Indian women.

  20. Cynthia J. Najdowski: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. The 2012 winner is Cynthia J. Najdowski for an outstanding research paper that examines how jurors' judgments are influenced by a juvenile defendant's confession and status as intellectually disabled. Through the use of a mock trial experiment, the research revealed that jurors discounted a juvenile's coerced confession and sometimes used intellectual disability as a mitigating factor. Attribution theory and the discounting principle were used to identify the psychological mechanisms underlying this effect. The paper, titled 'Understanding Jurors' Judgments in Cases Involving Juvenile Defendants,' was published in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law in October 2011 and was the basis for Najdowski's selection as the recipient of the 2012 Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. Bette L. Bottoms, PhD, served as faculty supervisor. Najdowski's Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Recipients of major scientific awards: A descriptive and predictive analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, Andrew Calvin

    Recent trends demonstrate an increase of women in leadership roles, STEM fields, and participating in higher education including graduate and doctoral programs, which is a result of Title IX. This quantitative study considered major scientific awards awarded to females and examines demographic characteristics of awardees from the Nobel, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and National Science Foundation (NSF). More specifically, the following awards were examined the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, the NAS Public Welfare Medal, and the NSF National Medal of Science within the discipline of Physical Science. Also, this study focused on equality to determine if a fair playing field and equal opportunity for women in academics has improved since Title IX. A limited amount of research has explored female award recipients. Specifically, existing research, has not examined the pinnacle of academic performance in the form of national and international awards. In the present study, I posed research questions relating to demographic characteristics of award recipients from the Nobel, NAS, and NSF between 1975 and 2015. Additionally, I examined if sex and age of the awardees could predict early career award obtainment. Through the frame of Social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1986, 1997, and 2005) I considered how perceptions of gender roles are a product of influence by society and the possible connection to performance. Results indicated a limited number of females have received these scientific awards and the awardees age could predict receiving an award early in their career. Additionally, the study provided insight into the progression of Title IX within the context of athletics and academics. It addressed the incremental and systematic increase in academics for women at high school, college, career, and scientific awards. Perhaps most importantly, it identified an observed pattern for female science award recipients reaching a critical mass and a tipping point.

  2. CERN safety expert receives international award

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    On 18 December 2004, the President of the Swiss Electro-technical Committee, Martin Reichle (left), presented the award to Helmut Schönbacher. Helmut Schönbacher, of the Safety Commission at CERN, has received, the "1906 Award" of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) for his standardisation work on the influence of ionizing radiation on insulating materials. From 1986 until 2004, Schönbacher was leader of a working group on radiation composed of internationally recognised experts. It edited standards of the IEC 60544 series on the determination of the effects of ionizing radiation on electrical insulating materials. The working group also edited three IEC Technical Reports on the determination of long-term radiation ageing in polymers. This standardisation work and long-term experience from CERN on the radiation ageing of materials also contributed to research coordination programmes of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). From 1968 until 1988, Schönbacher was a member of the Rad...

  3. Growth, psychomotor development and morbidity up to 3 years of age in children born after IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivurova, S; Hartikainen, A-L; Sovio, U; Gissler, M; Hemminki, E; Järvelin, M-R

    2003-11-01

    To examine the long-term child outcome after IVF until the age of 3 years in Northern Finland, we conducted a population-based cohort study. First, a cohort of 299 IVF children born in 1990-1995 was compared with a cohort of 558 controls representing the general population in terms of a multiple birth rate of 1.2%, randomly chosen from the Finnish Medical Birth Register (FMBR) and matched for sex, year of birth, area of residence, parity, maternal age and social class (full sample analyses). Second, IVF singletons (n = 150) were compared with singleton controls (n = 280). Third, a plurality matched control cohort (n = 100) for IVF twins (n = 100) was randomly chosen, matched as above, from the FMBR and analysed separately. Infant mortality rate was compared with the national rate from the FMBR. Infant mortality in the IVF group was >2-fold higher compared to the national rate in the general population. The risk (OR, 95% CI) of low weight and height, below the lowest quartile, at 1 year of age (1.6, 1.1-2.2; 1.6, 1.1-2.4) and 2 years of age (1.5, 1.1-2.4; 1.7, 1.2-2.5) was significantly higher in the IVF group when compared with the general population control group. No statistically significant differences were found in the psychomotor development between the cohorts. Cumulative incidence of different diseases up to 3 years of age was significantly higher among IVF children in the full sample and singleton analyses (OR, 95% CI: 2.3, 1.7-3.2; 2.1, 1.3-3.3 respectively) especially regarding respiratory diseases (3.5, 1.9-6.5; 3.1, 1.0-9.4) and diarrhoea (3.7, 2.2-6.2; 5.7, 2.6-12.7), but not in twin comparisons. The growth of IVF children was behind that of control children during the first 3 years of life, but their psychomotor development was similar. Their postnatal health was worse, probably reflecting the problems in the neonatal period.

  4. Short implants as an alternative to crestal sinus lift: a 3-year multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldi, Giorgio; Felice, Pietro; Pistilli, Roberto; Barausse, Carlo; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Esposito, Marco

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of short (5 or 6 mm long) dental implants vs 10 mm or longer implants placed in crestally lifted sinuses. Twenty partially edentulous patients with 5 to 7 mm of residual crestal height and at least 7 mm thickness below the maxillary sinuses as measured on computed tomography scans were randomised according to a parallel group design to receive either one to two 5 or 6 mm long implants (10 patients) or 10 mm long implants (10 patients) after crestal sinus lifting and grafting with anorganic bovine bone. Implants were left to heal submerged for 4 months and were loaded with reinforced acrylic provisional prostheses, replaced, after 4 months, by definitive provisionally cemented or screw-retained metal-ceramic or metal-composite prostheses. Outcome measures were: prosthesis and implant failures, any complications, radiographic peri-implant marginal bone level changes, and patient's satisfaction assessed by blinded assessors, when possible. All patients were followed up to 3 years after loading. Two patients from the augmented group dropped out after the 1-year follow-up. No implant or prosthesis failure occurred. One short implant patient was affected by two complications vs one complication in the long implant group. There was no difference for patients experiencing complications between the two groups (difference in proportions = -0.03 %; 95%CI: -0.32 to 0.27; P = 1.000). Short implants lost 0.89 ± 0.25 mm and long implants lost 1.08 ± 0.29 mm of peri-implant marginal bone 3 years after loading, the difference between the two groups being not statistically significant (difference = -0.19 mm; 95%CI: -0.46 to 0.09; P = 0.165). All patients were fully or partially satisfied with function and fully satisfied with aesthetics. Both techniques achieved excellent results and no differences were observed between prostheses supported by one to two 5 or 6 mm long implants vs 10 mm long in posterior atrophic maxillae up to 3 years after loading

  5. 76 FR 69246 - Application for New Awards; High School Equivalency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Average Size of Awards: $432,000. Maximum Award: We will reject any application that proposes a HEP award.... Use a font that is either 12 point or larger or no smaller than 10 pitch (characters per inch...

  6. 78 FR 79455 - Information Collection; System for Award Management Registration Requirements for Prime Grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ...] Information Collection; System for Award Management Registration Requirements for Prime Grant Recipients.... ADDRESSES: Submit comments identified by Information Collection 3090- 0290, System for Award Management... ``Information Collection 3090-0290, System for Award Management Registration Requirements for Prime Grant...

  7. Eye size and shape in newborn children and their relation to axial length and refraction at 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Laurence Shen; Chua, Sharon; Tan, Pei Ting; Cai, Shirong; Chong, Yap-Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Gluckman, Peter D; Fortier, Marielle V; Ngo, Cheryl; Qiu, Anqi; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2015-07-01

    To determine if eye size and shape at birth are associated with eye size and refractive error 3 years later. A subset of 173 full-term newborn infants from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the dimensions of the internal eye. Eye shape was assessed by an oblateness index, calculated as 1 - (axial length/width) or 1 - (axial length/height). Cycloplegic autorefraction (Canon Autorefractor RK-F1) and optical biometry (IOLMaster) were performed 3 years later. Both eyes of 173 children were analysed. Eyes with longer axial length at birth had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years (p Eyes with larger baseline volumes and surface areas had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years (p Eyes which were more oblate at birth had greater increases in axial length at 3 years (p eyes had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years compared to oblate eyes (p eyes had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years compared to oblate eyes (p eye size and shape at birth and refraction, corneal curvature or myopia at 3 years. Eyes that are larger and have prolate or spherical shapes at birth exhibit smaller increases in axial length over the first 3 years of life. Eye size and shape at birth influence subsequent eye growth but not refractive error development. © 2015 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2015 The College of Optometrists.

  8. 49 CFR 262.17 - Combining grant awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS § 262.17 Combining grant awards. Two or more States, but not political subdivisions of States, may, pursuant to an agreement entered into by the States, combine any part of the amounts... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combining grant awards. 262.17 Section 262.17...

  9. 48 CFR 19.602-4 - Awarding the contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Certificates of Competency and Determinations of Responsibility 19.602-4 Awarding the contract. (a) If new information causes the contracting officer to determine... contracting officer shall award the contract to the concern in question if the SBA issues a COC after...

  10. 5 CFR 930.206 - Performance rating and awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance rating and awards. 930.206 Section 930.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Judge Program § 930.206 Performance rating and awards. (a) An agency may not rate the job performance of...

  11. 13 CFR 134.618 - How are awards paid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....618 How are awards paid? If you are seeking payment of an award, you must submit a copy of the final... of Financial Operations, SBA, P.O. Box 205, Denver, CO 80201-0205. SBA will pay you the amount...

  12. Research Award: Donor Partnership Division (DPD) Deadline: 12 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    Research Award: Donor Partnership Division (DPD). Deadline: 12 September 2012. Please note that all applications must be sent electronically. IDRC's Research Awards are a unique opportunity for master's and doctoral-level students, as well as recent graduates to enhance their research skills and gain a fresh ...

  13. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This award is given by the Board of Educational Affairs in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. These contributions might include important research on education and training; the development of effective materials for instruction; the establishment of workshops, conferences, or networks of communication for education and training; achievement and leadership in administration that facilitates education and training; or activity in professional organizations that promote excellence. The Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in psychology recognizes a specific contribution to education and training. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. This year the Education and Training Awards Committee selected a psychologist for the Career designation. The 2017 recipients of the APA Education and Training Contributions Awards were selected by the 2016 Education and Training Awards Committee appointed by the Board of Educational Affairs (BEA). Members of the 2016 Education and Training Awards Committee were Erica Wise, PhD (Chair); Ron Rozensky, PhD; Jane D. Halonen, PhD; Sharon Berry, PhD (Chair Elect); Emil Rodolfa, PhD; and Sylvia A. Rosenfield, PhD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. What Determines the Success of States in Attracting SBIR Awards?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlist, van der A.J.; Gerking, S.; Folmer, H.

    2004-01-01

    This article analyzes the interstate distribution of per capita awards made through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program operated by the U.S.government from 1983 to 1993. The main finding is that after adjusting for population size, awards tend to be made to firms in centers of

  15. Akzo Nobel Science Award: Svensk upptaeckt botar framtidens cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    'Akzo Nobel Science Award: Svensk upptaeckt botar framtidens cancerStockholm, 27 februari, 2003. Aarets Akzo Nobel Science Award Sweden paa 500 000 kronor gaar till professorn i medicinsk straalningsfysik Anders Brahme. Han prisas foer "sin unika forskargaerning inom straalbehandlingsysiken samt kombinationen av grundforskning, tillaempad forskning och interaktion med industrin"' (1 page).

  16. 48 CFR 339.7002 - Notice of intended award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of intended award. 339.7002 Section 339.7002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SPECIAL... Blanket Purchase Agreements for Independent Risk Analysis Services 339.7002 Notice of intended award. The...

  17. 38 CFR 61.44 - Awarding special needs grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Awarding special needs... (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.44 Awarding special needs grants. (a... applicable, will be conditionally selected to receive a special needs grant in accordance with their ranked...

  18. 40 CFR 35.6610 - Contracts awarded by a contractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Procurement Requirements Under A Cooperative Agreement § 35.6610 Contracts awarded by a... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contracts awarded by a contractor. 35...

  19. 28 CFR 523.16 - Lump sum awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION, CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.16 Lump sum awards. Any staff member may recommend to the Warden the approval of an inmate for a lump sum award of extra good time. Such recommendations...

  20. 4 CFR 28.124 - Review of arbitration awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review of arbitration awards. 28.124 Section 28.124... ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Special Procedures; Unfair Labor Practices § 28.124 Review of arbitration awards. (a) Filing an exception. (1) Either party to arbitration, conducted pursuant to a grievance procedure under a...

  1. 48 CFR 53.301-33 - Solicitation, Offer and Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Solicitation, Offer and Award. 53.301-33 Section 53.301-33 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-33 Solicitation, Offer and Award. ER09DE97...

  2. 5 CFR 5301.102 - Participation in proposals and awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... identified in a proposal as a party to the proposal or award and with whom the employee has: (A) A family..., book, article, report, or paper within the last 48 months; or (D) Co-edited a journal, compendium, or... proposal at issue or on which the award was based. (ii) A “prospective NSF employee” is any person being...

  3. 48 CFR 53.301-26 - Award/Contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Award/Contract. 53.301-26 Section 53.301-26 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-26 Award/Contract. ER22AP08.000 [73 FR 21785, Apr...

  4. Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2014 recipient of the Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award is Mary E. Kite. 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  5. Kelly D. Brownell: Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of Kelly D. Brownwell, winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology (2012). He won the award for outstanding contributions to our understanding of the etiology and management of obesity and the crisis it poses for the modern world. A seminal thinker in…

  6. International Journal of Molecular Science 2017 Best Paper Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-02

    The Editors of the International Journal of Molecular Sciences have established the Best Paper Award to recognize the most outstanding articles published in the areas of molecular biology, molecular physics and chemistry that have been published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences. The prizes have been awarded annually since 2012 [...].

  7. 7 CFR 3019.14 - Special award conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 3019.14 Special award conditions. If an applicant or recipient. (a) Has a history of poor performance, (b) Is not financially stable, (c) Has a management system that does not meet the standards prescribed in this part, (d...

  8. 40 CFR 30.14 - Special award conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.14 Special award conditions. If an applicant or recipient: has a history of poor performance, is not financially stable; has a management system that does not meet the standards prescribed in Circular A-110; has not conformed to the terms and...

  9. 24 CFR 84.14 - Special award conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 84.14 Special award conditions. If an applicant or recipient: (a) Has a history of poor performance; (b) Is not financially stable; (c) Has a management system that does not meet the standards prescribed in this part; (d) Has not...

  10. 14 CFR 1260.114 - Special award conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations Pre-Award Requirements § 1260.114 Special award conditions. If an applicant or recipient has a history of poor performance, is not financially stable, has a management system that does not meet the standards prescribed in this subpart, has not...

  11. 32 CFR 32.14 - Special award conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... part, if an applicant or recipient: (1) Has a history of poor performance; (2) Is not financially stable; (3) Has a management system that does not meet the standards prescribed in this part; (4) Has not..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 32.14 Special award conditions. (a...

  12. 36 CFR 1210.14 - Special award conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 1210.14 Special award conditions. If an applicant or recipient has a history of poor performance, is not financially stable, has a management system that does not meet the standards prescribed in this part, has not...

  13. 22 CFR 145.14 - Special award conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 145.14 Special award conditions. If an applicant or recipient: has a history of poor performance, is not financially stable, has a management system that does not meet the standards prescribed in this regulation, has not conformed to the...

  14. 28 CFR 104.34 - Publication of awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publication of awards. 104.34 Section 104.34 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND... or all of the awards, but shall not publish the name of the claimants or victims that received each...

  15. General FAQs regarding the IDRC Doctoral Research Awards 2017 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Can a part-time doctoral student apply for this award, and receive it (if awarded) while still being part-time? 25. Would you tell me more about the David and Ruth Hopper and Ramesh and Pilar Bhatia Canada Fund? 1. I am a doctoral student interested in the IDRA. Could you please send me information concerning this ...

  16. William Knocke receives 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award

    OpenAIRE

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2008-01-01

    William R. Knocke, W.C. English Professor and head of the Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech, was awarded the 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award at the Virginia Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers' (ASCE) banquet, held recently in Williamsburg, Va.

  17. A 3-year old girl with seizures, hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnisch, E; Leertouwer, T; Cransberg, K; Kist-van Holthe, J E

    2010-11-26

    A 3-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with seizures, low-grade fever and vomiting. She had tachycardia and a slow capillary refill. Blood pressure could not be measured. Because of suspected sepsis and/or meningo-encephalitis, broad spectrum antibiotics and antiviral medication were given together, along with volume expansion and anticonvulsive therapy. A few hours later, after a second seizure, the blood pressure was extremely high (156/116 mm Hg). The girl was treated with anticonvulsants and intravenous antihypertensive agents. MRI of the brain showed signs of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Cultures of blood and cerebrospinal fluid remained sterile. Further investigation into the cause of the malignant hypertension revealed hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis and extremely high plasma renin activity, caused by a rare renal abnormality: bilateral renal segmental hypoplasia or Ask-Upmark kidneys.

