WorldWideScience

Sample records for poleward heat transport

  1. Changing storm track diffusivity and the upper limit to poleward latent heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, R.

    2010-12-01

    Poleward atmospheric energy transport plays a key role in the climate system by helping set the mean equator-pole temperature gradient. The mechanisms controlling the response of poleward heat flux to climate change are still poorly understood. Recent work shows that midlatitude poleward latent heat flux in atmospheric GCMs generally increases as the climate warms but reaches an upper limit at sufficiently high temperature and decreases with further warming. The reasons for this non-monotonic behavior have remained unclear. Simple arguments suggests that the latent heat flux Fl should scale as Fl ˜ vref qs, where vref is a typical meridional velocity in the baroclinic zone and qs is saturation humidity. While vref decreases with temperature, qs increases much more rapidly, so this scaling implies monotonically increasing moisture flux. We study this problem using a series of simulations employing NCAR’s CAM3 GCM coupled to a slab-ocean aquaplanet and spanning a wide range of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We find that a modified scaling, Fl ˜ vref2 qs, describes the changes in moisture flux much more accurately. Using Lagrangian trajectory analysis, we explain the success of this scaling in terms of changes in the mixing length, which contracts proportionally to vref.

  2. Poleward energy transport: is the standard definition physically relevant at all time scales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Minyi; Czaja, Arnaud; Graversen, Rune; Tailleux, Remi

    2018-03-01

    Poleward energy transport in the atmosphere and oceans constitutes an important branch of the global energy budget, and its role in the climate system has been the subject of many studies. In the atmosphere, the transport is affected by "eddies" and large scale meridional cells, both with zero net mass transport across latitude circles, but also partly by processes associated with a net transport of mass across latitude circles. The latter must cease to operate in steady state, but they may be significant when time variability of the heat budget is considered. Indeed, examination of reanalysis data on short (daily to monthly) timescales shows that mass variations on these timescales result in surprisingly large fluctuations (in excess of 10^{15} W = 1 PW) in the poleward heat transport. These fluctuations are referred to as "extensive", for they primarily alter the mass integrated energy of the region considered, but not its averaged value. It is suggested that extensive fluctuations mask more meaningful climate signals present in the heat transport variability on monthly and interannual timescales, and a new formulation is proposed to isolate the latter. This new formulation is applied successfully to reanalysis data and climate model simulations.

  3. Poleward upgliding Siberian atmospheric rivers over sea ice heat up Arctic upper air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Kensuke K; Alexeev, Vladimir A; Repina, Irina A; Tachibana, Yoshihiro

    2018-02-13

    We carried out upper air measurements with radiosondes during the summer over the Arctic Ocean from an icebreaker moving poleward from an ice-free region, through the ice edge, and into a region of thick ice. Rapid warming of the Arctic is a significant environmental issue that occurs not only at the surface but also throughout the troposphere. In addition to the widely accepted mechanisms responsible for the increase of tropospheric warming during the summer over the Arctic, we showed a new potential contributing process to the increase, based on our direct observations and supporting numerical simulations and statistical analyses using a long-term reanalysis dataset. We refer to this new process as "Siberian Atmospheric Rivers (SARs)". Poleward upglides of SARs over cold air domes overlying sea ice provide the upper atmosphere with extra heat via condensation of water vapour. This heating drives increased buoyancy and further strengthens the ascent and heating of the mid-troposphere. This process requires the combination of SARs and sea ice as a land-ocean-atmosphere system, the implication being that large-scale heat and moisture transport from the lower latitudes can remotely amplify the warming of the Arctic troposphere in the summer.

  4. Lagrangian transport in poleward breaking Rossby waves in the North Atlantic - Europe tropopause region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, J.; Peters, D. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    The poleward advection of upper-tropospheric air is investigated for poleward Rossby wave breaking events. During boreal winter months the isentropic deformations of the tropopause are examined using maps of Ertel`s potential vorticity (EPV) and contour advection (CA) calculations. The role of ambient baro-tropic flow is further examined by idealized numerical models. In the vicinity of the tropopause the characteristic Lagrangian transport of air masses for ECMWF-analysis data are compared with high resolution (T106) ECHAM4 experiments. (author) 3 refs.

  5. Role of extratropical cyclones in the recently observed increase in poleward moisture transport into the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamil-Otero, Gian A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Juanxiong; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2018-01-01

    Poleward atmospheric moisture transport (AMT) into the Arctic Ocean can change atmospheric moisture or water vapor content and cause cloud formation and redistribution, which may change downward longwave radiation and, in turn, surface energy budgets, air temperatures, and sea-ice production and melt. In this study, we found a consistently enhanced poleward AMT across 60°N since 1959 based on the NCAR-NCEP reanalysis. Regional analysis demonstrates that the poleward AMT predominantly occurs over the North Atlantic and North Pacific regions, contributing about 57% and 32%, respectively, to the total transport. To improve our understanding of the driving force for this enhanced poleward AMT, we explored the role that extratropical cyclone activity may play. Climatologically, about 207 extratropical cyclones move across 60°N into the Arctic Ocean each year, among which about 66 (32% of the total) and 47 (23%) originate from the North Atlantic and North Pacific Ocean, respectively. When analyzing the linear trends of the time series constructed by using a 20-year running window, we found a positive correlation of 0.70 between poleward yearly AMT and the integrated cyclone activity index (measurement of cyclone intensity, number, and duration). This shows the consistent multidecadal changes between these two parameters and may suggest cyclone activity plays a driving role in the enhanced poleward AMT. Furthermore, a composite analysis indicates that intensification and poleward extension of the Icelandic low and accompanying strengthened cyclone activity play an important role in enhancing poleward AMT over the North Atlantic region.

  6. On the pattern of CO2 radiative forcing and poleward energy transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Xia, Yan; Tan, Xiaoxiao

    2017-10-01

    A set of general circulation model experiments are conducted to analyze how the poleward energy transport (PET) is related to the spatial pattern of CO2 radiative forcing. The effects of forcing pattern are affirmed by comparing the conventional doubling CO2 experiment, in which the forcing pattern is inhomogeneous, to a set of forcing homogenization experiments, in which the top of atmosphere (TOA), surface, or atmospheric forcing distribution is homogenized respectively. In addition, we separate and compare the effects of CO2 forcing to various feedbacks on atmospheric and oceanic PETs, by using a set of radiative kernels that we have developed for both TOA and surface radiation fluxes. The results here show that both the enhancement of atmospheric PET and weakening of oceanic PET during global warming are directly driven by the meridional gradients of the CO2 forcing. Interestingly, the overall feedback effect is to reinforce the forcing effect, mainly through the cloud feedback in the case of atmospheric PET and the albedo feedback in the case of the oceanic PET. Contrary to previous studies, we find that the water vapor feedback only has a weak effect on atmospheric PET. The Arctic warming amplification, which strongly affects atmospheric PET, is sensitive to the CO2 forcing pattern.

  7. A direct estimate of poleward volume, heat and fresh water flux at 59.5°N between Greenland and Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossby, Thomas; Reverdin, Gilles; Chafik, Leon; Søiland, Henrik

    2017-04-01

    The meridional overturning circulation (MOC) in the North Atlantic plays a major role in the transport of heat from low latitudes to high. In this study we combine recent measurements of currents from the surface to >700 m from a shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler on the Nuka Arctica, a freighter in regular service between Greenland and Denmark with Argo profiles (to 2000 m) to estimate poleward volume, heat and freshwater flux at 59.5°N between Greenland and Scotland. For the period late 2012 to early 2016 the de-seasoned mean meridional overturning circulation reaches a 14.9±1.7 Sv maximum at the σθ = 27.55 kg m-3 isopycnal, which varies in depth from near the surface in the western Irminger Sea to 1000 m in Rockall Trough. The surface to bottom transport has a -0.44 Sv (southward) residual, which is not significantly different from zero. The total heat and fresh water fluxes across 59.5°N = 307 PW and 0.15 Sv, both with a 12% uncertainty principally due to uncertainties of the MOC. Comparing this ADCP dataset with an earlier one of comparable size from 1999-2002 (to 400 m depth only) shows strikingly similar transports in both west and east of the Reykjanes Ridge suggesting at least for these two periods 13 years apart very little difference in the strength of the MOC.

  8. A direct estimate of poleward volume, heat, and freshwater fluxes at 59.5°N between Greenland and Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossby, T.; Reverdin, Gilles; Chafik, Leon; Søiland, Henrik

    2017-07-01

    The meridional overturning circulation (MOC) in the North Atlantic plays a major role in the transport of heat from low to high latitudes. In this study, we combine recent measurements of currents from the surface to >700 m from a shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler with Argo profiles (to 2000 m) to estimate poleward volume, heat, and freshwater flux at 59.5°N between Greenland and Scotland. This is made possible thanks to the vessel Nuka Arctica that operates on a 3 week schedule between Greenland and Denmark. For the period late 2012 to early 2016, the deseasoned mean meridional overturning circulation reaches a 18.4 ± 3.4 Sv maximum at the σθ = 27.55 kg m-3 isopycnal, which varies in depth from near the surface in the western Irminger Sea to 1000 m in Rockall Trough. The total heat and freshwater fluxes across 59.5°N = 399 ± 74 TW and -0.20 ± 0.04 Sv, where the uncertainties are principally due to that of the MOC. Analysis of altimetric sea surface height variations along exactly the same route reveals a somewhat stronger geostrophic flow north during this period compared to the 23 year mean suggesting that for a long-term mean the above flux estimates should be reduced slightly to 17.4 Sv, 377 TW, and -0.19 Sv, respectively, with the same estimate uncertainties. The ADCP program is ongoing.

  9. Paleoclassical electron heat transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Radial electron heat transport in low collisionality, magnetically-confined toroidal plasmas is shown to result from paleoclassical Coulomb collision processes (parallel electron heat conduction and magnetic field diffusion). In such plasmas the electron temperature equilibrates along magnetic field lines a long length L, which is the minimum of the electron collision length and a maximum effective half length of helical field lines. Thus, the diffusing field lines induce a radial electron heat diffusivity M ≅ L/(πR 0q ) ∼ 10 >> 1 times the magnetic field diffusivity η/μ 0 ≅ ν e (c/ω p ) 2 . The paleoclassical electron heat flux model provides interpretations for many features of 'anomalous' electron heat transport: magnitude and radial profile of electron heat diffusivity (in tokamaks, STs, and RFPs), Alcator scaling in high density plasmas, transport barriers around low order rational surfaces and near a separatrix, and a natural heat pinch (or minimum temperature gradient) heat flux form. (author)

  10. Heat transport and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despois, J.

    1977-01-01

    Recalling the close connections existing between heat transport and storage, some general considerations on the problem of heat distribution and transport are presented 'in order to set out the problem' of storage in concrete form. This problem is considered in its overall plane, then studied under the angle of the different technical choices it involves. The two alternatives currently in consideration are described i.e.: storage in a mined cavity and underground storage as captive sheet [fr

  11. The effect of the low-level jet on the poleward water vapour transport in the central region of South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berri, Guillermo J.; Inzunza, Juan B.

    The low-level jet (LLJ) in the central region of South America is studied. This LLJ is generated by the daily cycle of convergence and divergence east of the Andes Mountains. We use the 1973-1974 radiosonde and pilot balloon data set from the upper air weather stations, Salta and Resistencia, in northern Argentina to select 10 LLJ cases and another 10 NoLLJ cases (when the LLJ is not present). We use the University of Utah Mesoscale Model to simulate these situations in order to obtain a high-resolution low-level wind field. These model predictions are then used to calculate the meridional water vapour transport across a vertical cross-section, along 26°S in central South America. The results reveal that the LLJs are a very effective mechanism for the poleward water vapour transport.

  12. Heat transport through atomic contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosso, Nico; Drechsler, Ute; Menges, Fabian; Nirmalraj, Peter; Karg, Siegfried; Riel, Heike; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2017-05-01

    Heat transport and dissipation at the nanoscale severely limit the scaling of high-performance electronic devices and circuits. Metallic atomic junctions serve as model systems to probe electrical and thermal transport down to the atomic level as well as quantum effects that occur in one-dimensional (1D) systems. Whereas charge transport in atomic junctions has been studied intensively in the past two decades, heat transport remains poorly characterized because it requires the combination of a high sensitivity to small heat fluxes and the formation of stable atomic contacts. Here we report heat-transfer measurements through atomic junctions and analyse the thermal conductance of single-atom gold contacts at room temperature. Simultaneous measurements of charge and heat transport reveal the proportionality of electrical and thermal conductance, quantized with the respective conductance quanta. This constitutes a verification of the Wiedemann-Franz law at the atomic scale.

  13. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  14. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  15. Heat transport the cold way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    A novel system for long-distance heat transport is being born in the 'Kernforschungsanlage Juelich' with the project being called 'Nukleare Fernenergie' (nuclear district energy). The project is also known as 'EVA/ADAM' [EVA = Einzelrohr-Versuchs-Anlage (single tube test facility); ADAM = Anlage mit Drei Adiabaten Methanisierungsreaktoren (plant provided with three adiabate methanising reactors)] and is based in principle on transport of energy in chemical bond within a closed loop. In the 60ies already this development was discussed both in the 'Kernforschungsanlage Juelich' and in the 'Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke' independent of each other. In 1975 these two organizations concluded a co-operation contract. (orig.) [de

  16. Transport processes: Momentum, heat and mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geankoplis, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book discusses basic transport processes including mass transport. Topics covered are as follows: an introduction to engineering principles and units; principles of momentum transfer and overall balances; principles of momentum transfer and applications; principles of steady-state heat transfer; principles of unsteady-state heat transfer; principles of mass transfer; principles of unsteady-state and convective mass transfer

  17. The poleward shift of storm tracks under global warming: A Lagrangian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarin, T.; Kaspi, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Comprehensive models of climate change projections have shown that the latitudinal band of extratropical storms will likely shift poleward under global warming. Here we study this poleward shift from a Lagrangian storm perspective, through simulations with an idealized general circulation model. By employing a feature tracking technique to identify the storms, we demonstrate that the poleward motion of individual cyclones increases with increasing global mean temperature. A potential vorticity tendency analysis of the cyclone composites highlights two leading mechanisms responsible for enhanced poleward motion: nonlinear horizontal advection and diabatic heating associated with latent heat release. Our results imply that for a 4 K rise in the global mean surface temperature, the mean poleward displacement of cyclones increases by about 0.85° of latitude, and this occurs in addition to a poleward shift of about 0.6° in their mean genesis latitude. Changes in cyclone tracks may have a significant impact on midlatitude climate, especially in localized storm tracks such as the Atlantic and Pacific storm tracks, which may exhibit a more poleward deflected shape.

  18. Particle and heat transport in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelier, M.

    1984-01-01

    A limitation to performances of tokamaks is heat transport through magnetic surfaces. Principles of ''classical'' or ''neoclassical'' transport -i.e. transport due to particle and heat fluxes due to Coulomb scattering of charged particle in a magnetic field- are exposed. It is shown that beside this classical effect, ''anomalous'' transport occurs; it is associated to the existence of fluctuating electric or magnetic fields which can appear in the plasma as a result of charge and current perturbations. Tearing modes and drift wave instabilities are taken as typical examples. Experimental features are presented which show that ions behave approximately in a classical way whereas electrons are strongly anomalous [fr

  19. Mesoscale Eddies in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean: Three-Dimensional Eddy Structures and Heat/Salt Transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Di; Brandt, Peter; Chang, Ping; Schütte, Florian; Yang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Jinhui; Zeng, Jisheng

    2017-12-01

    The region encompassing the Kuroshio Extension (KE) in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean (25°N-45°N and 130°E-180°E) is one of the most eddy-energetic regions of the global ocean. The three-dimensional structures and transports of mesoscale eddies in this region are comprehensively investigated by combined use of satellite data and Argo profiles. With the allocation of Argo profiles inside detected eddies, the spatial variations of structures of eddy temperature and salinity anomalies are analyzed. The results show that eddies predominantly have subsurface (near-surface) intensified temperature and salinity anomalies south (north) of the KE jet, which is related to different background stratifications between these regions. A new method based on eddy trajectories and the inferred three-dimensional eddy structures is proposed to estimate heat and salt transports by eddy movements in a Lagrangian framework. Spatial distributions of eddy transports are presented over the vicinity of the KE for the first time. The magnitude of eddy-induced meridional heat (freshwater volume) transport is on the order of 0.01 PW (103 m3/s). The eddy heat transport divergence results in an oceanic heat loss south and heat gain north of the KE, thereby reinforcing and counteracting the oceanic heat loss from air-sea fluxes south and north of the KE jet, respectively. It also suggests a poleward heat transport across the KE jet due to eddy propagation.

  20. Ion heat transport studies in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P; Angioni, C; Baiocchi, B

    2011-01-01

    Detailed experimental studies of ion heat transport have been carried out in JET exploiting the upgrade of active charge exchange spectroscopy and the availability of multi-frequency ion cyclotron resonance heating with 3He minority. The determination of ion temperature gradient (ITG) threshold...

  1. Atmospheric Compensation of Variations in Tropical Ocean Heat Transport: Understanding Mechanisms and Implications on Tectonic Timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rencurrel, M. C.; Rose, B. E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The poleward transport of energy is a key aspect of the climate system, with surface ocean currents presently dominating the transport out of deep tropics. A classic study by Stone (1978) proposed that the total heat transport is determined by astronomical parameters and is highly insensitive to the detailed atmosphere-ocean dynamics. On the other hand, previous modeling work has shown that past continental configurations could have produced substantially different tropical ocean heat transport (OHT). How thoroughly does the atmosphere compensate for changes in ocean transport in terms of the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative budget, what are the relevant mechanisms, and what are the consequences for surface temperature and climate on tectonic timescales? We examine these issues in a suite of aquaplanet GCM simulations subject to large prescribed variations in OHT. We find substantial but incomplete compensation, in which adjustment of the atmospheric Hadley circulation plays a key role. We then separate out the dynamical and thermodynamical components of the adjustment mechanism. Increased OHT tends to warm the mid- to high latitudes without cooling the tropics due asymmetries in radiative feedback processes. The warming is accompanied by hydrological cycle changes that are completely different from those driven by greenhouse gases, suggesting that drivers of past global change might be detectable from combinations of hydroclimate and temperature proxies.

  2. ECRH and electron heat transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, X.L.; Giruzzi, G.; Dumont, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been observed during the ECRH experiments in tokamaks that the shape of the electron temperature profile in stationary regimes is not very sensitive to the ECRH power deposition i.e. the temperature profile remains peaked at the center even though the ECRH power deposition is off-axis. Various models have been invoked for the interpretation of this profile resilience phenomenon: the inward heat pinch, the critical temperature gradient, the Self-Organized Criticality, etc. Except the pinch effect, all of these models need a specific form of the diffusivity in the heat transport equation. In this work, our approach is to solve a simplified time-dependent heat transport equation analytically in cylindrical geometry. The features of this analytical solution are analyzed, in particular the relationship between the temperature profile resilience and the Eigenmode of the physical system with respect to the heat transport phenomenon. Finally, applications of this analytical solution for the determination of the transport coefficient and the polarization of the EC waves are presented. It has been shown that the solution of the simplified transport equation in a finite cylinder is a Fourier-Bessel series. This series represents in fact a decomposition of the heat source in Eigenmode, which are characterized by the Bessel functions of order 0. The physical interpretation of the Eigenmodes is the following: when the heat source is given by a Bessel function of order 0, the temperature profile has exactly the same form as the source at every time. At the beginning of the power injection, the effectiveness of the temperature response is the same for each Eigenmode, and the response in temperature, having the same form as the source, is local. Conversely, in the later phase of the evolution, the effectiveness of the temperature response for each Eigenmode is different: the higher the order, the lower the effectiveness. In this case the response in temperature appears as

  3. Heat Transfer in Directional Water Transport Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Directional water transport fabrics can proactively transfer moisture from the body. They show great potential in making sportswear and summer clothing. While moisture transfer has been previously reported, heat transfer in directional water transport fabrics has been little reported in research literature. In this study, a directional water transport fabric was prepared using an electrospraying technique and its heat transfer properties under dry and wet states were evaluated, and compared with untreated control fabric and the one pre-treated with NaOH. All the fabric samples showed similar heat transfer features in the dry state, and the equilibrium temperature in the dry state was higher than for the wet state. Wetting considerably enhanced the thermal conductivity of the fabrics. Our studies indicate that directional water transport treatment assists in moving water toward one side of the fabric, but has little effect on thermal transfer performance. This study may be useful for development of “smart” textiles for various applications.

  4. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  5. Poleward intrusion in the northern Galician shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, I.; Ospina-Alvarez, N.; deCastro, M.; Varela, M.; Gomez-Gesteira, M.; Prego, R.

    2010-05-01

    The evolution of a warm water mass related to the Iberian Poleward Current (IPC) was characterized along the northern Galician shelf in November 2008 by means of Sea Surface Temperature and wind data. It was observed that under upwelling favorable conditions water temperature decreased along the northern coast and a temperature break appeared between Cape Vilano and Cape Ortegal showing a relaxation of the poleward intrusion. The effect of the IPC was also analyzed inside the Northern Galician Rias taking into account the hydrographical and biogeochemical properties measured on November 18. Water driven by the IPC was observed close to the mouth of the rias, around Cape Estaca de Bares, causing a nutrient salts decrease. Inside the rias a slight biological activity was found near surface resulting from fluvial contributions.

  6. One-Loop Operation of Primary Heat Transport System in MONJU During Heat Transport System Modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, T.; Tsushima, H.; Sakurai, N.; Jo, T.

    2006-01-01

    MONJU is a prototype fast breeder reactor (FBR). Modification work commenced in March 2005. Since June 2004, MONJU has changed to one-loop operation of the primary heat transport system (PHTS) with all of the secondary heat transport systems (SHTS) drained of sodium. The purposes of this change are to shorten the modification period and to reduce the cost incurred for circuit trace heating electrical consumption. Before changing condition, the following issues were investigated to show that this mode of operation was possible. The heat loss from the reactor vessel and the single primary loop must exceed the decay heat by an acceptable margin but the capacity of pre-heaters to keep the sodium within the primary vessel at about 200 deg. C must be maintained. With regard to the heat loss and the decay heat, the estimated heat loss in the primary system was in the range of 90-170 kW in one-loop operation, and the calculated decay heat was 21.2 kW. Although the heat input of the primary pump was considered, it was clear that circuit heat loss greatly exceeded the decay heat. As for pre-heaters, effective capacity was less than the heat loss. Therefore, the temperature of the reactor vessel room was raised to reduce the heat loss. One-loop operation of the PHTS was able to be executed by means of these measures. The cost of electrical consumption in the power plant has been reduced by one-loop operation of the PHTS and the modification period was shortened. (authors)

  7. TOUGH, Unsaturated Groundwater Transport and Heat Transport Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.A.; Cooper, C.; Osnes, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: A successor to the TOUGH program, TOUGH2 offers added capabilities and user features, including the flexibility to handle different fluid mixtures (water, water with tracer; water, CO 2 ; water, air; water, air with vapour pressure lowering, and water, hydrogen), facilities for processing of geometric data (computational grids), and an internal version control system to ensure referenceability of code applications. TOUGH (Transport of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat) is a multi-dimensional numerical model for simulating the coupled transport of water, vapor, air, and heat in porous and fractured media. The program provides options for specifying injection or withdrawal of heat and fluids. Although primarily designed for studies of high-level nuclear waste isolation in partially saturated geological media, it should also be useful for a wider range of problems in heat and moisture transfer, and in the drying of porous materials. For example, geothermal reservoir simulation problems can be handled simply by setting the air mass function equal to zero on input. The TOUGH simulator was developed for problems involving strongly heat-driven flow. To describe these phenomena a multi-phase approach to fluid and heat flow is used, which fully accounts for the movement of gaseous and liquid phases, their transport of latent transitions between liquid and vapor. TOUGH takes account of fluid flow in both liquid and gaseous phases occurring under pressure, viscous, and gravity forces according to Darcy's law. Interference between the phases is represented by means of relative permeability functions. The code handles binary, but not Knudsen, diffusion in the gas phase and capillary and phase absorption effects for the liquid phase. Heat transport occurs by means of conduction with thermal conductivity dependent on water saturation, convection, and binary diffusion, which includes both sensible and latent heat. 2 - Method of solution: All

  8. Crop pests and pathogens move polewards in a warming world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebber, Daniel P.; Ramotowski, Mark A. T.; Gurr, Sarah J.

    2013-11-01

    Global food security is threatened by the emergence and spread of crop pests and pathogens. Spread is facilitated primarily by human transportation, but there is increasing concern that climate change allows establishment in hitherto unsuitable regions. However, interactions between climate change, crops and pests are complex, and the extent to which crop pests and pathogens have altered their latitudinal ranges in response to global warming is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate an average poleward shift of 2.7+/-0.8kmyr-1 since 1960, in observations of hundreds of pests and pathogens, but with significant variation in trends among taxonomic groups. Observational bias, where developed countries at high latitudes detect pests earlier than developing countries at low latitudes, would result in an apparent shift towards the Equator. The observed positive latitudinal trends in many taxa support the hypothesis of global warming-driven pest movement.

  9. Ultimate heat sink and directly associated heat transport systems for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The scope of the Guide covers design considerations for various types of ultimate heat sinks (UHS) and directly associated heat transport systems, and for types and sources of related heat transport fluids. The scope encompasses the conditions for using the UHS for reactor safety following postulated initiating events, as well as its selection, sizing and reliability

  10. Heat in the Barents Sea: transport, storage, and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Smedsrud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A column model is set up for the Barents Sea to explore sensitivity of surface fluxes and heat storage from varying ocean heat transport. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force the simulations. Results show that by using updated ocean transports of heat and freshwater the vertical mean hydrographic seasonal cycle can be reproduced fairly well.

    Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production.

    The northern Barents Sea receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss annually in the north. The balance is achieved by a heat loss through long wave radiation all year, removing most of the summer solar heating.

    During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. The Barents Sea responds to such large changes by adjusting temperature and heat loss. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  11. Source effects on impurity and heat transport in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.B.

    1980-12-01

    A recently developed generalization of neoclassical theory is extended here to study heat flux contributions to impurity transport, as well as the heat fluxes themselves. The theory accounts for the first four source moments, with external drags, which has been studied previously with either fewer moments or restricted to a collisional plasma. Conditions are established for which a momentum source may be used to modify the particle and heat transport. In the course of this work, the particle and heat transport is evaluated for a two species plasma with arbitrary plasma geometry, beta, and collisionality

  12. Reliability of CANDU heat transport pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earl, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    While CANDU heat transport pumps are effectively demonstrating their reliability in the most reliable reactors in the world, the current level of reliability was only achieved after ongoing refinements to the original design. Each design modification was initiated in response to a problem, with reliability taking precedence over cost and efficiency so that each modification has predictably increased pump reliability. Seal reliability, a problem with most large, high temperature pumps, has through an extensive research and development program been improved to a point where a reliable lifetime of about five years can be expected. Co-operative research and development programs at bearing manufacturers facilities and at AECL's Engineering Laboratory have resulted in no bearing related pump incapabilities at either Pickering or Bruce nuclear generating stations. Motor windings, a source of unreliability at the Bruce station, have been improved through the introduction of better turn insulation and additional surge protection. Refinements to the current pump design will continue and AECL is placing particular emphasis on evaluating pump performance in post-LOCA conditions. (orig.)

  13. Upgrading primary heat transport pump seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, T.; Metcalfe, R.; Rhodes, D.; McInnes, D.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the operating environment at the Bruce-A Nuclear Generating Station created the need for an upgraded Primary Heat Transport Pump (PHTP) seal. In particular, the requirement for low pressure running during more frequent start-ups exposed a weakness of the CAN2 seal and reduced its reliability. The primary concern at Bruce-A was the rotation of the CAN2 No. 2 stators in their holders. The introduction of low pressure running exacerbated this problem, giving rapid wear of the stator back face, overheating, and thermocracking. In addition, the resulting increase in friction between the stator and its holder increased stationary-side hysteresis and thereby changed the seal characteristic to the point where interseal pressure oscillations became prevalent. The resultant increased hysteresis also led to hard rubbing of the seal faces during temperature transients. An upgraded seal was required for improved reliability to avoid forced outages and to reduce maintenance costs. This paper describes this upgraded 'replacement seal' and its performance history. In spite of the 'teething' problems detailed in this paper, there have been no forced outages due to the replacement seal, and in the words of a seal maintenance worker at Bruce-A, 'it allows me to go home and sleep at night instead of worrying about seal failures.' (author)

  14. Carbon nanostructured surfaces for enhanced heat transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high performance thermal systems has stimulated interest in methods to improve heat transfer rates. Considerable efforts have been made to increase heat transfer rates by implementing passive convective heat transfer enhancement methods that require no direct consumption of

  15. Heat-pipe heat transport system for Stirling space power converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alger, Donald L.

    Life issues relating to a sodium-heat-pipe heat transport system are discussed. The heat-pipe system provides heat, at a temperature of 1050 K, to a 50-kWe Stirling engine/linear alternator power converter called the Stirling space power converter. Because corrosion of heat-pipe materials in contact with sodium can affect the life of the heat pipe, a literature review of sodium corrosion processes was performed. It was found that impurity reactions, primarily oxygen, and dissolution of alloy elements were the two corrosion processes likely to be operative in the heat pipe. Approaches that are being taken to minmize these corrosion processes are discussed.

  16. Experimental Study of Heat Transport in Fractured Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Nicola; Cherubini, Claudia; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicoletta M.; Redondo, Jose M.; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2015-04-01

    Fractured rocks play an important role in transport of natural resources or contaminants transport through subsurface systems. In recent years, interest has grown in investigating heat transport by means of tracer tests, driven by the important current development of geothermal applications. In literature different methods are available for predicting thermal breakthrough in fractured reservoirs based on the information coming from tracer tests. Geothermal energy is one of the largest sources of renewable energies that are extracted from the earth. The growing interest in this new energy source has stimulated attempts to develop methods and technologies for extracting energy also from ground resource at low temperature. An example is the exploitation of low enthalpy geothermal energy that can be obtained at any place with the aid of ground-source heat pump system from the soil, rock and groundwater. In such geothermal systems the fluid movement and thermal behavior in the fractured porous media is very important and critical. Existing theory of fluid flow and heat transport through porous media is of limited usefulness when applied to fractured rocks. Many field and laboratory tracer tests in fractured media show that fracture -matrix exchange is more significant for heat than mass tracers, thus thermal breakthrough curves (BTCs) are strongly controlled by matrix thermal diffusivity. In this study the behaviour of heat transport in a fractured network at bench scale has been investigated. Heat tracer tests on an artificially created fractured rock sample have been carried out. The observed thermal BTCs obtained with six thermocouple probes located at different locations in the fractured medium have been modeled with the Explicit Network Model (ENM) based an adaptation of Tang's solution for solute transport in a semi-infinite single fracture embedded in a porous matrix. The ENM model is able to represent the behavior of observed heat transport except where the

  17. Heat transport in closed cell aluminum foams: application notes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, Jaime; Escudero, Javier; Solorzano, Eusebio; Rodriguez-Perez, Miguel A.; Saja, Jose A. de [Cellular Materials Group (CellMat), Condensed Matter Physics Department, University of Valladolid (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    Heat transport equations have been used to solve, by implementing the Finite Element Method (FEM), three different cases representative of the aluminium foams life: the production process (solidification in the molten state), post-production (water quenching heat treatments) and applications (fire barriers). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years

  19. Consequences of nonlinear heat transport laws on expected plasma profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, K.

    1987-03-01

    The expected variation of plasma pressure profiles against changes in power deposition is investigated by using a simple linear heat transport law as well as a quadratic one. Applying the quadratic transport law it can be shown that the stiffening of the resulting profiles is sufficient to understand the experimentally measured phenomenon of 'profile consistence' without further assumptions of nonlocal effects. (orig.) [de

  20. Heat and Moisture transport of socks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komárková, P.; Glombíková, V.; Havelka, A.

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the liquid moisture transport and thermal properties is essential for understanding physiological comfort of clothes. This study reports on an experimental investigation of moisture management transport and thermal transport on the physiological comfort of commercially available socks. There are subjective evaluation and objective measurements. Subjective evaluation of the physiological comfort of socks is based on individual sensory perception of probands during and after physical exertion. Objective measurements were performed according to standardized methods using Moisture Management tester for measuring the humidity parameters and C-term TCi analyzer for thermal conductivity and thermal effusivity. The obtained values of liquid moisture transport and thermal properties were related to the material composition and structure of the tested socks. In summary, these results show that objective measurement corresponds with probands feelings.

  1. High efficiency heat transport and power conversion system for cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, I.; Bourque, R.F.; Creedon, R.L.; Schultz, K.R.

    1985-02-01

    The Cascade ICF reactor features a flowing blanket of solid BeO and LiAlO 2 granules with very high temperature capability (up to approx. 2300 K). The authors present here the design of a high temperature granule transport and heat exchange system, and two options for high efficiency power conversion. The centrifugal-throw transport system uses the peripheral speed imparted to the granules by the rotating chamber to effect granule transport and requires no additional equipment. The heat exchanger design is a vacuum heat transfer concept utilizing gravity-induced flow of the granules over ceramic heat exchange surfaces. A reference Brayton power cycle is presented which achieves 55% net efficiency with 1300 K peak helium temperature. A modified Field steam cycle (a hybrid Rankine/Brayton cycle) is presented as an alternate which achieves 56% net efficiency

  2. Phonon hydrodynamics for nanoscale heat transport at ordinary temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2018-01-01

    The classical Fourier's law fails in extremely small and ultrafast heat conduction even at ordinary temperatures due to strong thermodynamic nonequilibrium effects. In this work, a macroscopic phonon hydrodynamic equation beyond Fourier's law with a relaxation term and nonlocal terms is derived through a perturbation expansion to the phonon Boltzmann equation around a four-moment nonequilibrium solution. The temperature jump and heat flux tangential retardant boundary conditions are developed based on the Maxwell model of the phonon-boundary interaction. Extensive steady-state and transient nanoscale heat transport cases are modeled by the phonon hydrodynamic model, which produces quantitative predictions in good agreement with available phonon Boltzmann equation solutions and experimental results. The phonon hydrodynamic model provides a simple and elegant mathematical description of non-Fourier heat conduction with a clear and intuitive physical picture. The present work will promote deeper understanding and macroscopic modeling of heat transport in extreme states.

  3. Phonon heat transport in gallium arsenide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy linewidth is found to be an extremely sensitive quantity in the transport phenomena of crystalline solids as a collection of large number of scattering processes, namely, boundary scattering, impurity scattering, multiphonon scattering, interference scattering, electron–phonon processes and resonance scattering.

  4. Passive heat transport in advanced CANDU containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, M.; Mathew, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    A passive CANDU containment design has been proposed to provide the necessary heat removal following a postulated accident to maintain containment integrity. To study its feasibility and to optimize the design, multi-dimensional containment modelling may be required. This paper presents a comparison of two CFD codes, GOTHIC and PHOENICS, for multi-dimensional containment analysis and gives pressure transient predictions from a lumped-parameter and a three-dimensional GOTHIC model for a modified CANDU-3 containment. GOTHIC proved suitable for multidimensional post-accident containment analysis, as shown by the good agreement with pressure transient predictions from PHOENICS. GOTHIC is, therefore, recommended for passive CANDU containment modelling. (author)

  5. Generalized heat-transport equations: parabolic and hyperbolic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogolino, Patrizia; Kovács, Robert; Ván, Peter; Cimmelli, Vito Antonio

    2018-03-01

    We derive two different generalized heat-transport equations: the most general one, of the first order in time and second order in space, encompasses some well-known heat equations and describes the hyperbolic regime in the absence of nonlocal effects. Another, less general, of the second order in time and fourth order in space, is able to describe hyperbolic heat conduction also in the presence of nonlocal effects. We investigate the thermodynamic compatibility of both models by applying some generalizations of the classical Liu and Coleman-Noll procedures. In both cases, constitutive equations for the entropy and for the entropy flux are obtained. For the second model, we consider a heat-transport equation which includes nonlocal terms and study the resulting set of balance laws, proving that the corresponding thermal perturbations propagate with finite speed.

  6. Heat pipe heat transport system for the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alger, Donald L.

    1992-08-01

    Life issues relating to a sodium heat pipe heat transport system are described. The heat pipe system provides heat, at a temperature of 1050 K, to a 50 kWe Stirling engine/linear alternator power converter called the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC). The converter is being developed under a National Aeronautics and Space Administration program. Since corrosion of heat pipe materials in contact with sodium can impact the life of the heat pipe, a literature review of sodium corrosion processes was performed. It was found that the impurity reactions, primarily oxygen, and dissolution of alloy elements were the two corrosion process likely to be operative in the heat pipe. Approaches that are being taken to minimize these corrosion processes are discussed.

  7. Thermodynamic framework for a generalized heat transport equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yangyu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a generalized heat transport equation including relaxational, nonlocal and nonlinear effects is provided, which contains diverse previous phenomenological models as particular cases. The aim of the present work is to establish an extended irreversible thermodynamic framework, with generalized expressions of entropy and entropy flux. Nonlinear thermodynamic force-flux relation is proposed as an extension of the usual linear one, giving rise to the nonlinear terms in the heat transport equation and ensuring compatibility with the second law. Several previous results are recovered in the linear case, and some additional results related to nonlinear terms are also obtained.

  8. Phonon hydrodynamics and its applications in nanoscale heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2015-09-01

    Phonon hydrodynamics is an effective macroscopic method to study heat transport in dielectric solid and semiconductor. It has a clear and intuitive physical picture, transforming the abstract and ambiguous heat transport process into a concrete and evident process of phonon gas flow. Furthermore, with the aid of the abundant models and methods developed in classical hydrodynamics, phonon hydrodynamics becomes much easier to implement in comparison to the current popular approaches based on the first-principle method and kinetic theories involving complicated computations. Therefore, it is a promising tool for studying micro- and nanoscale heat transport in rapidly developing micro and nano science and technology. However, there still lacks a comprehensive account of the theoretical foundations, development and implementation of this approach. This work represents such an attempt in providing a full landscape, from physical fundamental and kinetic theory of phonons to phonon hydrodynamics in view of descriptions of phonon systems at microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic levels. Thus a systematical kinetic framework, summing up so far scattered theoretical models and methods in phonon hydrodynamics as individual cases, is established through a frame of a Chapman-Enskog solution to phonon Boltzmann equation. Then the basic tenets and procedures in implementing phonon hydrodynamics in nanoscale heat transport are presented through a review of its recent wide applications in modeling thermal transport properties of nanostructures. Finally, we discuss some pending questions and perspectives highlighted by a novel concept of generalized phonon hydrodynamics and possible applications in micro/nano phononics, which will shed more light on more profound understanding and credible applications of this new approach in micro- and nanoscale heat transport science.

  9. Magnetic-field asymmetry of nonlinear thermoelectric and heat transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sun-Yong; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Lee, Minchul

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear transport coefficients do not obey, in general, reciprocity relations. We here discuss the magnetic-field asymmetries that arise in thermoelectric and heat transport of mesoscopic systems. Based on a scattering theory of weakly nonlinear transport, we analyze the leading-order symmetry parameters in terms of the screening potential response to either voltage or temperature shifts. We apply our general results to a quantum Hall antidot system. Interestingly, we find that certain symmetry parameters show a dependence on the measurement configuration. (paper)

  10. Ductile fracture behaviour of primary heat transport piping material ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    1. Introduction. The design of primary heat transport piping (PHT) of nuclear reactors has to ensure that uncontrolled failure does not occur under normal, faulted or accidental service conditions. One of the most severe failure scenarios traditionally envisaged is instantaneous double-ended guillotine break (DEGB), which ...

  11. FFTF Heat Transport System (HTS) component and system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.W.; Edwards, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    The FFTF Heat Transport Systems and Components designs have been completed and successfully tested at isothermal conditions up to 427 0 C (800 0 F). General performance has been as predicted in the design analyses. Operational flexibility and reliability have been outstanding throughout the test program. The components and systems have been demonstrated ready to support reactor powered operation testing planned later in 1980

  12. Enhanced poleward propagation of storms under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarin-Brodsky, Talia; Kaspi, Yohai

    2017-12-01

    Earth's midlatitudes are dominated by regions of large atmospheric weather variability—often referred to as storm tracks— which influence the distribution of temperature, precipitation and wind in the extratropics. Comprehensive climate models forced by increased greenhouse gas emissions suggest that under global warming the storm tracks shift poleward. While the poleward shift is a robust response across most models, there is currently no consensus on what the underlying dynamical mechanism is. Here we present a new perspective on the poleward shift, which is based on a Lagrangian view of the storm tracks. We show that in addition to a poleward shift in the genesis latitude of the storms, associated with the shift in baroclinicity, the latitudinal displacement of cyclonic storms increases under global warming. This is achieved by applying a storm-tracking algorithm to an ensemble of CMIP5 models. The increased latitudinal propagation in a warmer climate is shown to be a result of stronger upper-level winds and increased atmospheric water vapour. These changes in the propagation characteristics of the storms can have a significant impact on midlatitude climate.

  13. Is Climate Change Shifting the Poleward Limit of Mangroves?

    KAUST Repository

    Hickey, Sharyn M.

    2017-02-01

    Ecological (poleward) regime shifts are a predicted response to climate change and have been well documented in terrestrial and more recently ocean species. Coastal zones are amongst the most susceptible ecosystems to the impacts of climate change, yet studies particularly focused on mangroves are lacking. Recent studies have highlighted the critical ecosystem services mangroves provide, yet there is a lack of data on temporal global population response. This study tests the notion that mangroves are migrating poleward at their biogeographical limits across the globe in line with climate change. A coupled systematic approach utilising literature and land surface and air temperature data was used to determine and validate the global poleward extent of the mangrove population. Our findings indicate that whilst temperature (land and air) have both increased across the analysed time periods, the data we located showed that mangroves were not consistently extending their latitudinal range across the globe. Mangroves, unlike other marine and terrestrial taxa, do not appear to be experiencing a poleward range expansion despite warming occurring at the present distributional limits. Understanding failure for mangroves to realise the global expansion facilitated by climate warming may require a focus on local constraints, including local anthropogenic pressures and impacts, oceanographic, hydrological, and topographical conditions.

  14. Latent heat transport and microlayer evaporation in nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawurek, H.H.

    1977-08-01

    Part 1 of this work provides a broad overview and, where possible, a quantitative assessment of the complex physical processes which together constitute the mechanism of nucleate boiling heat transfer. It is shown that under a wide range of conditions the primary surface-to-liquid heat flows within an area of bubble influence are so redistributed as to manifest themselves predominantly as latent heat transport, that is, as vaporisation into attached bubbles. Part 2 deals in greater detail with one of the component processes of latent heat transport, namely microlayer evaporation. A literature review reveals the need for synchronised records of microlayer geometry versus time and of normal bubble growth and departure. An apparatus developed to provide such records is described. High-speed cine interference photography from beneath and through a transparent heating surface provided details of microlayer geometry and an image reflection system synchronised these records with the bubble profile views. Results are given for methanol and ethanol boiling at sub-atmospheric pressures and at various heat fluxes and bulk subcoolings. In all cases it is found that microlayers were of sub-micron thickness, that microlayer thinning was restricted to the inner layer edge (with the thickness elsewhere remaining constant or increasing with time) and that the contribution of this visible evaporation to the total vapour flow into bubbles was negligible. The observation of thickening towards the outer microlayer edge, however, demonstrates that a liquid replenishment flow occurred simultaneously with the evaporation process

  15. Changes in ocean vertical heat transport with global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zika, Jan D.; Laliberté, Frédéric; Mudryk, Lawrence R.; Sijp, Willem P.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2015-06-01

    Heat transport between the surface and deep ocean strongly influences transient climate change. Mechanisms setting this transport are investigated using coupled climate models and by projecting ocean circulation into the temperature-depth diagram. In this diagram, a "cold cell" cools the deep ocean through the downwelling of Antarctic waters and upwelling of warmer waters and is balanced by warming due to a "warm cell," coincident with the interhemispheric overturning and previously linked to wind and haline forcing. With anthropogenic warming, the cold cell collapses while the warm cell continues to warm the deep ocean. Simulations with increasingly strong warm cells, set by their mean Southern Hemisphere winds, exhibit increasing deep-ocean warming in response to the same anthropogenic forcing. It is argued that the partition between components of the circulation which cool and warm the deep ocean in the preindustrial climate is a key determinant of ocean vertical heat transport with global warming.

  16. Perturbative Heat Transport Experiments on TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguilor, S.; Castejon, F.; Luna, E. de la; Cappa, A.; Likin, K.; Fernandez, A.; Tj-II, T.

    2002-01-01

    Heat wave experiments are performed on TJ-II stellarator plasmas to estimate both heat diffusivity and power deposition profiles. High frequency ECRH modulation experiments are used to obtain the power deposition profiles, which is observed to be wider and duller than estimated by tracing techniques. The causes of this difference are discussed in the paper. Fourier analysis techniques are used to estimate the heat diffusivity in low frequency ECRH modulation experiments. This include the power deposition profile as a new ingredient. ECHR switch on/off experiments are exploited to obtain power deposition and heat diffusivities profile. Those quantities are compared with the obtained by modulation experiments and transport analysis, showing a good agreement. (Author) 18 refs

  17. Is the poleward migration of tropical cyclone maximum intensity associated with a poleward migration of tropical cyclone genesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daloz, Anne Sophie; Camargo, Suzana J.

    2018-01-01

    A recent study showed that the global average latitude where tropical cyclones achieve their lifetime-maximum intensity has been migrating poleward at a rate of about one-half degree of latitude per decade over the last 30 years in each hemisphere. However, it does not answer a critical question: is the poleward migration of tropical cyclone lifetime-maximum intensity associated with a poleward migration of tropical cyclone genesis? In this study we will examine this question. First we analyze changes in the environmental variables associated with tropical cyclone genesis, namely entropy deficit, potential intensity, vertical wind shear, vorticity, skin temperature and specific humidity at 500 hPa in reanalysis datasets between 1980 and 2013. Then, a selection of these variables is combined into two tropical cyclone genesis indices that empirically relate tropical cyclone genesis to large-scale variables. We find a shift toward greater (smaller) average potential number of genesis at higher (lower) latitudes over most regions of the Pacific Ocean, which is consistent with a migration of tropical cyclone genesis towards higher latitudes. We then examine the global best track archive and find coherent and significant poleward shifts in mean genesis position over the Pacific Ocean basins.

