WorldWideScience

Sample records for policies university center

  1. University of Illinois at Chicago Health Policy Center - Funding

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1991-2015. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Funding Data, Appropriations...

  2. An Investigation of Creative Climate of University R&D Centers and Policy Implications for Innovation in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Rasmussen, Palle; Chemi, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    The chapter focuses on the influences of science and technology (S&T) policies on creative climate of university R&D centers in China that provide policy implications for improving roles of university R&D in innovation system. The empirical data came from two questionnaire surveys, one...

  3. Universal service policy in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do Manh, Thai; Falch, Morten; Von Salakpi, Simeon

    2016-01-01

    Universal service provision is a key to bridge the digital divide. This paper provides an empirical examination of the Vietnamese universal policy introduced in 2015 for implementation up to 2020. Using the framework of King et al. (1994) the paper analyses the universal services policy in Vietnam...

  4. University Transportation Center : administration manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    University Transportation Centers (UTCs) were established by the U.S. Department of : Transportation (USDOT) in 1987. UTCs are part of an on-going federal government effort to : improve transportation research, transportation education and to stre...

  5. University Research Centers: Heuristic Categories, Issues, and Administrative Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    University-based research centers can bring prestige and revenue to the institutions of higher education with which they are affiliated. Collaborating with corporations, units of government, and foundations, centers provide services to organizational leaders, policy makers, and communities. University research centers continue to increase in…

  6. Research Universities in Developing Countries: Centers or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As one of the key elements in the globalization of science, the research university is at the center of science, scholarship, and the new knowledge economies. The research university educates the new generation of personnel needed for technological and intellectual leadership, develops new knowledge so necessary for ...

  7. Optimization of Overflow Policies in Call Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koole, G.M.; Nielsen, B.F.; Nielsen, T.B.

    2015-01-01

    We examine how overflow policies in a multi-skill call center should be designed to accommodate performance measures that depend on waiting time percentiles such as service level. This is done using a discrete Markovian approximation of the waiting time of the first customers waiting in line...... and customers are treated in a FCFS order....

  8. Computer Viruses. Legal and Policy Issues Facing Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David R.; And Others

    Compiled by various members of the higher educational community together with risk managers, computer center managers, and computer industry experts, this report recommends establishing policies on an institutional level to protect colleges and universities from computer viruses and the accompanying liability. Various aspects of the topic are…

  9. Universally design social policy: when disability disappears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickenbach, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review and evaluate the legal and policy feasibility of applying the principles of Universal Design (UD) to create a "universalised disability policy" that targets the needs and circumstances of persons with disabilities in light of universal human rights, conscious of individual differences. Applying modified versions of the principles of UD to disability social policy and using core interpretative strategies for human rights implementation (used in the United Nations' Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities) to illuminate, by analogy, ways to resolve the dilemma between seeking equality and respecting difference. The aspirations of UD in architecture and planning - namely to design buildings and cities to accommodate the needs of the widest spectrum of abilities as possible - can successfully be applied to social policy that focuses on the needs and circumstances of persons with disabilities, and which underwrites a blueprint for reform in the delivery of social services. "Universal social policy", and UD, are feasible and desirable approaches to their respective domains, if we adopt a strategy derived from the legal interpretation of human rights implementation. The consequence, however, may be a policy that begins a process of social disappearance of disability. Implications for Rehabilitation The well-recognised principles of Universal Design (UD) have analogs for social policy that focuses on the needs of persons with disabilities. Universal social policy is consistent with the rights and aspirations of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Universalising social policy may lead eventually to the disappearance of "disability" as a policy category.

  10. Graduate Women, Sexual Harrassment, and University Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Beth E.

    1987-01-01

    A survey concerning sexual harrassment of 356 women graduate students at a major public university documents the extent and complexity of incidents of "everyday harassment" and both consensual and coercive dating and sex with male faculty. Current university policy is evaluated. (Author/MSE)

  11. University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Dr. Ira [University of Vermont and State Agricultural College

    2013-08-02

    This grant was awarded in support of Phase 2 of the University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging. Phase 2 outlined several specific aims including: The development of expertise in MRI and fMRI imaging and their applications The acquisition of peer reviewed extramural funding in support of the Center The development of a Core Imaging Advisory Board, fee structure and protocol review and approval process.

  12. University/City Partnerships: Creating Policy Networks for Urban Transformation in Nairobi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, Jacqueline; Ngau, Peter; Sclar, Elliot

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative collaboration between the Center for Sustainable Urban Development at Columbia University and the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Nairobi. By bringing universities into urban policy networks, this partnership aims to re-shape pedagogy, policy and research action for sustainable…

  13. Increasing Counseling Center Utilization: Yeshiva University's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Victor; Nissel, Chaim; Eisenberg, Daniel; Kay, Jerald; Brown, Joshua T.

    2012-01-01

    Yeshiva University established a counseling center during the 2004-2005 academic year. As a religiously based institution, the administration recognized that there would likely be significant impediments to utilization of on-campus mental health services as a result of negative attitudes about mental illness and its treatment--stigma. To combat…

  14. THE KANSAS UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTER (KUTC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe LEE, Ph.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Universities are an integral part of society, and they have a role in society. In addition to educate the youngs, many universities also conduct research and service activities. In this paper, a brief description of a university-based research unit, University of Kansas Transportation Center (KUTC is presented. Three KUTC research/service programs namely the LTAP, the RTAP and the PC-TRANS are discussed in detail. The activities involved in these programs are outlined. These research/service programs have been able to reach and impact a large group of professionals in the field. The programs have contributed significantly to the betterment of our transportation system and the transportation community.

  15. 351 University Education for Youth Empowerment: Policy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Abstract. Policy and management issues that inhibit quality university education for youth empowerment in Nigeria were discussed in this paper. These issues include access, gender disparity in enrolment, high enrolment growth, staff quality and quantity, funding, cultism and poor quality of infrastructure. Unless these ...

  16. University Education for Youth Empowerment: Policy/ Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Policy and management issues that inhibit quality university education for youth empowerment in Nigeria were discussed in this paper. These issues include access, gender disparity in enrolment, high enrolment growth, staff quality and quantity, funding, cultism and poor quality of infrastructure. Unless these issues are ...

  17. NSF-CAREER outreach at the K-6 level through Project Excite, Center for Talent Development, School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, S. D.; Cockrell, K.

    2011-12-01

    Many scientists can attribute their careers to some kind of impressionable exposure to experimentation and research at an early age. However, children across the country receive varying levels of exposure to professional scientists depending upon local resources and socioeconomic composition. Outreach goals under this NSF-CAREER award are predicated on the idea that children can develop a life-long interest in science and mathematics at a very early age. The PI has focused on geoscience education to local K-6 students who might not otherwise get exposure to the field at a critical stage of their intellectual development. Working with educators at Northwestern's Center for Talent Development, the PI leads Earth science modules in Project Excite, a longitudinal program that recruits minority third-grade students from local elementary schools for a six-year program involving regular visits to the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. The primary goal is to boost minority enrollment in advanced placement courses in science and mathematics at Evanston Township High School. Hands-on demonstration modules have been developed on Mars rovers, renewable energy, as well as rock and mineral identification. Research under this CAREER award examines the role of silicate minerals in Earth's deep water cycle from atomic to geophysical scales. Under laboratory-simulated mantle conditions of 400-700 km depth, high-pressure minerals can incorporate a remarkable amount of water into their structures, resulting in modified physical properties. Experimental studies focus on determining hydration mechanisms at the atomic scale, and understanding the influence of hydration on the behavior of Earth materials at high pressures. Results will provide geophysical indicators of mantle hydration and facilitate detection of potential deep-mantle reservoirs of water remotely using seismic waves.

  18. University/Hospital fetal dose policy experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.M.; Vinson, W.R.; Deforest, W.W.; Washburn, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Since at least 1981, an informal policy has existed at the authors research university and teaching hospital institution to interview, inform and assure appropriate personnel monitoring for pregnant radiation workers. Events, such as popular and technical publications (NCRP 87) and the maturation of NRC's proposed changes in 10 CFR 20 (NRC 88), brought increased attention to the subject of fetal radiation dose. The need for a formal approach to the subject became evident. By 1987, a concerted effort to promulgate a formal policy was launched. A draft policy statement was presented to each institutional radiation safety committee for review and action. There was immediate strong interest. A thorough, multilevel review, comment and redraft process developed. Well tested policy statements were then approved in 1988

  19. Views from the Center of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, N. E.; Primack, J. R.

    2009-08-01

    The modern theory of the composition, evolution, and structure of the universe had its origins in the early 1980s, and in the past decade the astronomical evidence for it has become extremely strong. We now know that the vast majority of the universe is invisible dark energy and cold dark matter, with stars, gas, planets, and other visible stuff making up only about 0.5% of the cosmic density. The new cosmology gives us a new perspective on how we fit into the universe. We humans are made of the rarest material in the universe, relatively heavy atoms like oxygen and carbon that are forged in stars. Our size is midway between the largest and smallest sizes, the cosmic horizon and the Planck scale. We also live at the center of time from the perspective of the cosmos, of our solar system, and of life on earth. There is no geographic center of the expanding universe, but we humans are turning out to be central to the principles that underlie the new cosmology. Many of humanity's most dangerous problems arise from our 17th century way of looking at the universe, which is at odds with the principles of modern science that we blithely use in countless technologies. There is an almost total disjunction between the power of our technologies and the wisdom required to use them over the almost unimaginably long periods during which their effects will last. People can't recognize threats that don't make sense in their cosmology, and this is why the new cosmology is such an important contribution to the world at this moment and must be presented to the public in ways they can appreciate. We can learn to do this from earlier cultures' cosmologies, which were presented through stories, images, symbols, and rituals. Those cosmologies were scientifically wrong, but they nevertheless provided a mental homeland that defined a shared reality for their people. The challenge today is to take the new universe picture and present it not just as physics but as a mental homeland for our

  20. New Mexico State University Arrowhead Center PROSPER Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peach, James

    2012-12-31

    This document is the final technical report of the Arrowhead Center Prosper Project at New Mexico State University. The Prosper Project was a research and public policy initiative funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Prosper project (DOE Grant Number DE-NT0004397) began on October 1, 2008 (FY2009, Quarter 1) and ended on December 31, 2012 (FY2013, Quarter 1). All project milestones were completed on time and within the budget. This report contains a summary of ten technical reports resulting from research conducted during the project. This report also contains a detailed description of the research dissemination and outreach activities of the project including a description of the policy impacts of the project. The report also describes project activities that will be maintained after the end of the project.

  1. Together with Research Centers and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Domingos Garrido

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Journal Motricidade has always been walking in parallel with the scientific communities. We found that the affiliation of most authors has, nearly always, a University (Uni or a Research Center (RC. In fact it is almost impossible to conduct research outside these two universes. In this sense, Uni and RC feed the most, if not all, of scientific journals worldwide. By this I mean that is in the interest of Motricidade to be associated with high-quality RC and Uni equally recognized. With regard to RC, Motricidade will publish this year a supplement of the International Congress of Research Centre in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development (CIDESD. This RC has conducted research in a variety of areas within the Sport Sciences and Health and always with high recognition and associated publications. It was not by chance that this RC was evaluated with ‘very good’ by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT panel and has been granted funding. This Congress, which takes place every two years, targets to converge research and high level practices within these three areas: Sports, Health and Human Development. The 2016 CIDESD edition is dedicated to "Exercise and Health, Sports and Human Development" and will be held at the University of Évora, between 11 and 12 November of 2016. The readers can check the program in the following link http://gdoc.uevora.pt/450120 and get more information in the Congress Site available at http://www.cidesd2016.uevora.pt/. With regard to Uni, Motricidade signed a cooperation protocol with the University of Beira Interior (UBI in May of 2016, involving the development and dissemination of scientific knowledge in Sports Sciences, Psychology, Human Development and Health. At the present, UBI hosts more than 6,000 students spread across five faculties - Arts & Letters, Sciences, Health Sciences, Humanities and Social Sciences and Engineering. When looking at the rankings, for instance

  2. The University of Mississippi Geoinformatics Center (UMGC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easson, Gregory L.

    2003-01-01

    The overarching goal of the University of Mississippi Geoinformatics Center (UMGC) is to promote application of geospatial information technologies through technology education, research support, and infrastructure development. During the initial two- year phase of operation the UMGC has successfully met those goals and is uniquely positioned to continue operation and further expand the UMGC into additional academic programs. At the end of the first funding cycle, the goals of the UMGC have been and are being met through research and educational activities in the original four participating programs; Biology, Computer and Information Science, Geology and Geological Engineering, and Sociology and Anthropology, with the School of Business joining the UMGC in early 2001. Each of these departments is supporting graduate students conducting research, has created combination teaching and research laboratories, and supported faculty during the summer months.

  3. Mississippi State University Sustainable Energy Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, W. Glenn [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2014-09-26

    The Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC) project at Mississippi State University included all phases of biofuel production from feedstock development, to conversion to liquid transportation fuels, to engine testing of the fuels. The feedstocks work focused on non-food based crops and yielded an increased understanding of many significant Southeastern feedstocks. an emphasis was placed on energy grasses that could supplement the primary feedstock, wood. Two energy grasses, giant miscanthus and switchgrass, were developed that had increased yields per acre. Each of these grasses was patented and licensed to companies for commercialization. The fuels work focused on three different technologies that each led to a gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel product. The three technologies were microbial oil, pyrolysis oil, and syngas-to liquid-hydrocarbons

  4. Nuclear energy research in Germany 2008. Research centers and universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromm, Walter

    2009-01-01

    This summary report presents nuclear energy research at research centers and universities in Germany in 2008. Activities are explained on the basis of examples of research projects and a description of the situation of research and teaching in general. Participants are the - Karlsruhe Research Center, - Juelich Research Center (FZJ), - Dresden-Rossendorf Research Center (FZD), - Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), - Technical University of Dresden, - University of Applied Sciences, Zittau/Goerlitz, - Institute for Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems (IKE) at the University of Stuttgart, - Reactor Simulation and Reactor Safety Working Group at the Bochum Ruhr University. (orig.)

  5. Georgia Health Policy Center Child Policy Briefs, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This set of briefs discusses state public policy and implications as they pertain to children in Georgia. The five briefs each address a single policy issue: kinship care, dental care, child care, special health care needs, and school health practice in Georgia. Each two-page brief provides background information on the issue, details the types of…

  6. Academic Specialization and Contemporary University Humanities Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownley, Martine W.

    2012-01-01

    Given the academic specialization endemic today in humanities disciplines, some of the most important work of humanities centers has become promoting education about the humanities in general. After charting the rise of humanities centers in the US, three characteristics of centers that enable their advancement of larger concerns of the humanities…

  7. The Stanford University US-Japan Technology Management Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dasher, Richard

    2002-01-01

    This grant established the U.S.-Japan Technology Management Center, Stanford University School of Engineering, as an ongoing center of excellence for the study of emerging trends and interrelationships between technology...

  8. Universal Basic Education Policy: Impact on Enrolment and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iddrisu, Issah

    2016-01-01

    The universal basic education policy enshrined in the constitution of Ghana is aimed at making education accessible and affordable for all Ghanaian citizens. This paper sought to assess whether the universal basic education policy really have an impact on access at the basic level. The study was carried out on the premise that the universal basic…

  9. Financial policies and performance of line managers in Universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study analysed the effect of financial policies on the performance of line managers in Ugandan Universities. The field research was carried out in private and public universities. Every university had a financial policies so their line managers were expected to perform their duties effectively. The objectives of the study ...

  10. University-Based Research Centers: Characteristics, Organization, and Administrative Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Creso M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the characteristics and organizational issues associated with university-based research centers. The first section sketches general characteristics and functions of centers. The second section examines major issues concerning the organization of centers, including funding and sustainability, center autonomy, and relations with…

  11. University of Washington Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  12. Technology Transfer from University-Based Research Centers: The University of New Mexico Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Everett M.; Hall, Brad; Hashimoto, Michio; Steffensen, Morten; Speakman, Kristen L.; Timko, Molly K.

    1999-01-01

    A study of 55 research centers at the University of New Mexico investigated the nature of the typical center, why funding has risen during the 1990s, reasons for founding the centers, the director's role, how university-based research centers transfer technology to private companies and other organizations, and what determines program…

  13. An Artist in the University Medical Center. Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A. Everette, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "An Artist in the University Medical Center" (M. Lesser, New Orleans: Tulane University Press, 1989), in which the artist captures the human side of the complex Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans (Louisiana). The interplay of drawings, etchings, watercolors, and prose conveys traditions of nurturing in the hospital. (SLD)

  14. Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, George A.

    2006-10-17

    The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: • Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials • Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals • Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis • Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic

  15. New library buildings: Creighton University Bio-Information Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannarka, M B

    1980-04-01

    In May 1977 the newly constructed Creighton University Bio-Information Center, costing over $4 million and containing more than 57,000 square feet of space, officially began to provide services. This facility houses three educational support programs--the Health Sciences Library, the Learning Resources Center, and the Biomedical Communications Center--that primarily serve the University's health sciences schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and allied health, and the University's major teaching hospital, Saint Joseph Hospital. This article begins with a brief history of the development of the library and is chiefly concerned with the Health Sciences Library and the Learning Resources Center. Criteria formulated during the design phase of the Bio-Information Center are identified. A description of the center and its services, with an emphasis on the application of these criteria, is set forth. Finally, an assessment of the current increased utilization of library services and resources contained in the Bio-Information Center is presented.

  16. University Mergers in Russia: Four Waves of Educational Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, K. R.; Lisyutkin, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    This article is aimed at identifying distinctive features of the educational policy of university mergers--their main stages, types, and declared goals. We analyzed cases of university mergers and acquisitions (M&A) from the 1990s to the present, which allowed us to identify and describe four Russia-specific waves of educational policy. Based…

  17. Starting the Conversation: University-Wide Research Data Management Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erway, Ricky

    2013-01-01

    This call for action addresses the high-level benefits of adopting a university-wide policy regarding research data management. It identifies the various university stakeholders and suggests that the library initiate a conversation among them in order to get buy-in for a proactive, rather than reactive, high-level policy for responsible data…

  18. Legalistic or Inspirational? Comparing University Conflict of Interest Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elise; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2009-01-01

    In response to growing public and policy concern about conflicts of interest (COI) in university research, academic institutions in North America and Europe have introduced policies to manage COI. However, depending on their form and content, COI policies can be more or less helpful in the effective management of COI. In this paper, we examine and…

  19. Investment Policies for College and University Endowments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, William T.

    1999-01-01

    College trustees have a responsibility to institute investment policies that preserve real endowment value. The chief financial officer's responsibility varies, but at a minimum should provide the board with essential information and ensure that trustees understand the importance of policy decisions. Critical tasks include establishing and…

  20. Plan for radiological security at a university health center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huiaman Mendoza, G.M.; Sanchez Riojas, M.M.; Felix JImenez, D.

    1998-01-01

    This work shows a radiological security plan applied to a Basic Radiological Service at a university health center. Factors taken into account were installation designs, equipment operation parameters, work procedures, image system and responsibilities

  1. Memphis State University Center for Nuclear Studies progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This quarterly report outlines the progress made by the Center for Nuclear Studies at Memphis State University in the development of specialized educational programs for the nuclear industry through the month of February, 1976

  2. The University and College Counseling Center and Malpractice Suits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimak, Richard E.; Berkowitz, Stanley R.

    1983-01-01

    Provides the university and college counseling center with management suggestions for and discussion of malpractice suits regarding issues that refer to sexual abuse, potentially dangerous, and suicidal clients. (Author/RC)

  3. The New Public Management and gender equality policies in Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Castaño Collado

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gender equality policies at European universities have been introduced in the context of reforms of higher education aimed at the implementation of market logic in the management of higher education (New Public Management. Greater transparency and mechanisms of competitiveness could call into question the traditional systems of production and reproduction of male power in universities. This article analyzes the experience of some countries that have preceded Spain in the implementation of equality policies in parallel with policies of transparency and competitiveness. Our goal is to draw conclusions that are useful for public policy.

  4. University of Utah, Energy Commercialization Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, James [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-01-17

    During the Energy Commercialization Center’s (ECC) three years in operation, the only thing constant was change. The world of commercialization and cleantech evolved significantly during the time the ECC was formed and operating, including: the availability of cleantech funding lessoned, the growth of incubators and accelerators skyrocketed, the State of Utah created an office dedicated to energy development, the University of Utah was both praised and criticized for its success in commercialization, and the Federal government temporarily shut down. During the three-year grant there were three principle investigators on the grant, as well as three directors for the University’s Commercialization Office. Change can be hard for an organization,but as we instruct the companies we support, “Fail fast and fail often, because it is the fastest path to success.” Although there were some unanticipated challenges along the way, the local ecosystem is stronger because of the ECC’s efforts. Perhaps the greatest lesson learned was the importance of aligned incentives between key stakeholders in the commercialization process and the need for resources at the company and individual entrepreneur levels. The universities have systems and incentives to commercialize technologies, but creating value and companies generally rest with the individuals and entrepreneurs. Unfortunately the ECC was unable to create a viable mechanism to transfer the commercialization process that successfully aligned incentives and achieve a more effective ecosystem within the Rocky Mountain West. However, the ECC was successful in adding value to the individual ecosystems, and connecting national resources to regional and local needs. Regarding the ECC’s effectiveness in developing a cleantech commercialization ecosystem, initial inroads and relationships were established with key stakeholders. However, incentives, perceived or real competition, differences in commercialization processes, and

  5. Use of Expedited Partner Therapy for Sexually Transmitted Diseases in College and University Health Centers in the United States, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Ryan; Martinez, Nina; Roberts, Craig; Habel, Melissa A; Leino, E Victor; Leichliter, Jami S

    2015-10-01

    We examined expedited partner therapy for chlamydia and gonorrhea in college and university health centers by institutional and policy characteristics. Expedited partner therapy awareness and use was low (44.1% used), did not differ by institutional characteristics, and differed by policy environment. Our findings suggest missed opportunities for sexually transmitted disease prevention in college and university health centers.

  6. Library Technology Centers and Community Building: Yale University Library Electronic Text Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg-Hart, Diane Y.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses various communities that have contributed to the development of the Yale University Library Electronic Text Center (ETC) and describes the evolution of the ETC from a center for the support of electronic texts in the humanities to an electronic resource center providing support in the creation of World Wide Web resources. (LRW)

  7. Ethics Centers' Activities and Role in Promoting Ethics in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safatly, Lise; Itani, Hiba; El-Hajj, Ali; Salem, Dania

    2017-01-01

    In modern and well-structured universities, ethics centers are playing a key role in hosting, organizing, and managing activities to enrich and guide students' ethical thinking and analysis. This paper presents a comprehensive survey of the goals, activities, and administration of ethics centers, as well as their role in promoting ethical thinking…

  8. International Students, University Health Centers, and Memorable Messages about Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, Heather J.; Bedi, Shireen; Heiss, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    International students entering US universities often experience a variety of important socialization messages. One important message is learning about and using the US health system. International students often first encounter the US health system through their experiences with university health centers. The authors explore the memorable…

  9. From Policy to Practice: Implementation of Water Policies in Child Care Centers in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Ann E.; Henderson, Kathryn E.; Schwartz, Marlene B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Child care policies may contribute to healthy beverage consumption patterns. This study documented availability and accessibility of water and correspondence with state and federal policy and accreditation standards in child care centers. Design: One-day observations were conducted in a random sample of 40 Child and Adult Care Food…

  10. Translating Language Policy into Practice: Language and Culture Policy at a Dutch University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Kevin; Dijk, Anje

    2016-01-01

    The CEFR will only achieve its potential in higher education if it is embedded in a meaningful way in the wider processes of the university. One means of embedding the CEFR is through policy, and in this article we report the development of a language policy in the broader context of internationalization at a Dutch university. We describe some the…

  11. Checklist "Open Access Policies": Analysis of the Open Access Policies of Public Universities in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bauer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This checklist provides an overview of the Open Access policies implemented at Austrian universities and extramural research institutions. Furthermore, the polices adopted at nine public universities are analyzed and the respective text modules are categorized thematically. The second part of the checklist presents measures for the promotion of Open Access following the implementation of an Open Access policy.

  12. Getting Into Neutral: Climate Policy and the University

    OpenAIRE

    William Shobe

    2008-01-01

    On March 11, 2008 the University of Virginia Faculty Senate voted in favor of having the university take steps to make it climate neutral. This paper examines whether such a policy is feasible, and further whether pursuing a policy of climate neutrality is likely the best way to spend university resources, if the goal is to reduce the university’s carbon footprint. A revised version of this paper was published as Going Green: The inconvenient truth about U.Va.\\'s carbon neutrality initiativ...

  13. Customer-Centered Structuring in University Libraries and Personnel Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Yılmaz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management (TQM aims at creating a client-centered organizati- on and providing customer satisfaction. This study reviews TQM and its applica- tions in university libraries and examines employees' satisfaction with their work respectively. It was hypothesized that library personnel is not satisfıed because university libraries lack customer-centered (users and personnel structuring. Survey method was used to gather data. The questionnaire was administered to the 66 employees of Hacettepe University (HU libraries. High-level administra- tors of HU libraries were also interviewed. Data w ere analyzed using “t test” and “one-way analysis ofvariance (ANOVA”.

  14. TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS TO SOCIETY BY UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. JOHNS

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of knowledge in the global economy and reviews the process in which knowledge is applied to develop innovations. It confirms the importance of innovation as a key factor for success in today's competitive environment. The paper discusses the contributions a university can make to the innovation process in the field of transportation, and offers a vision of how a university center can enhance and facilitate these contributions. It then describes the efforts of one center, including three examples of innovations facilitated by the center in traffic detection, regional planning, and pavement management. The paper concludes with suggestions that would strengthen the societal contributions of university transportation centers.

  15. Utilization of electronic communication (E-mail) with patients at university and college health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neinstein, L

    2000-07-01

    To examine the utilization and potential uses and problems of electronic communication with patients. University and college health centers were surveyed about the type of utilization and policies of electronic communication with patients. The survey group consisted of 99 health centers predominantly serving students representing small-, medium-, and large-sized public and private colleges and universities. Eighty-nine health centers completed the survey. Of the responding health centers, 63.6% use some form of electronic communication with patients. Twenty-seven percent of the health centers give out some form of medical advice via E-mail or the Internet; 14.7% give out some laboratory results via E-mail; 3.4% make appointments via E-mail; and 63.6% give out administrative advice by E-mail. While there was consistent concern expressed about confidentiality and security, only five health centers had a policy about electronic communication. Uses were most common in nonclinical areas but did include health education, Web sites, medical advice, laboratory results, appointment-making or confirmation, and contacting hard-to-reach patients including those studying abroad. While electronic communication with patients was common, provision of direct medical advice was less common. Issues receiving little attention include determining the types of electronic communication that is acceptable to staff and students, determining the level of security of their current information system, educating staff about confidentiality and security issues, and establishing a comprehensive policy regarding electronic communication with patients.

  16. Language Policy and Planning: Challenges for Latin American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Rainer Enrique; Álvarez López, Elisa; Carvalhal, Tatiana Pereira

    2016-01-01

    This article starts with an overview of the sociolinguistic situation in Latin America as a context for language policy and planning (LPP) decisions in the academic field. Then it gives a brief overview of the language policy challenges faced by universities to cope with neoliberal internationalisation. A conceptualisation of the domain as a…

  17. Alumni access policies in public university libraries | Burclaff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the current library access policies for alumni at a public university system using document analysis, observations and interviews. We found that alumni are specifically addressed in only two library access policies, and borrowing privileges through cards, on-site access and restricted access to electronic ...

  18. Issues on Serials Policy Formulation for Nigerian University Libraries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses the need and importance of serial policy statement as a guide to providing balanced, relevant and up to date information for quality academic exercise particularly in the area of teaching and research work. The paper formulated and presents a serial policy statement for adoption by Nigerian university ...

  19. Sprogpolitik for Roskilde Universitet/Language Policy for Roskilde University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karsten; Klitgård, Ida; Hvidtfeldt, Susanne

    sammenhænge. Roskilde University’s International Education Strategy was passed in 2012. Part of the strategy said the Roskilde University must implement a new language policy. The language policy will contribute to Roskilde University as a workplace with room for people from various cultures and places....... The policy stipulates that Danish is the university’s main language (Swedish and Norwegian can be use on an equal footing with Danish) , that English is our common secondary language, and that other languages can be used when relevant....

  20. Evidence-Informed Leadership in the Japanese Context: Middle Managers at a University Self-Access Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, John; Brown, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the steering of a self-access learning center in a Japanese university by its "middle management" committee over the first years of its operation. Middle management practice was informed by an ethnographic archive of various facets of center use, particularly concerning language policy and curriculum integration, issues about…

  1. [The health policy of the Paul Verlaine University-Metz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Students represent a population group that is for the most part in good health. However, students also face specific stresses and constraints that are likely to make it difficult for them to adapt to student life, and these adjustments can lead to unhealthy behaviours. Within Universities, the implementation of a coherent health policy must aim to positively impact on the development of both the professional and daily lives of young adults. The University of Paul Verlaine in Metz (France) has taken this perspective on board, and under the leadership of its social health department, the whole University has adopted a comprehensive policy for student well-being under the five action areas of the Ottawa Charter. This approach to well-being as a public policy strategy, through the Healthy Life policy, is central to all decisions taken at the Metz University and throughout the Regional Centre for Scholars and University Students (CROUS) in Lorraine. A number of facilities dedicated to students' health and well-being have been created in this supporting environment, and the engagement of students in the Healthy Life policy (some students 'relay' the information, others are 'peer educators') show that they are involved in the community life of the University. The introduction of teaching modules by the University's health department has given access to training to increase students' awareness of the concept of a holistic approach to health. Finally students have had improved access to healthcare services thanks to an increase in the number of activities provided by the student health department focusing on common problems experienced by university students.

  2. Electronic Commerce Resource Centers. An Industry--University Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Thomas R.; Sommer, Rainer; Tarimcilar, M. Murat

    1999-01-01

    Electronic Commerce Resource Centers focus on transferring emerging technologies to small businesses through university/industry partnerships. Successful implementation hinges on a strategic operating plan, creation of measurable value for customers, investment in customer-targeted training, and measurement of performance outputs. (SK)

  3. A Report of the Center for Continuing Education, Drake University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Clarence H., Ed.

    With assistance from Title I of the Higher Education Act, a two-day workshop for counselors in Iowa was sponsored by the Center for Continuing Education at Drake University. Proceedings of the workshop, reported in this publication, include four interlocking dimensions: (1) the counselor's role in vocational decision making, (2) the counselor's…

  4. Rice University: Building an Academic Center for Nonprofit Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaworth, Angela

    2012-01-01

    According to the author, the setting for their nonprofit education center was close to ideal: Support from a dean who cares deeply about nonprofit organizations; encouragement from the university and its renewed focus on reaching beyond its walls on the eve of its centennial; and a generous gift from alumni who have been affiliated with the…

  5. UAE University Students' Awareness of Using the Writing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Murshidi, Ghadah; Al Abd, Kholood

    2014-01-01

    Writing has always been regarded as playing a prominent role in learning a second language. UAE university writing center provides a key support service within the institution, and as such must find ways to evaluate the impact of the instruction they provide. However, many studies of tutorial effectiveness lack adequate analyses of tutorial…

  6. Walk-In Triage Systems in University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Katharine S.; Love, Michael M.; Chapman, Kelsey M.; Horn, Angela J.; Haak, Patricia P.; Shen, Claire Y. W.

    2017-01-01

    To meet the complex mental health needs of students, some university counseling centers (UCCs) have implemented walk-in triage intake systems, which have not yet been empirically investigated. This study compared client and clinician differences (N = 5564) between a traditional scheduled intake system (Year 1) and a walk-in triage system (Year 2)…

  7. Integrating Mindfulness Meditation within a University Counseling Center Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurash, Cheryl; Schaul, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    This paper documents the development of a mindfulness meditation component within a University Counseling Center setting. The specific focus is upon the inclusion of meditation as it pertains to both organizational structure and psychotherapy training. The integration of a meditation practice into any organization is a slow process that poses…

  8. Translating language policy into practice: Language and culture policy at a Dutch university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haines, Kevin; Dijk, Anje

    2016-01-01

    The CEFR will only achieve its potential in higher education if it is embedded in a meaningful way in the wider processes of the university. One means of embedding the CEFR is through policy, and in this article we report the development of a language policy in the broader context of

  9. European University Students' Experiences and Attitudes toward Campus Alcohol Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hal, Guido; Tavolacci, Marie-Pierre; Stock, Christiane

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many studies indicate that a substantial part of the student population drinks excessively, yet most European universities do not have an alcohol policy. In the absence of an alcohol guideline at universities and the easy access to alcohol sold at the student cafeteria, for instance......, students recognized that alcohol was a big problem on their campuses yet they knew very little, if any, about the rules concerning alcohol on their campus. CONCLUSIONS: Students will not support an on campus alcohol restriction and a policy should therefore focus on prevention initiatives....

  10. The value of a writing center at a medical university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariail, Jennie; Thomas, Suzanne; Smith, Tom; Kerr, Lisa; Richards-Slaughter, Shannon; Shaw, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Students often enter graduate healthcare/biomedical schools with insufficient undergraduate instruction in effective writing, yet the ability to write well affects their career opportunities in health care and in scientific research. The present study was conducted to determine the value and effectiveness of instruction by faculty with expertise in teaching writing at a writing center at an academic health science center. Two separate sources of data were collected and analyzed. First, an anonymous campus-wide survey assessed students' satisfaction and utilization of the university's Writing Center. Second, a nonexperimental objective study was conducted comparing a subsample of students who used versus those who did not receive instruction at the Writing Center on quality of writing, as determined by an evaluator who was blind to students' utilization status. From the campus-wide survey, more than 90% of respondents who used the center (which was 26% of the student body) agreed that it was a valuable and effective resource. From the objective study of writing quality, students who used the Writing Center were twice as likely as students who did not to receive an A grade on the written assignment, and the blinded evaluator accurately estimated which students used the Writing Center based on the clarity of writing. The instruction at the Writing Center at our university is highly valued by students, and its value is further supported by objective evidence of efficacy. Such a center offers the opportunity to provide instruction that medical and other healthcare students increasingly need without requiring additions to existing curricula. By developing competency in writing, students prepare for scholarly pursuits, and through the process of writing, they engage critical thinking skills that can make them more attuned to narrative and more reflective and empathetic in the clinical setting.

  11. IMPACT OF ROMANIAN HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING POLICY ON UNIVERSITY EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRETAN Georgiana Camelia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The issues of higher education funding policy and university operating efficiency are hot points on the actual public agenda worldwide as the pressures exercised upon the public resources increased, especially in the aftermath of the last economic crisis. Concerned with the improvement of the funding mechanism through which government allocates the public funds in order to meet the national core objectives within the area of higher education, the policy makers adjusted the funding policy by diversifying the criteria used in distributing the funds to public universities. Thus, the aim of this research is to underline both the impact and the consequences the public funding patterns of higher education have on the relative efficiency of public funded higher education institutions, across time. Moreover, the research conducted aims to determine whether the changes occurred within the Romanian public funding methodology of higher education institutions improved the relative efficiency scores of public funded universities, before and after the economic crisis of 2008. Thus, on one hand we have underlined the changes brought to the Romanian public funding mechanism of higher education during the years of 2007, 2009 and 2010 compared to the year of 2006, using the content analysis, and on the other hand we assessed and compared the relative efficiency scores of each selected public funded university using a multiple input - multiple output linear programming model, by employing the Data Envelopment Analysis technique. The findings of the research undertaken emphasized that a more performance oriented funding mechanism improves the efficiency scores of public universities. The results of the research undertaken could be used either by the policy makers within the area of higher education or by the administrative management of public universities in order to correlate the funding with the results obtained and/or the objectives assumed by both the

  12. University of Rhode Island Regional Earth Systems Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothstein, Lewis [Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Cornillon, P. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The primary objective of this program was to establish the URI Regional Earth System Center (“Center”) that would enhance overall societal wellbeing (health, financial, environmental) by utilizing the best scientific information and technology to achieve optimal policy decisions with maximum stakeholder commitment for energy development, coastal environmental management, water resources protection and human health protection, while accelerating regional economic growth. The Center was to serve to integrate existing URI institutional strengths in energy, coastal environmental management, water resources, and human wellbeing. This integrated research, educational and public/private sector outreach Center was to focus on local, state and regional resources. The centerpiece activity of the Center was in the development and implementation of integrated assessment models (IAMs) that both ‘downscaled’ global observations and interpolated/extrapolated regional observations for analyzing the complexity of interactions among humans and the natural climate system to further our understanding and, ultimately, to predict the future state of our regional earth system. The Center was to begin by first ‘downscaling’ existing global earth systems management tools for studying the causes of local, state and regional climate change and potential social and environmental consequences, with a focus on the regional resources identified above. The Center would ultimately need to address the full feedbacks inherent in the nonlinear earth systems by quantifying the “upscaled” impacts of those regional changes on the global earth system. Through an interacting suite of computer simulations that are informed by observations from the nation’s evolving climate observatories, the Center activities integrates climate science, technology, economics, and social policy into forecasts that will inform solutions to pressing issues in regional climate change science,

  13. The Networked University: The Structure, Culture, and Policy of Universities in a Changing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    The universities in Europe are finding themselves in a turbulent environment. They are exposed to global and European developments. This article links changes in the structure, culture, and policy of universities to these developments and changes in the broader-than-national environment. The central question is, in short: what is globalisation…

  14. The effects of China's universal two-child policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Hesketh, Therese

    2016-10-15

    In October, 2015, China's one-child policy was replaced by a universal two-child policy. The effects of the new policy are inevitably speculative, but predictions can be made based on recent trends. The population increase will be relatively small, peaking at 1·45 billion in 2029 (compared with a peak of 1·4 billion in 2023 if the one-child policy continued). The new policy will allow almost all Chinese people to have their preferred number of children. The benefits of the new policy include: a large reduction in abortions of unapproved pregnancies, virtual elimination of the problem of unregistered children, and a more normal sex ratio. All of these effects should improve health outcomes. Effects of the new policy on the shrinking workforce and rapid population ageing will not be evident for two decades. In the meantime, more sound policy actions are needed to meet the social, health, and care needs of the elderly population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Academic Freedom and University Autonomy: A Higher Education Policy Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kai; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    This article reflects upon three seminal articles published in "Higher Education Policy" ("HEP") on academic freedom and university autonomy. The reflections indicate that "HEP" research contributes to a sophisticated and systematic understanding of the complexity of academic freedom, addressing both the original…

  16. The Center for Adventist Research at Andrews University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Dwain Robertson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Center for Adventist Research (CAR, an Andrews University and General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist organization, seeks to promote an understanding and appreciation of the heritage and mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church (SDA. It combines the resources of the James White Library’s Adventist Heritage Center and the Ellen G. White Estate Branch Office to provide the most extensive collection of Adventist related resources in the world, both physically and digitally. An introduction to the background, collections, and activities of CAR is presented. Of particular interest are the digitization projects.

  17. Polar Science Weekend: A University / Science Center Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, H. L.; Moritz, R. E.; Lettvin, E.; Schatz, D.; Russell, L.

    2008-12-01

    Polar Science Weekend (PSW) is a four-day event featuring hands-on activities, live demonstrations, and a variety of exhibits about the polar regions and current polar research, presented by scientists from the University of Washington's Polar Science Center, and held at Seattle's Pacific Science Center. PSW was conceived and organized jointly by the Polar Science Center and Pacific Science Center, which is Washington State's most well-attended museum. The first PSW in March 2006 drew over 5000 visitors, and subsequent PSWs in 2007 and 2008 have both surpassed that figure. The success of this university / science center partnership has made PSW an annual event, and has served as a model for Pacific Science Center's Portal to the Public program, in which partnerships with other scientific institutions have been built. Researchers at the Polar Science Center (PSC) study the physical processes controlling high-latitude oceans, atmosphere, sea ice, and ice sheets, and are involved in numerous IPY projects. PSC scientists also engage in many outreach efforts such as classroom visits and public lectures, but PSW stands out as the highlight of the year. The partnership with Pacific Science Center brings access to facilities, publicity, and a large audience that would not otherwise be readily available to PSC. Pacific Science Center, constructed for the 1962 World's Fair in Seattle, serves more than one million visitors per year. Pacific Science Center's mission is to inspire a lifelong interest in science, math and technology by engaging diverse communities through interactive and innovative exhibits and programs. PSW helps to advance this mission by bringing students, teachers, and families face-to-face with scientists who work in some of the most remote and challenging places on earth, to learn first-hand about polar research in a fun and informal setting. This is made possible only by the partnership with PSC. In this talk we will present descriptions and photos of PSW

  18. The University of Miami Center for Oceans and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, L. E.; Smith, S. L.; Minnett, P. J.

    2007-05-01

    Two recent major reports on the health of the oceans in the United States have warned that coastal development and population pressures are responsible for the dramatic degradation of U.S. ocean and coastal environments. The significant consequences of this increased population density, particularly in sub/tropical coastal regions, can be seen in recent weather events: Hurricanes Andrew, Ivan, and Katrina in the US Gulf of Mexico states, and the Tsunami in Southeast Asia in December 2004, all causing significant deaths and destruction. Microbial contamination, man-made chemicals, and a variety of harmful algal blooms and their toxins are increasingly affecting the health of coastal human populations via the seafood supply, as well as the commercial and recreational use of coastal marine waters. At the same time, there has been the realization that the oceans are a source of unexplored biological diversity able to provide medicinal, as well as nutritional, benefits. Therefore, the exploration and preservation of the earth's oceans have significant worldwide public health implications for current and future generations. The NSF/NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health Center (COHH) at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School and its collaborators builds on several decades of collaborative and interdisciplinary research, education, and training to address the NIEHS-NSF research initiative in Oceans and Human Health. The COHH focuses on issues relevant to the Southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as global Sub/Tropical areas worldwide, to integrate interdisciplinary research between biomedical and oceanographic scientists. The Center includes three Research Projects: (1) research into the application of toxic algal culture, toxin analysis, remote sensing, oceanography, and genomics to subtropical/tropical Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) organism and toxin distribution; (2) exploring the interaction between functional genomics and oceanography of the subtropical

  19. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) TRIGA Reactor Conversion so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. This workshop was held in conjunction with a similar workshop for the University of Florida Reactor Conversion. Some of the generic lessons from that workshop are included in this report for completeness.

  20. Policy processes underpinning universal health insurance in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui T. T. Ha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In almost 30 years since economic reforms or ‘renovation’ (Doimoi were launched, Vietnam has achieved remarkably good health results, in many cases matching those in much higher income countries. This study explores the contribution made by Universal Health Insurance (UHI policies, focusing on the past 15 years. We conducted a mixed method study to describe and assess the policy process relating to health insurance, from agenda setting through implementation and evaluation. Design: The qualitative research methods implemented in this study were 30 in-depth interviews, 4 focus group discussions, expert consultancy, and 420 secondary data review. The data were analyzed by NVivo 7.0. Results: Health insurance in Vietnam was introduced in 1992 and has been elaborated over a 20-year time frame. These processes relate to moving from a contingent to a gradually expanded target population, expanding the scope of the benefit package, and reducing the financial contribution from the insured. The target groups expanded to include 66.8% of the population by 2012. We characterized the policy process relating to UHI as incremental with a learning-by-doing approach, with an emphasis on increasing coverage rather than ensuring a basic service package and financial protection. There was limited involvement of civil society organizations and users in all policy processes. Intertwined political economy factors influenced the policy processes. Conclusions: Incremental policy processes, characterized by a learning-by-doing approach, is appropriate for countries attempting to introduce new health institutions, such as health insurance in Vietnam. Vietnam should continue to mobilize resources in sustainable and viable ways to support the target groups. The country should also adopt a multi-pronged approach to achieving universal access to health services, beyond health insurance.

  1. Policy processes underpinning universal health insurance in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Bui T T; Frizen, Scott; Thi, Le M; Duong, Doan T T; Duc, Duong M

    2014-01-01

    In almost 30 years since economic reforms or 'renovation' (Doimoi) were launched, Vietnam has achieved remarkably good health results, in many cases matching those in much higher income countries. This study explores the contribution made by Universal Health Insurance (UHI) policies, focusing on the past 15 years. We conducted a mixed method study to describe and assess the policy process relating to health insurance, from agenda setting through implementation and evaluation. The qualitative research methods implemented in this study were 30 in-depth interviews, 4 focus group discussions, expert consultancy, and 420 secondary data review. The data were analyzed by NVivo 7.0. Health insurance in Vietnam was introduced in 1992 and has been elaborated over a 20-year time frame. These processes relate to moving from a contingent to a gradually expanded target population, expanding the scope of the benefit package, and reducing the financial contribution from the insured. The target groups expanded to include 66.8% of the population by 2012. We characterized the policy process relating to UHI as incremental with a learning-by-doing approach, with an emphasis on increasing coverage rather than ensuring a basic service package and financial protection. There was limited involvement of civil society organizations and users in all policy processes. Intertwined political economy factors influenced the policy processes. Incremental policy processes, characterized by a learning-by-doing approach, is appropriate for countries attempting to introduce new health institutions, such as health insurance in Vietnam. Vietnam should continue to mobilize resources in sustainable and viable ways to support the target groups. The country should also adopt a multi-pronged approach to achieving universal access to health services, beyond health insurance.

  2. Net Resource Assessment (NetRA): A Collaborative Effort Between USGS Science and Decisions Center, the Science Impact Laboratory for Policy and Economics (University of New Mexico) and Sandia National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookshire, D.; Bernknopf, R.; Adhikari, D. R.; Babis, C.; Broadbent, C. D.; Tidwell, V. C.

    2015-12-01

    Department of Interior Secretarial Order No. 3330, "… establishes a Department-wide mitigation strategy that will ensure consistency and efficiency in the review and permitting of infrastructure development projects and in conserving our Nation's valuable natural and cultural resources." The USGS Organic Act authorizes resource assessments to estimate the in-place potential capacity of energy, mineral, hydrologic, and biologic resources (20 Stat. 394; 43 U.S.C. 31) and later amendments. These two statements form the basis for the development of the Net Resources Assessment (NetRA) framework. NetRA is a policy-relevant, interdisciplinary approach to assessing natural resources availability in examining the regional-scale interrelationships between energy or mineral extraction and impact on ecosystem services. The systems dynamics approach (SD) emphasizes the interdependence of natural resource development and its effect on collocated ecosystem services over space and time. The example of the NetRA that will be presented focuses on tradeoffs associated with land management decisions in the West. The Piceance Basin, CO example that will be discussed involves development of a continuous gas deposit and its impact on Mule Deer and water quality. The SD is the hub for generating a range of simulated landscape outcomes. The probabilistic model provides an economic indicator as to the expected net societal benefit of economic development and biophysical indicators for ecosystem services affected in the region. Both natural and economic indicators are associated with each outcome via a tradeoff analysis the can be used for risk analysis. The NetRA also retains map attributes for before and after map comparisons to specific alternatives for an existing baseline. The model has three stages: map-based scenario development with slider bars (choice variables), side-by-side extraction and ecosystem services sub-models, and integrated multiple resource trade-off outcomes.