  18. A case of localized juvenile periodontitis: treatment and 3 years follow-up with superimposable radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrez, B; Baehni, P; Cimasoni, G

    1996-06-01

    A 17-year-old male patient with localized juvenile periodontitis was treated by subgingival instrumentation with full thickness flap on the lower molars, combined with a 3-week course of systemic tetracycline, and a programme of supervised oral hygiene. The treatment was rapidly followed by dramatic clinical and microbiological improvement. However, despite good oral hygiene, gingival inflammation recurred at regular intervals. It was necessary to maintain the clinical results by periodic subgingival instrumentation with an ultrasonic scaler. Healing of alveolar bone was monitored in the lower 1st molar regions over 3 years by using superimposable radiographs. Quantitative analysis of bone density performed with a high-resolution digitalisation technique showed a considerable improvement 1 year after therapy. However, continuous remodelling, probably related to variations in inflammation, occurred during the 3 postoperative years.

  19. Intervention effects of supplying homeless individuals with permanent housing: a 3-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, M M; Quadflieg, N

    2006-01-01

    To describe the intervention effects of supplying homeless individuals with permanent housing. In a prospective study, 109 male and 20 female homeless individuals were assessed at baseline and at 1- and 3-year follow-up concerning mental illness (SCID-I), psychopathology, global assessment of functioning, emotional lability and alcohol consumption. A high proportion (86%) of the individuals was able to maintain or improve stability of housing. Only minor changes were observed concerning mental illness and global functioning. Extensive alcohol consumption and high psychopathology increased the risk of losing the stable housing. The placement of homeless individuals in board and care homes or community housing after social counselling seems to be a necessary measure to remedy homelessness. However, supplying more permanent housing is not sufficient to decisively improve mental health status.

  20. Workplace safety in Bangladesh ready-made garment sector: 3 years after the Rana Plaza collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Uttama; Ansary, Mehedi Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Workplace safety is one of the most important issues in industries worldwide, and is endangered by industrial accidents. Different industrial disasters have resulted in several initiatives worldwide to protect human life and reduce material damage, both nationally and internationally. In Bangladesh, the ready-made garment (RMG) industry is one of the most important export-oriented business sectors, which is facing challenges to ensure workplace safety. The Rana Plaza collapse in Bangladesh is the consequence of such non-compliance. The accident resulted in different local and global initiatives to address the challenges. This article reviews progress and achievement of the initiatives to reduce vulnerability in the Bangladesh RMG industry within 3 years after the deadly accident. In the long run, the challenge is to maintain momentum already created for achieving sustainability in the RMG sector in Bangladesh and maintaining compliance even after the end of support from external partners.

  1. Chocolate-candy consumption and 3-year weight gain among postmenopausal U.S. women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, James A; Manson, JoAnn E; Buijsse, Brian; Wang, Lu; Allison, Matthew A; Neuhouser, Marian L; Tinker, Lesley; Waring, Molly E; Isasi, Carmen R; Martin, Lisa W; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2015-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that greater chocolate-candy intake is associated with more weight gain in postmenopausal women. A prospective cohort study involved 107,243 postmenopausal American women aged 50-79 years (mean = 60.7) at enrollment in the Women's Health Initiative, with 3-year follow-up. Chocolate-candy consumption was assessed by food frequency questionnaire, and body weight was measured. Linear mixed models, adjusted for demographic, socio economic, anthropomorphic, and behavioral variables, were used to test our main hypotheses. Compared with women who ate a 1 oz (∼28 g) serving of chocolate candy candy intake level increased as BMI increased above the normal range (18.5-25 kg/m(2)), and was inversely associated with age. Greater chocolate-candy intake was associated with greater prospective weight gain in this cohort of postmenopausal women. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  2. Sustained Effectiveness of the Maternal Pertussis Immunization Program in England 3 Years Following Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirthalingam, Gayatri; Campbell, Helen; Ribeiro, Sonia; Fry, Norman K.; Ramsay, Mary; Miller, Elizabeth; Andrews, Nick

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of maternal immunization in preventing infant pertussis was first demonstrated in England, 1 year after the program using diphtheria–tetanus–5-component acellular pertussis–inactivated polio vaccine (dT5aP-IPV) was introduced in 2012. Vaccine effectiveness against laboratory-confirmed pertussis has been sustained >90% in the 3 years following its introduction, despite changing to another acellular vaccine with different antigen composition. Consistent with this, disease incidence in infants immunization is retained in infants who received their first dose of the primary series. There is no longer evidence of additional protection from maternal vaccination after the third infant dose. Although numbers are small and ongoing assessment is required, there is no evidence of increased risk of disease after primary immunization in infants whose mothers received maternal vaccination. PMID:27838678

  3. High-sensitivity determination of radioactive cesium in Japanese foodstuffs. 3 years after the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumi Shozugawa; Mayumi Hori; Motoyuki Matsuo

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed 134 Cs, 137 Cs and 40 K in 96 foodstuffs in supermarkets with high sensitivity over 3 years after Fukushima accident. Milk, yoghurt, rice, tea, salmon, cereal, blueberry, miso, and apples had a trace of 134 Cs and 137 Cs from 10 -3 to 100 Bq/kg, however, some mushrooms that were bought in the outer Fukushima prefecture were contaminated by radioactive cesium over the regulatory limit (100 Bq/kg). In view of the 134 Cs/ 137 Cs radioactivity ratio, we can conclude that 137 Cs detected in remote areas 300 km or more from Fukushima Nuclear power plant contained activity from Pre-Fukushima events such as Chernobyl accident (1986) and atmospheric nuclear explosions (from 1945). (author)

  4. Peliosis hepatis causing inferior vena cava compression in a 3-year-old child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiorns, Melanie P.; Rossi, Umberto G.; Roebuck, Derek J. [Great Ormond Street Children' s NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-01

    Peliosis hepatis is a rare benign condition characterized by oval or irregular, multiple blood-filled spaces within the liver parenchyma. It is most commonly seen in adults and may be idiopathic, but has various associations including malignancy, infection and drugs. The imaging findings are often non-specific and the condition may be mistaken for multiple abscesses, metastases or vascular malformations. Peliosis hepatis is an especially rare condition in children and to our knowledge only six cases have been described in the literature. Our case describes and illustrates peliosis in a 3-year-old girl and is the first described in any age group to cause complete IVC obstruction. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. (orig.)

  5. Longitudinal behavioral analysis during dental care of children aged 0 to 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Frederico Cunha

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "When" and "how" the dentist intervenes have repercussions on children's physical and emotional patterns. The objective of the present study was to conduct a longitudinal behavioral analysis during dental care of babies aged 0 to 3 years. A total of 216 patients seen at the Baby Clinic of the School of Dentistry at Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP, were selected. The selection criterion was attendance at ten dental care sessions at bimonthly intervals for routine procedures such as clinical examination and oral hygiene. There was a predominance of cooperative behavior compared to uncooperative behavior when each visit was analyzed separately. The behavior of the patients must have been directly influenced by their psychomotor development. Constant attendance and exposure of the baby to non-stressful dental stimuli are factors that favor a cooperative behavior.

  6. Development, Validation and Parametric study of a 3-Year-Old Child Head Finite Element Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shihai; Chen, Yue; Li, Haiyan; Ruan, ShiJie

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury caused by drop and traffic accidents is an important reason for children's death and disability. Recently, the computer finite element (FE) head model has been developed to investigate brain injury mechanism and biomechanical responses. Based on CT data of a healthy 3-year-old child head, the FE head model with detailed anatomical structure was developed. The deep brain structures such as white matter, gray matter, cerebral ventricle, hippocampus, were firstly created in this FE model. The FE model was validated by comparing the simulation results with that of cadaver experiments based on reconstructing the child and adult cadaver experiments. In addition, the effects of skull stiffness on the child head dynamic responses were further investigated. All the simulation results confirmed the good biofidelity of the FE model.

  7. Systemic activity of inhaled steroids in 1- to 3-year-old children with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anhøj, Jacob; Bisgaard, Anne Marie; Bisgaard, Hans

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the systemic activity of inhaled steroids in young children. METHODS: Forty children with mild asthma aged 1 to 3 years were studied in a 3-way crossover, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Treatment with inhaled fluticasone propionate, 200 microg twice daily...... delivered via pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) and Babyhaler (FP400), was compared with budesonide, 200 microg twice daily delivered via pMDI and NebuChamber (BUD400), and to placebo. The Babyhaler was primed before use. Knemometry was used to detect systemic steroid activity. It was performed...... treatments were 85, 45, and 34 microm/d, respectively (adjusted mean). The growth in lower-leg length was significantly reduced from both steroid treatments. The difference between BUD400 and placebo was -40 microm/d (n = 25; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -8 to -72). The difference between FP400 and placebo...

  8. Paternal psychosocial characteristics and corporal punishment of their 3-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shawna J; Perron, Brian E; Taylor, Catherine A; Guterman, Neil B

    2011-01-01

    This study uses data from 2,309 biological fathers who participated in the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study (FFCWS) to examine associations between psychosocial characteristics and levels of corporal punishment (CP) toward their 3-year-old children over the past month. Results indicate that 61% of the fathers reported no CP over the past month, 23% reported using CP once or twice, and 16% reported using CP a few times in the past month or more. In multivariate models controlling for important sociodemographic factors as well as characteristics of the child, fathers' parenting stress, major depression, heavy alcohol use, and drug use were significantly associated with greater use of CP, whereas involvement with the child and generalized anxiety disorder were not. Girls were less likely to be the recipient of CP than were boys, and child externalizing behavior problems but not internalizing behavior problems were associated with more CP.

  9. Caring for babies from 0 to 3 years of age in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Oliveira Araujo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-4512.2017v19n35p29 Based on an approach that considers the relational and situated constitution of the subjects in development, this article aims to present a picture about the care of infants from 0 to 3 years in community. This study was obtained from a master's research about the daily life of a group of children and families in the context of settlement of the agrarian reform. The organization of the times and environments of each child, by the people of their relational universe, revealed a community practice of care, in which their needs and wants are inserted as part of the collective activities of each family. Immersed in these networks of community relationships, we find that the way of life in the countryside is permeated by a strong network of solidarity created among the members of different generations of the family, to care for babies.

  10. Extraosseous Thoracic Foraminal Osteoblastoma: Diagnostic Dilemma and Management with 3 Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadgaonkar, Shailesh Ramakant; Shah, Kunal Chandrakant; Khurjekar, Ketan Shripad; Sancheti, Parag Kantilal

    2014-01-01

    Osteoblastomas are bone forming lesions arising mainly from posterior elements of the vertebra. They are commonly encountered in the cervical and lumbar regions. We present a case of a thoracic osteoblastoma which is extra osseous and is not communicating with any part of the vertebra present intraforaminally. This is a rare presentation of an osteoblastoma. Imaging studies do not accurately diagnose the osteiod lesion. The size of the lesion and cortical erosion seen on the computed tomography scan help in differentiating the osteoid osteoma and osteoblastoma, but they are less sensitive and specific. Thus a histopathology is the investigation of choice to diagnose the osteoblastoma. Early and adequate removal of mass prevents malignant transformation, metastasis, and recurrence. In our case we excised the pars interarticularis unilaterally, removed the osteoid mass intact, and performed unilateral instrumented fusion. There was no recurrence and solid fusion was seen at 3 years follow up. PMID:25346825

  11. Survival of patients identified as candidates for intestinal transplantation: a 3-year prospective follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pironi, L.; Forbes, A.; Joly, F.

    2008-01-01

    with parenteral nutrition-related liver failure (P = .364). CONCLUSIONS: The results confirm home parenteral nutrition as the primary therapeutic option for intestinal failure and support the appropriateness and potential life-saving role of timely intestinal transplantation for patients with parenteral nutrition......BACKGROUND & AIMS: The US Medicare indications for intestinal transplantation are based on failure of home parenteral nutrition. The American Society of Transplantation also includes patients at high risk of death from their primary disease or with high morbidity intestinal failure. A 3-year...... prospective study evaluated the appropriateness of these indications. METHODS: Survival on home parenteral nutrition or after transplantation was analyzed in 153 (97 adult, 56 pediatric) candidates for transplantation and 320 (262 adult, 58 pediatric) noncandidates, enrolled through a European multicenter...

  12. Epidermoid Cyst in the Floor of the Mouth of a 3-Year-Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Pascual Dabán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts are a rare entity in the oral cavity and are even less frequent in the floor of the mouth, representing less than 0.01% of all the cases. We present the case of a 3-year-old girl with a growth in the floor of the mouth with 2 months of evolution and without changes since it was discovered by her parents. The lesion was asymptomatic; it did not cause dysphagia, dyspnea, or any other alteration. A CT scan with contrast was done which revealed the location and exact size of the lesion, allowing an intraoral approach for its excision. The histological examination confirmed the clinical speculation of an epidermoid cyst.

  13. Alternative fruit and vegetables consumption for 1-3 year old Indonesian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhayati Nurhayati

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang:World Health Organization merekomendasikan konsumsi sayur dan buah paling sedikit 400 gr atau 5 (lima porsi sayur dan buah sehari. Penelitian ini untuk menentukan alternatif jumlah dan jenis anjuran konsumsi sayur dan buah dan kecukupan vitamin A, vitamin C, potasium, asam folat dan serat yang dapat dipenuhi untuk kelompok umur 1-3 tahun anak Indonesia. Metode:Penelitian menggunakan data konsumsi sayur dan buah dari data Riskesdas tahun 2010. Analisis data menggunakan analisis linier programming untuk memperoleh lima alternatif jumlah dan jenis sayur dan buah untuk anak usia 1-3 tahun.Hasil:Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa lima jenis buah yang paling banyak dikonsumsi anak usia 1-3 tahun adalah pisang, jeruk, pepaya, apel dan semangka. Lima jenis sayur yang paling banyak dikonsumsi anak usia 1-3 tahun adalah sayur bayam, sayur sop, sayur kangkung, sayur daun singkong, dan sayur asam. Jumlah anjuran konsumsi sayur dan buah untuk anak usia 1-3 tahun adalah 100-200 gram sayuran dan 150-200 gram buah Kesimpulan: Alternatif anjuran konsumsi sayur dan buah untuk anak usia 1-3 tahun adalah 100-200 gram (1-2 mangkok sayuran dan 150-200 gram (3-4 potong buah. (Health Science Indones 2013;2:74-7Kata kunci: anjuran, konsumsi, sayur, buah, anak usia 1-3 tahunAbstractBackground: WHO recommends the daily consumption of fruit and vegetables at least 400 grams or 5 servings. Based on national health survey Indonesia in 2007, means of daily portion of fruit and vegetable for Indonesian was less than 5 portion. This study was conducted to assess consumption of fruit and vegetables in 1-3 year old Indonesian children, and adequacy of daily requirement of vitamin A, vitamin C, potasium, folic acid and fiber. Methods: The study used consumption data from 2010 National Health Survey Indonesia. Using linier programming, we then could present 5 alternatives of combination of fruits and vegetables. Result:  The  study  found  five  kind  of

  14. The Strategic Study of National Quality Award through Business Excellence Model - The IBM, Panasonic and E.SUN Bank Cases in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Lung Fu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Quality is a dignity to a country and also masterpiece and bedrock for the development of a country. To recover economical prosperity immediately right from the II world war, Japan founded Demin Quality Award to encourage the improvement of quality and promote the whole scale of competence core for enterprises in 1951. All the products produced by Japan are entirely favoured by the customers around the world during the period of 1975. The Japanese made automobiles, electronics and appliances are inexpensive and competitive enough to sluggish the economy growth of USA. To counter the serious threats and regain the advantage of the market, the United States finally founded Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, MBNQA to provide a series of standards for excellence performance in 1987. European Excellence Award was set up by the European Foundation for Quality Management, EFQM for advancing the superiority of tech development in 1991. Among the developing countries, there is no exception can be made for the emerging countries, especially in area of Aisa. Taiwan is the first country in Asia to establish Taiwan National Quality Award, TNQA in 1990 to represent the great honour of quality, also the first national quality award in this area. As the candidate with the great potential to be developed country in this region, not only Taiwan is struggling to advance its technology, but also promote the quality issues by quality related policies of government. Therefore, this paper is to examine the process of involvement in the promotion to Taiwan National Quality Award for three different enterprises, the 1assessment of various dimension in company through spot visit by judges of TNQA, and the analysis of interview record from the superior executives for the further research and introductive contribution of this award. Conclusively, this paper is trying to draw the overview of how to improve the excellence of quality in the practice of business

  15. Perinatal Risk Factors for Feeding and Eating Disorders in Children Aged 0 to 3 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvelplund, Carolina; Hansen, Bo Mølholm; Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Andersson, Mikael; Skovgaard, Anne Mette