  18. Core heat transport in the MAST Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, A.R.; Akers, R.J.; Brickley, C.; Carolan, P.G.; Challis, C.; Conway, N.J.; Cunningham, G.; Meyer, H.; Patel, A.; Roach, C.; Valovie, M.; Applegate, D.J.; Cowley, S.C.; Joiner, N.; Walsh, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    High-β spherical tokamak (ST) plasmas have intrinsic properties which favour the suppression of anomalous transport. Transport has been studied in NBI heated plasmas in the MAST ST device, where it is found that ion thermal transport is typically close to the neo-classical level. Calculations of the ITG microstability with the GS2 gyro-kinetic code suggest that this form of turbulence may be suppressed by the high ExB shearing rates in these plasmas. Electron transport is somewhat higher and cannot be explained from mixing length estimates of ETG turbulence. This is perhaps due instead either to micro-tearing modes in the core plasma or extended radial structures in the saturated turbulence. Micro-stability is also favoured by low magnetic shear and this has been used to produce high-performance L- and H-mode plasmas with improved core confinement as well as plasmas exhibiting ITBs in both the ion and electron channels. Broad electron ITBs have been produced with counter-NBI heating in which anomalous electron transport apparently has been reduced by the very high ExB shearing rates prevailing in these plasmas. Such studies also contribute towards testing the transport and ITB physics basis for the ITER device. (author)

  19. Ductile fracture behaviour of primary heat transport piping material ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Heat transport piping material of nuclear reactors. 169. Table 1. Chemical composition of. SA333, Grade 6 steel in wt%. C. Mn. Si. S. P. 0·18 0·90 0·25 0·02 0·02 room temperature. The tensile flow curve of the steel exhibited prominent yield-point effect accompanied by non-hardening strain propagation (Lüders strain) of ...

  20. Heat transport modelling in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2009-02-01

    A model to estimate the heat transport in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch (RFP) is described. The model, based on experimental and theoretical results, divides the RFP electron heat diffusivity χe into three regions, one in the plasma core, where χe is assumed to be determined by the tearing modes, one located around the reversal radius, where χe is assumed not dependent on the magnetic fluctuations and one in the extreme edge, where high χe is assumed. The absolute values of the core and of the reversal χe are determined by simulating the electron temperature and the soft x-ray and by comparing the simulated signals with the experimental ones. The model is used to estimate the heat diffusivity and the energy confinement time during the flat top of standard plasmas, of deep F plasmas and of plasmas obtained with the intelligent shell.

  1. Quantum Thermodynamics in Strong Coupling: Heat Transport and Refrigeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Katz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The performance characteristics of a heat rectifier and a heat pump are studied in a non-Markovian framework. The device is constructed from a molecule connected to a hot and cold reservoir. The heat baths are modelled using the stochastic surrogate Hamiltonian method. The molecule is modelled by an asymmetric double-well potential. Each well is semi-locally connected to a heat bath composed of spins. The dynamics are driven by a combined system–bath Hamiltonian. The temperature of the baths is regulated by a secondary spin bath composed of identical spins in thermal equilibrium. A random swap operation exchange spins between the primary and secondary baths. The combined system is studied in various system–bath coupling strengths. In all cases, the average heat current always flows from the hot towards the cold bath in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The asymmetry of the double well generates a rectifying effect, meaning that when the left and right baths are exchanged the heat current follows the hot-to-cold direction. The heat current is larger when the high frequency is coupled to the hot bath. Adding an external driving field can reverse the transport direction. Such a refrigeration effect is modelled by a periodic driving field in resonance with the frequency difference of the two potential wells. A minimal driving amplitude is required to overcome the heat leak effect. In the strong driving regime the cooling power is non-monotonic with the system–bath coupling.

  2. JOYO MK-III heat transport system renovation operation. Primary heat transport mechanical system (IHXs (intermediate heat exchangers))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Jun; Ashida, Takashi; Isozaki, Kazunori; Sumino, Kouzou; Yamaguchi, Akira; Sakaba, Hideo; Tomita, Naoki; Ozawa, Kenji

    2004-04-01

    The MK-III project to improve the irradiation capability of the experimental fast reactor JOYO have been carried out since 1987. The increase of fast neutron flux and the enlargement of irradiation field increase the reactor thermal power from 100 MWt to 140 MWt. To accommodate the increased thermal power, the IHXs and the IHX connecting piping were replaced. The IHXs were replaced with securing cooling system boundary in high dose rate surroundings and very limited operation space of the radiation controlled area in the containment vessel. Primary sodium contains radioactive 22 Na, 24 Na and radioactive CPs such as 60 Co and 54 Mn, and this sodium adhered to the inner surface of IHXs and pipe. Therefore, the renovation procedure and method were carefully examined based on the JOYO operation and maintenance experiences and research and development results on the sodium handling technique. The major results obtained in the primary heat transport mechanical system (IHXs) renovation operation were shown as follows; (1) The mock up tests to optimize the operating methods, to check the operability and for workers training were useful for reduction of radiation exposure by shortening the operation time in high dose rate surrounding. (2) The effectiveness of seal bag for prevention of impurity ingress to the sodium system and contamination during sodium boundary opening (cutting pipes, sodium removal and welding pipes) was confirmed. (3) The pipes were cut without foreign object such as cutting piece and tool ingress by careful examination of cutting procedure and methods such as bite, roller cutter. (4) The temporary closing equipment such as seal cap and seal plug were effectively worked to seal the cooling system boundary between cutting and welding pipes. (5) Sodium adhered on the inner surfaces of pipe was effectively and safely removed by a mechanical scraper or drill and a cloth moistened by a mixture of alcohol and water. (6) Control of low gas pressure difference

  3. Convective heat transport in Viscoplastic material due to localized heating: An Experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhunjhunwala, Kishan; Shahiruddin; Hassan, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    Viscoplastic materials are found extensively both in natural and manmade form. In this work experimental investigation of natural convection in viscoplastic fluid with partially heated bottom wall and continuous cooling of top wall in a square cross section enclosure has been carried out. Carbopol Ultrez 20 gel of various concentrations has been used as sample viscoplastic fluid. Conduction and convection phase of heat transport are identified. The results are presented in terms of temperature distribution across the fluid for different gel concentrations and heat input. The average Nusselt numbers are also discussed for different conditions. Onset of convection is delayed and convection strength is weakened with increase in test fluid yield stress. Steady state temperature difference between hot and cold wall shows linear behaviour with heat input for conduction regime and non-linear behaviour in convection regime. Fluid temperature in enclosure shows sharp gradient closure to thermally active walls.

  4. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gregory T

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. Methods We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1 surface contact heating and (2 spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42°C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. Results The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45°C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. Conclusions The heat transport system model of the

  5. Three dimensional heat transport modeling in Vossoroca reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcie Polli, Bruna; Yoshioka Bernardo, Julio Werner; Hilgert, Stephan; Bleninger, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater reservoirs are used for many purposes as hydropower generation, water supply and irrigation. In Brazil, according to the National Energy Balance of 2013, hydropower energy corresponds to 70.1% of the Brazilian demand. Superficial waters (which include rivers, lakes and reservoirs) are the most used source for drinking water supply - 56% of the municipalities use superficial waters as a source of water. The last two years have shown that the Brazilian water and electricity supply is highly vulnerable and that improved management is urgently needed. The construction of reservoirs affects physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the water body, e.g. stratification, temperature, residence time and turbulence reduction. Some water quality issues related to reservoirs are eutrophication, greenhouse gas emission to the atmosphere and dissolved oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion. The understanding of the physical processes in the water body is fundamental to reservoir management. Lakes and reservoirs may present a seasonal behavior and stratify due to hydrological and meteorological conditions, and especially its vertical distribution may be related to water quality. Stratification can control heat and dissolved substances transport. It has been also reported the importance of horizontal temperature gradients, e.g. inflows and its density and processes of mass transfer from shallow to deeper regions of the reservoir, that also may impact water quality. Three dimensional modeling of the heat transport in lakes and reservoirs is an important tool to the understanding and management of these systems. It is possible to estimate periods of large vertical temperature gradients, inhibiting vertical transport and horizontal gradients, which could be responsible for horizontal transport of heat and substances (e.g. differential cooling or inflows). Vossoroca reservoir was constructed in 1949 by the impoundment of São João River and is located near to

  6. Experimental determination of soil heat storage for the simulation of heat transport in a coastal wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Michael; Swain, Matthew; Lohmann, Melinda; Swain, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Two physical experiments were developed to better define the thermal interaction of wetland water and the underlying soil layer. This information is important to numerical models of flow and heat transport that have been developed to support biological studies in the South Florida coastal wetland areas. The experimental apparatus consists of two 1.32. m diameter by 0.99. m tall, trailer-mounted, well-insulated tanks filled with soil and water. A peat-sand-soil mixture was used to represent the wetland soil, and artificial plants were used as a surrogate for emergent wetland vegetation based on size and density observed in the field. The tanks are instrumented with thermocouples to measure vertical and horizontal temperature variations and were placed in an outdoor environment subject to solar radiation, wind, and other factors affecting the heat transfer. Instruments also measure solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed.Tests indicate that heat transfer through the sides and bottoms of the tanks is negligible, so the experiments represent vertical heat transfer effects only. The temperature fluctuations measured in the vertical profile through the soil and water are used to calibrate a one-dimensional heat-transport model. The model was used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the soil. Additionally, the model was used to calculate the total heat stored in the soil. This information was then used in a lumped parameter model to calculate an effective depth of soil which provides the appropriate heat storage to be combined with the heat storage in the water column. An effective depth, in the model, of 5.1. cm of wetland soil represents the heat storage needed to match the data taken in the tank containing 55.9. cm of peat/sand/soil mix. The artificial low-density laboratory sawgrass reduced the solar energy absorbed by the 35.6. cm of water and 55.9. cm of soil at midday by less than 5%. The maximum heat transfer into the underlying peat-sand-soil mix

  7. Cascade: a review of heat transport and plant design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, K.A.; McDowell, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop for Cascade, a centrifugal-action solid-breeder reaction chamber, has been investigated and results are presented. The Cascade concept, a double-cone-shaped reaction chamber, rotates along its horizontal axis. Solid Li 2 O or other lithium-ceramic granules are injected tangentially through each end of the chamber. The granules cascade axially from the smaller radii at the ends to the larger radius at the center, where they are ejected into a stationary granule catcher. Heat and tritium are then removed from the granules and the granules are reinjected into the chamber. A 50% dense Li 2 O granule throughput of 2.8 m 3 /s is transferred from the reaction chamber to the steam generators via continuous bucket elevators. The granules then fall by gravity through 4 vertical steam generators. The entire transport system is maintained at the same vacuum conditions present inside the reaction chamber

  8. Electron heat transport analysis of low-collisionality plasmas in the neoclassical-transport-optimized configuration of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Sadayoshi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Wakasa, Arimitsu

    2002-01-01

    Electron heat transport in low-collisionality LHD plasma is investigated in order to study the neoclassical transport optimization effect on thermal plasma transport with an optimization level typical of so-called ''advanced stellarators''. In the central region, a higher electron temperature is obtained in the optimized configuration, and transport analysis suggests the considerable effect of neoclassical transport on the electron heat transport assuming the ion-root level of radial electric field. The obtained experimental results support future reactor design in which the neoclassical and/or anomalous transports are reduced by magnetic field optimization in a non-axisymmetric configuration. (author)

  9. Heat transport inventory monitoring for CANDU-PHW reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.; Luxat, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A computer-based D 2 O coolant inventory monitoring system proposed for implementation on the digital computer controllers at Ontario Hydro's CANDU generating units is discussed. By monitoring process parameters and utilizing probabilistically-based decision algorithms, timely indication of any significant loss of D 2 O inventory will be provided to the operator. The monitoring is performed in a co-ordinated manner such that D 2 O losses from either the heat transport system or the inventory control system can be detected. (orig.)

  10. Policies and initiatives for carbon neutrality in nordic heating and transport systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Jakob Glarbo; Wu, Qiuwei; Ostergaard, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    to heat pumps in the Nordic region rely on both private economic and national economic incentives. Initiatives toward carbon neutrality in the transport system are mostly concentrated on research, development and demonstration for deployment of a large number of EVs. All Nordic countries have plans......Policies and initiatives promoting carbon neutrality in the Nordic heating and transport systems are presented. The focus within heating systems is the propagation of heat pumps while the focus within transport systems is initiatives regarding electric vehicles (EVs). It is found that conversion...... for the future heating and transport systems with the ambition of realizing carbon neutrality....

  11. Currents and fluctuations of quantum heat transport in harmonic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motz, T; Ankerhold, J; Stockburger, J T

    2017-01-01

    Heat transport in open quantum systems is particularly susceptible to the modeling of system–reservoir interactions. It thus requires us to consistently treat the coupling between a quantum system and its environment. While perturbative approaches are successfully used in fields like quantum optics and quantum information, they reveal deficiencies—typically in the context of thermodynamics, when it is essential to respect additional criteria such as fluctuation-dissipation theorems. We use a non-perturbative approach for quantum dissipative dynamics based on a stochastic Liouville–von Neumann equation to provide a very general and extremely efficient formalism for heat currents and their correlations in open harmonic chains. Specific results are derived not only for first- but also for second-order moments, which requires us to account for both real and imaginary parts of bath–bath correlation functions. Spatiotemporal patterns are compared with weak coupling calculations. The regime of stronger system–reservoir couplings gives rise to an intimate interplay between reservoir fluctuations and heat transfer far from equilibrium. (paper)

  12. Transition to ballistic regime for heat transport in helium II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciacca, Michele, E-mail: michele.sciacca@unipa.it [Dipartimento Scienze Agrarie e Forestali, Università degli studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Sellitto, Antonio, E-mail: ant.sellitto@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Matematica, Informatica ed Economia, Università della Basilicata, Campus Macchia Romana, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Jou, David, E-mail: david.jou@uab.cat [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Institut d' Estudis Catalans, Carme 47, 08001 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-07-04

    The size-dependent and flux-dependent effective thermal conductivity of narrow capillaries filled with superfluid helium is analyzed from a thermodynamic continuum perspective. The classical Landau evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of quiescent superfluid, or the Gorter–Mellinck regime of turbulent superfluids, is extended to describe the transition to ballistic regime in narrow channels wherein the radius R is comparable to (or smaller than) the phonon mean-free path ℓ in superfluid helium. To do so, we start from an extended equation for the heat flux incorporating non-local terms, and take into consideration a heat slip flow along the walls of the tube. This leads from an effective thermal conductivity proportional to R{sup 2} (Landau regime) to another one proportional to Rℓ (ballistic regime). We consider two kinds of flows: along cylindrical pipes and along two infinite parallel plates. - Highlights: • Heat transport in counterflow helium in the ballistic regime. • The one-fluid model based on the Extended Thermodynamics is used. • The transition from the Landau regime to the ballistic regime. • The transition from quantum turbulence to ballistic regime.

  13. Currents and fluctuations of quantum heat transport in harmonic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motz, T.; Ankerhold, J.; Stockburger, J. T.

    2017-05-01

    Heat transport in open quantum systems is particularly susceptible to the modeling of system-reservoir interactions. It thus requires us to consistently treat the coupling between a quantum system and its environment. While perturbative approaches are successfully used in fields like quantum optics and quantum information, they reveal deficiencies—typically in the context of thermodynamics, when it is essential to respect additional criteria such as fluctuation-dissipation theorems. We use a non-perturbative approach for quantum dissipative dynamics based on a stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation to provide a very general and extremely efficient formalism for heat currents and their correlations in open harmonic chains. Specific results are derived not only for first- but also for second-order moments, which requires us to account for both real and imaginary parts of bath-bath correlation functions. Spatiotemporal patterns are compared with weak coupling calculations. The regime of stronger system-reservoir couplings gives rise to an intimate interplay between reservoir fluctuations and heat transfer far from equilibrium.

  14. Experimental study on the supercritical startup and heat transport capability of a neon-charged cryogenic loop heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yuandong; Lin, Guiping; He, Jiang; Bai, Lizhan; Zhang, Hongxing; Miao, Jianyin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A neon-charged CLHP integrated with a G-M cryocooler was designed and investigated. • The CLHP can realize the supercritical startup with an auxiliary heat load of 1.5 W. • Maximum heat transport capability of the CLHP was 4.5 W over a distance of 0.6 m. • There existed an optimum auxiliary heat load to expedite the supercritical startup. • There existed an optimum charged pressure to reach the largest heat transfer limit. - Abstract: Neon-charged cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP) can realize efficient cryogenic heat transport in the temperature range of 30–40 K, and promises great application potential in the thermal control of future space infrared exploration system. In this work, extensive experimental studies on the supercritical startup and heat transport capability of a neon-charged CLHP integrated with a G-M cryocooler were carried out, where the effects of the auxiliary heat load applied to the secondary evaporator and charged pressure of the working fluid were investigated. Experimental results showed that the CLHP could successfully realize the supercritical startup with an auxiliary heat load of 1.5 W, and there existed an optimum auxiliary heat load and charged pressure of the working fluid respectively, to achieve the maximum temperature drop rate of the primary evaporator during the supercritical startup. The CLHP could reach a maximum heat transport capability of 4.5 W over a distance of 0.6 m corresponding to the optimum charged pressure of the working fluid; however, the heat transport capability decreased with the increase of the auxiliary heat load. Furthermore, the inherent mechanisms responsible for the phenomena observed in the experiments were analyzed and discussed, to provide a better understanding from the theoretical view.

  15. Energy Conversion Advanced Heat Transport Loop and Power Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, C. H.

    2006-08-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to various

  16. Development of CANDU 6 Primary Heat Transport System Modeling Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hyung-beom; Kim, Sung-min; Park, Joong-woo; Kim, Kwang-su; Ko, Dae-hack; Han, Bong-seob

    2007-01-01

    NUCIRC is a steady-state thermal-hydraulic code used for design and performance analyses of CANDU Heat Transport System. The code is used to build PHT model in Wolsong NPP and to calculate channel flow distribution. Wolsong NPP has to calculate channel flow distribution and quality of coolant at the ROH header after every outage by OPP (Operating Policy and Principal). PHT modeling work is time consuming which need a lot of operation experience and specialty. It is very difficult to build PHT model as plant operator in two weeks which is obligate for plant operation after every outage. That is why Wolsong NPP develop NUMODEL (NUcirc MODELing) with many-years experience and a know-how of using NUCIRC code. NUMODEL is computer program which is used to create PHT model based on utilizing NUCIRC code

  17. Periodic inspection for safety of CANDU heat transport piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellyin, F.

    1979-10-01

    Periodic inspection of heat transport and emergency core cooling piping systems is intended to maintain an adequate level of safety throughout the life of the plant, and to protect plant personnel and the public from the consequences of a failure and release of fission products. This report outlines a rational approach to the periodic inspection based on a fully probabilistic model. It demonstrates the methodology based on theoretical treatment and experimental data whereby the strength of a pressurized pipe or vessel containing a defect could be evaluated. It also shows how the extension of the defect at various lifetimes could be predicted. These relationships are prerequisite for the probabilistic formulation and analysis for the periodic inspection of piping systems

  18. Optimal wall spacing for heat transport in thermal convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkina, Olga [Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    The simulation of RB flow for Ra up to 1 x 10{sup 10} is computationally expensive in terms of computing power and hard disk storage. Thus, we gratefully acknowledge the computational resources supported by Leibniz-Rechenzentrum Munich. Compared to Γ=1 situation, a new physical picture of heat transport is identified here at Γ{sub opt} for any explored Ra. Therefore, a detailed comparison between Γ=1 and Γ=Γ{sub opt} is valuable for our further research, for example, their vertical temperature and velocity profiles. Additionally, we plan to compare the fluid with different Pr under geometrical confinement, which are computationally expensive for the situations of Pr<<1 and Pr>>1.

  19. Next generation CANDU heat transport system parameter assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hau, K.F.; Love, J.W.; Vadera, M.; Vecchiarelli, J.

    2001-01-01

    AECL has initiated an innovative program to develop the next generation of technologies for CANDU reactors, and to apply them to a highly cost-effective new family of next generation power plants. Four major design changes were considered in the present conceptual design of the Heat Transport System (HTS) for the Next Generation (NG) CANDU. These include: light water replacement of heavy water as coolant, a compact core design resulting from a fuel channel lattice pitch reduction, use of Slightly Enriched Uranium (SEU) CANFLEX fuel bundles, and higher HTS and Turbine Generator (TG) operating pressures and temperatures. In designing the HTS, the goal is to reduce the capital cost while meeting the design and safety requirements with robust safety margins. This paper describes the studies to optimize key HTS parameters, including the assessment methodology and the basis of proposed design conditions for the NG CANDU HTS. (author)

  20. Heat transport modeling of the dot spectroscopy platform on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, W. A.; Jones, O. S.; Barrios, M. A.; Strozzi, D. J.; Koning, J. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D.; Suter, L. J.; Liedahl, D. A.; Lemos, N.; Eder, D. C.; Kauffman, R. L.; Landen, O. L.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.

    2018-04-01

    Electron heat transport within an inertial-fusion hohlraum plasma is difficult to model due to the complex interaction of kinetic plasma effects, magnetic fields, laser-plasma interactions, and microturbulence. Here, simulations using the radiation-hydrodynamic code, HYDRA, are compared to hohlraum plasma experiments which contain a Manganese-Cobalt tracer dot (Barrios et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 056307). The dot is placed either on the capsule or on a film midway between the capsule and the laser-entrance hole. From spectroscopic measurements, electron temperature and position of the dot are inferred. Simulations are performed with ad hoc flux limiters of f = 0.15 and f = 0.03 (with electron heat flux, q, limited to fnT 3/2/m 1/2), and two more physical means of flux limitation: the magnetohydrodynamics and nonlocal packages. The nonlocal model agrees best with the temperature of the dot-on-film and dot-on-capsule. The hohlraum produced x-ray flux is over-predicted by roughly ˜11% for the f = 0.03 model and the remaining models by ˜16%. The simulated trajectories of the dot-on-capsule are slightly ahead of the experimental trajectory for all but the f = 0.03 model. The simulated dot-on-film position disagrees with the experimental measurement for all transport models. In the MHD simulation of the dot-on-film, the dot is strongly perturbative, though the simulation predicts a peak dot-on-film temperature 2-3 keV higher than the measurement. This suggests a deficiency in the MHD modeling possibly due to the neglect of the Righi-Leduc term or interpenetrating flows of multiple ion species which would reduce the strength of the self-generated fields.

  1. Mangrove expansion and saltmarsh decline at mangrove poleward limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintilan, Neil; Wilson, Nicholas C.; Rogers, Kerrylee; Rajkaran, Anusha; Krauss, Ken W.

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves are species of halophytic intertidal trees and shrubs derived from tropical genera and are likely delimited in latitudinal range by varying sensitivity to cold. There is now sufficient evidence that mangrove species have proliferated at or near their poleward limits on at least five continents over the past half century, at the expense of salt marsh. Avicennia is the most cold-tolerant genus worldwide, and is the subject of most of the observed changes. Avicennia germinans has extended in range along the US Atlantic coast and expanded into salt marsh as a consequence of lower frost frequency and intensity in the southern USA. The genus has also expanded into salt marsh at its southern limit in Peru, and on the Pacific coast of Mexico. Mangroves of several species have expanded in extent and replaced salt marsh where protected within mangrove reserves in Guangdong Province. In south-eastern Australia, the expansion of Avicennia marina into salt marshes is now well documented, and Rhizophora stylosa has extended its range southward, while showing strong population growth within estuaries along its southern limits in northern New South Wales. Avicennia marina has extended its range southwards in South Africa. The changes are consistent with the pole-ward extension of temperature thresholds co-incident with sea-level rise, although the specific mechanism of range extension might be complicated by limitations on dispersal or other factors. The shift from salt marsh to mangrove dominance on subtropical and temperate shorelines has important implications for ecological structure, function, and global change adaptation.

  2. Climate in the absence of ocean heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, B. E. J.

    2017-12-01

    The energy transported by the oceans to mid- and high latitudes is small compared to the atmosphere, yet exerts an outsized influence on climate. A key reason is the strong interaction between ocean heat transport (OHT) and sea ice extent. I quantify the absolute climatic impact of OHT using the state-of-the-art CESM simulations by comparing a realistic control climate against a slab ocean simulation in which OHT is disabled. The absence of OHT leads to a massive expansion of sea ice into the subtropics in both hemispheres, and a 24 K global cooling. Analysis of the transient simulation after setting the OHT to zero reveals a global cooling process fueled by a runaway sea ice albedo feedback. This process is eventually self-limiting in the cold climate due to a combination of subtropical cloud feedbacks and surface wind effects that are both connected to a massive spin-up of the atmospheric Hadley circulation. A parameter sensitivity study shows that the simulated climate is far more sensitive to small changes in ice surface albedo in the absence of OHT. I conclude that the oceans are responsible for an enormous global warming by mitigating an otherwise very potent sea ice albedo feedback, but that the magnitude of this effect is rather uncertain. These simulations provide a graphic illustration of how the intimate coupling between sea ice and ocean circulation governs the present-day climate, and by extension, highlight the importance of modeling ocean - sea ice interaction with high fidelity.

  3. DOS-HEATING6: A general conduction code with nuclear heat generation derived from DOT-IV transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.L.; Yuecel, A.; Nadkarny, S.

    1988-05-01

    The HEATING6 heat conduction code is modified to (a) read the multigroup particle fluxes from a two-dimensional DOT-IV neutron- photon transport calculation, (b) interpolate the fluxes from the DOT-IV variable (optional) mesh to the HEATING6 control volume mesh, and (c) fold the interpolated fluxes with kerma factors to obtain a nuclear heating source for the heat conduction equation. The modified HEATING6 is placed as a module in the ORNL discrete ordinates system (DOS), and has been renamed DOS-HEATING6. DOS-HEATING6 provides the capability for determining temperature distributions due to nuclear heating in complex, multi-dimensional systems. All of the original capabilities of HEATING6 are retained for the nuclear heating calculation; e.g., generalized boundary conditions (convective, radiative, finned, fixed temperature or heat flux), temperature and space dependent thermal properties, steady-state or transient analysis, general geometry description, etc. The numerical techniques used in the code are reviewed and the user input instructions and JCL to perform DOS-HEATING6 calculations are presented. Finally a sample problem involving coupled DOT-IV and DOS-HEATING6 calculations of a complex space-reactor configurations described, and the input and output of the calculations are listed. 10 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Heat transport analysis in a district heating and snow melting system in Sapporo and Ishikari, Hokkaido applying waste heat from GTHTR300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, Seiji; Kamiji, Yu; Terada, Atsuhiko; Yan Xing; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Murata, Tetsuya; Mori, Michitsugu

    2015-01-01

    A district heating and snow melting system utilizing waste heat from Gas Turbine High temperature Gas Reactor of 300 MW e (GTHTR300), a heat-electricity cogeneration design of high temperature gas-cooled reactor, was analyzed. Application areas are set in Sapporo and Ishikari, the heavy snowfall cities in Northern Japan. The heat transport analyses are carried out by modeling the components in the system; pipelines of the secondary water loops between GTHTR300s and heat demand district and heat exchangers to transport the heat from the secondary water loops to the tertiary loops in the district. Double pipe for the secondary loops are advantageous for less heat loss and smaller excavation area. On the other hand, these pipes has disadvantage of more electricity consumption for pumping. Most of the heat demand in the month of maximum requirement can be supplied by 2 GTHTR300s and delivered by 9 secondary loops and around 5000 heat exchangers. Closer location of GTHTR300 site to the heat demand district is largely advantageous economically. Less decrease of the distance from 40 km to 20 km made the heat loss half and cost of the heat transfer system 22% smaller. (author)

  5. Numerical Modeling of the Vertical Heat Transport Through the Diffusive Layer of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    transport through thermohaline staircases in the Arctic region. Results revealed that vertical fluxes exceeded those of extant “four-thirds flux...vertical heat flux, thermohaline staircase 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 73 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18...DNS) were conducted to assess the vertical heat transport through thermohaline staircases in the Arctic region. Results revealed that vertical

  6. Influence of tube and particle diameter on heat transport in packed beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borkink, J.G.H.; Borkink, J.G.H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Influence of the tube and particle diameter and shape, as well as their ratio, on the radial heat transport in packed beds has been studied. Heat transport experiments were performed with four different packings in three wall-cooled tubes, which differed in inner diameter only. Experimental values

  7. Transport phenomena in a sidewall-moving bottom-heated cavity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The understanding of basic feature of energy transport from a heat source is important from the fundamental point of view as well as from various engineering and technological applications. To enrich the knowledge in this area, this paper presents energy transport phenomena from the heated bottom of an air-filled ...

  8. Enhanced heat transport in environmental systems using microencapsulated phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, D. P.; Mulligan, J. C.; Bryant, Y. G.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for enhanced heat transport and storage that uses a new two-component fluid mixture consisting of a microencapsulated phase change material (microPCM) for enhanced latent heat transport is outlined. SBIR investigations for NASA, USAF, SDIO, and NSF since 1983 have demonstrated the ability of the two-component microPCM coolants to provide enhancements in heat transport up to 40 times over that of the carrier fluid alone, enhancements of 50 to 100 percent in the heat transfer coefficient, practically isothermal operation when the coolant flow is circulated in an optimal manner, and significant reductions in pump work.

  9. Strain dependence of the heat transport properties of graphene nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmeline Yeo, Pei Shan; Loh, Kian Ping; Gan, Chee Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Using a combination of accurate density-functional theory and a nonequilibrium Green’s function method, we calculate the ballistic thermal conductance characteristics of tensile-strained armchair (AGNR) and zigzag (ZGNR) edge graphene nanoribbons, with widths between 3 and 50 Å. The optimized lateral lattice constants for AGNRs of different widths display a three-family behavior when the ribbons are grouped according to N modulo 3, where N represents the number of carbon atoms across the width of the ribbon. Two lowest-frequency out-of-plane acoustic modes play a decisive role in increasing the thermal conductance of AGNR-N at low temperatures. At high temperatures the effect of tensile strain is to reduce the thermal conductance of AGNR-N and ZGNR-N. These results could be explained by the changes in force constants in the in-plane and out-of-plane directions with the application of strain. This fundamental atomistic understanding of the heat transport in graphene nanoribbons paves a way to effect changes in their thermal properties via strain at various temperatures. (paper)

  10. The Poleward Shift of Storm Tracks Under Climate Change: Tracking Cyclones in CMIP5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Y.; Tamarin, T.

    2017-12-01

    Extratropical cyclones dominate the distribution of precipitation and wind in the midlatitudes, and therefore their frequency, intensity, and paths have a significant effect on weather and climate. Comprehensive climate models forced by enhanced greenhouse gas emissions suggest that under a climate change scenario, the latitudinal band of storm tracks would shift poleward. While the poleward shift is a robust response across most models, there is currently no consensus on what is the dominant dynamical mechanism. Here we use a Lagrangian approach to study the poleward shift, by employing a storm-tracking algorithm on an ensemble of CMIP5 models forced by increased CO2 emissions. We demonstrate that in addition to a poleward shift in the latitude of storm genesis, associated with the expansion of the Hadley cell, the averaged cyclonic storm also propagates more poleward until it reaches its maximum intensity. A mechanism for enhanced poleward motion of cyclones in a warmer climate is proposed, supported by idealized global warming experiments, and relates the shift to changes in upper level jet and atmospheric water vapour content. Our results imply that under the RCP8.5 climate change scenario, the averaged latitude of peak cyclone intensity shifts poleward by about 1.2○ (1.0○) in the Atlantic (Pacific) storm track in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), and by about 1.6○ in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) storm track. These changes in cyclone tracks can have a significant impact on midlatitude climate.

  11. Kinetochore-independent chromosome poleward movement during anaphase of meiosis II in mouse eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manqi Deng

    Full Text Available Kinetochores are considered to be the key structures that physically connect spindle microtubules to the chromosomes and play an important role in chromosome segregation during mitosis. Due to different mechanisms of spindle assembly between centrosome-containing mitotic cells and acentrosomal meiotic oocytes, it is unclear how a meiotic spindle generates the poleward forces to drive two rounds of meiotic chromosome segregation to achieve genome haploidization. We took advantage of the fact that DNA beads are able to induce bipolar spindle formation without kinetochores and studied the behavior of DNA beads in the induced spindle in mouse eggs during meiosis II. Interestingly, DNA beads underwent poleward movements that were similar in timing and speed to the meiotic chromosomes, although all the beads moved together to the same spindle pole. Disruption of dynein function abolished the poleward movements of DNA beads but not of the meiotic chromosomes, suggesting the existence of different dynein-dependent and dynein-independent force generation mechanisms for the chromosome poleward movement, and the latter may be dependent on the presence of kinetochores. Consistent with the observed DNA bead poleward movement, sperm haploid chromatin (which also induced bipolar spindle formation after injection to a metaphase egg without forming detectable kinetochore structures also underwent similar poleward movement at anaphase as DNA beads. The results suggest that in the chromatin-induced meiotic spindles, kinetochore attachments to spindle microtubules are not absolutely required for chromatin poleward movements at anaphase.

  12. Pluto: Fluidized Transport of Tholins by Heating of the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Spohrer, Steven; Grundy, William M.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; White, Oliver L.; Beyer, Ross A.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Stern, S. A.; Young, Leslie; hide

    2017-01-01

    New Horizons images of Pluto show evidence of the transport of the colored non-ice component across the surface, with substantial accumulations in some areas of low elevation. The non-ice component is presumed to be tholin produced in the atmosphere as a precipitating aerosol, in the surface ices by photolysis or radiolysis, or both. We model the surface layer of N2 ice with varying amounts of incorporated tholin particles to explore the heating within the ice that occurs by the solid-state greenhouse effect. We find that in plausible models of the contaminated N2 surface ice the triple point temperature (63.15K) is reached at a depth of approximately less than 1m. At that depth the confining pressure of the ice column is much less than the triple point pressure (12.52 kPa), so N2 should convert to the gas phase, exerting pressure on the overburden. When the gas pressure exceeds the strength of the confining ice, a breakout on the surface will occur, fluidizing fragments of ice and its contaminants that are then free to flow downhill, rafted on entrained gas, similar in some ways to the pyroclastic volcanic phenomenon known as nuée ardente. The digital elevation map of Pluto made from stereo images shows some surface regions that may have been stripped of the N2 layer, exposing H2O ice (presumed to be bedrock) below, with a corresponding accumulation of dark material that was that was the previously entrained particulate tholin. Accumulations of tholin are found associated with some of the fossae, and some cover preexisting topography to depths of up to a few hundred meters.

  13. Increased Ocean Heat Convergence Into the High Latitudes With CO 2 Doubling Enhances Polar-Amplified Warming: OCEAN HEAT AND POLAR WARMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, H. A. [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, U.S. DOE Office of Science, Richland WA USA; Rasch, P. J. [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, U.S. DOE Office of Science, Richland WA USA; Rose, B. E. J. [Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, State University of New York at Albany, Albany NY USA

    2017-10-18

    We isolate the role of the ocean in polar climate change by directly evaluating how changes in ocean dynamics with quasi-equilibrium CO2-doubling impact high-latitude climate. With CO2-doubling, the ocean heat flux convergence (OHFC) shifts poleward in winter in both hemispheres. Imposing this pattern of perturbed OHFC in a global climate model results in a poleward shift in ocean-to-atmosphere turbulent heat fluxes (both sensible and latent) and sea ice retreat; the high-latitudes warm while the midlatitudes cool, thereby amplifying polar warming. Furthermore, midlatitude cooling is propagated to the polar mid-troposphere on isentropic surfaces, augmenting the (positive) lapse rate feedback at high latitudes. These results highlight the key role played by the partitioning of meridional energy transport changes between the atmosphere and ocean in high-latitude climate change.

  14. Experimental investigation on heat transport in gravel-sand materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maureschat, Gerald; Heller, Alfred

    1997-01-01

    in sand-gravel material, the storage media is to be water satured. In this case, handling of such material on site is rather complex. The conduction is highly dependent on the thermal properties of the storage media and so is the overall thermal performance of a storage applying such media. For sandy...... out in a small size experiment. The experiment consists of a highly insulated box filled with two kinds of sand material crossed by a plastic heat pipe. Heat transfer is measured under dry and water satured conditions in a cross-section.The conclusions are clear. To obtain necessary heat conduction......The project is a basic study on the expected thermal behaviour of gravel storage initiated as a part of a research and demonstration gravel storage for seasonal heat storage.The goal of the investigation is to determine the heat transfer between heat pipes and sand-gravel storage media by carrying...

  15. Ballistic near-field heat transport in dense many-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latella, Ivan; Biehs, Svend-Age; Messina, Riccardo; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Radiative heat transport mediated by near-field interactions is known to be superdiffusive in dilute, many-body systems. Here we use a generalized Landauer theory of radiative heat transfer in many-body planar systems to demonstrate a nonmonotonic transition from superdiffusive to ballistic transport in dense systems. We show that such a transition is associated to a change of the polarization of dominant modes. Our findings are complemented by a quantitative study of the relaxation dynamics of the system in the different regimes of heat transport. This result could have important consequences on thermal management at nanoscale of many-body systems.

  16. Nonlinear heat and particle transport due to collisional drift waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi-kawa, K.I.; Hatori, T.; Terashima, Y.

    1977-03-01

    The nonlinear evolution of unstable modes which govern transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas were investigated. A nonlinear theory of unstable collisional drift wave, and the consequent nonlinear transport were extended to include electron and ion temperature gradients. Thermal transport properties are discussed and basic equations are given.

  17. ANALYZING NUMERICAL ERRORS IN DOMAIN HEAT TRANSPORT MODELS USING THE CVBEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromadka, T.V.

    1987-01-01

    Besides providing an exact solution for steady-state heat conduction processes (Laplace-Poisson equations), the CVBEM (complex variable boundary element method) can be used for the numerical error analysis of domain model solutions. For problems where soil-water phase change latent heat effects dominate the thermal regime, heat transport can be approximately modeled as a time-stepped steady-state condition in the thawed and frozen regions, respectively. The CVBEM provides an exact solution of the two-dimensional steady-state heat transport problem, and also provides the error in matching the prescribed boundary conditions by the development of a modeling error distribution or an approximate boundary generation.

  18. Heat balance in the catalyst layer and the boundary condition for heat transport equation in a low-temperature fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikovsky, A. A.

    We consider heat balance in the catalyst layer of a low-temperature fuel cell. Based on the heat transport equation in the layer, the exact boundary condition for the problem of heat transport in the cell is obtained. The limits of validity of the resulting expression are discussed.

  19. WHIST transport analysis of high neutron production, ICRH heated, pellet fueled jet plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Tolliver, J.S.; Phillips, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    The WHIST 1-1/2-D predictive transport code is used to model the particle and energy transport of JET pellet-fueled, ICRH-heated plasmas. Pellet injection during the current rise phase was used to produce strong central peaking of the particle density followed by central ICRH heating and led to transient period of enhanced confinement. The evolution of the density profile as well as the electron and ion temperature profiles and strong ICRH heating conditions are examined during this period of enhanced confinement in the context of models for particle and energy transport. Because WHIST is a predictive transport code, it requires models for particle and energy sources and transport coefficients. The analysis procedure thus consists of modeling the particle source terms (pellets, gas, and recycled neutrals), energy source terms (ohmic and ICRH heating), and energy loss terms (primarily radiation), and varying the transport models until the best qualitative and quantitative agreement is obtained between calculated and observed quantities. We find that plasma behavior is well described during the first second of ICRH heating following pellet injection by the same transport coefficients that describe the ohmic plasma. The distinction between electron and ion thermal losses depends on the relative heating rates of electrons and ions as determined by the ICRH model, as well as the radiation losses. 10 refs., 4 figs

  20. Changes in Tropical Precipitation at the Mid-Holocene: Role of the Oceanic Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Battisti, D. S.; Donohoe, A.

    2015-12-01

    There is ample geological and geochemical evidence that precipitation in the tropics is largely different from today at the mid-Holocene, an era roughly 6,000 years ago when the Northern Hemisphere summer (winter) insolation was stronger (weaker) than today. These insolation differences are caused mainly by the precession of the earth's rotational axis, or called "precessional forcing". Using the mid-Holocene experiments of PMIP3, we studied changes in the zonal mean tropical precipitation, and its associated change in cross-equatorial energy transport. A northward movement of the zonal mean precipitation in the mid-Holocene is seen in 10 out of 13 PMIP3 models, with a correspondingly anomalous southward atmospheric heat transport across the equator. The slope is 3.0º per PW, close to the estimate given by Donohoe et al. (2013). The changes in cross-equatorial atmospheric heat transport are dictated by changes in the hemispheric asymmetry of heating from the surface, which in turn are associated with changes in the cross-equatorial oceanic heat transport: an anomalous northward oceanic heat transport at the equator is seen in all of the PMIP3 models. Analysis on this anomalous oceanic heat transport reveals that changes in the wind-driven gyre in the Pacific Ocean are primarily responsible for the changes in cross-equatorial ocean heat transport. Specifically, stronger easterly anomalies north of the equator in the western Pacific drives an anomalous northward mass transport, and therefore accomplishes an anomalous northward heat transport across the equator by acting on the asymmetric mean-state zonal temperature. The wind anomalies responsible for this anomalous ocean heat transport are seen in every PMIP3 model, as well as an ECHAM4-slab ocean model, indicating that it is atmospherically driven and independent of the changes in ocean heat transport. It also explains the consistency of ocean heat transport change, and eventually the relative consistency of zonal

  1. Heat transport in the XXZ spin chain: from ballistic to diffusive regimes and dephasing enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza-Arenas, J J; Al-Assam, S; Clark, S R; Jaksch, D

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study the heat transport in an XXZ spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain with homogeneous magnetic field, incoherently driven out of equilibrium by reservoirs at the boundaries. We focus on the effect of bulk dephasing (energy-dissipative) processes in different parameter regimes of the system. The non-equilibrium steady state of the chain is obtained by simulating its evolution under the corresponding Lindblad master equation, using the time evolving block decimation method. In the absence of dephasing, the heat transport is ballistic for weak interactions, while being diffusive in the strongly interacting regime, as evidenced by the heat current scaling with the system size. When bulk dephasing takes place in the system, diffusive transport is induced in the weakly interacting regime, with the heat current monotonically decreasing with the dephasing rate. In contrast, in the strongly interacting regime, the heat current can be significantly enhanced by dephasing for systems of small size. (paper)

  2. Subcooled He II heat transport in the channel with abrupt contractions/enlargements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, R.; Iwamoto, A.; Hamaguchi, S.; Mito, T.

    2002-01-01

    Heat transport mechanisms for subcooled He II in the channel with abrupt contractions and/or enlargements have been investigated under steady state conditions. The channel, made of G-10, contains various contraction geometries to simulate the cooling channel of a superconducting magnet. In other words, contractions are periodically placed along the channel to simulate the spacers within the magnet winding. A copper block heater inputs the heat to the channel from one end, while the other end is open to the He II bath. Temperature profiles were measured with temperature sensors embedded in the channel as a function of heat input. Calculations were performed using a simple one-dimensional turbulent heat transport equation and with geometric factor consideration. The effects on heat transport mechanisms in He II caused by abrupt change of channel geometry and size are discussed

  3. FEFLOW finite element modeling of flow, mass and heat transport in porous and fractured media

    CERN Document Server

    Diersch, Hans-Jörg G

    2013-01-01

    Placing advanced theoretical and numerical methods in the hands of modeling practitioners and scientists, this book explores the FEFLOW system for solving flow, mass and heat transport processes in porous and fractured media. Offers applications and exercises.

  4. New Parametrization for Heat Transport Through Diffusive Convection Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuang-Xi; Cen, Xian-Rong; Zhou, Sheng-Qi

    2018-02-01

    A laboratory experiment of two-layer diffusive convection (DC) within a rectangular cell is reported. The run-down evolution of two mixed layers and their interface is exhibited by the temperature and salinity structures, where the interface thicknesses of temperature and salinity increase with time as hT˜t0.42 and hS˜t0.43. Heat flux across the interface is respectively evaluated in terms of the heat energy conservation and the assumption of conductive interface. Both of them give the consistent heat flux values. When the 4/3 scaling between heat flux F and temperature difference across the interface ΔT holds (F˜C>(Rρ>)ΔT4/3, where C>(Rρ>) is function of density ratio Rρ), previous heat flux parameterizations are found to have low coefficient of determination (r2≤0.5) with our heat flux data within 1.6law function of Rρ, and the best fitting is C>(Rρ>)=0.081>(Rρ-1>)-1.28, resulting in r2 as high as 0.74. By using all available heat flux data over a wide Rρ range (1.2-27.6), including those collected in previous literatures, C>(Rρ>) is revised as C>(Rρ>)=0.065>(Rρ-1>)-1.20 accompanied by r2=0.70 and a reduced chi-square χ2=0.91. Alternatively, C>(Rρ>) can be derived from previous DC layer thickness parameterization, which is expressed as C>(Rρ>)=0.076>(Rρ-1>)-4/3. This formula is also superior to previous parameterizations in the evaluation of heat flux, indicated by high r2 and low χ2.

  5. Magnetically Modulated Heat Transport in a Global Simulation of Solar Magneto-convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Campus Box 600, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Charbonneau, Paul [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K. [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, RG2 9AX (United Kingdom); Rast, Mark P., E-mail: Jean-Francois.Cossette@lasp.colorado.edu, E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: smolar@ecmwf.int, E-mail: Mark.Rast@lasp.colorado.edu [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Campus Box 391, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    We present results from a global MHD simulation of solar convection in which the heat transported by convective flows varies in-phase with the total magnetic energy. The purely random initial magnetic field specified in this experiment develops into a well-organized large-scale antisymmetric component undergoing hemispherically synchronized polarity reversals on a 40 year period. A key feature of the simulation is the use of a Newtonian cooling term in the entropy equation to maintain a convectively unstable stratification and drive convection, as opposed to the specification of heating and cooling terms at the bottom and top boundaries. When taken together, the solar-like magnetic cycle and the convective heat flux signature suggest that a cyclic modulation of the large-scale heat-carrying convective flows could be operating inside the real Sun. We carry out an analysis of the entropy and momentum equations to uncover the physical mechanism responsible for the enhanced heat transport. The analysis suggests that the modulation is caused by a magnetic tension imbalance inside upflows and downflows, which perturbs their respective contributions to heat transport in such a way as to enhance the total convective heat flux at cycle maximum. Potential consequences of the heat transport modulation for solar irradiance variability are briefly discussed.