  3. Jefferson InterProfessional Education Center, Thomas Jefferson University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenson, Christine; Rose, Molly; Lyons, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson University initiated the Jefferson InterProfessional Education Center in early 2007. The Center facilitates many diverse student and faculty projects on interprofessional education yearly. Faculty development programs include, most recently, the second Jefferson Interprofessional Education conference, IPE scholarly lecture series, an IPE and care practicum, and multiple lecture/discussions to select faculty/administrative groups. At present, there is no external funding for any of the programs. The Health Mentor Program is one of the major student programs. It is a required two-year longitudinal interprofessional chronic illness program for all medical, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, pharmacy and couples and family therapy students. It began in the fall of 2007 and is integrated into existing coursework in each of the participating disciplines.

  4. University of Florida lightning research at the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uman, Martin A.; Thomson, Ewen M.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of basic and applied research programs are being conducted at the Kennedy Space Center. As an example of this research, the paper describes the University of Florida program to characterize the electric and magnetic fields of lightning and the coupling of those fields to utility power lines. Specifically, detailed consideration is given to the measurements of horizontal and vertical electric fields made during the previous three summers at KSC and the simultaneous measurements of the voltages on a 500 m test line made during the past two summers at KSC. Theory to support these measurements is also presented.

  5. Analysis of selected policies towards universal health coverage in Uganda: the policy implementation barometer protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoro, Charles; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Twalo, Thembinkosi; Mwendera, Chikondi; Douglas, Mbuyiselo; Mukuru, Moses; Kasasa, Simon; Ssengooba, Freddie

    2018-01-01

    Policy implementation remains an under researched area in most low and middle income countries and it is not surprising that several policies are implemented without a systematic follow up of why and how they are working or failing. This study is part of a larger project called Supporting Policy Engagement for Evidence-based Decisions (SPEED) for Universal Health Coverage in Uganda. It seeks to support policymakers monitor the implementation of vital programmes for the realisation of policy goals for Universal Health Coverage. A Policy Implementation Barometer (PIB) is proposed as a mechanism to provide feedback to the decision makers about the implementation of a selected set of policy programmes at various implementation levels (macro, meso and micro level). The main objective is to establish the extent of implementation of malaria, family planning and emergency obstetric care policies in Uganda and use these results to support stakeholder engagements for corrective action. This is the first PIB survey of the three planned surveys and its specific objectives include: assessment of the perceived appropriateness of implementation programmes to the identified policy problems; determination of enablers and constraints to implementation of the policies; comparison of on-line and face-to-face administration of the PIB questionnaire among target respondents; and documentation of stakeholder responses to PIB findings with regard to corrective actions for implementation. The PIB will be a descriptive and analytical study employing mixed methods in which both quantitative and qualitative data will be systematically collected and analysed. The first wave will focus on 10 districts and primary data will be collected through interviews. The study seeks to interview 570 respondents of which 120 will be selected at national level with 40 based on each of the three policy domains, 200 from 10 randomly selected districts, and 250 from 50 facilities. Half of the respondents at

  6. Social Media And Libraries In View Of Sabancı University Information Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Özel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on how a university library / information center should use social media tools. The importance of sharing in social media with users has been expressed in the example of Sabancı University Information Center.

  7. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorland, William [University of Maryland

    2014-11-18

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical report describes the physics results from the UMD CMPD.

  8. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This Annual Report covers the research activities and the technical developments of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, for the period from April 1988 to March 1989. Laborious work of refreshing 12UD has continued throughout the year, in parallel with the regular machine-time service. Almost 95% of the work has been completed by the end of March 1989. At the time of writing this manuscript, 12UD is running up modestly beyond 11.0MV, raising joyous murmur of pellet chains. She has recovered up to the hilt. In spite of the considerable time consumed by the refreshing, the total machine-time has exceeded 3,000 hours. Activities at the Center covered a wide area of research field, viz. 1) nuclear spectroscopy of transitional nuclei, 2) heavy ion fusion and fission processes, 3) polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions, 4) charge exchange process in atomic collisions, 5) application of energetic heavy ions to investigating solid-state physics, and 6) effect of ion-irradiation on the fatigue properties of metal. Theoretical work pertinent to the nuclear structure is also included in this report. Prospects for a project attempting to equip the Center with a crystal-ball spectrometer is, at least, not gloomy. First streaks of light seems to begin glimmering. (author)

  9. Advantages of a Universal and Generous Family Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Since WWII Europeans have enjoyed a cumulative expansion of social citizenship rights. The sequencing of types of entitlement is the same everywhere, and family benefits are the last to be granted indicating a well-developed welfare society. Societies vary with respect to extension of family...... allowances, child and elderly care and tax policies towards families. The Scandinavian region is a for-runner because of a combined effort of generous universal transfers and services, which has led a family (or women) friendly welfare state. The result is a high female labor market participation rate since...... generous policies allow women both to be mothers and workers and has resulted in a relatively high absolute fertility rate of 1.9; up from 1.4 in 1983 when the expansion of social services for families took off. The family welfare package has also resulted in low child poverty. Unfortunately, Scandinavian...

  10. Joint development utility and university and utility and research center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Roberto del Giudice R.; Valgas, Helio Moreira [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This paper shows the background acquired by CEMIG in dealing with projects associated with R and D (Research and Development), carried out as a result of the establishment of contracts or governants with universities and research center for direct application on the solution of problems related to the operation of the system, within the scope of electrical operation planning. The various aspects of a project of this nature such as legal questions, characterization of a contract or a covenant, main developments and new opportunity areas should be covered. Finally the subject shall be dealt with under the Total Quality approach, involving the proposition of control items associated to the process and goals to be reached. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs.

  11. University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center opportunities for improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Tara M; Waldinger, Marcy; Silver, Samuel M

    2014-02-01

    The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMCCC) Opportunities for Improvement project involved a detailed patient-level medical record review, feedback to medical providers and clinical leadership, and discussion of potential predictors of discordant or delayed care. The medical record review revealed that reasons for discordant or delayed care were well documented by clinical providers, and medical comorbidity was the most common predisposing factor. Another common theme was the difficulty in obtaining treatment records for patients who received a portion of their care outside UMCCC. The project provided a valuable opportunity to examine established processes of care and data collection and consider how the newly implemented electronic health record might support future efforts aimed at improving efficiency and communication among providers.

  12. Diversity leadership: the Rush University Medical Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, J R

    2010-01-01

    Meeting the challenges of diversity is crucial, and within healthcare organizations a particularly strong case exists for a diversity strategy. Rush University Medical Center in 2006 was at an important juncture. Since its founding, the organization had made notable progress toward advancing diversity and inclusiveness. On the other hand, many diversity-related problems continued. Rush convened a committee to review the work of the institution in this area. The committee's report called for changes, and a Diversity Leadership Group (DLG) model was established. This article documents the progress made since 2006 through implementation of the DLG model. The changes prescribed for Rush are presented as recommendations and challenges that other healthcare organizations may find applicable to their own institutions.

  13. Towards Patient-Centered Conflicts of Interest Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Young

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Financial conflicts of interest exist between industry and physicians, and these relationships have the power to influence physicians’ medical practice. Transparency about conflicts matters for ensuring adequate informed consent, controlling healthcare expenditure, and encouraging physicians’ reflection on professionalism. The US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS launched the Open Payments Program (OPP to publicly disclose and bring transparency to the relationships between industry and physicians in the United States. We set out to explore user awareness of the database and the ease of accessibility to disclosed information, however, as we show, both awareness and actual use are very low. Two practical policies can greatly enhance its intended function and help alleviate ethical tension. The first is to provide data for individual physicians not merely in absolute terms, but in meaningful context, that is, in relation to the zip code, city, and state averages. The second increases access to the OPP dataset by adding hyperlinks from physicians’ professional websites directly to their Open Payments disclosure pages. These changes considerably improve transparency and the utility of available data, and can furthermore enhance professionalism and accountability by encouraging physicians to reflect more actively on their own practices.

  14. The Stocker AstroScience Center at Florida International University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The new Stocker AstroScience Center located on the MMC campus at Florida International University in Miami Florida represents a unique facility for STEM education that arose from a combination of private, State and university funding. The building, completed in the fall of 2013, contains some unique spaces designed not only to educate, but also to inspire students interested in science and space exploration. The observatory consists of a 4-story building (3 floors) with a 24” ACE automated telescope in an Ash dome, and an observing platform above surrounding buildings. Some of the unique features of the observatory include an entrance/exhibition hall with a 6-ft glass tile floor mural linking the Florida climate to space travel, a state-of-the art telescope control that looks like a starship bridge, and displays such as “Music from the universe”. The observatory will also be the focus of our extensive public outreach program that is entering its 20 year.

  15. Actions for the Construction of a University Policy in Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Yaneth González Pinzón

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17227/01234870.41folios143.155 This article aims at reporting some of the findings of a research study conducted at Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Bogotá (PUJ-Bogotá, as part of a multi-case study carried out by thirteen universities in Colombia which belong to the academic group Red de Lectura y Escritura en Educación Superior (REDLESS. In this study, students’ initial preparation in reading and writing is characterized in order to identify its impact on their subsequent academic development. To do so, student’s development during the final two years at high school (Educación Media was first analyzed along with their preparation during the first year at university and its possible impact on their academic development during their majors. In addition to these data, the contents of a university course designed to prepare students in literacy was analyzed along with the perceptions of the teachers in charge of it and those of disciplinary courses. The results offered by the intersection of such diverse sources of information are used to make some proposals aimed at consolidating an institutional policy for literacy and other derived factors such as orality and the transformation and construction of knowledge.

  16. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  17. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements

  18. Beyond Foucault: Toward a User-Centered Approach to Sexual Harassment Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Frances J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how United States national policy regarding sexual harassment exemplifies the Foucauldian paradigm in its attempt to regulate sexuality through seemingly authorless texts. Proposes a user-centered approach to policy drafting that values the knowledge of workers as users and makers of workplace policy. Argues that regulation through such…

  19. Effect of Fees Policies on the Quality of University Education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on the findings of a study that was undertaken to analyse the effect of fees policy on the quality of university education in Uganda. It reports that every university in Uganda has a fees policy and that these fees policies differ in content and implementation. The paper confirms a significant relationship ...

  20. Progress and Challenges for Language Policy Implementation at the University of KwaZulu-Natal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndimande-Hlongwa, Nobuhle; Balfour, Robert J.; Mkhize, Nhlanhla; Engelbrecht, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The University of KwaZulu-Natal approved its bilingual language policy in 2006 based on the framework of the National Language Policy for Higher Education of 2002. The guiding principles of this policy suggest that the university develops the use of isiZulu as a language of instruction and communication, in line with recommendations of the…

  1. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuno, K.; Shima, K.; Komatsubara, T.

    1992-09-01

    This annual report includes the research activities and the technical developments carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center in University of Tsukuba for the period from April 1991 to March 1992. Research activities covered the following subjects. Experimental investigations were made on 1) nuclear spectroscopy of high-spin rotational states and high-spin isomers in odd-odd nuclei, anomalous Fermi-coupling constant in the β decay of 35 Ar and the search for new isotopes around the mass number 90; 2) polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions; 3) the application of energetic heavy ions to solid state physics; 4) the properties of defects in metal produced by proton irradiation; 5) the magnetic properties of LiVO 2 by NMR; 6) off line Moessbauer studies; and 7) the mechanism of micro-cluster formation at the surface of material by heavy-ion bombardment. Theoretical work pertinent to the nuclear collective motion and the relativistic mean-field theory is also included in this report. (J.P.N.)

  2. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This annual report covers the work carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, during fiscal year 1984. The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator was operated very stably. In addition, the heavy ion post accelerator with interdigital-H structure has worked well, providing additional energy of 2 MeV per charge for heavy ions. The constructions of a new Lamb-shift polarized ion source, a multi-computer control system for the ion sources of the UTTA, an electrostatic inflection system of incident ions for the UTTA, a new beam bunching system, and a new SF 6 gas handling system were under way. The development and performance test of various radiation detector systems were carried out. Two thirds of the research works were performed by using the beam from the Lamb-shift polarized ion source (PIS). A newly constructed fast spin state interchange control system for the PIS made polarization experiment more effective and accurate. The research activities in the fields of nuclear physics, atomic and solid state physics, and biology and medical science are reported. (Kako, I.)

  3. The potential conflict between policy and ethics in caring for undocumented immigrants at academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacari Stone, Lisa; Steimel, Leah; Vasquez-Guzman, Estela; Kaufman, Arthur

    2014-04-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are at the forefront of delivering care to the diverse medically underserved and uninsured populations in the United States, as well as training the majority of the health care workforce, who are professionally obligated to serve all patients regardless of race or immigration status. Despite AHCs' central leadership role in these endeavors, few consolidated efforts have emerged to resolve potential conflicts between national, state, and local policies that exclude certain classifications of immigrants from receiving federal public assistance and health professionals' social missions and ethical oath to serve humanity. For instance, whereas the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides a pathway to insurance coverage for more than 30 million Americans, undocumented immigrants and legally documented immigrants residing in the United States for less than five years are ineligible for Medicaid and excluded from purchasing any type of coverage through state exchanges. To inform this debate, the authors describe their experience at the University of New Mexico Hospital (UNMH) and discuss how the UNMH has responded to this challenge and overcome barriers. They offer three recommendations for aligning AHCs' social missions and professional ethics with organizational policies: (1) that AHCs determine eligibility for financial assistance based on residency rather than citizenship, (2) that models of medical education and health professions training provide students with service-learning opportunities and applied community experience, and (3) that frontline staff and health care professionals receive standardized training on eligibility policies to minimize discrimination towards immigrant patients.

  4. Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffington, Warren M.; Eggebrecht, James A.

    2007-02-24

    This project benefited the public by assisting manufacturing plants in the United States to save costly energy resources and become more profitable. Energy equivalent to over 75,000 barrels of oil was conserved. The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) visited 96 manufacturing plants and spent 101 days in those plants during the contract period from August 9, 2002, through November 30, 2006. Recommended annual energy savings for manufacturers were 37,400,000 kWh (127,600 MMBtu—site basis) of electricity and 309,000 MCF (309,000 MMBtu) of natural gas. Each manufacturer subsequently was surveyed, and based on these surveys reportedly implemented 79% of the electricity savings and 36% of the natural gas savings for an overall energy savings of 48% of recommended. Almost 800 (798) projects were recommended to manufacturers, and they accomplished two-thirds of the projects. Cost savings recommended were $12.3 million and implemented savings were $5.7 million or 47%. During the contract period our average time between site visit and report submittal averaged 46 days; and decreased from 48 days in 2003 to 44 days in 2006. Serving clients well and promptly has been a priority. We visited five ESA overflow clients during FY 06. The Texas A&M University IAC pioneered the presentation of air pollution information in reports, and includes NOx and CO2 reductions due to energy savings in all reports. We also experimented with formal PowerPoint BestPractices presentations called Lunchtime/Showtime in each plant and with delivering electronic versions of the report. During the period of the contract, the director served on the Texas Industries of the Future (IOF) Refining and Chemicals Committee, which oversaw the showcases in 2003 and 2006. The assistant director was the Executive Director of the International Energy Technology Conference held annually. The director and assistant director became qualified specialists in the Process Heating Assessment Scoping

  5. Perceptions on Information and Communication Technology among the Faculty of a Mexican University: the South University Center of the University of Guadalajara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina López De la Madrid

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It is the faculty members who can generate the greatest changes in universities around the world, based on the establishment of defined policies. On the teachers falls the responsibility of training and orienting students—the primary users of these institutions. The objective of the present study is to define what have been the perceptions and the changes among teaching faculty in the process of implementing information technologies in the South University Center, University of Guadalajara (Mexico. Questionnaires were distributed to 42 of the institution’s 320 teachers. Four areas were addressed: technological infrastructure; teacher training and support; reasons for implementing information and communication technologies; and modification of the teaching/learning process. Based on the surveyees’ answers, categories of analysis were developed; these were used to define the needs of the group. Next a process of research-action was carried out with a group of faculty interested in changing their educational practices; the group members received several different training courses. Most of the professors accepted the implementation of the technologies in their academic programs, although many of them had not put them into practice. On the other hand, they pointed out the importance of having the necessary infrastructure and training support, as well as constant technical, methodological and didactic assistance.

  6. Promoting one health: the University of Missouri Research Center for Human/Animal Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca A

    2013-01-01

    The University of Missouri's College of Veterinary Medicine is home to the Research Center for Human-Animal Interaction. This center uniquely addresses a growing area of research that focuses on how the human-animal bond impacts health in people and animals. This article highlights the One Health basis for the center, several research projects, and future goals for the center.

  7. University-industry research collaborations in Canada: the role of federal policy instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Creso M Sá; Jeffrey Litwin

    2011-01-01

    Canada's research policy has aimed to facilitate technology transfer from universities and induce innovation in industry for the past three decades. This article examines the policy instruments currently employed by the federal government in Canada to stimulate university-industry research linkages. First, the article examines the national landscape of industry R&D and its interface with university research. Then, multiple policy instruments are identified, and their goals and functions are e...

  8. University of Illinois FRIENDS Children’s Environmental Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FRIENDS Children's Environmental Health Center at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, was established in 2001 to investigate the interactive effects of...

  9. Senior Centers and Policy Advocacy: Changing Public Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardasani, Manoj; Goldkind, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    As critical components of the aging continuum of care, senior centers promote older adult health and well-being by providing opportunities for recreation, socialization, nutrition, health education, and access to vital social services. Nationally, a vast network of 11,000 senior centers serves over four million older adults annually. As the United…

  10. University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Interest Compliance Program Doing Business Code of Ethics Office of Health Policy Employee Resources Employee Resources ... Calculators Clinical Practice Algorithms Physicians Network Products Leadership Employer Contracts Network Providers Education For Professionals Prospective Members ...

  11. A Case Study of Gender Neutral Policies in University Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chave, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Gender neutral housing is an innovative new policy being developed in colleges around the country. One reason to create these policies is an attempt to meet the unique needs and challenges of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students. As the number of gender neutral housing policies in the United States continues to rise, research has been…

  12. Universities and the Public Good: A Review of Knowledge Exchange Policy and Related University Practice in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthill, Michael; O'Shea, Éidín; Wilson, Bruce; Viljoen, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Australian policy relating to knowledge exchange has never been well articulated, notwithstanding that the nexus between knowledge, engagement and higher education in Australia has been on the national agenda for several decades (Grattan Institute, 2013). In universities, this policy deficit is reflected in a lack of project management and…

  13. Taming the Anxious Mind: An 8-Week Mindfulness Meditation Group at a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an eight-week mindfulness meditation-based group that took place at a university counseling center. The group is patterned after the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program developed by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn at the Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Group members are taught…

  14. State Tuition, Fees, and Financial Assistance Policies: For Public Colleges and Universities, 2010-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Allison C.; Carnahan, Julie; L'Orange, Hans P.

    2011-01-01

    This report, "State Tuition, Fees, and Financial Assistance Policies for Public Colleges and Universities: 2010-11", examines the philosophies, policies, and procedures that influence decision-making regarding public college and university tuition, student fees, and student financial aid programs. This report also provides information…

  15. Comparative Analysis of Institutional Policy Definitions of Plagiarism: A Pan-Canadian University Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2017-01-01

    This article shares the findings of a study investigating institutional policy definitions of plagiarism at twenty English-speaking Canadian universities. The types of primary sources consulted for this study included: (1) university academic calendars for 2016-2017, (2) institutional policies on academic misconduct, and (3) student academic codes…

  16. Model-Driven Policy Framework for Data Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caba, Cosmin Marius; Kentis, Angelos Mimidis; Soler, José

    2016-01-01

    Data Centers (DCs) continue to become increasingly complex, due to comprising multiple functional entities (e.g. routing, orchestration). Managing the multitude of interconnected components in the DC becomes difficult and error prone, leading to slow service provisioning, lack of QoS support, etc...

  17. Huria: Journal of the Open University of Tanzania: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr. Neville Reuben, Institute of Continuing Education, The Open University of Tanzania Dr. Salim Mohamed Faculty of Business Management, The Open University of Tanzania Dr. Clarence Mgina University of Dar es Salaam Prof. B. Lembariti, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Administration), Muhimbili University of Health and ...

  18. Work/Life Satisfaction Policy in ADVANCE Universities: Assessing Levels of Flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Leslie E.; Dilks, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Work/life satisfaction policies are seen as key to recruiting, retaining, and advancing high quality faculty. This article explores the work/life policies prevalent at NSF ADVANCE institutions (PAID, Catalyst, and IT). We systematically review ADVANCE university websites (N = 124) and rank 9 categories of work/life policy including dual career…

  19. Constructing Outsiders: The Discursive Framing of Access in University Diversity Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Susan V.

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates how discourses circulating in diversity policies reflect and produce perceptions about diversity in higher education. This study, utilizing the method of policy discourse analysis, examines 21 diversity action plans issued at 20 U.S. land-grant universities to understand how these policy documents frame diversity.…

  20. ASSURED CLOUD COMPUTING UNIVERSITY CENTER OFEXCELLENCE (ACC UCOE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-18

    Security Monitors,” MS Thesis, Department of Computer Science , University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, Urbana, IL, August 2015. Approved for...Flow Constraints”, MS Thesis, Department of Computer Science , University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, May 2015. 13. Fangzhou Yao, “ Secure ...infrastructure security -Design of algorithms and techniques for real-time assuredness in cloud computing -Map-reduce task assignment with data locality

  1. University Counseling Center Use of Prolonged Exposure Therapy: In-Clinic Treatment for Students with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Ted C.

    2015-01-01

    Students utilize university counseling center services to address distress related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Since counseling centers services such as group work or general psychotherapy may not address specific PTSD-symptom reduction, centers often give community referrals in such cases. Evidence-based therapies (EBTs), including…

  2. Sexual Violence Screening Practices of Student Health Centers Located on Universities in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Valerie; Williams, Jessica R.; Gattamorta, Karina; Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe current sexual violence screening practices of student health centers located on universities in Florida. Participants: Institutional level data was collected from 33 student health centers from November 2015 through January 2016. The student health centers were located on public or private…

  3. User-Centered Design in Practice: The Brown University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordac, Sarah; Rainwater, Jean

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study in user-centered design that explores the needs and preferences of undergraduate users. An analysis of LibQual+ and other user surveys, interviews with public service staff, and a formal American with Disabilities Act accessibility review served as the basis for planning a redesign of the Brown University…

  4. The trouble with Nigerian universities: bogus policy and speculative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no gainsaying the fact that Nigerian public universities and no less privately owned universities are facing a lot of challenges. Such problems that now characterise our universities include indiscipline, poor funding and inadequate facilities, examination malpractices, demonstration and rioting, secret cult activities, ...

  5. University-community engagement in the wider policy environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Charles, David; Benneworth, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This chapter seeks to place the idea of university–community engagement in terms of the way that is regarded by public policy managers, who are increasingly adopting the mind-sets and policy paradigms of New Public Management (NPM). This chapter firstly argues that one unintended consequence of the

  6. A Systemic, Student-Centered Study of University Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenders, David A.; Hope, Peter; Ninnan, Abraham

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the methods and findings of the student focus project, a six-month study of student perceptions of service at a large university in Brisbane, Australia. Analysis of 24 focus groups identified "malignant bureaucracy" and the "balkanization of information" as systemic factors negatively influencing student perceptions…

  7. Reforming the University: The Role of the Research Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Sam D.; Lazarsfeld, Paul F.

    The authors seek to show the potentiality of research organizations for the achievement of basic university goals, and to isolate the conditions that impede or promote the success of these integrative agencies. In addition, they examine the role of the managerial scholars who are in the positions of leadership since they believe this role is vital…

  8. Legal prison tattooing centers: viable health policy initiative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awofeso, Niyi

    2010-01-01

    Tattooing exemplifies several important links between criminal justice systems, public health, custodial management, and the social organization and behavior of prisoners. This commentary examines the efficiency of setting up legal, prison-financed tattooing centers as a way of discouraging illicit tattooing and minimizing bloodborne disease transmission risks in prison settings. The author posits that the impact of legal prison tattooing centers is unlikely to be significant since less than 5 percent of bloodborne infectious diseases have been reliably attributable to tattooing, either in prison or in community settings. Behavioral studies indicate that prisoners at the highest risk of contracting bloodborne infections would probably not utilize legal prison tattooing services. Furthermore, such a service is likely to be very expensive relative to potential health benefits. Strategies focussed on reducing injecting drug use among prisoners will yield greater benefits for reducing bloodborne disease transmission per dollar spent compared with setting up legal prison tattooing parlors. Social marketing of temporary tattooing alternatives (eg, henna tattoos) to traditional illicit tattooing techniques in prison settings is potentially valuable, as temporary tattoos pose no infection risk and may also facilitate reduction in occupational and social stigma associated with many illicit prison tattoos.

  9. The drug thief at Georgetown University Medical Center: anatomy of a $2 billion class-action lawsuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Separate lawsuits filed on behalf of plaintiff patients at Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, have been consolidated under a District of Columbia judge who is scheduled to rule soon on whether to certify them as a class-action suit against the medical center. The case involves a drug-abusing worker in the interventional radiology unit at Georgetown University Hospital who may have exposed up to 500 patients to HIV, hepatitis, and other viruses during his period of employment from September 8, 1999 to February 2, 2000. The lawsuits allege that the med center failed to protect patients by not adopting American Hospital Association guidelines that call for universal pre-employment drug screening. The hospital currently is in the final stages of being sold to Medstar Health, Columbia, MD, which may eventually change the drug-screening policy. The episode not only has been embarrassing for the prestigious medical center, but also has focused attention on the potential consequences for hospitals that do not screen employees for drug use.

  10. Microcomputing Facilities: Objectives and Policies. The Microcomputing Program at Drexel University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Microcomputing Program.

    Microcomputing facilities at Drexel University are described. In 1983 the university instituted a policy requiring all students to have personal access to a microcomputer. Students keep their computers in their dorm rooms or off-campus living quarters. To provide access to students while they are on campus, clusters of university-owned machines…

  11. Final Technical Report for University of Michigan Industrial Assessment Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, Arvind

    2007-04-17

    The UM Industrial Assessment Center assisted 119 primary metals, automotive parts, metal casting, chemicals, forest products, agricultural, and glass manufacturers in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana to become more productive and profitable by identifying and recommending specific measures to improve energy efficiency, reduce waste and increase productivity. This directly benefits the environment by saving a total of 309,194 MMBtu of energy resulting in reduction of 0.004 metric tons of carbon emissions. The $4,618,740 implemented cost savings generated also saves jobs that are evaporating from the manufacturing industries in the US. Most importantly, the UM Industrial Assessment Center provided extremely valuable energy education to forty one UM graduate and undergraduate students. The practical experience complements their classroom education. This also has a large multiplier effect because the students take the knowledge and training with them.

  12. Enacting Sustainable School-Based Health Initiatives: A Communication-Centered Approach to Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canary, Heather E.

    2011-01-01

    Communication plays an important role in all aspects of the development and use of policy. We present a communication-centered perspective on the processes of enacting public health policies. Our proposed conceptual framework comprises 4 communication frames: orientation, amplification, implementation, and integration. Empirical examples from 2 longitudinal studies of school-based health policies show how each frame includes different communication processes that enable sustainable public health policy practices in school-based health initiatives. These 4 frames provide unique insight into the capacity of school-based public health policy to engage youths, parents, and a broader community of stakeholders. Communication is often included as an element of health policy; however, our framework demonstrates the importance of communication as a pivotal resource in sustaining changes in public health practices. PMID:21233442

  13. From universal health insurance to universal healthcare? The shifting health policy landscape in Ireland since the economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sara Ann; Normand, Charles; Barry, Sarah; Thomas, Steve

    2016-03-01

    Ireland experienced one of the most severe economic crises of any OECD country. In 2011, a new government came to power amidst unprecedented health budget cuts. Despite a retrenchment in the ability of health resources to meet growing need, the government promised a universal, single-tiered health system, with access based solely on medical need. Key to this was introducing universal free GP care by 2015 and Universal Health Insurance from 2016 onwards. Delays in delivering universal access and a new health minister in 2014 resulted in a shift in language from 'universal health insurance' to 'universal healthcare'. During 2014 and 2015, there was an absence of clarity on what government meant by universal healthcare and divergence in policy measures from their initial intent of universalism. Despite the rhetoric of universal healthcare, years of austerity resulted in poorer access to essential healthcare and little extension of population coverage. The Irish health system is at a critical juncture in 2015, veering between a potential path to universal healthcare and a system, overwhelmed by years of austerity, which maintains the status quo. This papers assesses the gap between policy intent and practice and the difficulties in implementing major health system reform especially while emerging from an economic crisis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Growth of a Science Center: The Center for Science and Mathematics Education (CESAME) at Stony Brook University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafney, Leo; Bynum, R. David; Sheppard, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the origin and development of CESAME (The Center for Science and Mathematics Education) at Stony Brook University. The analysis identifies key ingredients in areas of personnel, funding, organizational structures, educational priorities, collaboration, and institutionalization. After a discussion of relevant issues in…

  15. Center for Space Power, Texas A and M University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ken

    Johnson Controls is a 106 year old company employing 42,000 people worldwide with $4.7 billion annual sales. Though we are new to the aerospace industry we are a world leader in automobile battery manufacturing, automotive seating, plastic bottling, and facilities environment controls. The battery division produces over 24,000,000 batteries annually under private label for the new car manufacturers and the replacement market. We are entering the aerospace market with the nickel hydrogen battery with the help of NASA's Center for Space Power at Texas A&M. Unlike traditional nickel hydrogen battery manufacturers, we are reaching beyond the space applications to the higher volume markets of aircraft starting and utility load leveling. Though space applications alone will not provide sufficient volume to support the economies of scale and opportunities for statistical process control, these additional terrestrial applications will. For example, nickel hydrogen batteries do not have the environmental problems of nickel cadmium or lead acid and may someday start your car or power your electric vehicle. However you envision the future, keep in mind that no manufacturer moves into a large volume market without fine tuning their process. The Center for Space Power at Texas A&M is providing indepth technical analysis of all of the materials and fabricated parts of our battery as well as thermal and mechanical design computer modeling. Several examples of what we are doing with nickel hydrogen chemistry to lead to these production efficiencies are presented.

  16. Research showcase, winter 2014 : reducing traffic noise impacts, university transportation centers, advanced prismatic sheeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This issue of Research Showcase features articles on two successful research efforts, one on quiet : pavements and the other on the bene ts of prismatic sign sheeting, and an article on university : transportation center participation in Florida.

  17. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health - Columbia University

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University studies long-term health of urban pollutants on children raised in minority neighborhoods in inner-city communities.

  18. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  19. Evaluation of Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Child Care Centers within Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jaime S; Contreras, Dawn; Gold, Abby; Keim, Ann; Oscarson, Renee; Peters, Paula; Procter, Sandra; Remig, Valentina; Smathers, Carol; Mobley, Amy R

    2015-10-01

    Although some researchers have examined nutrition and physical activity policies within urban child care centers, little is known about the potentially unique needs of rural communities. Child care centers serving preschool children located within low-income rural communities (n = 29) from seven states (Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) were assessed to determine current nutrition and physical activity (PA) practices and policies. As part of a large-scale childhood obesity prevention project, the Community Healthy Living Index's previously validated Early Childhood Program Assessment Tool was used to collect data. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to identify high-priority areas. Healthy People 2020 and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' recommendations for nutrition and PA policies in child care centers were used as benchmarks. Reports of not fully implementing (nutrition-related policies or practices within rural early child care centers were identified. Centers not consistently serving a variety of fruits (48%), vegetables (45%), whole grains (41%), limiting saturated fat intake (31%), implementing healthy celebration guidelines (41%), involving children in mealtime (62%), and referring families to nutrition assistance programs (24%) were identified. More than one third of centers also had limited structured PA opportunities. Although eligible, only 48% of the centers participated in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Overall, centers lacked parental outreach, staff training, and funding/resources to support nutrition and PA. These results provide insight into where child care centers within low-income, rural communities may need assistance to help prevent childhood obesity.

  20. Instituting a smoke-free policy for city recreation centers and playgrounds, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Raymond; Mallya, Giridhar; Dean, Lorraine T; Rizvi, Amna; Dignam, Leo; Schwarz, Donald F

    2013-07-11

    In the United States, more than 600 municipalities have smoke-free parks, and more than 100 have smoke-free beaches. Nevertheless, adoption of outdoor smoke-free policies has been slow in certain regions. Critical to widespread adoption is the sharing of knowledge about the policy development and implementation process. In this article, we describe our experience in making City of Philadelphia recreation centers and playgrounds smoke-free. Of the 10 largest US cities, Philadelphia has among the highest rates of adult and youth smoking. Our objectives for an outdoor smoke-free policy included protecting against secondhand smoke, supporting a normative message that smoking is harmful, motivating smokers to quit, and mitigating tobacco-related sanitation costs. The Philadelphia Department of Public Health and the Department of Parks and Recreation engaged civic leaders, agency staff, and community stakeholders in the following steps: 1) making the policy case, 2) vetting policy options and engaging stakeholders, and 3) implementing policy. Near-term policy impacts were assessed through available data sources. More than 220 recreation centers, playgrounds, and outdoor pools became smoke-free through a combined mayoral executive order and agency regulation. Support for the policy was high. Estimates suggest a policy reach of 3.6 million annual visitors and almost 850 acres of new smoke-free municipal property. Localities can successfully implement outdoor smoke-free policies with careful planning and execution. Such policies hold great potential for reducing exposure to secondhand smoke, promoting nonsmoking norms, and providing additional motivation for residents to quit smoking.

  1. [Midodrine (Gutron) prescription practice at a University Hospital Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desboeuf, K; Senard, J M; Pavy-Le-Traon, A; Brefel, C; Clanet, M; Géraud, G; Montastruc, J L

    2000-01-01

    A historical study of the prescription of midodrine was carried out at the university hospital of Toulouse (France) between 1994 and 1998. The aim was to compare the observed prescriptions and the ideal prescriptions in accordance with the Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC). The analysis of 97 consecutive medical reports found discrepancies in prescription concerning the non-respect of contraindications and of potentially hazardous drug associations. Fifty-four (55.7 per cent) patients would have been excluded from prescription if the physicians had strictly respected the SPC. The inappropriate prescription of midodrine was associated with an increase in adverse drug reactions (ADRs). ADRs occurred in 34.0 per cent of cases overall and required drug discontinuation in 15.5 per cent.

  2. MARKETING POLICIES THROUGH THE INTERNET: THE CASE OF SKIING CENTERS IN GREECE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis LEFAKIS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lately, Internet constitutes a major tool for transactions in every aspect and supports innovative marketing policies. Broadband Internet has become “the key to success” for businesses, as it offers various advantages and benefits through Internet marketing (e-marketing policies. In Greece, mountainous areas are usually covered with snow during winter months; so, skiing centers have become an important asset for winter tourism. The Internet evolution and the development of network infrastructure enhance marketing policies for winter tourism activities. This paper studies the use of marketing policies in Greek skiing centers through the Internet, such as promotional activities, website interactivity, accommodation & entertainment information, online weather forecast, guest book, etc Therefore, the paper aims to optimize and evaluate skiing centers in Greece, qualitatively and quantitatively according to e-marketing policies used as criteria, based on the multicriteria method of PROMETHEE II and further to classify them in groups. Finally we identify and describe the optimum group of skiing centers to be used as a model with enhanced customer communication services.

  3. Teaching professional writing in an academic health sciences center: the Writing Center model at the Medical University of South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tom G; Ariail, Jennie; Richards-Slaughter, Shannon; Kerr, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Writing is taught as professional competency in higher education generally, but the health science education literature emphasizes writing as a pedagogical means rather than a professional end. The Medical University of South Carolina established a Writing Center in 1994 to teach professional writing. This report describes the rationale for profession-specific, graduate-level writing instruction; summarizes the Writing Center model; and reports usage data. Students have reported improvement in particular texts and said they would be better able to complete writing tasks in the future. Interventions modeled after the Writing Center and staffed with professionally trained writing teachers may provide a means to pool resources to teach writing as professional competency. The Writing Center has provided the expertise to teach professional writing without demanding curricular revision.

  4. Geographic Modeling to Quantify the Impact of Primary and Comprehensive Stroke Center Destination Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Michael T; Pajerowski, William; Messé, Steven R; Mechem, C Crawford; Jia, Judy; Abboud, Michael; David, Guy; Carr, Brendan G; Band, Roger

    2018-02-28

    We evaluated the impact of a primary stroke center (PSC) destination policy in a major metropolitan city and used geographic modeling to evaluate expected changes for a comprehensive stroke center policy. We identified suspected stroke emergency medical services encounters from 1/1/2004 to 12/31/2013 in Philadelphia, PA. Transport times were compared before and after initiation of a PSC destination policy on 10/3/2011. Geographic modeling estimated the impact of bypassing the closest hospital for the closest PSC and for the closest comprehensive stroke center. There were 2 326 943 emergency medical services runs during the study period, of which 15 099 had a provider diagnosis of stroke. Bypassing the closest hospital for a PSC was common before the official policy and increased steadily over time. Geographic modeling suggested that bypassing the closest hospital in favor of the closest PSC adds a median of 3.1 minutes to transport time. Bypassing to the closest comprehensive stroke center would add a median of 8.3 minutes. Within a large metropolitan area, the time cost of routing patients preferentially to PSCs and comprehensive stroke centers is low. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. The Use of Bibliometric Data as Tools for University Research Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moed, H. F.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A University of Leiden study on the potential use of quantitative, literature-based indicators as tools for monitoring research productivity and establishing research policy, based on the bibliographic productivity of two major faculties, is reported and discussed. (MSE)

  6. A Wish List for the Advancement of University and College Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, John B.

    2016-01-01

    University and college counseling centers continue to meet emerging challenges in higher education. This article addresses three issues: the need for a more unified organizational structure to represent the profession, the potential value for counseling centers in seeking accreditation, and the importance of specialized training for those entering…

  7. A Further Review of the California State University's Contra Costa Center. Commission Report 89-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    A follow-up report on the California State University's Contra Costa Center, a proposed permanent off-campus center, is presented. The California Postsecondary Education Commission approved the original proposal in 1987, contingent on finding solutions to concerns about transportation access and services to disadvantaged students. The university…

  8. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Education, Aeronautics, Space, Autonomy, Earth and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, M. (Editor); Lumia, R. (Editor); Tunstel, E., Jr. (Editor); White, B. (Editor); Malone, J. (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This first volume of the Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE) Center Press Series on NASA University Research Center's (URC's) Advanced Technologies on Space Exploration and National Service constitute a report on the research papers and presentations delivered by NASA Installations and industry and Report of the NASA's fourteen URC's held at the First National Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico from February 16-19, 1997.

  9. Current Fees Charging Practices and Perceptions in College and University Counseling Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, James C.; And Others

    A questionnaire designed to assess the practice of charging special fees for counseling, testing, and outreach programs as well as the perceptions of counseling center directors on the fee issue was sent to 281 Directors of college and university counseling centers. Two hundred and twenty-five (80%) were returned. The results indicated that…

  10. Theoretical Communities of Praxis: The University Writing Center as Cultural Contact Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monty, Randall William

    2013-01-01

    The fundamental purpose of "Theoretical Communities of Praxis: The University Writing Center as Cultural Contact Zone" is to investigate the situatedness of Writing Center Studies, defining it as an autonomous (sub)discipline and interdisciplinary contact zone within the larger discipline of Rhetoric and Composition. In order to meet…

  11. 78 FR 25469 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of South Alabama Center for Archaeological Studies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of South Alabama Center for Archaeological Studies... Alabama Center for Archaeological Studies has completed an inventory of human remains and associated...

  12. The Utility of an Efficient Outcomes Assessment System at University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopta, S. Mark; Petrik, Megan L.; Saunders, Stephen M.; Mond, Michael; Hirsch, Glenn; Kadison, Richard; Raymond, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased demands placed on university counseling centers (UCCs) in recent years, there is a need for these centers to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of their psychological services. Regularly monitoring client progress is one approach to increase the likelihood of positive clinical outcomes. This article describes the use of the…

  13. Changing Higher Education Policies for Japanese National Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Akiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes current debate on changes in Japan's higher education system which involve "corporatizing" all national universities and introducing performance-based contractual funding. Suggests that these changes may be part of a complex game of struggle for control. (EV)

  14. A Place of Her Own: The Case for University-Based Centers for Women Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The author describes the benefits of university-based women entrepreneur centers as an educational and outreach strategy and argues for their establishment and support by universities interested in educating women entrepreneurs and advancing women-owned businesses. Based on extensive research on women business owners and firsthand experience with…

  15. 2008 Issues on Serials Policy Formulation for Nigerian University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gbaje E.S

    Notwithstanding, Ola (2006) in her own studies, itemized the need to formulate and adopt every policy as thus:- i. Encourages advice from the academic staff regarding what materials to add to collection. ii. Encourages Input from students iii. Ensures participation of the collection development librarian iv. Defines clearly the ...

  16. Institutional Diversity in Ontario's University Sector: A Policy Debate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piché, Pierre G.; Jones, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet the demands in a cost-effective manner of an emerging knowledge society that is global in scope, structural higher education policy changes have been introduced in many countries with a focus on systemic and programmatic diversity. There has been an ongoing debate about institutional diversity in Ontario higher education,…

  17. Impact of Smoke-Free Residence Hall Policies: The Views of Administrators at 3 State Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Megan

    2005-01-01

    Nationwide efforts to protect the public against the health effects of secondhand smoke have prompted college and university administrators to adopt more restrictive smoking policies. Some campus officials are concerned that new policies will lead to student backlash, increased staff workloads, and an increased economic burden. To understand the…

  18. When Online Exchanges Byte: An Examination of the Policy Environment Governing Cyberbullying at the University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Chantal; Jackson, Margaret; Cassidy, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on findings from a scan of 465 policies relevant to the handling of cyberbullying in 74 Canadian universities. It first assesses the commonalities and differences in the policies. Second, it considers how their various lenses--a human rights perspective versus a student conduct perspective, for instance--can affect the…

  19. Foreign Language Faculty's Appropriation of an Academic Publishing Policy at a US University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Ronald; Gómez Soler, Inmaculada

    2018-01-01

    As a result of internationalisation, many universities have developed policies that encourage publications in English. This study explores this issue by examining multilingual scholars' experiences of publishing policies in an Anglophone context and more specifically within the discipline of foreign languages--an inherently plurilingual discipline…

  20. The development of a research data policy at Wageningen University & Research: best practices as a framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeland, van Hilde; Ringersma, J.

    2017-01-01

    The current case study describes the development of a Research Data Management policy at Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands. To develop this policy, an analysis was carried out of existing frameworks and principles on data management (such as the FAIR principles), as well as of

  1. Expanding Downward: Innovation, Diffusion, and State Policy Adoptions of Universal Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, F. Chris

    2015-01-01

    Framed within the theoretical framework of policy innovation and diffusion, this study explores both interstate (diffusion) and intrastate predictors of adoption of state universal preschool policies. Event history analysis methodology is applied to a state level dataset drawn from the Census, the NCES Common Core, the Book of the States, and…

  2. A Moral Economy of Patents: Case of Finnish Research Universities' Patent Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of the concept of moral economy for higher education studies through a study of Finnish research universities' patent policies. Patent policies not only stimulate the commercialization of research, they also set norms for behavior and aim to clarify how to distribute rights and…

  3. Language Ideology or Language Practice? An Analysis of Language Policy Documents at Swedish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Beyza

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an analysis and interpretation of language policy documents from eight Swedish universities with regard to intertextuality, authorship and content analysis of the notions of language practices and English as a lingua franca (ELF). The analysis is then linked to Spolsky's framework of language policy, namely language…

  4. Does Federal Financial Aid Policy Influence the Institutional Aid Policies of Four-Year Colleges and Universities? An Exploratory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossler, Don; Kwon, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    There is a dearth of empirical work that examines the relationships between federal financial aid policy and institutional financial aid priorities and expenditures. This study uses Resource Dependency Theory to explore whether changes the amount of financial aid awarded by colleges and universities during the last fifty years are best explained…

  5. The development and goals of the AAFP center for policy studies in family practice and primary care. American Academy of Family Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, L A; Fryer, G E

    1999-11-01

    In this article we describe the creation and role of the Center for Policy Studies in Family Practice and Primary Care established by the American Academy of Family Physicians in Washington, DC, this year. We recount the events leading to the decision to implement the Center, list its guiding assumptions, and explain its initial structure and function. We also identify the 3 themes that will guide the early work of the Center: sustaining the functional domain of family practice and primary care; investing in key infrastructures; and securing universal health coverage.

  6. State Primary Stroke Center Policies in the US: Rural Health Issues.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slade, C.; O'Toole, Laurence J.; Rho, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between state primary stroke center (PSC) designation policy implementation and access to optimal stroke care for residents of rural areas. Materials and Methods: Primary data were collected during the period September 2008–August 2009. Following content

  7. The New Cannabis Policy Taxonomy on APIS: Making Sense of the Cannabis Policy Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzner, Michael D; Thomas, Sue; Schuler, Jonathan; Hilton, Michael; Mosher, James

    2017-06-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism's Alcohol Policy Information System (APIS) is, for the first time, adding legal data pertaining to recreational cannabis use to its current offerings on alcohol policy. Now that Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Alaska, and the District of Columbia have legalized aspects of recreational cannabis, and more states are considering it, there is an urgency to provide high-quality, multi-dimensional legal data to the public health community. This article introduces the Cannabis Policy Taxonomy recently posted on APIS, and explores its theoretical and empirical contributions to the substance abuse literature and its potential for use in policy research. We also present results of interviews with public health experts in alcohol and cannabis policy, which sought to determine the most important variables to address in the initial release of cannabis policy data. From this process, we found that pricing controls emerged as the variable singled out by the largest number of experts. This analysis points to a host of vital policies that are of increasing importance to public health policy scholars and their current and future research.

  8. Improving Anti-Rape Policy and Education at the University of Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    It is incumbent on colleges and universities to evaluate the conditions that lead to sexual assault on their campuses and to address those that may support a climate that encourages or tolerates rape. Though various policies and educational programs attempt to mitigate the problem, still it persists. The University of Delaware has not engaged in a…

  9. Universities' Expectations for Study-Abroad Programs Fostering Internationalization: Educational Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Take, Hiroko; Shoraku, Ai

    2018-01-01

    Because internationalization in higher education has recently received significant attention within the context of globalization, universities in Japan have begun to develop study-abroad programs to support their students in gaining international experience. This article explores those university policies designed to support the…

  10. Japan's Higher Education Incorporation Policy: A Comparative Analysis of Three Stages of National University Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    A number of countries with public higher education systems have implemented privatisation policies. In Japan, the national government introduced the National University Corporation Act (NUCA) in 2004 and changed the legal status of national universities from that of government-owned public institutions to independent administrative agencies. Its…

  11. An Examination of Social Media Policy Usage of South Central United States' Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Virginia J.; Luse, Donna W.; Hodge, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Since the use of social media tools by universities has expanded exponentially, a university can easily find itself in a precarious situation in a moment's notice because social media tools have been used inadvertently. This study investigated the social media policies of AACSB-International accredited schools in the SREB South Central Region of…

  12. Australian Early Childhood Educators: From Government Policy to University Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sharon; Trinidad, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the Australian Federal Government initiatives in the area of early childhood with regard to the provision of early childhood education and care. These changes have influenced a Western Australian university to develop an innovative birth to 8 years preservice educator education curriculum. Using an ecological…

  13. Transformation of University Governance through Internationalization: Challenges for Top Universities and Government Policies in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Akiyoshi; Shimmi, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    In order to strengthen their international presence, universities pursuing a world-class status are striving to increase their internationalization. Internationalization implies a transformation of university governance, especially for universities in a non-English-speaking system such as Japan's. This paper examines the challenges of…

  14. Challenges of Implementing Contract Policies for University Academics in Malawi: A Case of Mzuzu University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawa, Lester B.; Mgomezulu, Victor Y.