    2016-02-01

    To describe the incidence, age at diagnosis, and associations between perinatal risk factors of feeding and eating disorders (FED) diagnosed at hospital in children aged 0 to 3 years. A nationwide cohort of 901 227 children was followed until 48 months of age in the national registers from 1997 to 2010. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for FED diagnosis according to the International Classification of Diseases and associations with perinatal risk factors. A total of 1365 children (53% girls) were diagnosed with FED at hospital, corresponding to a cumulative incidence of 1.6 per 1000 live births. High risk of FED was seen in children born before gestational week 28 (HR, 3.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.15-5.78). HRs were 3.74 for children small for gestational age ≤3 SD (95% CI, 2.71-5.17) and 4.71 in those with congenital malformations (95% CI, 3.86-5.74). Increased risk of FED was associated with female gender (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.08-1.34), maternal smoking in pregnancy (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.08-1.42), immigrant status (HR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.92-2.61), and being the firstborn (HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.19-1.50). FED in referred children aged 0 to 3 years are associated with perinatal adversities, female gender, maternal smoking in pregnancy, being firstborn, and having immigrant parents. The results suggest complex causal mechanisms of FED and underscore the need for a multidisciplinary approach in the clinical management of young children with persistent problems of feeding, eating, and weight faltering. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Testicular cancer: seminoma. Stage I. Adjuvant radiotherapy. Results at 3 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lione, M.; Ticera, N.; Mandachain, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To evaluate the results achieved with adjuvant radiotherapy. Materials and methods: We analyzed 40 medical records of patients diagnosed with stage I of testicular cancer, all of them received adjuvant radiotherapy between April 1992 and May 2004. The histological type was classical seminoma (95%) and spermatocytes (5%). Diagnosis and staging were performed with testicular ultrasound, determination of tumor markers, computed tomography of abdomen - pelvis and chest radiographs. Radiotherapy: Patients were treated with 60 Co unit and a linear accelerator of 6 MV photons. Volumes: Group I: lumboaortic lymph node region and ipsilateral pelvis. Group II: lumboaortic only. Daily dose: 1.8 Gy, total dose: 30.6 Gy. Patient in supine position, 2 parallel fields and opposed, DFP: 80 cm, calculated from midplane. They were followed for 3 years with chest X-ray, CAT scan of abdomen and pelvis at 12 months and then a full clinical control 1 time per year. Results: We defined the rate of ipsilateral pelvic node recurrence (group I: 0% vs. Group II: 6.25%), progression at distance (group I: 8.3% vs. Group II: 0%) and global survival (GS) (group I: 100% vs. group II: 100%) at 3 years of follow up. Conclusions: Our result is similar to that published in the international literature. Given the small number of patients, no evidence of changes in GS with the addition of radiotherapy to ipsilateral pelvic node. Radiation therapy to lumboaortic lymph nodes is the usual treatment, being necessary to optimize the modality of radiotherapy (RC3D - IRMT) to reduce toxicity in a long term. (authors) [es

  17. Quality of life among patients after Hodgkin lymphoma treatment: a 3-year prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Samura

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate the quality of life among patients after Hodgkin lymphoma treatment to estimate demographic, clinical, psychosocial risk factors of unfavorable prognosis depending on the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Materials and methods. Population sample was 38 patients after Hodgkin lymphoma treatment. All patients received the interviewer, 35 patients (92.1% of all respondents answered the questions and were included to the study. Clinical visits have been conducted each month for 3 years after enrollment, during which cardiovascular events have been recorded. Results: During observation period progression of Hodgkin lymphoma was proved in 8 patients, 3 persons were excluded for poor follow-up. Thirty four cumulative clinical events occurred in 12 patients (50% within the follow-up, with their distribution being as follows: 2 cardiovascular deaths, 16 cardiac arrhythmias, 6 cardiac ischemic events, 1 stroke, 4 chronic heart failures and 5 hospital admissions for cardiovascular reasons. 3 deaths were not related with cardiovascular pathology or cardiovascular reasons. 3 deaths were not related with cardiovascular pathology. Patients who had cardiovascular events reported significantly worse physical functioning after anthracyclines with cumulative dose ≥326 mg/m2, after mediastinal radiotherapy. There were significant lower level of vitality in patients with cardiovascular events (p<0.001, in patients with advanced stages and mediastinal radiotherapy. After second-line treatment (MINE patients had much worse physical functioning (p<0.001 that was associated with quality of life outcomes. There were significant differences in mental health, (р<0.001, role-psychological (р<0.03 scales. The lower level of mental health was associated with disease stages, doses of radiotherapy. Conclusion: The general health perceptions and vitality levels of Hodgkin lymphoma survivors depends on passed courses of

  18. Neurodevelopmental outcomes at 3 years old for infants with birth weights under 500 g.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagara, Syunsuke; Kouwaki, Masanori; Togawa, Takao; Sugiura, Tokio; Okada, Mayumi; Koyama, Norihisa

    2017-09-21

    Marked improvements have been achieved in the survival of extremely low birth weight infants, but survival rates and prognoses of extremely small infants with birth weights ≤500 g remain poor. The aim of this study was to clarify long-term outcomes for surviving infants with birth weights ≤500 g. The study population comprised fetuses of gestational age ≥22 weeks, expected live- or stillbirth weight ≤500 g, and birth date between 2003 and 2012. Developmental assessments were performed prospectively at 3 years old. Data were obtained for 21 fetuses, including 10 live births and 11 stillbirths. Of the 10 live births, median gestational age was 25.2 weeks (range, 22.4-27.1 weeks), median birth weight was 426 g (range, 370-483 g), and two neonates died before discharge. One infant with severe asphyxia died within 12 h and another infant with Down syndrome died at 34 days. The survival rate was thus 80%. All surviving infants were small for gestational age. Seven of the 8 surviving infants (88%) weighed less than 2500 g at a corrected age of 40 weeks. Seven infants were available for developmental assessments at 3 years old. One infant could not be followed. Two of those seven infants (29%) showed normal development, three infants (42%) showed mild neurodevelopmental disability, and two infants (29%) showed severe neurodevelopmental disability. One infant had periventricular leukomalacia and cerebral palsy. Two of the seven infants (29%) had short stature (g. Further large studies are needed to assess long-term outcomes for extremely small infants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. [Practical repercussions of 3 years of experience of national hemovigilance on the subject of viral complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperche, S

    1998-06-01

    The residual risk of transmitting viral infections by transfusion of screened blood is mainly linked to donations occurring in the window period. Using a mathematical model, a French study, including a 3 year period of blood donations (1994-1996), was performed by the Hepatitis Virus and Retrovirus working groups of the French Society of Blood Transfusion. The residual risk in France was estimated as follows: for HIV, 1 in 1 million (IC 95% = 1/10 million to 1/295,000), for HTLV 1 in 5 million (IC 95% = 0 to 1/625,000), for VHC 1 in 200,000 (IC 95% = 1/530,000 to 1/97,000), for VHB 1 in 180,000 (IC 95% = 1/560,000 to 1/66,000). Based on these estimations, the number of recipients possibly contaminated should have been seven for HIV, one or two for HTLV, 35 for VHC, 40 for VHB for a 3 year period. These 83 to 84 theoretically contaminated recipients are not in accordance with the six recipients contaminated by a blood product (two with HIV, one with VHC, three with VHB) that were reported to the National Haemovigilance Unit of the Agence Française du Sang. This observed difference may be explained by an overestimated calculated risk (the whole window period is not infectious), or by an underestimation of real post-transfusion contamination due to a lack of exhaustive notifications. However, a national database of post-tranfusion contamination is useful to approach the real residual risk. Therefore, efforts to continue the recipient follow-up have to be encouraged.

  20. Living with diabetes - development of learning patterns over a 3-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneck, Åsa; Fagerberg, Ingegerd; Eriksson, Lars E; Lundman, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Learning involves acquiring new knowledge and skills, and changing our ways of thinking, acting, and feeling. Learning in relation to living with diabetes is a lifelong process where there is limited knowledge of how it is experienced and established over time. It was considered important to explore how learning was developed over time for persons living with diabetes. The aim of the study was to identify patterns in learning when living with diabetes, from recently being diagnosed, and over a 3-year period. A longitudinal qualitative descriptive design was used. Thirteen participants, with both type I and type II diabetes, were interviewed at three different occasions during a 3-year period. Qualitative content analysis was used in different steps in order to distinguish patterns. Five main patterns of learning were identified. Two of the patterns (I and II) were characterized by gradually becoming comfortable living with diabetes, whereas for one pattern (IV) living with diabetes became gradually more difficult. For pattern V living with diabetes was making only a limited impact on life, whereas for Pattern III there was a constant management of obstacles related to illness. The different patterns in the present study showed common and different ways of learning and using different learning strategies at different timespans. The present study showed that duration of illness is not of importance for how far a person has come in his own learning process. A person-centered care is needed to meet the different and changing needs of persons living with diabetes in relation to learning to live with a lifelong illness.

  1. Metabolic safety of the etonogestrel contraceptive implant in healthy women over a 3-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villas-Boas, Jaqueline; Vilodre, Luiz C; Malerba, Helena; Pontremoli Salcedo, Mila; Foresti Jiménez, Mirela; El Beitune, Patrícia

    2016-07-01

    To ascertain whether placement of the etonogestrel contraceptive implant induces significant changes in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as reflected by metabolic parameters, in healthy women. Prospective cohort study of 213 healthy patients who received etonogestrel implants. Weight, BMI, blood pressure and a comprehensive metabolic profile were assessed at baseline, 1, 2 and 3 years. In 21 of the 213 participants, AUC for glucose levels, fasting insulin levels at baseline and year 3 (immediately before implant removal), HOMA-IR score, and the QUICK index were assessed. Parameters were expressed as median and interquartile range. The Wilcoxon test and ANOVA were used for comparison of measurements after implant placement (significance level p0.05). Of the metabolic variables, FBG (85-88) and HDL (53-46) had significant differences (p<0.002). In the subgroup of 21 patients, there were reductions in insulin levels (9.65 vs. 8.4mU/dL, p=0.03), HOMA scores (2.06 vs. 1.75, p=0.02), QUICK index (0.34 vs. 0.35, p=0.03), TC (178 vs. 160mg/dL, p=0.001), HDL (51 vs. 46mg/dL, p=0.009), and LDL (110 vs. 100mg/dL, p=0.035). These results provide evidence of the metabolic safety of the ENG implant in healthy women over a 3-year period. Indeed, implant placement induces changes consistent with a lower risk of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Rates of Mutation and Host Transmission for an Escherichia coli Clone over 3 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Peter R.; Liu, Bin; Zhou, Zhemin; Li, Dan; Guo, Dan; Ren, Yan; Clabots, Connie; Lan, Ruiting; Johnson, James R.; Wang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Although over 50 complete Escherichia coli/Shigella genome sequences are available, it is only for closely related strains, for example the O55:H7 and O157:H7 clones of E. coli, that we can assign differences to individual evolutionary events along specific lineages. Here we sequence the genomes of 14 isolates of a uropathogenic E. coli clone that persisted for 3 years within a household, including a dog, causing a urinary tract infection (UTI) in the dog after 2 years. The 20 mutations observed fit a single tree that allows us to estimate the mutation rate to be about 1.1 per genome per year, with minimal evidence for adaptive change, including in relation to the UTI episode. The host data also imply at least 6 host transfer events over the 3 years, with 2 lineages present over much of that period. To our knowledge, these are the first direct measurements for a clone in a well-defined host community that includes rates of mutation and host transmission. There is a concentration of non-synonymous mutations associated with 2 transfers to the dog, suggesting some selection pressure from the change of host. However, there are no changes to which we can attribute the UTI event in the dog, which suggests that this occurrence after 2 years of the clone being in the household may have been due to chance, or some unknown change in the host or environment. The ability of a UTI strain to persist for 2 years and also to transfer readily within a household has implications for epidemiology, diagnosis, and clinical intervention. PMID:22046404

  3. Oral Disease and 3-Year Incidence of Frailty in Mexican Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrejón-Pérez, Roberto Carlos; Jiménez-Corona, Aida; Bernabé, Eduardo; Villa-Romero, Antonio R; Arrivé, Elise; Dartigues, Jean-François; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel; Borges-Yáñez, S Aída

    2017-07-01

    Poor oral health has been associated with some components of frailty. The objective of this study was to identify the association between clinical measures of oral health and the incidence of frailty among community-dwelling older adults aged 70 or older in Mexico City. A 3-year cohort study with a probabilistic representative sample of home-dwelling elders of one district of Mexico City was performed. Baseline and follow-up interview and oral clinical evaluations were carried out by standardized examiners in participants' homes. Dependent variable was incident frailty defined according to the frailty phenotype. Independent variables were the utilization of dental services, the presence of xerostomia, the number of natural teeth, use of removable dental prostheses, presence of severe periodontitis, and presence of root remnants. Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health measures were included as confounders. The association between oral health conditions and incident frailty was modeled using Poisson regression models with robust variance estimators. The models were adjusted for confounders and interactions. We identified a 14.8% cumulative incidence of frailty. Each additional tooth was associated with a lower probability of developing frailty by 5.0% (risk ratio = 0.90; 95% CI 1.02-1.10). The 3-year risk ratio of developing frailty was 2.13 times higher (95% CI 1.01-4.50) among participants having severe periodontitis. The number of teeth and the presence of severe periodontitis are associated with the development of frailty after controlling for confounders. Further studies are needed on this topic. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Economist Innovation Award for Tim Berners-Lee

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In September, Tim Berners-Lee, who invented the World Wide Web at CERN and is now Director of the W3C World Wide Web Consortium, received the 2nd Economist Annual Innovation Award in Computing. With the award The Economist, a British weekly newspaper, recognises individuals responsible for breakthroughs in Bioscience, Computing, Energy and the Environment, and Telecommunications that have a profound impact on industry. A fifth award is given in a special "No Boundaries" category, observing innovation that transcends industries. Candidates for the awards are proposed by The Economist readers and writers, and by a group of judges. Tim Berners-Lee received the Computing award for his global hypertext project, to be known as the World Wide Web, which "forever altered the way information is shared" and is a huge contribution to the efficiency of the scientific community. Based on a programme for storing information using random associations called "Enquire", it...

  5. Golden Hadron awards for the LHC's top suppliers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The following firms have been selected to receive a GOLDEN HADRON AWARD 2003, in recognition of their outstanding achievement: JDL TECHNOLOGIES, Belgium "in producing automatic cable inspection systems", FURUKAWA ELECTRIC COMPANY, Japan "in producing high quality superconducting cable", IHI Corporation, Japan, and LINDE KRYOTECHNIK, Switzerland "in producing novel 1.8 K refrigeration units based on advanced cold compressor technology" for the Large Hadron Collider.Photos 01, 02: Recipients of the 2003 Golden Hadron awards at the presentation ceremony on 16 May.Photo 03: LHC project leader Lyn Evans updates the award recipients on work for CERN's new accelerator.Photo 04: René Joannes of JDL Technologies (left) receives a Golden Hadron award from LHC project leader Lyn Evans.Shinichiro Meguro, managing director of Furukawa Electric Company, receives a Golden Hadron award from LHC project leader Lyn Evans.Photo 06: Kirkor Kurtcuoglu of Linde Kryotechnik (left) and Motoki Yoshinaga, associate director of IHI...

  6. A rich harvest of awards for the CERN Pension Fund

    CERN Document Server

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Pension Fund recently received two prestigious international awards. The governing bodies and the whole Pension Fund team are celebrating this success, and looking forward to a busy and bright new year.   On 29 November, Théodore Economou (left) accepted the Best Risk Management Solutions Prize at the 2012 Investments & Pensions Europe Awards. “The awards go to the entire CERN Pension Fund team, the Pension Fund Governing Board, and the Investment Committee,” says Théodore Economou, the Fund’s Chief Executive Officer. On 29 November, at a ceremony held in Copenhagen, Théodore accepted the first award received by the Fund for the Best Risk Management Solutions at the 2012 Investments & Pensions Europe (IPE) Awards. A few days later, he was informed that the Fund had also won the “2012 Industry Innovation Award” of the Asset International - Chief Investment Officer (aiCIO) magazine, in the &l...

  7. Doctoral student wins national award for dissertation

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2008-01-01

    Stephanie P. Newbold, a graduate of Virginia Tech's public administration and policy doctoral program in the Center for Public Administration and Policy, College of Architecture and Urban Studies, won an honorable mention from the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration for her dissertation, "All but Forgotten: Thomas Jefferson's Contribution to the Development of Public Administration in the United States."

  8. Award for the best CMS thesis

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 CMS PhD Thesis Award for has been presented to Giacomo Luca Bruno for his thesis defended at the University of Pavia in Italy and entitled "The RPC detectors and the muon system for the CMS experiment at the LHC". His work was supervised by Sergio P. Ratti from the University of Pavia. Since April 2002, Giacomo has been employed as a research fellow by CERN's EP Division. He continues to work on CMS in the areas of data acquisition and physics reconstruction and selection. Last Monday he received a commemorative engraved plaque from Lorenzo Foà, chairman of the CMS Collaboration Board. He will also receive expenses paid to an international physics conference to present his thesis results. Giacomo Luca Bruno with Lorenzo Foà

  9. Final Technical Report for Award # ER64999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalf, William W. [University of Illinois

    2014-10-08

    This report provides a summary of activities for Award # ER64999, a Genomes to Life Project funded by the Office of Science, Basic Energy Research. The project was entitled "Methanogenic archaea and the global carbon cycle: a systems biology approach to the study of Methanosarcina species". The long-term goal of this multi-investigator project was the creation of integrated, multiscale models that accurately and quantitatively predict the role of Methanosarcina species in the global carbon cycle under dynamic environmental conditions. To achieve these goals we pursed four specific aims: (1) genome sequencing of numerous members of the Order Methanosarcinales, (2) identification of genomic sources of phenotypic variation through in silico comparative genomics, (3) elucidation of the transcriptional networks of two Methanosarcina species, and (4) development of comprehensive metabolic network models for characterized strains to address the question of how metabolic models scale with genetic distance.