  6. Diffusive heat transport across magnetic islands and stochastic layers in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelzl, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Heat transport in tokamak plasmas with magnetic islands and ergodic field lines was simulated at realistic plasma parameters in realistic tokamak geometries. This requires the treatment of anisotropic heat diffusion, which is more efficient along magnetic field lines by up to ten orders of magnitude than perpendicular to them. Comparisons with analytical predictions and experimental measurements allow to determine the stability properties of neoclassical tearing modes as well as the experimental heat diffusion anisotropy.

  7. Major Variations in Sub-Tropical North Atlantic Heat Transport at Short Timescales: Causes and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moat, Ben; Josey, Simon; Sinha, Bablu; Blaker, Adam; Smeed, David; McCarthy, Gerard; Johns, William; Hirschi, Joel; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Rayner, Darren; Duchez, Aurelie; Coward, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Variability in the North Atlantic ocean heat transport at 26.5°N on short (5-day) timescales is identified and contrasted with different behaviour at monthly intervals using a combination of RAPID/MOCHA/WBTS measurements and the NEMO-LIM2 1/12° ocean circulation/sea ice model. Wind forcing plays the leading role in establishing the heat transport variability through the Ekman transport response of the ocean and the associated driving atmospheric conditions vary significantly with timescale. We find that at 5-day timescales the largest changes in the heat transport across 26.5N coincide with north-westerly airflows originating over the American land mass that drive strong southward anomalies in the Ekman flow. During these events the northward heat transport reduces by 0.5-0.7 PW (i.e. about 50% of the mean). In contrast, the Ekman transport response at longer monthly timescales is smaller in magnitude (0.2-0.3 PW) and consistent with expected variations in the leading mode of North Atlantic atmospheric variability, the North Atlantic Oscillation. The north-westerly airflow mechanism can have a prolonged influence beyond the central 5-day timescale and on occasion can reduce the accumulated winter ocean heat transport into the north Atlantic by 40%.

  8. Major variations in subtropical North Atlantic heat transport at short (5 day) timescales and their causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moat, B. I.; Josey, S. A.; Sinha, B.; Blaker, A. T.; Smeed, D. A.; McCarthy, G. D.; Johns, W. E.; Hirschi, J. J.-M.; Frajka-Williams, E.; Rayner, D.; Duchez, A.; Coward, A. C.

    2016-05-01

    Variability in the North Atlantic ocean heat transport at 26.5°N on short (5 day) timescales is identified and contrasted with different behaviour at monthly intervals using a combination of RAPID/MOCHA/WBTS measurements and the NEMO-LIM2 1/12° ocean circulation/sea ice model. Wind forcing plays the leading role in establishing the heat transport variability through the Ekman transport response of the ocean and the associated driving atmospheric conditions vary significantly with timescale. We find that at 5 day timescales the largest changes in the heat transport across 26.5°N coincide with north-westerly airflows originating over the American land mass that drive strong southward anomalies in the Ekman flow. During these events the northward heat transport reduces by 0.5-1.4 PW. In contrast, the Ekman transport response at longer monthly timescales is smaller in magnitude (up to 0.5 PW) and consistent with expected variations in the leading mode of North Atlantic atmospheric variability, the North Atlantic Oscillation. The north-westerly airflow mechanism can have a prolonged influence beyond the central 5 day timescale and on occasion can reduce the accumulated winter ocean heat transport into the North Atlantic by ˜40%.

  9. VS2DRTI: Simulating Heat and Reactive Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W; Haile, Sosina S; Parkhurst, David L; Charlton, Scott R

    2018-01-29

    Variably saturated groundwater flow, heat transport, and solute transport are important processes in environmental phenomena, such as the natural evolution of water chemistry of aquifers and streams, the storage of radioactive waste in a geologic repository, the contamination of water resources from acid-rock drainage, and the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. Up to now, our ability to simulate these processes simultaneously with fully coupled reactive transport models has been limited to complex and often difficult-to-use models. To address the need for a simple and easy-to-use model, the VS2DRTI software package has been developed for simulating water flow, heat transport, and reactive solute transport through variably saturated porous media. The underlying numerical model, VS2DRT, was created by coupling the flow and transport capabilities of the VS2DT and VS2DH models with the equilibrium and kinetic reaction capabilities of PhreeqcRM. Flow capabilities include two-dimensional, constant-density, variably saturated flow; transport capabilities include both heat and multicomponent solute transport; and the reaction capabilities are a complete implementation of geochemical reactions of PHREEQC. The graphical user interface includes a preprocessor for building simulations and a postprocessor for visual display of simulation results. To demonstrate the simulation of multiple processes, the model is applied to a hypothetical example of injection of heated waste water to an aquifer with temperature-dependent cation exchange. VS2DRTI is freely available public domain software. © 2018, National Ground Water Association.

  10. Dynamics of water transport and storage in conifers studied with deuterium and heat tracing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.C. Meinzer; J.R. Brooks; J.-C. Domec; B.L. Gartner; J.M. Warren; D.R. Woodruff; K. Bible; D.C. Shaw

    2006-01-01

    The volume and complexity of their vascular systems make the dynamics of tong-distance water transport in large trees difficult to study. We used heat and deuterated water (D20) as tracers to characterize whole-tree water transport and storage properties in individual trees belonging to the coniferous species Pseudotsuga menziesii...

  11. Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongyun; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out simulations with a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an “eyeball.” For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs’ habitable zone. This study provides a demonstration of the importance of exooceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets. PMID:24379386

  12. Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongyun; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-14

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out simulations with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an "eyeball." For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs' habitable zone. This study provides a demonstration of the importance of exooceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets.

  13. Thickness Optimisation of Textiles Subjected to Heat and Mass Transport during Ironing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korycki Ryszard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Let us next analyse the coupled problem during ironing of textiles, that is, the heat is transported with mass whereas the mass transport with heat is negligible. It is necessary to define both physical and mathematical models. Introducing two-phase system of mass sorption by fibres, the transport equations are introduced and accompanied by the set of boundary and initial conditions. Optimisation of material thickness during ironing is gradient oriented. The first-order sensitivity of an arbitrary objective functional is analysed and included in optimisation procedure. Numerical example is the thickness optimisation of different textile materials in ironing device.

  14. Transport phenomena in capillary-porous structures and heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Henry

    2009-01-01

    With emphasis on the processes involved, this text explores the experimental efforts in two-phase thermal control technology research and development. This work evaluates and compares different theoretical approaches, experimental results, and models, such as semi-empirical models for critical boiling heat fluxes.

  15. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  16. Fluctuation theory for transport properties in multicomponent mixtures: thermodiffusion and heat conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The theory of transport properties in multicomponent gas and liquid mixtures, which was previously developed for diffusion coefficients, is extended onto thermodiffusion coefficients and heat conductivities. The derivation of the expressions for transport properties is based on the general statis...... of the heat conductivity coefficient for ideal gas. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......The theory of transport properties in multicomponent gas and liquid mixtures, which was previously developed for diffusion coefficients, is extended onto thermodiffusion coefficients and heat conductivities. The derivation of the expressions for transport properties is based on the general...... statistical theory of fluctuations around an equilibrium state. The Onsager matrix of phenomenological coefficients is expressed in terms of the penetration lengths, including the newly introduced penetration length for the energy transfer. As an example, this penetration length is found from the known value...

  17. Study of Heat Flux Threshold and Perturbation Effect on Transport Barrier Formation Based on Bifurcation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatthong, B.; Onjun, T.; Imbeaux, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Strugarek, A.; Picha, R.; Poolyarat, N.

    2011-06-01

    Full text: Formation of transport barrier in fusion plasma is studied using a simple one-field bistable S-curve bifurcation model. This model is characterized by an S-line with two stable branches corresponding to the low (L) and high (H) confinement modes, connected by an unstable branch. Assumptions used in this model are such that the reduction in anomalous transport is caused by v E velocity shear effect and also this velocity shear is proportional to pressure gradient. In this study, analytical and numerical approaches are used to obtain necessary conditions for transport barrier formation, i.e. the ratio of anomalous over neoclassical coefficients and heat flux thresholds which must be exceeded. Several profiles of heat sources are considered in this work including constant, Gaussian, and hyperbolic tangent forms. Moreover, the effect of perturbation in heat flux is investigated with respect to transport barrier formation

  18. Graphene transport properties upon exposure to PMMA processing and heat treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Lene; Caridad, Jose; Cagliani, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of graphene's electrical transport properties due to processing with the polymer polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and heat are examined in this study. The use of stencil (shadow mask) lithography enables fabrication of graphene devices without the usage of polymers, chemicals or heat......, allowing us to measure the evolution of the electrical transport properties during individual processing steps from the initial as-exfoliated to the PMMA-processed graphene. Heating generally promotes the conformation of graphene to SiO2 and is found to play a major role for the electrical properties...... that flakes conforming poorly to the substrate will have a higher carrier mobility which will however be reduced as heat treatment enhance the conformation. We finally show the electrical properties of graphene to be reversible upon heat treatments in air up to 200°C....

  19. Characteristics of nonlocally-coupled transition of the heat transport in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Itoh, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Sudo, S.; Yamada, H.; Inagaki, S.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of characteristics between a nonlocal transport phenomenon and an electron internal transport barrier (ITB) in the Large Helical Device is performed with a transient transport analysis and from the viewpoint of a dynamic behavior of transport state. The electron ITB is characterized by a jump of electron temperature gradient. In contrast, the transient transport analysis indicates the nonlocal transport phenomenon is characterized by a jump of electron heat flux. And seen from the viewpoint of the dynamic behavior of transport state, the physical mechanism of the appearance of the nonlocal transport phenomenon is found to be qualitatively different from that of the formation of the electron ITB. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Integrated heat transport simulation of high ion temperature plasma of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Sakai, A.

    2014-10-01

    A first dynamical simulation of high ion temperature plasma with carbon pellet injection of LHD is performed by the integrated simulation GNET-TD + TASK3D. NBI heating deposition of time evolving plasma is evaluated by the 5D drift kinetic equation solver, GNET-TD and the heat transport of multi-ion species plasma (e, H, He, C) is studied by the integrated transport simulation code, TASK3D. Achievement of high ion temperature plasma is attributed to the 1) increase of heating power per ion due to the temporal increase of effective charge, 2) reduction of effective neoclassical transport with impurities, 3) reduction of turbulence transport. The reduction of turbulence transport is most significant contribution to achieve the high ion temperature and the reduction of the turbulent transport from the L-mode plasma (normal hydrogen plasma) is evaluated to be a factor about five by using integrated heat transport simulation code. Applying the Z effective dependent turbulent reduction model we obtain a similar time behavior of ion temperature after the C pellet injection with the experimental results. (author)

  1. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHMN) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1995-01-01

    The finite element code FEHMN is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developed hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent K d model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect 14 C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also provide that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies

  2. Nonlocal heat transport and improved target design for x-ray heating studies at x-ray free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoidn, Oliver; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2018-01-01

    The extremely high-power densities and short durations of single pulses of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) have opened new opportunities in atomic physics, where complex excitation-relaxation chains allow for high ionization states in atomic and molecular systems, and in dense plasma physics, where XFEL heating of solid-density targets can create unique dense states of matter having temperatures on the order of the Fermi energy. We focus here on the latter phenomena, with special emphasis on the problem of optimum target design to achieve high x-ray heating into the warm dense matter (WDM) state. We report fully three-dimensional simulations of the incident x-ray pulse and the resulting multielectron relaxation cascade to model the spatial energy density deposition in multicomponent targets, with particular focus on the effects of nonlocal heat transport due to the motion of high energy photoelectrons and Auger electrons. We find that nanoscale high-Z /low-Z multicomponent targets can give much improved energy density deposition in lower-Z materials, with enhancements reaching a factor of 100. This has three important benefits. First, it greatly enlarges the thermodynamic parameter space in XFEL x-ray heating studies of lower-Z materials. Second, it allows the use of higher probe photon energies, enabling higher-information content x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements such as in two-color XFEL operations. Third, while this is merely one step toward optimization of x-ray heating target design, the demonstration of the importance of nonlocal heat transport establishes important common ground between XFEL-based x-ray heating studies and more traditional laser plasma methods.

  3. Increased Ocean Heat Convergence Into the High Latitudes With CO2 Doubling Enhances Polar-Amplified Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. A.; Rasch, P. J.; Rose, B. E. J.

    2017-10-01

    We isolate the role of the ocean in polar climate change by directly evaluating how changes in ocean dynamics with quasi-equilibrium CO2 doubling impact high-latitude climate. With CO2 doubling, the ocean heat flux convergence (OHFC) shifts poleward in winter in both hemispheres. Imposing this pattern of perturbed OHFC in a global climate model results in a poleward shift in ocean-to-atmosphere turbulent heat fluxes (both sensible and latent) and sea ice retreat; the high latitudes warm, while the midlatitudes cool, thereby amplifying polar warming. Furthermore, midlatitude cooling is propagated to the polar midtroposphere on isentropic surfaces, augmenting the (positive) lapse rate feedback at high latitudes. These results highlight the key role played by the partitioning of meridional energy transport changes between the atmosphere and ocean in high-latitude climate change.

  4. The Influence of Rain Sensible Heat and Subsurface Energy Transport on the Energy Balance at the Land Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollet, S.J.; Cvijanovic, I.; Schüttemeyer, D.; Maxwell, R.M.; Moene, A.F.; Bayer, P.

    2009-01-01

    In land surface models, which account for the energy balance at the land surface, subsurface heat transport is an important component that reciprocally influences ground, sensible, and latent heat fluxes and net radiation. In most models, subsurface heat transport parameterizations are commonly

  5. Nonlinear charge transport in bipolar semiconductors due to electron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Valdovinos, S., E-mail: sergiom@fisica.uaz.edu.mx [Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Académica de Física, Calzada Solidaridad esq. Paseo, La Bufa s/n, CP 98060, Zacatecas, Zac, México (Mexico); Gurevich, Yu.G. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Departamento de Física, Av. IPN 2508, México D.F., CP 07360, México (Mexico)

    2016-05-27

    It is known that when strong electric field is applied to a semiconductor sample, the current voltage characteristic deviates from the linear response. In this letter, we propose a new point of view of nonlinearity in semiconductors which is associated with the electron temperature dependence on the recombination rate. The heating of the charge carriers breaks the balance between generation and recombination, giving rise to nonequilibrium charge carriers concentration and nonlinearity. - Highlights: • A new mechanism of nonlinearity of current-voltage characteristic (CVC) is proposed. • The hot electron temperature violates the equilibrium between electrons and holes. • This violation gives rise to nonequilibrium concentration of electrons and holes. • This leads to nonlinear CVC (along with the heating nonlinearity).

  6. Photothermal heating in metal-embedded microtools for material transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Palima, Darwin; Banas, Andrew Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Material transport is an important mechanism in microfluidics and drug delivery. The methods and solutions found in literature involve passively diffusing structures, microneedles and chemically fueled structures. In this work, we make use of optically actuated microtools with embedded metal layer...

  7. Heat and momentum transport in sheared Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, Ruby; Zhu, Yi

    This is a report on laboratory measurements of heat and momentum flux in sheared Rayleigh-Benard convection. A cylindrical annulus of water uniformly heated below and cooled above was subjected to an imposed shear by driving the bottom boundary so that it rotated steadily around the vertical axis of symmetry. The top boundary was stationary and formed part of a torsion balance. It was suspended from the laboratory ceiling by a long torsion wire. The torque exerted upon the top boundary by the fluid was measured by the twist of the torsion wire. From this angle of twist, the vertical flux of horizontal momentum was determined. The heat flux as well as the momentum flux were measured at each fixed value of Rayleigh number Ra and Reynolds number Re. The measurements were made in the range 6 × 10 6 ≤ Ra ≤ 6 × 10 7 and 38 ≤ Re ≤ 352. One of the most striling results is that at Ra near 3 × 10 7 to 5 × 10 7 depending upon Re, the dimensionless momentum flux Mo ceases its increasing trend and begins to decrease with increasing Ra. This may be described by saying that the effective viscosity decreases with further increasing of Ra. However, Mo always remained greater than unity in the range investigated.

  8. Shallow heat injection and storage experiment monitored with electrical resistivity tomography and simulated with heat transport model

    OpenAIRE

    Hermans, Thomas; Daoudi, Moubarak; Vandenbohede, Alexander; Lebbe, Luc; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater resources are increasingly used around the world as geothermal systems. Understanding physical processes and quantification of parameters determining heat transport in porous media is therefore important. To monitor the geothermal behavior of groundwater systems and to estimate the governing parameters, we rely mainly on borehole observations of the temperature field at a few locations (temperature logs or thermal response test). In analogy to research in hydrogeophysics, geophysi...

  9. Analysis for Heat Transfer in a High Current-Passing Carbon Nanosphere Using Nontraditional Thermal Transport Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol C Y; Chen, B C; Tsai, Y H; Ma, C; Wen, M Y

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the thermal transport in hollow microscale and nanoscale spheres subject to electrical heat source using nontraditional thermal transport model. Working as supercapacitor electrodes, carbon hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres needs excellent heat transfer characteristics to maintain high specific capacitance, long cycle life, and high power density. In the nanoscale regime, the prediction of heat transfer from the traditional heat conduction equation based on Fourier's law deviates from the measured data. Consequently, the electrical heat source-induced heat transfer characteristics in hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are studied using nontraditional thermal transport model. The effects of parameters on heat transfer in the hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are discussed in this study. The results reveal that the heat transferred into the spherical interior, temperature and heat flux in the hollow sphere decrease with the increasing Knudsen number when the radius of sphere is comparable to the mean free path of heat carriers.

  10. 3D modeling of groundwater heat transport in the shallow Westliches Leibnitzer Feld aquifer, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Gerhard; Kupfersberger, Hans

    2018-02-01

    For the shallow Westliches Leibnitzer feld aquifer (45 km2) we applied the recently developed methodology by Kupfersberger et al. (2017a) to derive the thermal upper boundary for a 3D heat transport model from observed air temperatures. We distinguished between land uses of grass and agriculture, sealed surfaces, forest and water bodies. To represent the heat flux from heated buildings and the mixture between different land surfaces in urban areas we ran the 1D vertical heat conduction module SoilTemp which is coupled to the heat transport model (using FEFLOW) on a time step basis. Over a simulation period of 23 years the comparison between measured and observed groundwater temperatures yielded NSE values ranging from 0.41 to 0.92 including readings at different depths. The model results showed that the thermal input signals lead to distinctly different vertical groundwater temperature distributions. To overcome the influence of specific warm or cold years we introduced the computation of an annual averaged groundwater temperature profile. With respect to the use of groundwater cooling or heating facilities we evaluated the application of vertically averaged statistical groundwater temperature distributions compared to the use of temperature distributions at selected dates. We concluded that the heat transport model serves well as an aquifer scale management tool to optimize the use of the shallow subsurface for thermal purposes and to analyze the impacts of corresponding measures on groundwater temperatures.

  11. Effect of rotational speed modulation on heat transport in a fluid layer with temperature dependent viscosity and internal heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Bhadauria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theoretical investigation has been carried out to study the combined effect of rotation speed modulation and internal heating on thermal instability in a temperature dependent viscous horizontal fluid layer. Rayleigh–Bénard momentum equation with Coriolis term has been considered to describe the convective flow. The system is rotating about it is own axis with non-uniform rotational speed. In particular, a time-periodic and sinusoidally varying rotational speed has been considered. A weak nonlinear stability analysis is performed to find the effect of modulation on heat transport. Nusselt number is obtained in terms of amplitude of convection and internal Rayleigh number, and depicted graphically for showing the effects of various parameters of the system. The effect of modulated rotation speed is found to have a stabilizing effect for different values of modulation frequency. Further, internal heating and thermo-rheological parameters are found to destabilize the system.

  12. Application of thermohydraulic dispatcher in low temperature district heating systems for decreasing heat carrier transportation energy cost and increasing reliability of heat supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavorovsky, Y. V.; Romanov, D. O.; Sennikov, V. V.; Sultanguzin, I. A.; Malenkov, A. S.; Zhigulina, E. V.; Lulaev, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Low pressure district heating systems have low breakdown rate and allow decreasing heat carrier transportation energy cost by means of avoiding throttling of available water head. One of the basic elements of such systems is thermohydraulic dispatcher (THD) which separates primary circuit and secondary circuit (or circuits) that allows avoiding mutual hydraulic influence of circuits on each other and reducing water heads of network pumps. Analysis of perspective ways of using thermohydraulic dispatcher (THD) in low temperature district heating systems is made in this paper. Principal scheme and mathematical model of low pressure and temperature district heating system based on CHP generation with THD are considered. The main advantages of such systems are pointed out.

  13. Dynamical transition of heat transport in a physical gel near the sol-gel transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya U.; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally study heat transport in a gelatin solution near a reversible sol-gel transition point where viscosity strongly depends on temperature. We visualize the temperature field and velocity field using thermochromic liquid crystals and polystyrene latex particles, respectively. During the initial stages of heating, we find that heat transport undergoes a dynamical transition from conductive to convective. Subsequently, during later stages, we observe that the transport dynamics are much more complex than conventional thermal convections. At the sample’s surface we observe the formation of stagnant domains, which lack fluid flow. Their formation is not due to the effects of local cooling. We determine that it is the dynamics of these stagnant domains that induce convective-conductive-convective transitions.

  14. The influence of meridional ice transport on Europa's ocean stratification and heat content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P.; Manucharyan, G.; Thompson, A. F.; Goodman, J. C.; Vance, S.

    2017-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa likely hosts a saltwater ocean beneath its icy surface. Geothermal heating and rotating convection in the ocean may drive a global overturning circulation that redistributes heat vertically and meridionally, preferentially warming the ice shell at the equator. Here we assess thepreviously unconstrained influence of ocean-ice coupling on Europa's ocean stratification and heat transport. We demonstrate that a relatively fresh layer can form at the ice-ocean interface due to a meridional ice transport forced by the differential ice shell heating between the equator and the poles. We provide analytical and numerical solutions for the layer's characteristics, highlighting their sensitivity to critical ocean parameters. For a weakly turbulent and highly saline ocean, a strong buoyancy gradient at the base of the freshwater layer can suppress vertical tracer exchange with the deeper ocean. As a result, the freshwater layer permits relatively warm deep ocean temperatures.

  15. EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSIS OF CAMPUS HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM OF DNIPROPETROVSK NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF RAILWAY TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Pshinko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Heat consumption for heating and hot water supply of housing and industrial facilities is an essential part of heat energy consumption. Prerequisite for development of energy saving measures in existing heating systems is their preliminary examination. The investigation results of campus heating system of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V. Lazaryan are presented in the article. On the basis of the analysis it is proposed to take the energy saving measures and assess their effectiveness. Methodology. Analysis of the consumption structure of thermal energy for heating domestic and hot water supply was fulfilled. The real costs of heat supply during the calendar year and the normative costs were compared. Findings. The recording expenditures data of thermal energy for heating supply of residential buildings and dormitories in 2012 were analyzed. The comparison of actual performance with specific regulations was performed. This comparison revealed problems, whose solution will help the efficient use of thermal energy. Originality. For the first time the impact of climate conditions, features of schemes and designs of heating systems on the effective use of thermal energy were analyzed. It was studied the contribution of each component. Practical value. Based on the analysis of thermal energy consumption it was developed a list of possible energy saving measures that can be implemented in the system of heat and power facilities. It was evaluated the fuel and energy resources saving.

  16. Nonequilibrium Green's functions in the study of heat transport of driven nanomechanical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Arrachea, L.; Rizzo, B.

    2013-01-01

    We review a recent theoretical development based on non-equilibrium Green's function formalism to study heat transport in nanomechanical devices modeled by phononic systems of coupled quantum oscillators driven by ac forces and connected to phononic reservoirs. We present the relevant equations to calculate the heat currents flowing along different regions of the setup, as well as the power developed by the time-dependent forces. We also present different strategies to evaluate the Green's fu...

  17. Nonlinear heat and particle transport due to collisional drift waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi-Kawa, K.I.; Hatori, T.; Terashima, Y.

    1978-07-01

    A nonlinear analysis of collisional drift instability is developed in a slab model based on the two fluid equations, where inhomogeneities in electron and ion temperatures and unperturbed current are included in addition to ion inertia, finite ion gyroradius, and viscosity. A systematic expansion is introduced by taking epsilon=vertical-barkappavertical-barl as a smallness parameter, where kappa is the degree of density gradient and l is the linear scale of the slab along the density gradient. The nonlinear development of the drift wave near marginal stability is studied on the basis of the model equations. A new feature, hard excitation, has been found, which is due to the effects of the nonlinear frequency shift and the electron temperature gradient. The saturation amplitude is calculated, and the expressions for wave-associated particle and heat fluxes are obtained. A comparison of the expressions with the experimental results of a stellerator device is also made.

  18. An Interactive Energy System with Grid, Heating and Transportation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz de Cerio Mendaza, Iker

    , flexibility definition and quantification, stochastic impact assessment of LV networks and control of the demand response in LV networks. In a first stage, different residential and non-residential loads are modelled with system analysis purposes. The active loads considered can be categorized as...... of this research work the control of the demand response in LV networks is tackled. The hierarchical structure presented aims to control the operation of heat pumps and plug-in electric vehicles to satisfy technical and commercial aspects of LV grids. This strategy allows system operators to perform their energy......The environmental consciousness and the fact of achieving greater energy independency have led many countries to apply important changes in their energy systems. The intensive renewable energy growth of the last decades represents the most notorious example at this moment. However, this is not only...

  19. Screening for heat transport by groundwater in closed geothermal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Heat transfer due to groundwater flow can significantly affect closed geothermal systems. Here, a screening method is developed, based on Peclet numbers for these systems and Darcy's law. Conduction-only conditions should not be expected where specific discharges exceed 10(-8)  m/s. Constraints on hydraulic gradients allow for preliminary screening for advection based on rock or soil types. Identification of materials with very low hydraulic conductivity, such as shale and intact igneous and metamorphic rock, allow for analysis with considering conduction only. Variability in known hydraulic conductivity allows for the possibility of advection in most other rocks and soil types. Further screening relies on refinement of estimates of hydraulic gradients and hydraulic conductivity through site investigations and modeling until the presence or absence of conduction can be confirmed. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  20. Computational study of heat transport in compositionally disordered binary crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyver, John W.; Blaisten-Barojas, Estela

    2006-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of compositionally disordered binary crystals with atoms interacting through Lennard-Jones potentials has been studied as a function of temperature. The two species in the crystal differ in mass, hard-core atomic diameter, well depth and relative concentration. The isobaric Monte Carlo was used to equilibrate the samples at near-zero pressure. The isoenergy molecular dynamics combined with the Green-Kubo approach was taken to calculate the heat current time-dependent autocorrelation function and determine the lattice thermal conductivity of the sample. The inverse temperature dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity was shown to fail at low temperatures when the atomic diameters of the two species differ. Instead, the thermal conductivity was nearly a constant across temperatures for species with different atomic diameters. Overall, it is shown that there is a dramatic decrease of the lattice thermal conductivity with increasing atomic radii ratio between species and a moderate decrease due to mass disorder

  1. A predictive transport modeling code for ICRF-heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.K.; Hwang, D.Q.

    1992-02-01

    In this report, a detailed description of the physic included in the WHIST/RAZE package as well as a few illustrative examples of the capabilities of the package will be presented. An in depth analysis of ICRF heating experiments using WHIST/RAZE will be discussed in a forthcoming report. A general overview of philosophy behind the structure of the WHIST/RAZE package, a summary of the features of the WHIST code, and a description of the interface to the RAZE subroutines are presented in section 2 of this report. Details of the physics contained in the RAZE code are examined in section 3. Sample results from the package follow in section 4, with concluding remarks and a discussion of possible improvements to the package discussed in section 5

  2. Heat and mass transport during a groundwater replenishment trial in a highly heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Simone; Prommer, Henning; Siade, Adam; Harris, Brett; Trefry, Mike; Martin, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Changes in subsurface temperature distribution resulting from the injection of fluids into aquifers may impact physiochemical and microbial processes as well as basin resource management strategies. We have completed a 2 year field trial in a hydrogeologically and geochemically heterogeneous aquifer below Perth, Western Australia in which highly treated wastewater was injected for large-scale groundwater replenishment. During the trial, chloride and temperature data were collected from conventional monitoring wells and by time-lapse temperature logging. We used a joint inversion of these solute tracer and temperature data to parameterize a numerical flow and multispecies transport model and to analyze the solute and heat propagation characteristics that prevailed during the trial. The simulation results illustrate that while solute transport is largely confined to the most permeable lithological units, heat transport was also affected by heat exchange with lithological units that have a much lower hydraulic conductivity. Heat transfer by heat conduction was found to significantly influence the complex temporal and spatial temperature distribution, especially with growing radial distance and in aquifer sequences with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution. We attempted to estimate spatially varying thermal transport parameters during the data inversion to illustrate the anticipated correlations of these parameters with lithological heterogeneities, but estimates could not be uniquely determined on the basis of the collected data.

  3. Superdiffusive Heat Transport in a Class of Deterministic One-dimensional Many-Particle Lorentz Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Pierre; Eckmann, Jean-Pierre; Mejía-Monasterio, Carlos

    2009-07-01

    We study heat transport in a one-dimensional chain of a finite number N of identical cells, coupled at its boundaries to stochastic particle reservoirs. At the center of each cell, tracer particles collide with fixed scatterers, exchanging momentum. In a recent paper (Collet and Eckmann in Commun. Math. Phys. 287:1015, 2009), a spatially continuous version of this model was derived in a scaling regime where the scattering probability of the tracers is γ˜1/ N, corresponding to the Grad limit. A Boltzmann-like equation describing the transport of heat was obtained. In this paper, we show numerically that the Boltzmann description obtained in Collet and Eckmann (Commun. Math. Phys. 287:1015, 2009) is indeed a bona fide limit of the particle model. Furthermore, we study the heat transport of the model when the scattering probability is 1, corresponding to deterministic dynamics. Thought as a lattice model in which particles jump between different scatterers the motion is persistent, with a persistence probability determined by the mass ratio among particles and scatterers, and a waiting time probability distribution with algebraic tails. We find that the heat and particle currents scale slower than 1/ N, implying that this model exhibits anomalous heat and particle transport.

  4. Study of heat transfer and particle transport in Tore Supra and HL-2A tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, S.

    2011-12-01

    This thesis reports on experimental studies of heat and particles transport performed on 2 large tokamaks: Tore Supra (based at CEA/Cadarache, France) and HL-2A (based at the Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, China). The modulated source is the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) for the heat pinch and density pump-out studies, while the non-local transport experiments use the Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection (SMBI) as source of modulation. The emphasis is put on the inward heat pinch. In the off-axis ECRH modulation experiments on Tore Supra with low frequency (1 Hz), strong heat inward transport has been observed, in particular for low density. Two transport models have been applied in order to analyze the experimental behavior. The first one is the linear pinch model (LPM) and the second one is an empirical model based on micro-instabilities theory, named Critical Gradient Model (CGM). Good agreement has been found for all harmonics between the experimental data and the simulation using LPM. On the other hand, good agreement has not been achieved using CGM. The density pump-out with large particles and energy losses during ECRH is commonly observed in tokamaks. A new dynamic approach using the modulation technique has been used in HL-2A for analyzing the transient phase of the density pump-out. A correlation between the turbulence increase and the density pump-out has been found. The non-local transport phenomenon, characterized by a fast transient process compared to the normal diffusive response to the perturbation is observed. Both phenomena, i.e., pump-out and non-locality, show as simultaneous variation of density and temperature. This can be an inspiration for the usage of a transport matrix which considers the density and temperature evolution together. Simulations with a simple transport matrix, with non-diagonal terms coupling temperature and density qualitatively reproduce the non-local and pump-out effects qualitatively

  5. Required momentum, heat, and mass transport experiments for liquid-metal blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; Sze, D.K.; Abdou, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Through the effects on fluid flow, many aspects of blanket behavior are affected by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects, including pressure drop, heat transfer, mass transfer, and structural behavior. In this paper, a set of experiments is examined that could be performed in order to reduce the uncertainties in the highly related set of issues dealing with momentum, heat, and mass transport under the influence of a strong magnetic field (i.e., magnetic transport phenomena). By improving our basic understanding and by providing direct experimental data on blanket behavior, these experiments will lead to improved designs and an accurate assessment of the attractiveness of liquid-metal blankets

  6. Flexibility analysis of main primary heat transport system : Narora Atomic Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, S.K.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents flexibility analysis problem of main primary heat transport system and the approximate analysis that has been made to estimate the loads coming on major equipments. The primary heat transport system for Narora Atomic Power Project is adopting vertical steam generators and pumps equally divided on either side of the reactor with inter-connecting pipes and feeders. Since the system is mainly spring supported with movement of a few points in certain direction defined but no anchorage, it represents a good problem for flexibility analysis which can only be solved in one step by developing a good computer programme. (author)

  7. Design considerations for CRBRP heat transport system piping operating at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollono, L.P.; Mello, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The heat transport system sodium piping for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) within the reactor containment building must withstand high temperatures for long periods of time. Each phase of the mechanical design process of the piping system is influenced by elevated temperature considerations which include material thermal creep effects, ratchetting caused by rapid temperature transients and stress relaxation, and material degradation effects. The structural design philosophy taken to design the CRBRP piping operating in a high temperature environment is described. The resulting design of the heat transport system piping is presented along with a discussion of special features that resulted from the elevated temperature considerations

  8. Heat transport in low-dimensional materials: A review and perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Xu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat transport is a key energetic process in materials and devices. The reduced sample size, low dimension of the problem and the rich spectrum of material imperfections introduce fruitful phenomena at nanoscale. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the understanding of heat transport process in low-dimensional materials, with focus on the roles of defects, disorder, interfaces, and the quantum-mechanical effect. New physics uncovered from computational simulations, experimental studies, and predictable models will be reviewed, followed by a perspective on open challenges.

  9. Heat transfer analysis of a volumetric solar receiver by coupling the solar radiation transport and internal heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xue; Xia, Xin-Lin; Liu, Hua; Li, Yang; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A model coupling solar radiation transport and internal heat transfer is developed. • Two other treatment approaches for the concentrated solar radiation are compared. • Porous parameters significantly affect the distribution of absorbed solar radiation. • The TBC approach overestimates the solid temperature with a deviation up to 76.4%. • The CIR approach provides acceptable temperature field with deviation less than 3.4%. - Abstract: Volumetric receivers have become a promising technology for the solar thermal conversion. The absorption of concentrated solar radiation and the heat transfer to the working fluid are the two dominant processes. To effectively investigate the thermal performance of receiver, a numerical model coupling the solar radiation transport and the internal heat transfer is presented. Solar radiation transport from the dish concentrator to the interior of receiver is simulated with the Monte Carlo ray tracing method. Combining the distribution of absorbed solar energy in the receiver, the local thermal non-equilibrium model with P1 approximation is used to solve the internal heat transfer. Two other treatment approaches for the concentrated solar radiation are compared. One considers the solar radiation on the front surface of receiver as thermal boundary condition (TBC) and the other as a collimated incident radiation (CIR) beam. The results show that the porosity and mean cell size have a great effect on the distribution of absorbed solar radiation. Compared with the coupling approach, the TBC approach overestimates the solid temperature near the front surface with a deviation up to 76.4%, while the CIR approach provides acceptable temperature field with a deviation less than 3.4%. In addition, the fluid and solid temperatures both decrease as the slope error of concentrator increases.

  10. Turbulent heat transport in two- and three-dimensional temperature fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaraweera, Don Sarath Abesiri [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1978-03-01

    A fundamental numerical study of turbulent heat and mass transport processes in two- and three-dimensional convective flows is presented. The model of turbulence employed is the type referred to as a second-order closure. In this scheme transport equations for all nonzero components of the Reynolds stress tensor, for the isotropic dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, for all nonzero scalar flux tensor components and for the mean square scalar fluctuations are solved by a finite difference method along with the mean momentum and mean enthalpy (or concentration) equations. The model used for the stresses was developed earlier. Parallel ideas were utilised in obtaining a model for turbulent heat and mass transfer processes. The study has focused especially on the problem of nonaxisymmetric convective heat and mass transport in pipes, which arises when the boundary conditions are not axisymmetric. The few available experimental data on such situations have indicated anisotropy in effective diffusivities. To expand the available data base an experiment was conducted to obtain heat transfer measurements in strong three-dimensional heating conditions. Numerical procedures especially suitable for incorporation of second-order turbulent closure models have been developed. The effect of circumferential conduction in the tube material, which is influential in the asymmetric heating data currently available, was accounted for directly by extending the finite difference calculations into the pipe wall. The principal goal of predicting three-dimensional scalar transfer has been achieved.

  11. Analytical and experimental investigations of the passive heat transport in HTRs under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, W.; Barthels, H.; Jahn, W.; Cleveland, J.C.; Ishihara, M.

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic accident analyses have been performed with computer simulation models to investigate core heatup sequences, sensitivity analyses, power variations, anticipated transients without scram, and core displacement considerations for probabilistic safety analyses (PSA) of small gas-cooled high-temperature reactors (e.g. HTR-Module). In worst case considerations where not only a loss of the active heat removal system is assumed but also a loss of the vessel cooling system, the heat would be transported into the surrounding concrete structure. In such a case the concrete would act as a natural long-term intermediate heat storage dissipating the heat through the concrete surface. Large scale and reactor safety experiments have been performed to investigate passive heat transport mechanisms -- which can cooldown a HIR core during severe accident conditions -- for validation basis of computer simulation codes used for accident analyses. In general, the comparisons of experimental and analytical results with computer calculations of the heat transport codes are in good agreement

  12. Heat pulse analysis in JET and relation to local energy transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, J.C.M. de; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Han, W.; Sack, C.; Taroni, A.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of a perturbation T e of the electron temperature depends on the linearised expression of the heat flux q e and may be not simply related to the local value of the electron heat conductivity χ e . It is possible that local heat transport models predicting similar temperature profiles and global energy confinement properties, imply a different propagation of heat pulses. We investigate here this possibility for the case of two models developed at JET. We also present results obtained at JET on a set of discharges covering the range of currents from 2 to 5 MA. Only L-modes, limiter discharges are considered here. Experimental results on the scaling of χ HP , the value of χ e related to heat pulse propagation, are compared with those of χ HP derived from the models. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Modelling of Temperature Profiles and Transport Scaling in Auxiliary Heated Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, J.D.; Christiansen, J.P.; Cordey, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    in detail: (i) a heat pinch or excess temperature gradient model with constant coefficients; and (ii) a non-linear heat diffusion coefficient (χ) model. Both models predict weak (lesssim20%) temperature profile responses to physically relevant changes in the heat deposition profile – primarily because...... that result from the models clarify why temperature profiles in many tokamaks are often characterized as exhibiting a high degree of 'profile consistency'. Global transport scaling laws are also derived from the two models. The non-linear model with χ ∝ dT/dr produces a non-linear energy confinement time (L......-mode) scaling with input power, . The constant heat pinch or excess temperature gradient model leads to the offset linear law for the total stored energy W with Pin, W = τinc Pin + W(0), which describes JET auxiliary heating data quite well. It also provides definitions for the incremental energy confinement...

  14. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHM) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1996-08-01

    The finite element code FEHMN, developed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developing hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent Kd model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The new chemical capabilities of FEHMN are illustrated by using Los Alamos National Laboratory's site scale model of Yucca Mountain to model two-dimensional, vadose zone 14 C transport. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect 14 C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also prove that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies

  15. Refrigerant Performance Evaluation Including Effects of Transport Properties and Optimized Heat Exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignoli, Riccardo; Brown, J Steven; Skye, H; Domanski, Piotr A

    2017-08-01

    Preliminary refrigerant screenings typically rely on using cycle simulation models involving thermodynamic properties alone. This approach has two shortcomings. First, it neglects transport properties, whose influence on system performance is particularly strong through their impact on the performance of the heat exchangers. Second, the refrigerant temperatures in the evaporator and condenser are specified as input, while real-life equipment operates at imposed heat sink and heat source temperatures; the temperatures in the evaporator and condensers are established based on overall heat transfer resistances of these heat exchangers and the balance of the system. The paper discusses a simulation methodology and model that addresses the above shortcomings. This model simulates the thermodynamic cycle operating at specified heat sink and heat source temperature profiles, and includes the ability to account for the effects of thermophysical properties and refrigerant mass flux on refrigerant heat transfer and pressure drop in the air-to-refrigerant evaporator and condenser. Additionally, the model can optimize the refrigerant mass flux in the heat exchangers to maximize the Coefficient of Performance. The new model is validated with experimental data and its predictions are contrasted to those of a model based on thermodynamic properties alone.

  16. Heat science and transport phenomena in fuel cells; Thermique et phenomenes de transport dans les piles a combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberatore, P.M.; Boillot, M. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique de Nancy, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Bonnet, C.; Didieerjean, S.; Lapicque, F.; Deseure, J.; Lottin, O.; Maillet, D.; Oseen-Senda, J. [Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee, 54 - Vandoeuvre Les Nancy (France); Alexandre, A. [Laboratoire d' Etudes Thermiques, ENSMA, 86 Poitiers (France); Topin, F.; Occelli, R.; Daurelle, J.V. [IUSTI / Polytech' Marseille, Institut universitaire des Systemes Thermiques Industriels Ecole, 13 - Marseille (France); Pauchet, J.; Feidt, M. [CEA Grenoble, Groupement pour la recherche sur les echangeurs thermiques (Greth), 38 (France); Voarino, C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes du Ripault, 37 - Tours (France); Morel, B.; Laurentin, J.; Bultel, Y.; Lefebvre-Joud, F. [CEA Grenoble, LEPMI, 38 (France); Auvity, B.; Lasbet, Y.; Castelain, C.; Peerohossaini, H. [Ecole Centrale de Nantes, Laboratoire de Thermocinetique de Nantes (LTN), 44 - Nantes (France)

    2005-07-01

    In this work are gathered the transparencies of the lectures presented at the conference 'heat science and transport phenomena in fuel cells'. The different lectures have dealt with 1)the gas distribution in the bipolar plates of a fuel cell: experimental studies and computerized simulations 2)two-phase heat distributors in the PEMFC 3)a numerical study of the flow properties of the backing layers on the transfers in a PEMFC 4)modelling of the heat and mass transfers in a PEMFC 5)two-phase cooling of the PEMFC with pentane 6)stationary thermodynamic model of the SOFC in the GECOPAC system 7)modelling of the internal reforming at the anode of the SOFC 8)towards a new thermal design of the PEMFC bipolar plates. (O.M.)

  17. The role of monsoon-like zonally asymmetric heating in interhemispheric transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Orbe, Clara; Waugh, Darryn

    2017-03-01

    While the importance of the seasonal migration of the zonally averaged Hadley circulation on interhemispheric transport of trace gases has been recognized, few studies have examined the role of the zonally asymmetric monsoonal circulation. This study investigates the role of monsoon-like zonally asymmetric heating on interhemispheric transport using a dry atmospheric model that is forced by idealized Newtonian relaxation to a prescribed radiative equilibrium temperature. When only the seasonal cycle of zonally symmetric heating is considered, the mean age of air in the Southern Hemisphere since last contact with the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude boundary layer is much larger than the observations. The introduction of monsoon-like zonally asymmetric heating not only reduces the mean age of tropospheric air to more realistic values but also produces an upper tropospheric cross-equatorial transport pathway in boreal summer that resembles the transport pathway simulated in the NASA Global Modeling Initiative Chemistry Transport Model driven with Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications meteorological fields. These results highlight that the monsoon-induced eddy circulation plays an important role in the interhemispheric transport of long-lived chemical constituents.

  18. Transport of Heat and Charge in Electromagnetic Metrology Based on Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Baker-Jarvis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Current research is probing transport on ever smaller scales. Modeling of the electromagnetic interaction with nanoparticles or small collections of dipoles and its associated energy transport and nonequilibrium characteristics requires a detailed understanding of transport properties. The goal of this paper is to use a nonequilibrium statistical-mechanical method to obtain exact time-correlation functions, fluctuation-dissipation theorems (FD, heat and charge transport, and associated transport expressions under electromagnetic driving. We extend the time-symmetric Robertson statistical-mechanical theory to study the exact time evolution of relevant variables and entropy rate in the electromagnetic interaction with materials. In this exact statistical-mechanical theory, a generalized canonical density is used to define an entropy in terms of a set of relevant variables and associated Lagrange multipliers. Then the entropy production rate are defined through the relevant variables. The influence of the nonrelevant variables enter the equations through the projection-like operator and thereby influences the entropy. We present applications to the response functions for the electrical and thermal conductivity, specific heat, generalized temperature, Boltzmann’s constant, and noise. The analysis can be performed either classically or quantum-mechanically, and there are only a few modifications in transferring between the approaches. As an application we study the energy, generalized temperature, and charge transport equations that are valid in nonequilibrium and relate it to heat flow and temperature relations in equilibrium states.

  19. Moment approach to neoclassical flows, currents and transport in auxiliary heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yil Bong.