    2016-01-01

    Utilising critical theory, we explored the causes of the conflict that arose between academic staff on fixed-term renewable contracts and university administrators at Mzuzu University in Malawi in order to draw lessons. We collected data using semi-structured, in-depth interviews and document analysis. Ten university employees were purposively…

  15. Patenting productivity and intellectual property policies at Research I universities: An exploratory comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mendoza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 1980s, the US government encouraged the cooperation of industries with universities in order to bridge funding gaps and cope with global competitive markets through legislations that allow universities to start spin-off businesses and to generate profits from patents. At the turn of the century, university partnerships with the private sector have greatly increased through research grants, licensing patents, and in some cases, the formation of new firms'mainly at research universities and in the hard sciences. In response to these entrepreneurial opportunities, university administrators developed intellectual property policies to facilitate the commercialization of research. The purpose of this study is to explore the differences across IP policies among nine research universities as potential sources of influence on faculty engagement in for-profit research ventures according to existing models of faculty role performance and achievement.

  16. State-Mandated Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Screen Time Policies in Child Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Martinez, Catherina; Ahmed, Nasar U; Natale, Ruby A; Messiah, Sarah E

    2017-09-01

    The child care center (CCC) environment presents opportunities for healthy weight promotion in preschoolers. Our study examined the current state of CCC adherence to nutrition, physical activity, and screen time legislative regulations and the differences in their adherence by center socioeconomic position (SEP: low, middle, high) in Miami-Dade County. In 34 CCC, we used the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation tool to evaluate nutrition, physical activity, and screen time practices during 1-school day. Twenty-five of the centers (73.5%) were participants of the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Almost 80% of the centers adhered to serving low-fat/fat-free milk to children older than 2 years. Only 34.5% served vegetables and 75.9% served whole fruits during meals/snacks. Ninety-four percent of the centers had quiet and active play incorporated into their daily routines. All centers adhered to the 2-hour screen time limit for children older than 2 years. Low- and middle-SEP centers fared better in the serving of fruits, vegetables, and low-fat/fat-free milk. The centers averaged 1 hour in outdoor play regardless of SEP. High-SEP centers had no TV or screen time during day of observation. CCC practices highlight opportunities for improvement in nutrition, physical activity, and screen time practices in the prevention of overweight in early childhood.

  17. Effects of a New State Policy on Physical Activity Practices in Child Care Centers in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Jennifer R; Dowda, Marsha; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E; Neelon, Brian; Pate, Russell R

    2017-01-01

    We sought to determine the extent to which child care centers in South Carolina improved physical activity practices after a new policy took effect. In 2012, South Carolina adopted new mandatory physical activity standards within its child care quality enhancement program. This quasi-experimental study used North Carolina, a state not making policy changes, as the comparison. Participants were 34 child care centers in South Carolina and 30 centers in North Carolina. Researchers used the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation (EPAO) tool to conduct center observations before and after policy implementation and then conducted repeated-measures linear regression with interaction between state and time for the Physical Activity Environment Total Score and the 8 subscale scores. Compared with centers in North Carolina, EPAO subscale scores in South Carolina centers increased significantly for the Fixed Play Environment (P child care centers was associated with improvements in practices aimed at increasing children's physical activity.

  18. Evaluation of an advertising method for a university family practice center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricer, R E; English, J C; Frebault, J P; Talanca, J

    1989-01-01

    Advertising by physicians has become accepted by the public and is practically mandatory in today's competitive marketplace. This study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of a specific method of advertising a university family practice center by using fliers targeted to nearby neighborhoods. The fliers were inexpensive handbills describing the center's location and services, distributed to 23,000 households. Six months after distribution of the fliers, a randomized survey of 100 of these households was conducted to determine the fliers' success at increasing consumers' awareness of the center's location and altering consumers' attitudes and behavior concerning using the center's services. In 27% of the households, someone recalled receiving the flier. Half of these still had the fliers in their possession. Two thirds of those who remembered it thought the flier made them consider using the center, and half had called or visited the center. The results show that this technique was effective.

  19. University Counseling Centers' Perceptions and Experiences Pertaining to Emotional Support Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Lori R.; Schaefer, Karen; Erdman, Phyllis; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of students are requesting accommodations for emotional support animals (ESAs) in higher education settings. Since the legislation pertaining to this type of service animal differs from the laws governing disability service animals, colleges and universities are faced with developing new policies and guidelines. A sample of 248…

  20. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program, Center for Housing Innovation, University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This research program addresses the need to increase the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers have responsibility for the program: the Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. The two organizations provide complementary architectural, systems engineering, and industrial engineering capabilities. In 1989 we worked on these tasks: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. The current research program, under the guidance of a steering committee composed of industry and government representatives, focuses on three interdependent concerns -- (1) energy, (2) industrial process, and (3) housing design. Building homes in a factory offers the opportunity to increase energy efficiency through the use of new materials and processes, and to increase the value of these homes by improving the quality of their construction. Housing design strives to ensure that these technically advanced homes are marketable and will meet the needs of the people who will live in them.

  1. Annual report of Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, for fiscal 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A research center of the University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Center (TAC) has a 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator as its principal apparatus; of which acceptance test was finished in July 1976. Activities of the TAC for the period of April 1976 to March 1977 are reported: accelerator and beam transport system, general equipments, equipment development, nuclear physics, chemistry, and biological and medical Science. (Mori, K.)

  2. Annual report of Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, for fiscal 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Tandem Accelerator Center (TAC) is a research center of the University of Tsukuba established mainly for interdisciplinary research. Its principal apparatus is a 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator of which assembling was completed in fiscal 1975. Activities of the TAC for the period of April 1975 to March 1976 are reported: accelerator and beam transport system, general equipments, equipment development, and heavy-ion reactions. (Mori, K.)

  3. Constraints and changes in the development of science and technology policies in Argentina's University of Buenos Aires and the National Autonomous University of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Armando

    1999-06-01

    This dissertation is a comparison of the effects of structural adjustment on scientific and technological policies in two of the largest and most important universities of Latin America, UBA and UNAM. In its broadest sense, scientific and technological policies encompass a set of interventions, decisions, and activities of different institutions within a given society aimed to hinder or stimulate the progress of scientific research, and the application of its products to socioeconomic, political, cultural or military objectives. The methodological approach for this dissertation aimed to combine data collected at both the macro and micro levels. First, a profound examination of different bibliographical sources such as books, articles, and documents of different kinds (policy papers, national plans, and working papers), was carried out. Secondly, a series of interviews were conducted with scientists in some of the natural sciences' research centers and institutes, academic administrators and top officials of the S&T government agencies, in Argentina and Mexico, The main goal of these interviews was to understand the institutional dynamics as it was shaped by actors and processes, outside and within the two universities. This study found that the structural adjustment process in Argentina and Mexico has negatively affected the S&T policies in both UBA and UNAM. Local S&T played a original role in the two universities under scrutiny. Investments in science and technology have remained significantly low in Argentina and Mexico. In addition to this, the small amount of scientific personnel, the predominantly public characteristic of S&T funds, and the reduced number of doctoral graduates resulted in low levels of scientific output as compared with the number of publications in international scientific literature. A predominant academic orientation with few contributions to societal needs, either related to the productive sectors or to social problems such as pollution

  4. Determining the Optimal Inventory Management Policy for Naval Medical Center San Diego’s Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    budget. It is a very good tool for those hospitals that have a restrictive formulary. There is also the option to combine these to analyses into the...evaluating the inventory of a pharmacy and should be used in conjunction with a tool that takes non- monetary factors into consideration. The VEN analysis...OPTIMAL INVENTORY MANAGEMENT POLICY FOR NAVAL MEDICAL CENTER SAN DIEGO’S PHARMACY by Jason S. Galka December 2016 Thesis Advisor: Eddine

  5. Students' drinking behavior and perceptions towards introducing alcohol policies on university campus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Eva Ladekjær; Andsager Smorawski, Gitte; Lund Krabak, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Background High alcohol consumption among university students is a well-researched health concern in many countries. At universities in Denmark, policies of alcohol consumption are a new phenomenon if existing at all. However, little is known of how students perceive campus alcohol policies...... topics such as experiences and attitudes towards alcohol consumption among students, regulations, and norms of alcohol use on campus. The analysis followed a pre-determined codebook. Results Alcohol consumption is an integrated practice on campus. Most of the participants found it unnecessary to make...

  6. Risk evaluation and mitigation strategies: assessment of a medical center's policies and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Lindsey; Alexander, Earnest; Duong, Minh-Tri

    2012-05-15

    The results of a hospital's initiative to evaluate and improve compliance with federally mandated risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) are presented. Food and Drug Administration approved REMS plans are required for more than 145 drugs, but clear guidance on strategies for achieving REMS compliance is lacking. As a first step toward determining the extent of REMS compliance at a large medical center, a systematic assessment was conducted to ascertain existing policies and procedures for the use of drugs subject to REMS requirements applicable in the inpatient setting. About 123 drugs with such "inpatient-applicable" REMS requirements were identified; of those, 10 had been ordered by hospital providers during a specified 18-month time frame and were included in the assessment of policies and procedures. The assessment revealed that the hospital lacked a formal REMS policy and had no REMS-compliant procedures in place for 7 evaluated drugs (ambrisentan, buprenorphine-naloxone, darbepoetin alfa, epoetin alfa, oxycodone controlled-release tablets, prasugrel, and pregabalin). Pursuant to the compliance assessment, new procedures to help ensure the safe use of those 7 drugs were developed, and REMS-focused educational programs, order-entry system enhancements, and drug storage modifications were implemented. Quality-improvement initiatives including staff education, incorporation of REMS requirements into existing policy, development of an electronic resource, and creation of a separate storage section for drugs subject to REMS were implemented at a large academic medical center to help ensure compliance with inpatient-applicable REMS requirements.

  7. Instructors' Perceived Effectiveness of Current Professional Development Programs at Taif University English Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawalbeh, Tha'er Issa

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aimed to explore the EFL instructors perceived effectiveness of current professional development programs run at Taif University English Language Center (TUELC) in Saudi Arabia, and to provide suggestions to improve the current situation of these programs. To achieve these purposes, the researcher tried to answer three questions.…

  8. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  9. Working with Clients Who Have Religious/Spiritual Issues: A Survey of University Counseling Center Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellems, Ian S.; Hill, Clara E.; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.; Freitas, Gary

    2010-01-01

    University counseling center therapists (N = 220) completed an Internet survey about religion/spirituality in therapy, with 200 of these therapists describing therapy with a recent client whose issues involved religion/spirituality. Common client religion/spirituality issues were questioning one's childhood religion, exploring…

  10. Current Perceptions and Practices of Charging Fees in College and University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, James C.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    A questionnaire that assessed the practice of charging special fees for counseling, testing, and outreach programs was sent to directors of university counseling centers. Charging fees for counseling services is a practice of 4 percent of the respondents, while fees for testing has increased from 11 percent to 34 percent over a 10-year period.…

  11. Brief Therapy at a University Counseling Center: Working Alliance, Readiness to Change, and Symptom Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Megan; Laux, John M.; Ritchie, Martin H.; Piazza, Nick J.; Tiamiyu, Mojisola F.

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated whether students receiving short-term individual counseling at a university counseling center showed progress as evidenced by perceived client and counselor outcomes and the roles that client readiness to change and working alliance played in this setting. The results indicated that the counselor reports, not the client…

  12. History of the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Jean Mayer United States Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, while quite a mouthful, is aptly named, since it has contributed substantially to the legacy of Jean Mayer, to the scientific stature of the USDA and, in Atwater’s tradition, to the d...

  13. New library buildings: the University of Michigan Medical Library and Learning Resource Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, L Y; Calhoun, J G

    1984-01-01

    The University of Michigan opened a new medical library in July 1980. The five-story structure combines the library with a learning-resources center. Overall, the building has operated smoothly and has been well accepted. The combining of two facilities designed to support the teaching and learning objectives of the health sciences curriculum will ensure long-term cooperation between them.

  14. Authority in an Agency-Centered, Inquiry-Based University Calculus Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Hope; Bateman, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Authority roles among teachers and students have traditionally been hierarchal and centered with the expertise and power of the teacher limiting opportunities for students to act with autonomy to build and justify mathematics. In this paper we discuss authority roles for teachers and students that have been realized in an inquiry-based university,…

  15. Broom Closet or Fish Bowl? An Ethnographic Exploration of a University Queer Center and Oneself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teman, Eric D.; Lahman, Maria K. E.

    2012-01-01

    The authors detail an educational ethnography of a university queer cultural center's role on campus and in the surrounding community. The data include participant observation, in-depth interviews, and artifacts. The authors review lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, ally, and questioning (LGBTAQ) issues in higher education, heterosexual…

  16. Implementation of Cooperative Learning in the Center for Community Service and Continuing Education at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansari, Eissa M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the success of implementation of cooperative learning in various courses delivered at the Center for Community Service and Continuing Education at Kuwait University. According to recent research in the field of social cognition, learning situations which make use of the social context often achieve superior…

  17. Expanding the Intellectual Property Knowledge Base at University Libraries: Collaborating with Patent and Trademark Resource Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Martin; Reinman, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    Patent and Trademark Resource Centers are located in libraries throughout the U.S., with 43 being in academic libraries. With the importance of incorporating a knowledge of intellectual property (IP) and patent research in university curricula nationwide, this study developed and evaluated a partnership program to increase the understanding of IP…

  18. Performance Evaluation of Extension Education Centers in Universities Based on the Balanced Scorecard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Yi-Kuei; Chang, Chi-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at developing a set of appropriate performance evaluation indices mainly based on balanced scorecard (BSC) for extension education centers in universities by utilizing multiple criteria decision making (MCDM). Through literature reviews and experts who have real practical experiences in extension education, adequate performance…

  19. Preliminary Evidence on the Effectiveness of Psychological Treatments Delivered at a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Takuya; Davies, D. Robert; Tierney, Sandra Callen; Bettmann, Joanna E.; McAward, Scott M.; Averill, Lynnette A.; Huebner, Lois A.; Weitzman, Lauren M.; Benbrook, Amy R.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Wampold, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment data from a university counseling center (UCC) that utilized the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 (OQ-45; M. J. Lambert et al., 2004), a self-report general clinical symptom measure, was compared against treatment efficacy benchmarks from clinical trials of adult major depression that utilized similar measures. Statistical analyses suggested…

  20. Global health equity in United Kingdom university research: a landscape of current policies and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotham, Dzintars; Meldrum, Jonathan; Nageshwaran, Vaitehi; Counts, Christopher; Kumari, Nina; Martin, Manuel; Beattie, Ben; Post, Nathan

    2016-10-10

    Universities are significant contributors to research and technologies in health; however, the health needs of the world's poor are historically neglected in research. Medical discoveries are frequently licensed exclusively to one producer, allowing a monopoly and inequitable pricing. Similarly, research is often published in ways that make it inaccessible. Universities can adopt policies and practices to overcome neglect and ensure equitable access to research and its products. For 25 United Kingdom universities, data on health research funding were extracted from the top five United Kingdom funders' databases and coded as research on neglected diseases (NDs) and/or health in low- and lower-middle-income countries (hLLMIC). Data on intellectual property licensing policies and practices and open-access policies were obtained from publicly available sources and by direct contact with universities. Proportions of research articles published as open-access were extracted from PubMed and PubMed Central. Across United Kingdom universities, the median proportion of 2011-2014 health research funds attributable to ND research was 2.6% and for hLLMIC it was 1.7%. Overall, 79% of all ND funding and 74% of hLLMIC funding were granted to the top four institutions within each category. Seven institutions had policies to ensure that technologies developed from their research are affordable globally. Mostly, universities licensed their inventions to third parties in a way that confers monopoly rights. Fifteen institutions had an institutional open-access publishing policy; three had an institutional open-access publishing fund. The proportion of health-related articles with full-text versions freely available online ranged from 58% to 100% across universities (2012-2013); 23% of articles also had a creative commons CC-BY license. There is wide variation in the amount of global health research undertaken by United Kingdom universities, with a large proportion of total research

  1. The University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women: science inspired by women's stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Carol E

    2011-09-01

    Research in the violence against women area has been undertaken for more than 30 years, but individual researchers who have made these scholarly contributions have not been advantaged by adequate attention, funding, or organizational structure within the university setting. This article offers a detailed description of a model of an interdisciplinary research center designed to provide an academic architecture within which research on intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and other forms of violence against women can flourish and advance. The article describes the impetus for creation of the University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women, its current mission, organizational structure, financial operations, and initiatives related to research, education, and public service. Practical strategies for establishing and sustaining a center of this type are offered.

  2. College and University Mergers: Recent Trends. Policy Matters: A Higher Education Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Given the current economic turbulence characterized, in part, by unprecedented business consolidations, talk of mergers has spread to higher education. At first glance, merger discussions may seem more appropriate to the corporate world than academe because American colleges and universities were not created in accordance with a centralized…

  3. National University Extension Policy: analysis of the experience of the Institute of Health Sciences of UFPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durbens Martins Nascimento

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The current study purpose refers to the university extension, addressing the concepts of university, organization, knowledge andextension. We sought to answer the following question: Does the outcome that has been generated through projects on extension practices developed by ICS/UFPA actually fulfill the guidelines of the National University Extension Policy? The pursued objective consisted in a general analysisof the extension practices of the Institute of Health Sciences (ICS at the Federal University of Pará (UFPA in the light of the National University Extension Policy (NUEP, comprehending dialogical interaction, interdisciplinary and interprofessionalism, teaching-research-extension inseparability, impact on student training, and impact and social transformation envisaged within the Policy Extension of UFPA. The research methodology comprehended a quantitative and qualitative approach supported by bibliographic and documentary supply. It was consulted the collection of various documents, given more evidence to those focused on the university extension in 2012, contained into several instances of UFPA. A number of 80 projects and 60 reports of extension of ICS were selected for analysis in the year 2012. The results revealed that the guidelines of PNEU fell far short of being reached by the ICS products, when it came to interdisciplinarity and interprofessionalism, teaching-research-extension inseparability, and impact and social transformation. Furthermore, there was little participation by teachers, students and administrative technicians of ICS in such activity. It was concluded that the extension model of ICS consists is a welfare model, developed through service provision.

  4. Aligning Practice to Policies: Changing the Culture to Recognize and Reward Teaching at Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennin, Michael; Schultz, Zachary D.; Feig, Andrew; Finkelstein, Noah; Greenhoot, Andrea Follmer; Hildreth, Michael; Leibovich, Adam K.; Martin, James D.; Moldwin, Mark B.; O’Dowd, Diane K.; Posey, Lynmarie A.; Smith, Tobin L.; Miller, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for improvement in undergraduate education within STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines are hampered by the methods used to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Faculty members at research universities are commonly assessed and promoted mainly on the basis of research success. To improve the quality of undergraduate teaching across all disciplines, not only STEM fields, requires creating an environment wherein continuous improvement of teaching is valued, assessed, and rewarded at various stages of a faculty member’s career. This requires consistent application of policies that reflect well-established best practices for evaluating teaching at the department, college, and university levels. Evidence shows most teaching evaluation practices do not reflect stated policies, even when the policies specifically espouse teaching as a value. Thus, alignment of practice to policy is a major barrier to establishing a culture in which teaching is valued. Situated in the context of current national efforts to improve undergraduate STEM education, including the Association of American Universities Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative, this essay discusses four guiding principles for aligning practice with stated priorities in formal policies: 1) enhancing the role of deans and chairs; 2) effectively using the hiring process; 3) improving communication; and 4) improving the understanding of teaching as a scholarly activity. In addition, three specific examples of efforts to improve the practice of evaluating teaching are presented as examples: 1) Three Bucket Model of merit review at the University of California, Irvine; (2) Evaluation of Teaching Rubric, University of Kansas; and (3) Teaching Quality Framework, University of Colorado, Boulder. These examples provide flexible criteria to holistically evaluate and improve the quality of teaching across the diverse institutions comprising modern higher education. PMID:29196430

  5. Global Flows in Local Language Planning: Articulating Parallel Language Use in Swedish University Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Francis M.; Källkvist, Marie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the language policies of three Swedish universities are examined as instances of language planning in local contexts. Although Sweden has the national Language Act of 2009 (SFS 2009:600) as well as a general Higher Education Ordinance (SFS 1993:100; SFS 2014:1096), language planning for higher education is left to the purview of…

  6. Financing Policies for High Cost University of Minnesota Health Professions Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Higher Education Coordinating Board, St. Paul.

    Issues and related data are examined concerning financial aid to students in the health professions at the University of Minnesota, with a focus on targeted grant programs for dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, and medicine. Following a discussion of policy implications in general and an overview of each of the fields involved, eight policy…

  7. Language Policy as a Sociocultural Tool: Insights from the University of Cape Town

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Magda

    2016-01-01

    This theoretically oriented article draws on the author's previous research, which examined language policy and planning (LPP) of the University of Cape Town within the context of post-apartheid transformation driven by need to redress inequalities of the past, and demands of globalization. Drawing on critical linguistics, but indicating…

  8. Universities, Public Policy and Economic Development in Latin America: The Cases of Mexico and Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorey, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Since establishment of national university systems in Mexico and Venezuela, three principal demands have dominated policy formation: government ideological demand; economic demand for expertise; and political and social demand for upward mobility through education. Tensions between these demands have stemmed from economic inability to sustain…

  9. University Policy vs Students' Expectations: Investigating Students' Perceptions of Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Jo; Rossi, Dolene

    2015-01-01

    Central Queensland University (CQU) is progressing toward a policy whereby all course materials will only be available online from 2013. The assumption by decision-makers within CQU is that current and potential students are comfortable enough with the use of technology that they will accept all their course materials being delivered online. This…

  10. The National Energy Policy Institute (NEPI) at The University of Tulsa (F INAL REPORT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blais, Roger [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2013-10-31

    NEPI, a non-profit organization located at The University of Tulsa (TU), was established to develop and disseminate national energy policy recommendations. Research under this grant covered a wide variety of projects, including research into the future of nuclear power, oil market pricing, and the feasibility of biofuels.

  11. Bridging Water Resources Policy and Environmental Engineering in the Classroom at Cornell University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, M. T.; Shaw, S. B.; Seifert, S.; Schwarz, T.

    2006-12-01

    Current university undergraduate students in environmental sciences and engineering are the next generation of environmental protection practitioners. Recognizing this, Cornell's Biological and Environmental Engineering department has developed a popular class, Watershed Engineering (BEE 473), specifically designed to bridge the too-common gap between water resources policy and state-of-art science and technology. Weekly homework assignments are to design real-life solutions to actual water resources problems, often with the objective of applying storm water policies to local situations. Where appropriate, usually in conjunction with recent amendments to the Federal Clean Water Act, this course introduces water resource protection tools and concepts developed in the Cornell Soil and Water Lab. Here we present several examples of how we build bridges between university classrooms and the complex world of water resources policy.

  12. Pandemic policy and planning considerations for universities: findings from a tabletop exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Randal; Stergachis, Andy; Thompson, Jack; Osaki, Carl; Johnson, Clark; Charvat, Steven J; Marsden-Haug, Nicola

    2007-12-01

    The potential for a novel influenza virus to cause a pandemic represents a significant threat to global health. Planning for pandemic flu, as compared to planning for other types of hazards, presents some unique challenges to businesses, communities, and education institutions. To identify and address the challenges that may be faced by major metropolitan universities during a flu pandemic, a tabletop exercise was developed, offered, and evaluated. Its purpose was to assess existing University of Washington (UW) plans and policies for responding to an influenza pandemic. On May 31, 2006, more than 50 participants, including UW administrators and unit leaders and a number of key external partners, participated in a tabletop exercise designed to simulate all phases of an influenza pandemic. This exercise revealed existing gaps in university pandemic influenza plans and policies, including issues related to isolation and quarantine, continuity of operations, disaster mental health services, integration of volunteers into a disaster response, tracking travel of university students and personnel, communication problems, and ways to meet the needs of resident and foreign students and faculty during an outbreak. Policy and planning recommendations are offered that address each of these challenges faced by UW as well as other major research universities and colleges.

  13. Evaluating the impact of strategic personnel policies using a MILP model: The public university case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre, R. de la; Lusa, A.; Mateo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of the paper is to evaluate the impact of diverse personnel policies around personnel promotion in the design of the strategic staff plan for a public university. The strategic staff planning consists in the determination of the size and composition of the workforce for an organization. Design/methodology/approach: The staff planning is solved using a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) model. The MILP model represents the organizational structure of the university, the personnel categories and capacity decisions, the demand requirements, the required service level and budget restrictions. All these aspects are translated into a set of data, as well as the parameters and constraints building up the mathematical model for optimization. The required data for the model is adopted from a Spanish public university. Findings: The development of appropriate policies for personnel promotion can effectively reduce the number of dismissals while proposing a transition towards different preferable workforce structures in the university. Research limitations/implications: The long term staff plan for the university is solved by the MILP model considering a time horizon of 8 years. For this time horizon, the required input data is derived from current data of the university. Different scenarios are proposed considering different temporal trends for input data, such as in demand and admissible promotional ratios for workers. Originality/value: The literature review reports a lack of formalized procedures for staff planning in universities taking into account, at the same time, the regulations on hiring, dismissals, promotions and the workforce heterogeneity, all considered to optimize workforce size and composition addressing not only an economic criteria, but also the required workforce expertise and the quality in the service offered. This paper adopts a formalized procedure developed by the authors in previous works, and exploits it to assess the

  14. Strengthening the health workforce and rolling out universal health coverage: the need for policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Adam D; Mayhew, Susannah H

    2013-07-24

    This article opens a debate about how to think about moving forward with the emerging twin movements of human resources for health (HRH) and universal health coverage (UHC). There is sufficient evidence to warrant these movements, but actors and the policy process significantly affect which policies are adopted and how they are implemented. How exactly this occurs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is not very well understood. Furthermore, it is not clear whether actors will mobilize for or against the emergent HRH and UHC agendas. Policy analysis should help illuminate potential strategies to account for multiple interests and divergent values in volatile stakeholder environments. We argue that not only should the movement for UHC be paired with current efforts to address the human resources crisis, but also, for both to succeed, we need to know more about how health policy works in LMICs.

  15. Nutrition policies at child-care centers and impact on role modeling of healthy eating behaviors of caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erinosho, Temitope O; Hales, Derek P; McWilliams, Christina P; Emunah, Josie; Ward, Dianne Stanton

    2012-01-01

    Studies suggest that caregivers influence children's dietary behaviors through role modeling in child-care environments. However, few studies have examined role modeling by caregivers and child-care center policies. This cross-sectional study evaluated the associations between child-care center policies about staff eating practices and caregivers' eating behaviors during mealtime interactions with children. Data were collected in 2008-2009 at 50 North Carolina child-care centers. Caregivers (n=124) reported about modeling healthy eating behaviors to children, trained research staff observed caregivers' (n=112) eating behaviors in classrooms, and directors reported about the presence/absence of center policies on staff eating practices. About 90% of caregivers reported modeling healthy eating behaviors to children. At 80% of centers, caregivers were observed modeling healthy dietary behaviors (eg, sitting with or eating same foods as children), but at fewer centers they were observed consuming unhealthy foods (eg, fast foods, salty snacks: 25%; and sugar-sweetened beverages: 50%). Although no substantial associations were observed between caregiver behaviors and center policies, effect size estimates suggest differences that may be of clinical significance. For example, caregivers were observed modeling healthy dietary behaviors more frequently at centers that had written policies about staff discouraging unhealthy foods for meals/snacks and having informal nutrition talks with children at meals. However, caregivers were observed consuming unhealthy foods and sugar-sweetened beverages more often at centers with policies that promoted healthier foods for meals/snacks. Future research should build on this study by using larger samples to understand why healthy food policies in child-care centers may not translate to eating practices among caregivers. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The UNCG Center for New North Carolinians: University Research and Service for Immigrant Empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Bailey

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of how a university can serve as a resource for newcomer empowerment in light of changing demographics. The University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s Center for New North Carolinians (CNNC was established during a time of dramatic demographic change in the state due to immigrant in-migration. CNNC began with a commitment to culturally appropriate outreach services that empower immigrant communities. This article is adapted from and expands upon a presentation by the author at a symposium on Mexican immigration to the Southeastern US, held in 2005, hosted by the Consul General of Mexico.

  17. The First National Student Conference: NASA University Research Centers at Minority Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daso, Endwell O. (Editor); Mebane, Stacie (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The conference includes contributions from 13 minority universities with NASA University Research Centers. Topics discussed include: leadership, survival strategies, life support systems, food systems, simulated hypergravity, chromium diffusion doping, radiation effects on dc-dc converters, metal oxide glasses, crystal growth of Bil3, science and communication on wheels, semiconductor thin films, numerical solution of random algebraic equations, fuzzy logic control, spatial resolution of satellite images, programming language development, nitric oxide in the thermosphere and mesosphere, high performance polyimides, crossover control in genetic algorithms, hyperthermal ion scattering, etc.

  18. A University-based Forensics Training Center as a Regional Outreach, Education, and Research activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayford B. Vaughn

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a university-based Forensics Training Center (FTC established by a Department of Justice grant for the purpose of improving the ability of state and local law enforcement in the Southeastern part of the United States to address the rising incidence of computer based crime. The FTC effort is described along with supporting evidence of its need. The program is not only a service activity, but also contributes to the Mississippi State University (MSU security program pedagogy, and research effort.

  19. Partnering Healthy@Work: an Australian university-government partnership facilitating policy-relevant research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Kim; Venn, Alison; Jarman, Lisa; Seal, Judy; Teale, Brook; Scott, Jennifer; Sanderson, Kristy

    2017-12-01

    Research funding is increasingly supporting collaborations between knowledge users and researchers. Partnering Healthy@Work (pH@W), an inaugural recipient of funding through Australia's Partnership for Better Health Grants scheme, was a 5-year partnership between the Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania and the Tasmanian State Service (TSS). The partnerships purpose was to evaluate a comprehensive workplace health promotion programme (Healthy@Work) targeting 30 000 public sector employees; generating new knowledge and influencing workplace health promotion policy and decision-making. This mixed methods study evaluates the partnership between policy-makers and academics and identifies strategies that enabled pH@W to deliver key project outcomes. A pH@W document review was conducted, two partnership assessment tools completed and semi-structured interviews conducted with key policy-makers and academics. Analysis of the partnership assessment tools and interviews found that pH@W had reached a strong level of collaboration. Policy-relevant knowledge was generated about the health of TSS employees and their engagement with workplace health promotion. Knowledge exchange of a conceptual and instrumental nature occurred and was facilitated by the shared grant application, clear governance structures, joint planning, regular information exchange between researchers and policy-makers and research student placements in the TSS. Flexibility and acknowledgement of different priorities and perspectives of partner organizations were identified as critical factors for enabling effective partnership working and research relevance. Academic-policy-maker partnerships can be a powerful mechanism for improving policy relevance of research, but need to incorporate strategies that facilitate regular input from researchers and policy-makers in order to achieve this. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  20. How to make a hospital-based wound center financially viable: the Georgetown University Hospital model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attinger, Christopher E; Hoang, Han; Steinberg, John; Couch, Kara; Hubley, Katherine; Winger, Linda; Kugler, Margaret

    2008-11-01

    As the medical need and expenditure for chronic wound care have increased markedly over the past decade, wound centers have grown exponentially throughout the country. They can be community-based or hospital-based, and in either case, can be run by the facility or by a national chain. The wound center's viability is dependent on generated revenue, and its clinical effectiveness is based on a multidisciplinary approach to wound care. By incorporating the wound center into an existing hospital system, one can take advantage of the hospital's resources to effectively treat the more complex patients. Additionally, by focusing on limb salvage, the hospital attracts the critical limb ischemia and other complex patients that often require inpatient admission. We examined the Georgetown University Hospital Center for Wound Healing performance over the first 6 years of operation. Since opening the wound center in 1999, the number of outpatient visits has doubled, the wound care inpatient census has doubled, and the operative cases have increased 3-fold. Because the outpatient segment of the wound center can at best cover its direct cost, it cannot financially justify its existence. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) can increase the revenue to the point where the indirect costs are covered as well and the wound center can be revenue neutral. Due to the medical complexity of limb salvage patients, the inpatient collections are much higher than those of the outpatient wound center and therefore can serve as justification for the latter's financial viability. More importantly, with the wound center in place, the hospital can provide the local/regional community with a comprehensive service that can effectively treat the most challenging wounds. The success is built on a multidisciplinary team approach, use of evidence-based treatment protocols, efficient clinical structure, and a supportive hospital system. The beneficiaries include the patient with a healed wound, the physician with a

  1. India's Proposed Universal Health Coverage Policy: Evidence for Age Structure Transition Effect and Fiscal Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Muttur Ranganathan

    2016-12-01

    India's High Level Expert Group on Universal Health Coverage in 2011 recommended a universal, public-funded and national health coverage policy. As a plausible forward-looking macroeconomic reform in the health sector, this policy proposal on universal health coverage (UHC) needs to be evaluated for age structure transition effect and fiscal sustainability to strengthen its current design and future implementation. Macroeconomic analyses of the long-term implications of age structure transition and fiscal sustainability on India's proposed UHC policy. A new measure of age-specific UHC is developed by combining the age profile of public and private health consumption expenditure by using the National Transfer Accounts methodology. Different projections of age-specific public health expenditure are calculated over the period 2005-2100 to account for the age structure transition effect. The projections include changes in: (1) levels of the expenditure as gross domestic product grows, (2) levels and shape of the expenditure as gross domestic product grows and expenditure converges to that of developed countries (or convergence scenario) based on the Lee-Carter model of forecasting mortality rates, and (3) levels of the expenditure as India moves toward a UHC policy. Fiscal sustainability under each health expenditure projection is determined by using the measures of generational imbalance and sustainability gap in the Generational Accounting methodology. Public health expenditure is marked by age specificities and the elderly population is costlier to support for their healthcare needs in the future. Given the discount and productivity growth rates, the proposed UHC is not fiscally sustainable under India's current fiscal policies except for the convergence scenario. However, if the income elasticity of public expenditure on social welfare and health expenditure is less than one, fiscal sustainability of the UHC policy is attainable in all scenarios of projected public

  2. Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease (CNMR) at the Health Sciences Center, at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia for the construction and operation was prepared by DOE. The EA documents analysis of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts that might occur as a result of these actions, and characterizes potential impacts on the environment. In the EA, DOE presents its evaluation of potential impacts of construction and operation of the CNMR on health and safety of both workers and the public, as well as on the external environment. Construction impacts include the effects of erosion, waste disposal, air emissions, noise, and construction traffic and parking. Operational impacts include the effects of waste generation (domestic, sanitary, hazardous, medical/biological, radioactive and mixed wastes), radiation exposures, air emissions (radioactive, criteria, and air toxics), noise, and new workers. No sensitive resources (wetlands, special sources of groundwater, protected species) exist in the area of project effect.

  3. The Preparation of Master's-Level Professional Counselors for Positions in College and University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Brian M.; Remley, Theodore P., Jr.; Ward, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated college and university counseling center directors' perceptions of the adequacy of the preparation of master's-level counselors for work in college and university counseling centers. Results indicated that counselors were rated on average as prepared; however, many directors had concerns about counselors'…

  4. Brucellosis in Kosovo and Clinical Features of Brucellosis at University clinical center of Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Buçaj, Emine; Puca, Edmond; Namani, Sadie; Bajrami, Muharem; Krasniqi, Valbon; Berisha, Lindita; Jakupi, Xhevat; Halili, Bahrie; Kraja, Dhimiter

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Brucellosis became a remarkable disease in Kosovo. But there is not a comprehensive epidemiological study about pidemiology and clinical course of this disease from Kosovo. The aim of our study is to present demographic and clinical data of patients with brucellosis at University Clinical Center of Kosovo.Methods: A retrospective study was performed for the patients with brucellosis treated in our clinic during years 2011- 2012. The data about demography, history of the disease, cl...

  5. Assessment of oral health attitudes and behavior among students of Kuwait University Health Sciences Center

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of this study were to assess attitudes and behavior of oral health maintenance among students in four faculties (Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Allied Health) and to compare oral health attitudes and behavior of all students at Kuwait University Health Sciences Center (KUHSC) based on their academic level. Materials and Methods: Students enrolled in the Faculties of Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Allied Health at KUHSC were evaluated regarding their oral health attitudes...

  6. Policies Regulating the Assignments of the Bachelor of Education Programme of Indira Gandhi National Open University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sutapa

    2016-01-01

    This case study examines the policies formulated by the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), an open and distance learning university of India for regulating the practices related to the assignments of its Bachelor of Education programme. Following the examination it argues that some policies are formulated in the context of the…

  7. Direct Access to Physical Therapy Services Is Safe in a University Student Health Center Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintken, Paul E; Pascoe, Stephanie C; Barsch, Andrea K; Cleland, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective descriptive study was to determine if direct access to physical therapy (PT) in a university health center placed patients at risk for adverse events. Direct access to PT is underutilized, even though it has been reported to reduce medical costs; however, there is a paucity of evidence on the clinical risks related to this practice. The University of Colorado at Boulder instituted a direct access musculoskeletal injury clinic in 2000. A retrospective analysis was performed on patient visits to Wardenburg Student Health Center from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2011. Descriptive statistics were analyzed for the number of new patients examined with and without a referral, documented patient adverse events, and any disciplinary or legal action against a physical therapist. During the 10-year data collection period, 12,976 patients accessed PT without a referral. There were no reported unidentified cases of serious medical pathology or adverse events and none of the PTs had their credentials or licenses modified or revoked for disciplinary action. Patients managed through direct access are at minimal to no risk for negligent care when evaluated and treated by PTs in a university student health center setting.

  8. The institutionalization of gender equality policies at the Spanish university. Advances and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inma Pastor Gosalbez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The path to eliminating gender gaps moves between advances and promises. Its pace is determined by the combination of policies, legislation and social changes. Despite the measures taken, gender inequality persists in scientific, technological and academic fields. Equality Plans, which must be implemented at Spanish universities since the adoption of the Organic Law 3/2007 of 22 March for the effective equality of women and men, constitute an important, but not sufficient, step to achieve equality in this area. A key factor can be the structures and networks for the implementation of equality policies (intra- and interuniversity ones, as well as those with other agencies and institutions, which are not sufficiently developed at present. This article describes the process of institutionalization of equality policies at Spanish universities and presents an analysis of the legislation applicable to university level. Furthermore, data about equality units and their characteristics are shown. The article concludes with a reflection upon the elements that can increase the impact of university equality structures as well as the remaining challenges.

  9. Impact of Policies on Physical Activity and Screen Time Practices in 50 Child-Care Centers in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erinosho, Temitope; Hales, Derek; Vaughn, Amber; Mazzucca, Stephanie; Ward, Dianne S

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed physical activity and screen time policies in child-care centers and their associations with physical activity and screen time practices and preschool children's (3-5 years old) physical activity. Data were from 50 child-care centers in North Carolina. Center directors reported on the presence/absence of written policies. Trained research assistants observed physical activity and screen time practices in at least 1 preschool classroom across 3 to 4 days. Children (N = 544) wore accelerometers to provide an objective measure of physical activity. Physical activity and screen time policies varied across centers. Observational data showed 82.7 min/d of active play opportunities were provided to children. Screen time provided did not exceed 30 min/d/child at 98% of centers. Accelerometer data showed children spent 38 min/d in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and 206 min/d in sedentary activity. Policies about staff supervision of media use were negatively associated with screen time (P < .05). Contrary to expectation, policies about physical activity were associated with less time in physical activity. Clear strategies are needed for translating physical activity policies to practice. Further research is needed to evaluate the quality of physical activity policies, their impact on practice, and ease of operationalization.

  10. Analysis of Academic Medical Center Graduate Medical Education Websites for Policies Regarding Restrictive Covenants in Non-ACGME Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juern, Jeremy S; Stahl, David M; Weigelt, John A

    2017-10-25

    The topic of restrictive covenants in fellowships that are not approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has not been studied. To investigate the presence of institutional polices at academic medical centers regarding restrictive covenants in non-ACGME fellowships. The graduate medical education (GME) office website of 132 academic medical centers was evaluated and searched for the following as of June 1, 2017: presence of any ACGME residency or fellowship, presence of any non-ACGME fellowship, presence of GME policies and procedures, presence of a restrictive covenant policy, and if that policy applies to non-ACGME fellowships. A total of 96 academic medical centers had non-ACGME fellowships. Of these, 56 prohibit restrictive covenants in non-ACGME fellowships because of either their GME policy or state law. Seven academic medical centers have a GME policy that allows restrictive covenants in non-ACGME fellowships. Two academic medical centers clearly state that fellows in a certain subspecialty fellowship will be required to sign a restrictive covenant. GME policies at academic medical centers that allow restrictive covenants in non-ACGME fellowships are very uncommon. The practice of having fellows sign a restrictive covenant in a non-ACGME fellowship is in conflict with an American Medical Association ethics statement, ACGME institutional requirement IV.L, and the rules of the San Francisco Match. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical Informatics Training at Columbia University and the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, J J; Allen, B A; Clayton, P D

    The Department of Medical Informatics at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons consists of a faculty of 17 full- and part-time faculty. The Department faculty collaborate with the Department of Computer Science and several clinical departments of the medical center. We offer courses in medical informatics, formal degrees (M.A., M.Phil. and Ph.D.) and a postdoctoral training program. In addition to academic offerings, the close affiliation with the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and the primary responsibilities for clinical information systems offers trainees unique opportunities to work with and develop real-world applications. Faculty research programs include work on the Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS), Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), High-Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC), Electronic Medical Records, automated decision support and technology transfer through the Center for Advanced Technology.

  12. Approaching the concept of territory and its relation to the universality of social policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirce Koga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The text dialogue on territorial perspective on Brazilian social policies, against the backdrop of the exclusionary capitalist logic that causes the residents’ daily struggle for access to the city and to citizenship. In search of some key understanding of the dynamics present in the territory of living of those who are citizens of law is that it proposes an approach to the concept of territory and its relation to the universality of social policies and at the same time, with roughness and socio-territorial densities.

  13. Societal values and policies may curtail preschool children's physical activity in child care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kristen A; Sherman, Susan N; Kendeigh, Cassandra A; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Saelens, Brian E

    2012-02-01

    Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children's physical activity in child care centers. Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. We identified 3 main barriers to children's physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on "academics." Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. Societal priorities for young children--safety and school readiness--may be hindering children's physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children's health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies.

  14. Publications of the University of Karlsruhe (T.H.) and the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This is the 14th volume of the joint list of publications of the University of Karlsruhe (T.H.), the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe and some institutions which are closely linked to the University. It contains the publications of the year 1981 as well as some addenda from 1980. Included were books and journals, journal articles and contributions from compilations, research reports, dissertations and habilitation theses which were written or published by these institutions, their bodies and institutes as well as their teachers and scientific staff, and also patents. Not included were, as a rule, diploma theses, newspaper articles, reviews, internal reports and bulletins. The list of publications from University is mainly based on entries made by the institutes and chairs; its completeness can not be granted here. (orig./RW) [de

  15. Health at the center of health systems reform: how philosophy can inform policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmberg, Joachim P; Martin, Carmel M; Moes, Mark M

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary views hold that health and disease can be defined as objective states and thus should determine the design and delivery of health services. Yet health concepts are elusive and contestable. Health is neither an individual construction, a reflection of societal expectations, nor only the absence of pathologies. Based on philosophical and sociological theory, empirical evidence, and clinical experience, we argue that health has simultaneously objective and subjective features that converge into a dynamic complex-adaptive health model. Health (or its dysfunction, illness) is a dynamic state representing complex patterns of adaptation to body, mind, social, and environmental challenges, resulting in bodily homeostasis and personal internal coherence. The "balance of health" model-emergent, self-organizing, dynamic, and adaptive-underpins the very essence of medicine. This model should be the foundation for health systems design and also should inform therapeutic approaches, policy decision-making, and the development of emerging health service models. A complex adaptive health system focused on achieving the best possible "personal" health outcomes must provide the broad policy frameworks and resources required to implement people-centered health care. People-centered health systems are emergent in nature, resulting in locally different but mutually compatible solutions across the whole health system.

  16. Conveying campus sexual misconduct policy information to college and university students: Results from a 7-campus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S J; Edwards, K M; Banyard, V L; Stapleton, J G; Demers, J M; Moynihan, M M

    2016-01-01

    To examine the efficacy of different methods (ie, in-class policy reading; in-class policy reading and discussion; no reading or discussion) to deliver campus sexual misconduct policy information to students on 7 campuses. A total of 1,195 participants at 7 colleges and universities participated in the study from August to October 2014. Participants were randomly assigned at the class level and completed pretest and posttest surveys assessing knowledge of campus policy and resources and confidence to seek help for sexual assault. Students exposed to a larger dosage of material (in-class policy reading plus discussion) showed greater positive changes in attitudes and knowledge than students who did not receive information or were only read the policy. However, on some indices, students who were only read the policy showed positive outcomes compared with students receiving no intervention. Colleges and universities must use engaging methods to disseminate campus sexual misconduct policies to students.

  17. Threats to the Sustainability of the Outsourced Call Center Industry in the Philippines: Implications for Language Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friginal, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This study overviews current threats to the sustainability of the outsourced call center industry in the Philippines and discusses implications for macro and micro language policies given the use of English in this cross-cultural interactional context. This study also summarizes the present state of outsourced call centers in the Philippines, and…

  18. 78 FR 21399 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Center for Archaeological Research at the University of Texas at...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ...-PPWOCRADN0] Notice of Inventory Completion: Center for Archaeological Research at the University of Texas at... Archaeological Research at the University of Texas at San Antonio has completed an inventory of human remains, in... Research at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribe...