  10. Remarks delivered at the awards ceremony

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumberger, H.; Hendricks, R.W. (eds.)

    1978-06-01

    For almost four decades, the distinguished trio of professors, W. W. Beeman, A. Guinier, and O. Kratky, have provided leadership of the field of small-angle scattering through both their teaching and their personal research. Collectively, they have authored or coauthored over 400 scientific articles and reviews, several books, and have been associated with over 140 graduate and postdoctoral students. It was thus appropriate that each should be honored for his outstanding contributions to the field at the Fourth International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering which was held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, in October 1977. The Board of Directors of the Special Interest Group on Small-Angle Scattering of the American Crystallographic Association in conjunction with the Conference Organizing Committee, arranged a special awards ceremony during which each honoree presented his personal reminiscences of the development of small-angle scattering in his own laboratory. This report is a record of this event.

  11. Risks and causes of death in a community-based stroke population : 1 month and 3 years after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loor, Henriette; Groenier, KH; Limburg, M; Schuling, J; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    1999-01-01

    We performed a community-based study on a cohort of 221 stroke patients followed for 3 years. In this paper, we tried to answer the following questions: Is the risk of dying increased throughout the first 3 years after stroke? What a re the causes of death after the ist month! What factors at stroke

  12. Development of an Age Band on the ManuVis for 3-Year-Old Children with Visual Impairments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimer, A.M.; Barsingerhorn, A.D.; Overvelde, A.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Boonstra, F.N.; Cox, R.F.A.

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To compare fine motor performance of 3-year-old children with visual impairment with peers having normal vision, to provide reference scores for 3-year-old children with visual impairment on the ManuVis, and to assess inter-rater reliability. METHOD: 26 children with visual impairment (mean

  13. Kuroda named for UN population award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This article focuses on the accomplishments of a prominent Japanese demographer, Toshio Kuroda, and his receipt of the 1997 UN Population Award. Kuroda is director emeritus of the Nihon University Population Research Institute and a board member of JOICFP. He was honored for his research, publications, and leadership contributions in Japan and throughout Asia and the world. His first population experience was with the Institute of Population Problems of the Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare in 1947. Eventually he became director of the Institute before assuming a position at Nihon University as director of NUPRI. Kuroda served as a Japanese representative in the UN Population Commission, at the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the Environment, and at the 1974 Bucharest International Conference on Population. He served as a resource person for Asian population conferences, Japanese nongovernmental groups, and the Mainichi Newspapers Population Problems Research Council. He developed a reputation as a consensus builder among Japanese leaders and policymakers, has maintained a long-standing relationship with JOICFP, and served as a resource person at its many forums and training courses. Since 1985 he has served as a major resource person on JOICFP's aging program for the Asian region. Since 1988 he has supervised the development of UNFPA's annual State of World Population Report for Japan. Kuroda is known for his views on the integration of micro- and macrolevels of analysis and discussion. He believes that a high level of education is key to the promotion of family planning. Girls should be enrolled in school through high school. Toshio Kuroda was one of three people and the second Japanese person to receive the UN Population Award.

  14. Split-Mouth Comparison of Splinted and Nonsplinted Prostheses on Short Implants: 3-Year Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clelland, Nancy; Chaudhry, Jahanzeb; Rashid, Robert G; McGlumphy, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    To compare splinted and individual restorations supported by short implants featuring an internal connection utilizing a split-mouth design. Splinted and nonsplinted implant crowns were prospectively compared in 18 patients. After verifying the need for at least two consecutive implants bilaterally, computed tomography scans were made, virtual planning was done, and qualifying patients were enrolled. Implants were placed using a two-stage surgical approach. After 3 to 5 months, patients were randomly restored with splinted prostheses on their left or right side. Nonsplinted restorations were made for contralateral sides. Radiographs were taken at prostheses seating and yearly exams. Radiographic bone levels were analyzed and compared (SAS 9.4) to determine differences between splinted and nonsplinted implants. Complications such as screw loosening, screw breakage, or porcelain fracture were assessed at recalls. Eighteen patients (9 men and 9 women) with an age range from 49 to 76 years (mean = 56 years), received ≥ 4 implants in symmetrical posterior locations. Implants (n = 82) ranged in length from 6 to 11 mm with 70 implants ≤ 9 mm and 38 implants = 6 mm. At the time of this report, 3-year examinations and bone level comparisons were completed on 15 patients. One patient was lost to follow-up, one deviated from study protocol by smoking, and one was splinted on both sides due to repeated screw breakage. Screw loosening occurred in five patients on their nonsplinted side. These were 6-mm implants except for one patient. Porcelain chipping occurred for one patient on the splinted side. One 6-mm-length nonsplinted implant was lost after loading; this implant was successfully replaced after grafting. This patient had a total of six implants placed; ongoing bone level measurements included two pairs of implants only. For all implants combined, there was no significant difference (P > .05) at 1, 2, or 3 years for mean bone change around splinted and nonsplinted

  15. [Clinical analysis of allergic rhinitis in children between 1 and 3 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei-li; Zhang, Jie; Pan, Yue-song; Chen, Min; Zhang, Ya-mei

    2011-11-01

    To study the atopy spectrum and its related factors in 1 to 3 years old children with allergic rhinitis. Ninety-six children with allergic rhinitis, aged between 1 and 3 years old, referred to ENT department of Beijing Children's Hospital between August 2009 and November 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were recorded for patients' age, age stratification, sex, the age of first symptom, the duration of history, and the allergic history of children, the allergic history of parents. The screening tests on inhalant and food allergens were conducted by immunoblot assay using the Allergy Screen system. The total serum IgE level was also measured. The distribution of the inhalant and food allergens was summarized. The influence of the clinical characteristics was analyzed according to the age subgroup determined by month, allergen category and positiveness of eczema or asthma. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship of clinical characteristics and allergen spectrum. The total positive rates of allergic screening test rate were 81.3%. The inhalant and food allergens were 62.5% and 53.1% respectively. The commonest allergy was mixed fungal (50.0%), followed by milk (34.4%), lamb (31.3%), beef (26.0%), dust mite (21.0%), wheat (18.8%), mugwort (12.5%), egg white or egg yolk (11.5%).62.5% of patients could be diagnosed as AR, the remaining could be diagnosed temporarily as non-allergic rhinitis temporarily. Single factor analysis of clinical characteristics in different subgroup determined by month showed that: inhalant allergen (positive/negative) (χ2=13.699, P=0.001), father suffered from AR (χ2=14.060, P=0.001), and father or mother suffered from AR (χ2=7.396, P=0.025) were statistically significant at three monthly age groups. The personal history of eczema (OR=3.143, P=0.034) might increase the possibility of sensitization to allergens. The personal history of eczema (OR=3.125, P=0.015) and the total serum IgE level>200 IU/ml (OR=3.119, P=0

  16. Tough Policies, Incredible Policies?

    OpenAIRE

    Andres Velasco; Alejandro Neut

    2003-01-01

    We revisit the question of what determines the credibility of macroeconomic policies here, of promises to repay public debt. Almost all thinking on the issue has focused on governments' strategic decision to default (or erode the value of outstanding debt via inflation/devaluation). But sometimes governments default not because they want to, but because they cannot avoid it: adverse shocks leave them no option. We build a model in which default/devaluation can occur deliberately (for strategi...

  17. Comparative heart failure profile over a 3-year period in a Romanian general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop D

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dana Pop,1 Oana Maria Penciu,1 Adela Viviana Sitar-Taut,2 Dumitru Tudor Zdrenghea11Department of Cardiology, Clinical Rehabilitation Hospital, "Iuliu Hatieganu" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania; 2"Babes-Bolyai" University, Cluj-Napoca, RomaniaBackground: Heart failure (HF has become an increasingly significant public health problem, associated with repeated hospitalizations, high costs, low quality of life, and decreased survival rate. The progress of the disease may be slowed if treatment is administered in accordance with current guidelines.Objectives: To compare the clinical profile of HF patients in a Romanian general hospital over a 3-year period.Methods and results: We studied two cohorts of patients admitted in the cardiology department of a rehabilitation hospital with a diagnosis of chronic HF New York Heart Association class II–IV. The first, in 2006, included 415 patients, 67.08 ± 10.59 years; the second, in 2009, included 500 patients, 67.31 ± 11.27 years. Considering all patients, the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF was not statistically different in the two cohorts. Compared to the 2006 cohort, the 2009 female cohort had higher LVEF (60.49% ± 13.41% vs 64.42% ± 13.79%, P < 0.05, while males over 65 years of age had lower LVEF (52.75% ± 15.02% vs 54.37% ± 15.23%, P = NS. For females, the probability of having LVEF ,45% was higher in 2006 (odds ratio = 1.573. HF with preserved LVEF was more common in females, both in 2006 (78.2% vs 54.2% and 2009 (87.2% vs 57.3%. In the 2009 cohort, LVEF was higher both in young patients (59.08% ± 14.22% vs 55.35% ± 14.92% and patients ≥ than 75 years of age (62.28% ± 13.81% vs 56.79% ± 14.81% compared to the 2006 cohort. Ischemic heart disease was the main underlying cause for HF in both cohorts.Conclusion: HF appeared to have the same clinical profile over a 3-year period. Females diagnosed with HF showed higher rates of preserved LVEF.Keywords: heart

  18. Ultrasonic Percutaneous Tenotomy for Recalcitrant Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy: Sustainability and Sonographic Progression at 3 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Chusheng; Mohan, P Chandra; Koh, Suang Bee Joyce; Howe, Tet Sen; Lim, Yee Gen; Lee, Brian P; Morrey, Bernard F

    2016-02-01

    A previously published study found positive outcomes for a novel technique for ultrasound-guided percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy, showing good tolerability, safety, and early efficacy within an office setting. In this follow-up study, all 20 members of the original cohort were contacted after 3 years to explore the sustainability of symptomatic relief, functional improvement, and sonographic soft tissue response for percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. All 20 subjects of the clinical trial that was performed from June to November 2011 were further assessed at 36 months after the procedure in terms of visual analog scale for pain, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH)-Compulsory/Work scores, need for adjunct procedures, and overall satisfaction. Importantly, all 20 were reassessed with ultrasound imaging at 36 months, and evidence of the common extensor tendon response was assessed in terms of tendon hypervascularity, tendon thickness, and the progress of the hypoechoic scar tissue. A 100% clinical follow-up was achieved, inclusive of ultrasonographic assessment. None of the subjects required further treatment procedures, and 100% expressed satisfaction. Previous improvements in visual analog scale (current median ± SD, 0 ± 0.9; range, 0-3) and DASH-Work scores (current median, 0 ± 0) were sustained with conformity to a linear pattern on polynomial measures. There was further reduction in DASH-Compulsory scores to a median of 0 ± 0.644 (range, 0-2) with a significant decrease on repeated measures (P = .008). Tendon hypervascularity was resolved in 94% of patients, and 100% had reduction in tendon thickness. Overall reduction in the hypoechoic scar tissue was observed in all subjects, with a 90% response achieved by 6 months. Between 6 and 36 months, further reduction in the scar was observed in around 60% of patients, with 20% of patients having complete resolution of the hypoechoic scar. Minimally invasive

  19. Immediate implants and immediate loading in periodontally compromised patients-a 3-year prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Celia Coutinho; Correia, Andre Ricardo; Neves, Manuel

    2010-10-01

    To avoid the necessity of a removable provisional prosthesis, and therefore preserve the patient's functional outcome, esthetics, and quality of life, a clinical protocol was developed to approach periodontally compromised patients presenting a full-arch irreversibly lost dentition: full-arch extraction and immediate replacement with a provisional acrylic resin implant-supported fixed partial denture (FPD). A total of 23 periodontally compromised patients (11 women, 12 men; 4 smokers, 4 controlled diabetics) were included in this study. Pretreatment casts were taken and vertical dimension of occlusion was determined. In most patients, 6 Straumann implants were distributed along the arch according to the surgical guide or bone availability, with the most distal ones in the maxilla slightly tilted so they could emerge more distally. A total of 168 implants (146 Straumann, 10 Nobel Biocare, 8 Biomet 3i, and 4 Lifecore) were placed (83 in the maxilla, 85 in the mandible). Of those in the maxilla, 74 were loaded immediately (implant stability quotient mentor [ISQm] > 70) and 9 placed with delayed loading (ISQm =/ 70). If an FPD had not been fabricated already, impressions were taken during surgery to do so. The prosthesis was then adapted (cemented or screwed) to the 6 implants within the first 48 hours postsurgery. After 2 months, definitive impressions were taken, and a definitive porcelain-fused-to-metal implant-supported 12-element FPD was fabricated and cemented or screwed to all 6 implants. Of the 168 implants, 108 were immediate implants and 159 immediately loaded. Only 2 implants (1 in the mandible, 1 in the maxilla) did not osseointegrate. This yields a 3-year cumulative survival rate of 98.74% (98.65% in the maxilla, 98.82% in the mandible). From a total of 26 immediately loaded prostheses (12 in the maxilla, 14 in the mandible), 6 were cemented and 20 screw-retained. The 3-year cumulative survival rate was 100%. Immediate loading in mandibular and maxillary

  20. The cultural and linguistic diversity of 3-year-old children with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; Ching, Teresa Y C

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cultural and linguistic diversity of young children with hearing loss informs the provision of assessment, habilitation, and education services to both children and their families. Data describing communication mode, oral language use, and demographic characteristics were collected for 406 children with hearing loss and their caregivers when children were 3 years old. The data were from the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study, a prospective, population-based study of children with hearing loss in Australia. The majority of the 406 children used spoken English at home; however, 28 other languages also were spoken. Compared with their caregivers, the children in this study used fewer spoken languages and had higher rates of oral monolingualism. Few children used a spoken language other than English in their early education environment. One quarter of the children used sign to communicate at home and/or in their early education environment. No associations between caregiver hearing status and children's communication mode were identified. This exploratory investigation of the communication modes and languages used by young children with hearing loss and their caregivers provides an initial examination of the cultural and linguistic diversity and heritage language attrition of this population. The findings of this study have implications for the development of resources and the provision of early education services to the families of children with hearing loss, especially where the caregivers use a language that is not the lingua franca of their country of residence.

  1. Packaging and shipping capabilities of New York State hospital laboratories: a 3-year drill assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Paula A; Brennan, Lynn E; Burhans, Robert L; Ostrowski, Stephanie E

    2011-01-01

    In a previous publication, we discussed the results of the 2006-2007 New York State (NYS) Hospital Laboratory Drill Series which emphasized the need for ongoing testing and evaluation of laboratory preparedness capabilities, particularly those required to support hospital functions during a public health emergency. In this paper, we will discuss how a followup drill series in 2007-2008 was implemented in an effort to re-assess the ability of NYS acute care hospital facilities to recognize and respond to a suspected bioterrorism, chemical terrorism or pandemic flu emergency specimen submission event. We will explain how the results of the follow-up drill series, when compared to those of the original exercise, warranted a statewide hospital laboratory preparedness drill held in 2009, focused solely on addressing the overarching deficiency of chemical terrorism (CT) specimen submission capabilities. Although drill results conclude that NYS acute care hospital facilities are much better prepared than 3 years ago to support hospital functions during a CT public health emergency event, they also highlight the continued need to improve competency.

  2. Development of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug intolerance over a 3 year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Shirai

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the detailed clinical course of a 47-year-old woman with aspirin-induced asthma in which non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID intolerance developed over a 3 year period. The patient had mild asthma and was admitted with a femoral fracture in August 1996. Although she was given NSAIDs, including rectal diclofenac and oral loxoprofen, there was no worsening of asthma. After discharge, she was followed as having NSAID-tolerant asthma. When she developed perennial rhinitis and anosmia subsequent to an upper respiratory tract infection, asthma control was well maintained. Later, she experienced three episodes of severe asthmatic attacks after intake of aspirin or ketoprofen. Thus, we investigated her NSAID tolerability in September 1999. Sodium tolmetin inhalation challenge demonstrated a positive reaction, leading to the diagnosis of aspirin-induced asthma. Open challenges with loxoprofen and diclofenac also provoked positive reactions. The present case illustrates the potential variability of aspirin-induced asthma. Aspirin or NSAIDs challenge tests should be performed when nasal symptoms, particularly anosmia, develop or worsen.

  3. Primary extranodal lymphomas - spectrum of distribution and morphology with immunophenotyping: A 3-year institutional study

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    Chinnam Aparna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malignant lymphomas arising in extranodal sites are intriguing. The histological types of lymphomas vary from one site to another. This study is undertaken to diagnose and categorize extranodal lymphomas using histochemistry and immunohistochemistry (IHC. Materials and Methods: Formalin processed paraffin blocks and hematoxylin and eosin stained sections were used for routine histology. IHC was done in all cases. Results: We have encountered 31 cases of extra nodal lymphomas over a period of 3 years. The tumors occurred at different sites, including brain, nasopharynx, nose, gastrointestinal tract, thyroid, bone, testis, breast, lung, vagina, and skin. Majority of the cases were B-cell lymphomas, while four cases were T-cell lymphomas. Among the B-cell lymphomas diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was the most common variant. Conclusion: This study reiterates the key role of IHC particularly when the differential diagnosis includes an undifferentiated epithelial malignancy and a high-grade lymphoma in the extranodal sites as the treatment modalities and prognosis are different.