    1988-02-01

    The moment approach is utilized to derive the full complement of neoclassical transport processes in auxiliary heated tokamaks. The effects of auxiliary heating [neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH)] considered arise from the collisional interaction between the background plasma species and the fast-ion-tail species. From a known fast ion distribution function we evaluate the parallel (to the magnetic field) momentum and heat flow inputs to the background plasma. Then, through the momentum and heat flow balance equations, we can determine the induced parallel flows (and current) and radial transpot fluxes in ''equilibrium'' (on the time scale much longer than the collisional relaxation time, i.e., t >> 1ν/sub ii/). In addition to the fast-ion-induced current, the total neoclassical current includes the boostap current, which is driven by the pressure and temperature gradients, the Pfirsch-Schlueter current which is required for charge neutrality, and the neoclassical (including trapped particle effects) Spitzer current due to the parallel electric field. The radial transport fluxes also include off-diagonal compnents in the transport matrix which correspond to the Ware (neoclassical) pinch due to the inductive applied electric field an the fast-ion-induced radial fluxes, in addition to the usual pressure- and temperature-gradient-driven fluxes (particle diffusion and heat conduction). Once the tranport coefficient are completely determined, the radial fluxes and the heat fluxes can be substituted into the density and energy evolution equations to provide a complete description of ''equilibrium'' (δδt << ν/sub ii/) neoclassical transport processes in a plasma. 47 refs., 14 figs

  20. The role of individual cyclones for atmospheric latent and sensible heat transport into the European Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodemann, H.; Stohl, A.

    2010-12-01

    The bulk of the atmospheric latent heat transport induced by extratropical cyclones is organized in the warm conveyor belt, also known as atmospheric rivers. In order to enhance the process understanding of atmospheric sensible and latent heat transport with these structures into the European Arctic, the magnitude and variability of the energy flux from individual cyclones in this region was studied. We applied a moisture source tracking algorithm embedded in the limited-area numerical weather prediction model (NWP) Climate High-Resolution Model (CHRM) to trace the evaporation sources and transport of water vapour from different latitude bands of the North Atlantic Ocean. September 2002 and December 2006 were chosen as initial analysis periods, since a particularly large number of cyclones (including former hurricanes) traveled within the North Atlantic storm track during these months. The main findings are that latent heat (LH) from more southerly source regions is transported at higher altitudes. Stronger storms draw latent heat from a larger area (further south), and the ensuing precipitation will hence on average originate from further south as well. Most long-range transport of LH occurs in the cold frontal bands. Individual cyclones are the main source of sub-monthly LH flux variability, and can cause up to 4-sigma variation of the mean flux. LH flux is almost permanently net positive (northward), unlike for sensible heat (SH) and other energy fluxes. Most LH that is "permanently" transferred to north of 60°N in the Atlantic storm track originates from directly south of that latitude, implying on average short atmospheric moisture lifetimes, and hence a fast energy turnover. We compare these findings to results from a Lagrangian moisture tracking method based on the FLEXPART model. Remarks with regard to differences in the transport conditions of latent head in such structures along the North American West Coast and the Norwegian West Coast will be made.

  1. The Influence of Heat Flux Boundary Heterogeneity on Heat Transport in Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C. J.; Mound, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    Rotating convection in planetary systems can be subjected to large lateral variations in heat flux from above; for example, due to the interaction between the metallic cores of terrestrial planets and their overlying silicate mantles. The boundary anomalies can significantly reorganise the pattern of convection and influence global diagnostics such as the Nusselt number. We have conducted a suite of numerical simulations of rotating convection in a spherical shell geometry comparing convection with homogeneous boundary conditions to that with two patterns of heat flux variation at the outer boundary: one hemispheric pattern, and one derived from seismic tomographic imaging of Earth's lower mantle. We consider Ekman numbers down to 10-6 and flux-based Rayleigh numbers up to 800 times critical. The heterogeneous boundary conditions tend to increase the Nusselt number relative to the equivalent homogeneous case by altering both the flow and temperature fields, particularly near the top of the convecting region. The enhancement in Nusselt number tends to increase as the amplitude and wavelength of the boundary heterogeneity is increased and as the system becomes more supercritical. In our suite of models, the increase in Nusselt number can be as large as 25%. The slope of the Nusselt-Rayleigh scaling also changes when boundary heterogeneity is included, which has implications when extrapolating to planetary conditions. Additionally, regions of effective thermal stratification can develop when strongly heterogeneous heat flux conditions are applied at the outer boundary.

  2. Decline and poleward shift in Indian summer monsoon synoptic activity in a warming climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, S; Ajayamohan, R S; Boos, William R; Sabin, T P; Praveen, V

    2018-03-13

    Cyclonic atmospheric vortices of varying intensity, collectively known as low-pressure systems (LPS), travel northwest across central India and produce more than half of the precipitation received by that fertile region and its ∼600 million inhabitants. Yet, future changes in LPS activity are poorly understood, due in part to inadequate representation of these storms in current climate models. Using a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model that realistically simulates the genesis distribution of LPS, here we show that Indian monsoon LPS activity declines about 45% by the late 21st century in simulations of a business-as-usual emission scenario. The distribution of LPS genesis shifts poleward as it weakens, with oceanic genesis decreasing by ∼60% and continental genesis increasing by ∼10%; over land the increase in storm counts is accompanied by a shift toward lower storm wind speeds. The weakening and poleward shift of the genesis distribution in a warmer climate are confirmed and attributed, via a statistical model, to the reduction and poleward shift of low-level absolute vorticity over the monsoon region, which in turn are robust features of most coupled model projections. The poleward shift in LPS activity results in an increased frequency of extreme precipitation events over northern India. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  3. Poleward propagating subinertial alongshore surface currents off the U.S. West Coast

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Sung Yong

    2013-12-01

    The network comprising 61 high-frequency radar systems along the U.S. West Coast (USWC) provides a unique, high resolution, and broad scale view of ocean surface circulation. Subinertial alongshore surface currents show poleward propagating signals with phase speeds of O(10) and O(100-300) km d -1 that are consistent with historical in situ observations off the USWC and that can be possibly interpreted as coastally trapped waves (CTWs). The propagating signals in the slow mode are partly observed in southern California, which may result from scattering and reflection of higher-mode CTWs due to curvature of shoreline and bathymetry near Point Conception, California. On the other hand, considering the order of the phase speed in the slow mode, the poleward propagating signals may be attributed to alongshore advection or pressure-driven flows. A statistical regression of coastal winds at National Data Buoy Center buoys on the observed surface currents partitions locally and remotely wind-forced components, isolates footprints of the equatorward propagating storm events in winter off the USWC, and shows the poleward propagating signals year round. Key Points A unique resource to examine synoptic-scale alongshore variability Isolation of equatorward wind events in winter using a statistical model Poleward propagating surface signals year-round © 2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Decline and poleward shift in Indian summer monsoon synoptic activity in a warming climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, S.; Ajayamohan, R. S.; Boos, William R.; Sabin, T. P.; Praveen, V.

    2018-03-01

    Cyclonic atmospheric vortices of varying intensity, collectively known as low-pressure systems (LPS), travel northwest across central India and produce more than half of the precipitation received by that fertile region and its ˜600 million inhabitants. Yet, future changes in LPS activity are poorly understood, due in part to inadequate representation of these storms in current climate models. Using a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model that realistically simulates the genesis distribution of LPS, here we show that Indian monsoon LPS activity declines about 45% by the late 21st century in simulations of a business-as-usual emission scenario. The distribution of LPS genesis shifts poleward as it weakens, with oceanic genesis decreasing by ˜60% and continental genesis increasing by ˜10%; over land the increase in storm counts is accompanied by a shift toward lower storm wind speeds. The weakening and poleward shift of the genesis distribution in a warmer climate are confirmed and attributed, via a statistical model, to the reduction and poleward shift of low-level absolute vorticity over the monsoon region, which in turn are robust features of most coupled model projections. The poleward shift in LPS activity results in an increased frequency of extreme precipitation events over northern India.

  5. Plants on the move: plant-soil interactions in poleward shifting plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunsven, van R.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    As a result of recent global climate change, areas that have previously been climatically unsuitable for species have now become suitable new habitats. Many plant-species are expanding their range polewards, colonizing these newly available areas. If these species are able to expand their range

  6. Numerical modeling of coupled water flow and heat transport in soil and snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs J. Kelleners; Jeremy Koonce; Rose Shillito; Jelle Dijkema; Markus Berli; Michael H. Young; John M. Frank; William Massman

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional vertical numerical model for coupled water flow and heat transport in soil and snow was modified to include all three phases of water: vapor, liquid, and ice. The top boundary condition in the model is driven by incoming precipitation and the surface energy balance. The model was applied to three different terrestrial systems: A warm desert bare...

  7. Stochastic Impact Assessment of the Heating and Transportation Systems Electrification on LV grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendaza, Iker Diaz de Cerio; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Chen, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    According to the new energy policy agreements, a conceptual and technological re-structuration of the Danish energy sector is expected. One of the key points for its successful implementation is the partial electrification of the heating and transportation systems. This fact, which reflects...

  8. Study of heat transport in structured soil under grass cover. Dual-continuum approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votrubová, J.; Dohnal, M.; Tesař, Miroslav; Vogel, T.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2011), s. 7414 ISSN 1607-7962. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2011. 03.04.2011-08.04.2011, Vienna] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1174 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : water and heat transport * model S1D * Sumava Mts. Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology

  9. Measurements of Combined Axial Mass and Heat Transport in He II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Warren W.; Jones, Michael C.

    An experiment was performed that allowed measurements of both axial mass and heat transport of He-II (the superfluid phase of helium 4) in a long tube. The apparatus allowed the pressure difference and the temperature difference across the flow tube to each be independently adjusted, and the resulting steady-state values of net fluid velocity and…

  10. Thermal transport in low dimensions from statistical physics to nanoscale heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Understanding non-equilibrium properties of classical and quantum many-particle systems is one of the goals of contemporary statistical mechanics. Besides its own interest for the theoretical foundations of irreversible thermodynamics(e.g. of the Fourier's law of heat conduction), this topic is also relevant to develop innovative ideas for nanoscale thermal management with possible future applications to nanotechnologies and effective energetic resources. The first part of the volume (Chapters 1-6) describes the basic models, the phenomenology and the various theoretical approaches to understand heat transport in low-dimensional lattices (1D e 2D). The methods described will include equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, hydrodynamic and kinetic approaches and the solution of stochastic models. The second part (Chapters 7-10) deals with applications to nano and microscale heat transfer, as for instance phononic transport in carbon-based nanomaterials, including the prominent case of na...

  11. Heat transport in the quasi-single-helicity islands of EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J.

    2009-03-01

    The heat transport inside the magnetic island generated in a quasi-single-helicity regime of a reversed-field pinch device is studied by using a numerical code that simulates the electron temperature and the soft x-ray emissivity. The heat diffusivity χe inside the island is determined by matching the simulated signals with the experimental ones. Inside the island, χe turns out to be from one to two orders of magnitude lower than the diffusivity in the surrounding plasma, where the magnetic field is stochastic. Furthermore, the heat transport properties inside the island are studied in correlation with the plasma current and with the amplitude of the magnetic fluctuations.

  12. The Role of Ocean and Atmospheric Heat Transport in the Arctic Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Martes, R. M.; Kwon, Y. O.; Furey, H. H.

    2017-12-01

    Observational data and climate model projections have suggested that the Arctic region is warming around twice faster than the rest of the globe, which has been referred as the Arctic Amplification (AA). While the local feedbacks, e.g. sea ice-albedo feedback, are often suggested as the primary driver of AA by previous studies, the role of meridional heat transport by ocean and atmosphere is less clear. This study uses the Community Earth System Model version 1 Large Ensemble simulation (CESM1-LE) to seek deeper understanding of the role meridional oceanic and atmospheric heat transports play in AA. The simulation consists of 40 ensemble members with the same physics and external forcing using a single fully coupled climate model. Each ensemble member spans two time periods; the historical period from 1920 to 2005 using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) historical forcing and the future period from 2006 to 2100 using the CMIP5 Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 (RCP8.5) scenario. Each of the ensemble members are initialized with slightly different air temperatures. As the CESM1-LE uses a single model unlike the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble, the internal variability and the externally forced components can be separated more clearly. The projections are calculated by comparing the period 2081-2100 relative to the time period 2001-2020. The CESM1-LE projects an AA of 2.5-2.8 times faster than the global average, which is within the range of those from the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble. However, the spread of AA from the CESM1-LE, which is attributed to the internal variability, is 2-3 times smaller than that of the CMIP5 ensemble, which may also include the inter-model differences. CESM1LE projects a decrease in the atmospheric heat transport into the Arctic and an increase in the oceanic heat transport. The atmospheric heat transport is further decomposed into moisture transport and dry static energy transport. Also, the oceanic heat

  13. Effect of coherence of nonthermal reservoirs on heat transport in a microscopic collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zou, Jian; Li, Hai; Xu, Bao-Ming; Wang, Yuan-Mei; Shao, Bin

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the heat transport between two nonthermal reservoirs based on a microscopic collision model. We consider a bipartite system consisting of two identical subsystems, and each subsystem interacts with its own local reservoir, which consists of a large collection of initially uncorrelated ancillas. Then a heat transport is formed between two reservoirs by a sequence of pairwise collisions (intersubsystem and subsystem-local reservoir). In this paper we consider two kinds of the reservoir's initial states: the thermal state and the state with coherence whose diagonal elements are the same as that of the thermal state and the off-diagonal elements are nonzero. In this way, we define the effective temperature of the reservoir with coherence according to its diagonal elements. We find that for two reservoirs having coherence the direction of the steady current of heat is different for different phase differences between the two initial states of two reservoirs, especially the heat can transfer from the "cold reservoir" to the "hot reservoir" in the steady regime for particular phase difference. In the limit of the effective temperature difference between the two reservoirs Δ T →0 , for most of the phase differences, the steady heat current increases with the increase of effective temperature until it reaches the high effective temperature limit, while for the thermal state or particular phase difference the steady heat current decreases with the increase of temperature at high temperatures, and in this case the conductance can be obtained.

  14. Analysis of photon transport in biological tissue and the subsequent heating effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadhali, M.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of laser interaction with matter revealed the possibilities of many industrial and therapeutic applications. This research article discusses the theoretical aspects of laser beam interaction with biological tissues. It introduces the numerical analysis of photon distribution and transport in the tissue and its bio-thermal heating effects. The Monte Carlo method has been applied to simulate the variation of photon distribution and photon fluence with the radial distance from the point of interaction as well as laser powers and tissue thickness. For a specific wavelength, the variation of diffuse reflectance with the absorption coefficient was depicted for different values of the anisotropy factor. It has also been used to simulate the bio-heat transfer to obtain the temperature variation with the heating depth. On the other hand, finite difference method (FDM) has been applied to simulate the heating effect resulted from the incident laser beam on the tissue based on Penne's bio-heat equation combined with the obtained photon distribution and transport parameters from the MC method. The heating effect of the laser beam and hence the occurred thermal damage in the tissue was depicted. A linear relationship between the temperature and the rate of thermal damage has been manifested. This result can be used as a threshold reference for various medical applications of lasers. (authors)

  15. Momentum, heat, and mass transfer analogy for vertical hydraulic transport of inert particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaćimovski Darko R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer in vertical liquid-solids flow, as well as in single phase flow, were studied. The aim of this investigation was to establish the analogy among those phenomena. Also, effect of particles concentration on momentum, heat and mass transfer was studied. The experiments in hydraulic transport were performed in a 25.4 mm I.D. cooper tube equipped with a steam jacket, using spherical glass particles of 1.94 mm in diameter and water as a transport fluid. The segment of the transport tube used for mass transfer measurements was inside coated with benzoic acid. In the hydraulic transport two characteristic flow regimes were observed: turbulent and parallel particle flow regime. The transition between two characteristic regimes (γ*=0, occurs at a critical voidage ε≈0.85. The vertical two-phase flow was considered as the pseudofluid, and modified mixture-wall friction coefficient (fw and modified mixture Reynolds number (Rem were introduced for explanation of this system. Experimental data show that the wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer coefficients, in vertical flow of pseudofluid, for the turbulent regime are significantly higher than in parallel regime. Wall-to-bed, mass and heat transfer coefficients in hydraulic transport of particles were much higher then in single-phase flow for lower Reynolds numbers (Re15000, there was not significant difference. The experimental data for wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer in vertical flow of pseudofluid in parallel particle flow regime, show existing analogy among these three phenomena. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172022

  16. Study of electronic heat transport in plasma through diagnosis based on modulated electron cyclotron heating; Etudes de transport de la chaleur electronique par injection modulee d'ondes a la frequence cyclotronique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemencon, A.; Guivarch, C

    2003-07-01

    In order to make nuclear fusion energetically profitable, it is crucial to heat and confine the plasma efficiently. Studying the behavior of the heat diffusion coefficient is a key issue in this matter. The use of modulated electron cyclotron heating as a diagnostic has suggested the existence of a transport barrier under certain plasma conditions. We have determined the solution to the heat transport equation, for several heat diffusion coefficient profiles. By comparing the analytical solutions with experimental data; we are able to study the heat diffusion coefficient profile. Thus, in certain experiments, we can confirm that the heat diffusion coefficient switches from low to high values at the radius where the electron cyclotron heat deposition is made. (authors)

  17. Effects of Solar Geoengineering on Meridional Energy Transport and the ITCZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russotto, R. D.; Ackerman, T. P.; Frierson, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    The polar amplification of warming and the ability of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) to shift to the north or south are two very important problems in climate science. Examining these behaviors in global climate models (GCMs) running solar geoengineering experiments is helpful not only for predicting the effects of solar geoengineering, but also for understanding how these processes work under increased CO2. Both polar amplification and ITCZ shifts are closely related to the meridional transport of moist static energy (MSE) by the atmosphere. In this study we examine changes in MSE transport in 10 fully coupled GCMs in Experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, in which the solar constant is reduced to compensate for abruptly quadrupled CO2 concentrations. In this experiment, poleward MSE transport decreases relative to preindustrial conditions in all models, in contrast to the CMIP5 abrupt4xCO2 experiment, in which poleward MSE transport increases. The increase in poleward MSE transport under increased CO2 is due to latent heat transport, as specific humidity increases faster in the tropics than at the poles; this mechanism is not present under G1 conditions, so the reduction in dry static energy transport due to a weakened equator-to-pole temperature gradient leads to weaker energy transport overall. Changes in cross-equatorial MSE transport in G1, meanwhile, are anticorrelated with shifts in the ITCZ. The northward ITCZ shift in G1 is 0.14 degrees in the multi-model mean and ranges from -0.33 to 0.89 degrees between the models. We examine the specific forcing and feedback terms responsible for changes in MSE transport in G1 by running experiments with a moist energy balance model. This work will help identify the largest sources of uncertainty regarding ITCZ shifts under solar geoengineering, and will help improve our understanding of the reasons for the residual polar amplification that occurs in the G1 experiment.

  18. The heat transport system and plant design for the HYLIFE-2 fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    HYLIFE is the name given to a family of self-healing liquid-wall reactor concepts for inertial confinement fusion. This HYLIFE-II concept employs the molten salt, Flibe, for the liquid jets instead of liquid lithium used in the original HYLIFE-I study. A preliminary conceptual design study of the heat transport system and the balance of plant of the HYLIFE-II fusion power plant is described in this paper with special emphasis on a scoping study to determine the best intermediate heat exchanger geometry and flow conditions for minimum cost of electricity. 11 refs., 8 figs

  19. Finite speed heat transport in a quantum spin chain after quenched local cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Pascal; Hinrichsen, Haye

    2017-04-01

    We study the dynamics of an initially thermalized spin chain in the quantum XY-model, after sudden coupling to a heat bath of lower temperature at one end of the chain. In the semi-classical limit we see an exponential decay of the system-bath heatflux by exact solution of the reduced dynamics. In the full quantum description however, we numerically find the heatflux to reach intermediate plateaus where it is approximately constant—a phenomenon that we attribute to the finite speed of heat transport via spin waves.

  20. A unified framework for heat and mass transport at the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponga, Mauricio; Sun, Dingyi

    2018-04-01

    We present a unified framework to simulate heat and mass transport in systems of particles. The proposed framework is based on kinematic mean field theory and uses a phenomenological master equation to compute effective transport rates between particles without the need to evaluate operators. We exploit this advantage and apply the model to simulate transport phenomena at the nanoscale. We demonstrate that, when calibrated to experimentally-measured transport coefficients, the model can accurately predict transient and steady state temperature and concentration profiles even in scenarios where the length of the device is comparable to the mean free path of the carriers. Through several example applications, we demonstrate the validity of our model for all classes of materials, including ones that, until now, would have been outside the domain of computational feasibility.

  1. Carbon transport in a bimetallic sodium loop simulating the intermediate heat transport system of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampton, L.V.; Spalaris, C.N.; Roy, P.

    1980-04-01

    Carbon transport data from a bimetallic sodium loop simulating the intermediate heat transport system of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor are discussed. The results of bulk carbon analyses after 15,000 hours' exposure indicate a pattern of carburization of Type 304 stainless steel foils which is independent of loop sodium temperature. A model based on carbon activity gradients accounting for this behavior is proposed. Data also indicate that carburization of Type 304 stainless steel is a diffusion-controlled process; however, decarburization of the ferritic 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel is not. It is proposed that the decarburization of the ferritic steel is controlled by the dissolution of carbides in the steel matrix. The differences in the sodium decarburization behavior of electroslag remelted and vacuum-arc remelted 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel are also highlighted

  2. Comparing the value of bioenergy in the heating and transport sectors of an electricity-intensive energy system in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assefa Hagos, Dejene; Gebremedhin, Alemayehu; Folsland Bolkesjø, Torjus

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the most valuable sector for the use of bioenergy in a flexible energy system in order to meet the energy policy objectives of Inland Norway. A reference system was used to construct alternative systems in the heating and transport sectors. The alternative system in the heating sector is based on heat pumps and bio-heat boilers while the alternative systems in the transport sector are based on three different pathways: bio-dimethyl ether, hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and battery electric vehicles. The alternative systems were compared with the reference system after a business-economic optimisation had been made using an energy system analysis tool. The results show that the excess electricity availability due to increased energy efficiency measures hampers the competitiveness and penetration of bio-heating over heat pumps in the heating sector. Indeed, the synergy effect of using bio-dimethyl ether in the transport sector for an increased share of renewable energy sources is much higher than that of the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and battery electric vehicle pathways. The study also revealed that increasing renewable energy production would increase the renewable energy share more than what would be achieved by an increase in energy efficiency. -- Highlights: •Bio-heating is less competitive over heat pump for low quality heat production. •Renewable energy production meets policy objectives better than system efficiency. •Bioenergy is more valuable in the transport sector than the heating sector

  3. Heat and Fission Product Transport in a Molten U-Zr-O Pool With Crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, J.I.; Suh, K.Y.; Kang, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Heat transfer and fluid flow in a molten pool are influenced by internal volumetric heat generated from the radioactive decay of fission product species retained in the pool. The pool superheat is determined based on the overall energy balance that equates the heat production rate to the heat loss rate. Decay heat of fission products in the pool was estimated by product of the mass concentration and energy conversion factor of each fission product. For the calculation of heat generation rate in the pool, twenty-nine elements were chosen and classified by their chemical properties. The mass concentration of a fission product is obtained from released fraction and the tabular output of the ORIGEN 2 code. The initial core and pool inventories at each time can also be estimated using ORIGEN 2. The released fraction of each fission product is calculated based on the bubble dynamics and mass transport. Numerical analysis was performed for the TMI-2 accident. The pool is assumed to be a partially filled hemispherical geometry and the change of pool geometry during the numerical calculation was neglected. Results of the numerical calculation revealed that the peak temperature of the molten pool significantly decreased and most of the volatile fission products were released from the molten pool during the accident. (authors)

  4. Sea Transportation of Some Agriculture Products Liable to Self-heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzenna Popek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Propensity of cargoes to self-heating is determined by many factors which can be divided into two main types - properties of the cargo and environment/storage conditions. Some agricultural products are susceptible to self-heating which can cause many serious problems during handling, storage and sea transportation of such commodities. Palm kernel shells (PKS have been shipped in bulk since 2007 but they are not a currently listed cargo in the IMSBC. PKS are a natural by-product of palm oil processing and differ materially from the palm kernel expellers currently regulated by the IMSBC Code. However, their specific characteristics and negative external influences may cause them to behave like a substance from Class 4.2 (Substances liable to spontaneous combustion or MHB cargo. Due to the importance of spontaneous combustion, particularly with respect to the storage and sea transportation of PKS, an investigation has been conducted.

  5. Heat Exchanger Design Options and Tritium Transport Study for the VHTR System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2008-09-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to consider heat exchanger options and tritium transport in a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The heat exchanger options include types, arrangements, channel patterns in printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHE), coolant flow direction, and pipe configuration in shell-and-tube designs. Study considerations include: three types of heat exchanger designs (PCHE, shell-and-tube, and helical coil); single- and two-stage unit arrangements; counter-current and cross flow configurations; and straight pipes and U-tube designs in shell-and-tube type heat exchangers. Thermal designs and simple stress analyses were performed to estimate the heat exchanger options, and the Finite Element Method was applied for more detailed calculations, especially for PCHE designs. Results of the options study show that the PCHE design has the smallest volume and heat transfer area, resulting in the least tritium permeation and greatest cost savings. It is theoretically the most reliable mechanically, leading to a longer lifetime. The two-stage heat exchanger arrangement appears to be safer and more cost effective. The recommended separation temperature between first and second stages in a serial configuration is 800oC, at which the high temperature unit is about one-half the size of the total heat exchanger core volume. Based on simplified stress analyses, the high temperature unit will need to be replaced two or three times during the plant’s lifetime. Stress analysis results recommend the off-set channel pattern configuration for the PCHE because stress reduction was estimated at up to 50% in this configuration, resulting in a longer lifetime. The tritium transport study resulted in the development of a tritium behavior analysis code using the MATLAB Simulink code. In parallel, the THYTAN code, previously performed by Ohashi and Sherman (2007) on the Peach Bottom data, was revived

  6. A note on poleward undercurrent along the southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; RameshKumar, M.R.; Rao, L.V.G.

    . The climatological data supports this observation but the wind stress further south contradicts the climatological picture. Similarly the trend of the northerly wind from Cochin to Marmagao appears to be far from reality when compared to the climatological wind... and SALAT, 1981). If the narrowing of surface currents at Quilon is associated with the topography of the sea floor which could funnel or constrict the longshore current, it might augment the intensity of upwelling close to the coast• The poleward...

  7. Advanced Intermediate Heat Transport Loop Design Configurations for Hydrogen Production Using High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Rober Barner; Paul Pickard

    2005-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic evaluations and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various

  8. Heat transport and afterheat removal for gas cooled reactors under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Heat Transport and Afterheat Removal for Gas Cooled Reactors Under Accident Conditions was organized within the framework of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs) and supports the conduct of these activities. Advanced GCR designs currently being developed are predicted to achieve a high degree of safety through reliance on inherent safety features. Such design features should permit the technical demonstration of exceptional public protection with significantly reduced emergency planning requirements. For advanced GCRs, this predicted high degree of safety largely derives from the ability of the ceramic coated fuel particles to retain the fission products under normal and accident conditions, the safe neutron physics behaviour of the core, the chemical stability of the core and the ability of the design to dissipate decay heat by natural heat transport mechanisms without reaching excessive temperatures. Prior to licensing and commercial deployment of advanced GCRs, these features must first be demonstrated under experimental conditions representing realistic reactor conditions, and the methods used to predict the performance of the fuel and reactor must be validated against these experimental data. Within this CRP, the participants addressed the inherent mechanisms for removal of decay heat from GCRs under accident conditions. The objective of this CRP was to establish sufficient experimental data at realistic conditions and validated analytical tools to confirm the predicted safe thermal response of advance gas cooled reactors during accidents. The scope includes experimental and analytical investigations of heat transport by natural convection conduction and thermal

  9. Tokamak electron heat transport by direct numerical simulation of small scale turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labit, B.

    2002-10-01

    In a fusion machine, understanding plasma turbulence, which causes a degradation of the measured energy confinement time, would constitute a major progress in this field. In tokamaks, the measured ion and electron thermal conductivities are of comparable magnitude. The possible sources of turbulence are the temperature and density gradients occurring in a fusion plasma. Whereas the heat losses in the ion channel are reasonably well understood, the origin of the electron losses is more uncertain. In addition to the radial velocity associated to the fluctuations of the electric field, electrons are more affected than ions by the magnetic field fluctuations. In experiments, the confinement time can be conveniently expressed in terms of dimensionless parameters. Although still somewhat too imprecise, these scaling laws exhibit strong dependencies on the normalized pressure β or the normalized Larmor radius, ρ * . The present thesis assesses whether a tridimensional, electromagnetic, nonlinear fluid model of plasma turbulence driven by a specific instability can reproduce the dependence of the experimental electron heat losses on the dimensionless parameters β and ρ * . The investigated interchange instability is the Electron Temperature Gradient driven one (ETG). The model is built by using the set of Braginskii equations. The developed simulation code is global in the sense that a fixed heat flux is imposed at the inner boundary, leaving the gradients free to evolve. From the nonlinear simulations, we have put in light three characteristics for the ETG turbulence: the turbulent transport is essentially electrostatic; the potential and pressure fluctuations form radially elongated cells called streamers; the transport level is very low compared to the experimental values. The thermal transport dependence study has shown a very small role of the normalized pressure, which is in contradiction with the Ohkama's formula. On the other hand, the crucial role of the

  10. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Fluid and Heat Transport in an Accretionary Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, C. A.; Ge, S.; Screaton, E. J.

    2001-12-01

    As sediments are scraped off of the subducting oceanic crust and accreted to the overriding plate, the rapid loading causes pore pressures in the underthrust sediments to increase. The change in pore pressure drives fluid flow and heat transport within the accretionary complex. Fluid is channeled along higher permeability faults and fractures and expelled at the seafloor. In this investigation, we examined the effects of sediment loading on fluid flow and thermal transport in the decollement at the Barbados Ridge subduction zone. Both the width and thickness of the Barbados Ridge accretionary complex increase from north to south. The presence of mud diapers south of the Tiburon Rise and an observed southward decrease in heat flow measurements indicate that the increased thickness of the southern Barbados accretionary prism affects the transport of chemicals and heat by fluids. The three-dimensional geometry and physical properties of the accretionary complex were utilized to construct a three-dimensional fluid flow/heat transport model. We calculated the pore pressure change due to a period of sediment loading and added this to steady-state pressure conditions to generate initial conditions for transient simulations. We then examined the diffusion of pore pressure and possible perturbation of the thermal regime over time due to loading of the underthrust sediments. The model results show that the sediment-loading event was sufficient to create small temperature fluctuations in the decollement zone. The magnitude of temperature fluctuation in the decollement was greatest at the deformation front but did not vary significantly from north to south of the Tiburon Rise.

  11. Nonequilibrium dynamics of a stochastic model of anomalous heat transport: numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfini, L; Lepri, S; Mejia-Monasterio, C; Politi, A; Livi, R

    2010-01-01

    We study heat transport in a chain of harmonic oscillators with random elastic collisions between nearest-neighbours. The equations of motion of the covariance matrix are numerically solved for free and fixed boundary conditions. In the thermodynamic limit, the shape of the temperature profile and the value of the stationary heat flux depend on the choice of boundary conditions. For free boundary conditions, they also depend on the coupling strength with the heat baths. Moreover, we find a strong violation of local equilibrium at the chain edges that determine two boundary layers of size √N (where N is the chain length) that are characterized by a different scaling behaviour from the bulk. Finally, we investigate the relaxation towards the stationary state, finding two long time scales: the first corresponds to the relaxation of the hydrodynamic modes; the second is a manifestation of the finiteness of the system.

  12. Nonequilibrium Green's functions in the study of heat transport of driven nanomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; Rizzo, Bruno

    2013-03-01

    We review a recent theoretical development based on non-equilibrium Green's function formalism to study heat transport in nanomechanical devices modeled by phononic systems of coupled quantum oscillators driven by ac forces and connected to phononic reservoirs. We present the relevant equations to calculate the heat currents flowing along different regions of the setup, as well as the power developed by the time-dependent forces. We also present different strategies to evaluate the Green's functions exactly or approximately within the weak driving regime. We finally discuss the different mechanisms in which the ac driving forces deliver the energy. We show that, besides generating heat, the forces may operate exchanging energy as a quantum engine.

  13. Controlling Heat Transport and Flow Structures in Thermal Turbulence Using Ratchet Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hechuan; Zhu, Xiaojue; Mathai, Varghese; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2018-01-01

    In this combined experimental and numerical study on thermally driven turbulence in a rectangular cell, the global heat transport and the coherent flow structures are controlled with an asymmetric ratchetlike roughness on the top and bottom plates. We show that, by means of symmetry breaking due to the presence of the ratchet structures on the conducting plates, the orientation of the large scale circulation roll (LSCR) can be locked to a preferred direction even when the cell is perfectly leveled out. By introducing a small tilt to the system, we show that the LSCR orientation can be tuned and controlled. The two different orientations of LSCR give two quite different heat transport efficiencies, indicating that heat transport is sensitive to the LSCR direction over the asymmetric roughness structure. Through a quantitative analysis of the dynamics of thermal plume emissions and the orientation of the LSCR over the asymmetric structure, we provide a physical explanation for these findings. The current work has important implications for passive and active flow control in engineering, biofluid dynamics, and geophysical flows.

  14. Controlling heat transport and flow structures in thermal turbulence using ratchet surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Jiang, Hechuan; Zhu, Xiaojue; Mathai, Varghese; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-11-01

    In this combined experimental and numerical study on thermally driven turbulence in a rectangular cell, the global heat transport and the coherent flow structures are controlled with an asymmetric ratchet-like roughness on the top and bottom plates. We show that, by means of symmetry breaking due to the presence of the ratchet structures on the conducting plates, the orientation of the Large Scale Circulation Roll (LSCR) can be locked to a preferred direction even when the cell is perfectly leveled out. By introducing a small tilt to the system, we show that the LSCR orientation can be tuned and controlled. The two different orientations of LSCR give two quite different heat transport efficiencies, indicating that heat transport is sensitive to the LSCR direction over the asymmetric roughness structure. Through analysis of the dynamics of thermal plume emissions and the orientation of the LSCR over the asymmetric structure, we provide a physical explanation for these findings. This work is financially supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11672156, the Dutch Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the Dutch Technology Foundation (STW) and a VIDI Grant.

  15. A one-dimensional heat-transport model for conduit flow in karst aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Andrew J.; Gilcrease, P.C.

    2009-01-01

    A one-dimensional heat-transport model for conduit flow in karst aquifers is presented as an alternative to two or three-dimensional distributed-parameter models, which are data intensive and require knowledge of conduit locations. This model can be applied for cases where water temperature in a well or spring receives all or part of its water from a phreatic conduit. Heat transport in the conduit is simulated by using a physically-based heat-transport equation that accounts for inflow of diffuse flow from smaller openings and fissures in the surrounding aquifer during periods of low recharge. Additional diffuse flow that is within the zone of influence of the well or spring but has not interacted with the conduit is accounted for with a binary mixing equation to proportion these different water sources. The estimation of this proportion through inverse modeling is useful for the assessment of contaminant vulnerability and well-head or spring protection. The model was applied to 7 months of continuous temperature data for a sinking stream that recharges a conduit and a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in western South Dakota. The simulated conduit-flow fraction to the well ranged from 2% to 31% of total flow, and simulated conduit velocity ranged from 44 to 353 m/d.

  16. A modelling study of the Bjerknes compensation in the meridional heat transport in a freshening ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The compensation between the meridional heat transports in the atmosphere and ocean is studied through a coupled model's water-hosing experiments. It is found that the atmospheric heat transport (AHT change compensates the oceanic heat transport (OHT change very well in the extratropics, while the former over-compensates the latter in the tropics. Similar to previous studies, the fresh water input in the high latitude Atlantic weakens the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and thus the northward Atlantic OHT significantly, leading to a warming (cooling in sea surface temperature in the Southern (Northern Hemisphere and in turn a southward shift of atmospheric convection. This results in an enhanced Hadley Cell (HC and stronger northward AHT, compensating the reduced Atlantic OHT. Meanwhile, the wind-driven Subtropical Cell in the Indo-Pacific oceans is enhanced in response to the HC change, increasing the northward OHT in the Indo-Pacific, which partly offsets the reduced OHT in the Atlantic. The response in the Indo-Pacific is responsible for the overcompensation of the AHT to the global OHT. The Held's mechanism works very well in the tropical Indo-Pacific in our experiments. This is substantially different from previous studies.

  17. Turbulent transport regimes and the scrape-off layer heat flux width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Russell, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the responsible mechanisms and resulting scaling of the scrape-off layer (SOL) heat flux width is important for predicting viable operating regimes in future tokamaks and for seeking possible mitigation schemes. In this paper, we present a qualitative and conceptual framework for understanding various regimes of edge/SOL turbulence and the role of turbulent transport as the mechanism for establishing the SOL heat flux width. Relevant considerations include the type and spectral characteristics of underlying instabilities, the location of the gradient drive relative to the SOL, the nonlinear saturation mechanism, and the parallel heat transport regime. We find a heat flux width scaling with major radius R that is generally positive, consistent with the previous findings [Connor et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 169 (1999)]. The possible relationship of turbulence mechanisms to the neoclassical orbit width or heuristic drift mechanism in core energy confinement regimes known as low (L) mode and high (H) mode is considered, together with implications for the future experiments.

  18. Transportation Stress and Expression of Heat Shock Protein Affecting Pork Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Tang, , , and

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between heat shock protein (Hsp expression and meat quality were assessed in pigs. Carcasses from 2 h- and 6 h-transported pigs had higher temperatures and lower pH and water holding capacity values in the longissimus dorsi and gluteus maximus superficialis muscles. Long journeys were associated with increased creatine kinase (CK levels. Higher CK levels are indicative of physical stress, as the enzyme is released from muscle fibers as a result of intense muscular exertion. These physiological and enzymatic changes were correlated with increased Hsp70 and decreased Hsp90 expression levels in both skeletal muscles. Animals whose cells contained high levels of Hsp may have had an advantage due to the protective role conferred by Hsp. Reduced Hsp levels were indicative of a higher meat quality and a good welfare of the transported pigs. The stress response declined over time in response to the same stress, such as a 6-h transport stress.

  19. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics, heat transport and thermal waves in laminar and turbulent superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongiovì, Maria Stella; Jou, David; Sciacca, Michele

    2018-01-01

    This review paper puts together some results concerning non equilibrium thermodynamics and heat transport properties of superfluid He II. A one-fluid extended model of superfluid helium, which considers heat flux as an additional independent variable, is presented, its microscopic bases are analyzed, and compared with the well known two-fluid model. In laminar situations, the fundamental fields are density, velocity, absolute temperature, and heat flux. Such a theory is able to describe the thermomechanical phenomena, the propagation of two sounds in liquid helium, and of fourth sound in superleak. It also leads in a natural way to a two-fluid model on purely macroscopical grounds and allows a small amount of entropy associated with the superfluid component. Other important features of liquid He II arise in rotating situations and in superfluid turbulence, both characterized by the presence of quantized vortices (thin vortex lines whose circulation is restricted by a quantum condition). Such vortices have a deep influence on the transport properties of superfluid helium, as they increase very much its thermal resistance. Thus, heat flux influences the vortices which, in turn, modify the heat flux. The dynamics of vortex lines is the central topic in turbulent superfluid helium. The model is generalized to take into account the vortices in different cases of physical interest: rotating superfluids, counterflow superfluid turbulence, combined counterflow and rotation, and mass flow in addition to heat flow. To do this, the averaged vortex line density per unit volume L, is introduced and its dynamical equations are considered. Linear and non-linear evolution equations for L are written for homogeneous and inhomogeneous, isotropic and anisotropic situations. Several physical experiments are analyzed and the influence of vortices on the effective thermal conductivity of turbulent superfluid helium is found. Transitions from laminar to turbulent flows, from diffusive to

  20. Numerical modeling of coupled thermal chemical reactive transport: simulation of a heat storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, H.; Watanabe, N.; Singh, A. K.; Nagel, T.; Linder, M.; Woerner, A.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-12-01

    As a carbon-free energy supply technology, the operation time and final energy output of thermal solar power plants can be greatly extended if efficient thermal storage systems are applied. One of the proposed design of such system is to utilize reversible thermochemical reactions and its embedded reaction enthalpy, e.g. the Ca(OH)2/CaO hydration circle, in a fixed-bed gas-solid reactor (Schaube et al. 2011) The modeling of such a storage system involves multiple strongly-coupled physical and chemical processes. Seepage velocity is calculated by the nonlinear Forchheimer law. Gas phase density and viscosity are temperature, pressure and composition dependent. Also, heat transfer between gas and solid phases is largely influenced by the exothermal heat produced by the hydration of calcium oxide. Numerical solution of four governing PDEs include the mass balance, reactive transport, heat balance equations for gas and solid phases, which are implemented into the open source scientific software OpenGeoSys in a monolithic way. Based on it, a 2D numerical model, considering the boundary heat loss of the system, was set up to simulate the energy-storage and release circle. The high performance computing techniques were employed in two stages. First, the dynamic behavior of the heat storage system is simulated on a parallel platform. Second, a large number of processors are employed to perform sensitivity analysis, whereas the reaction rates and efficiency factor of heat transfer are parameterized so that the measured and simulated temperature profile fit with each other. The model showed that heat transfer coefficient between solid and gas phase, grain size of the filling material will influence the final performance greatly. By varying these factors, the calibrated model will be further applied to optimize the design of such energy storage system.

  1. Estimating the health benefits from natural gas use in transport and heating in Santiago, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Carrasco, Marcelo; Oliva, Estefania; Saide, Pablo; Spak, Scott N; de la Maza, Cristóbal; Osses, Mauricio; Tolvett, Sebastián; Campbell, J Elliott; Tsao, Tsao Es Chi-Chung; Molina, Luisa T

    2012-07-01

    Chilean law requires the assessment of air pollution control strategies for their costs and benefits. Here we employ an online weather and chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, and a gridded population density map, LANDSCAN, to estimate changes in fine particle pollution exposure, health benefits, and economic valuation for two emission reduction strategies based on increasing the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) in Santiago, Chile. The first scenario, switching to a CNG public transportation system, would reduce urban PM2.5 emissions by 229 t/year. The second scenario would reduce wood burning emissions by 671 t/year, with unique hourly emission reductions distributed from daily heating demand. The CNG bus scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 0.33 μg/m³ and up to 2 μg/m³ during winter months, while the residential heating scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 2.07 μg/m³, with peaks exceeding 8 μg/m³ during strong air pollution episodes in winter months. These ambient pollution reductions lead to 36 avoided premature mortalities for the CNG bus scenario, and 229 for the CNG heating scenario. Both policies are shown to be cost-effective ways of reducing air pollution, as they target high-emitting area pollution sources and reduce concentrations over densely populated urban areas as well as less dense areas outside the city limits. Unlike the concentration rollback methods commonly used in public policy analyses, which assume homogeneous reductions across a whole city (including homogeneous population densities), and without accounting for the seasonality of certain emissions, this approach accounts for both seasonality and diurnal emission profiles for both the transportation and residential heating sectors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Poleward Transport Variability in the Northern Hemisphere during Final Stratospheric Warmings simulated by CESM(WACCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiéblemont, Rémi; Matthes, Katja; Orsolini, Yvan; Hauchecorne, Alain; Huret, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    Observational studies of Arctic stratospheric final warmings have shown that tropical/subtropical air masses can be advected to high latitudes and remain confined within a long-lived "frozen-in" anticyclone (FrIAC) for several months. It was suggested that the frequency of FrIACs may have increased since 2000 and that their interannual variability may be modulated by (i) the occurrence of major stratospheric warmings (mSSWs) in the preceding winter and (ii) the phase of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO). In this study, we tested these observational-based hypotheses for the first time using a chemistry-climate model. Three 145-year sensitivity experiments were performed with the National Center of Atmospheric Research's Community Earth System Model (CESM): one control experiment including only natural variability, one with an extreme greenhouse gas emission scenario, and one without the QBO in the tropical stratosphere. In comparison with reanalysis, the model simulates a realistic frequency and characteristics of FrIACs, which occur under an abrupt and early winter-to-summer stratospheric circulation transition, driven by enhanced planetary wave activity. Furthermore, the model results support the suggestion that the development of FrIACs is favored by an easterly QBO in the middle stratosphere and by the absence of mSSWs during the preceding winter. The lower stratospheric persistence of background dynamical state anomalies induced by deep mSSWs leads to less favorable conditions for planetary waves to enter the high-latitude stratosphere in April, which in turn decreases the probability of FrIAC development. Our model results do not suggest that climate change conditions (RCP8.5 scenario) influence FrIAC occurrences.

  3. Impact of thermodynamic properties and heat loss on ignition of transportation fuels in rapid compression machines

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz

    2018-01-30

    Rapid compression machines (RCM) are extensively used to study autoignition of a wide variety of fuels at engine relevant conditions. Fuels ranging from pure species to full boiling range gasoline and diesel can be studied in an RCM to develop a better understanding of autoignition kinetics in low to intermediate temperature ranges. In an RCM, autoignition is achieved by compressing a fuel/oxidizer mixture to higher pressure and temperature, thereby initiating chemical reactions promoting ignition. During these experiments, the pressure is continuously monitored and is used to deduce significant events such as the end of compression and the onset of ignition. The pressure profile is also used to assess the temperature evolution of the gas mixture with time using the adiabatic core hypothesis and the heat capacity ratio of the gas mixture. In such RCM studies, real transportation fuels containing many components are often represented by simpler surrogate fuels. While simpler surrogates such as primary reference fuels (PRFs) and ternary primary reference fuel (TPRFs) can match research and motor octane number of transportation fuels, they may not accurately replicate thermodynamic properties (including heat capacity ratio). This non-conformity could exhibit significant discrepancies in the end of compression temperature, thereby affecting ignition delay (τign) measurements. Another aspect of RCMs that can affect τign measurement is post compression heat loss, which depends on various RCM parameters including geometry, extent of insulation, pre-heating temperature etc. To, better understand the effects of these non-chemical kinetic parameters on τign, thermodynamic properties of a number of FACE G gasoline surrogates were calculated and simulated in a multi-zone RCM model. The problem was further investigated using a variance based analysis and individual sensitivities were calculated. This study highlights the effects on τign due to thermodynamic properties of

  4. Diffusive-to-ballistic transition of the modulated heat transport in a rarefied air chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Gomez-Heredia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulated heat transfer in air subject to pressures from 760 Torr to 10-4 Torr is experimentally studied by means of a thermal-wave resonant cavity placed in a vacuum chamber. This is done through the analysis of the amplitude and phase delay of the photothermal signal as a function of the cavity length and pressure through of the Knudsen’s number. The viscous, transitional, and free molecular regimes of heat transport are observed for pressures P>1.5 Torr, 25 mTorrheat transport.