  19. The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Watson, L. E.; Hooper, E.; Huesmann, A.; Schenker, B.; Timbie, P.; Rzchowski, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides academic support and small-group supplemental instruction to students studying introductory algebra-based and calculus-based physics. These classes are gateway courses for majors in the biological and physical sciences, pre-health fields, engineering, and secondary science education. The Physics Learning Center offers supplemental instruction groups twice weekly where students can discuss concepts and practice with problem-solving techniques. The Center also provides students with access on-line resources that stress conceptual understanding, and to exam review sessions. Participants in our program include returning adults, people from historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, students from families in lower-income circumstances, students in the first generation of their family to attend college, transfer students, veterans, and people with disabilities, all of whom might feel isolated in their large introductory course and thus have a more difficult time finding study partners. We also work with students potentially at-risk for having academic difficulty (due to factors academic probation, weak math background, low first exam score, or no high school physics). A second mission of the Physics Learning Center is to provide teacher training and leadership experience for undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors. These Peer Tutors lead the majority of the weekly group sessions in close supervision by PLC staff members. We will describe our work to support students in the Physics Learning Center, including our teacher-training program for our undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors

  20. Early Complications in Hip and Knee Arthroplasties in a Safety Net Hospital vs a University Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jergesen, Harry E; Yi, Paul H

    2016-04-01

    Indigent populations face unique challenges that may increase surgical risk and adversely affect the outcomes of hip and knee arthroplasties. This study examines whether there is a difference in early postoperative complications in patients treated in a safety net hospital and in a nearby university center. A retrospective review was undertaken of 533 consecutive hip and knee arthroplasties performed by a single experienced surgeon in a safety net hospital and in a university medical center from 2008 to 2012. Patients were followed for a minimum of 2 years. The primary outcomes evaluated were total complications, deep infections, and reoperations. Statistical comparison of the data from the 2 patient groups was carried out using Fisher exact test. Despite the lower percentage of index revision procedures in the safety net group (8% vs 20.5%; P = .0003), the incidence of adverse outcomes was higher in this group than in the university group: for total complications, 12.3% vs 4.9% (P = .003); for deep infections, 3.2% vs 0.6% (P = .025); and for reoperations, 7.5% vs 2.6% (P = .009). For primary procedures in particular, differences in the incidences of these outcomes were even more significant. In this study, early complications were more frequent in patients who underwent hip and knee arthroplasties in a safety net hospital compared with those who underwent the same procedures in a nearby university center. Future prospective studies are warranted to determine which patient-related or care process-related factors should be optimized to improve arthroplasty outcomes in vulnerable, safety net populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Informing Science (IS and Science and Technology Studies (STS: The University as Decision Center (DC for Teaching Interdisciplinary Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Castelao-Lawless

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Students of history and philosophy of science courses at my University are either naïve robust realists or naïve relativists in relation to science and technology. The first group absorbs from culture stereotypical conceptions, such as the value-free character of the scientific method, that science and technology are impervious to history or ideology, and that science and religion are always at odds. The second believes science and technology were selected arbitrarily by ideologues to have privileged world views of reality to the detriment of other interpretations. These deterministic outlooks must be challenged to make students aware of the social importance of their future roles, be they as scientists and engineers or as science and technology policy decision makers. The University as Decision Center (DC not only reproduces the social by teaching standard solutions to well-defined problems but also provides information regarding conflict resolution and the epistemological, individual, historical, social, and political mechanisms that help create new science and technology. Interdisciplinary research prepares students for roles that require science and technology literacy, but raises methodological issues in the context of the classroom as it increases uncertainty with respect to apparently self-evident beliefs about scientific and technological practices.

  2. Putting women at the center: a review of Indian policy to address person-centered care in maternal and newborn health, family planning and abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aradhana Srivastava

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Person-centered care is a critical component of quality care, essential to enable treatment adherence, and maximize health outcomes. Improving the quality of health services is a key strategy to achieve the new global target of zero preventable maternal deaths by 2030. Recognizing this, the Government of India has in the last decade initiated a number of strategies to address quality of care in health and family welfare services. Methods We conducted a policy review of quality improvement strategies in India from 2005 to 15, covering three critical areas– maternal and newborn health, family planning, and abortion (MNHFP + A. Based on Walt and Gilson’s policy triangle framework, we analyzed the extent to which policies incorporated person-centered care, while identifying unaddressed issues. Data was sourced from Government of India websites, scientific and grey literature databases. Results Twenty-two national policy documents, comprising two policy statements and 20 implementation guidelines of specific schemes were included in the review. Quality improvement strategies span infrastructure, commodities, human resources, competencies, and accountability that are driving quality assurance in MNHFP + A services. However, several implementation challenges have affected compliance with person-centered care, thereby affecting utilization and outcomes. Conclusion Focus on person-centered care in Indian MNHFP + A policy has increased in recent years. Nevertheless, some aspects must still be strengthened, such as positive interpersonal behavior, information sharing and promptness of care. Implementation can be improved through better provider training, patient feedback and monitoring mechanisms. Moreover, unless persisting structural challenges are addressed implementation of person-centered care in facilities will not be effective.

  3. Putting women at the center: a review of Indian policy to address person-centered care in maternal and newborn health, family planning and abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Aradhana; Singh, Devaki; Montagu, Dominic; Bhattacharyya, Sanghita

    2017-07-14

    Person-centered care is a critical component of quality care, essential to enable treatment adherence, and maximize health outcomes. Improving the quality of health services is a key strategy to achieve the new global target of zero preventable maternal deaths by 2030. Recognizing this, the Government of India has in the last decade initiated a number of strategies to address quality of care in health and family welfare services. We conducted a policy review of quality improvement strategies in India from 2005 to 15, covering three critical areas- maternal and newborn health, family planning, and abortion (MNHFP + A). Based on Walt and Gilson's policy triangle framework, we analyzed the extent to which policies incorporated person-centered care, while identifying unaddressed issues. Data was sourced from Government of India websites, scientific and grey literature databases. Twenty-two national policy documents, comprising two policy statements and 20 implementation guidelines of specific schemes were included in the review. Quality improvement strategies span infrastructure, commodities, human resources, competencies, and accountability that are driving quality assurance in MNHFP + A services. However, several implementation challenges have affected compliance with person-centered care, thereby affecting utilization and outcomes. Focus on person-centered care in Indian MNHFP + A policy has increased in recent years. Nevertheless, some aspects must still be strengthened, such as positive interpersonal behavior, information sharing and promptness of care. Implementation can be improved through better provider training, patient feedback and monitoring mechanisms. Moreover, unless persisting structural challenges are addressed implementation of person-centered care in facilities will not be effective.

  4. Promoting universal financial protection: a policy analysis of universal health coverage in Costa Rica (1940-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Juan Rafael; Muiser, Jorine

    2013-08-21

    This paper explores the implementation and sustenance of universal health coverage (UHC) in Costa Rica, discussing the development of a social security scheme that covered 5% of the population in 1940, to one that finances and provides comprehensive healthcare to the whole population today. The scheme is financed by mandatory, tri-partite social insurance contributions complemented by tax funding to cover the poor. The analysis takes a historical perspective and explores the policy process including the key actors and their relative influence in decision-making. Data were collected using qualitative research instruments, including a review of literature, institutional and other documents, and in-depth interviews with key informants. Key lessons to be learned are: i) population health was high on the political agenda in Costa Rica, in particular before the 1980s when UHC was enacted and the transfer of hospitals to the social security institution took place. Opposition to UHC could therefore be contained through negotiation and implemented incrementally despite the absence of real consensus among the policy elite; ii) since the 1960s, the social security institution has been responsible for UHC in Costa Rica. This institution enjoys financial and managerial autonomy relative to the general government, which has also facilitated the UHC policy implementation process; iii) UHC was simultaneously constructed on three pillars that reciprocally strengthened each other: increasing population coverage, increasing availability of financial resources based on solidarity financing mechanisms, and increasing service coverage, ultimately offering comprehensive health services and the same benefits to every resident in the country; iv) particularly before the 1980s, the fruits of economic growth were structurally invested in health and other universal social policies, in particular education and sanitation. The social security institution became a flagship of Costa Rica

  5. Promoting universal financial protection: a policy analysis of universal health coverage in Costa Rica (1940–2000)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper explores the implementation and sustenance of universal health coverage (UHC) in Costa Rica, discussing the development of a social security scheme that covered 5% of the population in 1940, to one that finances and provides comprehensive healthcare to the whole population today. The scheme is financed by mandatory, tri-partite social insurance contributions complemented by tax funding to cover the poor. Methods The analysis takes a historical perspective and explores the policy process including the key actors and their relative influence in decision-making. Data were collected using qualitative research instruments, including a review of literature, institutional and other documents, and in-depth interviews with key informants. Results Key lessons to be learned are: i) population health was high on the political agenda in Costa Rica, in particular before the 1980s when UHC was enacted and the transfer of hospitals to the social security institution took place. Opposition to UHC could therefore be contained through negotiation and implemented incrementally despite the absence of real consensus among the policy elite; ii) since the 1960s, the social security institution has been responsible for UHC in Costa Rica. This institution enjoys financial and managerial autonomy relative to the general government, which has also facilitated the UHC policy implementation process; iii) UHC was simultaneously constructed on three pillars that reciprocally strengthened each other: increasing population coverage, increasing availability of financial resources based on solidarity financing mechanisms, and increasing service coverage, ultimately offering comprehensive health services and the same benefits to every resident in the country; iv) particularly before the 1980s, the fruits of economic growth were structurally invested in health and other universal social policies, in particular education and sanitation. The social security institution became a

  6. [THE NEW HADASSAH-HEBREW UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER: A LEADER IN ISRAELI PUBLIC MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevorach, Dror; Leibergall, Meir; Rothstein, Zeev

    2018-03-01

    Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center is regaining its lead in Israeli public medicine with clinical excellence, state-of-the art technology, high achievement in research, and outstanding medical education for students and trainees. Hadassah has two campuses at Ein Kerem and Mount Scopus that together offer 1200-hospital beds and 40 hybrid and advanced operating rooms. Hadassah Medical Center, an initiative of Hadassah organization led by Henrietta Szold, is one of the foremost health care providers in Israel. Together, the Hebrew University and Hadassah are home to Schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, Nursing, Public Health, Occupational Therapy, and Dental Medicine. The medical school enrolls over 1000 medical students including a special track for military physicians. Hadassah opened the new Davidson medical tower in 2012 and the development of new infrastructure continues for Centers of Excellence in Surgery, Oncology, Hematology, and Medicine, for the benefit of the public in greater Jerusalem and all of Israel. In this journal, we will present 12 articles that represent the integration of state-of-the-art clinical medicine and research technologies, all dedicated to advancing medicine for the people of Israel.

  7. Assessment of oral health attitudes and behavior among students of Kuwait University Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Dena A

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess attitudes and behavior of oral health maintenance among students in four faculties (Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Allied Health) and to compare oral health attitudes and behavior of all students at Kuwait University Health Sciences Center (KUHSC) based on their academic level. Students enrolled in the Faculties of Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Allied Health at KUHSC were evaluated regarding their oral health attitudes and behavior by an e-mail invitation with a link to the Hiroshima University Dental Behavior Inventory survey that was sent to all 1802 students with Kuwait University Health Sciences Center e-mail addresses. The data were analyzed for frequency distributions, and differences among the groups were assessed using the Mann-Whitney U test, Chi-square test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant ( P behavior than that of their nondental professional fellow students ( P behavior. Dental students and students who were in advanced levels of their training along with female students demonstrated better oral health practices and perceptions than students in lower academic levels and male students, respectively. Additional studies for investigating the effectiveness and identifying areas requiring modification within the dental curriculum at KUHSC may be warranted.

  8. Student, Faculty, and Staff Approval of University Smoke/Tobacco-Free Policies: An Analysis of Campus Newspaper Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Christopher M; Kabir, Zubair; Greiner, Birgit A; Davoren, Martin P

    2018-01-01

    To provide a nontraditional source of data to university policymakers regarding student, faculty, and staff approval of university smoke/tobacco-free policies, as published through campus newspaper articles. From January to April 2016, a total of 2523 articles were retrieved concerning campus smoking/tobacco at 4-year, public universities. Of these, 54 articles met the inclusion factors, which described 30 surveys about campus approval of tobacco-free policies and 24 surveys about smoke-free policies. In all, the surveys included more than 130 000 respondents. With the exception of 4 surveys, all reported that the most of the respondents approved a tobacco/smoke-free campus policy. Although the study had several limitations, the findings provide a synthesis from a nontraditional data source that is consistent with findings from the peer-reviewed literature, in which most of the students, faculty, and staff on university campuses approve of smoke/tobacco-free campus policies.

  9. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  10. [Researches on virology at the Tohoku University Research Center in the Philippines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshitani, Hitoshi; Saito, Mariko; Okamoto, Michiko; Tamaki, Raita; Kamigaki, Taro; Suzuki, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine has established the Tohoku-RITM Collaborative Research Center on Emerging and Re-emerging Diseases at Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM) in the Philippines in 2008. Our aim of the center is to conduct operational researches, which can contribute to control of infectious diseases in the Philippines. Therefore most of our researches in the Philippines are being conducted in the fields. Main research themes include severe acute respiratory infections in children, influenza disease burden study, molecular epidemiology of rabies, and viral etiology of acute diarrhea. The study on severe acute respiratory infections in children in Leyte Island has recruited hospitalized cases with severe pneumonia. We showed that enterovirus 68 was one of important causative agents in severe pneumonia cases. We also conducted other analyses including molecular epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and pathogenesis of human rhinoviruses (HRV). Based on these studies, we initiated more comprehensive researches in the Philippines since 2010.

  11. An ASEAN Ion Beam Analysis Center at Chiang Mai University, Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tippawan, U.; Kamwann, T.; Yu, L.D.; Intarasiri, S.; Puttaraksa, N.; Unai, S.; Thongleurm, C.; Singkarat, S.

    2014-01-01

    To contribute to the development of nuclear science and technology in Thailand, a comprehensive ion beam analysis center unique in the ASEAN region has recently been established at Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The center is equipped with a 1.7-MV Tandetron tandem accelerator with an ion beam analysis beam line. The beam line is currently capable of performing ion beam analysis techniques such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), RBS/channeling, Elastic BackScattering (EBS), Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Ionoluminescence (IL) with assistance of commercial and in-house-developed softwares. Micro ion beam for MeV-ion mapping using programmable aperture or capillary focusing techniques is being developed. Ion beam analysis experiments and applications have been vigorously developed, especially for novel materials analysis focused on archeological, gemological and biological materials besides other conventional materials.

  12. Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Susan N.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies. PMID:22218842

  13. Measurements of Radon Concentration in Several Wards of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo...

    OpenAIRE

    , Y. Halimi; , S. Kadiri; , G. Hodolli; , B. Xhafa; , A. Jonuzaj

    2016-01-01

    Understanding that what’s the level of environment pollution from radioactive pollutant in some wards of UCCK (University Clinical Center of Kosovo) in Prishtina are made measurements of α radiation which is the product of 222Rn and have been read doses of TLD to some staff workers in three wards of UCCK. All this is done to see the risk level of possible pollution. Concentration of radon 222Rn is measured with device CRM-510 portable instruments. During the measurements the apparatus has rec...

  14. A new apparatus at hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Hiromi; Iwai, Takeo; Narui, Makoto; Omata, Takao

    1996-01-01

    In the hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, following apparatuses were newly installed for accelerator relating apparatus on 1995 fiscal year; 1) Hyper ion microbeam analysis apparatus, 2) Fourier conversion infrared microscopy, 3) Pico second two-dimensional fluorescence measuring apparatus, 4) Femto second wave-length reversible pulse laser radiation apparatus, and others. In addition to double irradiation, pulse beam irradiation experiment and so forth characteristic in conventional hyper irradiation research apparatus, upgrading of material irradiation experiments using these new apparatuses are intended. (G.K.)

  15. Neutron dose rate in the facility at the Cyclotron Center of Chung Shan Medical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Juiping; Chen Chienyi

    2008-01-01

    The neutron dose equivalent rate (DR) leaking from the self-shielded cyclotron was measured using an FHT-751 neutron counting system in the facility at the Cyclotron Center of Chung Shan Medical University. This system was calibrated using two 252 Cf neutron sources and simulated according to MCNP code. The results show various DRs up to 120 μSv h -1 in the cyclotron room. Two-dimensional distributions of measured neutron DRs indicate an explicit, heavy leakage of neutrons through the self-shielded interlock. The neutron DR of the operating cyclotron that is hazardous to the health of medical personal and the public is evaluated. (author)

  16. The new library building at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronick, D A; Bowden, V M; Olivier, E R

    1985-04-01

    The new University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Library opened in June 1983, replacing the 1968 library building. Planning a new library building provides an opportunity for the staff to rethink their philosophy of service. Of paramount concern and importance is the need to convey this philosophy to the architects. This paper describes the planning process and the building's external features, interior layouts, and accommodations for technology. Details of the move to the building are considered and various aspects of the building are reviewed.

  17. Practice of Job Seeker Training Conducted by Polytechnic Center and Polytechnic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Minoru; Ikeda, Tomozumi; Shiota, Yasuhito

    Job seeker training for six months for 15 members was performed by Polytechnic Center Kanto in Yokohama from January, 2006. The injection mold was completed by having made training and a training subject correspond. And employment of all the members who consist of 90 persons during the 6 periods was completed. Furthermore, job seeker training for ten months for ten members was performed by the Polytechnic University from January, 2010. Then, The difficult injection mold was completed and all the members were employed. This paper discussed job seeker training and an employment result.

  18. Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Systems, New Mexico State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Stephen; DeLeon, Phillip; Borah, Deva; Lyman, Ray

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Systems activities at New Mexico State University. Presentations cover the following topics: (1) small satellite communications, including nanosatellite radio and virtual satellite development; (2) modulation and detection studies, including details on smooth phase interpolated keying (SPIK) spectra and highlights of an adaptive turbo multiuser detector; (3) decoupled approaches to nonlinear ISI compensation; (4) space internet testing; (4) optical communication; (5) Linux-based receiver for lightweight optical communications without a laser in space, including software design, performance analysis, and the receiver algorithm; (6) carrier tracking hardware; and (7) subband transforms for adaptive direct sequence spread spectrum receivers.

  19. Primary Care for Underserved Populations: Navigating Policy to Incorporate Occupational Therapy Into Federally Qualified Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Aileen D; Griffith, Vanessa M; Mroz, Tracy M; Jirikowic, Tracy L

    Federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) provide low- or no-cost primary care to medically underserved populations such as homeless or low-income people, migrant workers, and members of marginalized cultural groups. Occupational therapy services have the potential to help improve the health and functioning of FQHC patients. Using a FQHC serving American Indian/Alaska Native populations as a case example, we describe how occupational therapy is well suited to help meet the needs of medically underserved populations. We then examine options for integrating occupational therapy into this unique primary care setting, discuss related administrative and policy considerations, and propose possible solutions to identified barriers. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  20. Nutrition and physical activity in child care centers: the impact of a wellness policy initiative on environment and policy assessment and observation outcomes, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyn, Rodney; Maalouf, Joyce; Evers, Sarah; Davis, Justin; Griffin, Monica

    2013-05-23

    The child care environment has emerged as an ideal setting in which to implement policies that promote healthy body weight of children. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a wellness policy and training program on the physical activity and nutrition environment in 24 child care centers in Georgia. We used the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation instrument to identify changes to foods served, staff behaviors, and physical activity opportunities. Observations were performed over 1 day, beginning with breakfast and concluding when the program ended for the day. Observations were conducted from February 2010 through April 2011 for a total of 2 observations in each center. Changes to nutrition and physical activity in centers were assessed on the basis of changes in scores related to the physical activity and nutrition environment documented in the observations. Paired t test analyses were performed to determine significance of changes. Significant improvements to total nutrition (P environments of centers by enhancing active play (P = .02), the sedentary environment (P = .005), the portable environment (P = .002), staff behavior (P = .004), and physical activity training and education (P environment (P policies and training caregivers in best practices for physical activity and nutrition can promote healthy weight for young children in child care settings.

  1. Final report on a cold climate permeable interlocking concrete pavement test facility at the University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center (UNHSC) completed a two year field verification study of a permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP) stormwater management system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cold climate function...

  2. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Formative Center for the Evaluation of Environmental Impacts on Fetal Development - Brown University

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University studies long-term health of urban pollutants on children raised in minority neighborhoods in inner-city communities.

  3. A new methodology for assessing health policy and systems research and analysis capacity in African universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lê, Gillian; Mirzoev, Tolib; Orgill, Marsha; Erasmus, Ermin; Lehmann, Uta; Okeyo, Stephen; Goudge, Jane; Maluka, Stephen; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Aikins, Moses; de Savigny, Don; Tomson, Goran; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-10-08

    The importance of health policy and systems research and analysis (HPSR+A) has been increasingly recognised, but it is still unclear how most effectively to strengthen the capacity of the different organisations involved in this field. Universities are particularly crucial but the expansive literature on capacity development has little to offer the unique needs of HPSR+A activity within universities, and often overlooks the pivotal contribution of capacity assessments to capacity strengthening. The Consortium for Health Policy and Systems Analysis in Africa 2011-2015 designed and implemented a new framework for capacity assessment for HPSR+A within universities. The methodology is reported in detail. Our reflections on developing and conducting the assessment generated four lessons for colleagues in the field. Notably, there are currently no published capacity assessment methodologies for HPSR+A that focus solely on universities - we report a first for the field to initiate the dialogue and exchange of experiences with others. Second, in HPSR+A, the unit of assessment can be a challenge, because HPSR+A groups within universities tend to overlap between academic departments and are embedded in different networks. Third, capacity assessment experience can itself be capacity strengthening, even when taking into account that doing such assessments require capacity. From our experience, we propose that future systematic assessments of HPSR+A capacity need to focus on both capacity assets and needs and assess capacity at individual, organisational, and systems levels, whilst taking into account the networked nature of HPSR+A activity. A genuine partnership process between evaluators and those participating in an assessment can improve the quality of assessment and uptake of results in capacity strengthening.

  4. THE ROLE OF STUDENT-CENTERED EDUCATION IN STIMULATING THE ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT OF UNIVERSITY GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosca Remus

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship plays a major role in the economic growth and development of most modern economies. Measures are being taken by most governments in order to stimulate entrepreneurship, however even more can be done by promoting entrepreneurship in the educational context. According to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Global Report (2013 Romania is performing slightly under the average of similar countries when it comes to entrepreneurial activity, is above the average at necessity-driven entrepreneurship and low at innovation driven entrepreneurship. Under these circumstances, a focus on entrepreneurship in higher education is required in order to help Romania bridge the gap to the other efficiency-driven economies. Our study aims to assess the impact of the university level education on the career choices of present entrepreneurs in the Bihor county of Romania. 30 university graduates that are currently running a business have been interviewed regarding the reasons for starting their companies as well as the relationship that they had and have with the university from which they graduated. While some of the entrepreneurs claim that their education had little impact on the decision to become an entrepreneur, most of them believe that it played a big role on their performance and it prepared them somewhat for the challenges they faced once they opened their businesses. Also a large portion of them report being involved in the activity of the university. The participants offered valuable feedback regarding their experience with the university. They also provided considerable information regarding the improvement that they would like to see in the future and how a more student-centered education process could positively impact the development of entrepreneurial spirit and better prepare future graduates to start and run a business. We further discuss the means through which this could be achieved in the context of our institution and other

  5. A fraud prevention policy: Its relevance and implication at a university of technology in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Rorwana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Using research grants administrators and their clients (academic researchers as the lens, this paper investigated the relevance and implication of a fraud prevention policy at a University of Technology (UoT in South Africa. The paper adopted a quantitative approach in which closed-ended questions were complemented by open-ended questions in the survey questionnaire in the attempt to capture the perceptions of both research grants administrators and their clients on the relevance and implications of a fraud and irregularity prevention policy. The results indicate that both research grants administrators (71.4 %, and their clients (73% do not know if UoTx has a fraud and irregularity policy. While only 36% of research grants administrators indicated that they would feel safe reporting deceitful activities, a slight majority (59% of the clients reported same. With regards to the steps to follow to report fraudulent activity, it was noted that while all (100% the research grants administrators noted that they were clueless, ironically an overwhelming majority of their clients indicated otherwise. Notwithstanding, both research grants administrators and their clients (93% and 95% respectively concurred that a fraud prevention policy was necessary for UoTx. The implication is that having phenomenal controls that are not effectively publicized, monitored or worse still overridden by someone are useless.

  6. University Satellite Consortium and Space Education in Japan Centered on Micro-Nano Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasuka, S.; Kawashima, R.

    2002-01-01

    in Japan especially centered on micro or nano class satellites. Hands-on training using micro-nano satellites provide unique opportunity of space education to university level students, by giving them a chance to experience the whole space project cycle from mission creation, satellite design, fabrication, test, launch, operation through analysis of the results. Project management and team working are other important skills that can be trained in these projects. include 1) low cost, which allows one laboratory in university to carry out a project, 2) short development period such as one or two year, which enables students to obtain the results of their projects before they graduate, and 3) small size and weight, which enables fabrication and test within usually very narrow university laboratory areas. In Japan, several projects such as CanSat, CubeSat or Whale Observation Satellite have been carried out, proving that micro-nano satellites provide very unique and valuable educational opportunity. with the objective to make a university student and staff community of these micro-nano satellite related activities in Japan. This consortium aims for many activities including facilitating information and skills exchange and collaborations between member universities, helping students to use ground test facilities of national laboratories, consulting them on political or law related matters, coordinating joint development of equipments or projects, and bridging between these university activities and the needs or interests of the people in general. This kind of outreach activity is essential because how to create missions of micro-nano satellites should be pursued in order for this field to grow larger than a merely educational enterprise. The final objectives of the consortium is to make a huge community of the users, mission creators, investors and manufactures(i.e., university students) of micro-nano satellites, and provide a unique contribution to the activation of

  7. [Epidemiology of soft tissue sarcomas in a university center in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Maysam Amin; Perlaky, Tamás; Kovács, Krisztián; Kiss, János; Szalay, Krisztián; Antal, Imre; Sápi, Zoltán; Szendrõi, Miklós

    2017-12-18

    Our aim was to investigate the rare malignant soft tissue sarcomas responsible for 1.5% of all malignant tumors, to compare our epidemiological data from the patient population of the Department of Orthopaedics, Semmelweis University, to data described in the international literature for soft tissue tumors. We reviewed 595 cases of primary soft tissue sarcomas treated between 1994 and 2014 and compared results to international data from the literature. Our results were similar to those found in the international literature: mean age, mild male predominance, the most common sarcoma subgroups, the superficial and deep sarcoma ratio, low and high grade sarcoma ratio, the ratio of patients with a primary lung metastasis. Compared to other European data we found significantly longer patient referral to centers (3.6 months in case of superficial sarcomas, 8 months in case of deep localization) which surprisingly had no substantial effect on average tumor size (superficial: 5 cm, deep: 10.5 cm). This corresponds with data from the literature. The long delay period in patients' request of medical service draws attention to difficulties in differential diagnosis in this rare type of tumor, delays in referring patients to a center, and the lack of consultation. We recommend that the required investigations be performed in a musculoskeletal oncology center where this type of cancer is treated.

  8. Addressing the Global Zika Epidemic Locally: An Interprofessional Model of Universal Screening at One Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Rosha N; Mehta, Pooja K; Louis, Kettie R; Finneseth, Molly K; Yarrington, Christina D

    Escalating evidence for the fetal impact of Zika virus infection required a change in care by all prenatal providers. This article describes an effective model of rapid implementation of universal prenatal screening at one hospital and its network of community health centers for a large and diverse immigrant population exploring the challenges, experiences, and lessons learned. Implementation of national recommendations required a workflow change, challenging a system with a heterogeneity of settings and providers. Using a physician clinical champion and advanced practice nurses in the roles of logistical coordinator and liaison to the network, Zika screening was embedded into prenatal intake visits at both the hospital and community health centers. Challenges addressed include varied medical record systems, acceptance by patients, providers, and community health center leadership, as well as culturally appropriate outreach to diverse ethnic and linguistic communities. In 6 months, the prenatal screening rates increased from 20% to 88%, which resulted in the identification of more than 300 pregnant patients at risk of exposure to Zika virus. This model offers key lessons for emergency preparedness in heterogeneous, safety net hospital settings.

  9. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mago, Pedro [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Newell, LeLe [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2014-01-31

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  10. The evolving organizational structure of academic health centers: the case of the University of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Douglas J

    2008-09-01

    The organizational structures of academic health centers (AHCs) vary widely, but they all exist along a continuum of integration--that is, the degree to which the academic and clinical missions operate under a single administrative and governance structure. This author provides a brief overview of the topic of AHC integration, including the pros and cons of more integrated or less integrated models. He then traces the evolution of the University of Florida (UF) Health Science Center, which was created in the 1950s as a fully integrated AHC and which now operates under a more distributed management and governance model. Starting as a completely integrated AHC, UF's Health Science Center reached a time of maximal nonintegration (or dys-integration) in the late 1990s and at the beginning of this decade. Circumstances are now pushing the expanding clinical and academic enterprises to be more together as they face the challenges of market competition, federal research budget constraints, and reengineering clinical operations to reduce costs, enhance access, and improve quality and patient safety. Although formal organizational integration may not be possible or appropriate for any number of legal or political reasons, the author suggests that AHCs should strive for "functional integration" to be successful in the current turbulent environment.

  11. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Impelementation of Information Technology Service Management at Data And Information System Center of XYZ University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornelius Irfandhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Information Technology (IT is increasingly progressing. Nowadays, the success of a business of the organization/company is highly dependent on the IT infrastructure used. Therefore, organizations/companies have to manage their IT service to be optimal to their customers. Looking at this matter and the increasing dynamics of XYZ University, then Data and Information System Center (Pusdatin - an IT provider of XYZ University began implementing IT Service Management (ITSM from 2013 using the latest version of Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL, namely ITIL v3 as a framework for implementing ITSM in its business processes. However, along the way, there are still some problems happen in Pusdatin in order that ITSM can actually support and align with the objectives of XYZ University. Through this paper, the authors want to explain how the implementation of ITSM at Pusdatin, identify the problems related to the implementation of ITSM, and provide the solutions for each problem. The methods used are direct observation to Pusdatin, conductan interview with the Head of Pusdatin and Staff of Pusdatin, and also perform a literature review of books and papers that discuss about ITIL. The result of this research is that ITSM process of Pusdatin generally works quite well but there are still some shortcomings because ITSM is not 100% implemented in all areas.

  13. Play in the Sandpit: A University and a Child-Care Center Collaborate in Facilitated-Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Olga; French-Lee, Stacey; Bulunuz, Nermin; Bulunuz, Mizrap

    2010-01-01

    Sand play commonly occupies children at preschools, child-development centers, and school and park playgrounds. The authors review the research on sand play and present a small study on outdoor sand play conducted at a university-based, child-development center using a method they call "facilitated-action research." This study had four…

  14. Sexual Assault Policies and Consent Definitions: A Nationally Representative Investigation of U.S. Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Laurie M.; Treves-Kagan, Sarah; Magee, Erin P.; DeLong, Stephanie M.; Ashley, Olivia S.; Macy, Rebecca J.; Martin, Sandra L.; Moracco, Kathryn E.; Bowling, J. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Campus sexual assault (SA) policies and sexual consent definitions have not been widely studied. The study team conducted a nationally representative review of college and university websites (n = 995), assessing the prevalence of publicly accessible online policies and definitions and examining associations with school characteristics. A content…

  15. Cost of the meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus search and destroy policy in a Dutch university hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nulens, E; Broex, E; Ament, A; Deurenberg, R H; Smeets, E; Scheres, J; van Tiel, F H; Gordts, B; Stobberingh, E E

    Costs related to a search and destroy policy and treatment for Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in the University Hospital Maastricht were calculated for the period 2000 and 2004. The financial cost-benefit break-even point of the search and destroy policy was determined by modelling. On average

  16. Excellence and Diversity: Selective Admission Policies in Dutch Higher Education. A Case Study on Amsterdam University College.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reumer, Christoffel; van der Wende, Marijk

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the emergence of selective admission policies in Dutch university education. Such policies are being developed to promote excellence in a higher education system that is generally known to be “egalitarian” and increasingly criticized for a lack of differentiation. The changing

  17. The creation and early implementation of a high speed fiber optic network for a university health sciences center.

    OpenAIRE

    Schueler, J. D.; Mitchell, J. A.; Forbes, S. M.; Neely, R. C.; Goodman, R. J.; Branson, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    In late 1989 the University of Missouri Health Sciences Center began the process of creating an extensive fiber optic network throughout its facilities, with the intent to provide networked computer access to anyone in the Center desiring such access, regardless of geographic location or organizational affiliation. A committee representing all disciplines within the Center produced and, in conjunction with independent consultants, approved a comprehensive design for the network. Installation ...

  18. REGION NORTH OF TEACHER EDUCATION POLICY AND EVALUATION OF POLES OPEN UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso José da Costa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This text aims to present, in general, the north region and policies for teacher training implemented in the last 5 years, locating in this context the importance of the Brazil Open University system and its supporting poles face as methodology research linked to the project "Institutionalization of Distance Education in Brazil." Greater emphasis will be given to data from the states of Pará and Acre, given that two authors of this text act as coordinators of the poles supporting attendance System Open University of Brazil in these states. We design the text, based on testimony of poles coordinators who participated in participatory research, conducted by the Research Group "Teacher education and information and communication technologies", LANTE / UFF. We aim also to identify the structure and functioning of the Poles face Supporting UAB in the North as well as the assessment tool applied in this region.

  19. The Centers of Strategic Research of Foreign Policy of the Republic of Turkey: the General Characteristic and Stages of Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алим Видадиевич Сулейманов

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes and complication of an existing international political situation provide new challenges for diplomacy of every state. During making of foreign policy decisions complete and deep understanding of a subject of policy is required. Because of this matter in many countries of the world there are special nongovernmental organizations that provide the qualitative analysis of internal and foreign politics situation. In the given article the centers of strategic research which are carrying out the analysis of foreign policy of Turkish Republic are characterized. Their structure, level and scale of expertise and also stages of functioning are analyzed.

  20. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; Cox, James; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John

    2003-01-01

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week

  1. Innovative approaches to interprofessional care at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Julia; Bellon, Johanna E; Stevans, Joel; James, A Everette; Minnier, Tami; Reynolds, Benjamin R; Zhang, Yuting

    2015-01-01

    The enactment of the Affordable Care Act expands coverage to millions of uninsured Americans and creates a new workforce landscape. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (ICP) is no longer a choice but a necessity. In this paper, we describe four innovative approaches to interprofessional practice at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. These models demonstrate innovative applications of ICP to inpatient and outpatient care, relying on non-physician providers, training programs, and technology to deliver more appropriate care to specific patient groups. We also discuss the ongoing evaluation plans to assess the effects of these interprofessional practices on patient health, quality of care, and healthcare costs. We conclude that successful implementation of interprofessional teams involves more than just a reassignment of tasks, but also depends on structuring the environment and workflow in a way that facilitates team-based care.

  2. Annual report 1992 of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This annual report includes the research activities and the technical developments carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center in University of Tsukuba for the period from April 1992 to March 1993. New experimental investigations were made on (1) nuclear spectroscopy was initiated by a new γ ray spectrometer; (2) polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions; (3) the application of energetic heavy ions to solid state physics; (4) the behavior of self interstitial atoms and its migration mechanism in Mo metal (5) the studies on electronic conduction of metal oxides and bronzes by NMR; (6) Moessbauer studies on Fe-Cr alloy and the RBS analysis of YBCO superconductor films; and (7) a new field was challenged on the micro cluster physics. Nuclear collective motion and the relativistic mean-field theory is also included in this report. (J.P.N.)

  3. Pengembangan Framework Sistem Informasi Antrian pada Student Service Center Binus University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina Reina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Queues can be found in all aspects of life, especially in the service industry, including at Binus University in the Student Service Center. Sizeable number of students at certain arrival time, has led to a long queue and this affects student discomfort in waiting. Queue information systems that exist today should bedeveloped further in order to improve the comfort of the user, such as information that is integrated with a student desk, both in seeing a queue number, and knowing the history queue. The research method used is thethree phases of the Software Development Life Cycle methods Problems and Opportunities, System Requirements and System Design. The result of this research is a framework that can be used for queuing system so as to provide the freedom of time and space for the user waiting queue.

  4. University of Maryland Wall Washer Retrofit - LED Modules Replace Halogen Lamps in a Performing Arts Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Abell, Thomas C. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Perrin, Tess E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-03

    The University of Maryland (UMD) began retrofitting halogen wall washers in the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center (CSPAC) in April 2014. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting (SSL) GATEWAY program documented this process through the final installation in March 2015, summarized in this report. The wall washers illuminate hallways lining the atrium, providing task illuminance for transitioning between spaces and visual interest to the atrium boundaries. The main goals of the retrofit were to maintain the visual appearance of the space while reducing maintenance costs – energy savings was considered an additional benefit by UMD Facilities Management. UMD Facilities Management is pleased with the results of this retrofit, and continues to initiate LED retrofit projects across the UMD campus.

  5. Preventing hospital malnutrition: a survey on nutritional policies in an Italian University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annetta, M G; Pittiruti, M; De Rosa, S; Franchi, P; Pintaudi, G; Caricato, A; Antonelli, M

    2015-11-01

    A proper strategy for fighting hospital malnutrition should include nutritional screening of all hospitalized patients, adequate utilization of the Hospital facilities - such as Clinical Nutrition Services or Nutrition Teams - and an adequate algorithm for the adoption of proper nutrition support (oral, enteral or parenteral) with proper timing. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the current policies of different non-intensive wards of our institution (a 1100 beds University Hospital) in terms of prevention of hospital malnutrition. We conducted a one-day survey to verify the current policies of nutritional screening and the indication to nutritional support in adult patients, interviewing nurses and physicians of our non-intensive hospital wards. A total of 29 wards were considered, which sum up to 755 hospitalized patients. We found that nutritional screening at admission is routinely assessed only in 41% of wards and that oral nutrient intake is controlled regularly only in 72%. Indication to clinical nutrition support and specifically to artificial nutrition is not consistent with the current international guidelines. Only 14% of patients were receiving artificial nutrition at the moment of the survey and the majority of them were given parenteral nutrition rather than enteral feeding. Our survey confirmed that in large hospitals the main barriers to the fight against hospital malnutrition are the lack of knowledge and/or commitment by nurses and physicians as well as the lack of well-defined hospital policies on early nutritional screening, surveillance of nutritional status and indication to nutrition support.

  6. Implementation and evaluation of carousel dispensing technology in a university medical center pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Jack; Ludwig, Brad

    2010-05-15

    The implementation of carousel dispensing technology (CDT) at a university medical center pharmacy and the associated changes in drug distribution are described. An evaluation of CDT was conducted in three phases: before implementation, during implementation, and after implementation. The preimplementation phase consisted of data collection and facility planning leading up to the physical installation. The implementation phase included the physical installation, carousel medication assignment, and user training. The postimplementation phase included data collection and analysis. The data collected were used to compare preimplementation and postimplementation time studies, labor requirements, inventory turns, and accuracy rates. The estimated labor savings comparing the preimplementation and postimplementation time studies for automated dispensing cabinet (ADC) refills, first-dose requests, supplemental cart fill, and medication procurement totaled 2.6 full-time equivalents (FTEs). After departmental reorganization, a net reduction of 2.0 technician FTEs was achieved. The average turnaround time for stat medication requests using CDT was 7.19 minutes, and the percentage of doses filled in less than 20 minutes was 95.1%. After implementing CDT, the average accuracy rate for all dispense requests increased from 99.02% to 99.48%. The inventory carrying cost was reduced by $25,059. CDT improved the overall efficiency and accuracy of medication dispensing in a university medical center pharmacy. Workflow efficiencies achieved in ADC refill, first-dose dispensing, supplemental cart fill, and the medication procurement process allowed the department to reduce the amount of technician labor required to support the medication distribution process, as well as reallocate technician labor to other areas in need.

  7. 75 FR 52374 - National Environmental Policy Act; NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station Wind Farm Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ...; NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station Wind Farm Project AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the NASA GRC Plum Brook Station Wind Farm Project located near Sandusky... at Plum Brook Station, which will enable NASA to meet the objectives of the Energy Policy Act of 2005...

  8. Can policy ameliorate socioeconomic inequities in obesity and obesity-related behaviours? A systematic review of the impact of universal policies on adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olstad, D L; Teychenne, M; Minaker, L M; Taber, D R; Raine, K D; Nykiforuk, C I J; Ball, K

    2016-12-01

    This systematic review examined the impact of universal policies on socioeconomic inequities in obesity, dietary and physical activity behaviours among adults and children. PRISMA-Equity guidelines were followed. Database searches spanned from 2004 to August 2015. Eligible studies assessed the impact of universal policies on anthropometric, dietary or physical activity-related outcomes in adults or children according to socioeconomic position. Thirty-six studies were included. Policies were classified as agentic, agento-structural or structural, and their impact on inequities was rated as positive, neutral, negative or mixed according to the dominant associations observed. Most policies had neutral impacts on obesity-related inequities regardless of whether they were agentic (60% neutral), agento-structural (68% neutral) or structural (67% neutral). The proportion of positive impacts was similar across policy types (10% agentic, 18% agento-structural and 11% structural), with some differences for negative impacts (30% agentic, 14% agento-structural and 22% structural). The majority of associations remained neutral when stratified by participant population, implementation level and socioeconomic position measures and by anthropometric and behavioural outcomes. Fiscal measures had consistently neutral or positive impacts on inequities. Findings suggest an important role for policy in addressing obesity in an equitable manner and strengthen the case for implementing a broad complement of policies spanning the agency-structure continuum. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  9. The proposed EROSpace institute, a national center operated by space grant universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul L.; Swiden, LaDell R.; Waltz, Frederick A.

    1993-01-01

    The "EROSpace Institute" is a proposed visiting scientist program in associated with the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center (EDC). The Institute would be operated by a consortium of universities, possible drawn from NASA's Space Grant College and Fellowship Program consortia and the group of 17 capability-enhancement consortia, or perhaps from consortia though out the nation with a topical interest in remote sensing. The National Center for Atmospheric Research or the Goddard Institute for Space Studies provide models for the structure of such an institute. The objectives of the Institute are to provide ready access to the body of data housed at the EDC and to increase the cadre of knowledgeable and trained scientists able to deal with the increasing volume of remote sensing data to become available from the Earth Observing System. The Institute would have a staff of about 100 scientists at any one time, about half permanent staff, and half visiting scientists. The latter would include graduate and undergraduate students, as well as faculty on temporary visits, summer fellowships, or sabbatical leaves. The Institute would provide office and computing facilities, as well as Internet linkages to the home institutions so that scientists could continue to participate in the program from their home base.

  10. Phased implementation of AT and T PACS at Duke University Medical Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockbridge, C.; Ravin, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    ''Help me communicate more quickly and more effectively with referring clinicians''. This request was the driving behind the installation of the AT and T CommView System at Duke. The CommView System is a type of Digital Image Management System and Picture Archival Communication System whose chief purpose is to deliver interpolated diagnostic images to referring clinicians and attending physicians. The system acquires electronic images from modalities in a diagnostic imaging facility, stores these images in computer managed patient files and distributes these on demand over fiber optic cable to Display Consoles. The CommView System was designed at AT and T Bell Labs; it uses fiber optic ribbon cable between buildings fused to multistrand lightguide building cables to distribute images, typically around a medical center or campus at data transfer rates of 40 Mbps. This paper gives the rationale used in designing a start-up network and placing the initial equipment for a field of the AT and T CommView System in the Radiology Department of Duke University Medical Center

  11. "Phased Implementation Of AT&T PACS At Duke University Medical Center"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbridge, Chris; Ravin, Carl E.

    1986-06-01

    "Help me communicate more quickly and more effectively with referring clinicians". This request was the driving force behind the installation of the AT&T CommView System at Duke. The CommView System is a type of Digital Image Management System and Picture Archival Communication System whose chief purpose is to deliver interpreted diagnostic images to referring clinicians and attending physicians. The system acquires electronic images from modalities in a diagnostic imaging facility, stores these images in computer managed patient files and distributes these on demand over fiber optic cable to Display Consoles. The CommView System was designed at AT&T Bell Labs; it uses fiber optic ribbon cable between buildings fused to multistrand lightguide building cables to distribute images, typically around a medical center or campus at data transfer rates of 40 Mbps. This paper gives the rationale used in designing a start-up network and placing the initial equipment for a field trial of the AT&T CommView System in the Radiology Department of Duke University Medical Center.

  12. Phased Implementation Of At&T PACS At Duke University Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbridge, Chris; Ravin, Carl E.

    1986-01-01

    "Help me communicate more quickly and more effectively with referring clinicians". This request was the driving force behind the installation of the AT&T CommViewm System at Duke. The CommView System is a type of Digital Image Management System and Picture Archival Communication System whose chief purpose is to deliver interpreted diagnostic images to referring clinicians and attending physicians. The system acquires electronic images from modal-ities in a diagnostic imaging facility, stores these images in computer managed patient files and distributes these on demand over fiber optic cable to Display Consoles. The CommView System was designed at AT&T Bell Labs; it uses fiber optic ribbon cable between buildings fused to multistrand lightguide building cables to distribute images, typically around a medical center or campus at data transfer rates of 40 Mbps. This paper gives the rationale used in designing a start-up network and placing the initial equipment for a field trial of the AT&T CommView System in the Radiology Department of Duke University Medical Center.

  13. An overview of multidisciplinary research resources at the Osaka University Center for Twin Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo; Iwatani, Yoshinori

    2013-02-01

    Osaka University Center for Twin Research is currently organizing a government-funded, multidisciplinary research project using a large registry of aged twins living in Japan. The purpose of the project is to collect various information as well as biological resources from registered twins, and to establish a biobank and databases for preserving and managing these data and resources. The Center is collecting data from twin pairs, both of whom have agreed to participate in a one-day comprehensive medical examination. The following data are being collected: physical data (e.g., height, body mass, blood pressure, theoretical visceral fat, pulse wave velocity, and bone density), data regarding epidemiology (e.g., medical history, lifestyle, quality of life, mood status, cognitive function, and nutrition), electrocardiogram, ultrasonography (carotid artery and thyroid), dentistry, plastic surgery, positron emission tomography, magnetoencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging of brain. These data are then aggregated and systematically stored in specific databases. In addition, peripheral blood is obtained from the participants, and then genomic DNA is purified and sera are stored. A wide variety of studies are ongoing, and more are in the planning stage.

  14. The role of university and college counseling centers in advancing the professionalization of psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Rosie Phillips

    2015-11-01

    Psychologists in university and college counseling centers (UCCCs) have helped to shape and advance the professionalization of psychology. Most definitions of a profession contain at least 5 components. A profession has (1) systematic theories and underlying principles; (2) authority to practice provided by the client; (3) a long educational process, including training and mentoring; (4) standards and a code of ethics; and (5) a culture of service and accountability to the public. UCCC professionals have evolved in a manner that demonstrates all 5 components of a profession. They advance the discipline of psychology as a profession through their counseling interventions because such interventions are based on scientific theories and principles. While their practice rests on scientific principles, their work helps to confirm and modify that science. Authority to practice is evidenced by the continuous growth of counseling centers since World War II. UCCCs aid the extended educational process for psychology graduate students as evidenced by their providing more internship training sites than any other category of training agencies. The majority of UCCC professionals are licensed and must abide by their state code of ethics. Such codes hold psychologists accountable to the public because they regularly deliver counseling service to at least 10% of the campus student population and offer outreach services to many more in their communities. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Development of multidisciplinary nanotechnology undergraduate education program at the University of Rochester Integrated Nanosystems Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Bigelow, Nicholas P.; D'Alessandris, Paul D.