  4. Mediterranean diet and 3-year Alzheimer brain biomarker changes in middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Valentina; Walters, Michelle; Sterling, Joanna; Quinn, Crystal G; Logue, Michelle; Andrews, Randolph; Matthews, Dawn C; Osorio, Ricardo S; Pupi, Alberto; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Isaacson, Richard S; de Leon, Mony J; Mosconi, Lisa

    2018-04-13

    To examine in a 3-year brain imaging study the effects of higher vs lower adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet (MeDi) on Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarker changes (brain β-amyloid load via 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B [PiB] PET and neurodegeneration via 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG] PET and structural MRI) in midlife. Seventy 30- to 60-year-old cognitively normal participants with clinical, neuropsychological, and dietary examinations and imaging biomarkers at least 2 years apart were examined. These included 34 participants with higher (MeDi+) and 36 with lower (MeDi-) MeDi adherence. Statistical parametric mapping and volumes of interest were used to compare AD biomarkers between groups at cross section and longitudinally. MeDi groups were comparable for clinical and neuropsychological measures. At baseline, compared to the MeDi+ group, the MeDi- group showed reduced FDG-PET glucose metabolism (CMRglc) and higher PiB-PET deposition in AD-affected regions ( p brain aging and AD. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Adoption of a wiki within a large internal medicine residency program: a 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Bradley H; Mostaghimi, Arash; Reynolds, Eileen E

    2012-01-01

    To describe the creation and evaluate the use of a wiki by medical residents, and to determine if a wiki would be a useful tool for improving the experience, efficiency, and education of housestaff. In 2008, a team of medical residents built a wiki containing institutional knowledge and reference information using Microsoft SharePoint. We tracked visit data for 3 years, and performed an audit of page views and updates in the second year. We evaluated the attitudes of medical residents toward the wiki using a survey. Users accessed the wiki 23,218, 35,094, and 40,545 times in each of three successive academic years from 2008 to 2011. In the year two audit, 85 users made a total of 1082 updates to 176 pages and of these, 91 were new page creations by 17 users. Forty-eight percent of residents edited a page. All housestaff felt the wiki improved their ability to complete tasks, and 90%, 89%, and 57% reported that the wiki improved their experience, efficiency, and education, respectively, when surveyed in academic year 2009-2010. A wiki is a useful and popular tool for organizing administrative and educational content for residents. Housestaff felt strongly that the wiki improved their workflow, but a smaller educational impact was observed. Nearly half of the housestaff edited the wiki, suggesting broad buy-in among the residents. A wiki is a feasible and useful tool for improving information retrieval for house officers.

  6. Benign occipital epilepsy of childhood: Panayiotopoulos syndrome in a 3 year old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Narayanankutty Sunilkumar , Vadakut Krishnan Parvathy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS is a relatively frequent and benign epileptic syndrome seen in children in the age group of 3-6 years and is characterised by predominantly autonomic symptoms and/or simple motor focal seizures followed or not by impairment of consciousness. Although multifocal spikes with high amplitude sharp-slow wave complexes at various locations can be present in the EEG, interictal electroencephalogram (EEG in children with this particular type of epilepsy characteristically shows occipital spikes. This syndrome has known to be a masquerader and can imitate gastroenteritis, encephalitis, syncope, migraine, sleep disorders or metabolic diseases. In the absence of thorough knowledge of types of benign epilepsy syndromes and their various clinical presentations, epilepsy such as PS can be easily missed. The peculiar aspects of this type of epilepsy in children should be known not only by paediatricians but also by general doctors because a correct diagnosis would avoid aggressive interventions and concerns on account of its benign outcome. In this case study, we report a case of PS in a 3 year old child.

  7. Sexual function in ICU survivors more than 3 years after major trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvik, Atle; Kvåle, Reidar; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Flaatten, Hans

    2008-03-01

    To study sexual function in trauma patients 3-8 years after discharge from an ICU and to assess determinants of poor sex life. A postal questionnaire survey was conducted in 2006 on a cohort of 325 consecutive adult ICU trauma patients admitted to a university hospital during 1998-2003. Of 210 eligible patients 156 (74%) answered the questionnaires. Mean age was 46 years, and 124 were males. Sexual function was assessed by a self-report measure, and patients were asked to describe sexual life both currently and prior to trauma. The International Index of Erectile Function evaluated erectile function in males. At follow-up 50% reported sexual function to be unchanged, 41% impaired, and 9% to be better than preinjury status; 34% reported that the trauma impaired current sex life. Erectile dysfunction was found in 27% of men younger than 40 years and 51% of men 40 years or older. Age, being single, Injury Severity Score, and depression were associated with poor sexual function. Of 17 patients experiencing breakdown of a regular relationship 71% reported the trauma to be a significant contributor. At follow-up more than 3 years after injury one-third of our ICU trauma patients reported that the trauma impaired sexual function. Erectile dysfunction was significantly more frequent among men younger than 40 years than found in studies of the normal population. Evaluation of sexual function should be part of long-term outcome assessment after major trauma.

  8. Cultural differences in visual object recognition in 3-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Megumi; Smith, Linda B

    2016-07-01

    Recent research indicates that culture penetrates fundamental processes of perception and cognition. Here, we provide evidence that these influences begin early and influence how preschool children recognize common objects. The three tasks (N=128) examined the degree to which nonface object recognition by 3-year-olds was based on individual diagnostic features versus more configural and holistic processing. Task 1 used a 6-alternative forced choice task in which children were asked to find a named category in arrays of masked objects where only three diagnostic features were visible for each object. U.S. children outperformed age-matched Japanese children. Task 2 presented pictures of objects to children piece by piece. U.S. children recognized the objects given fewer pieces than Japanese children, and the likelihood of recognition increased for U.S. children, but not Japanese children, when the piece added was rated by both U.S. and Japanese adults as highly defining. Task 3 used a standard measure of configural progressing, asking the degree to which recognition of matching pictures was disrupted by the rotation of one picture. Japanese children's recognition was more disrupted by inversion than was that of U.S. children, indicating more configural processing by Japanese than U.S. children. The pattern suggests early cross-cultural differences in visual processing; findings that raise important questions about how visual experiences differ across cultures and about universal patterns of cognitive development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Causes of prolonged jaundice in infancy: 3-year experience in a tertiary paediatric centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Margaret; Day, Andrew S

    2016-01-29

    Although prolonged jaundice (PJ) commonly occurs in infancy, there is not yet agreement as to the appropriate extent of investigations, particularly in otherwise well children. Significant pathologies may present with PJ in this age group and need to be considered. The aim of this retrospective study was to ascertain the causes of PJ in infants referred to a single tertiary paediatric centre. Infants referred with PJ over a 3-year period were identified. Clinical documentation, electronic notes and results of investigations performed prior to and after referral were reviewed. One hundred and sixty-seven infants with PJ were seen. Fifty-eight percent were over 28 days of age. Four patients had conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia. Eighteen percent of patients were found to have a specific medical diagnosis causing or contributing to PJ, almost half of whom had normal clinical examination. The single most common pathological cause for PJ was hypothyroidism found in six patients. This study demonstrates that normal clinical examination and exclusion of conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia are insufficient to exclude pathological causes of PJ. Overall, these children were referred late. Guidelines, in conjunction with education initiatives, are required to optimise the management of prolonged jaundice in infancy.

  10. Outcomes of 3-year-old children with hearing loss and different types of additional disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Linda; Ching, Teresa Y C; Crowe, Kathryn; Seeto, Mark; Leigh, Greg; Street, Laura; Day, Julia; Marnane, Vivienne; Thomson, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the speech, language, and functional auditory outcomes of 119 3-year-old children with hearing loss and additional disabilities. Outcomes were evaluated using direct assessment and caregiver report. Multiple regressions revealed that type of additional disability and level of maternal education were significant predictors of language outcomes. Poorer outcomes were achieved in a combined group of children with autism, cerebral palsy, and/or developmental delay (DD) (Group A), compared with children with vision or speech output impairments, syndromes not entailing DD, or medical disorders (Group B). Better outcomes were associated with higher levels of maternal education. The association between better language outcomes and earlier cochlear implant switch-on approached significance. Further regression analyses were conducted separately for children with different types of additional disabilities. Level of maternal education was the only significant predictor of outcomes for Group A children, whereas degree of hearing loss was the strongest predictor for children in Group B. The findings highlight the variable impact that different types of additional disabilities can have on language development in children with hearing loss.

  11. A tale of two models: Changes in psychological need satisfaction and physical activity over 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnell, Katie E; Bélanger, Mathieu; Brunet, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    (a) Examine longitudinal measurement invariance of scores from psychological need satisfaction (PNS) scales, and (b) examine if changes in PNS were associated with change in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Adolescents (N = 842, Mage = 10.8, SD = .6) enrolled in the Monitoring Activities of Teenagers to Comprehend their Habits (MATCH) study completed measures of PNS and MVPA every 4 months over a 3-year period (2011-14) for a total of 9 times. PNS scores demonstrated strong longitudinal measurement invariance (i.e., invariant factor loadings and intercepts). Latent growth curve modeling indicated that a factor representing perceptions of all 3 PNS variables was positively associated with MVPA at Time 1 (β = .562, p change over time. Further, 2 equally well fitting models were found suggesting that change in PNS can be both an antecedent and an outcome of MVPA. As such, both PNS and MVPA could be targeted in interventions aimed at increasing need satisfaction or MVPA. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Prenatally buprenorphine-exposed children: health to 3 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivistö, Kaisa; Tupola, Sarimari; Kivitie-Kallio, Satu

    2015-11-01

    Our prospective study is among the first attempts to examine the health of prenatally buprenorphine-exposed children after neonatal age and to determine the types of child maltreatment in this patient group. The study population included 102 children (61/41 Caucasian males/females) who had a positive urine screen for buprenorphine as a newborn. In addition to buprenorphine, the children were also prenatally exposed to other substances. The data were collected by pediatricians in follow-up visits until 3 years of age and from medical records. Ten prenatally buprenorphine-exposed children (10 %) had some birth defect. The study children had slightly more major anomalies than newborns on average in Finland (3.4 %). Eye disorders (nystagmus, opticus atrophy, and strabismus) occurred in 11 % of children. One child was diagnosed with hepatitis C transmission. One female died of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and one male died of congenital heart disease. Pediatricians submitted altogether 70 reports to child welfare services of suspected maltreatment. Of these reports, 45 (64 %) involved medical neglect. Physical abuse was suspected in four reports. We suggest that prenatally buprenorphine-exposed children have several types of problems with their health at toddler age and that they are susceptible to child maltreatment, especially to medical neglect.

  13. Outcomes of 3-Year-Old Children With Hearing Loss and Different Types of Additional Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the speech, language, and functional auditory outcomes of 119 3-year-old children with hearing loss and additional disabilities. Outcomes were evaluated using direct assessment and caregiver report. Multiple regressions revealed that type of additional disability and level of maternal education were significant predictors of language outcomes. Poorer outcomes were achieved in a combined group of children with autism, cerebral palsy, and/or developmental delay (DD) (Group A), compared with children with vision or speech output impairments, syndromes not entailing DD, or medical disorders (Group B). Better outcomes were associated with higher levels of maternal education. The association between better language outcomes and earlier cochlear implant switch-on approached significance. Further regression analyses were conducted separately for children with different types of additional disabilities. Level of maternal education was the only significant predictor of outcomes for Group A children, whereas degree of hearing loss was the strongest predictor for children in Group B. The findings highlight the variable impact that different types of additional disabilities can have on language development in children with hearing loss. PMID:24150488

  14. Sustained Effectiveness of the Maternal Pertussis Immunization Program in England 3 Years Following Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirthalingam, Gayatri; Campbell, Helen; Ribeiro, Sonia; Fry, Norman K; Ramsay, Mary; Miller, Elizabeth; Andrews, Nick

    2016-12-01

    The effectiveness of maternal immunization in preventing infant pertussis was first demonstrated in England, 1 year after the program using diphtheria-tetanus-5-component acellular pertussis-inactivated polio vaccine (dT5aP-IPV) was introduced in 2012. Vaccine effectiveness against laboratory-confirmed pertussis has been sustained >90% in the 3 years following its introduction, despite changing to another acellular vaccine with different antigen composition. Consistent with this, disease incidence in infants Vaccine effectiveness against infant deaths was estimated at 95% (95% confidence interval, 79%-100%). Additional protection from maternal immunization is retained in infants who received their first dose of the primary series. There is no longer evidence of additional protection from maternal vaccination after the third infant dose. Although numbers are small and ongoing assessment is required, there is no evidence of increased risk of disease after primary immunization in infants whose mothers received maternal vaccination. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  15. Management of a 3-year-old child with ambiguous genitalia

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    Amarendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available True hermaphrodites have characteristics tissue both sex in the form of presence of vagina uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries as in female and presence of testis seminiferous tubules but penis as in penoscrotal hypospadias and bifid scrotal sac confuses as well developed labia majora. Determination of sex as per parents view in our social set up. The case was provisionally diagnosed as intersex. Total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salphingo-oophorectomy and colpectomy were conducted. A 3-year-old child referred by a pediatrician to Nalanda Medical College, child surgical department for investigation and management of his ambiguous genitalia having following features like, urine was not passing from the tip of penis; penis along with apparently looking female genitalia was taken under treatment. Examination under general anesthesia showed a presence of both male/female internal genitalia and gonads with features of external genitalia of both sexes. After total abdominal hysterectomy and human chorionic gonadotrophin treatment growth of phallus and testicle was noted. The child was made male after extirpation of female genitals. This case illustrates that gender correction can be made as per patients consent in adult but at this stage social customs and parents consent dictated the treatment.

  16. Caustic Injury In Adults – A Study For 3 Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenkova-Saeva J.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to present the results of a 3-year clinico-epidemiological investigation of caustic injury in adults. The study includes 43 patients with acute corrosive ingestion, hospitalized in the Toxicology Clinic, University Hospital “N. I. Pirogov”, Sofia, Bulgaria, for the period 01.01. 2010-31.12.2012. The methods used include: clinical observation and examination, clinical laboratory, imaging, and psychiatric methods and tests. 43 patients between the ages of 22 and 82 with acute corrosive ingestions have been observed. Eleven were male (25.6% and 32 female (74.4%. All ingestions were intentional. Alkaline agents were used by all of the patients. The severity of poisonings varied from moderate to extremely severe. Different complications were seen in 82% of the cases - severe bleeding, perforation, fistula or/and stricture formation. Two of the patients have undergone surgical intervention - coloesophagoplastic - and have recovered completely. The motivation in different age groups was also studied. Psychiatric comorbidity occurred in patients as depressive and schizoaffective disorder, as well as existential crises. Acute corrosive ingestions by alkaline agents cause severe pathology. The severity and complex character of the injuries require good coordination between different medical specialists.

  17. Longitudinal study of caries progression in 2- and 3-year-old German children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchika, Vinay; Kokel, Claudia; Andreeva, Jana; Crispin, Alexander; Hickel, Reinhard; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Kühnisch, Jan; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha

    2016-08-01

    This 2-year longitudinal study in 2- and 3-year-old kindergarten children investigated lesion progression on different surfaces of primary teeth. The study was conducted between September 2008 and September 2010 on a sample of 400 children from the Kyffhäuser district (Thuringia, Germany). A calibrated investigator recorded (non)cavitated caries lesions according to World Health Organization (WHO), International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) and Universal Visual Scoring System (UniViSS) criteria. Nonparametric methods and linear regression using a mixed-effects model with an unbalanced design were used for data analysis. There was a significant increase in the prevalence of noncavitated caries lesions during the 2-year period, with the highest chance for change on all surfaces compared to cavitated lesions. First visible sign lesions on occlusal surfaces had the highest chance for change (estimate 0.38), whereas established lesions revealed the highest chance for change on proximal (estimate 1.05) and smooth surfaces (estimate 0.62). Proximal lesions exhibited the greatest chance for change irrespective of severity level. Our study demonstrated that each type of carious lesion had different changing rates. Greater lesion severity correlated with greater chances to change and receive treatment. This information is crucial for dental practitioners in decision-making processes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Functional performance of children with chronic malnutrition aged 1 to 3 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Carla da Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Child malnutrition is a major public health problem, especially in northeastern Brazil, because it can compromise the growth and development of children irreversibly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional development of children with moderate or severe malnutrition aged 1 to 3 years old. To this end, we conducted a descriptive study with cross-sectional design with children diagnosed with moderate or severe chronic malnutrition who were being assisted at a center for nutrition recovery and education in Joao Pessoa, Alagoas state, Brazil. The scales for self-care, mobility, and social function of the Brazilian version of the Inventory of Pediatric Evaluation of Disability (PEDI were used to measure the functional performance of children. The sociodemographic conditions were investigated by a questionnaire previously developed for the study. The results showed that 3 of the 11 children evaluated presented functional performance lower than that expected for their age. Of these 3 children, one presented delay in the three areas assessed, one showed delay in the areas of mobility and self-care, and one only in the area of self-care. Self-care was the most affected area, suggesting that the unfavorable socioeconomic context of families affects the engagement of children in this area of occupation. We conclude that malnutrition can compromise performance in daily activities, and that intervention programs to malnourished children should include the stimulation of the development of activities of daily living together with nutritional rehabilitation.