  5. Study on a non-powered heat transporting system; Mudoryoku netsu hanso system ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Y. [Kanto Gakuin University, Yokohama (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    This paper proposes a non-powered heat transportation (HT) system. The system is composed of an evaporator, condenser, receiver, switching chamber (SC) and 3 check valves which are connected with each other by vapor and liquid tubes. Condensed liquid supercooled in the condenser exists in the receiver forming a saturated condition at a concerned temperature, and condensed liquid is lifted up from the condenser to the receiver by pressure difference between the evaporator and receiver. Generally evaporation pressure is higher by pressure difference between liquid levels in the condenser and receiver. The lifted up amount of condensed liquid increases with evaporation pressure, resulting in an increase in heating surface area of the condenser and amount of condensed liquid. A proper evaporator pressure is thus retained by reduction of evaporation pressure. SC is connected with the receiver and evaporator, and switches high- and low-pressure valves by motion of an inner float to transport heat from the evaporator to condenser. Reverse HT is possible as normal latent HT by installing a bypass. Some problems are also described. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  6. GEOTHER: a two-phase fluid-flow and heat-transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    GEOTHER is a three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation code. The model describes heat transport and flow of a single component, two-phase fluid in porous media. It is based on the continuity equations for steam and water, which are reduced to two nonlinear partial differential equations in which the dependent variables are fluid pressure and enthalpy. These equations, describing three-dimensional effects, are approximated using finite-difference techniques and are solved using an iterative technique. The nonlinear coefficients are calculated using Newton-Raphson iteration, and an option is provided for using either upstream or midpoint weighting on the mobility terms. GEOTHER can be used to simulate the fluid-thermal interaction in rock that can be approximated by a porous media representation. It can simulate heat transport and the flow of compressed water, two-phase mixtures, and super-heated steam in porous media over a temperature range of 10 to 300 0 C. In addition, it can treat the conversion from single- to two-phase flow, and vice versa. It can be used for evaluation of a near repository spatial scale and a time scale of a few years to thousands of years. The model can be used to investigate temperature and fluid pressure changes in response to thermal loading by waste materials. In Section 1.5 of this document the code custodianship and control is described along with the status of verification, validation and peer review of this report

  7. Heat transport through quantum Hall edge states: Tunneling versus capacitive coupling to reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Hugo; Arrachea, Liliana; Naón, Carlos; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2013-08-01

    We study the heat transport along an edge state of a two-dimensional electron gas in the quantum Hall regime, in contact to two reservoirs at different temperatures. We consider two exactly solvable models for the edge state coupled to the reservoirs. The first one corresponds to filling ν=1 and tunneling coupling to the reservoirs. The second one corresponds to integer or fractional filling of the sequence ν=1/m (with m odd), and capacitive coupling to the reservoirs. In both cases, we solve the problem by means of nonequilibrium Green function formalism. We show that heat propagates chirally along the edge in the two setups. We identify two temperature regimes, defined by Δ, the mean level spacing of the edge. At low temperatures, TΔ, finite-size effects become irrelevant, but the heat transport strongly depends on the strength of the edge-reservoir interactions, in both cases. The thermal conductance for tunneling coupling grows linearly with T, whereas for the capacitive case, it saturates to a value that depends on the coupling strengths and the filling factors of the edge and the contacts.

  8. EFFECT OF SANDSTONE ANISOTROPY ON ITS HEAT AND MOISTURE TRANSPORT PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Fořt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Each type of natural stone has its own geological history, formation conditions, different chemical and mineralogical composition, which influence its possible anisotropy. Knowledge in the natural stones anisotropy represents crucial information for the process of stone quarrying, its correct usage and arrangement in building applications. Because of anisotropy, many natural stones exhibit different heat and moisture transport properties in various directions. The main goal of this study is to analyse several anisotropy indices and their effect on heat transport and capillary absorption. For the experimental determination of the anisotropy effect, five types of sandstone coming from different operating quarries in the Czech Republic are chosen. These materials are often used for restoration of culture heritage monuments as well as for other building applications where they are used as facing slabs, facade panels, decoration stones, paving, etc. For basic characterization of studied materials, determination of their bulk density, matrix density and total open porosity is done. Chemical composition of particular sandstones is analysed by X-Ray Fluorescence. Anisotropy is examined by the non-destructive measurement of velocity of ultrasonic wave propagation. On the basis of ultrasound testing data, the relative anisotropy, total anisotropy and anisotropy coefficient are calculated. Then, the measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity in various directions of samples orientation is carried out. The obtained results reveal significant differences between the parameters characterizing the heat transport in various directions, whereas these values are in accordance with the indices of anisotropy. Capillary water transport is described by water absorption coefficient measured using a sorption experiment, which is performed for distilled water and 1M NaCl water solution.  The measured data confirm the effect of anisotropy which is

  9. Assessing the anomalous superdiffusive heat transport in a single one-dimensional PEDOT chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crnjar, Alessandro; Melis, Claudio; Colombo, Luciano

    2018-01-01

    We present a computational investigation on heat transport in a single polymer chain of poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT). By applying equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate the thermal conductivity, as well as by investigating how the polymer chain approaches equilibrium upon a local thermal excitation, we provide a robust picture assessing the anomalous superdiffusive (i.e., intermediate between ballistic and diffusive) character of its thermal transport. This assessment is provided by the present simulations showing that three scaling laws with unlike physical meaning and characterizing the thermal energy transport in one-dimensional systems indeed occur in the very same polymer chain with consistent critical exponents. In order to disentangle the effect of dimensionality, we perform a systematic comparison of transport features for a single one-dimensional (1D) PEDOT chain and a three-dimensional (3D) PEDOT crystal. Present simulations suggest that by increasing the dimensionality, the anomalous regime is completely removed as due to the occurrence of strong interchains anharmonic interactions. Finally, we prove that thermal transport in isolated single PEDOT chains belongs to a novel universality class of superdiffusion characterized by a critical exponent β =1 /2 .

  10. Mitigation of strontium and ruthenium release in the CANDU primary heat transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, J

    1998-03-01

    In certain severe accident scenarios, low-volatility fission products can appear to contribute significantly to dose, if treated with undue conservatism. Hence a survey was performed, to see if factors that may mitigate release of strontium and ruthenium could be incorporated into safety analyses, to cover parameters such as location in the fuel matrix under normal operating conditions, release from fuel, transport and deposition in the primary heat transport system and chemistry. In addition chemical equilibrium calculations were performed to investigate the volatility of strontium and ruthenium in the presence of uranium and important fission products. Strontium is very soluble in the U0{sub 2} fuel, up to 12 atom %, and hence release is improbable, particularly under oxidizing conditions until volatilization of the fuel matrix itself occurs. Ruthenium, however, can be released at low temperatures, but only under oxidizing conditions. These may occur during a fuel-handling accident or as a result of an end-fitting failure. Under these conditions, the primary heat transport system cannot be credited for retention. The volatile form of ruthenium, RuO{sub 4}(g), is thermally unstable above 381 K and decomposes to RuO{sub 2}(s) and O{sub 2}(g) upon contact with surfaces, a factor that is likely to minimize the release of ruthenium into the environment. (author)

  11. Heat and Moisture Transport and Storage Parameters of Bricks Affected by the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočí, Václav; Čáchová, Monika; Koňáková, Dana; Vejmelková, Eva; Jerman, Miloš; Keppert, Martin; Maděra, Jiří; Černý, Robert

    2018-05-01

    The effect of external environment on heat and moisture transport and storage properties of the traditional fired clay brick, sand-lime brick and highly perforated ceramic block commonly used in the Czech Republic and on their hygrothermal performance in building envelopes is analyzed by a combination of experimental and computational techniques. The experimental measurements of thermal, hygric and basic physical parameters are carried out in the reference state and after a 3-year exposure of the bricks to real climatic conditions of the city of Prague. The obtained results showed that after 3 years of weathering the porosity of the analyzed bricks increased up to five percentage points which led to an increase in liquid and gaseous moisture transport parameters and a decrease in thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of hygrothermal performance of building envelopes made of the studied bricks was done using both reference and weather-affected data. The simulated results indicated an improvement in the annual energy balances and a decrease in the time-of-wetness functions as a result of the use of data obtained after the 3-year exposure to the environment. The effects of weathering on both heat and moisture transport and storage parameters of the analyzed bricks and on their hygrothermal performance were found significant despite the occurrence of warm winters in the time period of 2012-2015 when the brick specimens were exposed to the environment.

  12. Applicability of heat and gas trans-port models in biocover design based on a case study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. A. F.; Binning, Philip John; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    . Both models used the heat equation for heat transfer, and the numerical model used advection-diffusion model with dual Monod kinetics for gas transport. The results were validated with data from a Danish landfi The models correlated well with the observed data: the coefficient of determination (R2...

  13. Optical probing of anisotropic heat transport in the quantum spin ladder Ca9La5Cu24O41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, M.; Athanasopoulos, G.; Hlubek, N.; Montagnese, M.; Labois, M.; Fishman, D. A.; de Haan, F.; Singh, S.; Lakehal, D.; Giapintzakis, J.; Hess, C.; Revcolevschi, A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.

    A transient thermal imaging technique is used to monitor heat diffusion at the surface of the antiferromagnetic spin ladder material Ca9La5Cu24O41. This material shows highly anisotropic thermal conductivity due to a large uni-directional magnetic heat transport along the ladders. The thermal

  14. An Integrated Approach on Groundwater Flow and Heat/Solute Transport for Sustainable Groundwater Source Heat Pump (GWHP) System Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Joun, W.; Park, B. H.; Park, J.; Park, I.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The GWHP system uses a stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as one of the most energy-saving and cost-efficient renewable energy techniques. A GWHP facility was installed at an island located at the confluence of North Han and South Han rivers, Korea. Because of well-developed alluvium, the aquifer is suitable for application of this system, extracting and injecting a large amount of groundwater. However, the numerical experiments under various operational conditions showed that it could be vulnerable to thermal interference due to the highly permeable gravel layer, as a preferential path of thermal plume migration, and limited space for well installation. Thus, regional groundwater flow must be an important factor of consideration for the efficient operation under these conditions but was found to be not simple in this site. While the groundwater level in this site totally depends on the river stage control of Paldang dam, the direction and velocity of the regional groundwater flow, observed using the colloidal borescope, have been changed hour by hour with the combined flows of both the rivers. During the pumping and injection tests, the water discharges in Cheongpyeong dam affected their respective results. Moreover, the measured NO3-N concentrations might imply the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality along the regional flow. It is obvious that the extraction and injection of groundwater during the facility operation will affect the fate of the agricultural contaminants. Particularly, the gravel layer must also be a main path for contaminant migration. The simulations for contaminant transport during the facility operation showed that the operation strategy for only thermal efficiency could be unsafe and unstable in respect of groundwater quality. All these results concluded that the integrated approach on groundwater flow and heat/solute transport is necessary

  15. Unified implicit kinetic scheme for steady multiscale heat transfer based on the phonon Boltzmann transport equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Guo, Zhaoli; Chen, Songze

    2017-12-01

    An implicit kinetic scheme is proposed to solve the stationary phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) for multiscale heat transfer problem. Compared to the conventional discrete ordinate method, the present method employs a macroscopic equation to accelerate the convergence in the diffusive regime. The macroscopic equation can be taken as a moment equation for phonon BTE. The heat flux in the macroscopic equation is evaluated from the nonequilibrium distribution function in the BTE, while the equilibrium state in BTE is determined by the macroscopic equation. These two processes exchange information from different scales, such that the method is applicable to the problems with a wide range of Knudsen numbers. Implicit discretization is implemented to solve both the macroscopic equation and the BTE. In addition, a memory reduction technique, which is originally developed for the stationary kinetic equation, is also extended to phonon BTE. Numerical comparisons show that the present scheme can predict reasonable results both in ballistic and diffusive regimes with high efficiency, while the memory requirement is on the same order as solving the Fourier law of heat conduction. The excellent agreement with benchmark and the rapid converging history prove that the proposed macro-micro coupling is a feasible solution to multiscale heat transfer problems.

  16. Transport investigations during neutral-beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and pellet injection experiments on TFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Neutral-beam injection and ion cyclotron frequency heating experiments have been carried out successively on TFR with inconel and carbon limiters. Heating efficiencies are for both methods lower with carbon limiters than with inconel. In the case of neutral-beam injection, the ion temperature saturation is supposed to be due to fast-ion charge-exchange losses. The electron temperature saturation is, in the two cases, correlated with small-scale density fluctuation enhancement. The difficulty of deeply modifying the electron temperature profile is also observed during pellet injection. These observations suggest that even slight modifications of the electron temperature gradients lead to enhanced transport. The role of plasma/wall interaction and recycling has not been clarified, but could be important, in particular with carbon limiters. (author)

  17. A Transport Model for Non-Local Heating of Electrons in ICP Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. H.; Bose, Deepak; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A new model has been developed for non-local heating of electrons in ICP reactors, based on a hydrodynamic approach. The model has been derived using the electron momentum conservation in azimuthal direction with electromagnetic and frictional forces respectively as driving force and damper of harmonic oscillatory motion of electrons. The resulting transport equations include the convection of azimuthal electron momentum in radial and axial directions, thereby accounting for the non-local effects. The azimuthal velocity of electrons and the resulting electrical current are coupled to the Maxwell's relations, thus forming a self-consistent model for non-local heating. This model is being implemented along with a set of Navier-Stokes equations for plasma dynamics and gas flow to simulate low-pressure (few mTorr's) ICP discharges. Characteristics of nitrogen plasma in a TCP 300mm etch reactor is being studied. The results will be compared against the available Langmuir probe measurements.

  18. Testing strategy for classifying self-heating substances for transport of dangerous goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervin, Sima; Bodman, Glenn T

    2004-11-11

    A testing strategy for the classification of self-heating substances for transport of dangerous goods is proposed. The strategy was developed based on the tests described and correlations used in the UN Recommendations. It was demonstrated that the value of activation energy of the exothermic reaction has a significant impact on the extrapolation of test results with regard to different container sizes and temperatures. Based on a combination of the Grewer Oven test screening, the 25 mm cube test at 140 degrees C, and the determination of the activation energy of a specific material, a flowchart is presented for classifying chemicals as self-heating. The presented approach allows predicting chemical stability in large containers more accurately and eliminates the need to perform hazardous large-scale tests of energetic chemicals in a laboratory.

  19. Chiral heat transport in driven quantum Hall and spin Hall edge states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    We consider a model for an edge state of electronic systems in the quantum Hall regime with filling ν=1 as well as in the quantum spin Hall regime. In both cases the system is in contact with two reservoirs by tunneling at point contacts. Both systems are locally driven by applying an ac voltage in one of the contacts. By weakly coupling them to a third reservoir, the transport of the generated heat is studied in two different ways: i) when the third reservoir acts as a thermometer the local temperature is sensed, and ii) when the third reservoir acts as a voltage probe the time-dependent local voltage is sensed. Our results indicate a chiral propagation of the heat along the edge in the quantum Hall case and in the quantum spin Hall case (if the injected electrons are spin polarized). The temperature profile shows that electrons along the edge thermalize with the closest upstream reservoir.

  20. Heat transport modeling for the design of a low enthalpy open-loop system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Piccinini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A case study of hydrogeological characterization and heat transport modeling for the design of a low enthalpy system in the Province of Treviso (Italy is here presented. It is an open loop system that pumps and re-injects groundwater from a confined aquifer of the high Veneto plain. This type of systems is the most efficient in terms of yield, but its construction is highly conditioned by the availability of groundwater resource and by the environmental laws related to groundwater exploitation. Groundwater flow modeling with MODFLOW 2005 led to a good aquifer parameters estimation, by means of the quantitative calibration of a pumping test made on the pumping well and an observation piezometer. Then, with the heat transport modeling with SEAWAT 4 the distance between pumping well and re-injecting well has been optimized, avoiding so the thermal feedback effect. The lack of sitespecific data for dispersivity parameters has been solved through a sensitivity analysis on the main dispersivity parameters of heat transport. Finally, in order to comply with the environmental laws, a long-term forecasting simulation (duration of 20 years has been set up in order to evaluate the open loop system thermal impact on the aquifer. The obtained results put in evidence that the design of low enthalpy systems strongly needs a detailed hydrogeological characterization of the aquifer interested by the pumping and that numerical modeling is the most effective tool in support of the definition of the optimal distance between pumping and re-injecting wells in the open loop systems.

  1. Events leading to foreign material being left in the primary heat transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groom, S.H.; Benton, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    On October 6,1995, following an extensive maintenance outage which had included boiler primary side cleaning, a Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system pump run was started in preparation for ultrasonic feeder flow measurements. Wooden debris in the system resulted in failure of the shaft seals of the PHT Pump 1. The subsequent investigation and assessment of this event provided an understanding of both the pump shaft failure mechanism and the origin of the debris in the PHT system. The pump shaft failed as a result of friction-generated heat resulting from contact between the rotating shaft and the stationary seal housing. This contact was initiated by mechanical and hydraulic imbalance in the pump impeller caused by wooden debris lodged in the impeller. The origin of the wooden debris was a temporary plywood cover which was inadvertently left in a boiler following maintenance. This cover moved from the boiler to the pump impeller when the PHT pumps were started. The cover was not accounted for and verified as being removed prior to boiler closure, although a visual inspection was conducted. A detailed institutional process for component accounting and verification of removal of materials did not exist at the time of this event. Details of the methods used to establish alternative heat sinks, provide debris recovery facilities and to assess the fitness for duty of the heat transport system and fuel channels prior to reactor startup are discussed in detail elsewhere. This report will concentrate on the events leading up to and following the events which ultimately resulted in failure of the PHT pump shaft

  2. Are Calanus spp. shifting poleward in the North Atlantic? A habitat modelling approach

    KAUST Repository

    Chust, Guillem

    2013-09-16

    In the last decade, the analysis based on Continuous Plankton Recorder survey in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean detected one of the most striking examples of marine poleward migration related to sea warming. The main objective of this study is to verify the poleward shift of zooplankton species (Calanus finmarchicus, C. glacialis, C. helgolandicus, C. hyperboreus) for which distributional changes have been recorded in the North Atlantic Ocean and to assess how much of this shift was triggered by sea warming, using Generalized Additive Models. To this end, the population gravity centre of observed data was compared with that of a series of simulation experiments: (i) a model using only climate factors (i.e. niche-based model) to simulate species habitat suitability, (ii) a model using only temporal and spatial terms to reconstruct the population distribution, and (iii) a model using both factors combined, using a subset of observations as independent dataset for validation. Our findings show that only C. finmarchicus had a consistent poleward shift, triggered by sea warming, estimated in 8.1 km per decade in the North Atlantic (16.5 per decade for the northeast), which is substantially lower than previous works at the assemblage level and restricted to the Northeast Atlantic. On the contrary, C. helgolandicus is expanding in all directions, although its northern distribution limit in the North Sea has shifted northward. Calanus glacialis and C. hyperboreus, which have the geographic centres of populations mainly in the NW Atlantic, showed a slight southward shift, probably responding to cool water penetrating southward in the Labrador Current. Our approach, supported by high model accuracy, shows its power in detecting species latitudinal shifts and identifying its causes, since the trend of occurrence observed data is influenced by the sampling frequency, which has progressively concentrated to lower latitudes with time. © 2013 © 2013 International Council for

  3. Semiquantum molecular dynamics simulation of thermal properties and heat transport in low-dimensional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Alexander V.; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Cantarero, Andres

    2012-08-01

    We present a detailed description of semiquantum molecular dynamics simulation of stochastic dynamics of a system of interacting particles. Within this approach, the dynamics of the system is described with the use of classical Newtonian equations of motion in which the effects of phonon quantum statistics are introduced through random Langevin-like forces with a specific power spectral density (the color noise). The color noise describes the interaction of the molecular system with the thermostat. We apply this technique to the simulation of thermal properties and heat transport in different low-dimensional nanostructures. We describe the determination of temperature in quantum lattice systems, to which the equipartition limit is not applied. We show that one can determine the temperature of such a system from the measured power spectrum and temperature- and relaxation-rate-independent density of vibrational (phonon) states. We simulate the specific heat and heat transport in carbon nanotubes, as well as the heat transport in molecular nanoribbons with perfect (atomically smooth) and rough (porous) edges, and in nanoribbons with strongly anharmonic periodic interatomic potentials. We show that the effects of quantum statistics of phonons are essential for the carbon nanotube in the whole temperature range T<500K, in which the values of the specific heat and thermal conductivity of the nanotube are considerably less than that obtained within the description based on classical statistics of phonons. This conclusion is also applicable to other carbon-based materials and systems with high Debye temperature like graphene, graphene nanoribbons, fullerene, diamond, diamond nanowires, etc. We show that the existence of rough edges and quantum statistics of phonons change drastically the low-temperature thermal conductivity of the nanoribbon in comparison with that of the nanoribbon with perfect edges and classical phonon dynamics and statistics. The semiquantum molecular

  4. Review of energy confinement and local transport scaling results in neutral-beam-heated tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    Over the past several years, tokamak neutral beam injection experiments have evolved from the brute force study of the effects of global discharge characteristics (I/sub p/, anti n/sub e/, P/sub heat/, etc.) on energy confinement to the appreciation that there are effects more subtle, yet controllable, that may influence confinement dramatically. While this evolution from first to second generation experiments is derived from an empirical understanding of low and high energy confinement modes and how to achieve them operationally, the underlying physics is still unknown. Several theories with different physical bases appear to describe the global scaling of the low confinement mode discharges quite well. On the other hand, little agreement has been found between theoretical and experimentally deduced values of local transport coefficients. While it is known operationally how to achieve any one of several types of high confinement mode discharges, here too, the underlying physics of the transport associated with these modes is poorly understood.

  5. Review of energy confinement and local transport scaling results in neutral-beam-heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    Over the past several years, tokamak neutral beam injection experiments have evolved from the brute force study of the effects of global discharge characteristics (I/sub p/, anti n/sub e/, P/sub heat/, etc.) on energy confinement to the appreciation that there are effects more subtle, yet controllable, that may influence confinement dramatically. While this evolution from first to second generation experiments is derived from an empirical understanding of low and high energy confinement modes and how to achieve them operationally, the underlying physics is still unknown. Several theories with different physical bases appear to describe the global scaling of the low confinement mode discharges quite well. On the other hand, little agreement has been found between theoretical and experimentally deduced values of local transport coefficients. While it is known operationally how to achieve any one of several types of high confinement mode discharges, here too, the underlying physics of the transport associated with these modes is poorly understood

  6. Analytical solutions for transport processes fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Brenn, Günter

    2017-01-01

    This book provides analytical solutions to a number of classical problems in transport processes, i.e. in fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer. Expanding computing power and more efficient numerical methods have increased the importance of computational tools. However, the interpretation of these results is often difficult and the computational results need to be tested against the analytical results, making analytical solutions a valuable commodity. Furthermore, analytical solutions for transport processes provide a much deeper understanding of the physical phenomena involved in a given process than do corresponding numerical solutions. Though this book primarily addresses the needs of researchers and practitioners, it may also be beneficial for graduate students just entering the field. .

  7. An Assessment of Transport Property Estimation Methods for Ammonia–Water Mixtures and Their Influence on Heat Exchanger Size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærn, Martin Ryhl; Modi, Anish; Jensen, Jonas Kjær

    2015-01-01

    Transport properties of fluids are indispensable for heat exchanger design. The methods for estimating the transport properties of ammonia–water mixtures are not well established in the literature. The few existent methods are developed from none or limited, sometimes inconsistent experimental...... of ammonia–water mixtures. Firstly, the different methods are introduced and compared at various temperatures and pressures. Secondly, their individual influence on the required heat exchanger size (surface area) is investigated. For this purpose, two case studies related to the use of the Kalina cycle...... the interpolative methods in contrast to the corresponding state methods. Nevertheless, all possible mixture transport property combinations used herein resulted in a heat exchanger size within 4.3 % difference for the flue-gas heat recovery boiler, and within 12.3 % difference for the oil-based boiler....

  8. Numerical Simulation of Density-Driven Flow and Heat Transport Processes in Porous Media Using the Network Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cánovas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Density-driven flow and heat transport processes in 2-D porous media scenarios are governed by coupled, non-linear, partial differential equations that normally have to be solved numerically. In the present work, a model based on the network method simulation is designed and applied to simulate these processes, providing steady state patterns that demonstrate its computational power and reliability. The design is relatively simple and needs very few rules. Two applications in which heat is transported by natural convection in confined and saturated media are studied: slender boxes heated from below (a kind of Bénard problem and partially heated horizontal plates in rectangular domains (the Elder problem. The streamfunction and temperature patterns show that the results are coherent with those of other authors: steady state patterns and heat transfer depend both on the Rayleigh number and on the characteristic Darcy velocity derived from the values of the hydrological, thermal and geometrical parameters of the problems.

  9. Effect of land albedo, CO2, orography, and oceanic heat transport on extreme climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Romanova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Using an atmospheric general circulation model of intermediate complexity coupled to a sea ice – slab ocean model, we perform a number of sensitivity experiments under present-day orbital conditions and geographical distribution to assess the possibility that land albedo, atmospheric CO2, orography and oceanic heat transport may cause an ice-covered Earth. Changing only one boundary or initial condition, the model produces solutions with at least some ice-free oceans in the low latitudes. Using some combination of these forcing parameters, a full Earth's glaciation is obtained. We find that the most significant factor leading to an ice-covered Earth is the high land albedo in combination with initial temperatures set equal to the freezing point. Oceanic heat transport and orography play only a minor role for the climate state. Extremely low concentrations of CO2 also appear to be insufficient to provoke a runaway ice-albedo feedback, but the strong deviations in surface air temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere point to the existence of a strong nonlinearity in the system. Finally, we argue that the initial condition determines whether the system can go into a completely ice covered state, indicating multiple equilibria, a feature known from simple energy balance models.

  10. Acoustic characterization of a CANDU primary heat transport pump at the blade-passing frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzentkowski, G.; Zbroja, S.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the acoustics of a single-stage, double-volute CANDU heat transport pump based on a full-scale experimental investigation. We estimate the strength of source variables (acoustic pressure and velocity) and establish the pump characteristics as an acoustic source at the blade-passing frequency. We conduct this analysis by first assessing the resonance effects in the test loop, and then decomposing the measured signal into the components associated with pump action and loop acoustics with the use of a simple pump model. The pump model is based on a linear superposition of pressure wave transmission and excitation. The results of this analysis indicate that the pump source variables are nearly free of acoustic resonance effects in the test loop. The source pressure and velocity are each estimated at approximately 10 kPa (zero-to-peak). The results also indicate that the pump may act as both a pressure and a velocity source. At the loop resonance, the pump acoustic behavior is exclusively governed by the pressure term. This observation leads to the conclusion that the maximum amplification of pressure pulsations in a reactor heat transport system may be predicted by modeling the pump as a pressure source. (orig.)

  11. Current & Heat Transport in Graphene Nanoribbons: Role of Non-Equilibrium Phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Gary; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The conducting channel of a graphitic nanoscale device is expected to experience a larger degree of thermal isolation when compared to traditional inversion channels of electronic devices. This leads to enhanced non-equilibrium phonon populations which are likely to adversely affect the mobility of graphene-based nanoribbons due to enhanced phonon scattering. Recent reports indicating the importance of carrier scattering with substrate surface polar optical phonons in carbon nanotubes^1 and graphene^2,3 show that this mechanism may allow enhanced heat removal from the nanoribbon channel. To investigate the effects of hot phonon populations on current and heat conduction, we solve the graphene nanoribbon multiband Boltzmann transport equation. Monte Carlo transport techniques are used since phonon populations may be tracked and updated temporally.^4 The electronic structure is solved using the NRL Tight-Binding method,^5 where carriers are scattered by confined acoustic, optical, edge and substrate polar optical phonons. [1] S. V. Rotkin et al., Nano Lett. 9, 1850 (2009). [2] J. H. Chen, C. Jang, S. Xiao, M. Ishigami and M. S. Fuhrer, Nature Nanotech. 3, 206 (2008). [3] V. Perebeinos and P. Avouris, arXiv:0910.4665v1 [cond-mat.mes-hall] (2009). [4] P. Lugli et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 50, 1251 (1987). [5] D. Finkenstadt, G. Pennington & M.J. Mehl, Phys. Rev. B 76, 121405(R) (2007).

  12. Heat Transport Compensation in Atmosphere and Ocean over the Past 22,000 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haijun; Zhao, Yingying; Liu, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; He, Feng; Zhang, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth’s climate has experienced dramatic changes over the past 22,000 years; however, the total meridional heat transport (MHT) of the climate system remains stable. A 22,000-year-long simulation using an ocean-atmosphere coupled model shows that the changes in atmosphere and ocean MHT are significant but tend to be out of phase in most regions, mitigating the total MHT change, which helps to maintain the stability of the Earth’s overall climate. A simple conceptual model is used to understand the compensation mechanism. The simple model can reproduce qualitatively the evolution and compensation features of the MHT over the past 22,000 years. We find that the global energy conservation requires the compensation changes in the atmosphere and ocean heat transports. The degree of compensation is mainly determined by the local climate feedback between surface temperature and net radiation flux at the top of the atmosphere. This study suggests that an internal mechanism may exist in the climate system, which might have played a role in constraining the global climate change over the past 22,000 years. PMID:26567710

  13. Bounds on heat transport in rapidly rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grooms, Ian; Whitehead, Jared P

    2015-01-01

    The heat transport in rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection is considered in the limit of rapid rotation (small Ekman number E) and strong thermal forcing (large Rayleigh number Ra). The analysis proceeds from a set of asymptotically reduced equations appropriate for rotationally constrained dynamics; the conjectured range of validity for these equations is Ra ≲ E −8/5 . A rigorous bound on heat transport of Nu ⩽ 20.56Ra 3 E 4 is derived in the limit of infinite Prandtl number using the background method. We demonstrate that the exponent in this bound cannot be improved on using a piece-wise monotonic background temperature profile like the one used here. This is true for finite Prandtl numbers as well, i.e. Nu ≲ Ra 3 is the best upper bound for this particular setup of the background method. The feature that obstructs the availability of a better bound in this case is the appearance of small-scale thermal plumes emanating from (or entering) the thermal boundary layer. The derived upper bound is consistent with, although significantly higher than the observed behaviour in simulations of the reduced equations, which find at most Nu ∼ Ra 2 E 8/3 . (paper)

  14. Regional climate variability and ocean heat transport in the southwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprintall, Janet; Roemmich, Dean; Stanton, Basil; Bailey, Richard

    1995-08-01

    The winter of 1992 was the coldest on record in New Zealand since the 1940s. Temperatures in New Zealand were as much as 3°C below average, with heavy rain and unusual snow. The oceanic surface layer in the southwest Pacific was also anomalously cold over the same period. A World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) hydrographic section (P14C) between Auckland and Fiji during September 1992 found cold sea surface temperatures and deep mixed layers near New Zealand when compared to 8 years of high-resolution expendable bathy thermograph (XBT) temperature measurements collected along the same transect. High nutrient and low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the surface layer indicated recent entrainment of thermocline waters. The Auckland to Fiji XBT section is one of three WOCE high-resolution XBT survey lines in the "Tasman Box" region, whose boundaries are Auckland-Fiji, Fiji-Brisbane and Wellington-Sydney transects plus the Australian coast. Geostrophic shear and transport were estimated from 10 realizations of the Tasman Box during the period 1991-1993. The time series of geostrophic transport shows that following a convergence in late 1991, early in 1992 there was a substantial divergence of mass in the upper waters, equivalent to a thinning of the warm water layer. The phase of this anomalous divergence is matched to an observed amplification of the seasonal oceanic heat storage cycle in 1991-1992. The top 200-m average temperature was warmer in the 1992 summer than in 1991 or 1993, but the winter of 1992 was the coldest of the 8-year record along the Auckland-Fiji line. The divergence (thinning) of the warm water layer appears to have preconditioned the region for the exceptionally cold 1992 winter. The alternative, cool conditions from anomalous air-sea heat exchange caused by variability in the wind field, is considered unlikely as large fluctuations in heat loss are not observed in the air-sea flux data during this period. The severe weather conditions

  15. The poleward migration of the location of tropical cyclone maximum intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossin, James P; Emanuel, Kerry A; Vecchi, Gabriel A

    2014-05-15

    Temporally inconsistent and potentially unreliable global historical data hinder the detection of trends in tropical cyclone activity. This limits our confidence in evaluating proposed linkages between observed trends in tropical cyclones and in the environment. Here we mitigate this difficulty by focusing on a metric that is comparatively insensitive to past data uncertainty, and identify a pronounced poleward migration in the average latitude at which tropical cyclones have achieved their lifetime-maximum intensity over the past 30 years. The poleward trends are evident in the global historical data in both the Northern and the Southern hemispheres, with rates of 53 and 62 kilometres per decade, respectively, and are statistically significant. When considered together, the trends in each hemisphere depict a global-average migration of tropical cyclone activity away from the tropics at a rate of about one degree of latitude per decade, which lies within the range of estimates of the observed expansion of the tropics over the same period. The global migration remains evident and statistically significant under a formal data homogenization procedure, and is unlikely to be a data artefact. The migration away from the tropics is apparently linked to marked changes in the mean meridional structure of environmental vertical wind shear and potential intensity, and can plausibly be linked to tropical expansion, which is thought to have anthropogenic contributions.

  16. Effects of molecular structure on microscopic heat transport in chain polymer liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Hiroki, E-mail: matsubara@microheat.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp; Kikugawa, Gota; Ohara, Taku [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Bessho, Takeshi; Yamashita, Seiji [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan)

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, we discuss the molecular mechanism of the heat conduction in a liquid, based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a systematic series of linear- and branched alkane liquids, as a continuation of our previous study on linear alkane [T. Ohara et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034507 (2011)]. The thermal conductivities for these alkanes in a saturated liquid state at the same reduced temperature (0.7T{sub c}) obtained from the simulations are compared in relation to the structural difference of the liquids. In order to connect the thermal energy transport characteristics with molecular structures, we introduce the new concept of the interatomic path of heat transfer (atomistic heat path, AHP), which is defined for each type of inter- and intramolecular interaction. It is found that the efficiency of intermolecular AHP is sensitive to the structure of the first neighbor shell, whereas that of intramolecular AHP is similar for different alkane species. The dependence of thermal conductivity on different lengths of the main and side chain can be understood from the natures of these inter- and intramolecular AHPs.

  17. Confinement-induced heat-transport enhancement in turbulent thermal convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Di; Kaczorowski, Matthias; Ni, Rui; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2013-09-06

    We report an experimental and numerical study of the effect of spatial confinement in turbulent thermal convection. It is found that when the width of the convection cell is narrowed, the heat-transfer efficiency increases significantly despite the fact that the overall flow is slowed down by the increased drag force from the sidewalls. Detailed experimental and numerical studies show that this enhancement is brought about by the changes in the dynamics and morphology of the thermal plumes in the boundary layers and in the large-scale flow structures in the bulk. It is found that the confined geometry produces more coherent and energetic hot and cold plume clusters that go up and down in random locations, resulting in more uniform and thinner thermal boundary layers. The study demonstrates how changes in turbulent bulk flow can influence the boundary layer dynamics and shows that the prevalent mode of heat transfer existing in larger aspect ratio convection cells, in which hot and cold thermal plumes are carried by the large-scale circulation along opposite sides of the sidewall, is not the most efficient way for heat transport.

  18. Transport of laser accelerated proton beams and isochoric heating of matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, M; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Harres, K [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bagnoud, V [GSI Helmholtzzentrum f. Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brown, C; Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Clarke, R; Heathcote, R; Li, B [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX14 OQX (United Kingdom); Daido, H [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, Kizugawa-City, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Fernandez, J; Flippo, K; Gaillard, S; Gauthier, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Glenzer, S; Kritcher, A; Kugland, N; LePape, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Makita, M, E-mail: markus.roth@physik.tu-darmstadt.d [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. We report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  19. Demonstrating Hybrid Heat Transport and Energy Conversion System Performance Characterization Using Intelligent Control Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrum, Lee; Manic, Milos

    2017-01-01

    The debate continues on the magnitude and validity of climate change caused by human activities. However, there is no debate about the need to make buildings, modes of transportation, factories, and homes as energy efficient as possible. Given that climate change could occur with the wasteful use of fossil fuel and the fact that fossil energy costs could and will swing wildly, it is imperative that every effort be made to utilize energy sources to their fullest. Hybrid energy systems (HES) are two or more separate energy producers used together to produce energy commodities. The HES this report focuses on is the use of nuclear reactor waste heat as a source of further energy utilization. Nuclear reactors use a fluid to cool the core and produce the steam needed for the production of electricity. Traditionally this steam, or coolant, is used to convert the energy then cooled elsewhere. The heat is released into the environment without being used further. By adding technologies to nuclear reactors to use the wasted heat, a system can be developed to make more than just electricity and allow for loading following capabilities.

  20. Demonstrating Hybrid Heat Transport and Energy Conversion System Performance Characterization Using Intelligent Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrum, Lee [Univ. of Idaho and Idaho Falls Center, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Manic, Milos [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The debate continues on the magnitude and validity of climate change caused by human activities. However, there is no debate about the need to make buildings, modes of transportation, factories, and homes as energy efficient as possible. Given that climate change could occur with the wasteful use of fossil fuel and the fact that fossil energy costs could and will swing wildly, it is imperative that every effort be made to utilize energy sources to their fullest. Hybrid energy systems (HES) are two or more separate energy producers used together to produce energy commodities. The HES this report focuses on is the use of nuclear reactor waste heat as a source of further energy utilization. Nuclear reactors use a fluid to cool the core and produce the steam needed for the production of electricity. Traditionally this steam, or coolant, is used to convert the energy then cooled elsewhere. The heat is released into the environment without being used further. By adding technologies to nuclear reactors to use the wasted heat, a system can be developed to make more than just electricity and allow for loading following capabilities.

  1. Chiral heat transport in driven quantum Hall and quantum spin Hall edge states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    We consider a model for an edge state of electronic systems in the quantum Hall regime with filling ν=1 and in the quantum spin Hall regime. In both cases, the system is in contact with two reservoirs by tunneling at point contacts. Both systems are locally driven by applying an ac voltage in one of the contacts. By weakly coupling them to a third reservoir, the transport of the generated heat is studied in two different ways: (i) when the third reservoir acts as a thermometer, the local temperature is sensed and (ii) when the third reservoir acts as a voltage probe, the time-dependent local voltage is sensed. Our results indicate a chiral propagation of the heat along the edge in the quantum Hall and in the quantum spin Hall cases (if the injected electrons are spin polarized). We also show that a analogous picture is obtained if instead of heating by ac driving the system is put in contact to a stationary reservoir at a higher temperature. In both cases, the temperature profile shows that the electrons along the edge thermalize with the closest “upstream” reservoir.

  2. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  3. Influence of fission product transport on delayed neutron precursors and decay heat sources in LMFBR accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apperson, C.E. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for studying the influence of fission product transpot on delayed neutron precursors and decay heat sources during Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) unprotected accidents. The model represents the LMFBR core as a closed homogeneous cell. Thermodynamic phase equilibrium theory is used to predict fission product mobility. Reactor kinetics behavior is analyzed by an extension of point kinetics theory. Group dependent delayed neutron precursor and decay heat source retention factors, which represent the fraction of each group retained in the fuel, are developed to link the kinetics and thermodynamics analysis. Application of the method to a highly simplified model of an unprotected loss-of-flow accident shows a time delay on the order of 10 ms is introduced in the predisassembly power history if fission product motion is considered when compared to the traditional transient solution. The post-transient influence of fission product transport calculated by the present model is a 24 percent reduction in the decay heat level in the fuel material which is similar to traditional approximations. Isotopes of the noble gases, Kr and Xe, and the elements I and Br are shown to be very mobile and are responsible for a major part of the observed effects. Isotopes of the elements Cs, Se, Rb, and Te were found to be moderately mobile and contribute to a lesser extent to the observed phenomena. These results obtained from the application of the described model confirm the initial hypothesis that sufficient fission product transport can occur to influence a transient. For these reasons, it is concluded that extension of this model into a multi-cell transient analysis code is warranted

  4. Changing transport processes in the stratosphere by radiative heating of sulfate aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Niemeier

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The injection of sulfur dioxide (SO2 into the stratosphere to form an artificial stratospheric aerosol layer is discussed as an option for solar radiation management. Sulfate aerosol scatters solar radiation and absorbs infrared radiation, which warms the stratospheric sulfur layer. Simulations with the general circulation model ECHAM5-HAM, including aerosol microphysics, show consequences of this warming, including changes of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO in the tropics. The QBO slows down after an injection of 4 Tg(S yr−1 and completely shuts down after an injection of 8 Tg(S yr−1. Transport of species in the tropics and sub-tropics depends on the phase of the QBO. Consequently, the heated aerosol layer not only impacts the oscillation of the QBO but also the meridional transport of the sulfate aerosols. The stronger the injection, the stronger the heating and the simulated impact on the QBO and equatorial wind systems. With increasing injection rate the velocity of the equatorial jet streams increases, and the less sulfate is transported out of the tropics. This reduces the global distribution of sulfate and decreases the radiative forcing efficiency of the aerosol layer by 10 to 14 % compared to simulations with low vertical resolution and without generated QBO. Increasing the height of the injection increases the radiative forcing only for injection rates below 10 Tg(S yr−1 (8–18 %, a much smaller value than the 50 % calculated previously. Stronger injection rates at higher levels even result in smaller forcing than the injections at lower levels.

  5. A model of recovering the parameters of fast nonlocal heat transport in magnetic fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Kulichenko, A. A.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Sokolov, A. V.; Voloshinov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    A model is elaborated for interpreting the initial stage of the fast nonlocal transport events, which exhibit immediate response, in the diffusion time scale, of the spatial profile of electron temperature to its local perturbation, while the net heat flux is directed opposite to ordinary diffusion (i.e. along the temperature gradient). We solve the inverse problem of recovering the kernel of the integral equation, which describes nonlocal (superdiffusive) transport of energy due to emission and absorption of electromagnetic (EM) waves with long free path and strong reflection from the vacuum vessel’s wall. To allow for the errors of experimental data, we use the method based on the regularized (in the framework of an ill-posed problem, using the parametric models) approximation of available experimental data. The model is applied to interpreting the data from stellarator LHD and tokamak TFTR. The EM wave transport is considered here in the single-group approximation, however the limitations of the physics model enable us to identify the spectral range of the EM waves which might be responsible for the observed phenomenon.

  6. Heat transport in the high-pressure ice mantle of large icy moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choblet, Gael; Tobie, Gabriel; Sotin, Christophe; Kalousova, Klara; Grasset, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    While the existence of a buried ocean sandwiched between surface ice and high-pressure (HP) polymorphs of ice emerges as the most plausible structure for the hundreds-of-kilometers thick hydrospheres within large icy moons of the Solar System (Ganymede, Callisto, Titan), little is known about the thermal structure of the deep HP ice mantle and its dynamics, possibly involving melt production and extraction. This has major implications for the thermal history of these objects as well as on the habitability of their ocean as the HP ice mantle is presumed to limit chemical transport from the rock component to the ocean. Here, we describe 3D spherical simulations of subsolidus thermal convection tailored to the specific structure of the HP ice mantle of large icy moons. Melt production is monitored and melt transport is simplified by assuming instantaneous extraction to the ocean above. The two controlling parameters for these models are the rheology of ice VI and the heat flux from the rock core. Reasonable end-members are considered for both parameters as disagreement remains on the former (especially the pressure effect on viscosity) and as the latter is expected to vary significantly during the moon's history. We show that the heat power produced by radioactive decay within the rock core is mainly transported through the HP ice mantle by melt extraction to the ocean, with most of the melt produced directly above the rock/water interface. While the average temperature in the bulk of the HP ice mantle is always relatively cool when compared to the value at the interface with the rock core (˜ 5 K above the value at the surface of the HP ice mantle), maximum temperatures at all depths are close to the melting point, often leading to the interconnection of a melt path via hot convective plume conduits throughout the HP ice mantle. Overall, we predict long periods of time during these moons' history where water generated in contact with the rock core is transported to

  7. An examination of the proposition to use membrane transport in an aqueous solution absorption heat pump cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J. S.; Haskin, W. L.; Chang, W. S.

    1990-06-01

    A thermal transfer cycle utilizing membrane osmotic transport of water against a pressure rise is investigated from the viewpoint of the operation of a conventional absorption heat pump using an aqueous solution as the working fluid. Physical sorption, similar or equivalent to condensation, of water vapor in the membrane material is considered to be an essential step in the overall process of water transport. The thermal nature of this step during which the heat of sorption similar in amount to the heat of condensation for water vapor must evolve at the evaporator temperature or lower disqualifies the system in performance as a heat pump. Simple flow relations for the aqueous sugar solution are derived under simplifying assumptions. A set of numerical calculations is given as an illustration to show that the inferred steps are well within the limits of thermodynamics.

  8. Numerical investigation of plasma edge transport and limiter heat fluxes in Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas with EMC3-EIRENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberg, F.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Bozhenkov, S. A.; Hölbe, H.; König, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Reiter, D.; Stephey, L.; W7-X Team

    2017-03-01

    The results of a first systematic assessment of plasma edge transport processes for the limiter startup configuration at Wendelstein 7-X are presented. This includes an investigation of transport from intrinsic and externally injected impurities and their impact on the power balance and limiter heat fluxes. The fully 3D coupled plasma fluid and kinetic neutral transport Monte Carlo code EMC3-EIRENE is used. The analysis of the magnetic topology shows that the poloidally and toroidally localized limiters cause a 3D helical scrape-off layer (SOL) consisting of magnetic flux tubes of three different connection lengths L C. The transport in the helical SOL is governed by L C as topological scale length for the parallel plasma loss channel to the limiters. A clear modulation of the plasma pressure with L C is seen. The helical flux tube topology results in counter streaming sonic plasma flows. The heterogeneous SOL plasma structure yields an uneven limiter heat load distribution with localized peaking. Assuming spatially constant anomalous transport coefficients, increasing plasma density yields a reduction of the maximum peak heat loads from 12 MWm-2 to 7.5 MWm-2 and a broadening of the deposited heat fluxes. The impact of impurities on the limiter heat loads is studied by assuming intrinsic carbon impurities eroded from the limiter surfaces with a gross chemical sputtering yield of 2 % . The resulting radiative losses account for less than 10% of the input power in the power balance with marginal impact on the limiter heat loads. It is shown that a significant mitigation of peak heat loads, 40-50%, can be achieved with controlled impurity seeding with nitrogen and neon, which is a method of particular interest for the later island divertor phase.