    2017-08-01

    Supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation educational grant, a coherent educational program at the University of Rochester (UR) in nanoscience and nanoengineering, based on the Institute of Optics and Intergrated Nanosystems Center resources was created. The main achievements of this program are (1) developing curriculum and offering the Certificate for Nanoscience and Nanoengineering program (15 students were awarded the Certificate and approximately 10 other students are working in this direction), (2) creating a reproducible model of collaboration in nanotechnology between a university with state-of-the-art, expensive experimental facilities, and a nearby, two-year community college (CC) with participation of a local Monroe Community College (MCC). 52 MCC students carried out two labs at the UR on the atomic force microscopy and a photolithography at a clean room; (3) developing reproducible hand-on experiments on nanophotonics ("mini-labs"), learning materials and pedagogical methods to educate students with diverse backgrounds, including freshmen and non-STEM-major CC students. These minilabs on nanophotonics were also introduced in some Institute of Optics classes. For the Certificate program UR students must take three courses: Nanometrology Laboratory (a new course) and two other selective courses from the list of several. Students also should carry out a one-semester research or a design project in the field of nanoscience and nanoengineering.

  16. Banner plans to issue new bonds to cover university of Arizona medical center purchase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbns RA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Modern Healthcare is reporting that Banner Health is issuing new bonds this week to refinance older debt (1. Banner financed the $1 billion purchase of the University of Arizona Health Network (UAHN including the University of Arizona Medical Center with a $700 million short-term loan from investment bank Mizuho in February. Banner is issuing $100 million in tax-exempt, fixed rate Series 2015A bonds. It is also planning to take on an additional $500 million in taxable and tax-exempt debt that will be used to replace the short-term loans associated with the purchase. Banner is focusing on how to improve the return on its UAHN investment, which has dragged down its earnings. UAHN's financial performance has deteriorated with an operating margin declining to -4.3% in fiscal 2014, down from -1.2% the previous fiscal year. Before that, UAHN was profitable, according to Banner Chief Financial Officer Dennis Dahlen. Banner reported an operating ...

  17. Creating a center for global health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Cynthia; Baumann, Linda; Olsen, Christopher W; Brown, Lori DiPrete; Kraus, Connie; Bousquet, Gilles; Conway, James; Easterday, B C

    2008-02-01

    Globalization, migration, and widespread health disparities call for interdisciplinary approaches to improve health care at home and abroad. Health professions students are pursuing study abroad in increasing numbers, and universities are responding with programs to address these needs. The University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison schools of medicine and public health, nursing, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, and the division of international studies have created an interdisciplinary center for global health (CGH). The CGH provides health professions and graduate students with courses, field experiences, and a new Certificate in Global Health. Educational programs have catalyzed a network of enthusiastic UW global health scholars. Partnerships with colleagues in less economically developed countries provide the foundation for education, research, and service programs. Participants have collaborated to improve the education of health professionals and nutrition in Uganda; explore the interplay between culture, community development, and health in Ecuador; improve animal health and address domestic violence in Mexico; and examine successful public health efforts in Thailand. These programs supply students with opportunities to understand the complex determinants of health and structure of health systems, develop adaptability and cross-cultural communication skills, experience learning and working in interdisciplinary teams, and promote equity and reduce health disparities at home and abroad. Based on the principles of equity, sustainability, and reciprocity, the CGH provides a strong foundation to address global health challenges through networking and collaboration among students, staff, and faculty within the UW and beyond.

  18. Establishment of a National Wind Energy Center at University of Houston

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Su Su [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The DOE-supported project objectives are to: establish a national wind energy center (NWEC) at University of Houston and conduct research to address critical science and engineering issues for the development of future large MW-scale wind energy production systems, especially offshore wind turbines. The goals of the project are to: (1) establish a sound scientific/technical knowledge base of solutions to critical science and engineering issues for developing future MW-scale large wind energy production systems, (2) develop a state-of-the-art wind rotor blade research facility at the University of Houston, and (3) through multi-disciplinary research, introducing technology innovations on advanced wind-turbine materials, processing/manufacturing technology, design and simulation, testing and reliability assessment methods related to future wind turbine systems for cost-effective production of offshore wind energy. To achieve the goals of the project, the following technical tasks were planned and executed during the period from April 15, 2010 to October 31, 2014 at the University of Houston: (1) Basic research on large offshore wind turbine systems (2) Applied research on innovative wind turbine rotors for large offshore wind energy systems (3) Integration of offshore wind-turbine design, advanced materials and manufacturing technologies (4) Integrity and reliability of large offshore wind turbine blades and scaled model testing (5) Education and training of graduate and undergraduate students and post- doctoral researchers (6) Development of a national offshore wind turbine blade research facility The research program addresses both basic science and engineering of current and future large wind turbine systems, especially offshore wind turbines, for MW-scale power generation. The results of the research advance current understanding of many important scientific issues and provide technical information for solving future large wind turbines with advanced design

  19. Nutrition and physical activity randomized control trial in child care centers improves knowledge, policies, and children's body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Abbey; Crowley, Angela A; Neelon, Sara E Benjamin; Hill, Sherika; Pan, Yi; Nguyen, Viet; Rose, Roberta; Savage, Eric; Forestieri, Nina; Shipman, Linda; Kotch, Jonathan B

    2014-03-01

    To address the public health crisis of overweight and obese preschool-age children, the Nutrition And Physical Activity Self Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) intervention was delivered by nurse child care health consultants with the objective of improving child care provider and parent nutrition and physical activity knowledge, center-level nutrition and physical activity policies and practices, and children's body mass index (BMI). A seven-month randomized control trial was conducted in 17 licensed child care centers serving predominantly low income families in California, Connecticut, and North Carolina, including 137 child care providers and 552 families with racially and ethnically diverse children three to five years old. The NAP SACC intervention included educational workshops for child care providers and parents on nutrition and physical activity and consultation visits provided by trained nurse child care health consultants. Demographic characteristics and pre - and post-workshop knowledge surveys were completed by providers and parents. Blinded research assistants reviewed each center's written health and safety policies, observed nutrition and physical activity practices, and measured randomly selected children's nutritional intake, physical activity, and height and weight pre- and post-intervention. Hierarchical linear models and multiple regression models assessed individual- and center-level changes in knowledge, policies, practices and age- and sex-specific standardized body mass index (zBMI), controlling for state, parent education, and poverty level. Results showed significant increases in providers' and parents' knowledge of nutrition and physical activity, center-level improvements in policies, and child-level changes in children's zBMI based on 209 children in the intervention and control centers at both pre- and post-intervention time points. The NAP SACC intervention, as delivered by trained child health professionals such as child care

  20. Organ Allocation Policies 10 Years After UNESCO's Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, C

    2016-03-01

    October 19, 2015, marked the 10th anniversary of the adoption by the General Conference of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) of the "Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights," which was signed by representatives of the 191 member states of the conference. The declaration is of major importance: it was the first legally binding document approved by a global organization to address the whole range of subjects covered by bioethics. Among the principles laid down in the declaration, those most relevant for the allocation of organs are benefit and harm (Article 4), equality, justice and equity (Article 10), nondiscrimination and nonstigmatization (Article 11), solidarity and cooperation (Article 13), social responsibility and health (including access to quality health care; Article 14), and sharing of benefits (Article 15). Policies concerning the allocation of organs cannot disregard the principles affirmed in the Declaration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Local and Regional Authorities as Resources for Implementing Universal Design Policy in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Einar

    2016-01-01

    The municipalities and regional authorities are in general resources for achieving national goals. Their management and works are crucial to the development and implementation of Universal Design. Through several programmes, national authorities have worked for activating the local and regional levels. The results are visible. We can see a long-term national strategy to help make society accessible to everyone and prevent discrimination. Participating municipalities and regional authorities are now able to create their own policy and strategies and implement solutions. The national programs have involved interested and motivated municipalities. All the 18 counties in Norway have been involved more or less in different periods and the same with up to a third of the about good 400 municipalities.

  2. The equity impact of the universal coverage policy: lessons from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakongsai, Phusit; Limwattananon, Supon; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2009-01-01

    This chapter assesses health equity achievements of the Thai health system before and after the introduction of the universal coverage (UC) policy. It examines five dimensions of equity: equity in financial contributions, the incidence of catastrophic health expenditure, the degree of impoverishment as a result of household out-of-pocket payments for health, equity in health service use and the incidence of public subsidies for health. The standard methods proposed by O'Donnell, van Doorslaer, and Wagstaff (2008b) were used to measure equity in financial contribution, healthcare utilization and public subsidies, and in assessing the incidence of catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment. Two major national representative household survey datasets were used: Socio-Economic Surveys and Health and Welfare Surveys. General tax was the most progressive source of finance in Thailand. Because this source dominates total financing, the overall outcome was progressive, with the rich contributing a greater share of their income than the poor. The low incidence of catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment before UC was further reduced after UC. Use of healthcare and the distribution of government subsidies were both pro-poor: in particular, the functioning of primary healthcare (PHC) at the district level serves as a "pro-poor hub" in translating policy into practice and equity outcomes. The Thai health financing reforms have been accompanied by nationwide extension of PHC coverage, mandatory rural health service by new graduates and systems redesign, especially the introduction of a contracting model and closed-ended provider payment methods. Together, these changes have led to a more equitable and more efficient health system. Institutional capacity to generate evidence and to translate it into policy decisions, effective implementation and comprehensive monitoring and evaluation are essential to successful system-level reforms.

  3. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Results: Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32% completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as ‘excellent’, 44% as ‘good’, 5% as ‘fair’, and 0% stated ‘poor’. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise.Conclusion: In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  4. New Cosmic Center Universe Model Matches Eight of Big Bang's Major Predictions Without The F-L Paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Gentry, R V

    2003-01-01

    Accompanying disproof of the F-L expansion paradigm eliminates the basis for expansion redshifts, which in turn eliminates the basis for the Cosmological Principle. The universe is not the same everywhere. Instead the spherical symmetry of the cosmos demanded by the Hubble redshift relation proves the universe is isotropic about a nearby universal Center. This is the foundation of the relatively new Cosmic Center Universe (CCU) model, which accounts for, explains, or predicts: (i) The Hubble redshift relation, (ii) a CBR redshift relation that fits all current CBR measurements, (iii) the recently discovered velocity dipole distribution of radiogalaxies, (iv) the well-known time dilation of SNeIa light curves, (v) the Sunyaev-Zeldovich thermal effect, (vi) Olber's paradox, (vii) SN dimming for z 1 an enhanced brightness that fits SN 1997ff measurements, (ix) the existence of extreme redshift (z > 10) objects which, when observed, will further distinguish it from the big bang. The CCU model also plausibly expl...

  5. Space and Materials Reservation Software in Mobile Applications Development: The Case of Istanbul Aydin University Information Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agah Alıcı

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explain the adoption of mobile application ICReserve (Information Center Reserve to improve the library services in terms of user satisfaction and management processes with an innovative approach. ICReserve is a kind of reservation software developed specifically for the needs of University Library by the Istanbul Aydin University IT Department and is integrated to the institution’s other information systems. This article contains technical information about mobile application development.

  6. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1993 - March 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    In this annual report, the research activities and the technical developments carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, for the period from April, 1993 to March, 1994 are described. The tandem accelerator worked with high stability, and provided with sufficient beam time for experiments till the middle of November, however, one of the charging chains broke on November 18. The replacement of the chain was finished in a short time, and experiments were continued to the end of December. From January, 1994, the operation of the accelerator was shut down to replace the cooling towers for building air conditioning and to reconstruct the cooling system for the accelerator. In this book, the activities in the accelerator and experimental facilities and the departments of the experiment and theory on nuclear physics, atomic and solid state physics, and ion beam application are reported. As the new development of experimental instruments, a new rf amplifier for the heavy ion postaccelerator was constructed, and with a liquid helium polarimeter, test experiments are in progress. (K.I.)

  7. The Regional Autopsy Center: The University of Alabama at Birmingham Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Daniel Stephen; Reilly, Stephanie

    2017-09-01

    Rates of autopsied deaths have decreased significantly for the last several decades. It may not be practical for some institutions to maintain the facilities and staffing required to perform autopsies. In recent years, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has established contracts to perform autopsies for several regional institutions including the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences (ADFS), the United States Veterans Affairs, the local prison system, local community hospitals, and with families for private autopsy services. Contracts and autopsy data from 2004 to 2015 were obtained and reviewed. Since 2004, the number of UAB hospital autopsies trended slightly downward. On average, UAB hospital cases comprised most yearly cases, and the ADFS was the second largest contributor of cases. Income generated from outside autopsies performed from 2006 to 2015 totaled just more than 2 million dollars, and most of the income was generated from referred ADFS cases. This study provides evidence that a centralized institution (regional autopsy center [RAC]) can provide regional autopsy service in a practical, feasible, and economically viable manner, and a RAC can benefit both the referring institutions as well as the RAC itself.

  8. Outcomes of Older Adults with Burn Injury: University Clinical Center of Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B Duci, Shkelzen; M Arifi, Hysni; R Ahmeti, Hasan; K Zatriqi, Violeta; A Buja, Zejn; T Hoxha, Enver; Y Mekaj, Agon

    2015-07-01

    Advances in burn care over the past 50 years have brought about remarkable improvement in mortality rates such that survival has become an expected outcome even in patients with extensive injuries. Although these improvements have occurred in all age groups, survival in older adults still lags far behind that in younger cohorts. This study determines the outcomes of older adults with burn injury in University Clinical Center of Kosovo. This is a retrospective study that includes 56 burn patients, older than 60 years who were admitted at the Department of Plastic Surgery, between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. Data processing was done with the statistical package of Stat 3. From the statistical parameters the structural index, arithmetic median, and standard deviation were calculated. Fifty six burned patient older than 60 years were included during a 10-year period. Of the 56 elderly patients 29 were women and 27 were men with a mean age of 66.7 years (range, 60-85 years). The differences were not statistically significant for both genders regarding the causes of burn injury. Considering the gradual increase of the elderly population in our country based on the data of the Ministry of Public Services, an increase is expected to the incidence of burn injuries in the population of this category of our country.

  9. Prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in the university medical center of Rabat, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razine Rachid

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to determine the hospital-acquired infections (HAI prevalence in all institutions of Rabat University Medical Center, to ascertain risk factors, to describe the pathogens associated with HAI and their susceptibility profile to antibiotics. Materials and methods Point-prevalence survey in January 2010 concerning all patients who had been in the hospital for at least 48 hours. At bedside, 27 investigators filled a standardized questionnaire from medical records, temperature charts, radiographs, laboratory reports and by consultation with the ward’s collaborating health professionals. Risk factors were determined using logistic regression. Results 1195 patients involved, occupancy rate was 51%. The prevalence of HAI was 10.3%. Intensive care units were the most affected wards (34.5%. Urinary tract infection was the most common infected site (35%. Microbiological documentation was available in 61% of HAI. Staphylococcus was the organism most commonly isolated (18.7% and was methicillin-resistant in 50% of cases. In multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with HAI were advanced age, longer length of hospital stay, presence of comorbidity, invasive devices and use of antibiotic use. Conclusion HAI prevalence was high in this study. Future prevention program should focus on patients with longer length of stay, invasive devices, and overprescribing antibiotics.

  10. An Epidemiological Study of Hyperhidrosis Patients Visiting the Ajou University Hospital Hyperhidrosis Center in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jung; Han, Kyung Ream; Choi, Ho; Kim, Do Wan

    2010-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a disorder of perspiration in excess of the body's physiologic need and significantly impacts one's occupational, physical, emotional, and social life. The purpose of our study was to investigate the characteristics of primary hyperhidrosis in 255 patients at Ajou University Hospital Hyperhidrosis Center from March 2006, to February 2008. Information collected from the medical records was: sex, sites of hyperhidrosis, age at visit, age of onset, aggravating factors, hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS) rank, family history, occupation, and past treatment. A total of 255 patient records were reviewed; 57.6% were male. Patients with a family history (34.1%) showed a lower age of onset (13.21±5.80 yr vs. 16.04±9.83 yr in those without family history); 16.5% had previous treatment, most commonly oriental medicine. Palmar and plantar sites were the most commonly affected, and 87.9% of patients felt their sweating was intolerable and always interfered with their daily activities. Our study provides some original information on the Korean primary hyperhidrosis population. Patients who have a family history show signs of disease in early age than those without family history. PMID:20436716

  11. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, Nuclear and Solid State Research Project, University of Tsukuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This is the fifth annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, as well as the third of the Nuclear and Solid State Research Project at the University of Tsukuba. It contains the short descriptions of the activities during the period from April, 1979, to March, 1980. The 12 UD Pelletron has worked well and was utilized over 2900 hours as the time of beam on targets. The performance of the polarized ion source has been quite good, and it produced the beams of polarized protons and deuterons as well as of alpha particles. The sputter ion source (TUNIS) replaced the direct extraction duoplasmatron in most cases, and it produced the beams of isotopes of O, F, Si, Cl, Ni, Cu, etc., without gas injection. The construction of the second measuring room has been completed, and four beam courses are equipped with a general purpose scattering chamber, the devices for perturbed angular correlation, inner and outer shell ionization, and biological studies. The beam pulsing system was installed on the accelerator, and will be in operation soon. Further efforts have been made to develop detection and data processing systems. The examples of the recent researches mainly under the program of the NSSRP in various fields are enumerated. The exchange and collaboration with other institutions were active. (Kako, I.)

  12. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    This annual report covers the research activities and technical developments of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, in the period from April, 1987 to March, 1988. In the field of nuclear physics, the elastic and inelastic scattering of polarized protons from even-even medium weight nuclei was investigated systematically by light ion beam experiment. A QDQ type magnetic spectrograph for double scattering experiment was almost complete. The studies on heavy ion-induced fission reaction advanced by measuring anisotropy in fission angular distribution, and a view on the mechanism of the reaction was acquired. A new, ingenious technique enabled to identify prompt characteristics X-ray accompanying the fusion reaction induced by heavy ions. In the field of atomic and solid state physics, a strange dependence of equilibrium charge state on the atomic number of projectile heavy ions has been elucidated. The research on ion beam shadowing effect on the emission of ion-induced secondary electrons was continued. The Rutherford backscattering of O 4+ ions was applied to determine the composition of Y-Ba-Cu oxide film, and it shed light on the condition governing the nature of superconductive materials. The 12 UD Pelletron was operated quite satisfactorily. (Kako, I.)

  13. Sports hernia: the experience of Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Groin injuries in high-performance athletes are common, occurring in 5% to 28% of athletes. Athletic pubalgia syndrome, or so-called sports hernia, is one such injury that can be debilitating and sport ending in some athletes. It is a clinical diagnosis of chronic, painful musculotendinous injury to the medial inguinal floor occurring with athletic activity. Over the past 12 years, we have operated on >100 patients with this injury at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas. These patients have included professional athletes, collegiate athletes, competitive recreational athletes, and the occasional “weekend warrior.” The repair used is an open technique using a lightweight polypropylene mesh. Patient selection is important, as is collaboration with other experienced and engaged sports health care professionals, including team trainers, physical therapists, team physicians, and sports medicine and orthopedic surgeons. Of the athletes who underwent surgery, 98% have returned to competition. After a minimum of 6 weeks for recovery and rehabilitation, they have usually returned to competition within 3 months. PMID:21566750

  14. Pediatric burns in University Clinical Center of Kosovo from 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duci, Shkelzen B; Arifi, Hysni M; Selmani, Mimoza E; Gashi, Sanije

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and cause of burns in children of our population. This was a retrospective study that included 399 patients with burns, younger than 15 years old who were admitted to the Department of Plastic Surgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo, between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2010. The patients were categorized into the following three age groups: infants and toddlers (0-2 years), early childhood (3-6 years), and late childhood (7-15 years). Arithmetic median and standard deviation were calculated from statistical parameters for gender and age; the differences between the three age groups were measured with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). A p value of burns in children were predominant in boys with 257 cases or 64.4%, while 142 patients were girls or 35.5% The difference between the three age groups related to the causes of burns was statistically significant: pburns and pburns caused by pyrotechnic devices. A high rate of childhood burns in Kosovo induces hospital admissions and prolonged hospital stays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Attitudes of students of a health sciences university towards the extension of smoke-free policies at the university campuses of Barcelona (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Cristina; Méndez, Carlos; Sánchez, María; Martínez-Sánchez, José María

    To assess attitudes towards the extension of outdoor smoke-free areas on university campuses. Cross-sectional study (n=384) conducted using a questionnaire administered to medical and nursing students in Barcelona in 2014. Information was obtained pertaining to support for indoor and outdoor smoking bans on university campuses, and the importance of acting as role models. Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine agreement. Most of the students agreed on the importance of health professionals and students as role models (74.9% and 64.1%, respectively) although there were statistically significant differences by smoking status and age. 90% of students reported exposure to smoke on campus. Students expressed strong support for indoor smoke-free policies (97.9%). However, only 39.3% of participants supported regulation of outdoor smoking for university campuses. Non-smokers (OR=12.315; 95% CI: 5.377-28.204) and students ≥22 years old (OR=3.001; 95% CI: 1.439-6.257) were the strongest supporters. The students supported indoor smoke-free policies for universities. However, support for extending smoke-free regulations to outdoor areas of university campuses was limited. It is necessary to educate students about tobacco control and emphasise their importance as role models before extending outdoor smoke-free legislation at university campuses. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Fostering the institutional repository through policies and interoperability with online services: the case of La Plata National University

    OpenAIRE

    Villarreal, Gonzalo Luján; Terruzzi, Franco Agustín; Lira, Ariel Jorge; Texier, José

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the work being done by La Plata National University (Universidad Nacional de La Plata, UNLP) to ensure both the preservation and dissemination of its academic and scientific output. To this end, the university has established a combination of institutional policies, workflows among departments, and services and sofware developments for its programs and projects. Developments focused on importing and exporting metadata between DSpace – the sofware used by the UNLP main re...

  17. Thirdspace Explorations in Online Writing Studios: Writing Centers, Writing in the Disiplines and First Year Composition in the Corporate University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the use of online writing studios housed in the University Writing Center and attached to a Writing in the Disciplines course in the College of Technology and a First Year Composition program. The original goal of the online writing studio, modified from Grego and Thompson's (2009) writing studio approach, was to create an…

  18. How Wageningen University and Research Center managed to influence researchers publishing behaviour towards more quality, impact and visibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fondermann, Philipp; Togt, van der P.L.

    2016-01-01

    Wageningen University and Research Center (WUR) is one of the most prestigious research institutions in the world in life sciences and improved significantly in several rankings over the last years. One of the `drivers` of this success story is a comprehensive quality management exercise based on

  19. The Experimental Teaching Reform in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology for Undergraduate Students in Peking University Health Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Sun, Luyang; Zhao, Ying; Yi, Xia; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Pu; Lin, Hong; Ni, Juhua

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, second-year undergraduate students of an eight-year training program leading to a Doctor of Medicine degree or Doctor of Philosophy degree in Peking University Health Science Center (PKUHSC) have been required to enter the "Innovative talent training project." During that time, the students joined a research lab and…

  20. PRE AND POST TRAINING EVALUATION ON UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS (UP PRACTICES AT PUTAT JAYA HEALTH CENTER, SURABAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cholis Bachroen

    2012-11-01

    membersihkan instrumen secara tepat rata-rata naik sekitar 35%. Kalau dihitung peningkatan kepatuhan terhadap UP pada setiap menangani  kasus, maka terflhat bahwa kenaikan setelah pelatihan adalah dari 0% menjadi 19,6% untuk mencuci tangan sebelum menyuntik, mengganti sarung tangan setiap melayani pasien meningkat dari 17,9% menjadi 59,5%, penggunaan 'one hand technique' dalam 'recapping' jarum suntik dari 6,7% menjadi 100% serta mengganti sarung tangan untuk petugas poli gigi dari 20,5% menjadi 100%. Keywords: Training Evaluation, Universal Precaution, Health Center, Diseases Prevention

  1. Tuition-Setting Authority and Deregulation at State Colleges and Universities. Policy Matters: A Higher Education Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    State support for public colleges and universities is based on a historic relationship; these institutions were established to perform the public service mission of predominantly educating residents from local and state-wide communities at a lower price than private, independent colleges and universities. In return, the states appropriated funds…

  2. The Peer-Interactive Writing Center at the University of New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The one-on-one format of tutoring, which is the norm for "writing" centers, can foster the much-maligned view of a "writing center" as a fix-it shop and undermine the role of the tutor as a co-learner and facilitator of peer-to-peer interactions. The peer-interactive "writing center approach", presented here, moves…

  3. Annual report of Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. April 1, 1993 - March 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Nobuyuki; Miura, Iwao; Takahisa, Keiji

    1994-01-01

    This volume of the RCNP annual report gives briefly research activities of the RCNP (Research Center for Nuclear Physics), Osaka University, in the academic year of 1993 (April 1993 - March 1994). RCNP is a national nuclear physics laboratory with the AVF cyclotron and the ring cyclotron. This annual report includes major research activities at RCNP as follows. 1) Low-energy nuclear physics by means of the K=140 MeV AVF cyclotron. Nuclear reactions and nuclear structures were studied. 2) Medium-energy nuclear physics by means of the 0.4 GeV ring cyclotron. The new ring cyclotron is in full operation, and several new progresses in the medium energy nuclear physics have been made. In particular, spin-isospin responses for discrete states, giant resonances and for quasi-free scattering processes have been studied by means of charge exchange reactions. 3) Heavy-ion physics with the secondary radio-active nuclear beams. It includes production of radioactive nuclei with large spin-polarization and studies of snow-balls. 4) Non-accelerator physics programs have started in collaboration with the Dept. Phys. group. Neutrino studies by means of double beta decays and dark matter searches by means of scintillators are under progress at the Kamioka underground laboratory. 5) Theoretical works on nuclear structures and nuclear reactions. The RCNP computers are widely used for theoretical studies all over Japan. 6) Developments of accelerators and detector systems. The new external ion-source and the new axial injection line are build in order to increase beam currents. (J.P.N.)

  4. Brucellosis in Kosovo and Clinical Features of Brucellosis at University clinical center of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Qehaja Buçaj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Brucellosis became a remarkable disease in Kosovo. But there is not a comprehensive epidemiological study about epidemiology and clinical course of this disease from Kosovo. The aim of our study is to present demographic and clinical data of patients with brucellosis at University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Methods: A retrospective study was performed for the patients with brucellosis treated in our clinic during years 2011- 2012. The data about demography, history of the disease, clinical presentations, serological test, serum biochemistry and reatment were collected from hospital medical records. The diagnosis of brucellosis based on clinical and laboratory findings. Results: This descriptive study included 47 patients, who 33 of them (70.2% were males. The mean age was 37.9 ± 19.3 years. The route of transmission of the disease was known in 28 59.5% of them. Direct contact with livestock in 22 (46.8% and ingestion of dairy products in six cases (12.7% were reported as the transmission route. The majority of patients (27 patients, 57.4% were from rural area. The main presenting symptoms were atigue, fever and arthralgia. Osteoarticular manifestations were the common forms of localized disease. Regarding to the therapy, 45 (95.7% of patients were treated with streptomycin and doxycycline for the first three weeks. Conclusion: Human brucellosis is not a common in Kosovo but there is a potential risk. Osteoarticular symptoms were the most common presentation reasons. The most effective and preferred treatment regimen was Streptomycin plus Doxycycline for the first three weeks, and Doxycycline plus Rifampicin thereafter. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(4: 147-150

  5. Stereotactic Breast Core Needle Biopsy in a Tertiary Breast Center of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Alikhassi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of stereotactic breast core needle biopsy in a tertiary breast center of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Methods: Patients who were candidates for mammography-guided stereotactic breast core biopsy from March 2011 to December 2013 were included in this study. Stereotactic biopsy was performed by a dedicated prone Hologic mammography unit employing an automatic biopsy device with a 14-gauge needle. Patients with malignant or premalignant biopsy results were followed up with surgical pathology reports and patients with benign core biopsy findings were followed up with mammograms.Results: Among the 150 patients who were included in the final analyses, 30 had malignant findings on stereotactic biopsy and 10 patients had a premalignant pathology result on stereotactic biopsy. The remaining 110 patients had benign results on histopathology; however, in 30 patients, wire localization and surgery of the same area were performed due to either discordant mammography-pathology findings or clinical suspicion of malignancy and in two of them, advancing pathologic grade was witnessed. A total of 80 patients with benign histopathologic results had follow-up mammograms and the follow-up period was between 12 months to 3 years. The sensitivity and specificity of stereotactic breast core biopsy in this study were 94% and 96%, respectively.Conclusions: Stereotactic breast core needle biopsy is an effective and safe method in evaluation of suspicious mammography-detected lesions but caution should be warranted when taking results into account, especially in mammography-pathology discordance and in patients with premalignant pathology reports.

  6. Tumors of the parapharyngeal space: the VU University Medical Center experience over a 20-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hees, Thijs; van Weert, Stijn; Witte, Birgit; René Leemans, C

    2018-04-01

    Tumors of the parapharyngeal space (PPS) are rare, accounting for 0.5-1.5% of all head and neck tumors. The anatomy of the PPS is responsible for a wide variety of tumors arising from the PPS. This series of 99 PPS tumors provides an overview of the clinical course and management of PPS tumors. This retrospective study included clinical data from patients treated for PPS tumors from 1991 to 2012 (warranting at least a 4-year follow-up) at the VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Fifty percent were salivary gland tumors, 41% were neurogenic and 9% had a different origin. 18.2% of the PPS tumors were malignant. The most reported symptom at presentation was swelling of the neck and throat. In 14%, the PPS tumor was an accidental finding following imaging for other diagnostic reasons. Cytology showed an accuracy rate of 73.1% (19/26). The positive predictive value of a malignant cytology result was 86% (95% CI 42.1-99.6%). Surgery was performed in 55 patients (56%). The most frequently performed approach (56%) was the cervical-transparotid approach, followed by the cervical (25%), transmandibular (16%) and transoral (2%) approach. Nine patients died of the disease, of which seven patients had a malignant salivary gland tumor, one patient had a pleomorphic adenoma at first diagnosis which degenerated into carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma and one patient died of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This large single-centre report on PPS tumors shows that careful diagnostic work up and proper surgical planning are important in this specific and rare group of head and neck tumors. Surgery was the main treatment (56%) for parapharyngeal tumors. Management of parapharyngeal neurogenic neoplasms generally consists of active surveillance due to peri-operative risk for permanent cranial nerve damage. The histopathological diagnoses were consistent with previous reports.

  7. SOCIAL POLICY CENTERED APPROACH ON GENDER DISCRIMINATION IN TURKEY: A SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    YÜKSEL, HASAN; ÖZTÜRK, MUSTAFA; ESER, H.BAHADIR

    2015-01-01

    As a field of science, social policy is the term that deals with the problems which appeal to all the units of the society including both men and women. In other words, as the concept of umbrella term, social policy within the framework of gender discrimination develops strategies and analyses data on both sexes in regards to employment, education, health, and so forth. In parallel to the objectives of social policy, it tries hard to close the gap between the women and men by laying an emphas...

  8. Surveillance of antibiotic and analgesic use in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haliti NR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Naim R Haliti,1 Fehim R Haliti,2 Ferit K Koçani,3 Ali A Gashi,4 Shefqet I Mrasori,3 Valon I Hyseni,5 Samir I Bytyqi,5 Lumnije L Krasniqi,2 Ardiana F Murtezani,5 Shaip L Krasniqi5 1Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, 2Department of Children Dentistry, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 3Department of Oral Disease, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 4Department of Oral Surgery, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 5Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, Prishtina, Kosovo Background: Because Kosovo has no reliable information on antimicrobial and analgesic use in dental practice, the survey reported here evaluated the antibiotic and analgesic prescriptions in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo (UDCCK.Methods: The data of 2,442 registered patients for a 1-year period were screened and analyzed concerning antibiotic and analgesic use as per standards of rational prescription.Results: Dentistry doctors prescribed antibiotics significantly more often than analgesics. Antibiotics were prescribed in 8.11% of all cases, while only 1.35% of total prescriptions were for analgesics. The total consumption of antibiotic drugs in the UDCCK was 4.53 Defined Daily Doses [DDD]/1,000 inhabitants/day, compared with only 0.216 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day for analgesics. From a total number of 117 patients, 32 patients received combinations of two antibiotics.Conclusion: Pharmacotherapy analysis showed that the prescription rates of antibiotics and analgesics in the UDCCK are not rational in terms of the qualitative aspects of treatment. For the qualitative improvement of prescription of these drug groups, we recommend the implementation of treatment guidelines following rational standards. Keywords: antibiotic, analgesics

  9. The Parallel Language Use of Swedish and English: The Question of "Nativeness" in University Policies and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteeva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    As a result of internationalisation, many universities in northern Europe have adopted English as a medium of instruction. At the same time, recent language policies have reinforced the importance of the national language(s) in the academic domain. Parallel language use was introduced and institutionalised in order to ensure students' right to…

  10. Sustainable Development Policies as Indicators and Pre-Conditions for Sustainability Efforts at Universities: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal Filho, Walter; Brandli, Luciana Londero; Becker, Deisi; Skanavis, Constantina; Kounani, Aristea; Sardi, Chrysoula; Papaioannidou, Dimitra; Paço, Arminda; Azeiteiro, Ulisses; de Sousa, Luiza Olim; Raath, Schalk; Pretorius, Rudi Wessel; Shiel, Christine; Vargas, Valeria; Trencher, Gregory; Marans, Robert W.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: There is a widely held belief that sustainable development (SD) policies are essential for universities to successfully engage in matters related to sustainability, and are an indicator of the extent to which they are active in this field. This paper aims to examine the evidence which currently exists to support this assumption. It…

  11. Managing the Risky Humanity of Academic Workers: Risk and Reciprocity in University Work-Life Balance Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltmarsh, Sue; Randell-Moon, Holly

    2015-01-01

    University work-life balance policies increasingly offer academic workers a range of possible options for managing the competing demands of work, family, and community obligations. Flexible work arrangements, family-friendly hours and campus facilities, physical well-being and mental health programs typify strategies for formally acknowledging the…

  12. The Impact of "Tuition-Paying" Policy on Retention and Graduation Rates at the University of Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atuahene, Francis

    2013-01-01

    African universities over the past decade have developed new modes of financial mobilization in search for fiscal solutions to the declining public support for higher education. The creation of the "tuition-paying" ("dual track" or "fee-paying") admission track policy, a variant of cost sharing, is one of such…

  13. An Examination of Current and Proposed Drug-Testing Policies at U.S. Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudala, Paul J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administrators at 332 colleges and universities completed surveys about their schools' current or proposed policies for urine drug testing of employees, applicants, and students. Fewer than 7% of schools reported urine drug testing of employees and applicants, and only 2% tested students. Few additional institutions were planning to adopt testing…

  14. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Acceptability and Effectiveness of University Smoke-Free Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, Joshua R.; Townsend, Joy L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Systematically review studies of support for, and effectiveness of, university campuses' smoke-free policies. Participants/Methods: A search was carried out for studies in English related to campus smoking bans through June 2013. Eligible studies had outcomes for student or faculty attitudes, or measures of smoking prevalence or…

  15. Discursive Mechanisms and Human Agency in Language Policy Formation: Negotiating Bilingualism and Parallel Language Use at a Swedish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källkvist, Marie; Hult, Francis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the enactment of Sweden's Language Act in 2009 and in the face of the growing presence of English, Swedish universities have been called upon by the Swedish Higher Education Authority to craft their own language policy documents. This study focuses on the discursive negotiation of institutional bilingualism by a language policy…

  16. Policy and Persistence: An Exploratory Mixed Methods Case Study of "Last Mile" Students at Portland State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubbold, Joseph Mark

    2012-01-01

    In an extension of educational attainment research, this exploratory mixed- methods case study examines the influence of institutional policies on the behavior of five cohorts (n = 925) of traditional first time, full time (FTFT) freshmen--called "Last Mile" students--at one urban research university located in the Pacific Northwest.…

  17. Toward Advanced Nursing Practice along with People-Centered Care Partnership Model for Sustainable Universal Health Coverage and Universal Access to Health 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Tomoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Omori, Junko; Arimori, Naoko; Hishinuma, Michiko; Asahara, Kiyomi; Shimpuku, Yoko; Ohashi, Kumiko; Tashiro, Junko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: this study developed a people-centered care (PCC) partnership model for the aging society to address the challenges of social changes affecting people’s health and the new role of advanced practice nurses to sustain universal health coverage. Method: a people-centered care partnership model was developed on the basis of qualitative meta-synthesis of the literature and assessment of 14 related projects. The ongoing projects resulted in individual and social transformation by improving community health literacy and behaviors using people-centered care and enhancing partnership between healthcare providers and community members through advanced practice nurses. Results: people-centered care starts when community members and healthcare providers foreground health and social issues among community members and families. This model tackles these issues, creating new values concerning health and forming a social system that improves quality of life and social support to sustain universal health care through the process of building partnership with communities. Conclusion: a PCC partnership model addresses the challenges of social changes affecting general health and the new role of advanced practice nurses in sustaining UHC. PMID:28146179

  18. [Laboral health in Penitentiary Center of Chile: a look from policies of human resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güilgüiruca R, M; Herrera-Bascur, J

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the influence of human resources policies on occupational health variables, such as engagement and job satisfaction, with regard to Chilean prison employees. 80 workers at the Women's Prison of Iquique were evaluated and results show that 77% and 88 % have a moderate to high score in terms of engagement and job satisfaction respectively. The 24% variation in engagement of the workers studied can be explained by policies aimed at promoting personal interests, while 32% of the variation in job satisfaction could be explained by policies of self-efficacy and personal interests. The above data permits the assertion to be made that human resources policies have a role that is relevant and necessary to modify and improve the occupational health conditions of these public sector workers.

  19. Working with Policy and Regulatory Factors to Implement Universal Design in the Built Environment: The Australian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Larkin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Built environments that are usable by all provide opportunities for engagement in meaningful occupations. However, enabling them in day to day design processes and practice is problematic for relevant professions. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain greater understanding of the policy and regulatory influences that promote or hinder the uptake of universal design in built environments, to inform better future design. Focus groups or telephone interviews were undertaken with 28 key building industry and disability stakeholders in Australia. Four themes were identified: the difficulties of definition; the push or pull of regulations and policy; the role of formal standards; and, shifting the focus of design thinking. The findings highlight the complexity of working within policy and regulatory contexts when implementing universal design. Occupational therapists working with colleagues from other professions must be aware of these influences, and develop the skills to work with them for successful practice.

  20. Working with Policy and Regulatory Factors to Implement Universal Design in the Built Environment: The Australian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Helen; Hitch, Danielle; Watchorn, Valerie; Ang, Susan

    2015-07-15

    Built environments that are usable by all provide opportunities for engagement in meaningful occupations. However, enabling them in day to day design processes and practice is problematic for relevant professions. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain greater understanding of the policy and regulatory influences that promote or hinder the uptake of universal design in built environments, to inform better future design. Focus groups or telephone interviews were undertaken with 28 key building industry and disability stakeholders in Australia. Four themes were identified: the difficulties of definition; the push or pull of regulations and policy; the role of formal standards; and, shifting the focus of design thinking. The findings highlight the complexity of working within policy and regulatory contexts when implementing universal design. Occupational therapists working with colleagues from other professions must be aware of these influences, and develop the skills to work with them for successful practice.

  1. SLC summer 2010 university - The ocean in the climate-energy problem, urban policies. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the summer 2010 university of the SLC (save the climate) organization on the topics of the ocean in the climate-energy problem, and of the urban policies. Nine presentations (slides) are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Biofuels made from micro-algae: stakes and challenges (Olivier Bernard, Comore - INRIA /CNRS/UPMC); 2 - The energy of waves (Alain Clement, Ecole Centrale de Nantes); 3 - The sea, new source of renewable energies? (J.J. Herou, EDF CIH); 4 - Oceans acidification: the other CO 2 problem (James Orr, Pierre Simon Laplace Institute - IPSL, Laboratory of climate and environmental Sciences - LSCE, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ); 5 - Oceans and carbon cycle (Laurent Bopp, IPSL/LSCE); 6 - Renewable marine energies (Yann-Herve De Roeck, France Energies Marines); 7 - Energy renovation of buildings (Jean-Claude Terrier, Mesac Europe); 8 - Modevur research project - Modeling of urban development, sketch of a development typology of chinese cities (Clement-Noel Douady); 9 - Urban areas in the fight against climate change: stakes, knowledge and controversies (Francois Menard, PUCA)

  2. Institutional Culture and OER Policy: How Structure, Culture, and Agency Mediate OER Policy Potential in South African Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Glenda; Trotter, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Several scholars and organizations suggest that institutional policy is a key enabling factor for academics to contribute their teaching materials as open educational resources (OER). But given the diversity of institutions comprising the higher education sector--and the administrative and financial challenges facing many institutions in the…

  3. Number Theory : A Seminar held at the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York

    CERN Document Server

    Chudnovsky, Gregory; Cohn, Harvey; Nathanson, Melvyn

    1989-01-01

    The New York Number Theory Seminar was organized in 1982 to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of recent advances in higher arithmetic and its applications. Papers included in this volume are based on the lectures presented by their authors at the Seminar at the Graduate Center of C.U.N.Y. in 1985-88. Papers in the volume cover a wide spectrum of number theoretic topics ranging from additive number theory and diophantine approximations to algebraic number theory and relations with algebraic geometry and topology.

  4. Upgrading the Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing - a GATE Center of Excellence at the University of Michigan-Dearborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallick, P. K.

    2012-08-30

    The Center for Lightweighting Materials and Processing (CLAMP) was established in September 1998 with a grant from the Department of Energy’s Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) program. The center received the second round of GATE grant in 2005 under the title “Upgrading the Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing”. Using the two grants, the Center has successfully created 10 graduate level courses on lightweight automotive materials, integrated them into master’s and PhD programs in Automotive Systems Engineering, and offered them regularly to the graduate students in the program. In addition, the Center has created a web-based lightweight automotive materials database, conducted research on lightweight automotive materials and organized seminars/symposia on lightweight automotive materials for both academia and industry. The faculty involved with the Center has conducted research on a variety of topics related to design, testing, characterization and processing of lightweight materials for automotive applications and have received numerous research grants from automotive companies and government agencies to support their research. The materials considered included advanced steels, light alloys (aluminum, magnesium and titanium) and fiber reinforced polymer composites. In some of these research projects, CLAMP faculty have collaborated with industry partners and students have used the research facilities at industry locations. The specific objectives of the project during the current funding period (2005 – 2012) were as follows: (1) develop new graduate courses and incorporate them in the automotive systems engineering curriculum (2) improve and update two existing courses on automotive materials and processing (3) upgrade the laboratory facilities used by graduate students to conduct research (4) expand the Lightweight Automotive Materials Database to include additional materials, design case studies and make it more

  5. Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, annual report 1998. April 1, 1998 - March 31, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The operation of the 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerators was very stable until December 12, 1998. A total beam time for experiments is 2383 hours. This report describes the activities at Tandem Accelerator Center of the University of Tsukuba in fiscal year 1998. The 32 reports are presented in the 4 categories; that are (1) Accelerator and Experimental Facilities (7 reports), (2) Nuclear Physics (12 reports), (3) Atomic and Solid State Physics, and Cluster Science (10 reports), (4) Ion Beam Application (3 reports). New development of experimental instruments were made on a proton polarimeter at very low energies, a detector of atomic cluster at low velocity, a long focal-plane position sensitive detector, and a liquid-helium-free superconducting solenoid for an Ecr ion source. In the field of nuclear physics, progresses were made in proton total-reaction cross sections, the continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) theory, (d, αX) reactions, 7 Li breakup reactions, hole states via (p, d) reaction, and nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam γ ray spectroscopy. New approaches were initiated on the precise measurement of proton-proton elastic scattering to search for magnetic monopole, and on perturbed angular correlations to measure nuclear g-factors in the pico second region. The investigation of ion-induced secondary electron is made in the binary-encounter electron emission from crystalline and non crystalline targets. An applicability of ion-induced Auger electrons to structure analysis was also demonstrated. An experiments of Br and I ions opened a new approach to the study of structural defects in amorphous silica. The study of deuteron implantation into silicon single crystal resulted in an interpretation of macroscopic migration. Microscopic migration was investigated on some metals. In atomic cluster physics, angular distributions of several noble-gas ions were measured to derive a new interaction potential. Mass spectra of semiconductor and 3d

  6. THE ROLE OF REGIONAL CENTERS AND UNIVERSITY CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL IN DEVELOPMENT OF HOME MECHANICAL VENTILATION NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rsovac Snezana

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Application of home mechanical ventilators represents the future in the treatment of children with chronic respiratory insufficiency. In this way patients are treated in the home environment, they have full support from their families, they are protected against nosocomial infections and their condition is monitored by medical staff. The role of regional centers is very important in the future development of the home mechanical ventilation network. Doctors in these centers under the full support of the University Children's Hospital physicians can assist and monitor the treatment of children on the household respirators.

  7. Planning and Implementing a Disaster Recovery Capability for a Mainframe-Based Hospital Information System: Duke University Medical Center's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, J. David; Walker, L. Phillip; Aaron, Walter H.; Whitesell, Judy J.; Stead, William W.

    1988-01-01

    Since October 1986, the Medical Center Information Systems Department at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC) has been developing and implementing a plan to provide for the continuation of the functions performed by Duke Hospital's central computing system in the event of a disaster that would disable the central hardware configuration for an extended amount of time. The key characteristic of the plan is that it provides for the full function and performance of the system to be returned to the end users within twenty four hours of the primary system's failure.

  8. Fort Collins Science Center- Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch : Integrating social, behavioral, economic and biological sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The Fort Collins Science Center's Policy Analysis and Science Assistance (PASA) Branch is a team of approximately 22 scientists, technicians, and graduate student researchers. PASA provides unique capabilities in the U.S. Geological Survey by leading projects that integrate social, behavioral, economic, and biological analyses in the context of human-natural resource interactions. Resource planners, managers, and policymakers in the U.S. Departments of the Interior (DOI) and Agriculture (USDA), State and local agencies, as well as international agencies use information from PASA studies to make informed natural resource management and policy decisions. PASA scientists' primary functions are to conduct both theoretical and applied social science research, provide technical assistance, and offer training to advance performance in policy relevant research areas. Management and research issues associated with human-resource interactions typically occur in a unique context, involve difficult to access populations, require knowledge of both natural/biological science in addition to social science, and require the skill to integrate multiple science disciplines. In response to these difficult contexts, PASA researchers apply traditional and state-of-the-art social science methods drawing from the fields of sociology, demography, economics, political science, communications, social-psychology, and applied industrial organization psychology. Social science methods work in concert with our rangeland/agricultural management, wildlife, ecology, and biology capabilities. The goal of PASA's research is to enhance natural resource management, agency functions, policies, and decision-making. Our research is organized into four broad areas of study.