  19. Anxiety sensitivity as a predictor of panic disorder symptoms: a prospective 3-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurin, Tanja; Biglbauer, Sonja

    2018-03-20

    Anxiety sensitivity (AS) is the fear of anxiety symptoms, a feature proven to be an important vulnerability factor for anxiety pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine whether AS (as well as its factors) predicts the onset of panic disorder symptoms when controlling for the contribution of trait anxiety. We conducted a prospective 3 year follow up study. The participants, students at the Humanities and Social Sciences in Zagreb (N = 1087), completed an Anxiety Sensitivity Index and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Trait form) and, after a period of three years, were asked to self-assess criteria for panic disorder (according to the DSM-5). The predictive validity of AS for the onset of panic disorder symptoms, regardless of trait anxiety, was confirmed. Furthermore, the physical concerns dimension of AS was the only significant predictor of panic disorder symptoms. The optimal cutoff score of 25 on the ASI provides poor to moderate accuracy indices in detecting participants who will manifest panic disorder symptoms in the next three years. This study contributes to our current understanding of AS as a prospective risk factor for panic disorder symptoms.

  20. Diffuse spinal leptomeningeal spread of a pilocytic astrocytoma in a 3-year-old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer Alyeldien

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pilocytic astrocytomas correspond to lowgrade gliomas and therefore metastasize exceedingly rare. However, pilocytic astrocytomas are able to and leptomeningeal dissemination may be seen. What are the treatment options of these cases? We present a case report of a 3-year-old child with a pilocytic astrocytoma of the optic chiasm with leptomeningeal dissemination of the spinal meninges. Partial resection of the cerebral tumor has been performed. Since the leptomeningeal dissemination was seen all over the spinal meninges, the child did not undergo further surgical treatment. A wait and watch strategy were followed. Chemotherapy was initiated, if a 25% tumor growth was seen. Leptomeningeal dissemination of a pilocytic astrocytoma is seen so infrequently that no standard therapy is established. Since these metastases may occur even up to 2 decades after primary tumor resection, long-term follow- up is indicated. In case of spinal metastases, surgical treatment should be performed if feasible. Otherwise observation should be possessed and/or chemotherapy should be initiated.

  1. Negative cognitive styles synergistically predict suicidal ideation in bipolar spectrum disorders: a 3-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Jonathan P; Hamilton, Jessica L; Burke, Taylor A; Kleiman, Evan M; O'Garro-Moore, Jared K; Seligman, Nicole D; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2015-03-30

    Rates of suicidal ideation and behavior are extremely high in bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs). However, relatively little work has evaluated potentially synergistic relationships between cognitive and emotion-regulatory processes proposed by theoretical models of suicidality in BSDs. The present study evaluated whether negative cognitive style and subtypes of rumination would exacerbate the impact of self-criticism on suicidal ideation in a prospective study of individuals with BSDs. Seventy-two young adults with BSDs (bipolar II, bipolar NOS, or cyclothymia) completed diagnostic interviews and trait measures of self-criticism, negative cognitive style, and brooding and reflective rumination at a baseline assessment. The occurrence of suicidal ideation was assessed as part of diagnostic interviews completed every 4 months for an average of 3 years of follow-up. Negative cognitive style and reflective rumination strengthened the association between self-criticism and the prospective occurrence of suicidal ideation across follow-up. Individuals with high levels of self-criticism in conjunction with negative cognitive style or reflective rumination were most likely to experience the onset of suicidal ideation. Self-criticism may work synergistically with negative cognitive style and rumination to confer risk for suicidal ideation in bipolar spectrum disorders. These results support theoretical models of suicidality in BSDs and indicate that evaluating and understanding negative cognitive styles may help to identify individuals who are at risk of suicide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypnotherapy and cognitive behaviour therapy of acute stress disorder: a 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Richard A; Moulds, Michelle L; Nixon, Reginald D V; Mastrodomenico, Julie; Felmingham, Kim; Hopwood, Sally

    2006-09-01

    The long-term benefits of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for trauma survivors with acute stress disorder were investigated by assessing patients 3 years after treatment. Civilian trauma survivors (n=87) were randomly allocated to six sessions of CBT, CBT combined with hypnosis, or supportive counselling (SC), 69 completed treatment, and 53 were assessed 2 years post-treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. In terms of treatment completers, 2 CBT patients (10%), 4 CBT/hypnosis patients (22%), and 10 SC patients (63%) met PTSD criteria at 2-years follow-up. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that 12 CBT patients (36%), 14 CBT/hypnosis patients (46%), and 16 SC patients (67%) met PTSD criteria at 2-year follow-up. Patients who received CBT and CBT/hypnosis reported less re-experiencing and less avoidance symptoms than patients who received SC. These findings point to the long-term benefits of early provision of CBT in the initial month after trauma.

  3. Gender abuse, depressive symptoms, and substance use among transgender women: a 3-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttbrock, Larry; Bockting, Walter; Rosenblum, Andrew; Hwahng, Sel; Mason, Mona; Macri, Monica; Becker, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    We examined the effects of gender abuse (enacted stigma), depressive symptoms, and demographic, economic, and lifestyle factors on substance use among transgender women. We conducted a 3-year prospective study (December 2004 to September 2007) of 230 transgender women aged 19 to 59 years from the New York Metropolitan Area. Statistical techniques included generalized estimating equations with logistic and linear regression links. Six-month prevalence of any substance use at baseline was 76.2%. Across assessment points, gender abuse was associated with alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, or any substance use during the previous 6 months, the number of days these substances were used during the previous month, and the number of substances used. Additional modeling associated changes in gender abuse with changes in substance use across time. Associations of gender abuse and substance use were mediated 55% by depressive symptoms. Positive associations of employment income, sex work, transgender identity, and hormone therapy with substance use were mediated 19% to 42% by gender abuse. Gender abuse, in conjunction with depressive symptoms, is a pervasive and moderately strong risk factor for substance use among transgender women. Improved substance abuse treatment is sorely needed for this population.

  4. Properties of Extreme Precipitation and Their Uncertainties in 3-year GPM Precipitation Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N.; Liu, C.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme high precipitation rates are often related to flash floods and have devastating impacts on human society and the environments. To better understand these rare events, 3-year Precipitation Features (PFs) are defined by grouping the contiguous areas with nonzero near-surface precipitation derived using Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Ku band Precipitation Radar (KuPR). The properties of PFs with extreme precipitation rates greater than 20, 50, 100 mm/hr, such as the geographical distribution, volumetric precipitation contribution, seasonal and diurnal variations, are examined. In addition to the large seasonal and regional variations, the rare extreme precipitation rates often have a larger contribution to the local total precipitation. Extreme precipitation rates occur more often over land than over ocean. The challenges in the retrieval of extreme precipitation might be from the attenuation correction and large uncertainties in the Z-R relationships from near-surface radar reflectivity to precipitation rates. These potential uncertainties are examined by using collocated ground based radar reflectivity and precipitation retrievals.

  5. Maternal and fetal outcome in women with rheumatic heart disease: a 3-year observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezk, Mohamed; Gamal, Awni

    2016-08-01

    To assess prospectively the maternal and fetal outcome in women with rheumatic heart disease (RHD). This was a prospective 3-year observational study carried out at Menoufia University Hospital, Egypt in which 192 patients out of 9856 pregnant women were diagnosed with RHD and divided into two groups: low- and high-risk groups based on the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification. Enrolled patients were followed to assess the maternal and fetal outcome. Mitral valve disease was the commonest single valve (118/192, 51.4 %) affected by rheumatic fever. Cardiac women with NYHA class I&II characterized by having fewer pulmonary hypertension, taking cardiac medications, prior heart failure and prior cardiac surgery than those with NYHA class III&IV. On the hand, cardiac women with NYHA III&IV have poorer maternal outcome with more complications as heart failure, arrhythmias, thromboembolism, admission to cardiac ICU, delivery by cesarean section and defective lactation. Prematurity and NICU admission were significantly more in NYHA III&IV. RHD still constitutes a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Multidisciplinary cooperation, proper preconception and antenatal care are the key measures to improve the outcomes of these patients.

  6. Bollasina Receives 2013 James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollasina, Massimo A.

    2014-08-01

    I am deeply honored to have been selected as this year's recipient of the James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award, and I receive it with heartfelt gratitude and humility. I clearly remember Peter Webster's call announcing the amazing news and how I literally remained speechless and overwhelmed. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the Atmospheric Sciences section of AGU and the members of the award committee. I am even more appreciative to have been presented this award handed by two outstanding scientists—Peter Webster and Bill Lau—who have remarkably contributed to our understanding of the Asian monsoon and tropical climate, my area of expertise.

  7. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  8. Impact of a 3-year pet management program on pet population and owner's perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias Costa, Esther; Martins, Camila Marinelli; Cunha, Graziela Ribeiro; Catapan, Dariane Cristina; Ferreira, Fernando; Oliveira, Simone Tostes; Garcia, Rita de Cassia Maria; Biondo, Alexander Welker

    2017-04-01

    Although pet population management programs have been established worldwide, few reports on program evaluation have been carried out to date. Accordingly, a 3-year longitudinal study has been carried out in a 4000 household neighborhood located within the metropolitan area of Curitiba, the eighth most populated city of Brazil. Visits were conducted and questionnaires completed to estimate and characterize the local pet population (animal sex, reproductive and vaccination status, street access). Care provided by owners, community perception on stray dog management and the possible changes were compared in these variables over time (2010 and 2013) were evaluated, after the establishment of a city pet population management program. In addition, associations between having children, owning dogs and cats, responsible pet ownership education and owner's perception on stray dogs were statistically tested. A total of 354/4000 (8.9%) household families were interviewed in 2010 and 70/354 (19.8%) of the same families again in 2013. No significant changes were found in overall number of dogs and cats and average pet age, animal care and owner's perception on stray dogs following the 3-year population management program. In 2010, an average of 1.6 dogs and 0.3 cats were found per family, with slightly more females (51.3% dogs and 51.1% cats), adults (4.0±3.5years for dogs and 2.1±2.4 for cats), intact (not neutered; 94.2% dogs and 84.0% cats) and lacking regular visit to veterinarian (71.6%). Although more families (53.1%) had children under 12 years old, no association was found between having children and having dogs and cats. Questionnaires revealed that owners perceived neutering/spaying to be the best pet population control method (42.4%), with "society" (50%) and "government" (49.4%) as responsible for pet population management. A significant positive association has been found between education level and the best way to control stray dogs (p=0.03), between having dogs

  9. Changes of migraine-related white matter hyperintensities after 3 years: a longitudinal MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdélyi-Bótor, Szilvia; Aradi, Mihály; Kamson, David Olayinka; Kovács, Norbert; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Schwarcz, Attila; Dóczi, Tamás; Komoly, Sámuel; Deli, Gabriella; Trauninger, Anita; Pfund, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate changes of migraine-related brain white matter hyperintensities 3 years after an initial study. Baseline quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of migraine patients with hemispheric white matter hyperintensities performed in 2009 demonstrated signs of tissue damage within the hyperintensities. The hyperintensities appeared most frequently in the deep white matter of the frontal lobe with a similar average hyperintensity size in all hemispheric lobes. Since in this patient group the repeated migraine attacks were the only known risk factors for the development of white matter hyperintensities, the remeasurements of migraineurs after a 3-year long follow-up may show changes in the status of these structural abnormalities as the effects of the repeated headaches. The same patient group was reinvestigated in 2012 using the same MRI scanner and acquisition protocol. MR measurements were performed on a 3.0-Tesla clinical MRI scanner. Beyond the routine T1-, T2-weighted, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging, diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and T1 and T2 relaxation time measurements were also performed. Findings of the baseline and follow-up studies were compared with each other. The follow-up proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of white matter hyperintensities showed significantly decreased N-acetyl-aspartate (median values 8.133 vs 7.153 mmol/L, P=.009) and creatine/phosphocreatine (median values 4.970 vs 4.641 mmol/L, P=.015) concentrations compared to the baseline, indicating a more severe axonal loss and glial hypocellularity with decreased intracellular energy production. The diffusion values, the T1 and T2 relaxation times, and the cerebral blood flow and volume measurements presented only mild changes between the studies. The number (median values 21 vs 25, P<.001) and volume (median values 0.896 vs 1.140 mL, P<.001) of

  10. 48 CFR 970.1504-1-2 - Fee policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in the clauses of the contract entitled “Security” and “Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives,” as... REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Contracting by Negotiation 970.1504-1-2 Fee policy. (a) DOE... Department, when work elements cannot be fixed price, incentive fees (including award fees) tied to objective...

  11. Practice-based clinical evaluation of metal-ceramic and zirconia molar crowns: 3-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, S; Schäfer, S; Lange, K; Gersdorff, N; Roediger, M

    2013-03-01

    This practice-based study evaluates the clinical performance of conventionally luted metal-ceramic and zirconia molar crowns fabricated with pronounced anatomical core design and a prolonged cooling period of the veneering porcelain. Fifty-three patients were treated from 07/2008 until 07/2009 with either metal-ceramic crowns (MCC) (high-noble alloy + low-fusing porcelain) or zirconia crowns (Cercon System, DeguDent, Germany). Forty-nine patients (30 women/19 men) with 100 restorations (metal-ceramic: 48/zirconia: 52, mean observational period: 36·5 ± 6 months) participated in a clinical follow-up examination and were included in the study. Time-dependent survival (in situ criteria), success (event-free restorations) and chipping rates (defects of the veneering ceramics) were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method and analysed in relation to the crown fabrication technique, using a Cox regression model (P zirconia: 2) were recorded (survival rate after 3 years: metal-ceramic: 97·6%, zirconia: 95·2%). Of the metal-ceramic restorations, 90·9% remained event-free (two ceramic fractures, one endodontic treatment), whereas the success rate for the zirconia was 86·8% (two ceramic fractures, one endodontic treatment, one secondary caries). No significant differences in survival (P = 0·53), success (P = 0·49) and ceramic fracture rates (P = 0·57) were detected. The combination of a pronounced anatomical core design and a modified firing of the veneering porcelain for the fabrication of zirconia molar crowns resulted in a 3-year survival, success and chipping rate comparable to MCC. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in Rural Cambodia: A 3-Year Prospective Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tara C.; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J.; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects. PMID:24755844

  13. A 3 year update on the influence of noise on performance and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charlotte; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    The effect of noise exposure on human performance and behavior continues to be a focus for research activities. This paper reviews developments in the field over the past 3 years, highlighting current areas of research, recent findings, and ongoing research in two main research areas: Field studies of noise effects on children's cognition and experimental studies of auditory distraction. Overall, the evidence for the effects of external environmental noise on children's cognition has strengthened in recent years, with the use of larger community samples and better noise characterization. Studies have begun to establish exposure-effect thresholds for noise effects on cognition. However, the evidence remains predominantly cross-sectional and future research needs to examine whether sound insulation might lessen the effects of external noise on children's learning. Research has also begun to explore the link between internal classroom acoustics and children's learning, aiming to further inform the design of the internal acoustic environment. Experimental studies of the effects of noise on cognitive performance are also reviewed, including functional differences in varieties of auditory distraction, semantic auditory distraction, individual differences in susceptibility to auditory distraction, and the role of cognitive control on the effects of noise on understanding and memory of target speech materials. In general, the results indicate that there are at least two functionally different types of auditory distraction: One due to the interruption of processes (as a result of attention being captured by the sound), another due to interference between processes. The magnitude of the former type is related to individual differences in cognitive control capacities (e.g., working memory capacity); the magnitude of the latter is not. Few studies address noise effects on behavioral outcomes, emphasizing the need for researchers to explore noise effects on behavior in more

  14. A 3 year update on the influence of noise on performance and behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Clark

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of noise exposure on human performance and behavior continues to be a focus for research activities. This paper reviews developments in the field over the past 3 years, highlighting current areas of research, recent findings, and ongoing research in two main research areas: Field studies of noise effects on children′s cognition and experimental studies of auditory distraction. Overall, the evidence for the effects of external environmental noise on children′s cognition has strengthened in recent years, with the use of larger community samples and better noise characterization. Studies have begun to establish exposure-effect thresholds for noise effects on cognition. However, the evidence remains predominantly cross-sectional and future research needs to examine whether sound insulation might lessen the effects of external noise on children′s learning. Research has also begun to explore the link between internal classroom acoustics and children′s learning, aiming to further inform the design of the internal acoustic environment. Experimental studies of the effects of noise on cognitive performance are also reviewed, including functional differences in varieties of auditory distraction, semantic auditory distraction, individual differences in susceptibility to auditory distraction, and the role of cognitive control on the effects of noise on understanding and memory of target speech materials. In general, the results indicate that there are at least two functionally different types of auditory distraction: One due to the interruption of processes (as a result of attention being captured by the sound, another due to interference between processes. The magnitude of the former type is related to individual differences in cognitive control capacities (e.g., working memory capacity; the magnitude of the latter is not. Few studies address noise effects on behavioral outcomes, emphasizing the need for researchers to explore noise

  15. Tapering clonazepam in patients with panic disorder after at least 3 years of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Antonio E; Freire, Rafael C; Valença, Alexandre M; Amrein, Roman; de Cerqueira, Ana Claudia R; Lopes, Fabiana L; Nascimento, Isabella; Mezzasalma, Marco A; Veras, André B; Sardinha, Aline; de Carvalho, Marcele R; da Costa, Rafael T; Levitan, Michelle N; de-Melo-Neto, Valfrido L; Soares-Filho, Gastão L; Versiani, Marcio

    2010-06-01

    High-potency benzodiazepines, such as clonazepam, are frequently used in the treatment of panic disorder (PD) because of their rapid onset of action and good tolerability. However, there is concern about their potential to cause withdrawal symptoms. We aimed to develop a protocol for safely tapering off clonazepam in patients with PD who had been receiving treatment for at least 3 years. A specific scale for judging withdrawal was also developed, the Composite Benzodiazepine Discontinuation Symptom Scale. We selected 73 patients with PD who had been asymptomatic for at least 1 year and who wished to discontinue the medication. The trial consisted of a 4-month period of tapering and an 8-month follow-up period. The dosage of clonazepam was decreased by 0.5 mg per 2-week period until 1 mg per day was reached, followed by a decrease of 0.25 mg per week. The mean dosage at the start of tapering was 2.7 +/- 1.2 mg/d. In total, 51 (68.9%) of the patients were free of the medication after the 4 months of tapering according to the protocol, and 19 (26.0%) of the patients needed another 3 months to be free of medication. Clonazepam discontinuation symptoms were mostly mild and included mainly: anxiety, shaking/trembling/tremor, nausea/vomiting, insomnia/nightmares, excessive sweating, tachycardia/palpitations, headache, weakness, and muscle aches. The improvement in PD and general well-being was maintained during both the taper and follow-up phases. Clonazepam can be successfully discontinued without any major withdrawal symptoms if the dose is reduced gradually. We recommend reducing the dosage of clonazepam after intermediate-term use by 0.25 mg/wk.