  9. Single-phase pump model for analysis of LMFBR heat transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madni, I.K.; Cazzoli, E.

    1978-05-01

    A single-phase pump model for transient and steady-state analysis of LMFBR heat transport systems is presented. Fundamental equations of the model are angular momentum balance to determine transient impeller speed and mass balance (including thermal expansion effects) to determine the level of sodium in the pump tank. Pump characteristics are modeled by homologous head and torque relations. All regions of pump operation are represented with reverse rotation allowed. The model also includes option for enthalpy rise calculations and pony motor operation. During steady state, the pump operating speed is determined by matching required head with total load in the circuit. Calculated transient results are presented for pump coastdown and double-ended pipe break accidents. The report examines the influence of frictional torque and specific speed on predicted response for the pump coastdown to natural circulation transient. The results for a double-ended pipe break accident indicate the necessity of including all regions of operation for pump characteristics

  10. Analysis of data obtained in two-phase flow tests of primary heat transport pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, T.C.

    1986-06-01

    This report analyzes data obtained in two-phase flow tests of primary heat transport pumps performed during the period 1980-1983. Phenomena which have been known to cause pump-induced flow oscillations in pressurized piping systems under two-phase conditions are reviewed and the data analyzed to determine whether any of the identified phenomena could have been responsible for the instabilities observed in those tests. Tentative explanations for the most severe instabilities are given based on those analyses. It is shown that suction pipe geometry probably plays an important role in promoting instabilities, so additional experiments to investigate the effect of suction pipe geometry on the stability of flow in a closed pipe loop under two-phase conditions are recommended

  11. Output feedback control of heat transport mechanisms in parabolic distributed solar collectors

    KAUST Repository

    Elmetennani, Shahrazed

    2016-08-05

    This paper presents an output feedback control for distributed parabolic solar collectors. The controller aims at forcing the outlet temperature to track a desired reference in order to manage the produced heat despite the external disturbances. The proposed control strategy is derived using the distributed physical model of the system to avoid the loss of information due to model approximation schemes. The system dynamics are driven to follow reference dynamics defined by a transport equation with a constant velocity, which allows to control the transient behavior and the response time of the closed loop. The designed controller depends only on the accessible measured variables which makes it easy for real time implementation and useful for industrial plants. Simulation results show the efficiency of the reference tracking closed loop under different working conditions.

  12. Primary heat transport pump mechanical seal replacement strategy for Pickering B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacinsi, V.

    1995-01-01

    Pickering Nuclear Generating Station is a CANDU PHWR eight unit station located on Lake Ontario. The station is divided into Pickering A (Units 1 to 4) and Pickering B (Units 5 to 8). Pickering B is the focus of this paper. Each unit is rated at 540 MWe. The Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system, which is used to cool the fuel, is divided into four quadrants. Each quadrant has four vertical Byron Jackson PHT main circulation pumps. Three pumps in each quadrant are required for normal operation, leaving one pump in each quadrant as a spare. Each Pickering PHT pump has a Byron Jackson Type SU two stage mechanical seal. The typical pressure breakdown across the seal is 8.7-4.5-1.0 MPa. Certain features of seal operation and the PHT system which influence seal replacement are discussed below. (author)

  13. Role of Heat Shock Factor 1 in Conserving Cholesterol Transportation in Leydig Cell Steroidogenesis via Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Shintaro; Shiraishi, Koji; Fujimoto, Mitsuaki; Katiyar, Arpit; Takii, Ryosuke; Nakai, Akira; Matsuyama, Hideyasu

    2017-08-01

    Testicular testosterone synthesis begins with cholesterol transport into mitochondria via steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein in Leydig cells. Acute heat stress is known to obstruct testicular steroidogenesis by transcriptional repression of StAR. In contrast, chronic heat stress such as cryptorchidism or varicocele generally does not affect testicular steroidogenesis, suggesting that Leydig cells adapt to heat stress and retain their steroid synthesis ability. However, the mechanisms of the stress response in steroid-producing cells are unclear. We examined the relationship between the heat stress response and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), which protects cells from proteotoxic stress by inducing heat shock protein as a molecular chaperone. The influences of HSF1 deficiency on cholesterol transport by StAR and the expression of steroidogenic enzymes under chronic heat stress were studied in testes of HSF1-knockout (HSF1KO) mice with experimental cryptorchidism. StAR protein in wild-type-cryptorchid mice was transiently decreased after induction of cryptorchidism and then gradually returned to basal levels. In contrast, StAR protein in HSF1KO mice continued to decrease and failed to recover, resulting in impaired serum testosterone. StAR messenger RNA was not decreased with cryptorchidism, indicating that posttranslational modification of StAR, not its transcription, was obstructed in cryptorchidism. Other steroidogenic enzymes, including CYP11A1, 3β-HSD, and CYP17A1, were not decreased. Lipid droplets were increased in the cytosol of HSF1KO-cryptorchid mice, suggesting dysfunctional cholesterol transportation. These findings provide insight into the role of HSF1 in Leydig cell steroidogenesis, suggesting that it maintains cholesterol transport by recovering StAR under chronic heat stress. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  14. Influences of chemical reaction and wall properties on MHD Peristaltic transport of a Dusty fluid with Heat and Mass transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Muthuraj

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of elasticity of flexible walls on peristaltic transport of a dusty fluid with heat and mass transfer in a horizontal channel in the presence of chemical reaction has been investigated under long wavelength approximation. Expressions have been constructed for stream function, temperature and concentration by using perturbation technique. The effects of various parameters on heat and mass transfer characteristics of the flow are discussed through graphs.

  15. Study of the electron heat transport in Tore-Supra tokamak; Etude du transport de la chaleur electronique dans le Tokamak Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harauchamps, E

    2004-07-01

    This work presents analytical solutions to the electron heat transport equation involving a damping term and a convection term in a cylindrical geometry. These solutions, processed by Matlab, allow the determination of the evolution of the radial profile of electron temperature in tokamaks during heating. The modulated injection of waves around the electron cyclotron frequency is an efficient tool to study heat transport experimentally in tokamaks. The comparison of these analytical solutions with experimental results from Tore-Supra during 2 discharges (30550 and 31165) shows the presence of a sudden change for the diffusion and damping coefficients. The hypothesis of the presence of a pinch spread all along the plasma might explain the shape of the experimental temperature profiles. These analytical solutions could be used to determine the time evolution of plasma density as well or of any parameter whose evolution is governed by a diffusion-convection equation. (A.C.)

  16. Heat and particle transport in a one-dimensional hard-point gas model with on-site potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat and particle transport in a one-dimensional hard-point gas of elastically colliding particles are studied. In the nonequal mass case, due to the presence of on-site potential, the heat conduction of the model obeys the Fourier law and all the transport coefficients asymptotically approach constants in the thermodynamic limit. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT increases slowly with the system length L and is proportional to the height of the potential barriers H in high H regime. These findings may serve as a guide for future theoretical and experimental studies.

  17. Poleward propagation of boreal summer intraseasonal oscillations in a coupled model: role of internal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayamohan, R. S.; Annamalai, H.; Luo, Jing-Jia; Hafner, Jan; Yamagata, Toshio

    2011-09-01

    The study compares the simulated poleward migration characteristics of boreal summer intraseasonal oscillations (BSISO) in a suite of coupled ocean-atmospheric model sensitivity integrations. The sensitivity experiments are designed in such a manner to allow full coupling in specific ocean basins but forced by temporally varying monthly climatological sea surface temperature (SST) adopted from the fully coupled model control runs (ES10). While the local air-sea interaction is suppressed in the tropical Indian Ocean and allowed in the other oceans in the ESdI run, it is suppressed in the tropical Pacific and allowed in the other oceans in the ESdP run. Our diagnostics show that the basic mean state in precipitation and easterly vertical shear as well as the BSISO properties remain unchanged due to either inclusion or exclusion of local air-sea interaction. In the presence of realistic easterly vertical shear, the continuous emanation of Rossby waves from the equatorial convection is trapped over the monsoon region that enables the poleward propagation of BSISO anomalies in all the model sensitivity experiments. To explore the internal processes that maintain the tropospheric moisture anomalies ahead of BSISO precipitation anomalies, moisture and moist static energy budgets are performed. In all model experiments, advection of anomalous moisture by climatological winds anchors the moisture anomalies that in turn promote the northward migration of BSISO precipitation. While the results indicate the need for realistic simulation of all aspects of the basic state, our model results need to be taken with caution because in the ECHAM family of coupled models the internal variance at intraseasonal timescales is indeed very high, and therefore local air-sea interactions may not play a pivotal role.

  18. Water, solute and heat transport in the soil: the Australian connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John

    2016-04-01

    The interest of Peter Raats in water, solute and heat transport in the soil has led to scientific and/or personal interactions with several Australian scientists such as John Philip, David Smiles, Greg Davis and John Knight. Along with John Philip and Robin Wooding, Peter was an early user of the Gardner (1958) linearised model of soil water flow, which brought him into competition with John Philip. I will discuss some of Peter's solutions relevant to infiltration from line and point sources, cavities and basins. A visit to Canberra, Australia in the early 1980s led to joint work on soil water flow, and on combined water and solute movement with David Smiles and others. In 1983 Peter was on the PhD committee for Greg Davis at the University of Wollongong, and some of the methods in his thesis 'Mathematical modelling of rate-limiting mechanisms of pyritic oxidation in overburden dumps' were later used by Peter's student Sjoerd van der Zee. David Smiles and Peter wrote a survey article 'Hydrology of swelling clay soils' in 2005. In the last decade Peter has been investigating the history of groundwater and vadose zone hydrology, and recently he and I have been bringing to light the largely forgotten work of Lewis Fry Richardson on finite difference solution of the heat equation, drainage theory, soil physics, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.

  19. Thermal conductivity and heat transport properties of nitrogen-doped graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goharshadi, Elaheh K; Mahdizadeh, Sayyed Jalil

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the thermal conductivity (TC) and heat transport properties of nitrogen doped graphene (N-graphene) were investigated as a function of temperature (107-400K) and N-doped concentration (0.0-7.0%) using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation based on Green-Kubo method. According to the results, a drastic decline in TC of graphene observed at very low N-doped concentration (0.5 and 1.0%). Substitution of just 1.0% of carbon atoms with nitrogens causes a 77.2, 65.4, 59.2, and 53.7% reduction in TC at 107, 200, 300, and 400K, respectively. The values of TC of N-graphene at different temperatures approach to each other as N-doped concentration increases. The results also indicate that TC of N-graphene is much less sensitive to temperature compared with pristine graphene and the sensitivity decreases as N-doped concentration increases. The phonon-phonon scattering relaxation times and the phonon mean free path of phonons were also calculated. The contribution of high frequency optical phonons for pristine graphene and N-graphene with 7.0% N-doped concentration is 0-2% and 4-8%, respectively. These findings imply that it is potentially feasible to control heat transfer on the nanoscale when designing N-graphene based thermal devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Internal transport barrier and β limit in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreiko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Golant, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    An Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) was found in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M (R 0 =53 cm, a l =22 cm - circular limiter configuration, B t ≤0.7T, I p ≤175 kA, ≤6.0·10 19 m -3 ). The barrier reveals itself as a formation of a steep gradient on electron temperature and density radial profiles. The regions with reduced diffusion and electron thermal diffusivity are in between r=0.5a and r=0.7a. The ITB appears more frequently in the shots with higher plasma current. At lower currents (I p N limit in the ohmically heated plasma are presented. Stored energy was measured using diamagnetic loops and compared with W calculated from kinetic data obtained by Thomson scattering and microwave interferometry. Measurements of the stored energy and of the β were performed in the ohmic H-mode before and after boronization and in the scenario with the fast Current Ramp-Down in the ohmic H-mode. Maximum value of β T of 2.0 % and β N of 2 were achieved. The β N limit achieved is 'soft' (nondisruptive) limit. The stored energy slowly decays after the Current Ramp-Down. No correlation was found between beta restriction and MHD phenomena. (author)

  1. Internal transport barrier and β limit in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreiko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Golant, V.E.

    1999-01-01

    An Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) was found in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M (R 0 = 53 cm, a l = 22 cm - circular limiter configuration, B t ≤ 0.7 T, I p ≤ 175 kA, ≤ 6.0·10 19 m -3 ). The barrier reveals itself as a formation of a steep gradient on electron temperature and density radial profiles. The regions with reduced diffusion and electron thermal diffusivity are in between r = 0.5a and r = 0.7a. The ITB appears more frequently in the shots with higher plasma current. At lower currents (I p N limit in the ohmically heated plasma are presented. Stored energy was measured using diamagnetic loops and compared with W calculated from kinetic data obtained by Thomson scattering and microwave interferometry. Measurements of the stored energy and of the β were performed in the ohmic H-mode before and after boronization and in the scenario with the fast Current Ramp-Down in the ohmic H-mode. Maximum value of β T of 2.0% and β N of 2 were achieved. The β N limit achieved is 'soft' (non-disruptive) limit. The stored energy slowly decays after the Current Ramp-Down. No correlation was found between beta restriction and MHD phenomena. (author)

  2. Microwave-mediated heat transport in a quantum dot attached to leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Feng; Dubi, Yonatan

    2012-01-01

    The thermoelectric effect in a quantum dot (QD) attached to two leads in the presence of microwave fields is studied by using the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green function technique. When the microwave is applied only on the QD and in the linear response regime, the main peaks in the thermoelectric figure of merit and the thermopower are found to decrease, with the emergence of a set of photon-induced peaks. Under this condition the microwave field cannot generate heat current or electrical bias voltage. Surprisingly, when the microwave field is applied only to one (bright) lead and not to the other (dark) lead or the QD, heat flows mostly from the dark to the bright lead, almost irrespective of the direction of the thermal gradient. We attribute this effect to microwave-induced opening of additional transport channels below the Fermi energy. The microwave field can change both the magnitude and the sign of the electrical bias voltage induced by the temperature gradient. (paper)

  3. Nano-thermal transport array: An instrument for combinatorial measurements of heat transfer in nanoscale films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCluskey, Patrick J.; Vlassak, Joost J.

    2010-01-01

    The nano-Thermal Transport Array is a silicon-based micromachined device for measuring the thermal properties of nanoscale materials in a high-throughput methodology. The device contains an array of thermal sensors, each one of which consists of a silicon nitride membrane and a tungsten heating element that also serves as a temperature gauge. The thermal behavior of the sensors is described with an analytical model. The assumptions underlying this model and its accuracy are checked using the finite element method. The analytical model is used in a data reduction scheme that relates experimental quantities to materials properties. Measured properties include thermal effusivity, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. While the array is specifically designed for combinatorial analysis, here we demonstrate the capabilities of the device with a high-throughput study of copper multi-layer films as a function of film thickness, ranging from 15 to 470 nm. Thermal conductivity results show good agreement with earlier models predicting the conductivity based on electron scattering at interfaces.

  4. Effect of variable properties, Navier slip and convective heating on hydromagnetic transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M. J.; Khan, W. A.; Ismail, A. I. Md.

    2016-06-01

    The effects of the temperature dependent viscosity, thermal conductivity and Navier slip on the forced convection of nanofluid and heat transfer over a wedge are investigated numerically. The effects of the thermal and mass convective boundary conditions are applied to get physically realistic results. The governing transport equations are transformed into a set of similarity equations using similarity transformations, before being solved using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order numerical method. Numerical results for the dimensionless velocity, temperature, nanoparticle volume fraction profiles as well as skin friction coefficient, Nusselt number and Sherwood numbers are presented to show interesting aspects of the solution. It is found that the skin friction and local Sherwood number decrease whilst local Nusselt number increases with conduction-convection parameter. The local Sherwood number increases with diffusion-convection parameter. The increase of hydrodynamic slip reduces skin friction and increases local Nusselt number. Magnetic parameter enhances skin friction, heat transfer as well as species diffusion. Viscosity parameter enhances skin friction. Some of the numerical results are compared with earlier published results, available in the literature.

  5. Variability of Atlantic Ocean heat transport and its effects on the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Sutton

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The variability of the Atlantic meridional Ocean Heat Transport (OHT has been diagnosed from a simulation of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model, and the mechanisms responsible for this variability have been elucidated. It has been demonstrated that the interannual variability in Atlantic OHT is dominated by windstress-driven Ekman fluctuations. In contrast, the decadal and multidecadal variability is associated with the fluctuations of the Thermohaline Circulation (THC, driven by the fluctuations in deep convection over the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian (GIN Sea. The fluctuations of OHT induce Ocean Heat Content (OHC, and Sea Surface Temperature (SST anomalies over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic. The SST anomalies, in turn, have an impact on the atmosphere. The lead-lag relationships between the fluctuations of THC-related OHT and those of OHC and SST raise the possibility that a knowledge of OHT fluctuations could be used to predict variations in Atlantic Sea surface temperatures, and perhaps aspects of climate, several years in advance. A comparison of results from a second, independent, coupled model simulation is also presented, and similar conclusions reached.

  6. Thermal relaxation and heat transport in spin ice Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemke, Bastian; Meissner, M.; Tennant, D.A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Strehlow, P. [Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, Institut Berlin (Germany); Kiefer, K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Grigera, S.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, St. Andrews (United Kingdom); Instituto de Fisica de Liquidos y Sistemas Biologicos, CONICET, UNLP, La Plata (Argentina)

    2011-07-01

    The thermal properties of single crystalline Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been studied at temperature below 30 K and magnetic fields applied along [110] direction up to 1.5 T. Based on a thermodynamic field theory (TFT) various heat relaxation and thermal transport measurements were analysed. So we were able to present not only the heat capacity of Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, but also for the first time the different contributions of the magnetic excitations and their corresponding relaxation times in the spin ice phase. In addition, the thermal conductivity and the shortest relaxation time were determined by thermodynamic analysis of steady state heat transport measurements. Finally, we were able to reproduce the temperature profiles recorded in heat pulse experiments on the basis of TFT using the previously determined heat capacity and thermal conductivity data without additional parameters. Thus, TFT has been proved to be thermodynamically consistent in describing three thermal transport experiments on different time scales. The observed temperature and field dependencies of heat capacity contributions and relaxation times indicate the magnetic excitations in the spin ice Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} as thermally activated monopole-antimonopole defects.

  7. The impact of heat waves on transport volumes in an urban emergency medical services system: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kue, Ricky C; Dyer, K Sophia

    2013-12-01

    Heat waves pose a serious public health risk to particular patient populations, especially in urban areas. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in many urban areas constitute the first line of regional preparation and response to major heat wave events; however, little is known on heat wave operational impact to the EMS system, such as call volume or demand. To examine the effect of heat wave periods on overall urban EMS system call volume and transport volume as well as the nature of the call types. Retrospective review of all emergency medical calls to an urban, two-tiered EMS system performed over a 5-year period from 2006-2010. Heat wave days (HWD) defined as two or more consecutive days of hot weather >32.2°C (90°F) were compared with similar non-heat wave days (nHWD) of the previous year to also include two calendar days prior to and after the heat wave. National Weather Service (NWS) temperature data, daily EMS call volume data, and call type codes were collected and underwent descriptive analysis. Thirty-one HWD were identified and compared with 93 nHWD. The mean maximum temperature for HWD was 34°C (93.2°F) compared with 25.3°C (77.6°F) for nHWD (P transported per day (247.5 vs 198.3, P transports between weekdays or weekend days. No significant differences on various call types were observed between HWD and nHWD except for "heat" related calls (7.7 vs 0.5, P < .001). Emergency Medical Services call volumes were significantly increased during heat waves, however there was minimal change in the types of calls received.

  8. Local Agenda 21. Settlement pattern and energy for transportation and heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orderud, Geir Inge

    1998-01-01

    This document deals with Local Agenda 21 (LA21) and the relationship between settlement pattern and the consumption of energy in transportation and heating of houses. Local Agenda 21 originates from the Earth Summit held in Rio in 1992 and draws up the strategies by which the local communities should participate in realizing the recommendations of the summit. So far much of the research around LA21 has examined how well the individual countries that ratified the Rio document have fulfilled the recommendations of Article 28 on local responsibility. From the point of view of research, however, the challenge is rather to investigate the conditions for realizing the broad participation of the people. From the administrative point of view, the important issue is the relationship between the representative channels and the direct participation of local people in the decision processes, as well as the delegation of decision-making authority from national to regional or local level. One recommendation in Agenda 21 is to emit less greenhouse gases. In this connection, a central issue is transportation, which is affected by the settlement pattern. A denser settlement within an urban area is supposed to reduce the transportation and the use of private cars. Thus the local development and area policy is a topic of current interest in the study of how LA21 works locally, especially so because sparsely built-up areas with single family houses are considered as the good way of living. Densely populated urban areas may conflict with the need for arable land and green space. LA 21 and the settlement pattern are both parts of a larger social environment and it is important know these relationships when local measures and actions are analysed. The possibility of a sustainable development must be assessed in relation to the fact that more power is gathered in the global flow of capital. 26 refs

  9. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials, APPENDIX A: Energy Use and Emissions from the Lifecycle of Diesel-Like Fuels Derived From Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    An Appendix to the Report, “A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materialsâ€

  10. Transport of heat and mass in a two-phase mixture : From a continuous to a discontinuous description

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glavatskiy, K.S.; Bedeaux, D.

    2010-01-01

    We present a theory that describes the transport properties of the interfacial region with respect to heat and mass transfer. Postulating the local Gibbs relation for a continuous description inside the interfacial region, we derive the description of the Gibbs surface in terms of excess densities

  11. Heat transport imaging in the spin-ladder compound Ca9La5Cu24O41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, M.; Krasnikov, V. V.; Fishman, D. A.; Pshenichnikov, M. S.; Saint-Martin, R.; Revcolevschi, A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.

    All-optical heat transport imaging on the spin-ladder compound Ca9La5Cu24O41 is presented. A 'time-of-flight' principle is discussed along with its experimental veri. cation which can be used to measure the bulk thermal diffusion constant. The results of the thermal imaging experiments clearly

  12. Heat

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Is it possible to make heat by rubbing your hands together? Why does an ice cube melt when you hold it? In this title, students will conduct experiments to help them understand what heat is. Kids will also investigate concepts such as which materials are good at conducting heat and which are the best insulators. Using everyday items that can easily be found around the house, students will transform into scientists as they carry out step-by-step experiments to answer interesting questions. Along the way, children will pick up important scientific skills. Heat includes seven experiments with detailed, age-appropriate instructions, surprising facts and background information, a "conclusions" section to pull all the concepts in the book together, and a glossary of science words. Colorful, dynamic designs and images truly put the FUN into FUN-damental Experiments.

  13. Development of suitability maps for ground-coupled heat pump systems using groundwater and heat transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Hikari; Itoi, Ryuichi [Department of Earth Resources Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Motooka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Inatomi, Tadasuke [YBM Co. Ltd., Kishiyama 589-10 Kitahata, Karatsu 847-1211 (Japan); Uchida, Youhei [Geological Survey of Japan, AIST Tsukuba Central 7, Tsukuba 305-8567 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    The thermophysical properties of subsurface materials (soils, sediments and rocks) and groundwater flow strongly affect the heat exchange rates of ground heat exchangers (GHEs). These rates can be maximized and the installation costs of the ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) systems reduced by developing suitability maps based on local geological and hydrological information. Such maps were generated for the Chikushi Plain (western Japan) using field-survey data and a numerical modeling study. First, a field-wide groundwater model was developed for the area and the results matched against measured groundwater levels and vertical temperature profiles. Single GHE models were then constructed to simulate the heat exchange performance at different locations in the plain. Finally, suitability maps for GCHP systems were prepared using the results from the single GHE models. Variations in the heat exchange rates of over 40% revealed by the map were ascribed to differences in the GHE locations, confirming how important it is to use appropriate thermophysical data when designing GCHP systems. (author)

  14. Transporting industrial waste heat. The potential of using the existing sewer system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niphuis, Sander

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The industry in the Netherlands consumes large amounts of energy for the production of heat. After the industrial processes, a substantial share of this heat is degraded to waste heat. In general, this waste heat is just being discharged to surro

  15. The Transport Properties of Sodium Atoms and the Heat Capacity of Sodium Dimers at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biolsi, L.; Holland, P. M.

    2010-05-01

    Including the contribution of excited state atoms can improve calculations of dilute gaseous transport properties at high temperatures. For sodium, experimental and/or theoretical information is available about the potential energy curves associated with each of ten low-lying states of the sodium dimer. These include the {X1Σ_g{}+} and {3Σ_u{}{}+} states that dissociate to two ground state 2S sodium atoms and the four {3Σ_g,u{}+, 1Σ _g,u{}+, 1Pi _g,u, 3Pi _g,u} gerade/ungerade pairs of states that dissociate to a ground state 2S atom and an excited state 2P atom. Nine of these are bound states and have been fitted with the Hulburt-Hirschfelder potential, a very good general purpose atom-atom potential. The 3Πg state is not bound and has been fitted with the exponential repulsive potential. We have used these potentials to calculate viscosity collision integrals as a function of temperature, and employed degeneracy-weighted averaging to determine the viscosity and translational contribution to the thermal conductivity of the sodium atoms. These same potentials have been used to calculate the heat capacity, {Cp^o}, of the sodium dimer using an approach that depends on the second virial coefficient and its first two temperature derivatives. Again, the inclusion of molecular states that dissociate to an excited state atom allows {Cp^o} to be determined with improved accuracy at higher temperatures. Thus, thermophysical property calculations for sodium have been extended to 25,000 K. These results are compared with previous results, including heat capacities given in the NIST-JANAF Thermochemical Tables.

  16. Weak oceanic heat transport as a cause of the instability of glacial climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin de Verdiere, Alain [Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Laboratoire de Physique des Oceans, Alain Colin de Verdiere, Brest 3 (France); Te Raa, L. [Utrecht University, Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research TNO, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    The stability of the thermohaline circulation of modern and glacial climates is compared with the help of a two dimensional ocean - atmosphere - sea ice coupled model. It turns out to be more unstable as less freshwater forcing is required to induce a polar halocline catastrophy in glacial climates. The large insulation of the ocean by the extensive sea ice cover changes the temperature boundary condition and the deepwater formation regions moves much further South. The nature of the instability is of oceanic origin, identical to that found in ocean models under mixed boundary conditions. With similar strengths of the oceanic circulation and rates of deep water formation for warm and cold climates, the loss of stability of the cold climate is due to the weak thermal stratification caused by the cooling of surface waters, the deep water temperatures being regulated by the temperature of freezing. Weaker stratification with similar overturning leads to a weakening of the meridional oceanic heat transport which is the major negative feedback stabilizing the oceanic circulation. Within the unstable regime periodic millennial oscillations occur spontaneously. The climate oscillates between a strong convective thermally driven oceanic state and a weak one driven by large salinity gradients. Both states are unstable. The atmosphere of low thermal inertia is carried along by the oceanic overturning while the variation of sea ice is out of phase with the oceanic heat content. During the abrupt warming events that punctuate the course of a millennial oscillation, sea ice variations are shown respectively to damp (amplify) the amplitude of the oceanic (atmospheric) response. This sensitivity of the oceanic circulation to a reduced concentration of greenhouse gases and to freshwater forcing adds support to the hypothesis that the millennial oscillations of the last glacial period, the so called Dansgaard - Oeschger events, may be internal instabilities of the climate system

  17. Investigation of the Dominant Processes controlling Volume, Heat, and Freshwater Transports through the Bering Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. T.; Woodgate, R. A.; Heimbach, P.

    2016-02-01

    The 85-km wide Bering Strait serves as the only connection between the Pacific and Arctic oceans. Recent observations have shown increases in northward volume, heat and freshwater fluxes through this narrow and shallow strait, with implications for the prolongation of the ice-free season and enhancement of nutrient supply to the ecosystems in the Chukchi Sea. Further downstream the increased flux influences watermass transformations, heat and freshwater budgets, and stratification in the upper Arctic Ocean. Thus, quantifying the mechanisms that control the mean and variability of the flow through this vital gateway is important for understanding and predicting changes in the Arctic. Here, to identify these key mechanisms, we use 14 years of mooring observations from the Bering Strait and the non-linear inverse-modeling framework of the Arctic Sub-polar gyre sTate Estimate (ASTE). ASTE is a synthesis of the MITgcm coupled ocean-sea ice model with all available satellite and in-situ observations of sea ice and ocean, including hydrographic and mooring data from the Beaufort Sea and the major Arctic gateways (Fram, Bering, and Davis straits), and is developed using the estimation infrastructure of the ECCO consortium. In ASTE's optimization mode, after 19 iterations, misfits to ITP hydrography and SSM/I ice concentration have reduced by 80% and 50% respectively. With ASTE as the baseline solution, we use the "adjoint" tool to compute the sensitivity of the model transports of volume and water properties at the Bering Strait to a set of control variables including ocean hydrography and atmospheric forcing. The partition of dominant sensitivities is connected to the data in two ways: the data serve as a guide to the interpretation of the controlling process while the model sensitivity can provide insights into processes which can be further tested with additional observations.

  18. Revisiting the Energy Budget of WASP-43b: Enhanced Day–Night Heat Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, Dylan; Cowan, Nicolas B. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2017-11-01

    The large day–night temperature contrast of WASP-43b has so far eluded explanation. We revisit the energy budget of this planet by considering the impact of reflected light on dayside measurements and the physicality of implied nightside temperatures. Previous analyses of the infrared eclipses of WASP-43b have assumed reflected light from the planet is negligible and can be ignored. We develop a phenomenological eclipse model including reflected light, thermal emission, and water absorption, and we use it to fit published Hubble and Spitzer eclipse data. We infer a near-infrared geometric albedo of 24% ± 1% and a cooler dayside temperature of 1483 ± 10 K. Additionally, we perform light curve inversion on the three published orbital phase curves of WASP-43b and find that each suggests unphysical, negative flux on the nightside. By requiring non-negative brightnesses at all longitudes, we correct the unphysical parts of the maps and obtain a much hotter nightside effective temperature of 1076 ± 11 K. The cooler dayside and hotter nightside suggest a heat recirculation efficiency of 51% for WASP-43b, essentially the same as for HD 209458b, another hot Jupiter with nearly the same temperature. Our analysis therefore reaffirms the trend that planets with lower irradiation temperatures have more efficient day–night heat transport. Moreover, we note that (1) reflected light may be significant for many near-IR eclipse measurements of hot Jupiters, and (2) phase curves should be fit with physically possible longitudinal brightness profiles—it is insufficient to only require that the disk-integrated light curve be non-negative.

  19. Impact of electro-magnetic stabilization, small- scale turbulence and multi-scale interactions on heat transport in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantica, Paola

    2016-10-01

    Heat transport experiments in JET, based on ICRH heat flux scans and temperature modulation, have confirmed the importance of two transport mechanisms that are often neglected in modeling experimental results, but are crucial to reach agreement between theory and experiment and may be significant in ITER. The first mechanism is the stabilizing effect of the total pressure gradient (including fast ions) on ITG driven ion heat transport. Such stabilization is found in non-linear gyro-kinetic electro-magnetic simulations using GENE and GYRO, and is the explanation for the observed loss of ion stiffness in the core of high NBI-power JET plasmas. The effect was recently observed also in JET plasmas with dominant ICRH heating and small rotation, due to ICRH fast ions, which is promising for ITER. Such mechanism dominates over ExB flow shear in the core and needs to be included in quasi-linear models to increase their ability to capture the relevant physics. The second mechanism is the capability of small- scale ETG instabilities to carry a significant fraction of electron heat. A decrease in Te peaking is observed when decreasing Zeff Te/Ti, which cannot be ascribed to TEMs but is in line with ETGs. Non-linear GENE single-scale simulations of ETGs and ITG/TEMs show that the ITG/TEM electron heat flux is not enough to match experiment. TEM stiffness is also much lower than measured. In the ETG single scale simulations the external flow shear is used to saturate the ETG streamers. Multi-scale simulations are ongoing, in which the ion zonal flows are the main saturating mechanism for ETGs. These costly simulations should provide the final answer on the importance of ETG-driven electron heat flux in JET. with JET contributors [F.Romanelli, Proc.25thIAEA FEC]. Supported by EUROfusion Grant 633053.

  20. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating: The soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMV-Model Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Massman

    2015-01-01

    Increased use of prescribed fire by land managers and the increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change require an improved modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing and testing the soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMVmodel, a 1-D (one-dimensional) non-equilibrium (liquid- vapor phase change)...

  1. Internal magnetic fluctuations and electron heat transport in the TORE SUPRA Tokamak. Observation by cross polarisation scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, L.; Paume, M.; Zou, X.L.; Chareau, J.M.; Guiziou, L.; Hoang, G.T.; Michelot, Y.; Gresillon, D.

    1997-03-01

    Magnetic fluctuations (radial size ∼ 5 mm) are measured by a cross polarisation scattering (CPS) diagnostic in TORE SUPRA. These fluctuations are investigated quantitatively in the ohmic and low confinement regimes over a wide range of plasma currents, densities and additional heating powers. Simultaneously, electron heat diffusivities expected from these fluctuations are compared to those obtained by profile analysis. A radial profile of the magnetic fluctuations in the gradient region ( 0.3 e mag = πqRv th (δ B r / B) 2 . Both the order of magnitude and the parametric dependence of χ e mag show similarities with electron diffusivities determined by transport analysis. In particular, a threshold is observed for the dependence of fluctuation-induced heat fluxes on the local temperature gradient, which is close to the critical gradient observed for the measured heat fluxes. (author)

  2. The heating rate in the tropical tropopause region; Die Erwaermungsrate in der tropischen Tropopausenregion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, Ulrich

    2010-07-01

    The major part of the movement of air masses from the troposphere to the stratosphere takes place in the tropics. The conveyed air mass is transported with the Brewer-Dobson circulation poleward and therefore influences the global stratospheric composition. An important cause variable for the transport of air through the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is the radiative heating, which is investigated in this work. The influence of trace gases, temperature, and cloudiness on the heating rate is quantified, especially the effect of the overlap of several cloud layers is discussed. The heating rate in the tropics is simulated for one year. Regional differences of the heating rate profile appear between convective and stably stratified regions. By means of trace gas concentrations, temperature, and heating rates it is determined that an enhanced transport of air through the TTL took place between January and April 2007. The comparison with previous works shows that accurate input data sets of trace gases, temperature, and cloudiness and exact methods for the simulation of the radiative transfer are indispensable for modeling of the heating rate with the required accuracy. (orig.)

  3. Impacts of Wind Stress Changes on the Global Heat Transport, Baroclinic Instability, and the Thermohaline Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson Prietsch Machado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The wind stress is a measure of momentum transfer due to the relative motion between the atmosphere and the ocean. This study aims to investigate the anomalous pattern of atmospheric and oceanic circulations due to 50% increase in the wind stress over the equatorial region and the Southern Ocean. In this paper we use a coupled climate model of intermediate complexity (SPEEDO. The results show that the intensification of equatorial wind stress causes a decrease in sea surface temperature in the tropical region due to increased upwelling and evaporative cooling. On the other hand, the intensification of wind stress over the Southern Ocean induces a regional increase in the air and sea surface temperatures which in turn leads to a reduction in Antarctic sea ice thickness. This occurs in association with changes in the global thermohaline circulation strengthening the rate of Antarctic Bottom Water formation and a weakening of the North Atlantic Deep Water. Moreover, changes in the Southern Hemisphere thermal gradient lead to modified atmospheric and oceanic heat transports reducing the storm tracks and baroclinic activity.

  4. Magnons coherent transmission and its heat transport at ultrathin insulating ferromagnetic nanojunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghantous M. Abou

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A model calculation is presented for the magnons coherent transmission and corresponding heat transport at magnetic insulating nanojunctions. The system consists of a ferromagnetically ordered ultrathin insulating junction between two semi-infinite ferromagnetically ordered leads. Spin dynamics are analyzed using the equations of motion for the spin precession displacements, valid for the range of temperatures of interest. Coherent scattering cross-sections at the junction boundary are calculated using the phase field matching theory, for all the incidence angles on the boundary from the lead bands, for arbitrary angles of incidence, at variable temperatures, and for different nano thicknesses of the ultrathin junction. The model is general; it is applied in particular to the Fe/Gd/Fe system with a sandwiched ferromagnetic Gd junction. It yields also the thermal conductivity due to the magnons coherent transmission between the two leads when these are maintained at slightly different temperatures. The calculation is carried out for state of the art values of the exchange constants, and elucidates the relation between the coherent scattering transmission of magnons and their thermal conductivity, for different thicknesses.

  5. Two-dimensional model for current and heat transport in solid-armature railguns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, John D.; Walbert, David J.; Zielinski, Alexander E.

    1993-02-01

    A numerical model is developed for solving the equations which predict current and heat transport in a solid-armature railgun. The model is two dimensional and fully time dependent. Some preliminary calculations are carried out for a 'U-shaped' armature similar to that currently under investigation in the ARDEC small and cannon-caliber railgun programs. The most extensive calculations are for a situation in which the projectile is started at rest and accelerated to about 500 m/s in a time of about 1 ms. Results of the calculations can be used to infer, for example, where melting in the armature is most likely to occur and where the electromagnetic fields are largest. For comparison, calculations are also presented for a situation in which the projectile is held fixed. Some discussion of future efforts is given, with particular emphasis on describing how the model might be used to guide the design of armatures, or provide input for other types of calculations relating to electromagnetic guns.

  6. Technology data for energy plants. Individual heating plants and energy transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-05-15

    The present technology catalogue is published in co-operation between the Danish Energy Agency and Energinet.dk and includes technology descriptions for a number of technologies for individual heat production and energy transport. The primary objective of the technology catalogue is to establish a uniform, commonly accepted and up-to-date basis for the work with energy planning and the development of the energy sector, including future outlooks, scenario analyses and technical/economic analyses. The technology catalogue is thus a valuable tool in connection with energy planning and assessment of climate projects and for evaluating the development opportunities for the energy sector's many technologies, which can be used for the preparation of different support programmes for energy research and development. The publication of the technology catalogue should also be viewed in the light of renewed focus on strategic energy planning in municipalities etc. In that respect, the technology catalogue is considered to be an important tool for the municipalities in their planning efforts. (LN)

  7. Heat transfer analysis of porous media receiver with different transport and thermophysical models using mixture as feeding gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fuqiang; Tan, Jianyu; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Using local thermal non-equilibrium model to solve heat transfer of porous media. • CH 4 /H 2 O mixture is adopted as feeding gas of porous media receiver. • Radiative transfer equation between porous strut is solved by Rosseland approximation. • Transport and thermophysical models not included in Fluent are programmed by UDFs. • Variations of model on thermal performance of porous media receiver are studied. - Abstract: The local thermal non-equilibrium model is adopted to solve the steady state heat and mass transfer problems of porous media solar receiver. The fluid entrance surface is subjected to concentrated solar radiation, and CH 4 /H 2 O mixture is adopted as feeding gas. The radiative heat transfer equation between porous strut is solved by Rosseland approximation. The impacts of variation in transport and thermophysical characteristics model of gas mixture on thermal performance of porous media receiver are investigated. The transport and thermophysical characteristics models which are not included in software Fluent are programmed by user defined functions (UDFs). The numerical results indicate that models of momentum source term for porous media receiver have significant impact on pressure drop and static pressure distribution, and the radiative heat transfer cannot be omitted during the thermal performance analysis of porous media receiver

  8. The role of parallel heat transport in the relation between upstream scrape-off layer widths and target heat flux width in H-mode plasmas of NSTX.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, J W; Boedo, J A; Maingi, R; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-01-05

    The physics of parallel heat transport was tested in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000) and S. M. Kaye, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S168 (2005)] tokamak by comparing the upstream electron temperature (T{sub e}) and density (n{sub e}) profiles measured by the mid-plane reciprocating probe to the heat flux (q{sub {perpendicular}}) profile at the divertor plate measured by an infrared (IR) camera. It is found that electron conduction explains the near SOL width data reasonably well while the far SOL, which is in the sheath limited regime, requires an ion heat flux profile broader than the electron one to be consistent with the experimental data. The measured plasma parameters indicate that the SOL energy transport should be in the conduction-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} (radial distance from the separatrix location) < 2-3 cm. The SOL energy transport should transition to the sheath-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm. The T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and q{sub {perpendicular}} profiles are better described by an offset exponential function instead of a simple exponential. The conventional relation between mid plane electron temperature decay length ({lambda}{sub Te}) and target heat flux decay length ({lambda}{sub q}) is {lambda}{sub Te} = 7/2{lambda}{sub q}, whereas the newly-derived relation, assuming offset exponential functional forms, implies {lambda}{sub Te} = (2-2.5){lambda}{sub q}. The measured values of {lambda}{sub Te}/{lambda}{sub q} differ from the new prediction by 25-30%. The measured {lambda}{sub q} values in the far SOL (R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm) are 9-10cm, while the expected values are 2.7 < {lambda}{sub q} < 4.9 cm (for sheath-limited regime). We propose that the ion heat flux profile is substantially broader than the electron heat flux profile as an explanation for this discrepancy in the far SOL.

  9. Effects of heat and water transport on the performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell under high current density operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Shiomi, Takeshi; Aoki, Osamu; Kubo, Norio; Shinohara, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Key challenges to the acceptance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) for automobiles are the cost reduction and improvement in its power density for compactness. In order to get the solution, the further improvement in a fuel cell performance is required. In particular, under higher current density operation, water and heat transport in PEMFCs has considerable effects on the cell performance. In this study, the impact of heat and water transport on the cell performance under high current density was investigated by experimental evaluation of liquid water distribution and numerical validation. Liquid water distribution in MEA between rib and channel area is evaluated by neutron radiography. In order to neglect the effect of liquid water in gas channels and reactant species concentration distribution in the flow direction, the differential cell was used in this study. Experimental results suggested that liquid water under the channel was dramatically changed with rib/channel width. From the numerical study, it is found that the change of liquid water distribution was significantly affected by temperature distribution in MEA between rib and channel area. In addition, not only heat transport but also water transport through the membrane also significantly affected the cell performance under high current density operation.

  10. NON-LINEAR TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION ANALYSIS OF INSULATION WALL OF TANK FOR TRANSPORTATION OF LIQUID ALUMINUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav M Živković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with transient nonlinear heat conduction through the insulation wall of the tank for transportation of liquid aluminum. Tanks designed for this purpose must satisfy certain requirements regarding temperature of loading and unloading, during transport. Basic theoretical equations are presented, which describe the problem of heat conduction finite element (FE analysis, starting from the differential equation of energy balance, taking into account the initial and boundary conditions of the problem. General 3D problem for heat conduction is considered, from which solutions for two- and one-dimensional heat conduction can be obtained, as special cases. Forming of the finite element matrices using Galerkin method is briefly described. The procedure for solving equations of energy balance is discussed, by methods of resolving iterative processes of nonlinear transient heat conduction. Solution of this problem illustrates possibilities of PAK-T software package, such as materials properties, given as tabular data, or analytical functions. Software also offers the possibility to solve nonlinear and transient problems with incremental methods. Obtained results for different thicknesses of the tank wall insulation materials enable its comparison in regards to given conditions

  11. Heat and mass transport during microwave heating of mashed potato in domestic oven--model development, validation, and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajia; Pitchai, Krishnamoorthy; Birla, Sohan; Negahban, Mehrdad; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyamkondan

    2014-10-01

    A 3-dimensional finite-element model coupling electromagnetics and heat and mass transfer was developed to understand the interactions between the microwaves and fresh mashed potato in a 500 mL tray. The model was validated by performing heating of mashed potato from 25 °C on a rotating turntable in a microwave oven, rated at 1200 W, for 3 min. The simulated spatial temperature profiles on the top and bottom layer of the mashed potato showed similar hot and cold spots when compared to the thermal images acquired by an infrared camera. Transient temperature profiles at 6 locations collected by fiber-optic sensors showed good agreement with predicted results, with the root mean square error ranging from 1.6 to 11.7 °C. The predicted total moisture loss matched well with the observed result. Several input parameters, such as the evaporation rate constant, the intrinsic permeability of water and gas, and the diffusion coefficient of water and gas, are not readily available for mashed potato, and they cannot be easily measured experimentally. Reported values for raw potato were used as baseline values. A sensitivity analysis of these input parameters on the temperature profiles and the total moisture loss was evaluated by changing the baseline values to their 10% and 1000%. The sensitivity analysis showed that the gas diffusion coefficient, intrinsic water permeability, and the evaporation rate constant greatly influenced the predicted temperature and total moisture loss, while the intrinsic gas permeability and the water diffusion coefficient had little influence. This model can be used by the food product developers to understand microwave heating of food products spatially and temporally. This tool will allow food product developers to design food package systems that would heat more uniformly in various microwave ovens. The sensitivity analysis of this study will help us determine the most significant parameters that need to be measured accurately for reliable

  12. Investigation of thermal energy transport from an anisotropic central heating element to the adjacent channels: A multipoint flux approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-02-01

    The problem of heat transfer from a central heating element pressed between two clad plates to cooling channels adjacent and outboard of the plates is investigated numerically. The aim of this work is to highlight the role of thermal conductivity anisotropy of the heating element and/or the encompassing plates on thermal energy transport to the fluid passing through the two channels. When the medium is anisotropic with respect to thermal conductivity; energy transport to the neighboring channels is no longer symmetric. This asymmetry in energy fluxes influence heat transfer to the coolant resulting in different patterns of temperature fields. In particular, it is found that the temperature fields are skewed towards the principal direction of anisotropy. In addition, the heat flux distributions along the edges of the heating element are also different as a manifestation of thermal conductivity anisotropy. Furthermore, the peak temperature at the channel walls change location and magnitude depending on the principal direction of anisotropy. Based on scaling arguments, it is found that, the ratio of width to the height of the heating system is a key parameter which can suggest when one may ignore the effect of the cross-diagonal terms of the full conductivity tensor. To account for anisotropy in thermal conductivity, the method of multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) is employed. Using this technique, it is possible to find a finite difference stencil which can handle full thermal conductivity tensor and in the same time enjoys the simplicity of finite difference approximation. Although the finite difference stencil based on MPFA is quite complex, in this work we apply the recently introduced experimenting field approach which construct the global problem automatically.