  9. Conflict of Interest Policies at Canadian Universities and Medical Schools: Some Lessons from the AMSA PharmFree Scorecard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu, Ghislaine

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Launched in 2007, the American Medical Students Association (AMSA PharmFree Scorecard is an annual ranking of conflict of interest (COI policies at American medical centres; it focuses on COIs that may occur when medical education seems likely to be influenced by university-industry relationships, especially those with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. The PharmFree Scorecard has proven influential in stimulating changes in policy regarding the management of COI at American medical institutions, thus it provides a useful jumping off point for reflection on how and why medical education institutions in other countries – and for our purposes, Canada – should pay more attention to the appropriate identification and management of COI. The PharmFree Scorecard methodology examines a diversity of factors and interests that could influence medical education; as such, it is an interesting approach to analysing the COI policies of medical schools. To test its utility or applicability outside the US, we decided to apply the PharmFree Scorecard to the COI policies of the 16 Canadian universities hosting medical schools. Overall, Canadian institutions rank very poorly, especially in ensuring that education and training tools are provided to staff, students and faculty members to enable the identification and management of COI. However, differences between the US and Canadian medical education contexts, e.g., with regards to the governance and funding of universities, limit to some extent the direct applicability of the AMSA ranking. Canadian medical schools – and their host universities – nonetheless have much to learn from insights provided by the AMSA PharmFree Scorecard ranking, although they can and should go further in developing their own COI policies and procedures.

  10. The teaching of rheumatology at the University. The journey from teacher based to student-centered learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Antonio; de Toro, Javier; Nolla, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, university education has undergone profound changes as a result of the creation of the European Space for Higher Education. It has gone from a teacher-centered model, based on the transmission of knowledge through lectures, to being student-centered, based on the acquisition of skills and attaching great importance to independent learning. This transformation involves the need to reorganize academic activity and employ new teaching tools, such as active learning methodologies, more in line with current requirements. In this article, the backbones of the European Space for Higher Education are presented, and diverse experiences of teaching innovation described under Reumacademia and from three Spanish universities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Applying accreditation standards in a self-evaluation process: The experience of Educational Development Center of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mirzazadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Educational Development Centers (EDCs, as the coordinator in education development in Medical Sciences universities, in order to improve their quality should evaluate their activities. In spite of remarkable performance of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS EDC in previous national rankings, but it faces many challenges and problems. This paper provided the process, results and lessons learned from a self-evaluation experience conducted at TUMS EDC based on accreditation standards. Method: The present study is an Institutional self-evaluation study based on the national accreditation standards of EDCs (2012. Data were gathered using an open-ended questionnaire developed on the basis of the SWOT format. A directional content analysis applied to analyze the data. Results: In total, 84 point of strengths, 87 weaknesses, 15 opportunities, 24 threats and also 99 recommendations for quality improvement were reported. The most important strengths of the center were the existence of an established mechanism regarding research process in education and scholarship of education, holding various faculty development courses and training standardized patient. The most important weaknesses were the lack of specified procedures in some areas such as monitoring the planning and reviewing of educational programs in the field of educational programs and evaluation of empowerment courses. Conclusion: The present evaluation results will be useful in directing future policies of TUMS EDC such as revising its strategic planning. We hope that the current experience can be helpful for administrators in EDCs in the Ministry of Health and Medical Education and also other Medical Sciences Universities.

  12. Performance Centered Maintenance as a Core Policy in Strategic Maintenance Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apallius de Vos, Jack I.; van Dongen, Leonardus Adriana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Rolling stock maintenance in the Netherlands traditionally is performed on several levels of complexity and therefore on levels of non-availability and cost. The challenge in optimizing performance and cost of rolling stock maintenance is to integrate the policy on maintenance concepts, maintenance

  13. Screening Mental Health Problems in Schools. A Center Policy Issues Analysis Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Long-standing policy controversies have heated up as a result of increasing proposals for using schools to screen for mental health problems (e.g., depression screening). This brief highlights the following issues: (1) How appropriate is large-scale screening for mental health problems? (2) Will the costs of large-scale mental health screening…

  14. University/Science Center Collaborations (A Science Center Perspective): Developing an Infrastructure of Partnerships with Science Centers to Support the Engagement of Scientists and Engineers in Education and Outreach for Broad Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Eric

    2009-03-01

    Science centers, professional associations, corporations and university research centers share the same mission of education and outreach, yet come from ``different worlds.'' This gap may be bridged by working together to leverage unique strengths in partnership. Front-end evaluation results for the development of new resources to support these (mostly volunteer-based) partnerships elucidate the factors which lead to a successful relationship. Maintaining a science museum-scientific community partnership requires that all partners devote adequate resources (time, money, etc.). In general, scientists/engineers and science museum professionals often approach relationships with different assumptions and expectations. The culture of science centers is distinctly different from the culture of science. Scientists/engineers prefer to select how they will ultimately share their expertise from an array of choices. Successful partnerships stem from clearly defined roles and responsibilities. Scientists/engineers are somewhat resistant to the idea of traditional, formal training. Instead of developing new expertise, many prefer to offer their existing strengths and expertise. Maintaining a healthy relationship requires the routine recognition of the contributions of scientists/engineers. As professional societies, university research centers and corporations increasingly engage in education and outreach, a need for a supportive infrastructure becomes evident. Work of TryScience.org/VolTS (Volunteers TryScience), the MRS NISE Net (Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network) subcommittee, NRCEN (NSF Research Center Education Network), the IBM On Demand Community, and IEEE Educational Activities exemplify some of the pieces of this evolving infrastructure.

  15. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research - University of Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    This center aims to understand why some children are more susceptible than others to the harmful effects of pesticides and are trying to identify how this susceptibility affects growth, development and learning.

  16. University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Center for Childhood Neurotoxicology and Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The main focus of the UMDNJ Children's Center, established in 2002, is to examine the effects of environmental chemicals on neurological health and development, with...

  17. Operation of the Nuclear Radiation Center as an all-university facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinman, G.W.

    1972-01-01

    The TRIGA at WSU is part of an all university research unit and its structure and work organization are presented. The facility seeks users from the university and from outside the university. In many cases projects are jointly sponsored by NRC faculty together with faculty from elsewhere on campus. In other cases neutrons or free use of other equipment is provided. The promotional efforts are rather sharply focused on environmental and health related problems. The effects of the institutional arrangement on the operation of the Centre are discussed

  18. Traces of Old and New Center-Periphery Dynamics in Language-in-Education Policy and Practice: Insights from a Linguistic Ethnographic Study in Timor-Leste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa Cabral, Ildegrada; Martin-Jones, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    This article reveals how center-periphery relations have unfolded, over time, in language policy processes in one nation--Timor-Leste--on the global periphery. We take a "longue durée" perspective on the language policy processes at work in this historical context, showing how different regimes of language were imposed, in the past, by…

  19. Do Father-Friendly Policies Promote Father-Friendly Child-Rearing Practices? A Review of Swedish Parental Leave and Child Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Michael B.; Sarkadi, Anna

    2012-01-01

    By reviewing the literature, we looked at how parental leave policies in Sweden have influenced two well-defined areas of early father involvement: participating in parental leave and at visits/activities at the Child Health Centers. Sweden has one of the most comprehensive and egalitarian parental leave policies in the world, permitting parents…

  20. Radiation Doses in Consecutive CT Examinations from Five University of California Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Moghadassi, Michelle; Wilson, Nicole; Nelson, Thomas R; Boone, John M; Cagnon, Christopher H; Gould, Robert; Hall, David J; Krishnam, Mayil; Lamba, Ramit; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Seibert, Anthony; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2015-10-01

    To summarize data on computed tomographic (CT) radiation doses collected from consecutive CT examinations performed at 12 facilities that can contribute to the creation of reference levels. The study was approved by the institutional review boards of the collaborating institutions and was compliant with HIPAA. Radiation dose metrics were prospectively and electronically collected from 199 656 consecutive CT examinations in 83 181 adults and 3871 consecutive CT examinations in 2609 children at the five University of California medical centers during 2013. The median volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose, along with the interquartile range (IQR), were calculated separately for adults and children and stratified according to anatomic region. Distributions for DLP and effective dose are reported for single-phase examinations, multiphase examinations, and all examinations. For adults, the median CTDIvol was 50 mGy (IQR, 37-62 mGy) for the head, 12 mGy (IQR, 7-17 mGy) for the chest, and 12 mGy (IQR, 8-17 mGy) for the abdomen. The median DLPs for single-phase, multiphase, and all examinations, respectively, were as follows: head, 880 mGy · cm (IQR, 640-1120 mGy · cm), 1550 mGy · cm (IQR, 1150-2130 mGy · cm), and 960 mGy · cm (IQR, 690-1300 mGy · cm); chest, 420 mGy · cm (IQR, 260-610 mGy · cm), 880 mGy · cm (IQR, 570-1430 mGy · cm), and 550 mGy · cm (IQR 320-830 mGy · cm); and abdomen, 580 mGy · cm (IQR, 360-860 mGy · cm), 1220 mGy · cm (IQR, 850-1790 mGy · cm), and 960 mGy · cm (IQR, 600-1460 mGy · cm). Median effective doses for single-phase, multiphase, and all examinations, respectively, were as follows: head, 2 mSv (IQR, 1-3 mSv), 4 mSv (IQR, 3-8 mSv), and 2 mSv (IQR, 2-3 mSv); chest, 9 mSv (IQR, 5-13 mSv), 18 mSv (IQR, 12-29 mSv), and 11 mSv (IQR, 6-18 mSv); and abdomen, 10 mSv (IQR, 6-16 mSv), 22 mSv (IQR, 15-32 mSv), and 17 mSv (IQR, 11-26 mSv). In general, values for children were approximately 50% those

  1. Performance Centered Maintenance as a Core Policy in Strategic Maintenance Control

    OpenAIRE

    Apallius de Vos, Jack I.; van Dongen, Leonardus Adriana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Rolling stock maintenance in the Netherlands traditionally is performed on several levels of complexity and therefore on levels of non-availability and cost. The challenge in optimizing performance and cost of rolling stock maintenance is to integrate the policy on maintenance concepts, maintenance locations and maintenance intervals (what, when & where). NedTrain as a subsidiary of the Netherlands Railways is developing and implementing this improved concept of maintenance. On one hand maint...

  2. Foreign and Security Policy of the Newly Independent States: Balancing between Two Power Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiy G. Fedunyak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is focusing on the interplay between foreign policy agenda of the post-Soviet states at the one hand and internal policy developments in these countries at the other hand. One of the main explanations why the post-Soviet elites in non-Russian republics are pursuing the so-called multi-vectorialism in the foreign policy is that it serves as a strategy to maximize the most from having good relations both with East and West, and thus trying to perpetuate the monopoly of the power. Uzbekistan is a country in case, as Ukraine (and Moldova is (or was indeed also. At the same time, the special relations between the elites of post-Soviet countries and Moscow are very important in shaping the foreign policy agenda of these countries as a result of the Soviet legacy, i.e. the ties of the former Communist nomenklatura with Moscow are still playing a very important role in the most of the former Soviet republics. Another relevant variable in explaining the current state of affairs in the foreign and security issues of the post-Soviet states and the still dominant role of Russia is the fact that the West (NATO and EU especially are not very successful in trying to limit Moscow’s ambitions in the “near abroad”. This is making the leaders of most NIS to be obedient to Russia’s pretensions in lack of real support from the West in order to counteract these neo-imperial claims from the part of the former metropolis.

  3. Developing a frenotomy policy at one medical center: a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaitis, N S; Kaempf, J W

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this study was to change procedures in our medical center regarding frenotomy for ankyloglossia (tongue-tie). The medical and breastfeeding outcomes of 36 fullterm infants who received frenotomies were studied. The information was used to develop frenotomy eligibility standards that would guide other physicians and insure timely treatment to avoid breastfeeding cessation.

  4. Student Centered Policies and Practices Help Students 'At Risk' Earn High School Diploma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Connie J.; Thorne, Tom

    2003-01-01

    A Wyoming alternative high school successfully graduates at-risk students because of its student-centered environment. Flexibility in the timelines to earn credits, a cross-disciplinary curriculum, community partnerships, and meaningful career enterprises offer the "person-environment fit" needed by students at risk. Student counseling…

  5. Understanding Quality in Context: Child Care Centers, Communities, Markets, and Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohacek, Monica; Adams, Gina C.; Kisker, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Early care and education can prepare children for school, but while some preschool and child care programs do an excellent job, others are inadequate and some may even harm healthy development. This study focuses on child care center directors to better understand why there is so much variation, and how public initiatives can better help…

  6. AN ANSWER TO DIVERSITY: AFFIRMATIVE ACTION POLICIES FOR TRADITIONAL PEOPLE -- THE UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DO PARÁ (FEDERAL UNIVERSITY OF PARÁ EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Felipe Beltrão

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Research analyzes the Admissions Program and the new reality of affirmative action measures at the Federal University of Pará, its context and implications. A special interest regards higher education and cultural diversity. Study reflects upon the goals of such policy; the different arguments among actors involved; the institutional conduct; and the benefits and difficulties faced to implement the program. The principle that guides the study understands the rights of indigenous populations in their access to University and sees the measures as a victory of the indigenous movement. Challenges remain, though, at two levels: first, it is necessary to develop policy to face institutional and social resistance to the implementation of the program; second, it is paramount to support the indigenous students in their needs in their new academic life.

  7. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Aeronautics, Space Sciences and Technology, Earth Systems Sciences, Global Hydrology, and Education. Volumes 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Tommy L. (Editor); White, Bettie (Editor); Goodman, Steven (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor); Randolph, Lynwood (Editor); Rickman, Doug (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This volume chronicles the proceedings of the 1998 NASA University Research Centers Technical Conference (URC-TC '98), held on February 22-25, 1998, in Huntsville, Alabama. The University Research Centers (URCS) are multidisciplinary research units established by NASA at 11 Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCU's) and 3 Other Minority Universities (OMU's) to conduct research work in areas of interest to NASA. The URC Technical Conferences bring together the faculty members and students from the URC's with representatives from other universities, NASA, and the aerospace industry to discuss recent advances in their fields.

  8. In the Shadow of Celebrity? World-Class University Policies and Public Value in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonini, Leon; Westerheijden, Don F.; Benneworth, Paul; Dauncey, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    The growing popularity of the concept of world-class universities raises the question of whether investing in such universities is a worthwhile use of public resources. Does concentrating public resources on the most excellent universities improve the overall quality of a higher education system, especially if definitions of excellence and…

  9. Is Drop-Out from University Dependent on National Culture and Policy? The Case of Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troelsen, Rie; Laursen, Per F.

    2014-01-01

    National cultures are known to influence educational institutions and practices in many ways. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that drop-out from university is also influenced by differences in national cultures. In this article, we compare drop-out from Danish universities with drop-out from European universities. Based on Danish national…

  10. Patenting Productivity and Intellectual Property Policies at Research I Universities: An Exploratory Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pilar; Berger, Joseph B.

    2005-01-01

    In the 1980s, the US government encouraged the cooperation of industries with universities in order to bridge funding gaps and cope with global competitive markets through legislations that allow universities to start spin-off businesses and to generate profits from patents. At the turn of the century, university partnerships with the private…

  11. In the Shadow of Celebrity? World-Class University Policies and Public Value in Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremonini, Leon; Westerheijden, Donald F.; Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Dauncey, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    The growing popularity of the concept of world-class universities raises the question of whether investing in such universities is a worthwhile use of public resources. Does concentrating public resources on the most excellent universities improve the overall quality of a higher education system,

  12. Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    At the request of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Research Universities, the Council on Governmental Relations (COGR), the Association of American Universities (AAU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) have assembled a set of ten recommendations for regulatory reform that would improve research…

  13. Effects of Class Size and Attendance Policy on University Classroom Interaction in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yin; Chang, Te-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Classroom interaction experience is one of the main parts of students' learning lives. However, surprisingly little research has investigated students' perceptions of classroom interaction with different attendance policies across different class sizes in the higher education system. To elucidate the effects of class size and attendance policy on…

  14. Task shifting of HIV/AIDS case management to Community Health Service Centers in urban China: a qualitative policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuchang; Lv, Fan; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Dapeng; Meng, Sining; Ju, Lahong; Jiang, Huihui; Ma, Liping; Sun, Jiangping; Wu, Zunyou

    2015-07-02

    The growing number of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in China points to an increased need for case management services of HIV/AIDS. This study sought to explore the challenges and enablers in shifting the HIV/AIDS case management services from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCs) to Community Health Service Centers (CHSCs) in urban China. A qualitative method based on the Health Policy Triangle (HPT) framework was employed to gain in-depth insights into four elements of the task shifting strategy. This included a review on published literature and health policy documents, 15 focus group discussions (FGDs) and 30 in-depth interviews (IDIs) with four types of key actors from three cities in China. A total of 78 studies and 17 policy files at the national, municipal and local levels were obtained and reviewed comprehensively. Three semi-structured interview guides were used to explore key actors' views on shifting the HIV/AIDS case management services to CHSCs. It is necessary and feasible for CHSCs to engage in case management services for PLWHA in local communities. The increasing number of PLWHA and shortage of qualified health professionals in CDCs made shifting case management services downwards to CHSCs an urgent agenda. CHSCs' wide distribution, technical capacity, accessibility and current practice enabled them to carry out case management services for PLWHA. However our findings indicated several challenges in this task shifting process. Those challenges included lack of specific policy and stable financial support for CHSCs, inadequate manpower, relatively low capacity for health service delivery, lack of coordination among sectors, PLWHA's fear for discrimination and privacy disclosure in local communities, which may compromise the effectiveness and sustainability of those services. Shifting the HIV/AIDS case management services from CDCs to CHSCs is a new approach to cope with the rising number of PLWHA in China, but it should be

  15. Southern Federal University as a Center for the Development of Inclusive Education in the Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryunova L.V.,

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article provides an overview of best practices for inclusive education in higher educational institutions of the country, in terms of assessing its role in the development of inclusion in the regions. Cluster approach is proposed as the main approach to the development of regional inclusive education. The article describes the experience of organizing inclusive education in the Southern Federal University as a basic educational institution of higher education and as a cluster- forming educational organization that provides learning environment for persons with disabilities at all levels of education. The article also reveals the purpose and objectives of the university in the organization and implementation of quality inclusive education as a key development strategy. We analyze the actual state of inclusive education system at the university, which allows us to identify and describe the main activities of the Southern Federal University that ensure the establishment and development of inclusive education system both within the university and in the Rostov region in general. This also provides the opportunity to describe the current experience that may be incorporated in other institutions of higher education thus ensuring the effectiveness of formation of inclusive education system.

  16. Archival policies and collections database for the Woods Hole Science Center's marine sediment samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, Brian J.; Kelsey, Sarah A.

    2007-01-01

    The Woods Hole Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been an active member of the Woods Hole research community, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, for over 40 years. In that time there have been many projects that involved the collection of sediment samples conducted by USGS scientists and technicians for the research and study of seabed environments and processes. These samples were collected at sea or near shore and then brought back to the Woods Hole Science Center (WHSC) for analysis. While at the center, samples are stored in ambient temperature, refrigerated and freezing conditions ranging from +2º Celsius to -18º Celsius, depending on the best mode of preparation for the study being conducted or the duration of storage planned for the samples. Recently, storage methods and available storage space have become a major concern at the WHSC. The core and sediment archive program described herein has been initiated to set standards for the management, methods, and duration of sample storage. A need has arisen to maintain organizational consistency and define storage protocol. This handbook serves as a reference and guide to all parties interested in using and accessing the WHSC's sample archive and also defines all the steps necessary to construct and maintain an organized collection of geological samples. It answers many questions as to the way in which the archive functions.

  17. The role of university hospitals as centers of excellence for shared health-care-delivery of in- and outpatients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelhard, K.; Matzko, M.; Bruening, R.; Holzknecht, N.; Stark, V.; Reiser, M.

    2002-01-01

    Problem. Health care delivery in Germany has to face severe challenges that will lead to a closer integration of services for in- and out-patients. University hospitals play an important role due to their activities in research, education and health care delivery. They are requested to promote and evaluate new means and ways for health care delivery. Methods. The Institute of Clinical Radiology at the University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University started teleradiological services for hospitals and general practices in January 1999 in the framework of the ''Imaging services - teleradiological center of excellence''. Legal, technical and organizational prerequisites were analyzed. Results. Networks between university hospitals and general practices are not likely to solve all future problems. They will, however, increase the availability of the knowledge of experts even in rural areas and contribute to a quality ensured health care at the patients home. Future developments may lead to international co-operations and such services may be available to patients abroad. Conclusion. Legal, technical and organizational obstacles have to be overcome to create a framework for high quality telemedical applications. University hospitals will play an important role in promoting and evaluating teleradiological services. (orig.) [de

  18. A Case Study: An ACT Stress Management Group in a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltry, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) stress management group in a college counseling center setting. This study explored (a) the effectiveness of ACT in increasing participants' ability to tolerate distress, which directly affects their ability to function in a stressful college…

  19. Performing Research at University Centers for Academic Development--An Explorative Case Study in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigmar, Martin; Edgren, Gudrun

    2017-01-01

    The aim is to explore the absence or presence of, and motives for, research at centers for academic development and to problematize the research situation among academic developers. Boyer's and Healey's theories are used as lenses for the analysis based on the questionnaires that were used for data collection. The conclusion is that research is a…

  20. Leaning toward the Centers: International Networking at China's Five C[subscript 9] League Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Xie, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Scholarly relations between developed and developing countries have long been characterized by imbalances and asymmetries. The "centers" in the North give direction, provide models, produce research and function as the pinnacles of the academic system while institutions in developing countries copy their development from the…

  1. Epidemiology of sports injuries referring to Kashan University of Medical Sciences Trauma Research Center from 2005 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyah Mansour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Among the injury types, sports ones constitute a considerable proportion of patients who refer to the medical centers. This research was conducted to examine the frequency of sportsrelated injuries referring to Kashan University of Medical Sciences Trauma Research Center from 2005 to 2011. Methods: This was a retrospective research in which existing data from the data bank of Kashan University of Medical Sciences Trauma Research Center were employed. The data were extracted from the main source by SPSS version 16.0. Variables such as age, education, occupation and gender were analyzed. Results: The highest proportion of injuries was observed in students (59.4% followed by workers (11.8%. Upper and lower extremities were most commonly injured. The most frequent injury was strain (35.4%, followed by sprain (27.7%. Conclusion: The results of this research showed that the majority of the sports trauma occurrs in students; therefore, they need more attention in regard to sports injuries. Preventive measures such as informing the coaches and teachers as well as increasing the students’ awareness about the injury risk can decrease the incidences of sports injuries. Key words: Athletic injuries; Epidemiology; Kashan

  2. Healthy caregivers-healthy children (HC2) phase 2: Integrating culturally sensitive childhood obesity prevention strategies into childcare center policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiah, Sarah E; Lebron, Cynthia; Moise, Rhoda; Sunil Mathew, M; Sardinas, Krystal; Chang, Catherina; Palenzuela, Joanne; Walsh, Jennifer; Shelnutt, Karla P; Spector, Rachel; Altare, Fiorella; Natale, Ruby

    2017-02-01

    Despite the high prevalence of obesity among preschool-aged children, most states lack childcare center (CCC) nutrition and physical activity policies. The Healthy Caregivers, Healthy Children (HC) Phase 2 project is examining the relationship between the CCC nutrition and physical activity environment and child dietary intake/physical activity patterns and body mass index (BMI). A total of 24 "Quality Counts" (Miami Dade County, Florida's Quality Rating Improvement System [QRIS)]) CCCs serving low resource families with ≥50 2-to-5year olds attending have been randomized to either intervention (n=12) or control (n=12). The HC2 intervention arm CCCs receive implementation of a daily curricula for (1) teachers/parents; (2) children; (3) snack, beverage, physical activity, and screen time policies; and (4) technical assistance with menu modifications. Control arm schools receive an attention control safety curriculum. HC2 is delivered once a month in year 1, quarterly in year 2 and will be disseminated throughout the Quality Counts network in year 3. Primary outcome measures include the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation tool (EPAO), standardized dietary intake and physical activity patterns surveys, and child BMI. The 'Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance (RE-AIM)' framework will guide the interpretation of outcome measures. CCCs are in need of evidence-based standardized nutrition and physical activity policies. The intersection of RE-AIM and early childhood obesity prevention in the childcare setting could generate robust and new information to the field about potential barriers, facilitators, adoption, and sustainability in this setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Building a Creative-Arts Therapy Group at a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Randal W.; Paul, Sherin

    2011-01-01

    Creative-arts therapy groups offer university students powerful ways to address intrapersonal and interpersonal concerns. These groups combine the strengths of a traditional process group with the benefits of participation in the expressive arts. The creative process draws students in, invites insight and introspection, and facilitates outward…

  4. Interpersonal Violence and Sexual Assault: Trauma-Informed Communication Approaches in University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Christina Granato; Campbell, Kimberly Brown

    2016-01-01

    A university in the United States Mountain West utilized grant resources to track counseling services for students who were currently experiencing or who had historically experienced relationship violence, sexual assault and/or stalking. This report reflects on the first 2 years of this program, including an overview of prevalence and reporting…

  5. University Health Center Providers' Beliefs about Discussing and Recommending Sexual Health Prevention to Women College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozkowski, Kristen N.; Geshnizjani, Alireza; Middlestadt, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual health concerns such as sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy remain substantial health problems faced by young adults, especially college women. University healthcare providers may be instrumental in increasing female patients' involvement in preventative sexual health behaviors, however little research has examined this…

  6. An example of a DOE [Department of Energy]/university partnership: South Carolina Pilot Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albenesius, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    A consortium of educational institutions in South Carolina proposed to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in July 1989 a working partnership for mutual improvement of technical capability in the environmental restoration and waste management fields. The institutions forming the consortium are Clemson University, the University of South Carolina, the Medical University of South Carolina, and South Carolina State College. A major component of the partnership is applied research closely coupled with the problems and issues of the Savannah River site regarding demonstration of waste management processes and concepts of disposal and disposal site closure. A primary benefit to DOE from this partnership is expected to be improved public perception of the actions being taken by DOE to protect the public, particularly in areas of environmental restoration and waste management. It is evident at the Savannah River site that this is a key factor in successfully achieving the site's mission. The strength of the interest of the South Carolina institutions in developing initiatives in waste management forecasts a healthy long-term prospect for the partnership. The State of South Carolina has established a hazardous waste research fund of approximately $650 thousand annually for research by the partnership universities to seek better ways to maintain a healthy environment and to reduce, dispose of, or store waste products safely

  7. Dropout Policy in Czech Higher Education: Can Universities Serve Several Masters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Švec Václav

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore the way higher education institutions adapt to environmental pressures. These pressures can be represented either by various demands or by specific policies. Dropout policy is examined on a Czech case study in order to demonstrate that at the end of the day, higher education institutions respond mainly to the most pressing challenges of an economic nature in the most rational way. As a result, their traditional mission (teaching, research, the third mission, and mainly the social function of the higher education system, may be at stake. At the same time, this study illustrates how difficult it is to introduce any higher education policy without thorough evaluation of other policies in place and of various factors affecting institutional behaviour.

  8. Practical Recommendations on the Improvement of the Effectiveness of Anti-Corruption Policy in Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Zamaletdinov, Radif R.; Yudina, Nadezhda P.; Lavrentyeva, Elvira I.; Savva, Lubov I.; Pugacheva, Natalya B.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the study is conditioned by the expansion of the scale of corruption in higher education. The purpose of the article is to develop practical recommendations for improving of anti-corruption policy’s effectiveness at universities. The study involved 450 teachers, 1200 students from 140 Russian universities. The main results of the study are to identify the causes of bribery and popular tools of counteraction of corruption in universities, organizational and practical measure...

  9. Water and sanitation policies in Argentina: the challenge of universalizing services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica L. Cáceres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed at contributing to the reflection and debate on the water and sanitation policies in Argentina. For this purpose, regulatory and institutional aspects are discussed regarding services management in the country. The paper also includes a characterization of the five stages of such policies that have marked the progress of the sector. Finally, the main challenges faced by the sector are mentioned as a conclusion.

  10. A systematic strategic planning process focused on improved community engagement by an academic health center: the University of Kansas Medical Center's story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David C; Nelson, Eve-Lynn; Ast, Cori; Lillis, Teresa

    2013-05-01

    A growing number of academic health centers (AHCs) are considering approaches to expand collaboration with their communities in order to address complex and multisystem health concerns. In 2010, internal leaders at the University of Kansas Medical Center undertook a strategic planning process to enhance both community engagement activities and the scholarship resulting from these engagement activities. The authors describe the strategic planning process, recommendations, and actions associated with elevating community engagement within the AHC's mission and priorities. The strategic planning process included conducting an inventory of community engagement activities within the AHC; analyzing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for community engagement work; and identifying goals and strategies to improve future community engagement activities and scholarship. The resulting road map for enhancing community engagement at their institution through 2015 consists of four main strategies: emphasize scholarship in community engagement, revise organizational structures to better facilitate community engagement, prioritize current engagement activities to ensure appropriate use of resources, and enhance communication of engagement initiatives to further develop stakeholder relationships.The authors also discuss implementation of the plan to date and highlight lessons learned that may inform other AHCs as they enhance and expand similar endeavors.

  11. Twenty Years of Proton Radiation Therapy at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Jerry D.

    The proton treatment center at Loma Linda is the first hospital-based proton facility in the world. Dr. James M. Slater spearheaded its development in response to the need to reduce normal tissue injury and unacceptable side effects. Loma Linda physicians treat a wide range of cancers and other conditions with protons; studies are ongoing to expand applications and realize the still-evolving potential of the modality.

  12. Citation Characteristics of Research Articles under the Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanapaisal, Soodjai; Thanapaisal, Chaiwit; Thanapaisal, Sukhumal

    2015-08-01

    Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University, has cooperated with the Medical Association of Thailand in publishing the special five issues of JMT (Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand) during the years 2010-2014 in order to promote research activities and working network of related fields in cleft lip-cleft palate and craniofacial deformities. This study aimed to examine the features of 106 research articles in terms of authors and disciplines, and analyze the citations considering sources, country and years after publication. The scope of study also included citations in the form of journal, which was presented as journal ranking compared with impact factors and Bradford's Law on journal citation. The results of study will be useful in developing multidisciplinary research activities of the center and especially assist in the acquisition of academic journals for essential sources of reference.

  13. Factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among 4,669 clinical medical students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbo Qing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To produce competent undergraduate-level medical doctors for rural township health centers (THCs, the Chinese government mandated that medical colleges in Central and Western China recruit rural-oriented, tuition-waived medical students (RTMSs starting in 2010. This study aimed to identify and assess factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among both RTMSs and other students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China. Methods: An internet-based self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted with medical students in Guangxi province. Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify factors related to the attitudes toward work in a rural township health center. Results: Among 4,669 medical students, 1,523 (33% had a positive attitude and 2,574 (55% had a neutral attitude toward working in THCs. Demographic characteristics, personal job concerns, and knowledge of THCs were associated with the choice of a career in THCs. The factors related to a positive attitude included the following: three-year program, a rural-oriented medical program, being male, an expectation of working in a county or township, a focus on medical career development, some perceived difficulty of getting a job, having family support, sufficient knowledge of THCs, optimism toward THC development, seeking lower working pressure, and a lower expected monthly salary. Conclusion: Male students in a three-year program or a rural-oriented tuition-waived medical education program were more likely to work in THCs. Selecting medical students through interviews to identify their family support and intentions to work in THCs would increase recruitment and retention. Establishing favorable policies and financial incentives to improve living conditions and the social status of rural physicians is necessary.

  14. A person-centered approach to individualizing a school-based universal preventive intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Linda L; Bradley, Stephanie; Coffman, Donna

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript focuses on how individualized components may be embedded within a universal preventive intervention (TimeWise: Taking Charge of Leisure Time) to make program delivery more effective. Leisure related variables (motivation, boredom/interest and peer and parental influence) were used to suggest ways to individualize the program. Latent Class Analysis was used to develop individualized risk and strength profiles of adolescents (N = 617). Comparisons were made between a treatment and control group. Four classes were identified: undifferentiated high, intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation/amotivation, undifferentiated low. These classes were related to substance use. Membership in the intrinsic class was associated with intervention group while the extrinsic class was related to the control group. Results were useful in suggesting ways to tailor a universal prevention program.

  15. Final Report for The University of Texas at Arlington Optical Medical Imaging Section of Advanced Imaging Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosrow Behbehani

    2013-02-26

    The goal of this project was to create state-of-the-art optical medical imaging laboratories for the Biomedical Engineering faculty and student researchers of the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) on the campus of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW). This has been successfully achieved. These laboratories provide an unprecedented opportunity for the bioengineers (from UTA) to bring about new breakthroughs in medical imaging using optics. Specifically, three major laboratories have been successfully established and state-of-the-art scientific instruments have been placed in the labs. As a result of this grant, numerous journal and conference publications have been generated, patents for new inventions have been filed and received, and many additional grants for the continuation of the research has been received.

  16. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: U01 Natural Products Screening | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project was to enlarge the chemical space probed by Project 1 (High-Throughput siRNA Screening of a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line Panel) by screening an expanded natural products library (~40,000) in an effort to further define vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer. This new library is derived from a diverse collection of marine bacteria (prepared by Dr. John MacMillan, University of Texas Southwestern).

  17. Improvement of cryogenic 3-dimensional observation system of soft x-ray microscope at the SR center of Ritsumeikan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, K.; Usui, K.; Ohigashi, T.; Fujii, H.; Yoshimura, M.; Namba, H.; Kihara, H.

    2013-10-01

    The improvements of a soft x-ray microscope beamline (BL-12) at the SR center of Ritsumeikan University are reported. A wedge-shaped slit and Si plane mirror were newly introduced. The better energy resolution was expected and the +2nd order diffraction from the CZP (1.2 nm at 2.4 nm observation) was suppressed. A new sample holding fixture allows the sample to be replaced quickly and accurately. A new sample cooling system allowed a stable cryogenic x-ray imaging.

  18. Assessment of capacity for Health Policy and Systems Research and Analysis in seven African universities: results from the CHEPSAA project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoev, Tolib; Lê, Gillian; Green, Andrew; Orgill, Marsha; Komba, Adalgot; Esena, Reuben K; Nyapada, Linet; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Amde, Woldekidan K; Nxumalo, Nonhlanhla; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-10-01

    The importance of health policy and systems research and analysis (HPSR+A) is widely recognized. Universities are central to strengthening and sustaining the HPSR+A capacity as they teach the next generation of decision-makers and health professionals. However, little is known about the capacity of universities, specifically, to develop the field. In this article, we report results of capacity self- assessments by seven universities within five African countries, conducted through the Consortium for Health Policy and Systems Analysis in Africa (CHEPSAA). The capacity assessments focused on both capacity 'assets' and 'needs', and covered the wider context, as well as organizational and individual capacity levels. Six thematic areas of capacity were examined: leadership and governance, organizations' resources, scope of HPSR+A teaching and research, communication, networking and getting research into policy and practice (GRIPP), demand for HPRS+A and resource environment. The self-assessments by each university used combinations of document reviews, semi-structured interviews and staff surveys, followed by comparative analysis. A framework approach, guided by the six thematic areas, was used to analyse data. We found that HPSR+A is an international priority, and an existing activity in Africa, though still neglected field with challenges including its reliance on unpredictable international funding. All universities have capacity assets, such as ongoing HPSR+A teaching and research. There are, however, varying levels of assets (such as differences in staff numbers, group sizes and amount of HPSR+A teaching and research), which, combined with different capacity needs at all three levels (such as individual training, improvement in systems for quality assurance and fostering demand for HPSR+A work), can shape a future agenda for HPSR+A capacity strengthening. Capacity assets and needs at different levels appear related. Possible integrated strategies for strengthening

  19. The InterCon network: a program for education partnerships at the University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, G A; Bouldin, P A; Farver, D W; Maugans, L A; Sanders, L C; Booker, J

    1999-04-01

    The University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center (UT-Houston) has created programs and activities to address the state's pressing needs in minority education. Through InterCon, a network of universities and K-12 schools, UT-Houston works with its partners to identify competitive candidates in the current pool of minority graduates with bachelor's degrees and to help them--along with their non-minority counterparts--progress in their education. Another objective is to expand the pool of minorities underrepresented in medicine who complete high school and go to college. In 1994 UT-Houston and Prairie View A&M University created a collaborative venture to provide new educational opportunities at UT-Houston for Prairie View's predominantly African American students. A three-track summer internship program--a result of that collaboration--has since been expanded to partnerships with other minority and majority universities throughout Texas. In 1998, for example, 108 undergraduate students from these universities (and 40 other universities nationwide) participated in research, professional, and administrative summer internships at UT-Houston. The InterCon network also has partnerships with K-12 schools. UT-Houston works with inner-city, suburban, and rural school districts to develop education models that can be transferred throughout the state. The partnerships deal with helping to teach basic academic skills and computer literacy, improve science-related instruction, meet demands for health promotion materials and information for school-initiated health and wellness programs, and develop distance-learning paradigms. UT-Houston views InterCon as a program helping Texas institutions to engage and adapt to the socioeconomic factors, demographic changes, and technology explosion that currently challenge public education.

  20. Política de acessibilidade universal na sociedade contemporânea = Universal accessibility policy in contemporary society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes, Idilia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo pretendemos analisar a condição da deficiência numa abordagem que não centralize no sujeito a patologia social. Existem inúmeras barreiras arquitetônicas e do preconceito nas instâncias da sociedade que se constituem como interdição social, tornando difícil o acesso das diferenças singulares aos bens sociais. Trabalhamos com o conceito de reconhecimento político das diferenças como um fundamento para dar base a todas as políticas voltadas para a área da deficiência e para a construção de uma política de acessibilidade universal. Estes princípios encontram eco na Convenção Sobre os Direitos da Pessoa com Deficiência (ONU, 2006, que hoje balizam internacionalmente às políticas na área

  1. The Impact of Institutional Culture, Policy and Process on Student Engagement in University Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Philip

    2018-01-01

    There is a strong focus on the importance of student engagement in higher education, with increasing attention on how students can participate in their university's decision-making processes. Yet, although the concept appears to be almost universally accepted, it is rarely problematised. This has led some commentators to conclude that student…

  2. An Analysis of the Quality Assurance Policies in a Ghanian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seniwoliba, Joseph Attiah; Yakubu, Richard Nalarb

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the implementation challenges of quality assurance in public universities in Ghana with a focus on University for Development Studies (UDS). The study adopted a qualitative case study design. The data for the study was collected through in-depth interviews, document analysis and participants observation. The study revealed that…

  3. China's Recruitment of African University Students: Policy Efficacy and Unintended Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Heidi Østbø

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how Sino-African relations are affected by the growing number of Africans who pursue higher education in China. China actively recruits African university students in order to increase soft power and generate income from the export of education services. Semi-structured interviews with African university students suggest that…

  4. Incoherent policies on universal coverage of health insurance and promotion of international trade in health services in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachanee, Cha-aim; Wibulpolprasert, Suwit

    2006-07-01

    The Thai government has implemented universal coverage of health insurance since October 2001. Universal access to antiretroviral (ARV) drugs has also been included since October 2003. These two policies have greatly increased the demand for health services and human resources for health, particularly among public health care providers. After the 1997 economic crisis, private health care providers, with the support of the government, embarked on new marketing strategies targeted at attracting foreign patients. Consequently, increasing numbers of foreign patients are visiting Thailand to seek medical care. In addition, the economic recovery since 2001 has greatly increased the demand for private health services among the Thai population. The increasing demand and much higher financial incentives from urban private providers have attracted health personnel, particularly medical doctors, from rural public health care facilities. Responding to this increasing demand and internal brain drain, in mid-2004 the Thai government approved the increased production of medical doctors by 10,678 in the following 15 years. Many additional financial incentives have also been applied. However, the immediate shortage of human resources needs to be addressed competently and urgently. Equity in health care access under this situation of competing demands from dual track policies is a challenge to policy makers and analysts. This paper summarizes the situation and trends as well as the responses by the Thai government. Both supply and demand side responses are described, and some solutions to restore equity in health care access are proposed.

  5. Cost management of cleft lips under the Universal Health Coverage Program of the Tawanchai Cleft Center, Srinagarind Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odton, Cheewarat; Rittirod, Theera; Pradubwong, Suteera; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2014-10-01

    The study ofcost management with regard to cleft lip patients under the Universal Health Coverage Program at Tawanchai Cleft Center Srinagarind Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, was conducted in order to provide fundamental information for the administrative team on how best to administrate and manage the organization. To study the cost management of cleft lip patients under the Universal Health Coverage Program. To compare individual patient management costs and costs from the National Health Security Office (NHSO), and to offer proper guidelines for cost management to the organization. The study was performed retrospectively. The data were collected by reviewing secondary sources of information from patients with cleft lips who consistently underwent treatment at Tawanchai Cleft Center. As for the provider prospects, the cost management did not address the other expenses. The study analyzed the comparison between cost management and income from the Universal Health Coverage Program, which it receivedfrom the National Health Security Office (NHSO). The study was conducted over 2 years (October 1, 2010 to 30 September, 2013). There were 21patients in this study. Microsoft excel was the instrument used to calculate the cost ofmanagement. (1) Total costs were lower than real payments because this cost did not take into account the total cost of the operation room, patient room, common bed, and costs of the medical equipment. Moreover the information regarding the building's price and the facility were not clear enough. The database of materials and equipment was also not yet complete. (2) The average cost ofpatient management was 12,025.14 Bahtperperson, but the compensation receivedfrom the National Health Security Office (NHSO) averaged 10,527.63 Bahtperperson, which was 87.55% ofthe total cost management. The department with the largest expenses was Anesthesia (36.42%). This study indicated that the cost of patient management is lower than usual

  6. Security Policy and Infrastructure in the Context of a Multi-Centeric Information System Dedicated to Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Said, Mohamed; Robel, Laurence; Golse, Bernard; Jais, Jean Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex neuro-developmental disorders affecting children in their early age. The diagnosis of ASD relies on multidisciplinary investigations, in psychiatry, neurology, genetics, electrophysiology, neuro-imagery, audiology and ophthalmology. In order to support clinicians, researchers and public health decision makers, we designed an information system dedicated to ASD, called TEDIS. TEDIS was designed to manage systematic, exhaustive and continuous multi-centric patient data collection via secured Internet connections. In this paper, we present the security policy and security infrastructure we developed to protect ASD' patients' clinical data and patients' privacy. We tested our system on 359 ASD patient records in a local secured intranet environment and showed that the security system is functional, with a consistent, transparent and safe encrypting-decrypting behavior. It is ready for deployment in the nine ASD expert assessment centers in the Ile de France district.

  7. The establishment of the School of Public Health at the State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center: the first nationally accredited school of public health in a public university in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James; LaRosa, Judith H; Kavaler, Florence; Benker, Karen; Schechter, Leslie

    2011-02-01

    The State University of New York (SUNY), Downstate Medical Center initiated a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree program in July 2001 following planning efforts that began in 1995. Twelve students entered the program in June 2002, and currently some 110 MPH students and 12 Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) students are enrolled. This article describes the long and complex process of transforming the original MPH degree program, with its single focus on urban and immigrant health, with a student enrollment of 12 and 8 full-time faculty, into a school of public health with a large student enrollment of 122 students, 25 full-time faculty, five MPH degree tracks, and four DrPH degree tracks. The process of establishing the SUNY Downstate School of Public Health in 2009 from its inception as an MPH program in 2001 spanned a period of 8 years. This process was guided by a commitment to two basic principles. The first was to maintain the original 2005 program accreditation by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). The second was to sequentially secure accreditation for all subsequent four MPH and four DrPH degree tracks through CEPH's procedure of substantive change approval. This policy assured continuous national CEPH accreditation of the original Urban and Immigrant Health MPH degree track and all added degree programs. The 5-year period following the initial CEPH accreditation of the MPH program in 2005 was one of intense development during which all of the essential elements for CEPH accreditation of a school of public health were put into place. This rapid development was made possible by the vision and full support of Downstate's president, John C. LaRosa, MD, FACP, and the dedicated efforts of many. This included the students, faculty, staff, and administrators of the School of Public Health, the school's Community Advisory Group, several external advisors, and many in the medical center's Central Administration, College of Medicine, School of Graduate

  8. Corrosion Research Center of the University of Minnesota. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriani, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Many of the projects which began with the inception of the Corrosion Research Center in early 1980 have progressed from the stage of acquisition and assembly of apparatus to that of generation of research results. In the area of research on surface reactions, notable progress has been made on the microscopic theory of corrosion, most importantly the recognition that the quantum mechanical depletion layer at the metal layer makes an appreciable contribution to the potential drop across the metal-electrolyte interface and to the capacitance of the interface

  9. Corrosion Research Center of the University of Minnesota. Progress report, July 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oriani, R.A.

    1981-01-30

    At present, the research ranges from the quantum mechanics of the corrosion unit reactions, organic and inorganic coatings, surface reactions on polymers, metals and semiconductors to high-temperature chemistry of interest to solar-energy conversion. A second objective of the Center is to increase the utilization of corrosion data by the technical community through education and through the dissemination of appropriately formatted information. At present, two projects are in the planning stage for the near future. One is a pedagogical symposium on corrosion in microelectronic components and systems; the other is a series of lectures and videotapes, as well as a workshop on cathodic protection.