  16. Use of Corporal Punishment for 3-year Old Children and Associated Intimate Partner Aggression or Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Catherine A.; Lee, Shawna J.; Guterman, Neil B.; Rice, Janet C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between maternal and paternal use of corporal punishment (CP) for 3-year old children and intimate partner aggression or violence (IPAV) in a population-based sample. Methods The study sample (n = 1997) was derived from wave 3 of the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Study. Mother and father reports regarding their use of CP and their IPAV victimization were analyzed. IPAV included coercion, non-physical and physical aggression. Results About 65% of the children were spanked at least once in the prior month by one or both parents. Of those couples that reported any family aggression (87%), 54% reported that both CP and IPAV occurred. The most prevalent patterns of co-occurrence involved both parents as aggressors either toward each other (i.e., bilateral IPAV) or toward the child. The presence of bilateral IPAV essentially doubled the odds that one or both parents would use CP, even after controlling for potential confounders such as parenting stress, depression, and alcohol or other drug use. Of the five patterns of co-occurring family aggression assessed, the “single aggressor” model, in which only one parent aggressed in the family, received the least amount of empirical support. Conclusions Despite American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendations against the use of CP, CP use remains common in the U.S. CP prevention and intervention efforts should carefully consider assumptions made about patterns of co-occurring aggression in families, given that adult victims of IPAV, including even minor, non-physical aggression between parents, have increased odds of using CP with their children. PMID:20732943

  17. Mandibular Fracture Patterns at a Medical Center in Central Taiwan: A 3-Year Epidemiological Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu-Yu; Wu, Chao-I; Cheng, Hsu-Tang

    2017-12-01

    Mandibular fractures constitute a major portion of maxillofacial trauma and may lead to considerable functional and aesthetic sequelae if treatment is inadequate or delayed. An epidemiology study on mandibular fractures may guide the preventive efforts of the Taiwan public health care system. Therefore, a retrospective review was conducted at a medical center in central Taiwan to evaluate the current mandibular fracture epidemiology.The medical records and digitized radiographs of 198 patients who received treatment for mandibular fractures during a 3-year period (from October 2010 to September 2013) at a medical center in central Taiwan were reviewed to obtain demographic and injury data.The average age was 29.4 years (3-82 years). Patients aged 21 to 30 years sustained the most mandibular fractures (62 patients, 31.3%). The overall sex distribution (male to female) ratio was 1.8. Motor-vehicle accidents (MVAs) were the most common mechanism of injury (162 patients, 82%), and scooter and motorcycle riders wearing partial-coverage helmets constituted the majority of patients. A chart review identified 198 patients with 335 mandibular fractures; 113 patients (57.1%) had multiple mandibular fractures. The most common fracture sites were the symphysis and parasymphysis regions (38.9%), followed by the condyle (26.0%), angle (14.3%), body (14.3%), and ramus (6.6%).MVAs are the major cause of mandibular fractures in central Taiwan, and patients aged Taiwan. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised patients: a 3-year multicenter retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert-Gangneux, Florence; Sterkers, Yvon; Yera, Hélène; Accoceberry, Isabelle; Menotti, Jean; Cassaing, Sophie; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Hennequin, Christophe; Delhaes, Laurence; Bonhomme, Julie; Villena, Isabelle; Scherer, Emeline; Dalle, Frédéric; Touafek, Feriel; Filisetti, Denis; Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Pelloux, Hervé; Bastien, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients (ICPs). The definitive diagnosis relies on parasite DNA detection, but little is known about the incidence and burden of disease in HIV-negative patients. A 3-year retrospective study was conducted in 15 reference laboratories from the network of the French National Reference Center for Toxoplasmosis, in order to record the frequency of Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection in ICPs and to review the molecular methods used for diagnosis and the prevention measures implemented in transplant patients. During the study period, of 31,640 PCRs performed on samples from ICPs, 610 were positive (323 patients). Blood (n = 337 samples), cerebrospinal fluid (n = 101 samples), and aqueous humor (n = 100 samples) were more frequently positive. Chemoprophylaxis schemes in transplant patients differed between centers. PCR follow-up of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) patients was implemented in 8/15 centers. Data from 180 patients (13 centers) were further analyzed regarding clinical setting and outcome. Only 68/180 (38%) patients were HIV(+); the remaining 62% consisted of 72 HSCT, 14 solid organ transplant, and 26 miscellaneous immunodeficiency patients. Cerebral toxoplasmosis and disseminated toxoplasmosis were most frequently observed in HIV and transplant patients, respectively. Of 72 allo-HSCT patients with a positive PCR result, 23 were asymptomatic; all were diagnosed in centers performing systematic blood PCR follow-up, and they received specific treatment. Overall survival of allo-HSCT patients at 2 months was better in centers with PCR follow-up than in other centers (P toxoplasmosis in HIV-negative ICPs and suggests that regular PCR follow-up of allo-HSCT patients could guide preemptive treatment and improve outcome. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. The impact of a 3-year after-school obesity prevention program in elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zenong; Moore, Justin B; Johnson, Maribeth H; Vernon, Marlo M; Gutin, Bernard

    2012-02-01

    Children tend to be sedentary during the after-school hours, and this has deleterious effects on their health. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of a 3-year after-school physical activity (PA) program, without restriction of dietary energy intake, on percent body fat (%BF), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and cardiometabolic markers in children. A cluster randomization design was employed. A total of 574 3rd grade children from 18 elementary schools in the southeastern United States participated. The intervention consisted of 80 minutes of age-appropriate moderate-to-vigorous PA each school day. The main outcomes of interest were %BF measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; CRF measured by heart rate in response to a submaximal step test; nonfasting total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C); and resting blood pressure (BP). Intent-to-treat analyses showed significant treatment by time interactions for %BF (p = 0.009) and CRF (p = 0.0003). The change pattern of the means suggested that %BF and CRF in intervention children improved relative to control children during the school months, rebounding to the levels of control children over the summers following years 1 and 2. Year-by-year analyses of what occurred during the months when the program was offered revealed dose–response relations for %BF and CRF, such that the clearest beneficial effects were seen for those youth who attended at least 60% of the after-school sessions. No significant intervention effects were seen for cholesterol or BP. An after-school PA program was effective in reducing adiposity and improving CRF, especially in the children who attended the sessions at least 3 days/week. However, the favorable effects on %BF and CRF were lost over the summer. Thus, it is critical to incorporate strategies that attract and retain the children to receive an adequate dose of PA year-round.

  20. Frequency of intrathoracic injuries in children younger than 3 years with rib fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, Stephen E. [Kapiolani Children' s Hospital, The Department of Radiology, Honolulu, HI (United States); Done, Stephen L.; Friedman, Seth D. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, The Department' s of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Feldman, Kenneth W. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, Pediatrics, General Pediatrics Division, Seattle, WA (United States); Seattle Children' s Protection Program, Children' s Protection Program, M/S M2-10, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Research documents that among children admitted to trauma intensive care units the number of rib fractures sustained indicates the child's likelihood of having and severity of intrathoracic injury. This has been misused in court to argue that children with multiple rib fractures who lack intrathoracic injury have abnormal bone fragility rather than inflicted injury. To determine frequency of intrathoracic injuries in children younger than 3 years with rib fractures in cases of child abuse and accidental trauma. We conducted a retrospective review of rib fractures caused by documented abuse or accidents from 2003 to 2010 in children treated at Seattle Children's Hospital and Harborview Medical Center. A senior pediatric radiologist and radiology fellow independently reviewed the imaging. Children with bone demineralization were excluded. Descriptive and simple comparative statistics were used. Seventy-two percent (47/65) of infants and toddlers with rib fractures were abused. Abused children had more rib fractures than accidentally injured children (5.55 vs. 3.11, P = 0.012). However intrathoracic injuries as a whole (55.6% vs. 12.8%, P < 0.001) and individual types of intrathoracic injuries were more common with accidents. Rates of other thoracic cage injuries did not differ substantially (27.8% accidents vs. 12.8% abuse, P = 0.064). Intracranial and intra-abdominal injuries and skull fractures were equally frequent, but other extrathoracic fractures were more common with abuse (70.2% vs. 16.7%, P < 0.001). Abused infants and toddlers have fewer intrathoracic injuries but more rib fractures than accidentally injured peers. This likely reflects different injury mechanics. Lack of intrathoracic injuries in abused children with rib fractures does not imply bone fragility. (orig.)

  1. Television exposure as a risk factor for aggressive behavior among 3-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer A; Taylor, Catherine A

    2009-11-01

    To examine associations of child television (TV) exposure and household TV use with aggressive behavior among 3-year-old children while controlling for demographic characteristics and risk and protective factors for aggression. The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a prospective cohort study. Data collected at home and by telephone from parents of children born from 1998 to 2000 from 20 cities. Mothers who completed a 36-month in-home survey and met inclusion criteria (n = 3128). Direct child TV exposure and household TV use were the primary explanatory variables. Additional risk factors included neighborhood disorder and maternal factors like depression. Childhood aggression was assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist/2-3. Multivariate linear regression models were used to examine associations between TV measures, additional risk factors, and childhood aggression. Children who were spanked in the past month (beta = 1.24, P < .001), lived in a disorderly neighborhood (beta = 2.07, P < .001), and had a mother reporting depression (beta = 0.92, P < .001) and parenting stress (beta = 0.16, P < .001) were significantly more likely to exhibit aggressive behavior. Direct child TV exposure (beta = 0.16, P < .001) and household TV use (beta = 0.09, P < .001) were also significantly associated with childhood aggression, even when controlling for other factors. Three-year-old children exposed to more TV, both directly and indirectly, are at increased risk for exhibiting aggressive behavior. Further research is essential to determine whether pediatric recommendations concerning TV and children should include limits for general household TV use.

  2. Worldwide, 3-Year, Post-Marketing Surveillance Experience with Tofacitinib in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stanley; Curtis, Jeffrey R; DeMasi, Ryan; Chen, Yan; Fan, Haiyun; Soonasra, Arif; Fleischmann, Roy

    2018-02-22

    Post-marketing surveillance (PMS) is an integral part of monitoring adverse events (AEs) following approval of new drugs. Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). An analysis of PMS reports was conducted to evaluate the safety of tofacitinib in a post-marketing setting. Worldwide tofacitinib PMS data received in the Pfizer safety database from November 6, 2012 (first marketing authorization of tofacitinib) to November 5, 2015 were analyzed. Serious AEs (SAEs) of interest were reviewed and reporting rates (RRs) were calculated by dividing the number of SAEs by the estimated 100 patient-years of exposure. Patient exposure was calculated based on estimated worldwide sales and an estimated daily regimen of tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily. During the 3-year reporting period, worldwide post-marketing exposure to tofacitinib since approval was estimated to be 34,223 patient-years. In total, 9291 case reports (82.9% non-serious) were received and 25,417 AEs, 102 fatal cases, and 4352 SAEs were reported. The RRs (per 100 patient-years) for SAEs of interest by Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities System Organ Class were 2.57 for infections, 0.91 for gastrointestinal disorders, 0.60 for respiratory disorders, 0.45 for neoplasms, 0.43 for cardiac disorders, and 0.12 for hepatobiliary disorders. Although there are limitations to these data, no new safety risks were revealed in this real-world setting compared with the safety profile identified in the tofacitinib RA clinical development program. Any risks identified through the tofacitinib development program and PMS will continue to be monitored through pharmacovigilance surveillance. Pfizer Inc.

  3. Pyridoxine-dependent convulsions among children with refractory seizures: A 3-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Deepak, Sai; Teja, Ravi; Kuruthukulangara, Seby

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy accounts for 1% of the global disease burden and about 8-10 million epilepsy patients live in India. About 30-40% of these patients become drug-resistant and land up with palliative or disease-modifying surgeries. This is a situation causing great concern in view of the psychosocial and economic burden on the patient and the family apart from severe cognitive and motor consequences, especially in children. Therefore, it is mandatory to have an insight into the wide spectrum of causes with reference to refractoriness to antiepileptic medications in children with epilepsy. Children admitted under our team with refractory epilepsy as per the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) criteria in the last 3 years were included in the study. Refractory epilepsy constituted 13.3% of inpatients in the pediatric group. Males dominated with 68.9% of these patients. Nearly 34.4% of these patients were found to suffer from various neurometabolic diseases. Almost 3.5% were due to pyridoxine-dependent convulsions. This group of patients showed an excellent response to dietary manipulation, disease-modifying treatment for the metabolic disorder, and supportive small-dose anticonvulsants. During follow-up, they showed very good response with reference to global development and seizure control. Pyridoxine-dependent convulsions are relatively rare forming about 3.5% of refractory epilepsies in this series. With initiation of appropriate therapy, results with reference to seizure control as well as neurodevelopment became evident within 2 weeks, and at 1-year follow-up, complete independence for majority of the needed activities is achieved with minimum cost, almost zero side effects, and absolute elimination of the need for palliative surgery.

  4. Etiology and audiological outcomes at 3 years for 364 children in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Henrik M Dahl

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is an etiologically heterogeneous trait with differences in the age of onset, severity and site of lesion. It is caused by a combination of genetic and/or environmental factors. A longitudinal study to examine the efficacy of early intervention for improving child outcomes is ongoing in Australia. To determine the cause of hearing loss in these children we undertook molecular testing of perinatal "Guthrie" blood spots of children whose hearing loss was either detected via newborn hearing screening or detected later in infancy. We analyzed the GJB2 and SLC26A4 genes for the presence of mutations, screened for the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA A1555G mutation, and screened for congenital CMV infection in DNA isolated from dried newborn blood spots. Results were obtained from 364 children. We established etiology for 60% of children. One or two known GJB2 mutations were present in 82 children. Twenty-four children had one or two known SLC26A4 mutations. GJB2 or SLC26A4 changes with unknown consequences on hearing were found in 32 children. The A1555G mutation was found in one child, and CMV infection was detected in 28 children. Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder was confirmed in 26 children whose DNA evaluations were negative. A secondary objective was to investigate the relationship between etiology and audiological outcomes over the first 3 years of life. Regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between hearing levels and etiology. Data analysis does not support the existence of differential effects of etiology on degree of hearing loss or on progressiveness of hearing loss.