  13. Modeling transverse heating and outflow of ionospheric ions from the dayside cusp/cleft. 1 A parametric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bouhram

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The transport patterns of non-thermal H + and O + field-aligned flows from the dayside cusp/cleft, associated with transverse heating by means of wave-particle interactions and in combination with the poleward motion due to the magnetospheric convection are investigated. This has been accomplished by developing a steady-state, two-dimensional, trajectory-based code. The ion heating is modelled by means of a Monte Carlo technique, via the process of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR, with the electromagnetic left-hand circular polarized component of a broad-band, extremely low-frequency (BBELF turbulence. The altitude dependence of ICR heating from 1000 km to 3 Earth radii (RE is modelled by a power law spectrum, with an index a, and a parameter w0 that is proportional to the spectral density at a referenced gyrofrequency. Because of the finite latitudinal extent of the cusp/cleft, the incorporation of the horizontal convection drift leads to a maximum residence time tD of the ions when being energized. A large set of simulations has been computed so as to study the transport patterns of the H + and O + bulk parameters as a function of tD , a, and w0. Residence time effects are significant in O + density patterns while negligible for H +. When comparing the results with analytical one-dimensional theories (Chang et al., 1986; Crew et al., 1990, we find that mean ion energies and pitch angles at the poleward edge of the heating region are slightly influenced by tD and may be used as a probe of ICR parameters ( a, w0. Conversely, poleward of the heating region, upward velocity and mean energy dispersive patterns depend mainly on tD (e.g. the magnitude of the convection drift with latitudinal profiles varying versus tD . In short, the main conclusion of the paper is that any triplet (tD , a, w0 leads to a unique transport-pattern feature of ion flows associated with a cusp/cleft ionospheric source. In a companion paper, by using high-altitude (1.5–3 RE

  14. Albedo and heat transport in 3-D model simulations of the early Archean climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kienert

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of the Archean eon (ca. 3.8 billion years ago, the Earth's climate state was significantly different from today due to the lower solar luminosity, smaller continental fraction, higher rotation rate and, presumably, significantly larger greenhouse gas concentrations. All these aspects play a role in solutions to the "faint young Sun paradox" which must explain why the ocean surface was not fully frozen at that time. Here, we present 3-D model simulations of climate states that are consistent with early Archean boundary conditions and have different CO2 concentrations, aiming at an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of the early Archean climate system. In order to do so, we have appropriately modified an intermediate complexity climate model that couples a statistical-dynamical atmosphere model (involving parameterizations of the dynamics to an ocean general circulation model and a thermodynamic-dynamic sea-ice model. We focus on three states: one of them is ice-free, one has the same mean surface air temperature of 288 K as today's Earth and the third one is the coldest stable state in which there is still an area with liquid surface water (i.e. the critical state at the transition to a "snowball Earth". We find a reduction in meridional heat transport compared to today, which leads to a steeper latitudinal temperature profile and has atmospheric as well as oceanic contributions. Ocean surface velocities are largely zonal, and the strength of the atmospheric meridional circulation is significantly reduced in all three states. These aspects contribute to the observed relation between global mean temperature and albedo, which we suggest as a parameterization of the ice-albedo feedback for 1-D model simulations of the early Archean and thus the faint young Sun problem.

  15. Gap structure of iron-pnictide superconductors from low-temperature heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jean-Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The structure of the superconducting gap provides important clues on the symmetry of the order parameter and the pairing mechanism. Here I describe how measurements of the thermal conductivity at very low temperature can be used to determine whether nodes are present in the gap function of a particular superconductor, and how the application of a magnetic field probes the low-energy quasiparticle excitations. Measurements on hole-doped and electron-doped pnictide superconductors, Ba1-xKxFe2As2 [1] and Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 [2], reveal a negligible residual linear term at T->0, showing that the gap of these two superconductors has no nodes, at least in the basal plane. In both pnictides, a small field is found to be very effective in exciting quasiparticles, showing that the gap must be very small in some direction on the Fermi surface. In Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2, the evolution with doping x is as follows: at low x, the gap is large everywhere on the Fermi surface, and beyond optimal doping the minimum gap becomes progressively smaller. I discuss what these features tell us about the nature of the superconducting state in pnictide superconductors. * Measurements of heat transport performed in collaboration with X.-G. Luo, H. Shakeripour, M.A. Tanatar, N. Doiron-Leyraud and L. Taillefer. [1] X.-G. Luo et al., Phys. Rev. B 80, 140503 (2009). [2] M.A. Tanatar et al., arXiv:0907.1276.

  16. Numerical study of the influence of the convective heat transport on acoustic streaming in a standing wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, Milan; Bednařík, Michal

    2018-02-01

    Within this work, acoustic streaming in an air-filled cylindrical resonator with walls supporting a temperature gradient is studied by means of numerical simulations. A set of equations based on successive approximations is derived from the Navier-Stokes equations. The equations take into account the acoustic-streaming-driven convective heat transport; as time-averaged secondary-field quantities are directly calculated, the equations are much easier to integrate than the original fluid-dynamics equations. The model equations are implemented and integrated employing commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics. Numerical calculations are conducted for the case of a resonator with a wall-temperature gradient corresponding to the action of a thermoacoustic effect. It is shown that due to the convective heat transport, the streaming profile is considerably distorted even in the case of weak wall-temperature gradients. The numerical results are consistent with available experimental data.

  17. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, H.F. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  18. Momentum transport and nonlocality in heat-flux-driven magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Fox, William; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Thomas, Alexander G. R.; Joglekar, Archis S.

    2017-10-01

    Recent theory has demonstrated a novel physics regime for magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density plasmas where the magnetic field is advected by heat flux via the Nernst effect. Here we elucidate the physics of the electron dissipation layer in this regime. Through fully kinetic simulation and a generalized Ohm's law derived from first principles, we show that momentum transport due to a nonlocal effect, the heat-flux-viscosity, provides the dissipation mechanism for magnetic reconnection. Scaling analysis, and simulations show that the reconnection process comprises a magnetic field compression stage and quasisteady reconnection stage, and the characteristic width of the current sheet in this regime is several electron mean-free paths. These results show the important interplay between nonlocal transport effects and generation of anisotropic components to the distribution function.

  19. Thermoprotection of a functional epithelium: heat stress effects on transepithelial transport by flounder renal tubule in primary monolayer culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M A; Upender, R P; Hightower, L E; Renfro, J L

    1992-01-01

    Primary monolayer cultures of winter flounder renal proximal-tubule cells were used to determine whether transepithelial transport could be protected from the damaging effects of extreme temperature by previous mild heat shock. Renal tubule epithelial cells were enzymatically dispersed and reorganized as confluent monolayer sheets on native rat tail collagen. Transepithelial electrical properties (potential difference, resistance, short-circuit current, and Na(+)-dependent glucose current) an...

  20. Climate change alters the structure of arctic marine food webs due to poleward shifts of boreal generalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortsch, Susanne; Primicerio, Raul; Fossheim, Maria; Dolgov, Andrey V.; Aschan, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Climate-driven poleward shifts, leading to changes in species composition and relative abundances, have been recently documented in the Arctic. Among the fastest moving species are boreal generalist fish which are expected to affect arctic marine food web structure and ecosystem functioning substantially. Here, we address structural changes at the food web level induced by poleward shifts via topological network analysis of highly resolved boreal and arctic food webs of the Barents Sea. We detected considerable differences in structural properties and link configuration between the boreal and the arctic food webs, the latter being more modular and less connected. We found that a main characteristic of the boreal fish moving poleward into the arctic region of the Barents Sea is high generalism, a property that increases connectance and reduces modularity in the arctic marine food web. Our results reveal that habitats form natural boundaries for food web modules, and that generalists play an important functional role in coupling pelagic and benthic modules. We posit that these habitat couplers have the potential to promote the transfer of energy and matter between habitats, but also the spread of pertubations, thereby changing arctic marine food web structure considerably with implications for ecosystem dynamics and functioning. PMID:26336179

  1. Climate change alters the structure of arctic marine food webs due to poleward shifts of boreal generalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortsch, Susanne; Primicerio, Raul; Fossheim, Maria; Dolgov, Andrey V; Aschan, Michaela

    2015-09-07

    Climate-driven poleward shifts, leading to changes in species composition and relative abundances, have been recently documented in the Arctic. Among the fastest moving species are boreal generalist fish which are expected to affect arctic marine food web structure and ecosystem functioning substantially. Here, we address structural changes at the food web level induced by poleward shifts via topological network analysis of highly resolved boreal and arctic food webs of the Barents Sea. We detected considerable differences in structural properties and link configuration between the boreal and the arctic food webs, the latter being more modular and less connected. We found that a main characteristic of the boreal fish moving poleward into the arctic region of the Barents Sea is high generalism, a property that increases connectance and reduces modularity in the arctic marine food web. Our results reveal that habitats form natural boundaries for food web modules, and that generalists play an important functional role in coupling pelagic and benthic modules. We posit that these habitat couplers have the potential to promote the transfer of energy and matter between habitats, but also the spread of pertubations, thereby changing arctic marine food web structure considerably with implications for ecosystem dynamics and functioning. © 2015 The Authors.

  2. Dynamic habitat suitability modelling reveals rapid poleward distribution shift in a mobile apex predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicholas J; Tobin, Andrew J; Reside, April E; Pepperell, Julian G; Bridge, Tom C L

    2016-03-01

    Many taxa are undergoing distribution shifts in response to anthropogenic climate change. However, detecting a climate signal in mobile species is difficult due to their wide-ranging, patchy distributions, often driven by natural climate variability. For example, difficulties associated with assessing pelagic fish distributions have rendered fisheries management ill-equipped to adapt to the challenges posed by climate change, leaving pelagic species and ecosystems vulnerable. Here, we demonstrate the value of citizen science data for modelling the dynamic habitat suitability of a mobile pelagic predator (black marlin, Istiompax indica) within the south-west Pacific Ocean. The extensive spatial and temporal coverage of our occurrence data set (n = 18 717), collected at high resolution (~1.85 km(2) ), enabled identification of suitable habitat at monthly time steps over a 16-year period (1998-2013). We identified considerable monthly, seasonal and interannual variability in the extent and distribution of suitable habitat, predominately driven by chlorophyll a and sea surface height. Interannual variability correlated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, with suitable habitat extending up to ~300 km further south during La Nina events. Despite the strong influence of ENSO, our model revealed a rapid poleward shift in the geometric mean of black marlin habitat, occurring at 88.2 km decade(-1) . By incorporating multiple environmental factors at monthly time steps, we were able to demonstrate a rapid distribution shift in a mobile pelagic species. Our findings suggest that the rapid velocity of climate change in the south-west Pacific Ocean is likely affecting mobile pelagic species, indicating that they may be more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Analysis technology in the thick plate free drop impact, heat and thermal stress of the cask for radioactive material transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dew Hey [Korea Institute of Nuclear and Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Shin; Ryu, Chung Hyun; Kim, Hyun Su; Choi, Kyung Joo; Choi, Young Jin; Lee, Jae Hyung; Na, Jae Yun; Kim, Seong Jong [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    In this study, The regulatory condition and analysis condition is analyzed for thick plate free drop, heat and thermal stress analysis to develop the safety assessment technology. Analysis is performed with finite element method which is one of the many analysis methods of the shipping cask. ANSYS, LS-DYNA3D and ABAQUS is suitable for thick plate free drop, heat and thermal stress analysis of the shipping cask. For the analysis model, the KSC-4 that is the shipping cask to transport spent nuclear fuel is investigated. The results of both LS-DYNA3D and ABAQUS for thick plate free drop and the results of ANSYS, LS-DYNA3D and ABAQUS for heat and thermal stress analysis is completely corresponded. And the integrity of the shipping cask is verified. Using this study, the reliable safety assessment technology is supplied to the staff. The efficient and reliable regulatory tasks is performed using the standard safety assessment technology.

  4. Analysis technology in the thick plate free drop impact, heat and thermal stress of the cask for radioactive material transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dew Hey; Lee, Young Shin; Ryu, Chung Hyun; Kim, Hyun Su; Choi, Kyung Joo; Choi, Young Jin; Lee, Jae Hyung; Na, Jae Yun; Kim, Seong Jong

    2002-03-01

    In this study, The regulatory condition and analysis condition is analyzed for thick plate free drop, heat and thermal stress analysis to develop the safety assessment technology. Analysis is performed with finite element method which is one of the many analysis methods of the shipping cask. ANSYS, LS-DYNA3D and ABAQUS is suitable for thick plate free drop, heat and thermal stress analysis of the shipping cask. For the analysis model, the KSC-4 that is the shipping cask to transport spent nuclear fuel is investigated. The results of both LS-DYNA3D and ABAQUS for thick plate free drop and the results of ANSYS, LS-DYNA3D and ABAQUS for heat and thermal stress analysis is completely corresponded. And the integrity of the shipping cask is verified. Using this study, the reliable safety assessment technology is supplied to the staff. The efficient and reliable regulatory tasks is performed using the standard safety assessment technology

  5. Transport phenomena in a steam-methanol reforming microreactor with internal heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jeong-Se; Lee, Ming-Tsang; Greif, Ralph; Grigoropoulos, Costas P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    An experimental and theoretical study of steam reforming of methanol is carried out in a packed-bed microreactor with internal heating. Experimental results of the methanol conversion and carbon monoxide concentration in an internally heated reformer are compared with those of an externally heated reformer. Higher methanol conversion and carbon monoxide concentration are obtained for internal heating at the same conditions. The results show the conversion efficiency of methanol and CO concentration increase with increasing internal heating rate over the range of operating conditions. A correlation for the conversion efficiency of methanol has been obtained as a function of the internal heating rate and a dimensionless time parameter which represents the ratio of the characteristic time of the methanol flow to the time for chemical reaction. (author)

  6. Radiation and gas conduction heat transport across a helium dewar multilayer insulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes a method for calculating mixed heat transfer through the multilayer insulation used to insulate a 4 K liquid helium cryostat. The method described here permits one to estimate the insulation potential for a multilayer insulation system from first principles. The heat transfer regimes included are: radiation, conduction by free molecule gas conduction, and conduction through continuum gas conduction. Heat transfer in the transition region between the two gas conduction regimes is also included

  7. INDUCTION HEATING IN HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT. APPLICATION IN MODERN TRANSPORT REPAIRING TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Batyhin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The technologies used in repair of vehicles were analyzed in the given paper. The shortcomings of the mechanical repair methods in question can be solved by using induction heating. Analysis of the stages of development and implementation of induction heating in industries showed effective performance of this technology and its opportunities for further improvement. An alternative repair technique, which consists in using induction heating, was proposed.

  8. Explaining the isotope effect on heat transport in L-mode with the collisional electron-ion energy exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, P. A.; Bustos, A.; Hennequin, P.; Ryter, F.; Bernert, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M. G.; Fischer, R.; Görler, T.; Happel, T.; Igochine, V.; Kurzan, B.; Lebschy, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Morel, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-06-01

    In ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), the normalised gyroradius {ρ\\star} was varied via a hydrogen isotope scan while keeping other dimensionless parameters constant. This was done in L-mode, to minimise the impact of pedestal stability on confinement. Power balance and perturbative transport analyses reveal that the electron heat transport is unaffected by the differences in isotope mass. Nonlinear simulations with the Gene code suggest that these L-mode discharges are ion temperature gradient (ITG) dominated. The different gyroradii due to the isotope mass do not necessarily result in a change of the predicted heat fluxes. This result is used in simulations with the Astra transport code to match the experimental profiles. In these simulations the experimental profiles and confinement times are reproduced with the same transport coefficients for hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. The mass only enters in the energy exchange term between electrons and ions. These numerical observations are supported by additional experiments which show a lower ion energy confinement compared to that of the electrons. Additionally, hydrogen and deuterium plasmas have a similar confinement when the energy exchange time between electrons and ions is matched. This strongly suggests that the observed isotope dependence in L-mode is not dominated by a gyroradius effect, but a consequence of the mass dependence in the collisional energy exchange between electrons and ions.

  9. Formation of core transport barrier and CH-Mode by ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Gettelfinger, G.; Hatcher, R.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.

    1995-01-01

    Observation of core transport barrier formation (for particles, ion and electron energies, and toroidal momentum) by ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) in PBX-M plasma is reported. The formation of a transport barrier leads to a strong peaking and significant increase of the core pressure (70%) and toroidal momentum (20%), and has been termed the core-high confinement mode (CH-Mode). This formation of a transport barrier is consistent, in terms of the expected barrier location as well as the required threshold power, with a theoretical model based on the poloidal sheared flow generation by the ion Bernstein wave power. The use of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) induced sheared flow as a tool to control plasma pressure and bootstrap current profiles shows a favorable scaling for the use in future reactor grade tokamak plasmas

  10. Heat and water transport in soils and across the soil-atmosphere interface: 1. Theory and different model concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderborght, Jan; Fetzer, Thomas; Mosthaf, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Evaporation is an important component of the soil water balance. It is composed of water flow and transport processes in a porous medium that are coupled with heat fluxes and free air flow. This work provides a comprehensive review of model concepts used in different research fields to describe...... evaporation. Concepts range from nonisothermal two-phase flow, two-component transport in the porous medium that is coupled with one-phase flow, two-component transport in the free air flow to isothermal liquid water flow in the porous medium with upper boundary conditions defined by a potential evaporation...... flux when available energy and transfer to the free airflow are limiting or by a critical threshold water pressure when soil water availability is limiting. The latter approach corresponds with the classical Richards equation with mixed boundary conditions. We compare the different approaches...

  11. Heat and Water Transport in Soils and Across the Soil-Atmosphere Interface: Comparison of Model Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderborght, Jan; Smits, Kathleen; Mosthaf, Klaus

    models were found. The effect of vapor flow in the porous medium on cumulative evaporation could be evaluated using the desorptivity, Sevap, which represents a weighted average of liquid and vapor diffusivity over the range of soil water contents between the soil surface water content and the initial......Evaporation from the soil surface represents a water flow and transport process in a porous medium that is coupled with free air flow and with heat fluxes in the system. We give an overview of different model concepts that are used to describe this process. These range from non-isothermal two......-phase flow two-component transport in the porous medium that is coupled with one-phase flow two-component transport in the free air to isothermal water flow in the porous with upper boundary conditions defined by a potential evaporation flux when available energy and transfer to the free air flow...

  12. Evaluation of Energy Efficient Options to Heat Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) Maintenance Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This project was initiated by the ODOT District 2 staff who were looking for more efficient ways to heat and operate their maintenance facilities. This especially applied to the idea of using radiant floor heating as an alternative to todays stand...

  13. Lithium Hideout and Return in the CANDU Heat Transport System during Shutdown and Start-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, L.; Snaglewski, A.P.

    2012-09-01

    Lithium hydroxide is used to control the pH a (pH apparent) of the Heat Transport System (HTS) coolant in CANDU R reactors. The recommended range of the lithium concentration in the coolant is between 0.38 ppm (5.5x10 -5 m) and 0.60 ppm (8.7x10 -5 m) to minimize carbon steel corrosion in the HTS and magnetite deposition in the core during normal operation; this corresponds to pH a values between 10.2 and 10.4. Similar pH a and lithium concentrations should be maintained during shutdown and start-up. However, maintaining the pH a of the HTS coolant within specification during shutdown and start-up has been difficult for some CANDU stations, especially when the HTS is taken to a Low Level Drain State (LLDS), because of lithium hideout and return. This paper presents the results from lithium adsorption and desorption studies on iron oxides under relevant shutdown and start-up chemistry conditions performed to elucidate the mechanisms of the observed lithium hideout and return. The results show that lithium hideout and return are driven largely by changes in the solubility of magnetite as the HTS coolant chemistry changes during shutdown; changes in lithium concentration were inversely correlated with the solubility of magnetite. When the HTS system is de-pressurized and drained to a low coolant level, the ingress of air rapidly oxidizes the dissolved Fe (II) in the coolant, 2Fe +2 + 1 / 2 O 2 + 3 H 2 = 2FEOOH + 4 H + , resulting in the formation of lepidocrocite or maghemite, which have much lower solubilities but larger surface areas than does magnetite. The large surface area of the Fe (III) oxides can adsorb significant quantities of lithium from the coolant, leading to lithium hideout and a pH a decrease. During start-up, the chemistry of the coolant changes from oxidizing to reducing, and lepidocrocite and other Fe (III) oxides are reduced to Fe (II), gradually dissolving as their solubility increases with increasing temperature. The adsorbed lithium is released

  14. A lead-before-break strategy for primary heat transport piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    1997-01-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) is being used to design the primary heat transport piping system of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR). The work is categorized in three directions to demonstrate three levels of safety against sudden catastrophic break. Level 1 is inherent in the design procedure of piping system as per ASME Sec.III with a well defined factor of safety. Level 2 consists of fatigue crack growth study of a postulated part-through flaw at the inside surface of pipes. Level 3 is stability analysis of a postulated leakage size flaw under the maximum credible loading condition. Developmental work related to demonstration of level 2 and level 3 confidence is described in this paper. In a case study on fatigue crack growth on PHT straight pipes for level 2, negligible crack growth is predicted for the life of the reactor. For level 3 analysis, the R6 method has been adopted. A database to evaluate SIF of elbows with throughwall flaws under combined internal pressure and bending moment has been generated to provide one of the inputs for R6 method. The methodology of safety assessment of elbow using R6 method has been demonstrated for a typical pump discharge elbow. In this analysis, limit load of the cracked elbow has been determined by carrying out elasto-plastic finite element analysis. The limit load results compared well with those given by Miller. However, it requires further study to give a general form of limit load solution. On the experimental front, a set of small diameter pipe fracture experiments have been carried out at room temperature and 300 degrees C. Two important observations of the experiments are - appreciable drop in maximum load at 300 degrees C in case of SS pipes and out-of-plane crack growth in case of CS pipes. Experimental load deflection curves are finally compared with five J-estimation schemes predictions. A material database of PHT piping materials is also being generated for use in LBB analysis

  15. A lead-before-break strategy for primary heat transport piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) is being used to design the primary heat transport piping system of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR). The work is categorized in three directions to demonstrate three levels of safety against sudden catastrophic break. Level 1 is inherent in the design procedure of piping system as per ASME Sec.III with a well defined factor of safety. Level 2 consists of fatigue crack growth study of a postulated part-through flaw at the inside surface of pipes. Level 3 is stability analysis of a postulated leakage size flaw under the maximum credible loading condition. Developmental work related to demonstration of level 2 and level 3 confidence is described in this paper. In a case study on fatigue crack growth on PHT straight pipes for level 2, negligible crack growth is predicted for the life of the reactor. For level 3 analysis, the R6 method has been adopted. A database to evaluate SIF of elbows with throughwall flaws under combined internal pressure and bending moment has been generated to provide one of the inputs for R6 method. The methodology of safety assessment of elbow using R6 method has been demonstrated for a typical pump discharge elbow. In this analysis, limit load of the cracked elbow has been determined by carrying out elasto-plastic finite element analysis. The limit load results compared well with those given by Miller. However, it requires further study to give a general form of limit load solution. On the experimental front, a set of small diameter pipe fracture experiments have been carried out at room temperature and 300{degrees}C. Two important observations of the experiments are - appreciable drop in maximum load at 300{degrees}C in case of SS pipes and out-of-plane crack growth in case of CS pipes. Experimental load deflection curves are finally compared with five J-estimation schemes predictions. A material database of PHT piping materials is also being generated for use in LBB analysis.

  16. Analysis of chemical-reaction-coupled mass and heat transport phenomena in a methane reformer duct for PEMFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Jinliang; Sunden, Bengt [Lund University, Lund (Sweden). Department of Energy Sciences, Faculty of Engineering; Ren, Fuan [Marine Engineering College, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian (China)

    2007-02-15

    Mass, heat and momentum transport processes are coupled with catalytic chemical reactions in a methane steam reforming duct. It is often found that endothermic and exothermic reactions in the ducts are strongly integrated by heat transfer from adjacent catalytic combustion ducts. In this paper, a three-dimensional calculation method is developed to simulate and analyze reforming reactions of methane, and the effects on various transport processes in a steam reforming duct. The reformer conditions such as mass balances associated with the reforming reactions and gas permeation to/from the porous catalyst reforming layer are applied in the analysis. The predicted results are presented and discussed for a composite duct consisting of a porous catalyst reaction layer, the fuel gas flow duct and solid layers. Parametric studies are conducted to reveal the importance of reformer designs and operating conditions. The results show that the variables, such as porous layer configuration, temperature and catalyst loading, have significant effects on the transport processes and reformer performance. (author)

  17. Combining in situ measurements and altimetry to estimate volume, heat and salt transport variability through the Faroe–Shetland Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Berx

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available From 1994 to 2011, instruments measuring ocean currents (Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers; ADCPs have been moored on a section crossing the Faroe–Shetland Channel. Together with CTD (Conductivity Temperature Depth measurements from regular research vessel occupations, they describe the flow field and water mass structure in the channel. Here, we use these data to calculate the average volume transport and properties of the flow of warm water through the channel from the Atlantic towards the Arctic, termed the Atlantic inflow. We find the average volume transport of this flow to be 2.7 ± 0.5 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s–1 between the shelf edge on the Faroe side and the 150 m isobath on the Shetland side. The average heat transport (relative to 0 °C was estimated to be 107 ± 21 TW (1 TW = 1012 W and the average salt import to be 98 ± 20 × 106 kg s−1. Transport values for individual months, based on the ADCP data, include a large level of variability, but can be used to calibrate sea level height data from satellite altimetry. In this way, a time series of volume transport has been generated back to the beginning of satellite altimetry in December 1992. The Atlantic inflow has a seasonal variation in volume transport that peaks around the turn of the year and has an amplitude of 0.7 Sv. The Atlantic inflow has become warmer and more saline since 1994, but no equivalent trend in volume transport was observed.

  18. Multiple zonal jets and convective heat transport barriers in a quasi-geostrophic model of planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2017-10-01

    We study rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection driven by internal heating in a full sphere. We use a numerical model based on the quasi-geostrophic approximation for the velocity field, whereas the temperature field is 3-D. This approximation allows us to perform simulations for Ekman numbers down to 10-8, Prandtl numbers relevant for liquid metals (˜10-1) and Reynolds numbers up to 3 × 104. Persistent zonal flows composed of multiple jets form as a result of the mixing of potential vorticity. For the largest Rayleigh numbers computed, the zonal velocity is larger than the convective velocity despite the presence of boundary friction. The convective structures and the zonal jets widen when the thermal forcing increases. Prograde and retrograde zonal jets are dynamically different: in the prograde jets (which correspond to weak potential vorticity gradients) the convection transports heat efficiently and the mean temperature tends to be homogenized; by contrast, in the cores of the retrograde jets (which correspond to steep gradients of potential vorticity) the dynamics is dominated by the propagation of Rossby waves, resulting in the formation of steep mean temperature gradients and the dominance of conduction in the heat transfer process. Consequently, in quasi-geostrophic systems, the width of the retrograde zonal jets controls the efficiency of the heat transfer.

  19. Heat pump without particle transport or external work on the medium achieved by differential thermostatting of the phase space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mechanism that enables heat flow from a colder region to a hotter region without necessitating either particle transport or external work on the conductor, thereby bypassing the compressor part of a classical heat pump cycle. Our mechanism relies on thermostatting the kinetic and configurational temperatures of the same particle differently. We keep the two ends of a conductor, which in the present study is a single dimensional ϕ4 chain, at the same kinetic temperature T0, but at different configurational temperatures—one end hotter and the other end colder than T0. While external energy is needed within the thermostatted regions to achieve this differential thermostatting, no external work is performed on the system itself. We show that the mechanism satisfies the statistical form of the second law of thermodynamics (the fluctuation theorem). The proposed mechanism reveals two interesting findings: (i) contrary to traditional thermodynamics where only the kinetic temperature is thought to govern heat conduction, configurational temperature can also play an important role, and (ii) the relative temperature difference between the kinetic and configurational variables governs the direction of heat flow. The challenge, however, is in developing experimental techniques to thermostat the kinetic and configurational variables of the same particle at different values.

  20. Non-equilibrium temperatures and heat transport in nanosystems with defects, described by a tensorial internal variable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restuccia Liliana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the meaning of non-equilibrium temperatures in nanosystems with an internal variable, describing defects inside them, and implications on heat transport. In equilibrium all definitions of temperature lead to the same value, but in nonequilibrium steady states they lead to different values, giving information on different degrees of freedom. We discuss the caloric and entropic non-equilibrium temperatures and the relations among them, in defective nanosystems (crystals with dislocations or porous channels, carbon nanotubes in a solid matrix and so on, crossed by an external energy flux. Here, we present a model for nanocrystals with dislocation defects submitted to an external energy flux. The dislocations may have a strong influence on the effective thermal conductivity, and their own dynamics may be coupled in relevant way to the heat flux dynamics. In the linear case the constitutive relations, the rate equations for the internal variable and the heat flux are worked out and a generalized telegraphic heat equation is derived in the anisotropic and isotropic case, describing the thermal disturbances with finite velocity.

  1. Body size, growth and life span: implications for the polewards range shift of Octopus tetricus in south-eastern Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Ramos

    Full Text Available Understanding the response of any species to climate change can be challenging. However, in short-lived species the faster turnover of generations may facilitate the examination of responses associated with longer-term environmental change. Octopus tetricus, a commercially important species, has undergone a recent polewards range shift in the coastal waters of south-eastern Australia, thought to be associated with the southerly extension of the warm East Australian Current. At the cooler temperatures of a polewards distribution limit, growth of a species could be slower, potentially leading to a bigger body size and resulting in a slower population turnover, affecting population viability at the extreme of the distribution. Growth rates, body size, and life span of O. tetricus were examined at the leading edge of a polewards range shift in Tasmanian waters (40°S and 147°E throughout 2011. Octopus tetricus had a relatively small body size and short lifespan of approximately 11 months that, despite cooler temperatures, would allow a high rate of population turnover and may facilitate the population increase necessary for successful establishment in the new extended area of the range. Temperature, food availability and gender appear to influence growth rate. Individuals that hatched during cooler and more productive conditions, but grew during warming conditions, exhibited faster growth rates and reached smaller body sizes than individuals that hatched into warmer waters but grew during cooling conditions. This study suggests that fast growth, small body size and associated rapid population turnover may facilitate the range shift of O. tetricus into Tasmanian waters.

  2. Body size, growth and life span: implications for the polewards range shift of Octopus tetricus in south-eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Jorge E; Pecl, Gretta T; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A; Strugnell, Jan M; León, Rafael I; Semmens, Jayson M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the response of any species to climate change can be challenging. However, in short-lived species the faster turnover of generations may facilitate the examination of responses associated with longer-term environmental change. Octopus tetricus, a commercially important species, has undergone a recent polewards range shift in the coastal waters of south-eastern Australia, thought to be associated with the southerly extension of the warm East Australian Current. At the cooler temperatures of a polewards distribution limit, growth of a species could be slower, potentially leading to a bigger body size and resulting in a slower population turnover, affecting population viability at the extreme of the distribution. Growth rates, body size, and life span of O. tetricus were examined at the leading edge of a polewards range shift in Tasmanian waters (40°S and 147°E) throughout 2011. Octopus tetricus had a relatively small body size and short lifespan of approximately 11 months that, despite cooler temperatures, would allow a high rate of population turnover and may facilitate the population increase necessary for successful establishment in the new extended area of the range. Temperature, food availability and gender appear to influence growth rate. Individuals that hatched during cooler and more productive conditions, but grew during warming conditions, exhibited faster growth rates and reached smaller body sizes than individuals that hatched into warmer waters but grew during cooling conditions. This study suggests that fast growth, small body size and associated rapid population turnover may facilitate the range shift of O. tetricus into Tasmanian waters.

  3. Dimensionless scalings of confinement, heat transport and pedestal stability in JET-ILW and comparison with JET-C

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frassinetti, L.; Saarelma, S.; Lomas, P.; Nunes, I.; Rimini, F.; Beurskens, M.N.A.; Bílková, Petra; Boom, J.E.; De La Luna, E.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Flanagan, J.; Garzotti, L.; Giroud, C.; Hawks, N.; Joffrin, E.; Kempenaars, M.; Kim, H.-T.; Kruezi, U.; Loarte, A.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Meneses, L.; Maggi, C.F.; Menmuir, S.; Peterka, Matěj; Rachlew, E.; Romanelli, M.; Stefanikova, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 014014. ISSN 0741-3335. [EPS 2016: Conference on Plasma Physics/43./. Leuven, 04.07.2016-08.07.2016] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : JET-ILW * dimensionless scaling * pedestal * confinement * pedestal stability * heat transport Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0741-3335/59/1/014014

  4. Valve stem packing seal test results for primary heat transport system conditions in Canadian nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.F.; Farrell, J.M.; Coutinho, R.F.

    1978-06-01

    Valve stem packing tests were done to obtain performance data on packing already in CANDU-PHW reactor service and on alternative packings. Most of the tests were replicated. Results are presented for ten packings tested under two stem cycle modes; leakage, packing consolidation and packing friction were the main responses. Packing tests were performed with water at close to CANDU-PHW reactor primary heat transport (PHT) system conditions (288 deg C and 10 MPa), but without ionizing radiation. The test rigs had rising, rotating stems. Stuffing box dimensions were typical of a standard Velan valve; packings were spring loaded to control applied packing stress

  5. The influence of episodic shallow magma degassing on heat and chemical transport in volcanic hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kewei; Zhan, Hongbin; Burns, Erick; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Agrinier, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Springs at La Soufrière of Guadeloupe have been monitored for nearly four decades since the phreatic eruption and associated seismic activity in 1976. We conceptualize degassing vapor/gas mixtures as square‐wave sources of chloride and heat and apply a new semianalytic solution to demonstrate that chloride and heat pulses with the same timing and duration result in good matches between measured and simulated spring temperatures and concentrations. While the concentration of chloride pulses is variable, the local boiling temperature of 96°C was assigned to all thermal pulses. Because chloride is a conservative tracer, chloride breakthrough is only affected by one‐dimensional advection and dispersion. The thermal tracer is damped and lagged relative to chloride due to conductive heat exchange with the overlying and underlying strata. Joint analysis of temperature and chloride allows estimation of the onset and duration of degassing pulses, refining the chronology of recent magmatic intrusion.

  6. Poloidal electric field and variation of radial transport during ICRF heating in the JET scrape-off layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, S.; Tagle, J.A.; Bures, M.; Vince, J.; Kock, L. de; Stangeby, P.C.

    1989-01-01

    The highly anomalous perpendicular transport in the plasma edge of a tokamak is generally attributed to plasma turbulence, primarily to density and electrostatic potential fluctuations. The edge transport could be modified by changing the geometry of objects in contact with the plasma (limiters, radio frequency antennae ...) and during additional heating experiments. Poloidal asymmetries in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in tokamaks using poloidal limiters (eg. ALCATOR-C) have been recently reported, indicating a poloidal asymmetry in cross-field transport. A poloidal ring limiter obstructs communications between different flux tubes in the SOL, thus permitting poloidal asymmetries in n e and T e to develop if D perpendicular is θ-dependent. When JET was operated with discrete limiters, equivalent to a single toroidal limiter at the outside mid-plane, little poloidal variation in the SOL plasma properties was observed. Currently JET is operated with two complete toroidal belt limiters located approximately one meter above and below the outside mid-plane. This configuration breaks the SOL into two regions: the low field side SOL (LFS), between the limiters, and the rest of the SOL on the high field side (HFS). Differences on the scrape-off lengths in the two SOLs are reported here, indicating that cross-field transport is faster on the LFS-SOL, in agreement with observations made on ASDEX and T-10. (author) 8 refs., 6 figs

  7. Calculations of Heat and Vapour Transport in Clothing: Transient Effects in Hygroscopic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    prises en considfration, ,eme si lea propriftfs hygroscopiques sont consid&rfes tris Alimentaires . Les calculs ont 6tg comparls A ceux des exp~riences de...calculated heat flows for wool drop off very slowly as the absorbed water evaporates. The calculation for polyester gives a steady additional heat loss for... additional explanatoriy 4 DESiCqlP1 lyE NOTES EntertIhi i:;iiiloiy ofl document. e~g notes. lechnisil ieport, technical note oi technic~ial lettei. It

  8. Modeling soil heating and moisture transport under extreme conditions: Forest fires and slash pile burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Massman

    2012-01-01

    Heating any soil during a sufficiently intense wildfire or prescribed burn can alter it irreversibly, causing many significant, long-term biological, chemical, and hydrological effects. Given the climate-change-driven increasing probability of wildfires and the increasing use of prescribed burns by land managers, it is important to better understand the dynamics of the...

  9. Numerical modelling of transient heat and moisture transport in protective clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Łapka, P; Furmański, P; Wisniewski, T S

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a complex model of heat and mass transfer in a multi-layer protective clothing exposed to a flash fire and interacting with the human skin. The clothing was made of porous fabric layers separated by air gaps. The fabrics contained bound water in the fibres and moist air in the pores. The moist air was also present in the gaps between fabric layers or internal fabric layer and the skin. Three skin sublayers were considered. The model accounted for coupled heat transfer by conduction, thermal radiation and associated with diffusion of water vapour in the clothing layers and air gaps. Heat exchange due to phase transition of the bound water were also included in the model. Complex thermal and mass transfer conditions at internal or external boundaries between fabric layers and air gaps as well as air gap and skin were assumed. Special attention was paid to modelling of thermal radiation which was coming from the fire, penetrated through protective clothing and absorbed by the skin. For the first time non-grey properties as well as optical phenomena at internal or external boundaries between fabric layers and air gaps as well as air gap and skin were accounted for. A series of numerical simulations were carried out and the risk of heat injures was estimated. (paper)

  10. Heat Transport upon River-Water Infiltration investigated by Fiber-Optic High-Resolution Temperature Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, T.; Schirmer, M.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2010-12-01

    Infiltrating river water is of high relevance for drinking water supply by river bank filtration as well as for riparian groundwater ecology. Quantifying flow patterns and velocities, however, is hampered by temporal and spatial variations of exchange fluxes. In recent years, heat has become a popular natural tracer to estimate exchange rates between rivers and groundwater. Nevertheless, field investigations are often limited by insufficient sensors spacing or simplifying assumptions such as one-dimensional flow. Our interest lies in a detailed local survey of river water infiltration at a restored river section at the losing river Thur in northeast Switzerland. Here, we measured three high-resolution temperature profiles along an assumed flow path by means of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) using fiber optic cables wrapped around poles. Moreover, piezometers were equipped with standard temperature sensors for a comparison to the DTS data. Diurnal temperature oscillations were tracked in the river bed and the riparian groundwater and analyzed by means of dynamic harmonic regression and subsequent modeling of heat transport with sinusoidal boundary conditions to quantify seepage velocities and thermal diffusivities. Compared to the standard temperature sensors, the DTS data give a higher vertical resolution, facilitating the detection of process- and structure-dependent patterns of the spatiotemporal temperature field. This advantage overcompensates the scatter in the data due to instrument noise. In particular, we could demonstrate the impact of heat conduction through the unsaturated zone on the riparian groundwater by the high resolution temperature profiles.

  11. Study of Transient Heat Transport Mechanisms in Superfluid Helium Cooled Rutherford-Cables

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100615

    The Large Hadron Collider leverages superconducting magnets to focus the particle beam or keep it in its circular track. These superconducting magnets are composed of NbTi-cables with a special insulation that allows superfluid helium to enter and cool the superconducting cable. Loss mechanisms, e.g. continuous random loss of particles escaping the collimation system heating up the magnets. Hence, a local temperature increase can occur and lead to a quench of the magnets when the superconductor warms up above the critical temperature. A detailed knowledge about the temperature increases in the superconducting cable (Rutherford type) ensures a secure operation of the LHC. A sample of the Rutherford cable has been instrumented with temperature sensors. Experiments with this sample have been performed within this study to investigate the cooling performance of the helium in the cable due to heat deposition. The experiment uses a superconducting coil, placed in a cryostat, to couple with the magnetic field loss m...

  12. Transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cell electrodes focusing on heat transfer related to chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navasa, M; Andersson, M; Yuan, J; Sundén, B

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are widely studied for their advantages especially at high temperatures. However, operating at high temperatures represents a high cost due to the strict requirements the materials are expected to fulfill. Thus, the main goal in SOFC research has been to decrease the operating temperature so that the range of available materials is widened and hence, the operating cost can be reduced. In this paper, the different heat sources that contribute to the cell energy balance are presented with strong emphasis on the chemical reactions that take place in SOFCs. The knowledge of which heat sources or sinks taking place and their locations within the SOFC can provide useful information for further design and efficiency improvements.

  13. Electromagnetic control of heat transport within a rectangular channel filled with flowing liquid metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modestov, M.; Kolemen, E.; Fisher, A. E.; Hvasta, M. G.

    2018-01-01

    The behavior of free-surface, liquid-metal flows exposed to both magnetic fields and an injected electric current is investigated via experiment and numerical simulations. The purpose of this paper is to provide an experimental and theoretical proof-of-concept for enhanced thermal mixing within fast-flowing, free-surface, liquid-metal plasma facing components that could be used in next-generation fusion reactors. The enhanced hydrodynamic and thermal mixing induced by non-uniform current density near the electrodes appears to improve heat transfer through the thickness of the flowing metal. Also, the outflow heat flux profile is strongly affected by the impact of the J  ×  B forces on flow velocity. The experimental results are compared to COMSOL simulations in order to lay the groundwork for future liquid-metal research.

  14. Moisture transport in heated concrete, as studied by NMR, and its consequences for fire spalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijden, G.H.A. van der; Bijnen, R.M.W. van; Pel, L.; Huinink, H.P.

    2007-01-01

    During the past 30 years concrete has developed enormously in both strength and durability. A drawback of these improvements is the increased risk of explosive spalling in case of fire. The moisture inside the concrete plays an important role in the spalling mechanism. In order to study the moisture migration inside concrete during intense heating, a dedicated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) setup was built. This setup can be placed inside a 1.5-T MRI scanner. With this setup one-dimensional moisture profiles can be measured while the concrete sample is heated up to 250 deg. C. Besides concrete, measurements were performed on fired-clay brick and calcium-silicate brick. The results show that water inside the concrete sample is superheated to a temperature of 170 deg. C, which results in an increased pressure inside the concrete. A model was developed to predict the movement of the observed drying front

  15. An Efficient Surface Algorithm for Random-Particle Simulation of Vorticity and Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. A.; Stansby, P. K.

    1989-04-01

    A new surface algorithm has been incorporated into the random-vortex method for the simulation of 2-dimensional laminar flow, in which vortex particles are deleted rather than reflected as they cross a solid surface. This involves a modification to the strength and random walk of newly created vortex particles. Computations of the early stages of symmetric, impulsively started flow around a circular cylinder for a wide range of Reynolds numbers demonstrate that the number of vortices required for convergence is substantially reduced. The method has been further extended to accommodate forced convective heat transfer where temperature particles are created at a surface to satisfy the condition of constant surface temperature. Vortex and temperature particles are handled together throughout each time step. For long runs, in which a steady state is reached, comparison is made with some time-averaged experimental heat transfer data for Reynolds numbers up to a few hundred. A Karman vortex street occurs at the higher Reynolds numbers.

  16. Electrical transport and specific heat of a Cr+2.2 at% Al single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberts, H.L., E-mail: hermana@uj.ac.z [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Prinsloo, A.R.E.; Strydom, A.M. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa)

    2010-05-15

    Electrical resistivity, thermoelectric power and specific heat measurements are reported for a Cr+2.2 at% Al alloy single crystal, having an Al content close to the triple point on the magnetic phase diagram of the Cr-Al alloy system. A weak resistivity component of spin-density-wave origin, not previously observed in alloys near the triple point concentration, is isolated at low temperatures. Its presence is confirmed by the thermoelectric measurements. The specific heat measurements suggest a maximum in the density of states at the Fermi energy for alloy concentrations close to the triple point, a point that appears to be a particular type of critical point for the Cr-Al alloy system.

  17. Heat transport and electron cooling in ballistic normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Shiro; Vasenko, Andrey S.; Ozaeta, Asier; Bergeret, Sebastian F.; Hekking, Frank W.J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate electron cooling based on a clean normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junction. Due to the suppression of the Andreev reflection by the spin-filter effect, the cooling power of the system is found to be extremely higher than that for conventional normal-metal/nonmagnetic-insulator/superconductor coolers. Therefore we can extract large amount of heat from normal metals. Our results strongly indicate the practical usefulness of the spin-filter effect for cooling detectors, sensors, and quantum bits

  18. Two-Dimensional Numerical Model of coupled Heat and Moisture Transport in Frost Heaving Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    approximation for diffusion oroblems is nee---. This is the main objective of the paper: to develop such a constant- * ~ actor which has the hhetprobability...The conseauences of the above results is that use of the proposed -j(It) - actor should result in a linear diffusion mass matrix lumped finite element...contents were assumed. Because of symmetry only half the tank was analyzed, where at the pipe centerline, zero heat flux in the x- direccion was

  19. Crossover from ballistic to normal heat transport in the ϕ4 lattice: If nonconservation of momentum is the reason, what is the mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Daxing; Saadatmand, Danial; Dmitriev, Sergey V.