  10. Comparison of the Performance of Health Volunteers in the Health Centers of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad-Reza Farsar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Health volunteers are the women who do charity work to prevent, protect and promote the health status of the covered neighbors and hereby cooperate with the health centers. The aim of this study was to compare the health volunteer's performance in the covered health centers by Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences.Materials and Methods: This descriptive- analytical study was performed by the participation of 2060 Health volunteers, who were cooperating with 90 covered health centers by Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. These include Shomal, Shargh, Shemiranat, Pakdasht, Damavand and Firoozkooh. We used census sampling method. Demographic data was gathered through interviews with the health volunteers and their performance evaluated by the supervisor of the volunteers; through the evaluation forms and these data gathered together.Results: The mean (SD of the health volunteers performance was 30.9 (16.4 in all centers. They were 35.1 (22 in Shargh, 34 (14.5 in Shomal, 32 (11.3 in Firoozkooh, 28.3 (14 in Shemiranat, 7.9 (9.2 in Damavand and 23.6 (8.5 in Pakdasht respectively. The mean (SD of the efficacy of health volunteers was 8.6 (9.9 in all centers. They were 11.7 (5.6 in Firoozkooh, 10.7 (15.7 in Shargh, 9.4 (6.8 in Shomal, 7.9 (4.9 in Damavand, 7.9 (6.1 in Shemiranat and 4.6 (4.3 in Pakdasht respectively. Older and married volunteers with more experience performed better. There was no significant relationship between the efficacy of health volunteers with their literacy level, employment status and absorber of them.              Conclusion: The health volunteers of Shomal, Shargh and Firoozkooh had the best performances respectively. The performances of those in Shemiranat, Damavand and Pakdasht were less than the overall health centers’ mean score. The efficacy score of Firoozkooh, Shomal and Shargh health centers were above the overall health centers’ mean score respectively

  11. Wide variability in physical activity environments and weather-related outdoor play policies in child care centers within a single county of Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kristen A; Sherman, Susan N; Khoury, Jane C; Foster, Karla E; Saelens, Brian E; Kalkwarf, Heidi J

    2011-05-01

    To examine the variability of physical activity environments and outdoor play policies in child care centers and to determine whether this variability is associated with the demographic characteristics of the child care centers surveyed. Early Learning Environments Physical Activity and Nutrition Telephone Survey. Child care centers in Hamilton County (greater Cincinnati area), Ohio, during the period from 2008 to 2009. Directors of all 185 licensed full-time child care centers in Hamilton County. Descriptive measures of playground and indoor physical activity environments and weather-related outdoor play policies. Of 185 eligible child care centers, 162 (88%) responded to our survey. Of the 162 centers that responded, 151 (93%) reported an on-site playground, but slightly more than half reported that their playgrounds were large, that they were at least one-third covered in shade, or that they had a variety of portable play equipment. Only half reported having a dedicated indoor gross motor room where children could be active during inclement weather. Only 32 centers (20%) allowed children to go outside in temperatures below 32°F (0°C), and 70 centers (43%) reported allowing children outdoors during light rain. A higher percentage of children receiving tuition assistance was associated with lower quality physical activity facilities and stricter weather-related practices. National accreditation was associated with more physical activity-promoting practices. We found considerable variability in the indoor and outdoor physical activity environments offered by child care centers within a single county of Ohio. Depending on the outdoor play policy and options for indoor physical activity of a child care center, children's opportunities for physical activity can be curtailed as a result of subfreezing temperatures or light rain. Policy changes and education of parents and teachers may be needed to ensure that children have ample opportunity for daily physical

  12. First Implementation of Transfusion Consent Policy in Oman; Audit of compliance from a tertiary care university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa Z. Al-Riyami

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Transfusions are a common medical intervention. Discussion of the benefits, risks and alternatives with the patient is mandated by many legislations prior to planned transfusions. At the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH, Muscat, Oman, a written transfusion consent policy was introduced in March 2014. This was the first time such a policy was implemented in Oman. This study therefore aimed to assess adherence to this policy among different specialties within SQUH. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent elective transfusions between June and August 2014 were reviewed to assess the presence of transfusion consent forms. If present, the consent forms were examined for completeness of patient, physician and witness information. Results: In total, the records of 446 transfused patients (299 adult and 147 paediatric patients were assessed. Haematology patients accounted for 50% of adult patients and 71% of paediatric patients. Consent was obtained for 75% of adult and 91% of paediatric patients. The highest adherence rate was observed among adult and paediatric haematology specialists (95% and 97%, respectively. Consent forms were correctly filled out with all details provided for 51% and 52% of adult and paediatric patients, respectively. Among inadequately completed forms, the most common error was a lack of witness details (20–25%. Conclusion: In most cases, the pre-transfusion consent policy was successfully adhered to at SQUH. However, further work is required to ensure full compliance with the consent procedure within different specialties. Implementation of transfusion consent in other hospitals in the country is recommended.

  13. Twenty years' single-center experience with mechanical heart valves: a critical review of anticoagulation policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nooten, Guido J; Caes, Frank; François, Katrien; Van Bellleghem, Yves; Bové, Thierry; Vandenplas, Guy; Taeymans, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Since January 1990, a variety of mechanical valves (St. Jude Medical, CarboMedics, ATS Medical) have been implanted routinely at the authors' institution. The study aim was to analyze, retrospectively, the 20-year clinical results of those mechanical valves, and to challenge the anticoagulation policy employed over the years. Between January 1990 and December 2008, a total of 2,108 mechanical valves was inserted into 1,887 consecutive patients (1,346 aortic, 725 mitral, 27 tricuspid, 10 pulmonary). The mean age of the patients was 63 +/- 13.2 years, and the majority (61%) were males. Preoperatively, 71% the patients were in NYHA class > or = III (average 3.01). The most frequent comorbidities included: atrial fibrillation (n = 594), coronary disease (n = 567) and diabetes (n = 398). The follow up (99% complete) totaled 13,721 patient-years (pt-yr), and ranged from 12 to 241 months (average 84 months). In-hospital mortality was 5.2% (n = 98, 14 valve-related). Of the 629 late deaths, the majority were cardiac (n = 276). Survival (Kaplan-Meier estimation) was significantly better for aortic valve patients compared to mitral or multiple valve replacement (Mantel-Cox, p valve thrombosis 0.31, thromboembolism 1.08, and bleeding 0.91. However, as repeated events occurred in several patients, the hazard function was not constant. Multivariate analysis (Cox regression model) showed age > 70 years (p or = III (p II as significant risk factors for thromboembolism, while long-acting coumadin and NYHA class > II were significant risk factors for bleeding. This 20-year experience demonstrated excellent clinical outcomes for patients with mechanical prostheses, with no valve structural failure and an acceptable incidence of adverse events. INR values between 2-2.5 for aortic valve patients, and 3-3.5 for mitral valve patients, yielded the fewest major adverse events.

  14. Archive of information about geological samples available for research from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Polar Rock Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Polar Rock Repository (PRR) operated by the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) at the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  15. Integration of science and education on the example of cooperation of Semipalatinsk State University of Shakarim and National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syzdykov, E.B.; Gavrilova, N.B.; Asambaev, A.Zh.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the ways of integration of science and education on the example of cooperation of Semipalatinsk State University of Shakarim and National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan are presented. (author)

  16. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Sediment Core Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Sediment Core Repository operated by the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine...

  17. A retrospective study of 22 patients with necrotising fasciitis treated at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo (2005-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifi, Hysni M; Duci, Shkelzen B; Zatriqi, Violeta K; Ahmeti, Hasan R; Ismajli, Vildane H; Gashi, Musli M; Zejnullahu, Ylber M; Mekaj, Agon Y

    2013-08-01

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is a destructive invasive infection of skin, subcutaneous tissue and deep fascia. The aim of the study is to determine the causative agents of NF, its localisation, predisposing factors and comorbid conditions, duration of treatment and distribution of NF in different age groups and over the years. We conducted a retrospective study including 22 patients with NF from 2005 to 2010 in the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The data were collected and analysed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The average age of patients was 56·9 years. In eight cases or 36·4% of total patients studied, NF was caused by monobacterial agents with a predominance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (five cases or 22·7% of total infections). Polybacterial agents were responsible for NF infection in other 14 cases (63·6%). Majority of the patients had other comorbidities like diabetes, trauma and prior history of surgical interventions. Diabetes was present in 17 patients or 77·3%. The remaining five patients (22·7%) had previous trauma and recent surgical intervention. Average length of treatment was 43 days. The hospital mortality rate in our case series was 22·6%. Early identification and diagnosis of NF significantly improves outcome and reduces mortality. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  18. Partnering with Universities, a NASA Visitor Center, Schools, and the INSPIRE Project to Perform Research and Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M.; Smith, J. A.; Kloostra, E.; Knupp, K. R.; Taylor, K.; Anderson, S.; Baskauf, C. J.; Buckner, S.; DiMatties, J.; Fry, C. D.; Gaither, B.; Galben, C. W.; Gallagher, D. L.; Heaston, M. P.; Kraft, J.; Meisch, K.; Mills, R.; Nations, C.; Nielson, D.; Oelgoetz, J.; Rawlins, L. P.; Sudbrink, D. L.; Wright, A.

    2017-12-01

    For the August 2017 eclipse, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center partnered with the U.S. Space and Rocket Center (USSRC), Austin Peay State University (APSU) in Clarksville, Tennessee, the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), the Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiments (INSPIRE) Project, and the local school systems of Montgomery County, Tennessee, and Christian County, Kentucky. Multiple site visits and workshops were carried out during the first eight months of 2017 to prepare local teachers and students for the eclipse. A special curriculum was developed to prepare USSRC Space Camp and INSPIRE students to observe and participate in science measurements during the eclipse. Representatives from Christian County school system and APSU carried out observations for the Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) Experiment in two separate locations. UAH and APSU as part of the Montana State Ballooning Project, launched balloons containing video cameras and other instruments. USSRC Space Camp students and counselors and INSPIRE students conducted science experiments that included the following: atmospheric science investigations of the atmospheric boundary layer, very-low frequency and Ham radio observations to investigate ionospheric responses to the eclipse, animal and insect observations, solar-coronal observations, eclipse shadow bands. We report on the results of all these investigations.

  19. Outcome Evaluation of a Policy-Mandated Lifestyle and Environmental Modification Program in a National Job Training Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Elizabeth Yakes; Harris, Amanda; Luna, Donald; Velasquez, Daniel; Slovik, Jonathan; Kong, Alberta

    2017-06-01

    Excess weight gain is common when adolescents become young adults, but there are no obesity prevention or weight management interventions that have been tested for emerging adults who follow non-traditional post-secondary paths, such as enrolling in job training programs. We evaluated Healthy Eating & Active Lifestyles (HEALs), a policy-mandated lifestyle education/environmental modification program, at a job training center for low-income 16-24 year olds. We examined average change in body mass index (BMI) z-score from baseline to 6 months for emerging adults (aged 16-24 years) in pre-HEALs implementation (n = 125) and post-HEALs implementation (n = 126) cohorts living at the job training center, by baseline weight status. In both cohorts, average BMI z-score significantly increased from baseline to 6 months for students with BMI < 25. Average BMI z-score significantly decreased for the overweight (BMI 25 to <30; -0.11, p = .03) and obese (BMI ≥ 30; -0.11, p = .001) students only within the post-HEALs cohort; changes within the pre-HEALs cohort and between cohorts were not significant. HEALs may promote positive weight-related trends for overweight/obese students, but prevention efforts for non-overweight/obese students need to be improved.

  20. Research Priority Setting for Social Determinants of Health Research Center of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Reza Sohrabi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: It is obvious that, because of the lack of resources, we should devote our limited resources to priorities in order to reach an acceptable level of health. The objective of this study was to research priority setting for Pediatric Surgery Research Center; with the participation of all stakeholders.Material and Methods: This is a Health System Research (HSR project in order to apply governance and leadership issues with the participation of 41 people including faculty members in Pediatric Surgery Research Center, Shahid Beheshti Medical University and the other pediatric specialists and health system stakeholders as well as the people associated with health system inside & outside the university. This was performed in 2010 using the Council on Health Research for Development COHRED( model with little change. Based on the model, at first the stakeholders were identified and the field situation of Pediatric Surgery was analyzed. Then, research areas and titles were specified and research priorities were set out by giving scores according to the criteria.Results: The seven obtained research areas in priority order are included pediatric trauma, pediatric cancers, pediatric urology diseases, undescended testicles in children, developmental genetics & congenital defects, emergency in children and application of laparoscopic surgery in children. Because each of the research areas is composed of multiple subareas, we managed to finally specify 43 research subareas as research priorities. These subareas included epidemiology, risk factors, prevention, screening, diagnosis and treatment. They also included follow-up, complications, knowledge & attitudes of parents, quality of life, economy aspects and data bank for further research.Conclusion: In this project, research priorities were set out for Pediatric Surgery Research Center of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, with the participation of all the stakeholders

  1. Teacher Education in the University: Working with Policy, Practice and Deleuze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Ken

    2007-01-01

    This paper is inspired by, and constructed around, a number of fundamental questions that are relevant to teacher educators working within the context of the government policy initiatives and implementations that are influencing Higher Education in the UK at the present time. Using teacher education practices as sites of inquiry, and a number of…

  2. Leadership Styles of College and University Athletic Directors and the Presence of NCAA Transgender Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Randall; McCauley, Kayleigh

    2016-01-01

    In September 2011, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) announced the "Policy on Transgender Inclusion." It provides guidelines for transgender student athletes to participate in sex-separated athletic teams according to their gender identity. The "2012 LGBTQ National College Athlete Report," the first of its…

  3. Dancing with Global Trends: Higher Education Policy and University Governance in Hong Kong, 1997-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, William Yat Wai; Tang, Hei-Hang Hayes

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the significance of global trends in higher education (HE) development in Hong Kong between 1997 and 2012. Two trends, massification and internationalisation, are considered key driving forces that shaped Hong Kong's HE policy during the period. The former refers to government measures to widen participation in HE. The latter…

  4. Policies and Identities in Mandarin Education: The Situated Multilingualism of University-Level "Heritage" Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Ann Marie

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation explores complex positionings of Chinese heritage language (CHL) learners amid several intersecting discourses, including those around globalization, identity development and language policies. Using critical, qualitative methods, the study combines textual and site-based analyses, linking the language development experiences of…

  5. An Operations Research Study of a Variable Loan and Duplication Policy at the University of Lancaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Michael K.

    1972-01-01

    The variable" loan and duplication policy which was developed is described and also the considerable impact of implementation. The work is presented as a case study in library O.R. The great importance of analyzing the structure of problems is stressed and the nature and usefulness of models is described. (9 references) (Author/NH)

  6. English for University Administrative Work: English Officialization Policy and Foreign Language Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongyeon; Choi, Jinsook

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how the English officialization policy of higher education in an EFL context interplays with administrative workers' motivational orientations towards English learning. The data consisted of questionnaire responses of 117 administrative members with undergraduate degrees and qualitative interviews with 9 who answered the…

  7. Managing and Mobilising Talent in Malaysia: Issues, Challenges and Policy Implications for Malaysian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Norzaini; Sirat, Morshidi; Pang, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The future of Malaysia as a high-income and competitive nation largely depends on its pool of highly skilled human capital. Hence, the issue of human capital development has taken centre stage in numerous reform agendas of Malaysia. This paper seeks to provide examples of policy initiatives aimed at facilitating the management of highly educated…

  8. Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Center (JCPRG), Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Steering Committee. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Reaction Data center (JCPRG) started at Apri1, 2007. The center has three main tasks: 1) database activities, 2) data evaluations and 3) Asian network activities. We are continuing data compilation for charged-particle nuclear reaction data obtained in Japan. We are scanning 17 journals for Japanese charged-particle and photo-nuclear nuclear reaction data compilation: PR/C, PRL, PL/B, EPJ/A, NST, NIM/A, NIM/B, JPJ, ARI, RCA, JRN, KPS, NSTS, CPL, ZP/A, PAN and JNRS. After Memo CP-E No.136, we newly found up 6 mistakes (Memo CP-E No.137) of the CINDA master file in bibliographic information. These 2 memos were reviewed at NEA Data Bank (A45, NRDC 2008). Cooperating with them, we verified error propagation from EXFOR to CINDA. Actually that had happened in the 34 lines (Memo CP-D No.561). Current EXFOR or NRDF Format is specific to itself. We suppose that a nuclear data exchange format of the next generation should be defined based on XML. If the exchange format was redefined based on XML, the data available from libraries (EXFOR, NRDF, etc.) would enable us to have wider common bases for our various software applications. We highly appreciate the presentation of Viktor Zerkin and discussions held in Sapporo, on March, 2009. To achieve an exchange format agreed, we will continue to gain various experiences with using XML and to apply the IntelligentPad technology for EXFOR systems

  9. The Future of Dental Schools in Research Universities and Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Laurie K

    2017-09-01

    As a profession, dentistry is at a point of discernible challenge as well as incredible opportunity in a landscape of evolving changes to health care, higher education, and evidence-based decision making. Respecting the past yet driving forward, a well-mapped future course is critical. Orchestrating this course in a collaborative manner is essential for the visibility, well-being, and potentially the existence of the dental profession. The research performed in dental institutions needs to be contemporary, aligned with biomedical science in general, and united with other disciplines. Dentistry is at risk of attrition in the quality of its research and discovery mission if participation with bioscience colleagues in the collaborative generation of new knowledge is underoptimized. A fundamental opportunity dentistry has is to contribute via its position in academic health centers. Rigorous research as to the impact of interprofessional education and collaborative care on population health outcomes provides significant potential for the dental profession to participate and/or lead such evidence-centered efforts. It is imperative that academic dental institutions are part of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary organizations that move health care into its new day. Strategizing diversity by bringing together people who have different ways of seeing problems to share perspectives, heuristics, interpretations, technologies, and predictive models across disciplines will lead to impactful progress. Academic dental institutions are a natural part of an emphasis on translational research and acceleration of implementing new scientific discoveries. Dentistry needs to remain an essential and integrated component of higher education in the health professions; doing so necessitates deliberate, respectful, and committed change. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  10. The role of the University in the context of Inclusive Education Policy: reflections about human resources formation and knowledge production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Glat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present text aims to discuss and present, briefly action lines about the role of University in the promotion of psicossocial and educational development of people with handicap and other special needs. Taking the framework of specialized literature, it brings different questions dealing with human resources formation, specially, teacher formation, and the production of knowledge in the area of Special Education, obtained through research and extension projects, done, preferentially, in partnership with the educational agents that work in the field. It also analyses how these actions may influence the implementation of policies regarding school, labor, and social inclusion of people with handicap and other developmental disorders.

  11. Impact of the Adoption of Tobacco-Free Campus Policies on Student Enrollment at Colleges and Universities, North Carolina, 2001-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kimberly D.; Yu, Dongqing; Lee, Joseph G. L.; Ranney, Leah M.; Simons, Daniel J.; Goldstein, Adam O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: College and university administrators have expressed concern that adoption of tobacco-free policies may reduce applications and enrollment. This study examines adoption and implementation of 100% tobacco-free campus policies by institutions of higher education on applications and enrollment. Participants: North Carolina private colleges…

  12. Labour Subjectivities for the New World of Work: A Critique of Government Policy on the Integration of Entrepreneurialism in the University Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Philippa

    2015-01-01

    International debates on the aims and purposes of entrepreneurship education in universities are examined in this paper through the prism of a policy critique of recent English higher education initiatives. The Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) policy to integrate rather than "add on" enterprise education throughout…

  13. Toward Advanced Nursing Practice along with People-Centered Care Partnership Model for Sustainable Universal Health Coverage and Universal Access to Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Tomoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Omori, Junko; Arimori, Naoko; Hishinuma, Michiko; Asahara, Kiyomi; Shimpuku, Yoko; Ohashi, Kumiko; Tashiro, Junko

    2017-01-30

    this study developed a people-centered care (PCC) partnership model for the aging society to address the challenges of social changes affecting people's health and the new role of advanced practice nurses to sustain universal health coverage. a people-centered care partnership model was developed on the basis of qualitative meta-synthesis of the literature and assessment of 14 related projects. The ongoing projects resulted in individual and social transformation by improving community health literacy and behaviors using people-centered care and enhancing partnership between healthcare providers and community members through advanced practice nurses. people-centered care starts when community members and healthcare providers foreground health and social issues among community members and families. This model tackles these issues, creating new values concerning health and forming a social system that improves quality of life and social support to sustain universal health care through the process of building partnership with communities. a PCC partnership model addresses the challenges of social changes affecting general health and the new role of advanced practice nurses in sustaining UHC. o estudo desenvolveu um modelo de parceria de cuidados centrados nas pessoas (CCP) para uma sociedade que está envelhecendo, com o fim de enfrentar os desafios das mudanças sociais que afetam a saúde das pessoas e o novo papel da prática avançada de enfermagem para sustentar a cobertura universal de saúde. um modelo de parceria de cuidados centrados nas pessoas foi desenvolvido com base na meta-síntese qualitativa da literatura e a avaliação de 14 projetos relacionados. Os projetos em curso resultaram na transformação individual e social, melhorando a alfabetização de saúde da comunidade e comportamentos que usam o cuidado centrado nas pessoas e aumentando a parceria entre os profissionais de saúde e membros da comunidade por meio da prática avançada de enfermagem

  14. Assessment of capacity for Health Policy and Systems Research and Analysis in seven African universities: results from the CHEPSAA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoev, Tolib; Lê, Gillian; Green, Andrew; Orgill, Marsha; Komba, Adalgot; Esena, Reuben K; Nyapada, Linet; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Amde, Woldekidan K; Nxumalo, Nonhlanhla; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    The importance of health policy and systems research and analysis (HPSR+A) is widely recognized. Universities are central to strengthening and sustaining the HPSR+A capacity as they teach the next generation of decision-makers and health professionals. However, little is known about the capacity of universities, specifically, to develop the field. In this article, we report results of capacity self- assessments by seven universities within five African countries, conducted through the Consortium for Health Policy and Systems Analysis in Africa (CHEPSAA). The capacity assessments focused on both capacity ‘assets’ and ‘needs’, and covered the wider context, as well as organizational and individual capacity levels. Six thematic areas of capacity were examined: leadership and governance, organizations’ resources, scope of HPSR+A teaching and research, communication, networking and getting research into policy and practice (GRIPP), demand for HPRS+A and resource environment. The self-assessments by each university used combinations of document reviews, semi-structured interviews and staff surveys, followed by comparative analysis. A framework approach, guided by the six thematic areas, was used to analyse data. We found that HPSR+A is an international priority, and an existing activity in Africa, though still neglected field with challenges including its reliance on unpredictable international funding. All universities have capacity assets, such as ongoing HPSR+A teaching and research. There are, however, varying levels of assets (such as differences in staff numbers, group sizes and amount of HPSR+A teaching and research), which, combined with different capacity needs at all three levels (such as individual training, improvement in systems for quality assurance and fostering demand for HPSR+A work), can shape a future agenda for HPSR+A capacity strengthening. Capacity assets and needs at different levels appear related. Possible integrated strategies for

  15. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1996 - March 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator has been operated successfully from April, 1996 to January, 1997. Although the operation of the accelerator became unstable in the middle of January, it was a short period. The research in the Tandem Accelerator Center covers wide fields, that is, polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions, the nonresonant breakup of Li-7, the further refinement of the CDCC theory, fusion and fission in heavy ion reactions, nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam γ ray spectroscopy, solid state physics using fast ion bemas, Moessbauer effect, NMR, the application of accelerated ion beams to PIXE, and accelerator mass spectrometry. In addition, two major installations were carried out in this academic year. One is a small tandem accelerator which was moved from Electrotechnical Laboratory in Tsukuba, and the other is a system for the production and analysis of atomic clusters. The research activities at the accelerator and experimental facilities and on experimental nuclear physics, theoretical nuclear physics, atomic and solid state physics, cluster science, and ion beam application are reported in this book. Also the list of the publications by these groups is given. Ph. D. and M. Sc. theses are listed, and the speakers and the titles of seminars are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Relationships between obesity management and depression management in a university-based family medicine center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Emily R; Theeke, Laurie; Minchau, Elizabeth; Mallow, Jennifer; Lucke-Wold, Noelle; Wampler, Jason

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and examine relationships among sociodemographics, obesity, and depression management in Appalachian adults. This study was conducted in a primary care center and used a cross-sectional, quantitative, nonexperimental descriptive, and predictive design. Data were obtained from a random sample of 240 adult records that were stratified by gender. Analysis included exploration of all variables for descriptive information followed by bivariate analyses to determine significant relationships between variables, and regression analysis using variables with significant relation to obesity and depression management. Obesity was prevalent (48%) though less than 1% had documented diagnosis. Over 98% of the 65 participants diagnosed with depression did not have documentation of use of a depression screening tool. Diagnosis of depression correlated significantly with elevated body mass index (BMI) and diagnosis of obesity. Gender bias was evident with males having more documentation of weight-loss discussions and planning, and women receiving more referrals to behavioral health for counseling. Innovations to enhance the diagnosis of obesity could lead to consistent provider-led management. Implementation studies of valid depression screening tools in the electronic medical record could enhance the identification of depressive symptoms and could promote health equity. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. Predicting Factors of Drop Out Counseling Process in University Psychological Counseling and Guidance Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer ÖZER

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predicting factors the drop out the counseling process . Methods: The study group consists of 555 college students admitted to a Counseling and Guidance Center (CGC and participated in at least one session of counseling after the first view in the 2013-2014 academic year. As a data collection tool, an "Application Form" on the demographic information and the "Brief Symptom Inventory" was applied to the students; and independent samples t-test and binary logistic regression techniques were used in the analysis of the collected data. Results: According to the analysis results, the age of the students attending the counseling process was found to be higher than those who drop out, but no significant difference was found in their psychometric properties in terms of continuation of the counseling process. Only the age of clients and their previous psychiatric help history was found to predict the dropping out counseling process early. Conclusion: Drop outs are less frequently observed in clients having a previous psychiatric help experience. In addition, it was determined that older clients less frequently drop out the counseling process. [JCBPR 2015; 4(1.000: 18-25

  18. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1996 - March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator has been operated successfully from April, 1996 to January, 1997. Although the operation of the accelerator became unstable in the middle of January, it was a short period. The research in the Tandem Accelerator Center covers wide fields, that is, polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions, the nonresonant breakup of Li-7, the further refinement of the CDCC theory, fusion and fission in heavy ion reactions, nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam {gamma} ray spectroscopy, solid state physics using fast ion bemas, Moessbauer effect, NMR, the application of accelerated ion beams to PIXE, and accelerator mass spectrometry. In addition, two major installations were carried out in this academic year. One is a small tandem accelerator which was moved from Electrotechnical Laboratory in Tsukuba, and the other is a system for the production and analysis of atomic clusters. The research activities at the accelerator and experimental facilities and on experimental nuclear physics, theoretical nuclear physics, atomic and solid state physics, cluster science, and ion beam application are reported in this book. Also the list of the publications by these groups is given. Ph. D. and M. Sc. theses are listed, and the speakers and the titles of seminars are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Gambling participation and problems among employees at a university health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Mallya, Sarita

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the frequency and intensity of gambling behaviors among employees at an academic health center. Employees were sent an anonymous questionnaire assessing demographic characteristics, participation in gambling activities, and gambling-related problems. Of the 904 respondents, 96% reported gambling in their lifetimes, with 69% gambling in the past year, 40% in the past two months, and 21% in the past week. The most common forms of gambling were lottery and scratch tickets, slot machines, card playing, sports betting, bingo, and track. Only 1.2% of the sample reported gambling on the internet. Using scores on the South Oaks Gambling Screen, 3.0% of the respondents were classified as Level 2 (or problem) gamblers, and an additional 1.8% were Level 3 (or pathological) gamblers. Compared to Level 1 (non-problem) gamblers, Level 2 and Level 3 gamblers were more likely to be male, single, and employed full-time, and to have lower income and education. About half of the Level 2 and Level 3 gamblers reported interest in an evaluation of their gambling behaviors and treatment interventions. These data suggest the need to screen for gambling problems in health care professionals and to provide gambling-specific treatments.

  20. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1997 - March 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    This report briefly described the investigations performed during the period from April 1997 to March 1998 in Tandem Accelerator Center. The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator was reconstructed and the first beam test was carried out in Nov. 1997. In nuclear physics, the measurement of total reaction cross sections, the non-resonant breakup of {sup 7}Li and {sup 9}Be, the investigation of hole states via (p,d) reaction, nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam {gamma} ray spectroscopy and the study of the three dimensional cranking model have been performed. In interdisciplinary fields, the development of AMS system has been continued. The trace element analysis of mineral samples has been carried out by means of PIXE with the proton beam which was focused on the sample as narrow as 50 {mu}m{sup 2}. The hydrogen analysis using H({sup 19}F,{alpha}{gamma}) reaction has been started aiming at the extension of the measurement of depth profile down to a few tens of {mu}m deep region. (M.N.)

  1. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1997 - March 31, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    This report briefly described the investigations performed during the period from April 1997 to March 1998 in Tandem Accelerator Center. The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator was reconstructed and the first beam test was carried out in Nov. 1997. In nuclear physics, the measurement of total reaction cross sections, the non-resonant breakup of 7 Li and 9 Be, the investigation of hole states via (p,d) reaction, nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam γ ray spectroscopy and the study of the three dimensional cranking model have been performed. In interdisciplinary fields, the development of AMS system has been continued. The trace element analysis of mineral samples has been carried out by means of PIXE with the proton beam which was focused on the sample as narrow as 50 μm 2 . The hydrogen analysis using H( 19 F,αγ) reaction has been started aiming at the extension of the measurement of depth profile down to a few tens of μm deep region. (M.N.)

  2. Projektarbejde i fremmedsprogene: Rapport fra seminar pa Roskilde Universitetscenter (Project Work in Foreign Languages: Report from a Seminar at Roskilde University Center). ROLIG-papir 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Karen Sonne, Ed.

    This report describes a seminar at Roskilde University Center (Denmark) on project work in foreign languages, which brought together language teachers and theorists from different schools, including universities, business schools, technical schools, merchants schools, and high schools, to discuss their experiences with project work in foreign…

  3. Survey of Policies and Guidelines on Antioxidant Use for Cancer Prevention, Treatment, and Survivorship in North American Cancer Centers: What Do Institutions Perceive as Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gyeongyeon; White, Jennifer; Zhong, Lihong; Carlson, Linda E

    2015-07-01

    Health care policies and guidelines that are clear and consistent with research evidence are important for maximizing clinical outcomes. To determine whether cancer centers in Canada and the United States had policies and/or guidelines about antioxidant use, and whether policies were aligned with the evidence base, we reviewed current research evidence in the field, and we undertook a survey of the policies and guidelines on antioxidant use at cancer institutions across North America. A survey of policies and guidelines on antioxidant use and the development and communication of the policies and guidelines was conducted by contacting cancer institutions in North America. We also conducted a Website search for each institution to explore any online resources. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant use were collected from 78 cancer institutions. Few cancer institutions had policies (5%) but most provided guidelines (69%). Antioxidants from diet were generally encouraged at cancer institutions, consistent with the current research evidence. In contrast, specific antioxidant supplements were generally not recommended at cancer institutions. Policies and guidelines were developed using evidence-based methods (53%), by consulting another source (35%), or through discussions/conference (26%), and communicated mainly through online resources (65%) or written handouts (42%). For cancer institutions that had no policy or guideline on antioxidants, lack of information and lack of time were the most frequently cited reasons. Policies and guidelines on antioxidants from diet were largely consistent with the research evidence. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant supplements during treatment were generally more restrictive than the research evidence might suggest, perhaps due to the specificity of results and the inability to generalize findings across antioxidants, adding to the complexity of their optimal and safe use. Improved communication of comprehensive research

  4. SPECIAL PURPOSE IT DERAILED: UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF UNIVERSAL IT LAWS AND POLICIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-26

    policy challenges pitting RDT&E requirements against compliance. This research project in large part was made possible through the support of my wife...Accreditation (C&A) is $78,000 per system initially and $21,000 annually thereafter.8 Thus, just taking into account the C&A costs, a conclusion can be made that...or benefit, compliance requirements should be challenged . 1 INTRODUCTION Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who

  5. Preventing and responding to complaints of sexual harassment in an academic health center: a 10-year review from the Medical University of South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Connie L; Smith, Daniel W; Raymond, John R; Greenberg, Raymond S; Crouch, Rosalie K

    2010-04-01

    There is a high incidence of sexual harassment and gender discrimination in academic health center (AHC) settings according to multiple surveys of medical students. Therefore, it is incumbent on AHCs to develop programs both to educate faculty, residents, and students and to handle complaints of possible episodes of sexual harassment or gender discrimination. Despite the apparent high prevalence of gender discrimination and sexual harassment, and the importance of handling complaints of gender discrimination and sexual harassment in a prompt, consistent, and rational manner, there are few descriptions of programs that address those concerns in AHCs.Herein, the authors describe their experiences in dealing with complaints of sexual harassment and gender discrimination for a 10-year period of time (late 1997 to early 2007) at the Medical University of South Carolina, through an Office of Gender Equity. They describe their complaint process, components of their prevention training, and the outcomes of 115 complaints. Key elements of their policies are highlighted. The authors offer an approach that could serve as a model for other AHCs.

  6. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: contributions from the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, David O; Robbins, Clifford A; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive brain trauma (RBT). Initially described in boxers, CTE has now been found in other contact sport athletes with a history of RBT. In recent years, there has been tremendous media attention regarding CTE, primarily because of the deaths of high profile American football players who were found to have CTE upon neuropathological examination. However, the study of CTE remains in its infancy. This review focuses on research from the Centre for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE) at Boston University. This study reviews the formation of the CSTE, major CSTE publications and current ongoing research projects at the CSTE. The neuropathology of CTE has been well-described. Current research focuses on: methods of diagnosing the disease during life (including the development of biomarkers), examination of CTE risk factors (including genetic susceptibility and head impact exposure variables); description of the clinical presentation of CTE; development of research diagnostic criteria for Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome; and assessment of mechanism and pathogenesis. Current research at the BU CSTE is aimed at increasing understanding of the long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts and attempting to begin to answer several of the unanswered questions regarding CTE.

  7. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. Annual report, September 15, 1990--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  8. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Doudna, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    The Universe explores the science of what we see in the night sky. Kids will learn about the life cycle of a star, find out how our universe was created, explore nebulae, galaxies, black holes, giant stars and more. Engaging photos, exciting graphics, and a fun quiz at the end of each book will keep them learning. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Super Sandcastle is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

  9. Strengthening the role of universities in addressing sustainability challenges: the Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions as an institutional experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. Hart

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As the magnitude, complexity, and urgency of many sustainability problems increase, there is a growing need for universities to contribute more effectively to problem solving. Drawing upon prior research on social-ecological systems, knowledge-action connections, and organizational innovation, we developed an integrated conceptual framework for strengthening the capacity of universities to help society understand and respond to a wide range of sustainability challenges. Based on experiences gained in creating the Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions (Mitchell Center, we tested this framework by evaluating the experiences of interdisciplinary research teams involved in place-based, solutions-oriented research projects at the scale of a single region (i.e., the state of Maine, USA. We employed a multiple-case-study approach examining the experiences of three interdisciplinary research teams working on tidal energy development, adaptation to climate change, and forest vulnerability to an invasive insect. Drawing upon documents, observations, interviews, and other data sources, three common patterns emerged across these cases that were associated with more effective problem-solving strategies. First, an emphasis on local places and short-term dynamics in social-ecological systems research provides more frequent opportunities for learning while doing. Second, iterative stakeholder engagement and inclusive forms of knowledge co-production can generate substantial returns on investment, especially when researchers are dedicated to a shared process of problem identification and they avoid framing solutions too narrowly. Although these practices are time consuming, they can be accelerated by leveraging existing stakeholder relationships. Third, efforts to mobilize interdisciplinary expertise and link knowledge with action are facilitated by an organizational culture that emphasizes mutual respect, adaptability, and solutions

  10. [Prevention of hepatitis C at Center for Haemodialisys of Clinical Centre of University of Sarajevo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miseljić, Sanja; Resić, Halima; Avdić, Emir; Osmić, Ibrahim; Helać-Cvijetić, Dzana; Sahović, Vahidin; Avdagić, Melka; Barhawi, Hasan; Corić, Aida; Miseljić, Nenad; Ajanović, Selma

    2005-01-01

    The patients with the chronical programm for haemodialisys have the higher risk from getting ill virus hepatitis C in the realtion to the rest population. Was the evaluation of the prevalence and incidence of hepatitis C at the Center for Haemodialisys CCU Sarajevo and the effect of the prevalentive measures on the incidence of the serum conversion of hepatitis C, in the period from 2002 till 2004 year. By the examening is comprehended 155 patients aged 54,58 +/- 14,797 years, with the aproximative length of the haemodialisys 58,9 +/- 53,9 months. Patients at the chronic programm of the bicarbonite haemodialisys taree times per week, and antibodies on the hepatitis C were determined III generation. Also was determined PCR. During the periiod of examination the dialized population was increased also 2002 year the prevalence of hepatitis C was 23,87% (37/155), in 2003 year 29,29% (46/157) and 2004 year the pregalence amounted 26,28% (46/175). Incidence of hepatitis C was significantly decreased in the course of the period of followup and in 2002 year was 16,21%, in 2003 year 13,04%, that in 2004 year would amount 4,34%, that is only in two patients occurred the serum conversion on hepatitis C. By applying of the corresponding protocoles and their strict realization (desinfection of the hands, wearing of gloves, apparatus desinfection) and separation of the dialyzed monitors for anti HCV positive and anti HCV negative patients dicreased significantly the hepatitis C incidence in our dialyzed population. The strict application of the preventive measures can completely prevent the speading occurrence of hepatitis C on haemodialisys.

  11. Health labour market policies in support of universal health coverage: a comprehensive analysis in four African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Angelica; Scheffler, Richard M; Koyi, Grayson; Ngah, Symplice Ngah; Abu-Agla, Ayat; M'kiambati, Harrison M; Nyoni, Jennifer

    2014-09-26

    Progress toward universal health coverage in many low- and middle-income countries is hindered by the lack of an adequate health workforce that can deliver quality services accessible to the entire population. We used a health labour market framework to investigate the key indicators of the dynamics of the health labour market in Cameroon, Kenya, Sudan, and Zambia, and identified the main policies implemented in these countries in the past ten years to address shortages and maldistribution of health workers. Despite increased availability of health workers in the four countries, major shortages and maldistribution persist. Several factors aggravate these problems, including migration, an aging workforce, and imbalances in skill mix composition. In this paper, we provide new evidence to inform decision-making for health workforce planning and analysis in low- and middle-income countries. Partial health workforce policies are not sufficient to address these issues. It is crucial to perform a comprehensive analysis in order to understand the dynamics of the health labour market and develop effective polices to address health workforce shortages and maldistribution as part of efforts to attain universal health coverage.

  12. What Else after Behavior Was Changed? the Effects of a University's Policy on Student Participation in Motorcycle Emission Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Long

    2014-01-01

    With an attempt to realize the effectiveness of a university's policy on motorcycle emission, this study compared its students' participation behavior, associated knowledge, and attitudes toward relevant environmental issues with those of three other universities without similar measures. The results of a survey on a total of 504 students revealed…

  13. Practical Recommendations for the Development and Implementation of Youth Policy in the University as a Tool for Development of Student Public Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhov, Sergey G.; Komarova, Nataliya M.; Khairullina, Elmira R.; Rapatskaia, Liudmila, A.; Miftakhov, Radik R.; Khusainova, Liana R.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by the increase of social responsibility of universities for improvement of the quality of higher education and development of students' socio-professional values. In terms of the conflicting realities of modern society the youth policy at the University is the most important tool to form students' commitment to…

  14. Paradigms and poverty in global energy policy: research needs for achieving universal energy access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K.; Bazilian, Morgan; Toman, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This research letter discusses elements of a long-term interdisciplinary research effort needed to help ensure the maximum social, economic, and environmental benefits of achieving secure universal access to modern energy services. Exclusion of these services affects the lives and livelihoods of billions of people. The research community has an important, but not yet well-defined, role to play.

  15. Seeking Solutions though the Mirror of Finnish Experience: Policy Recommendations for Regional University Transformation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuzhuo; Yang, Po; Lyytinen, Anu; Hölttä, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    China has recently launched a radical reform to transform over 600 regional universities into application and technology oriented institutions. The reform is a response to diverse labour market demands, regional economic development and the suboptimal structure of the higher education system, and uses international experiences as a reference.…

  16. Transition Communities and the Glass Ceiling of Environmental Sustainability Policies at Three Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardellas Santiago, Miguel; Meira Cartea, Pablo; Iglesias da Cunha, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper deals with the experiences of three European universities that have implemented transition initiatives, using the Transition Network's methodology to promote their sustainability plans. The Transition Communities' model for change is presented from a socio-educational perspective as an effective methodology for encouraging…

  17. Changing Relations between Universities and Research Policy and Industry: Catalyst or Deterrent to Unity of Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, Henry

    European institutions of higher education must let changing economic conditions play a bigger role in their decisions about what research to emphasize. As costs escalate, constraints on government spending force a shift of funding priorities toward research of more strategic value to industry. There are many ways that universities and industry…

  18. State-Funded "Eminent Scholars" Programs: University Faculty Recruitment as an Emerging Policy Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, James C.; McLendon, Michael K.; Lacy, T. Austin

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, state governments have increasingly invested in programs to recruit accomplished scientists from elsewhere to university positions. This event history analysis suggests that an intriguing mix of comparative state disadvantage and leveragable existing research resources is associated with the likelihood of states adopting…

  19. Race-Conscious Academic Policy in Higher Education: The University of Maryland Benneker Scholars Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Walter R.; Hunt, Darnell M.; Gilbert, Derrick I. M.

    1997-01-01

    This study, which evaluates the Benjamin Banneker Scholars Program, was undertaken in response to litigation challenging the University of Maryland's right to operate a scholarship reserved exclusively for high-achieving African Americans. Using varied data sources, the study found that the Banneker scholarship program continues to be necessary as…

  20. Aligning Practice to Policies: Changing the Culture to Recognize and Reward Teaching at Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennin, Michael; Schultz, Zachary D.; Feig, Andrew; Finkelstein, Noah; Greenhoot, Andrea Follmer; Hildreth, Michael; Leibovich, Adam K.; Martin, James D.; Moldwin, Mark B.; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Posey, Lynmarie A.; Smith, Tobin L.; Miller, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for improvement in undergraduate education within STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines are hampered by the methods used to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Faculty members at research universities are commonly assessed and promoted mainly on the basis of research success. To improve the quality of…

  1. Policy Analyses on the Effectiveness of the National University Corporation Act: What Has Changed since 2004?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Kensuke; Yanagiura, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    (Purpose) While numerous data and research indicate that the fiscal practice of institutions has been influenced by National University Corporation Act (NUCA), what exactly the effect NUCA has had on institutions is not known beyond anecdotal experiences and stories. The contribution of this paper is to provide hard evidence on such institutional…

  2. Education for Sustainability in University Curricula: Policies and Practice in Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leihy, Peodair; Salazar, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Education for sustainability (EfS) refers to education that builds the knowledge, skills and dispositions for living sustainably. It is bringing sustainability--for some time a prominent concern within higher education--firmly within the fold of teaching and learning, a key aspect of universities' core business. Is EfS an unstoppable juggernaut in…

  3. The Relevance of Problem-Based Learning for Policy Development in University-Business Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, Sue; Meerman, Arno; Kesting, Tobias; Baaken, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Most prior research on academic entrepreneurship focuses on the interplay between university research and technology transfer activities in the form of joint research, spinoffs, licencing and patenting. Yet questions still remain with respect to the role of academic entrepreneurship in education and learning. Lifelong learning has been developing…

  4. Emergence of extensive drug-resistant (XDR Acinetobacter baumanniiin the Clinical Center University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amela Dedeić-Ljubović

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim Recently increased attention and interest for Acinetobacterbaumannii are the result of the occurrence of multidrug resistant (MDR, extensive drug resistant (XDR and pandrug resistant (PDR isolates around the world. The aim of this study was to examine the resistance of A. baumannii isolates to antimicrobials in Clinical Centre University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods Two hundred and fifty-seven A.baumannii isolates were collected between July 2011 and June 2012 in different wards and from different clinical samples. Multidrug resistant, XDR and PDR were defined according to international expert proposal for interim standard definitions for acquired resistance. Results A total of 257 A. baumannii isolates showed eleven different patterns of resistance, of which ten patterns corresponded to MDR and one corresponded to XDR (sensitive only to colistin. Multidrug resistant and XDR strains were the most common at Intensive Care Units and surgical departments. The largest numbers of isolates were found in wound swabs, blood and bronchial aspirate. Conclusion This is the first report of XDR A. baumannii in the 2000-bed Clinical Centre University of Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Although XDR strains have been detected, the resistance to colistin has not. The elevated prevalence of these strains indicates that local antibiotic prescription policies should be revised and infection prevention and control should be improved.

  5. Considerations on the current universal vaccination policy against hepatitis A in Greece after recent outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassiani Mellou

    Full Text Available Greece is the only European Union member state that in 2008 included hepatitis A (HAV vaccine in the routine national childhood immunization program (NCIP. Given that the resources allocated to public health have dramatically decreased since 2008 and that Greece is a low endemicity country for the disease, the benefit from universal vaccination has been questioned. The aim of this paper is to summarize the available epidemiological data of the disease for 1982-2013, and discuss the effects of universal vaccination on disease morbidity. Descriptive analysis, ARIMA modeling and time series intervention analysis were conducted using surveillance data of acute HAV. A decreasing trend of HAV notification rate over the years was identified (p<0.001. However, universal vaccination (~ 80% vaccine coverage of children had no significant effect on the annual number of reported cases (p = 0.261 and has resulted to a progressive increase of the average age of infection in the general population. The mean age of cases before the inclusion of the vaccine to NCIP (24.1 years, SD = 1.5 was significantly lower than the mean age of cases after 2008 (31.7 years, SD = 2.1 (p<0.001. In the last decade, one third of all reported cases were Roma (a population accounting for 1.5% of the country's total population and in 2013 three outbreaks with 16, 9 and 25 Roma cases respectively, were recorded, indicating the decreased effectiveness of the current immunization strategy in this group. Data suggest that universal vaccination may need to be re-considered. Probably a more cost effective approach would be to implement a program that will include: a vaccination of high risk groups, b universal vaccination of Roma children and improving conditions at Roma camps, c education of the population and travel advice, and d enhancement of the control measures to increase safety of shellfish and other foods.

  6. Quality and dose optimized CT trauma protocol. Recommendation from a university level-I trauma center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Johannes; Boening, Georg; Rotzinger, Roman; Freyhardt, Patrick; Streitparth, Florian [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kaul, David [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schwabe, Philipp [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Trauma Surgery; Maurer, Martin H. [Inselspital Bern (Switzerland). Dept. of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology; Renz, Diane Miriam [Univ. Hospital Jena (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-09-15

    As a supra-regional level-I trauma center, we evaluated computed tomography (CT) acquisitions of polytraumatized patients for quality and dose optimization purposes. Adapted statistical iterative reconstruction [(AS)IR] levels, tube voltage reduction as well as a split-bolus contrast agent (CA) protocol were applied. Materials and Methods 61 patients were split into 3 different groups that differed with respect to tube voltage (120 - 140 kVp) and level of applied ASIR reconstruction (ASIR 20 - 50%). The CT protocol included a native acquisition of the head followed by a single contrast-enhanced acquisition of the whole body (64-MSCT). CA (350 mg/ml iodine) was administered as a split bolus injection of 100 ml (2 ml/s), 20 ml NaCl (1 ml/s), 60 ml (4 ml/s), 40 ml NaCl (4 ml/s) with a scan delay of 85s to detect injuries of both the arterial system and parenchymal organs in a single acquisition. Both the quantitative (SNR/CNR) and qualitative (5-point Likert scale) image quality was evaluated in parenchymal organs that are often injured in trauma patients. Radiation exposure was assessed. The use of IR combined with a reduction of tube voltage resulted in good qualitative and quantitative image quality and a significant reduction in radiation exposure of more than 40% (DLP 1087 vs. 647 mGy x cm). Image quality could be improved due to a dedicated protocol that included different levels of IR adapted to different slice thicknesses, kernels and the examined area for the evaluation of head, lung, body and bone injury patterns. In synopsis of our results, we recommend the implementation of a polytrauma protocol with a tube voltage of 120 kVp and the following IR levels: cCT 5mm: ASIR 20; cCT 0.625 mm: ASIR 40; lung 2.5 mm: ASIR 30, body 5 mm: ASIR 40; body 1.25 mm: ASIR 50; body 0.625 mm: ASIR 0. A dedicated adaptation of the CT trauma protocol (level of reduction of tube voltage and of IR) according to the examined body region (head, lung, body, bone) combined with a

  7. Community Health Centers: Providers, Patients, and Content of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Roderick S. Hooker is with The Lewin Group. References Taylor J. The fundamentals of community health centers [PDF - 221 KB] . National Health Policy Forum background paper. Washington, DC: The George Washington University. 2004. Rosenblatt RA, Andrilla CH, Curtin T, Hart ...