  5. Cutaneous Tuberculosis – A Profile of Cases 3 Years Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita P Javalgi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis is an ancient disease known since pre-historic times and remains important infectious disease today in terms of morbidity, mortality and economic impact. Cutaneous tuberculosis makes up a small proportion (1.5% of all cases of extra pulmonary tuberculosis. In a recent study from India cases of cutaneous tuberculosis make upto 0.15% of all skin outpatients. Irrespective of immunodeficiency status, cutaneous tuberculosis still contributes markedly in morbidity of developing countries and it remains at times a diagnostic challenge in dermatology clinic due to its varied clinical manifestations and varied histomorphology, hence proper clinical management with assisted histopathological diagnosis, the morbidity can be reduced. Aim and Objective: To study clinical and morphological variants of cutaneous tuberculosis with age and sex distribution. Materials and Methods: 3 years prospective study was done in the Department of Pathology, Shri Nijilingappa Medical College, Bagalkot from 2009 to 2011. Total 267 skin biopsies were received in the histopathology section. The biopsy tissue was processed as per routine procedure and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin stains and special stains (ZN with 20% H2SO4. Microscopic features were studied and diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis made with sub typing and clinical co-relation. Results: Out of 267 skin biopsies, 37 were diagnosed as cutaneous tuberculosis based on clinical examination and morphology, Lupus vulgaris (62.16% was a commonest variant affecting males (64.86% predominantly. Most frequent age group affected was 21-40 years (59.45%. Face and neck were the usual sites for manifestation. Forty one percent of cases were mantoux test positive. All cases were HIV negative and free from active pulmonary tuberculosis. Conclusion: Lupus vulgaris remains most frequent form of cutaneous tuberculosis in dermatopathology irrespective of HIV status. Strong clinical suspicion

  6. EARLY WHEEZING PHENOTYPES AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT OF 3-YEAR OLDS. COMMUNITY-RECRUITED BIRTH COHORT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Perera, Frederica P.; Jankowski, Jeffery; Maugeri, Umberto; Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Mroz, Elzbieta; Flak, Elzbieta; Skarupa, Anita; Edwards, Susan; Lisowska-Miszczyk, Ilona

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to answer the question whether young children without clinical diagnosis of asthma but experiencing early wheezing disorders and therefore being at high risk of developing asthma may have cognitive deficits. In the ongoing birth cohort study wheezing symptoms were recorded postpartum over two first years of age and subsequently cognitive status of children at the age of 3 years was assessed with the Bayley Mental Development Index (MDI). In the statistical analysis a wide range of modifying and confounding factors (maternal education, gender of children, prenatal exposure to lead and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) were considered to assess the independent effect of early wheezing phenotypes on cognitive development of children. The MDI score correlated inversely with the number of wheezing days recorded over 24 months (r = −0.13, p=0.007), lead cord blood concentration (r = − 0.12, p = − 0.02), number of siblings (r = − 0.17, p = 0.0006) and the number of cigarettes smoked daily by other household members at home over the pregnancy period (r = − 0.18, p = 0.0002). While the children who experienced wheezing over the first year of age showed deficit of 2 MDI scores (beta coeff. = −2.31, 95%CI: −4.63 to 0.02), those with persistent wheezing had the score deficit of 4 points (beta coeff. = − 4.41, 95%CI: −8.27 to −0.55). To our knowledge, it is the first report in the literature showing that early wheezing is associated the cognitive deficit in a community-recruited very young children. Observed cognitive deficit in early wheezers may be caused by RSV infections or can be related to lower lung function attributed to persistent wheezing, which reducing oxygen supply would affect rapidly developing brain. PMID:19548966

  7. Frequency of intrathoracic injuries in children younger than 3 years with rib fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, Stephen E.; Done, Stephen L.; Friedman, Seth D.; Feldman, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Research documents that among children admitted to trauma intensive care units the number of rib fractures sustained indicates the child's likelihood of having and severity of intrathoracic injury. This has been misused in court to argue that children with multiple rib fractures who lack intrathoracic injury have abnormal bone fragility rather than inflicted injury. To determine frequency of intrathoracic injuries in children younger than 3 years with rib fractures in cases of child abuse and accidental trauma. We conducted a retrospective review of rib fractures caused by documented abuse or accidents from 2003 to 2010 in children treated at Seattle Children's Hospital and Harborview Medical Center. A senior pediatric radiologist and radiology fellow independently reviewed the imaging. Children with bone demineralization were excluded. Descriptive and simple comparative statistics were used. Seventy-two percent (47/65) of infants and toddlers with rib fractures were abused. Abused children had more rib fractures than accidentally injured children (5.55 vs. 3.11, P = 0.012). However intrathoracic injuries as a whole (55.6% vs. 12.8%, P < 0.001) and individual types of intrathoracic injuries were more common with accidents. Rates of other thoracic cage injuries did not differ substantially (27.8% accidents vs. 12.8% abuse, P = 0.064). Intracranial and intra-abdominal injuries and skull fractures were equally frequent, but other extrathoracic fractures were more common with abuse (70.2% vs. 16.7%, P < 0.001). Abused infants and toddlers have fewer intrathoracic injuries but more rib fractures than accidentally injured peers. This likely reflects different injury mechanics. Lack of intrathoracic injuries in abused children with rib fractures does not imply bone fragility. (orig.)

  8. Pre-divorce problems in 3-year-olds: a prospective study in boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbers, Sylvana C C; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, C E M Toos; Verhulst, Frank C; Huizink, Anja C; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2011-04-01

    We examined to what extent internalizing and externalizing problems at age 3 preceded and predicted parental divorce, and if divorce and the time lapse since divorce were related to internalizing and externalizing problems at age 12. Parental ratings of internalizing and externalizing problems were collected with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) in a large sample (N = 6,426) of 3-year-old children. All these children were followed through the age of 12 years, at which parents completed the CBCL again, while teachers completed the Teacher's Report Form. Children whose parents divorced between age 3 and age 12 were compared with children whose families remained intact. Girls whose parents divorced between ages 3 and 12 already showed more externalizing problems at age 3 than girls whose parents stayed married. Higher levels of externalizing problems in girls at age 3 predicted later parental divorce. Parental reports indicated that 12-year-olds with divorced parents showed more internalizing and externalizing problems than children with married parents. Levels of teacher-reported problems were not different between children with married versus divorced parents. However, children whose parents divorced between ages 3 and 12 showed more teacher-rated internalizing problems at age 12 when the divorce was more recent than when the divorce was less recent. Parental ratings of both internalizing and externalizing problems at age 12 were not associated with the time lapse since divorce. Externalizing problems in girls precede and predict later parental divorce. Post-divorce problems in children vary by raters, and may depend on the time lapse since divorce.

  9. Prevalence, Patterns, and Persistence of Sleep Problems in the First 3 Years of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolton, Kimberly; Rausch, Joseph; Lanphear, Bruce; Beebe, Dean W.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Examine the prevalence, patterns, and persistence of parent-reported sleep problems during the first 3 years of life. METHODS: Three hundred fifty-nine mother/child pairs participated in a prospective birth cohort study. Sleep questionnaires were administered to mothers when children were 6, 12, 24, and 36 months old. Sleep variables included parent response to a nonspecific query about the presence/absence of a sleep problem and 8 specific sleep outcome domains: sleep onset latency, sleep maintenance, 24-hour sleep duration, daytime sleep/naps, sleep location, restlessness/vocalization, nightmares/night terrors, and snoring. RESULTS: Prevalence of a parent-reported sleep problem was 10% at all assessment intervals. Night wakings and shorter sleep duration were associated with a parent-reported sleep problem during infancy and early toddlerhood (6–24 months), whereas nightmares and restless sleep emerged as associations with report of a sleep problem in later developmental periods (24–36 months). Prolonged sleep latency was associated with parent report of a sleep problem throughout the study period. In contrast, napping, sleep location, and snoring were not associated with parent-reported sleep problems. Twenty-one percent of children with sleep problems in infancy (compared with 6% of those without) had sleep problems in the third year of life. CONCLUSIONS: Ten percent of children are reported to have a sleep problem at any given point during early childhood, and these problems persist in a significant minority of children throughout early development. Parent response to a single-item nonspecific sleep query may overlook relevant sleep behaviors and symptoms associated with clinical morbidity. PMID:22218837

  10. Prevalence, patterns, and persistence of sleep problems in the first 3 years of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byars, Kelly C; Yolton, Kimberly; Rausch, Joseph; Lanphear, Bruce; Beebe, Dean W

    2012-02-01

    Examine the prevalence, patterns, and persistence of parent-reported sleep problems during the first 3 years of life. Three hundred fifty-nine mother/child pairs participated in a prospective birth cohort study. Sleep questionnaires were administered to mothers when children were 6, 12, 24, and 36 months old. Sleep variables included parent response to a nonspecific query about the presence/absence of a sleep problem and 8 specific sleep outcome domains: sleep onset latency, sleep maintenance, 24-hour sleep duration, daytime sleep/naps, sleep location, restlessness/vocalization, nightmares/night terrors, and snoring. Prevalence of a parent-reported sleep problem was 10% at all assessment intervals. Night wakings and shorter sleep duration were associated with a parent-reported sleep problem during infancy and early toddlerhood (6-24 months), whereas nightmares and restless sleep emerged as associations with report of a sleep problem in later developmental periods (24-36 months). Prolonged sleep latency was associated with parent report of a sleep problem throughout the study period. In contrast, napping, sleep location, and snoring were not associated with parent-reported sleep problems. Twenty-one percent of children with sleep problems in infancy (compared with 6% of those without) had sleep problems in the third year of life. Ten percent of children are reported to have a sleep problem at any given point during early childhood, and these problems persist in a significant minority of children throughout early development. Parent response to a single-item nonspecific sleep query may overlook relevant sleep behaviors and symptoms associated with clinical morbidity.

  11. Early childhood severe scalds in a developing country: A 3-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pius Agbenorku

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The burns intensive care unit (BICU staff observed an increasing number of pediatric scald burn admissions as a result of increase injuries associated with the scald burns. A retrospective study was conducted to identify scalds demographics, etiologies, and mortality risk factors. This descriptive study comprised a total of 166 patients aged 0-5 years, who were admitted to the BICU of the Reconstructive Plastic Surgery and Burns Unit (RPSBU through the Accident and Emergency (A and E Centre of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH from May 1 st 2009 to April 30 th 2012. Source of information was the BICU Computerized Database System. Data extracted included demographics as well as treatment methods and outcomes. The study population was 166; 92 (55.4% males and 74 (44.6% females. Scalds admissions were 141 (84.9%; 13 (9.2% of them died, 83 (58.9% discharged, and 45 (31.9% transferred-out to another burn ward and pediatric surgery ward in the hospital. Scald patients' demographics included 78 males (55.3% and 63 females (44.7%; mean age was 2.18 years. Mortality risk factors identified were age <3 years (P = 0.044; scalds from hot water (P = 0.033, total burns surface area >30% (P = 0.017, and multiple body parts affected (P = 0.049. The current study showed age, hot water, and Total Burns Surface Area (TBSA as risk factors of early childhood scalds. Education on scalds prevention targeting mothers/caregivers is needed to create awareness of the frequency, severity, and danger associated with pediatric scalds.

  12. EDITORIAL: MST Best Paper Award for 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Patrick

    2004-09-01

    For the last 12 years, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of the journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. An Editorial Board working party, comprising Patrick Gill (Chairman), Ralph Tatam and David Birch, was convened to determine a single contributed paper describing new and significant work, well aligned with the measurement scope of the journal, and presented in clear and rigorous form. They received a number of recommendations from the Editorial and International Advisory Board Members, and they would like to record their thanks to the Members for these recommendations, as they form an all-important first stage in the assessment process. There were responses from some 12 Board Members. In total, there were 31 papers nominated. To aid the process, additional information in the form of the 2003 MST papers top rated by referees, and the top papers ranked by most electronic accesses, was accessed. Reviews, and papers which included a Board Member as an author, were automatically excluded. From the totality of nominations and working party deliberations, there emerged a clear winner. Thus the paper recommended by the working party for the MST Best Paper Award for 2003 is: 'Extension of the torsional crystal viscometer to measurements in the time domain' by Richard F Hafer and Arno Laesecke, 14 663-673 (2003) This paper describes a significant advance in viscosity measurement using torsional vibration in piezoelectric rods. The method reported here demonstrates the use of free-decay time-domain measurements as opposed to the more established steady-state forced-mode resonance technique. The time domain technique is faster and more sensitive, with the potential for improved accuracy due to the lack of large time constants necessary for the interpretation of forced mode data. It offers

  13. Does Federal Financial Aid Policy Influence the Institutional Aid Policies of Four-Year Colleges and Universities? An Exploratory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossler, Don; Kwon, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    There is a dearth of empirical work that examines the relationships between federal financial aid policy and institutional financial aid priorities and expenditures. This study uses Resource Dependency Theory to explore whether changes the amount of financial aid awarded by colleges and universities during the last fifty years are best explained…

  14. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Awards Ceremony for 2011 Award Winners (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The winners for 2011 of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award were recognized in a ceremony held May 21, 2012. Dr. Steven Chu and others spoke of the importance of the accomplishments and the prestigious history of the award. The recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for 2011 are: Riccardo Betti (University of Rochester); Paul C. Canfield (Ames Laboratory); Mark B. Chadwick (Los Alamos National Laboratory); David E. Chavez (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Amit Goyal (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Thomas P. Guilderson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Lois Curfman McInnes (Argonne National Laboratory); Bernard Matthew Poelker (Thomas Jeffereson National Accelerator Facility); and Barry F. Smith (Argonne National Laboratory).

  15. 37 CFR 1.335 - Filing of notice of arbitration awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... arbitration awards. 1.335 Section 1.335 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... Arbitration Awards § 1.335 Filing of notice of arbitration awards. (a) Written notice of any award by an... the inventor and patent owner, and the names and addresses of the parties to the arbitration. The...

  16. International recognition for ageing research: John Scott Award-2014 to Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorhead

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    It is with great pleasure and pride that we share the news of the award of the 2014 “City of Philadelphia John Scott Award”, to Dr. Leonard Hayflick and Dr. Paul Moorhead, for their research on ageing. The press release announcing the award states that: “from the first awarded in 1822, the Award...

  17. 3 CFR - Mexico City Policy and Assistance for Voluntary Population Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Population Planning Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of January 23, 2009 Mexico City Policy and Assistance for Voluntary Population Planning Memorandum for the Secretary of State [and... awards, and subsequently extended the policy to “voluntary population planning” assistance provided by...

  18. 48 CFR 1815.602 - Policy. (NASA paragraphs (1) and (2))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Policy. (NASA paragraphs (1) and (2)) 1815.602 Section 1815.602 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND... Proposals 1815.602 Policy. (NASA paragraphs (1) and (2)) (1) An unsolicited proposal may result in the award...

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Dow AgroSciences, developed spinosad, a highly selective, low-toxicity, nonpersistant insecticide made by a soil microorganism. It controls many chewing insect pests.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Lilly Research Laboratories, developed a low-waste drug synthesis using yeast for a stereospecific reduction, reducing solvent amounts, and replacing chromium oxide.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Legacy Systems, developed the Coldstrip process, which uses only water and oxygen to remove photoresist from silicon semiconductors. It replaces corrosive acids.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winners, Bayer Corporation and Bayer AG, developed a waste-free manufacturing process for sodium iminodisuccinate (Baypure CX), a biodegradable, nontoxic chelating agent.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Chemical Specialties, developed an alkaline copper quaternary wood preservative to replace chromated copper arsenate preservative phased out due to risk to children.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Academic Award (Waymouth and Hedrick)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winners, Professor Robert M. Waymouth and Dr. James L. Hedrick, developed a broad class of highly active, environmentally benign, metal-free catalysts for synthesizing plastics.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Pfizer, improved its synthesis of sertraline, the active ingredient in its drug, Zoloft, to double the yield and reduce the use of raw materials, energy, and water.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, Merck, discovered the asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation of unprotected enamines to make beta-amino acids. Merck applied this to synthesize sitagliptin (Januvia).

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Eastman Chemical Co., makes esters for emollients and emulsifiers in cosmetics with immobilized enzymes, saving energy and avoiding strong acids and organic solvents.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winners, Arkon Consultants and NuPro Technologies, developed a safer processing system for flexographic printing that includes washout solvents and reclamation/recycling.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Faraday Technology, Inc., process high-performance chrome coatings to be made from the less toxic, trivalent chromium. Reduce millions of pounds hexavalent chromium without comprising performance.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, Roche Colorado, developed a greener synthesis for gancyclovir (Cytovene, a potent antiviral drug) that uses a second-generation Guanine Triester (GTE) process.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winners, Procter & Gamble Co. (P&G) and Cook Composites and Polymers Co. (CCP), developed Chempol MPS resins and Sefose sucrose esters to enable high-performance low-VOC alkyd paints.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, Battelle, developed a biobased soy toner for laser printers and copiers. The technology saves energy and improves de-inking, allowing more paper fiber to be recycled.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, S.C. Johnson & Son, developed Greenlist, a rating system for environmental and health effects of ingredients. SC Johnson uses it to reformulate many of its products.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Bristol-Myers Squibb, manufactures paclitaxel, the active ingredient in the anticancer drug, Taxol, using plant cell fermentation and extraction to replace synthesis.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, BHC Company, developed a highly atom-efficient method to make ibuprofen, a common painkiller, using three catalytic steps instead of six stoichiometric ones.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Verdezyne, developed a yeast to produce USDA Certified Biobased dodecanedioic acid (DDDA) used to make high performance nylon 6,12. Lower greenhouse gas emissions, no high temperature or nitric acid

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, BioAmber, developed an integrated technology to produce large, commercial quantities of succinic acid by bacterial fermentation, replacing petroleum-based feedstocks.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winner, LS9, engineered microorganisms to convert fermentable sugars selectively to alkanes, olefins, fatty alcohols, or fatty esters, each in a single-unit biorefinery.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Sherwin-Williams, developed water-based acrylic alkyd paints with VOCs that can be made from recycled soda bottle (PET), acrylics, and soybean oil.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winners, Albemarle and CB&I, developed a safer technology to produce alkylate, a clean gasoline component by replacing liquid acid catalysts with a lower environmental impact catalyst