  8. Production of Astatine-211 at the Duke University Medical Center for its regional distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, Michael [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Systemic targeted radiation therapy and radioimmunotherapy continue to be important tools in the treatment of certain cancers. Because of their high energy and short path length, alpha particle emitters such as 211At are more effective than either external beam x- ray or in vivo beta radiation in delivering potentially curative doses of radiation. The limited clinical trials that have been conducted to date have yielded encouraging responses in some patients, e.g., malignant brain tumors. In order to escalate the additional necessary research and development in radiochemistry, radiobiology and efficacy evaluation of alpha particle radiotherapeutics, it is universally agreed that access to an affordable, reliable supply of 211At is warranted. In conjunction with the Department of Energy's intent to enhance stable and radioactive isotope availability for research applications, it is the primary objective of this project to improve 211At production and purification capabilities at Duke so that this radionuclide can be supplied to researchers at other institutions throughout the US.The most widely used 211At production method involves the α,2n reaction on Bismuth using a cyclotron with beams ≤ 28 MeV. Yields can be enhanced with use of an internal target that allows for a higher alpha fluence plus efficient heat dissipation in the target. Both of these items are in place at Duke; however, in order to support production for multi-institutional use, irradiation campaigns in excess of 50 µAp and four hours duration will be needed. Further, post-irradiation processing equipment is lacking that will enable the distribution process. Financial support is sought for i) a shielded, ventilated processing/containment hood; ii) development of a post-irradiation target retrieval system; iii) fabrication of a 211At distillation and recovery module and iv) a performance review and, where needed, an enhancement of seven

  9. Collaboration Platforms in China for Translational and Clinical Research: The Partnership Between Peking University Health Science Center and the University of Michigan Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolars, Joseph C; Fang, Weigang; Zheng, Kai; Huang, Amy Y; Sun, Qiudan; Wang, Yanfang; Woolliscroft, James O; Ke, Yang

    2017-03-01

    Clinical and translational research is increasing in China, attracting faculty-to-faculty collaborations between U.S. and Chinese researchers. However, examples of successful institution-to-institution collaborations to facilitate this research are limited. The authors describe a partnership between Peking University Health Science Center (PUHSC) and the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) designed to enable faculty-initiated joint translational and clinical research projects. In 2009, UMMS leadership identified PUHSC as the most appropriate institutional partner, and the Joint Institute for Translational and Clinical Research was established in 2010. Each contributed $7 million for joint research projects in areas of mutual interest. A shared governance structure, four thematic programs (pulmonary, cardiovascular, liver, and renal diseases), three joint research-enabling cores, and processes for awarding funding have been established along with methods for collaborating and mechanisms to share data and biomaterials. As of November 2015, 52 joint faculty proposals have been submitted, and 25 have been funded. These projects have involved more than 100,000 patients in the United States and China and have generated 13 peer-reviewed publications. Pilot data have been leveraged to secure $3.3 million of U.S. extramural funding. Faculty and trainee exchanges take place regularly (including an annual symposium), and mechanisms exist to link faculty seeking collaborations. Critical determinants of success include having co-ownership at all levels with coinvestment of resources. Each institution is committed to continuing its support with a repeat $7 million investment. Next steps include initiating studies in new clinical areas and pursuing large clinical intervention trials.

  10. Beyond the Letter of the Law: Accessibility, Universal Design, and Human-Centered Design in Video Tutorials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda S. Clossen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article demonstrates how Universal and Human-Centered Design approaches can be applied to the process of library video tutorial creation in order to enhance accessibility. A series of questions that creators should consider in order to focus their design process is discussed. These questions break down various physical and cognitive limitations that users encounter, providing a framework for future video creation that is not dependent on specific software. By approaching accommodations more holistically, videos are created with accessibility in mind from their conception. Working toward the ideal of a video tutorial that is accessible to every user leads to the creation of more clearly worded, effective learning objects that are much more inclusive, making instructional concepts available to users of all abilities.

  11. Interprofessional academic health center leadership development: the case of the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Healthcare Leadership Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Grant T; Duncan, W Jack; Knowles, Kathy L; Nelson, Kathleen; Rogers, David A; Kennedy, Karen N

    2014-05-01

    The study describes the genesis of the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Healthcare Leadership Academy (HLA), highlights the HLA's outcomes, discloses how the HLA has changed, and delineates future directions for academic health center (AHC) interprofessional leadership training. While interprofessional training is recognized as an important component of the professional education for health professionals, AHCs have not focused on interprofessional leadership training to prepare future AHC leaders. As professional bureaucracies, AHCs require leadership distributed across different professions; these leaders not only should be technical experts, but also skilled at interprofessional teamwork and collaborative governance. The HLA is examined using the case method, which is supplemented with a descriptive analysis of program evaluation data and outcomes. The HLA has created a networked community of AHC leaders; the HLA's interprofessional team projects foster innovative problem solving. Interprofessional leadership training expands individuals' networks and has multiple organizational benefits. © 2014.

  12. X-ray imaging of picoplankton in Lake Biwa by soft X-ray microscope at Ritsumeikan University SR Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, K; Ichikawa, M; Kihara, H; Ichise, S; Namba, H

    2009-01-01

    Lake Biwa is the largest lake in Japan. Recently, its chemical oxygen demand (COD) index is increasing in spite of a decrease in the values of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) index. In order to elucidate the mechanism, the first X-ray of a microstructure of picoplanktons inhabiting Lake Biwa was taken. After chemical fixation treatment, the laboratory-cultured Synechococcus cells were observed by soft X-ray microscope (BL12) of Ritsumeikan University SR Center. Each cell shows a dark sub-micron core. The low contrast region around the core can be interpreted as agar layers. The cells were estimated as 0.7μm in diameter and agar layers were estimate as 1.2μm in diameter. Namely the agar layer increases the quantification of organic compounds by factor of 1.7.

  13. New library buildings. Part VIII. The Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois at the Medical Center, Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theall, J N; Pizer, I H

    1976-10-01

    The new Library of the Health Sciences at the University of Illinois at the Medical Center is described and illustrated. The building was under construction for thirteen months, using phased construction techniques, and opened in October 1973. The library is a self-contained and physically independent building consisting of three levels above ground and one lower level, comprising an area of 130,000 sq. ft. gross and 88,000 sq. ft. net. The building provides space for 350,000 volumes, 1,037 readers, and a staff of 100. The cost of construction was $5,140,500 plus $858,500 for furnishings and equipment. Among the special features are a twenty-four-hour multimedia services department and a full-circulating style book detection system. Included in the article is an evaluation of the library after two years of occupancy.

  14. Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in The George Washington University at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Vladislav

    2002-01-01

    The program objectives were defined in the original proposal entitled 'Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in the JIAFS at NASA Langley Research Center' which was originated March 20, 1975, and yearly renewals of the research program dated December 1, 1998 to December 31, 2002. The program included three major topics: 1) Improvement of existing methods and development of new methods for flight and wind tunnel data analysis based on system identification methodology; 2) Application of these methods to flight and wind tunnel data obtained from advanced aircraft; 3) Modeling and control of aircraft. The principal investigator of the program was Dr. Vladislav Klein, Professor Emeritus at The George Washington University, DC. Seven Graduate Research Scholar Assistants (GRSA) participated in the program. The results of the research conducted during four years of the total co-operative period were published in 2 NASA Technical Reports, 3 thesis and 3 papers. The list of these publications is included.

  15. [Pepper's syndrome: report of two cases at the Charles de Gaulle University Pediatric Hospital Center, Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Madibèlè; Douamba, Sonia; Nagalo, Kisito; Dao, Lassina; Kouéta, Fla; Lougué, Claudine; Yé, Diarra

    2017-01-01

    Pepper's syndrome is a neuroblastoma that metastasizes to the liver. It affects infants younger than six months of age. It can regress spontaneously and is associated with a favorable prognosis in 80% of cases. Given its rarity, we here report two cases of Pepper's syndrome observed at the Charles de Gaulle university pediatric hospital center, Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso). Our study involved two female infants in whom the disease manifested as an increase in abdominal volume, hepatomegaly and signs of respiratory distress. Ultrasound enabled diagnosis, which was based on the nodular appearance of the liver in both cases and determination of the primary tumor in one case. Urinary catecholamine test confirmed the diagnosis in one case. Both patients died from complications related to liver compression, chemotherapy (in one of the cases) and lack of treatment (in the other case).

  16. Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center. Twenty-first progress report, January 1-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krohn, J.; Petesch, J.E.; Rogers, R.D.; Sandel, P.; Stasny, G.S.

    1985-03-01

    The Nuclear Science Center is operated by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station as a service to the Texas A and M University System and the State of Texas. The facility is available to the University, other educational institutions, governmental agencies, and private organizations and individuals. Reactor utilization decreased from 1983 as indicated by a slightly smaller number of samples irradiated and of total irradiations. Core VIII, established in December 1982, was used throughout 1984. Several major facility projects modifications, and improvements were completed during the past year. Experimentally the Beam Port No. 4 reflector and shutter was improved, the pulsing instrumentation is being expanded, and the pneumatic system controller developed for Lab No. 4 is now in use in the Center for Trace Characterization (CTC) and Shell Development labs. Several operational problems occurred in 1984 but did not result in a significant loss of reactor operating time. During this reporting period there were no changes made to the site area; however, there has been made a proposal to extend the runway at nearby Easterwood Airport such tha larger aircraft can be accommodated. This extension should occur in 1985 and should have no affect on the air traffic patterns relative to the NSC. Administratively during 1984 efforts have been made to stabilize the reactor operations staff following the mid year resignations of both a Reactor Supervisor and Manager of Reactor Operations. A long term replacement has been hired to fill the vacated Reactor Supervisor position; however, the manager position has not yet been filled and those duties have been assumed by the Assistant Director

  17. Prevalence, Severity and Factors Related to Mastalgia among Women Referring to Health Centers Affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Vaziri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mastalgia is a common problem among women. Severe mastalgia can have a negative impact on sexual, physical and sleep activities and behaviors. Regarding the absence of a study on the prevalence and severity of mastalgia in southern Iran, the current study was conducted. Methods: This is an analytical cross-sectional study. The participants were women who referred to health centers affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz. The inclusion criteria were willingness to participate in the study, not being pregnant and breastfeed. The severity of breast pain was calculated with visual analog scale. The data of 845 questionnaires were analyzed with SPSS software. Results: The participants’ age ranged from 15-50 years; the mean age was 32.84±9.49 years. Among 845 participants, 33% (279 of them had experienced mastalgia in the past three months. Among those who had experienced mastalgia, 81% (226 had cyclical mastalgai and 19% (53 had non-cyclical mastalgia. The mean of pain score was 4.32±2.38 and 12.9% of the participants (36 had pain scores of 8 to 10. The impact of mastalgia on daily and sexual activities and sleep behaviors was reported 9.31% (26, 12.66% (29 and 13.97% (36, respectively. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that the spread of mastalgia in women referred to health centers affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences is lower than that reported in western studies and has lesser effects on their daily, sexual and sleep activities and behaviors. We suggest further studies about mastalgia in others locations in Iran.

  18. Considerations on the Current Universal Vaccination Policy against Hepatitis A in Greece after Recent Outbreaks

    OpenAIRE

    Mellou, Kassiani; Sideroglou, Theologia; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Katsiaflaka, Anna; Bitsolas, Nikolaos; Verykouki, Eleni; Triantafillou, Eleni; Baka, Agoritsa; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Greece is the only European Union member state that in 2008 included hepatitis A (HAV) vaccine in the routine national childhood immunization program (NCIP). Given that the resources allocated to public health have dramatically decreased since 2008 and that Greece is a low endemicity country for the disease, the benefit from universal vaccination has been questioned. The aim of this paper is to summarize the available epidemiological data of the disease for 1982-2013, and discuss the effects ...

  19. Considerations on the current universal vaccination policy against hepatitis A in Greece after recent outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellou, Kassiani; Sideroglou, Theologia; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Katsiaflaka, Anna; Bitsolas, Nikolaos; Verykouki, Eleni; Triantafillou, Eleni; Baka, Agoritsa; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Greece is the only European Union member state that in 2008 included hepatitis A (HAV) vaccine in the routine national childhood immunization program (NCIP). Given that the resources allocated to public health have dramatically decreased since 2008 and that Greece is a low endemicity country for the disease, the benefit from universal vaccination has been questioned. The aim of this paper is to summarize the available epidemiological data of the disease for 1982-2013, and discuss the effects of universal vaccination on disease morbidity. Descriptive analysis, ARIMA modeling and time series intervention analysis were conducted using surveillance data of acute HAV. A decreasing trend of HAV notification rate over the years was identified (pvaccination (~ 80% vaccine coverage of children) had no significant effect on the annual number of reported cases (p = 0.261) and has resulted to a progressive increase of the average age of infection in the general population. The mean age of cases before the inclusion of the vaccine to NCIP (24.1 years, SD = 1.5) was significantly lower than the mean age of cases after 2008 (31.7 years, SD = 2.1) (poutbreaks with 16, 9 and 25 Roma cases respectively, were recorded, indicating the decreased effectiveness of the current immunization strategy in this group. Data suggest that universal vaccination may need to be re-considered. Probably a more cost effective approach would be to implement a program that will include: a) vaccination of high risk groups, b) universal vaccination of Roma children and improving conditions at Roma camps, c) education of the population and travel advice, and d) enhancement of the control measures to increase safety of shellfish and other foods.

  20. Considerations on the Current Universal Vaccination Policy against Hepatitis A in Greece after Recent Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellou, Kassiani; Sideroglou, Theologia; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Katsiaflaka, Anna; Bitsolas, Nikolaos; Verykouki, Eleni; Triantafillou, Eleni; Baka, Agoritsa; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Greece is the only European Union member state that in 2008 included hepatitis A (HAV) vaccine in the routine national childhood immunization program (NCIP). Given that the resources allocated to public health have dramatically decreased since 2008 and that Greece is a low endemicity country for the disease, the benefit from universal vaccination has been questioned. The aim of this paper is to summarize the available epidemiological data of the disease for 1982-2013, and discuss the effects of universal vaccination on disease morbidity. Descriptive analysis, ARIMA modeling and time series intervention analysis were conducted using surveillance data of acute HAV. A decreasing trend of HAV notification rate over the years was identified (pa progressive increase of the average age of infection in the general population. The mean age of cases before the inclusion of the vaccine to NCIP (24.1 years, SD = 1.5) was significantly lower than the mean age of cases after 2008 (31.7 years, SD = 2.1) (pa population accounting for 1.5% of the country’s total population) and in 2013 three outbreaks with 16, 9 and 25 Roma cases respectively, were recorded, indicating the decreased effectiveness of the current immunization strategy in this group. Data suggest that universal vaccination may need to be re-considered. Probably a more cost effective approach would be to implement a program that will include: a) vaccination of high risk groups, b) universal vaccination of Roma children and improving conditions at Roma camps, c) education of the population and travel advice, and d) enhancement of the control measures to increase safety of shellfish and other foods. PMID:25590132

  1. The prevalence of condom use among university students in zimbabwe: implications for planning and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkomazana, Njabulo; Maharaj, Pranitha

    2013-09-01

    Young people, especially university students, are at high risk of HIV infections because of little or no parental or administrative prohibitions in campus environments. The aim of this study was to ascertain the level of condom use among university students in Zimbabwe; that is, condom use at last sex and consistent condom use among both regular and casual partners. The study draws on self-completed questionnaires administered to university students. The results reveal that, while 78.3% of sexually active respondents had used condoms in penetrative sexual encounters before, only 56.2% had used condoms at their last sexual encounter. As expected, consistent condom use was lower in regular sexual partnerships than it was in casual partnerships (30.6% versus 54.6%). Condom use at first sex and high personal HIV risk perception were found to be the most important factors in explaining condom use at last sex and consistent condom use with casual partners. Condom use intentions were high, as 75% of respondents indicated that they would use condoms at their next sexual encounters. Whilst this is commendable, use rates should ideally be higher still. Campus HIV/AIDS programmers should endeavour to ensure that condoms are available at all times in order to help translate these intentions into actual condom use. In addition, promotional programmes should encourage those who have not yet initiated sexual intercourse to use condoms at their first sex and also to improve personal HIV risk perceptions in order to trigger initiation of protective sexual behaviours.

  2. Update and Expansion of the Center of Automotive Technology Excellence Under the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irick, David

    2012-08-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its seventh year of operation under this agreement, its thirteenth year in total. During this period the Center has involved eleven GATE Fellows and three GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center’s focus area: Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Control Systems. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $2,000,000.

  3. Universalization of access to modern energy services in Indian households-Economic and policy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, B. Sudhakara; Balachandra, P.; Nathan, Hippu Salk Kristle

    2009-01-01

    Provision of modern energy services for cooking (with gaseous fuels) and lighting (with electricity) is an essential component of any policy aiming to address health, education or welfare issues; yet it gets little attention from policy-makers. Secure, adequate, low-cost energy of quality and convenience is core to the delivery of these services. The present study analyses the energy consumption pattern of Indian domestic sector and examines the urban-rural divide and income energy linkage. A comprehensive analysis is done to estimate the cost for providing modern energy services to everyone by 2030. A public-private partnership-driven business model, with entrepreneurship at the core, is developed with institutional, financing and pricing mechanisms for diffusion of energy services. This approach, termed as EMPOWERS (entrepreneurship model for provision of wholesome energy-related basic services), if adopted, can facilitate large-scale dissemination of energy-efficient and renewable technologies like small-scale biogas/biofuel plants, and distributed power generation technologies to provide clean, safe, reliable and sustainable energy to rural households and urban poor. It is expected to integrate the processes of market transformation and entrepreneurship development involving government, NGOs, financial institutions and community groups as stakeholders.

  4. Possibilities for change toward universal design: Japanese housing policy for seniors at the crossroads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, S

    1996-01-01

    Japanese government policies for seniors have long assumed that informal care by their families exists for them. The rapid aging of Japan is eroding the basis for this assumption. It is now necessary to include barrier-free design concepts in the basic requirements for dwellings to be used by everyone, not just seniors, to support independent living. Essential requirements in proposed guidelines are already in effect in the design and construction of publicly operated rental housing. But at this time, only the schemes of the Housing Loan Corporation of Japan for additional loans are being used, in cases where some design requirements for senior users are being met. The Housing Loan Corporation's loan system has long been seen as a policy on the part of government to boost the economy, particularly during recessions, but assistance for construction of higher quality dwellings has been lacking. This article discusses the basic philosophy of design guidelines and practical ideas to be considered in dwelling design and the merit of model dwellings constructed by housing manufacturers in Japan. It also discusses potential strategies to implement the basic ideas of design guidelines. It then proposes some possible methods to realize life-span dwellings, or dwellings designed for everybody.

  5. Strong leadership and teamwork drive culture and performance change: Ohio State University Medical Center 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Fred; Bendapudi, Neeli; Rucci, Anthony; Schlesinger, Leonard

    2008-09-01

    Several characteristics of academic health centers have the potential to create high levels of internal conflict and misalignment that can pose significant leadership challenges. In September 2000, the positions of Ohio State University (OSU) senior vice president for health sciences, dean of the medical school, and the newly created position of chief executive officer of the OSU Medical Center (OSUMC) were combined under a single leader to oversee the OSUMC. This mandate from the president and trustees was modeled after top institutions with similar structures. The leader who assumed the role was tasked with improving OSUMC's academic, clinical, and financial performance. To achieve this goal, the senior vice president and his team employed the service value chain model of improving performance, based on the premise that leadership behavior/culture drives employee engagement/satisfaction, leading to customer satisfaction and improved organizational performance. Implementing this approach was a seven-step process: (1) selecting the right leadership team, (2) assessing the challenges and opportunities, (3) setting expectations for performance and leadership behavior, (4) aligning structures and functions, (5) engaging constituents, (6) developing leadership skills, and (7) defining strategies and tracking goals. The OSUMC setting during this period provides an observational case study to examine how these stepwise changes, instituted by strong leadership and teamwork, were able to make and implement sound decisions that drove substantial and measurable improvements in the engagement and satisfaction of faculty and staff; the satisfaction of students and patients; and academic, clinical, and financial performance.

  6. Childcare service centers' preferences and intentions to use a web-based program to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoong, Sze Lin; Williams, Christopher Michael; Finch, Meghan; Wyse, Rebecca; Jones, Jannah; Freund, Megan; Wiggers, John Henry; Nathan, Nicole; Dodds, Pennie; Wolfenden, Luke

    2015-04-30

    Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is a recommended strategy for obesity prevention, given that such services provide access to a substantial proportion of children during a key developmental period. Electronic Web-based interventions represent a novel way to support childcare service providers to implement such policies and practices. This study aimed to assess: (1) childcare centers' current use of technology, (2) factors associated with intention to use electronic Web-based interventions, and (3) Web-based features that managers rated as useful to support staff with implementing healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices. A computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) was conducted with service managers from long day care centers and preschools. The CATI assessed the following: (1) childcare center characteristics, (2) childcare centers' use of electronic devices, (3) intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program-assessed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) with ratings between 1 (strongly disagree) and 7 (strongly agree), and (4) features rated as useful to include in a Web-based program. Overall, 214 service centers out of 277 (77.3%) consented to participate. All service centers except 2 reported using computers (212/214, 99.1%), whereas 40.2% (86/214) used portable tablets. A total of 71.9% (151/210) of childcare service managers reported a score of 6 or more for intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, intention to use the program was significantly associated with perceived ease of use (P=.002, odds ratio [OR] 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.2) and perceived usefulness (Pchildcare center performance in relation to other childcare centers (212/212, 100%). Childcare

  7. Neurosurgical injuries resulting from the 2011 tornados in Alabama: the experience at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joseph H; Zywicke, Holly A; Fleming, James B; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Whisenhunt, Thomas R; Okor, Mamerhi O; Harrigan, Mark R; Pritchard, Patrick R; Hadley, Mark N

    2013-06-01

    The April 27, 2011, tornados that affected the southeastern US resulted in 248 deaths in the state of Alabama. The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Medical Center, the largest Level I trauma center in the state, triaged and treated a large number of individuals who suffered traumatic injuries during these events, including those requiring neurosurgical assessment and treatment. A retrospective review of all adult patients triaged at UAB Medical Center during the April 27, 2011, tornados was conducted. Those patients who were diagnosed with and treated for neurosurgical injuries were included in this cohort. The Division of Neurosurgery at UAB Medical Center received 37 consultations in the 36 hours following the tornado disaster. An additional patient presented 6 days later, having suffered a lumbar spine fracture that ultimately required operative intervention. Twenty-seven patients (73%) suffered injuries as a direct result of the tornados. Twenty-three (85%) of these 27 patients experienced spine and spinal cord injuries. Four patients (15%) suffered intracranial injuries and 2 patients (7%) suffered combined intracranial and spinal injuries. The spinal fractures that were evaluated and treated were predominantly thoracic (43.5%) and lumbar (43.5%). The neurosurgery service performed 14 spinal fusions, 1 ventriculostomy, 2 halo placements, 1 diagnostic angiogram, 1 endovascular embolectomy, and 1 wound debridement and lavage. Twenty-two patients (81.5%) were neurologically intact at discharge and all but 4 had 1 year of follow-up. Three patients had persistent deficits from spinal cord injuries and there was 1 death in a patient with multisystem injuries in whom no procedures were performed. Two patients experienced postoperative complications in the form of 1 wound infection and 1 stroke. The April 27, 2011, tornados in Alabama produced significant neurosurgical injuries that primarily involved the spine. There were a disproportionate number of

  8. How to characterize the efficiency of policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions? A method of analysis in an uncertain universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amant, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    For ADEME (the French Agence de l'Environnement et de la Maitrise de l'Energie), Carbone 4, a consulting firm, has developed several tools that apply a methodology for assessing the efficiency of policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This methodology is based on two criteria: the 'full cost per ton of avoided CO 2 equivalent' and the 'potential of avoided emissions'. It is original in that it compares measurements in quite different socioeconomic contexts and thus yields elements that are useful for making choices in an uncertain universe, as shall be increasingly necessary. This methodology brings to light the key factors determining a measure's efficiency and thus identifies the conditions for its success or failure. It is a precious tool for decision-making

  9. College and university environmental programs as a policy problem (Part 1): Integrating Knowledge, education, and action for a better world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.G.; Rutherford, M.B.; Auer, M.R.; Cherney, D.N.; Wallace, R.L.; Mattson, D.J.; Clark, D.A.; Foote, L.; Krogman, N.; Wilshusen, P.; Steelman, T.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental sciences/studies movement, with more than 1000 programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, is unified by a common interest-ameliorating environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. Unfortunately, environmental programs have struggled in their efforts to integrate knowledge across disciplines and educate students to become sound problem solvers and leaders. We examine the environmental program movement as a policy problem, looking at overall goals, mapping trends in relation to those goals, identifying the underlying factors contributing to trends, and projecting the future. We argue that despite its shared common interest, the environmental program movement is disparate and fragmented by goal ambiguity, positivistic disciplinary approaches, and poorly rationalized curricula, pedagogies, and educational philosophies. We discuss these challenges and the nature of the changes that are needed in order to overcome them. In a subsequent article (Part 2) we propose specific strategies for improvement. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  10. Impact of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital-Acquired Conditions Policy on Billing Rates for 2 Targeted Healthcare-Associated Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Alison Tse; Calderwood, Michael S; Jin, Robert; Soumerai, Stephen B; Vaz, Louise E; Goldmann, Donald; Lee, Grace M

    2015-08-01

    The 2008 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services hospital-acquired conditions policy limited additional payment for conditions deemed reasonably preventable. To examine whether this policy was associated with decreases in billing rates for 2 targeted conditions, vascular catheter-associated infections (VCAI) and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI). Adult Medicare patients admitted to 569 acute care hospitals in California, Massachusetts, or New York and subject to the policy. DESIGN We used an interrupted times series design to assess whether the hospital-acquired conditions policy was associated with changes in billing rates for VCAI and CAUTI. Before the policy, billing rates for VCAI and CAUTI were increasing (prepolicy odds ratio per quarter for VCAI, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.11-1.23]; for CAUTI, 1.19 [1.16-1.23]). The policy was associated with an immediate drop in billing rates for VCAI and CAUTI (odds ratio for change at policy implementation for VCAI, 0.75 [95% CI, 0.69-0.81]; for CAUTI, 0.87 [0.79-0.96]). In the postpolicy period, we observed a decreasing trend in the billing rate for VCAI and a leveling-off in the billing rate for CAUTI (postpolicy odds ratio per quarter for VCAI, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.97-0.99]; for CAUTI, 0.99 [0.97-1.00]). The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services hospital-acquired conditions policy appears to have been associated with immediate reductions in billing rates for VCAI and CAUTI, followed by a slight decreasing trend or leveling-off in rates. These billing rates, however, may not correlate with changes in clinically meaningful patient outcomes and may reflect changes in coding practices.

  11. Shaping public health education, research, and policy in the Arab ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    NCDP) program supports the generation of new knowledge to help inform policies and programs that are low cost but can ... University of Beirut (AUB) proposes a comprehensive and long-term ... based on three collaborating academic Centers.

  12. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  13. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  14. [The Assesment of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Patients Admiting to Gaziantep University of Medicine Faculty Leishmaniasis Diagnosis and Treatment Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Selma; Özgöztaşı, Orhan; Kayıran, Nuriye

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) is a curable clinical condition characterized by atrophic scars caused by the Leishmania species of protozoan parasites. In the period following the beginning of the Syrian Civil War, there has been a dramatic increase in number of CL cases in Gaziantep. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiological characteristics of CL patients admitted to Gaziantep University of Medicine Faculty Leishmaniasis diagnosis and treatment center in Gaziantep. Within the context of this study, a total of 635 CL patients admitted between 01 April 2013 and 01 April 2014 to the Leishmaniasis diagnosis and treatment center of the Gaziantep were evaluated retrospectively. Patient data regarding age, sex, the location of lesions, the number of lesions, the duration of the lesions, and the months in which the lesions appeared were recorded and statistically analyzed. Of these patients, 67 (10.6%) were Turkish citizens, while 568 (89.4%) were Syrian citizens. In addition, 299 (47.1%) of the patients were female, while 336 (52.9%) were male. The large majority of the cases were between 5-9 (n=140, 22%) and 10-19 (n=168, 26.5%) years of age; 66% of all cases were below 20 years of age. An evaluation of the distribution of cases according to the months revealed that the lowest number of cases occurred in the months of July (n=14, 2.2%) and August (n=13, 2.0%), while the highest number of cases occurred in the months of January (n=122, 19.2%) and February (n=106, 16.7%). Cutaneous Leishmaniasis is a condition that affects individuals of all ages and genders. It is thus necessary to conduct regular health screenings for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis, and to inform and educate vulnerable communities and the society in general regarding this condition.

  15. Annual report of Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. 1994 (April 1, 1994 - March, 31, 1995)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itahashi, Takahisa; Futakuchi, Atsuko

    1995-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the research activities and operations of the Research Center For Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, during the period of the academic year 1994, April 1994 to March 1995. RCNP is the national laboratory for nuclear physics in Japan. The AVF cyclotron with K = 0.14GeV and the ring cyclotron with K = 0.4GeV and E P = 0.4GeV are the major user facilities at RCNP. They have been extensively used for studying nuclear nucleon-meson systems. All facilities are open for users from universities and research institutes in Japan as well as those in foreign countries. The research activities at the RCNP cyclotron laboratory include studies of nuclear interactions and nuclear potentials, spin isospin excitations and decays nuclear reaction dynamics and others. Studies of solid state and atomic physics and medical applications were carried out also at the cyclotron laboratory. New external ion sources have been instaled for the injector cyclotron. New extensions of the RCNP research activities are under progress. One is the possible use of the 8 GeV electron storage ring built at the synchrotron radiation laboratory SPring-8. It is located 100 Km west of Osaka. It is expected to start its operation in 1997. The Compton back-scattering of laser photons from the 8 GeV electron beam provides 1-3.5 GeV γ-rays, which are very promising for studying nuclear quark and meson systems. Other is the non-accelerator physics for ultra-rare nuclear processes at the new under ground laboratory 'Ohto Cosmo Observatory'. It is located 100 km south of Osaka. Neutrino studies by investigating double beta decays, dark matter studies by investigating nuclear responses to them, and studies of other weak processes are planned to be studied there. (J.P.N.)

  16. Socioeconomic inequality in self-reported oral health status: the experience of Thailand after implementation of the universal coverage policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkotra, Tewarit

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to quantify the extent to which socioeconomic-related inequality in self-reported oral health status among Thais is present after the country implemented the Universal Coverage policy and to decompose the determinants and their associations with inequality in self-reported oral health status in particular with the worse condition. The study employed a concentration index to measure socioeconomic-related inequality in self-reported oral health status, and the decomposition method to identify the determinants and their associations with inequality in oral health-related measures. Data from 32,748 Thai adults aged 15-75 years from the nationally representative Health &Welfare Survey and Socio-Economic Survey 2006 were used in analyses. Reports of worse oral health status of the lower socioeconomic-status group were more common than their higher socioeconomic-status counterparts. The concentration index (equaling -0.208) corroborates the finding of pro-poor inequality in self-reported worse oral health. Decomposition analysis demonstrated certain demographic-, socioeconomic-, and geographic characteristics are particularly associated with poor-rich differences in self-reported oral health status among Thai adults. This study demonstrated socioeconomic-related inequality in oral health is discernable along the entire spectrum of socioeconomic status. Inequality in perceived oral health status among Thais is present even while the country has virtually achieved universality of health coverage. The study also indicates population subgroups, particularly the poor, should receive consideration for improving oral health status as revealed by underlying determinants.

  17. Variation in monitoring and treatment policies for intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury: A survey in 66 neurotrauma centers participating in the CENTER-TBI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Cnossen (Maryse); Huijben, J.A. (Jilske A.); van der Jagt, M. (Mathieu); Volovici, V. (Victor); van Essen, T. (Thomas); S. Polinder (Suzanne); D. Nelson (David); Ercole, A. (Ari); Stocchetti, N. (Nino); Citerio, G. (Giuseppe); W.C. Peul (Wilco); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); D.K. Menon (David ); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout W.); Lingsma, H.F. (Hester F.); Adams, H. (Hadie); Alessandro, M. (Masala); J.E. Allanson (Judith); Amrein, K. (Krisztina); Andaluz, N. (Norberto); N. Andelic (Nada); Andrea, N. (Nanni); L. Andreassen (Lasse); Anke, A. (Audny); Antoni, A. (Anna); Ardon, H. (Hilko); Audibert, G. (Gérard); Auslands, K. (Kaspars); Azouvi, P. (Philippe); Baciu, C. (Camelia); Bacon, A. (Andrew); Badenes, R. (Rafael); Baglin, T. (Trevor); R.H.M.A. Bartels (Ronald); P. Barzo (P.); Bauerfeind, U. (Ursula); R. Beer (Ronny); Belda, F.J. (Francisco Javier); B.-M. Bellander (Bo-Michael); A. Belli (Antonio); Bellier, R. (Rémy); H. Benali (Habib); Benard, T. (Thierry); M. Berardino (Maurizio); L. Beretta (Luigi); Beynon, C. (Christopher); Bilotta, F. (Federico); H. Binder (Harald); Biqiri, E. (Erta); Blaabjerg, M. (Morten); Lund, S.B. (Stine Borgen); Bouzat, P. (Pierre); Bragge, P. (Peter); Brazinova, A. (Alexandra); F. Brehar (Felix); Brorsson, C. (Camilla); Buki, A. (Andras); M. Bullinger (Monika); Bucková, V. (Veronika); Calappi, E. (Emiliana); P. Cameron (Peter); Carbayo, L.G. (Lozano Guillermo); Carise, E. (Elsa); K.L.H. Carpenter (Keri L.H.); Castaño-León, A.M. (Ana M.); Causin, F. (Francesco); Chevallard, G. (Giorgio); A. Chieregato (Arturo); G. Citerio (Giuseppe); Cnossen, M. (Maryse); M. Coburn (Mark); J.P. Coles (Jonathan P.); Cooper, J.D. (Jamie D.); Correia, M. (Marta); A. Covic (Amra); N. Curry (Nicola); E. Czeiter (Endre); M. Czosnyka (Marek); Dahyot-Fizelier, C. (Claire); F. Damas (François); P. Damas (Pierre); H. Dawes (Helen); De Keyser, V. (Véronique); F.D. Corte (Francesco); B. Depreitere (Bart); Ding, S. (Shenghao); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); K. Dizdarevic (Kemal); Dulière, G.-L. (Guy-Loup); Dzeko, A. (Adelaida); G. Eapen (George); Engemann, H. (Heiko); A. Ercole (Ari); P. Esser (Patrick); Ezer, E. (Erzsébet); M. Fabricius (Martin); V.L. Feigin (V.); Feng, J. (Junfeng); Foks, K. (Kelly); F. Fossi (Francesca); Francony, G. (Gilles); J. Frantzén (Janek); Freo, U. (Ulderico); S.K. Frisvold (Shirin Kordasti); Furmanov, A. (Alex); Gagliardo, P. (Pablo); D. Galanaud (Damien); G. Gao (Guoyi); K. Geleijns (Karin); A. Ghuysen (Alexandre); Giraud, B. (Benoit); Glocker, B. (Ben); Gomez, P.A. (Pedro A.); Grossi, F. (Francesca); R.L. Gruen (Russell); Gupta, D. (Deepak); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); E. Hadzic (Ermin); I. Haitsma (Iain); J.A. Hartings (Jed); R. Helbok (Raimund); E. Helseth (Eirik); Hertle, D. (Daniel); S. Hill (Sean); Hoedemaekers, A. (Astrid); S. Hoefer (Stefan); P.J. Hutchinson (Peter J.); Håberg, K.A. (Kristine Asta); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); Janciak, I. (Ivan); K. Janssens (Koen); Jiang, J.-Y. (Ji-Yao); Jones, K. (Kelly); Kalala, J.-P. (Jean-Pierre); Kamnitsas, K. (Konstantinos); Karan, M. (Mladen); Karau, J. (Jana); A. Katila (Ari); M. Kaukonen (Maija); Keeling, D. (David); Kerforne, T. (Thomas); N. Ketharanathan (Naomi); Kettunen, J. (Johannes); Kivisaari, R. (Riku); A.G. Kolias (Angelos G.); Kolumbán, B. (Bálint); E.J.O. Kompanje (Erwin); D. Kondziella (Daniel); L.-O. Koskinen (Lars-Owe); Kovács, N. (Noémi); F. Kalovits (Ferenc); A. Lagares (Alfonso); L. Lanyon (Linda); S. Laureys (Steven); Lauritzen, M. (Martin); F.E. Lecky (Fiona); C. Ledig (Christian); R. Lefering; V. Legrand (Valerie); Lei, J. (Jin); L. Levi (Leon); R. Lightfoot (Roger); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); D. Loeckx (Dirk); Lozano, A. (Angels); Luddington, R. (Roger); Luijten-Arts, C. (Chantal); Maas, A.I.R. (Andrew I.R.); MacDonald, S. (Stephen); MacFayden, C. (Charles); M. Maegele; M. Majdan (Marek); Major, S. (Sebastian); A. Manara (Alex); Manhes, P. (Pauline); G. Manley (Geoffrey); Martin, D. (Didier); C. Martino (Costanza); Maruenda, A. (Armando); H. Maréchal (Hugues); Mastelova, D. (Dagmara); Mattern, J. (Julia); McMahon, C. (Catherine); Melegh, B. (Béla); Menon, D. (David); T. Menovsky (Tomas); Morganti-Kossmann, C. (Cristina); Mulazzi, D. (Davide); Mutschler, M. (Manuel); H. Mühlan (Holger); Negru, A. (Ancuta); Nelson, D. (David); E. Neugebauer (Eddy); V.F. Newcombe (Virginia F.); Noirhomme, Q. (Quentin); Nyirádi, J. (József); M. Oddo (Mauro); A.W. Oldenbeuving; M. Oresic (Matej); Ortolano, F. (Fabrizio); A. Palotie (Aarno); P.M. Parizel; Patruno, A. (Adriana); J.-F. Payen (Jean-François); Perera, N. (Natascha); V. Perlbarg (Vincent); Persona, P. (Paolo); Peul, W. (Wilco); N. Pichon (Nicolas); Piilgaard, H. (Henning); A. Piippo (Anna); S.P. Floury (Sébastien Pili); M. Pirinen (Matti); H. Ples (Horia); Polinder, S. (Suzanne); Pomposo, I. (Inigo); M. Psota (Marek); P. Pullens (Pim); L. Puybasset (Louis); A. Ragauskas (Arminas); R. Raj (Rahul); Rambadagalla, M. (Malinka); Rehorcíková, V. (Veronika); J.K.J. Rhodes (Jonathan K.J.); S. Richardson (Sylvia); S. Ripatti (Samuli); S. Rocka (Saulius); Rodier, N. (Nicolas); Roe, C. (Cecilie); Roise, O. (Olav); C.M.A.A. Roks (Gerwin); Romegoux, P. (Pauline); J. Rosand (Jonathan); Rosenfeld, J. (Jeffrey); C. Rosenlund (Christina); G. Rosenthal (Guy); R. Rossaint (Rolf); S. Rossi (Sandra); Rostalski, T. (Tim); D. Rueckert (Daniel); de Ruiz, A.F. (Arcaute Felix); M. Rusnák (Martin); Sacchi, M. (Marco); Sahakian, B. (Barbara); J. Sahuquillo (Juan); O. Sakowitz (Oliver); Sala, F. (Francesca); Sanchez-Pena, P. (Paola); Sanchez-Porras, R. (Renan); Sandor, J. (Janos); Santos, E. (Edgar); N. Sasse (Nadine); Sasu, L. (Luminita); Savo, D. (Davide); I.B. Schipper (Inger); Schlößer, B. (Barbara); S. Schmidt (Silke); Schneider, A. (Annette); H. Schoechl (Herbert); G.G. Schoonman; Rico, F.S. (Frederik Schou); E. Schwendenwein (Elisabeth); Schöll, M. (Michael); Sir, O. (özcan); T. Skandsen (Toril); Smakman, L. (Lidwien); D. Smeets (Dominique); Smielewski, P. (Peter); Sorinola, A. (Abayomi); E. Stamatakis (Emmanuel); S. Stanworth (Simon); Stegemann, K. (Katrin); Steinbüchel, N. (Nicole); R. Stevens (Robert); W. Stewart (William); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); N. Stocchetti (Nino); Sundström, N. (Nina); Synnot, A. (Anneliese); J. Szabó (József); J. Söderberg (Jeannette); F.S. Taccone (Fabio); Tamás, V. (Viktória); Tanskanen, P. (Päivi); A. Tascu (Alexandru); Taylor, M.S. (Mark Steven); Te, A.B. (Ao Braden); O. Tenovuo (Olli); Teodorani, G. (Guido); A. Theadom (Alice); Thomas, M. (Matt); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.M. Tolias (Christos M.); Tshibanda, J.-F.L. (Jean-Flory Luaba); Tudora, C.M. (Cristina Maria); P. Vajkoczy (Peter); Valeinis, E. (Egils); Hecke, W.V. (Wim Van); Praag, D.V. (Dominique Van); Dirk, V.R. (Van Roost); Vlierberghe, E.V. (Eline Van); Vyvere, T.V. (Thijs vande); Vanhaudenhuyse, A. (Audrey); A. Vargiolu (Alessia); E. Vega (Emmanuel); J. Verheyden (Jan); Vespa, P.M. (Paul M.); A. Vik (Anne); R. Vilcinis (Rimantas); Vizzino, G. (Giacinta); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); V. Volovici (Victor); P. Vulekovic (Peter); Vámos, Z. (Zoltán); Wade, D. (Derick); Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K.W.); Wang, L. (Lei); E.D. Wildschut (Enno); G. Williams (Guy); Willumsen, L. (Lisette); Wilson, A. (Adam); Wilson, L. (Lindsay); Winkler, M.K.L. (Maren K.L.); P. Ylén (Peter); Younsi, A. (Alexander); M. Zaaroor (Menashe); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); Zheng, Z. (Zelong); Zumbo, F. (Fabrizio); de Lange, S. (Stefanie); G.C.W. De Ruiter (Godard C.W.); den Boogert, H. (Hugo); van Dijck, J. (Jeroen); T.A. van Essen (T.); C.M. van Heugten (Caroline M.); M. van der Jagt (Mathieu); J. van der Naalt (Joukje)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: No definitive evidence exists on how intracranial hypertension should be treated in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is therefore likely that centers and practitioners individually balance potential benefits and risks of different intracranial pressure (ICP)

  18. Surgical treatment of 137 cases with chronic subdural hematoma at the university clinical center of Kosovo during the period 2008?2012

    OpenAIRE

    Mekaj, Agon Y.; Morina, Arsim A.; Mekaj, Ymer H.; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Miftari, Ermira I.; Duci, Shkelzen B.; Hamza, Astrit R.; Gashi, Musli M.; Xhelaj, Mentor R.; Kelmendi, Fatos M.; Morina, Qamile Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is frequent pathology in neurosurgical practice. The aim of this study is to present the first series of patients with CSDH, who got surgically treated in Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study that included 137 patients with CSDH who had been treated during the period 2008-2012. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical...

  19. Gerald L. Epstein, PhD: director, center for science, technology, and security policy, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Interview by Madeline Drexler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Gerald L

    2009-12-01

    Over his entire career, Gerald Epstein has toiled at the nexus of science, technology, and security. From 2003 to 2009, he was Senior Fellow for Science and Security at the Center for Strategic and International Studies Homeland Security Program, where he worked on reducing biological weapons threats, improving national preparedness, and easing potential tensions between the scientific research and national security communities. Epstein came to CSIS from the Institute for Defense Analyses. From 1996 to 2001, he served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. And from 1983 to 1989, and again from 1991 until its demise in 1995, Epstein worked at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, where he directed a study on the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, alongside research on other global security topics. A recognized expert in biological risk reduction, Epstein was actually trained as a physicist, having received SB degrees in physics and electrical engineering from MIT, and a PhD in physics from the University of California at Berkeley. How, then, did he come to study the evolving threat from bioterrorism? "What compelled me about bioterrorism was that it was a stellar example of a topic that would lead to a train wreck between the scientific community and the security community unless they figured out how to work together," he said. "The distance between a laboratory and a very large consequence event is a lot shorter in biology than in any other field. I got into bioterrorism to help make sure that the security community doesn't get so scared of the science that it shuts it down, and that the science community isn't so oblivious of security concerns that it pays no attention to them." Epstein spoke on November 6, 2009, with contributing writer Madeline Drexler, author of Emerging Epidemics: The Menace of New Infections (Penguin, 2009), an updated version of an earlier volume. Drexler holds a visiting appointment at the

  20. Nutrition and physical activity randomized control trial in child care centers improves knowledge, policies, and children’s body mass index

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background To address the public health crisis of overweight and obese preschool-age children, the Nutrition And Physical Activity Self Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) intervention was delivered by nurse child care health consultants with the objective of improving child care provider and parent nutrition and physical activity knowledge, center-level nutrition and physical activity policies and practices, and children’s body mass index (BMI). Methods A seven-month randomized control trial was conducted in 17 licensed child care centers serving predominantly low income families in California, Connecticut, and North Carolina, including 137 child care providers and 552 families with racially and ethnically diverse children three to five years old. The NAP SACC intervention included educational workshops for child care providers and parents on nutrition and physical activity and consultation visits provided by trained nurse child care health consultants. Demographic characteristics and pre - and post-workshop knowledge surveys were completed by providers and parents. Blinded research assistants reviewed each center’s written health and safety policies, observed nutrition and physical activity practices, and measured randomly selected children’s nutritional intake, physical activity, and height and weight pre- and post-intervention. Results Hierarchical linear models and multiple regression models assessed individual- and center-level changes in knowledge, policies, practices and age- and sex-specific standardized body mass index (zBMI), controlling for state, parent education, and poverty level. Results showed significant increases in providers’ and parents’ knowledge of nutrition and physical activity, center-level improvements in policies, and child-level changes in children’s zBMI based on 209 children in the intervention and control centers at both pre- and post-intervention time points. Conclusions The NAP SACC intervention, as delivered by