    2017-10-01

    Anomalous (non-Fourier) heat transport is no longer just a theoretical issue since it has been observed experimentally in a number of low-dimensional nanomaterials, such as SiGe nanowires, carbon nanotubes, and others. To understand these anomalous behaviors, exploring the microscopic origin of normal (Fourier) heat transport is a fascinating theoretical topic. However, this issue has not yet been fully understood even for one-dimensional (1D) model chains, in spite of a great amount of thorough studies done to date. From those studies, it has been widely accepted that the conservation of momentum is a key ingredient to induce anomalous heat transport, while momentum-nonconserving systems usually support normal heat transport where Fourier's law is valid. But if the nonconservation of momentum is the reason, what is the underlying microscopic mechanism for the observed normal heat transport? Here we carefully revisit a typical 1D momentum-nonconserving ϕ4 model, and we present evidence that the mobile discrete breathers, or, in other words, the moving intrinsic localized modes with frequency components above the linear phonon band, can be responsible for that.

  20. Local Agenda 21. Settlement pattern and energy for transportation and heating; Lokal agenda 21. Bebyggelsesmoenster og energi til transport og oppvarming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orderud, Geir Inge

    1998-09-01

    This document deals with Local Agenda 21 (LA21) and the relationship between settlement pattern and the consumption of energy in transportation and heating of houses. Local Agenda 21 originates from the Earth Summit held in Rio in 1992 and draws up the strategies by which the local communities should participate in realizing the recommendations of the summit. So far much of the research around LA21 has examined how well the individual countries that ratified the Rio document have fulfilled the recommendations of Article 28 on local responsibility. From the point of view of research, however, the challenge is rather to investigate the conditions for realizing the broad participation of the people. From the administrative point of view, the important issue is the relationship between the representative channels and the direct participation of local people in the decision processes, as well as the delegation of decision-making authority from national to regional or local level. One recommendation in Agenda 21 is to emit less greenhouse gases. In this connection, a central issue is transportation, which is affected by the settlement pattern. A denser settlement within an urban area is supposed to reduce the transportation and the use of private cars. Thus the local development and area policy is a topic of current interest in the study of how LA21 works locally, especially so because sparsely built-up areas with single family houses are considered as the good way of living. Densely populated urban areas may conflict with the need for arable land and green space. LA 21 and the settlement pattern are both parts of a larger social environment and it is important know these relationships when local measures and actions are analysed. The possibility of a sustainable development must be assessed in relation to the fact that more power is gathered in the global flow of capital. 26 refs.

  1. Control of alpha-particle transport by ion cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.S.; Imre, K.; Weitzner, H.; Colestock, P.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper control of radial alpha-particle transport by using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) waves is investigated in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak geometry. Spatially inhomogeneous ICRF wave energy with properly selected frequencies and wave numbers can induce fast convective transports of alpha particles at the speed of order v α ∼ (P RF /n α ε 0 )ρ p , where R RF is the ICRF wave power density, n α is the alpha-particle density, ε 0 is the alpha-particle birth energy, and ρ p is the poloidal gyroradius of alpha particles at the birth energy. Application to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) plasma is studied and possible antenna designs to control alpha-particle flux are discussed

  2. Control of alpha particle transport by spatially inhomogeneous ion cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.S.; Imre, K.; Weitzner, H.; Colestock, P.

    1990-02-01

    Control of the radial alpha particle transport by using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency waves is investigated in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak geometry. It is shown that spatially inhomogeneous ICRF-wave energy with properly selected frequencies and wave numbers can induce fast convective transport of alpha particles at the speed of order υ alpha ∼ (P RF /n α ε 0 ) ρ p , where P RF is the ICRF-wave power density, n α is the alpha density, ε 0 is the alpha birth energy, and ρ p is the poloidal gyroradius of alpha particles at the birth energy. Application to ITER plasmas is studied and possible antenna designs to control alpha particle flux are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs

  3. Relativistic electron transport in a solid target: study of heating in the framework of inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinolli, E.

    2003-04-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of the energy deposition of fast electrons in matter. This topic is of prime importance for inertial fusion driven by laser since relativistic electrons are produced in laser-matter interaction for a laser operating in ultra-intense regime. This thesis is made up of: a theoretical chapter dealing with the generation and transport of fast electrons, of 2 chapters reporting experimental data obtained with optical and X-rays diagnostics at the laser facilities of LULI in France and RAL in U.K., and of a chapter dedicated to the simulation of electron transport by using a Monte-Carlo code combined to a hybrid collisional-electromagnetic PIC code. A new spectrometer has been designed: the detection of Kα rays coming from a fluorescent layer embedded in the target has allowed us to assess the size of the electron beam and the level of ionisation. (A.C.)

  4. Physiological effects and transport of 24-epibrassinolide in heat-stressed barley

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janeczko, A.; Oklešťková, Jana; Pociecha, E.; Koscielniak, J.; Mirek, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2011), s. 1249-1259 ISSN 0137-5881 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550801; GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Brassinosteroid transport * Dark respiration * Hordeum vulgare L * PSII efficiency * Metabolic activity Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.639, year: 2011

  5. Heat transport in electrically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes dispersed in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Alvarez, F.; Macias, J. D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2018-02-01

    A modified Ångström method was used to determine the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of aqueous dispersions of multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a function of their weight fraction concentration and in the presence of an externally applied electric field. Measurements were performed in planar samples, with a fixed thickness of 3.18 mm applying an AC voltage in the range from 0 to 70~V_RMS and for concentrations of carbon nanotubes from 0 to 2 wf%. It is shown that this field induces the formation of clusters followed by their alignment along the electric field, which can favor heat transfer in that direction. Heat transfer measurements show two regimes, in the first one under 0.5 wf%, voltages lower than 30~V_RMS are not strong enough to induce the adequate order of the carbon nanostructures, and as a consequence, thermal diffusivity of the dispersion remains close to the thermal diffusivity of water. In contrast for higher concentrations (above 1.5 wf%), 10~V_RMS are enough to get a good alignment. Above such thresholds of concentrations and voltages, thermal diffusivity and conductivity increase, when the electric field is increased, in such a way that for an applied voltage of 20~V_RMS and for a concentration of 1.5 wf%, an increase of 49% of the thermal conductivity was obtained. It is also shown that this approach exhibits limits, due to the fact that the electric-field induced structure, can act as a heating element at high electric field intensities and carbon nanotubes concentrations, which can induce convection and evaporation of the liquid matrix.

  6. Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions and Downstream Transport of Water, Heat, and Solutes in a Hydropeaked River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, S. B.; Cardenas, M. B.; Neilson, B. T.; Watson, J.

    2017-12-01

    A majority of the world's largest river systems are regulated by dams. In addition to being used for water resources management and flood prevention, many large dams are also used for hydroelectric power generation. In the United States, dams account for 7% of domestic electricity, and hydropower accounts for 16% of worldwide electricity production. To help meet electricity demand during peak usage times, hydropower utilities often increase their releases of water during high demand periods. This practice, termed hydropeaking, can cause large transient flow regimes downstream of hydroelectric dams. These transient flow increases can result in order of magnitude daily fluctuations in discharge, and the released water can have different thermal and chemical properties than ambient river water. As hydropeaking releases travel downstream, the temporary rise in stage and increase in discharge can enhance surface water-groundwater (SW-GW) exchange between the river and its alluvial aquifer. This dam-induced SW-GW exchange, combined with hydrodynamic attenuation and heat exchange processes, result in complex responses downstream. The dam-regulated Lower Colorado River downstream of Austin, TX was used as a natural laboratory to observe SW-GW interactions and downstream transport of water, heat, and solutes under hydropeaking conditions. To characterize SW-GW interactions, well transects were installed in the banks of the river to observe exchanges between the river and alluvial aquifer. The well transects were installed at three different distances from the dam (15km, 35km, and 80km). At each well transect conductivity, temperature, and pressure sensors were deployed in the monitoring wells and in the channel. Additional conductivity and temperature sensors were deployed along the study reach to provide a more detailed record of heat and solute transport during hydropeaking releases. The field data spans over two months of daily dam releases that were punctuated by two

  7. Heat transport in PBX-M high {beta}{sub p} plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBlanc, B.; Kaye, S.; Bell, R.; Fishman, H.; Hatcher, R.; Kaita, R.; Kessel, C.; Kugel, H.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Asakura, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki, Naka (Japan); Duperrex, P. [Laboratoire pour l`Armement, Bernes (Switzerland); Gammel, G. [Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States); Holland, A. [ARACOR, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Levinton, F. [Fusion Physics and Technologies, Torrance, CA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    PBX-M high beta poloidal discharges routinely transition into the H-mode regime: typically, a quiescent phase followed by an MHD active phase characterize the H-mode period. An analysis of the energy transport during these phases is conducted using the experimental data and the TRANSP code; effective diffusivities are computed to quantify the energy transport of the thermal component of the plasma. Compared to the L-mode, the quiescent H-phase is characterized by a decrease of the thermal ion energy transport and a flattening of the associated effective diffusivity profile. An error analysis is presented. Enhanced fast-ion losses are observed during the MHD active phase: particles in the lower end of the fast-ion energy spectrum with large perpendicular velocity component are predominantly affected. These losses must be taken into account in the analysis in order to reproduce the measured stored energy and time evolution of the neutron production rate during the MHD active phase.

  8. Tokamak local transport model and scaling relations under high power heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Bingren

    1997-05-01

    A simple, phenomenologically determined thermal conductivity model is suggested which will suit for L-mode and H-mode confinement analysis for high auxiliary heatings. By assuming that the central conductivity is proportional to the central temperature, the resultant energy confinement time will be automatically proportional to P tot -1/2 . The sawtooth effect, edge H-mode and central thermal barrier situations are discussed. This model can be extended to discuss the D, T burning process to greatly improve the usually used zero-dimensional POPC on analysis. (9 figs.)

  9. Transportation fuel production from gasified biomass integrated with a pulp and paper mill – Part A: Heat integration and system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaksson, Johan; Jansson, Mikael; Åsblad, Anders; Berntsson, Thore

    2016-01-01

    Production of transportation fuels from biorefineries via biomass gasification has been suggested as a way of introducing renewable alternatives in the transportation system with an aim to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. By co-locating gasification-based processes within heat demanding industries, excess heat from the gasification process can replace fossil or renewable fuels. The objective of this study was to compare the heat integration potential of four different gasification-based biorefinery concepts with a chemical pulp and paper mill. The results showed that the choice of end-product which was either methanol, Fischer-Tropsch crude, synthetic natural gas or electricity, can have significant impact on the heat integration potential with a pulp and paper mill and that the heat saving measures implemented in the mill in connection to integration of a gasification process can increase the biomass resource efficiency by up to 3%-points. Heat saving measures can reduce the necessary biomass input to the biorefinery by 50% if the sizing constraint is to replace the bark boiler with excess heat from the biorefinery. A large integrated gasification process with excess steam utilisation in a condensing turbine was beneficial only if grid electricity is produced at below 30% electrical efficiency. - Highlights: • Biomass gasification integrated with a pulp and paper mill. • Different sizing constraints of integrated biofuel production. • The biofuel product largely influence the heat integration potential. • An oversized gasifier for increased power production could be favourable.

  10. Effect of particle shape and slip mechanism on buoyancy induced convective heat transport with nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Pranit Satish; Mahapatra, Pallab Sinha; Pattamatta, Arvind

    2017-12-01

    Experiments and numerical simulation of natural convection heat transfer with nanosuspensions are presented in this work. The investigations are carried out for three different types of nanosuspensions: namely, spherical-based (alumina/water), tubular-based (multi-walled carbon nanotube/water), and flake-based (graphene/water). A comparison with in-house experiments is made for all the three nanosuspensions at different volume fractions and for the Rayleigh numbers in the range of 7 × 105-1 × 107. Different models such as single component homogeneous, single component non-homogeneous, and multicomponent non-homogeneous are used in the present study. From the present numerical investigation, it is observed that for lower volume fractions (˜0.1%) of nanosuspensions considered, single component models are in close agreement with the experimental results. Single component models which are based on the effective properties of the nanosuspensions alone can predict heat transfer characteristics very well within the experimental uncertainty. Whereas for higher volume fractions (˜0.5%), the multi-component model predicts closer results to the experimental observation as it incorporates drag-based slip force which becomes prominent. The enhancement observed at lower volume fractions for non-spherical particles is attributed to the percolation chain formation, which perturbs the boundary layer and thereby increases the local Nusselt number values.

  11. Influence of the Hole Transporting Layer on the Thermal Stability of Inverted Organic Photovoltaics Using Accelerated-Heat Lifetime Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermerschmidt, Felix; Savva, Achilleas; Georgiou, Efthymios; Tuladhar, Sachetan M; Durrant, James R; McCulloch, Iain; Bradley, Donal D C; Brabec, Christoph J; Nelson, Jenny; Choulis, Stelios A

    2017-04-26

    High power conversion efficiency (PCE) inverted organic photovoltaics (OPVs) usually use thermally evaporated MoO 3 as a hole transporting layer (HTL). Despite the high PCE values reported, stability investigations are still limited and the exact degradation mechanisms of inverted OPVs using thermally evaporated MoO 3 HTL remain unclear under different environmental stress factors. In this study, we monitor the accelerated lifetime performance under the ISOS-D-2 protocol (heat conditions 65 °C) of nonencapsulated inverted OPVs based on the thiophene-based active layer materials poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

  12. Modeling heat and mass transport phenomena at higher temperatures in solar distillation systems - The Chilton-Colburn analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsilingiris, P.T. [Department of Energy Engineering, Heat Transfer Laboratory, Technological Education Institution of Athens, A. Spyridonos Street, GR 122 10 Egaleo, Athens (Greece)

    2010-02-15

    In the present investigation efforts have been devoted towards developing an analysis suitable for heat and mass transfer processes modeling in solar distillation systems, when they are operating at higher temperatures. For this purpose the use of Lewis relation is not new although its validity is based on the assumptions of identical boundary layer concentration and temperature distributions, as well as low mass flux conditions, which are not usually met in solar distillation systems operating at higher temperatures associated with considerable mass transfer rates. The present analysis, taking into consideration these conditions and the temperature dependence of all pertinent thermophysical properties of the saturated binary mixture of water vapor and dry air, leads to the development of an improved predictive accuracy model. This model, having undergone successful first order validation against earlier reported measurements from the literature, appears to offer more accurate predictions of the transport processes and mass flow rate yield of solar stills when operated at elevated temperatures. (author)

  13. Numerical investigation of the transport phenomena occurring in the growth of SiC by the induction heating TSSG method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Adkar, Nikhil; Okano, Yasunori; Ujihara, Toru; Dost, Sadik

    2017-09-01

    A numerical simulation study was carried out to examine the transport phenomena occurring during the Top-Seeded Solution Growth (TSSG) process of SiC. The simulation model includes the contributions of radiative and conductive heat transfer in the furnace, mass transfer and fluid flow in the melt, and the induced electric and magnetic fields. Results show that the induced Lorentz force is dominant in the melt compared with that of buoyancy. At the relatively low coil frequencies, the effect of the Lorentz force on the melt flow is significant, and the corresponding flow patterns loose their axisymmetry and become almost fully disturbed. However, at the relatively higher frequency values, the flow is steady and the flow patterns remain axisymmetric.

  14. Resistor-network anomalies in the heat transport of random harmonic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Isaac; de Leeuw, Yaron; Kottos, Tsampikos; Cohen, Doron

    2016-06-01

    We consider thermal transport in low-dimensional disordered harmonic networks of coupled masses. Utilizing known results regarding Anderson localization, we derive the actual dependence of the thermal conductance G on the length L of the sample. This is required by nanotechnology implementations because for such networks Fourier's law G∝1/L^{α} with α=1 is violated. In particular we consider "glassy" disorder in the coupling constants and find an anomaly which is related by duality to the Lifshitz-tail regime in the standard Anderson model.

  15. Study of heat and salt transport processes in the Espinheiro Channel (Ria de Aveiro)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Nuno Alexandre Firmino

    O principal objectivo deste trabalho consistiu no estudo da dinâmica termohalina do Canal do Espinheiro em funcao de dois forcamentos principais: mare e caudal fluvial, usando duas abordagens distintas: trabalho experimental e modelacao numerica. A propagacao da mare e o caudal fluvial do Rio Vouga sao determinantes no estabelecimento da estrutura horizontal da salinidade ao longo do canal. A estrutura termica horizontal ao longo do canal e, em grande parte, determinada pela variacao sazonal da temperatura da agua do Rio Vouga, bem como, pela variacao sazonal das condicoes meteorologicas devido a reduzida profundidade. Foi observada a formacao de fortes gradientes de salinidade (relacionados com a formacao de frentes estuarinas) numa regiao a cerca de 7-8 km da embocadura do canal, observando-se a sua migracao numa regiao de aproximadamente 1 km, dependendo do regime de mare. O balanco entre o transporte de sal de natureza advectiva e difusiva foi calculado, revelando que junto a embocadura os processos fisicos que mais contribuem para o transporte de sal sao a circulacao residual e o aprisionamento da agua em canais secundarios. Junto a foz do Rio Vouga os termos devidos a descarga fluvial e a circulacao gravitacional dominam o transporte de sal. Foi calibrado e validado um modelo numerico (Mohid, em modo 2D e 3D), sendo posteriormente utilizado para estudar a hidrologia do canal. Foi concedida particular atencao ao estudo da hidrologia em condicoes extremas de caudal fluvial e de mare. Os resultados da modelacao numerica permitiram numa primeira fase avaliar o bom desempenho do Mohid na reproducao dos escoamentos barotropicos na Ria de Aveiro, bem como na evolucao temporal das propriedades termohalinas da agua. Sob condicoes de caudal fluvial reduzido, a dinâmica do canal e essencialmente dominada pela mare. Com o aumento do caudal fluvial, a influencia da agua doce estende-se para jusante, estratificando a coluna de agua. As simulacoes 3D do Canal do

  16. Structure of the poleward wall of the trough and the inclination of the geomagnetic field above the EISCAT radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Jones

    Full Text Available A special high-resolution routine of the EISCAT radar has been used to investigate the structure and development of the poleward wall of a deep trough in electron density. The feature was tracked by the radar during a 7-hour period under very quiet geomagnetic conditions. The field-aligned nature of the structure enabled an estimate to be made of the inclination of the geomagnetic field above EISCAT that was in good agreement with the current model. Observations of narrow field-aligned enhancements in electron temperature demonstrated that the wall of this trough is a dynamic feature, reforming regularly as the electron density responds on a time scale of tens of minutes to energy input from soft-particle precipitation.

  17. Structure of the poleward wall of the trough and the inclination of the geomagnetic field above the EISCAT radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Jones

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available A special high-resolution routine of the EISCAT radar has been used to investigate the structure and development of the poleward wall of a deep trough in electron density. The feature was tracked by the radar during a 7-hour period under very quiet geomagnetic conditions. The field-aligned nature of the structure enabled an estimate to be made of the inclination of the geomagnetic field above EISCAT that was in good agreement with the current model. Observations of narrow field-aligned enhancements in electron temperature demonstrated that the wall of this trough is a dynamic feature, reforming regularly as the electron density responds on a time scale of tens of minutes to energy input from soft-particle precipitation.

  18. Cooling of chiral heat transport in the quantum Hall effect regime of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slizovskiy, Sergey; Fal'ko, Vladimir

    2017-08-01

    In the quantum Hall effect (QHE) regime, heat is carried by electrons in the edge states of Landau levels. Here, we study cooling of hot electrons propagating along the edge of graphene at the filling factor ν =±2 , mediated by acoustic phonons. We determine the temperature profile extended from a hot spot, where the Hall current is injected into graphene from a metallic contact, taking into account specifics of boundary conditions for lattice displacements in graphene in a van der Waals heterostructure with an insulating substrate. Our calculations, performed using generic boundary conditions for Dirac electrons, show that emission of phonons can explain a short cooling length observed in graphene-based QHE devices by Nahm, Hwang, and Lee [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 226801 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.226801].

  19. Simulations of Heat Transport Phenomena in a Three-Dimensional Model of Knitted Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puszkarz A.K.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the current work is to analyse the three-dimensional approach for modelling knitted fabric structures for future analysis of physical properties and thermal phenomena. The introduced model assumes some simplification of morphology. First, fibres in knitted fabrics are described as monofilaments characterized by isotropic thermal properties. The current form of the considered knitted fabric is determined by morphological properties of the used monofilament and simplification of the stitch shape. This simplification was based on a particular technology for the knitting process that introduces both geometric parameters and physical material properties. Detailed descriptions of heat transfer phenomena can also be considered. A sensitivity analysis of the temperature field with respect to selected structural parameters was also performed.

  20. The future demographic niche of a declining grassland bird fails to shift poleward in response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Lisa A.; Ribic, Christine; Pomara, Lars Y.; Zuckerberg, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    ContextTemperate grasslands and their dependent species are exposed to high variability in weather and climate due to the lack of natural buffers such as forests. Grassland birds are particularly vulnerable to this variability, yet have failed to shift poleward in response to recent climate change like other bird species in North America. However, there have been few studies examining the effect of weather on grassland bird demography and consequent influence of climate change on population persistence and distributional shifts.ObjectivesThe goal of this study was to estimate the vulnerability of Henslow’s Sparrow (Ammodramus henslowii), an obligate grassland bird that has been declining throughout much of its range, to past and future climatic variability.MethodsWe conducted a demographic meta-analysis from published studies and quantified the relationship between nest success rates and variability in breeding season climate. We projected the climate-demography relationships spatially, throughout the breeding range, and temporally, from 1981 to 2050. These projections were used to evaluate population dynamics by implementing a spatially explicit population model.ResultsWe uncovered a climate-demography linkage for Henslow’s Sparrow with summer precipitation, and to a lesser degree, temperature positively affecting nest success. We found that future climatic conditions—primarily changes in precipitation—will likely contribute to reduced population persistence and a southwestward range contraction.ConclusionsFuture distributional shifts in response to climate change may not always be poleward and assessing projected changes in precipitation is critical for grassland bird conservation and climate change adaptation.

  1. STAR: The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor System - Encapsulated Fission Heat Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) is a novel 125 MWth fast spectrum reactor concept that was selected by the 1999 DOE NERI program as a candidate ''Generation-IV'' reactor. It uses Pb-Bi or other liquid-metal coolant and is intended to be factory manufactured in large numbers to be economically competitive. It is anticipated to be most useful to developing countries. The US team studying the feasibility of the ENHS reactor concept consisted of the University of California, Berkeley, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Westinghouse. Collaborating with the US team were three Korean organizations: Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Korean Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (KAIST) and the University of Seoul, as well as the Central Research Institute of the Electrical Power Industry (CRIEPI) of Japan. Unique features of the ENHS include at least 20 years of operation without refueling; no fuel handling in the host country; no pumps and valves; excess reactivity does not exceed 1$; fully passive removal of the decay heat; very small probability of core damaging accidents; autonomous operation and capability of load-following over a wide range; very long plant life. In addition it offers a close match between demand and supply, large tolerance to human errors, is likely to get public acceptance via demonstration of superb safety, lack of need for offsite response, and very good proliferation resistance. The ENHS reactor is designed to meet the requirements of Generation IV reactors including sustainable energy supply, low waste, high level of proliferation resistance, high level of safety and reliability, acceptable risk to capital and, hopefully, also competitive busbar cost of electricity

  2. STAR: The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor System - Encapsulated Fission Heat Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2003-10-31

    OAK-B135 The Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) is a novel 125 MWth fast spectrum reactor concept that was selected by the 1999 DOE NERI program as a candidate ''Generation-IV'' reactor. It uses Pb-Bi or other liquid-metal coolant and is intended to be factory manufactured in large numbers to be economically competitive. It is anticipated to be most useful to developing countries. The US team studying the feasibility of the ENHS reactor concept consisted of the University of California, Berkeley, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Westinghouse. Collaborating with the US team were three Korean organizations: Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Korean Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (KAIST) and the University of Seoul, as well as the Central Research Institute of the Electrical Power Industry (CRIEPI) of Japan. Unique features of the ENHS include at least 20 years of operation without refueling; no fuel handling in the host country; no pumps and valves; excess reactivity does not exceed 1$; fully passive removal of the decay heat; very small probability of core damaging accidents; autonomous operation and capability of load-following over a wide range; very long plant life. In addition it offers a close match between demand and supply, large tolerance to human errors, is likely to get public acceptance via demonstration of superb safety, lack of need for offsite response, and very good proliferation resistance. The ENHS reactor is designed to meet the requirements of Generation IV reactors including sustainable energy supply, low waste, high level of proliferation resistance, high level of safety and reliability, acceptable risk to capital and, hopefully, also competitive busbar cost of electricity.

  3. Defect-Engineered Heat Transport in Graphene: A Route to High Efficient Thermal Rectification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Yanlei; Wu, Zhangting; Wang, Wenhui; Bi, Kedong; Liang, Zheng; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei; Xu, Zhiping; Ni, Zhenhua

    2015-07-01

    Low-dimensional materials such as graphene provide an ideal platform to probe the correlation between thermal transport and lattice defects, which could be engineered at the molecular level. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations and non-contact optothermal Raman measurements to study this correlation. We find that oxygen plasma treatment could reduce the thermal conductivity of graphene significantly even at extremely low defect concentration (˜83% reduction for ˜0.1% defects), which could be attributed mainly to the creation of carbonyl pair defects. Other types of defects such as hydroxyl, epoxy groups and nano-holes demonstrate much weaker effects on the reduction where the sp2 nature of graphene is better preserved. With the capability of selectively functionalizing graphene, we propose an asymmetric junction between graphene and defective graphene with a high thermal rectification ratio of ˜46%, as demonstrated by our molecular dynamics simulation results. Our findings provide fundamental insights into the physics of thermal transport in defective graphene, and two-dimensional materials in general, which could help on the future design of functional applications such as optothermal and electrothermal devices.

  4. Research of the rotation effect upon the hydrodynamics and heat and mass transport in a chemical reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicheva, Natalia I.

    2017-11-01

    The subject of this research is a chemical reactor for producing tungsten. A physical and mathematical model of fluid motion and heat and mass transfer in a vortex chamber of the chemical reactor under forced and free convection has been described and simulated using two methods. The numerical simulation was carried out in «vortex – stream functions and «velocity – pressure» variables. The velocity field, the mass and the temperature distributions in the reactor were obtained. The influence of a rotation effect upon the hydrodynamics and heat and mass transport was showed. The rotation is important for more uniform distribution of temperature and matter in the vortex chamber. Parametric studies on effects of the Reynolds, Prandtl and Rossbi criteria on the flow characteristics were also performed. Reliability of the calculations was verified by comparing the results obtained by the methods mentioned above. Also, the created model was applied for numerically solving of the classical test problem of the velocity distribution in an annular channel and that of a rotating infinite disk in a stationary liquid. The study findings showed a good agreement with the exact solutions.

  5. Modelling of radionuclide migration and heat transport from an High-Level-Radioactive-Waste-repository (HLW) in Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Put, M.; Henrion, P.

    1992-01-01

    For the modelling of the migration of radionuclides in the Boom clay formation, the analytical code MICOF has been updated with a 3-dimensional analytical solution for discrete sources. the MICOF program is used for the calculation of the release of α and β emitters from the HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES (HLW). A coherent conceptual model is developed which describes all the major physico-chemical phenomena influencing the migration of radionuclides in the Boom clay. The concept of the diffusion accessible porosity is introduced and included in the MICOF code. Different types of migration experiments are described with their advantages and disadvantages. The thermal impact of the HLW disposal in the stratified Boom clay formation has been evaluated by a finite element simulation of the coupled heat and mass transport equation. The results of the simulations show that under certain conditions thermal convection cells may form, but the convective heat transfer in the clay formation is negligible. 6 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 5 appendices

  6. Isotope distributions in primary heat transport and containment systems during a severe accident in CANDU type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, M.

    2005-01-01

    The paper is intended to analyse the distribution of the fission products (FPs) in CANDU Primary Heat Transport (PHT) and CANDU Containment Systems by using the ASTEC code. The complexity of the data required by ASTEC and the complexity both of CANDU PHT and Containment System were strong motivation to begin with a simplified model. The data related to the nodes' definitions, temperatures and pressure conditions were chosen as possible as real data from CANDU loss of coolant accident sequence (CATHENA code results). The source term of FPs introduced into the PHT was estimated by ORIGEN code. The FPs distribution in the nodes of the circuit and the FPs mass transfer per isotope and chemical species were obtained by using SOPHAEROS module. The distributions within the containment are obtained by the CPA module (thermalhydraulic calculations in the containment and FPs aerosol transport). The results consist of mass distributions in the nodes of the circuit and the transferred mass to the containment through the break for different species (FPs and chemical species) and mass distributions in the different parts of the containment and different hosts. (authors)

  7. Heat transport in two-dimensional materials by directly solving the phonon Boltzmann equation under Callaway's dual relaxation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2017-10-01

    The single mode relaxation time approximation has been demonstrated to greatly underestimate the lattice thermal conductivity of two-dimensional materials due to the collective effect of phonon normal scattering. Callaway's dual relaxation model represents a good approximation to the otherwise ab initio solution of the phonon Boltzmann equation. In this work we develop a discrete-ordinate-method (DOM) scheme for the numerical solution of the phonon Boltzmann equation under Callaway's model. Heat transport in a graphene ribbon with different geometries is modeled by our scheme, which produces results quite consistent with the available molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, and experimental measurements. Callaway's lattice thermal conductivity model with empirical boundary scattering rates is examined and shown to overestimate or underestimate the direct DOM solution. The length convergence of the lattice thermal conductivity of a rectangular graphene ribbon is explored and found to depend appreciably on the ribbon width, with a semiquantitative correlation provided between the convergence length and the width. Finally, we predict the existence of a phonon Knudsen minimum in a graphene ribbon only at a low system temperature and isotope concentration so that the average normal scattering rate is two orders of magnitude stronger than the intrinsic resistive one. The present work will promote not only the methodology for the solution of the phonon Boltzmann equation but also the theoretical modeling and experimental detection of hydrodynamic phonon transport in two-dimensional materials.

  8. Heat resistant materials and their feasibility issues for a space nuclear transportation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    A number of nuclear propulsion concepts based on solid-core nuclear propulsion are being evaluated for a nuclear propulsion transportation system to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) involving the reestablishment of a manned lunar base and the subsequent exploration of Mars. These systems will require high-temperature materials to meet the operating conditions with appropriate reliability and safety built into these systems through the selection and testing of appropriate materials. The application of materials for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems and the feasibility issues identified for their use will be discussed. Some mechanical property measurements have been obtained, and compatibility tests were conducted to help identify feasibility issues. 3 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  9. The interaction between intermittent renewable energy and the electricity, heating and transport sectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Duić, Neven; Stadler, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    in a context characterized by a continuously increasing demand. Even in the current financial crisis, renewable energy is expanding heavily . The most used renewable energy is biomass; however there has been a significant increase in wind power and in photovoltaic in the last ten years. Such development....... The conference was dedicated to research concerning methods, policies and technologies for increasing the sustainable development as well as methods for assessing and measuring sustainability of development, regarding energy, transport, water and environment systems and their many combinations. At the conference...... 418 scientists from 55 countries representing six continents participated. In this Special Issue the interaction between sectors and renewable energy systems through selected papers from this conference is addressed from a range of technical system analyses to environmental and economic feasibility....

  10. Oxidative parameters and expression of 70kDa heat shock proteins in pig heart tissue after transport and slaughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Chmiel, R; Pyz-Łukasik, R; Dudzic, A; Wernicki, A

    2014-01-01

    In view of the significant role of Hsp70 in protecting the organism against the destructive effects of stress, and the possibility of using this protein as a marker of the infarction process in the heart, the aim of this study was to conduct an evaluation of the expression of 70kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70) and the concentration of TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and nitric oxide ions (NO), determined as nitrite ions, as markers of oxidative stress in hearts obtained from healthy pigs following slaughter and pigs which had died during or immediately after transport with symptoms of sudden cardiac death. The material consisted of hearts obtained from 90 pigs following slaughter and from pigs which had died. Oxidative stress was determined in heart lysates based on the concentration of TBARS and nitrite ions. Expression and concentration of Hsp70 were determined using SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and ELISA. Expression of Hsp70 was observed in hearts lysates obtained from slaughtered pigs and from those which had died with symptoms of sudden death. The strongest reaction in the Western Blotting was noted in hearts lysates from pigs with no pathological changes. The highest TBARS concentration was observed in lysates from hearts in pigs which had died during or immediately after transport. The highest concentration of NO ions, determined as nitrite ions, was noted in hearts from pigs with myocardial infarction lesions. The significant decrease observed in Hsp70 concentration in heart tissue obtained from the pigs which had died in comparison to the hearts from healthy pigs indicates the important role of this protein in protecting the heart muscle against the destructive effects of stress, which limits the occurrence of post-stress cardiomyopathy in pigs following transport.

  11. Numerical Studies of the Heat and Mass Transport in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, M. J.; Bodavarsson, G. S.

    1983-06-01

    Numerical simulation techniques are employed in studies of the natural flow of heat and mass through the Cerro Prieto reservoir, Mexico and of the effects of exploitation on the field's behavior. The reservoir model is a two-dimensional vertical east to west-southwest cross section, which is based on a recent hydrogeologic model of this geothermal system. The numerical code MULKOM is used in the simulation studies. The steady state pressure and temperature distributions are computed and compared against observed preproduction pressures and temperatures; a reasonable match is obtained. A natural hot water recharge rate of about 1×10-2 kg/s per meter of field length (measured in a north-south direction) is obtained. The model is then used to simulate the behavior of the field during the 1973-1978 production period. The response of the model to fluid extraction agrees to what has been observed in the field or postulated by other authors. There is a decrease in temperatures and pressures in the produced region. No extensive two-phase zone develops in the reservoir because of the strong fluid recharge. Most of the fluid recharging the system comes from colder regions located above and west of the produced reservoir.

  12. Effect of heat stress on the gene expression of ion transporters/channels in the uterus of laying hens during eggshell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadoran, Shahab; Dehghani Samani, Amir; Hassanpour, Hossein

    2018-01-01

    Heat stress is a problem in laying hens as it decreases egg quality by decreasing eggshell mineralization. Heat stress alters gene expression, hence our aim was to investigate effects of heat stress on gene expression of ion transport elements involving in uterine mineralization (TRPV6, CALB1, ITPR3, SCNN1G, SLC4A4, KCNJ15, SLC4A9, and CLCN2) by real time quantitative PCR. Forty 23-week-old White Leghorn laying hens were housed in two rooms. The control group (n = 20) was maintained at 21-23 °C, and the heat stress group (n = 20) was exposed to 36-38 °C for 8 weeks. All parameters of egg quality including egg weight, surface area, volume, and eggshell weight, thickness, ash weight, and calcium content were decreased in the heat stress group compared to the control group (by 26.9%, 32.7%, 44.1%, 38.4%, 31.7%, 39.4%, and 11.1%, respectively). Total plasma calcium was decreased by 13.4%. Levels of ITPR3, SLC4A4, and SLC4A9 transcripts in the uterine lining were decreased in the heat stress group compared to the control group (by 61.4%, 66.1%, and 66.1%, respectively). CALB1 transcript level was increased (by 34.2 fold) in the heat stress group of hens compared to controls. TRPV6, SCNN1G, KCNJ15, and CLCN2 transcript levels did not significantly differ between control and heat stress groups of laying hens. It is concluded that the down-expression of ITPR3, SLC4A4, and SLC4A9 genes may impair transportation of Cl - , HCO 3 - , and Na + in eggshell mineralization during heat stress. Increased CALB1 gene expression may increase resistance of uterine cells to detrimental effects of heat stress.

  13. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  14. Oceanic heat pulses fueling moisture transport towards continental Europe across the mid-Pleistocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, A.; Kaboth, S.; Hodell, D.; Zeeden, C.; Fiebig, J.; Friedrich, O.

    2018-01-01

    The mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT; approx. 1.2-0.7 Ma), is characterized by growing Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and the shift from a 41 kyr to a 100 kyr glacial-interglacial cyclicity. Concomitant to the growth of large ice sheets, atmospheric and oceanic circulation pattern have changed. One key feature of the North Atlantic is the wind-driven Subtropical Gyre, a major provider of heat and moisture for continental Europe. Here, we investigate changes in the strength and spatial configuration of the Subtropical Gyre during the MPT and its impact on the continental moisture balance. To reconstruct Subtropical Gyre dynamics, we conducted paired δ18O and Mg/Ca analyses on the deep-dwelling foraminifera Globorotalia inflata from Iberian Margin Site U1385 yielding thermocline temperature (Ttherm) variability between 1400 and 500 ka at the eastern boundary of the Subtropical Gyre. Long-term trends of Ttherm at Site U1385 oppose the North Atlantic climatic evolution of progressively intensified glacials during the MPT. Particularly, glacials MIS 20 and 18 were marked by warm thermocline waters off Iberia. We infer that a southward shift of the (sub)polar front displaced the source region of thermocline waters within the Subtropical Gyre from high to mid-latitudes. In addition, a strong Mediterranean Outflow Water production during the MPT caused the advection of warm waters to Iberia. Humid conditions during MIS 20 and 18 in SE Europe indicate that atmospheric moisture derived from this warm water might have been advected deep into continental Europe and contributed to enhanced growth of Alpine glaciers.

  15. Water injection into vapor- and liquid-dominated reservoirs: Modeling of heat transfer and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.; Moridis, G.; Finsterle, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes recent advances in methods for simulating water and tracer injection, and presents illustrative applications to liquid- and vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. High-resolution simulations of water injection into heterogeneous, vertical fractures in superheated vapor zones were performed. Injected water was found to move in dendritic patterns, and to experience stronger lateral flow effects than predicted from homogeneous medium models. Higher-order differencing methods were applied to modeling water and tracer injection into liquid-dominated systems. Conventional upstream weighting techniques were shown to be adequate for predicting the migration of thermal fronts, while higher-order methods give far better accuracy for tracer transport. A new fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator is described which allows a more accurate description of geofluids, and includes mineral dissolution and precipitation effects with associated porosity and permeability change. Comparisons between numerical simulation predictions and data for laboratory and field injection experiments are summarized. Enhanced simulation capabilities include a new linear solver package for TOUGH2, and inverse modeling techniques for automatic history matching and optimization.

  16. Radiation, impurity effects, instability characteristics and transport in Ohmically heated plasmas in the PLT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bol, K.; Arunasalam, V.; Bitter, M.

    1979-01-01

    Titanium-gettered deuterium plasmas, with graphite or steel limiters to define the plasma minor radius, have Zsub(eff) approximately 1 for 3x10 13 14 cm -3 . In ungettered discharges the density limit set by disruptions is about half the value in gettered discharges. The bolometrically measured energy flux from the whole plasma volume is 80-100% of the Ohmic input power for ungettered discharges and 50-70% for gettered ones. The strucutre of MHD modes continues to be intensively studied by means of soft X-ray detector arrays; however, the connection with the disruptive instability remains unclear. Microinstabilities, studied by means of a 2-mm homodyne scattering system, appear to be of sufficient magnitude to influence energy and particle transport. Ion energy confinement times in the central region of the plasma have been estimated to be 50-100ms. Gross electron energy confinement time increases linearly with density at constant temperature. The longest electron energy confinement times observed are approximately >40ms in dense gettered discharges, giving total energy confinement times approximately 80ms. (author)

  17. Early life thermal stress: Impact on future thermotolerance, stress response, behavior, and intestinal morphology in piglets exposed to a heat stress challenge during simulated transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Study objectives were to evaluate the impact of early life thermal stress (ELTS) on thermoregulation, stress, and intestinal health of piglets subjected to a future heat stress (HS) challenge during simulated transport. Approximately 7 d after farrowing, 12 first parity gilts and their litters were ...

  18. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, Douglas; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  19. Mangrove expansion and contraction at a poleward range limit: climate extremes and land-ocean temperature gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J; Day, Richard H; Hall, Courtney T; Brumfield, Marisa D; Dugas, Jason L; Jones, William R

    2017-01-01

    Within the context of climate change, there is a pressing need to better understand the ecological implications of changes in the frequency and intensity of climate extremes. Along subtropical coasts, less frequent and warmer freeze events are expected to permit freeze-sensitive mangrove forests to expand poleward and displace freeze-tolerant salt marshes. Here, our aim was to better understand the drivers of poleward mangrove migration by quantifying spatiotemporal patterns in mangrove range expansion and contraction across land-ocean temperature gradients. Our work was conducted in a freeze-sensitive mangrove-marsh transition zone that spans a land-ocean temperature gradient in one of the world's most wetland-rich regions (Mississippi River Deltaic Plain; Louisiana, USA). We used historical air temperature data (1893-2014), alternative future climate scenarios, and coastal wetland coverage data (1978-2011) to investigate spatiotemporal fluctuations and climate-wetland linkages. Our analyses indicate that changes in mangrove coverage have been controlled primarily by extreme freeze events (i.e., air temperatures below a threshold zone of -6.3 to -7.6°C). We expect that in the past 121 yr, mangrove range expansion and contraction has occurred across land-ocean temperature gradients. Mangrove resistance, resilience, and dominance were all highest in areas closer to the ocean where temperature extremes were buffered by large expanses of water and saturated soil. Under climate change, these areas will likely serve as local hotspots for mangrove dispersal, growth, range expansion, and displacement of salt marsh. Collectively, our results show that the frequency and intensity of freeze events across land-ocean temperature gradients greatly influences spatiotemporal patterns of range expansion and contraction of freeze-sensitive mangroves. We expect that, along subtropical coasts, similar processes govern the distribution and abundance of other freeze

  20. A preliminary design study of a pool-type FBR 'ARES' eliminating intermediate heat transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, N.; Nishi, Y.; Kinoshita, I.; Yoshida, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae Research Lab., Nuclear Systems Dept., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    An innovative reactor concept 'ARES' (Advanced Reactor Eliminating Secondary system) is proposed to aim at reducing the construction cost of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). This concept is developed to show the ultimate cost down potential of LMFBR's at their commercial stage. The electrical output is 1500 MW, while the thermal output is 3900 MW. Main components of the primary cooling system are four electromagnetic pumps (EMP) and eight double-wall-tube steam generators (SG). Both of them are installed in a reactor vessel like pool type LMFBR's. An intermediate heat transport system which a previous LMFBR has it eliminated, main components of which are intermediate heat exchangers (IHX), secondary pumps and secondary piping. Further, a high reliable SG could decrease the occurrence of water leak accidents and reduce the related mitigation systems. In this study, structure concept, approach to embody a high reliable SG and accidents analyses are carried out. Flow path configuration is mainly discussed in investigation of the structure concept. In case of a water leak accident in a SG, the fault SG must be isolated to prevent a reaction production from flowing into the core. The measure to cut both inlet and outlet coolant flow paths by siphon-break mechanism is adopted to be consistent with the decay heat removal operation. The safety design approach of the double-wall-tube SG is investigated to limit the accident occurrence below 10{sup -7} (1/ry). A tube-to-tube weld is excluded from the reference design, because the welding process is too difficult and complicated to prevent adhesion of the double-wall-tube effectively. The reliability of the tube-to-tube-sheet was evaluated as 10{sup -10} (1/hr) for an inner tube and 10{sup -9} (1/hr) for an outer tube with reference to the failure experience of previous SG's. The failure must be detected within 60 to 120 minutes. Finally, a seamless U tube type of double

  1. A dynamically consistent analysis of circulation and transports in the southwestern Weddell Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yaremchuk

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available An inverse model is applied for the analysis of hydrographic and current meter data collected on the repeat WOCE section SR4 in the Weddell Sea in 1989–1992. The section crosses the Weddell Sea cyclonic gyre from Kapp Norvegia to the northern end of the Antarctic Peninsula. The concepts of geostrophy, conservation of planetary vorticity and hydrostatics are combined with advective balances of active and passive properties to provide a dynamically consistent circulation pattern. Our variational assimilation scheme allows the calculation of three-dimensional velocities in the section plane. Current speeds are small except along the coasts where they reach up to 12 cm/s. We diagnose a gyre transport of 34 Sverdrup which is associated with a poleward heat transport of 28×1012 W corresponding to an average heat flux of 15 Wm–2 in the Weddell Sea south of the transect. This exceeds the estimated local flux on the transect of 2 Wm–2. As the transect is located mostly in the open ocean, we conclude that the shelf areas contribute significantly to the ocean-atmosphere exchange and are consequently key areas for the contribution of the Weddell Sea to global ocean ventilation. Conversion of water masses occuring south of the section transform 6.6±1.1 Sv of the inflowing warm deep water into approximately equal amounts of Weddell Sea deep water and Weddell Sea bottom water. The volume transport of surface water equals in the in- and outflow. This means that almost all newly formed surface water is involved in the deep and bottom water formation. Comparison with the results obtained by pure velocity interpolation combined with a hydrographic data subset indicates major differences in the derived salt transports and the water mass conversion of the surface water. The differences can be explained by deviations in the structure of the upper ocean currents to which shelf areas contribute significantly. Additionally a rigorous variance analysis is

  2. Comparing the Transition from Diffusive to Ballistic Heat Transport for 1D and 2D Nanoscale Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Charpak, J.; Hoogeboom-Pot, K.; Anderson, E.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H.; Nardi, D.

    2014-03-01

    How is thermal transport affected by spatial confinement in nanoscale systems? In past work we and others demonstrated that the Fourier Law of heat diffusion fails for length scales smaller than the mean free path of the energy carriers in a material. Here we probe how the transition from macroscopic diffusive behavior of phonons through the quasi-ballistic regime is different for 1D and 2D nano-confined hot spots. We study a series of periodic nickel lines (1D) and dots (2D) with linewidths varying from 750 to 30 nm deposited on both sapphire and silicon substrates. The thermal relaxation of these femtosecond-laser-excited nanostructures is monitored by the diffraction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light obtained from tabletop high harmonic generation. The short wavelength of EUV light, combined with the coherence and ultrashort pulses of high harmonic sources, provides a unique and powerful probe for nanostructured materials on their intrinsic length and time scales. The relaxation dynamics are linked to an effective thermal boundary resistivity with the assistance of multi-physics finite element analysis to quantify the stronger deviation from macroscopic diffusive behavior as a function of nanostructure linewidth in 2D hot spots compared to 1D. This work was supported by SRC Contract 2012-OJ-2304, by NSF Award No.: DGE 1144083, and used facilities provided by the NSF Engineering Research Center in EUV Science and Technology.

  3. Effect of Coolant Inventories and Parallel Loop Interconnections on the Natural Circulation in Various Heat Transport Systems of a Nuclear Power Plant during Station Blackout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash J. Gaikwad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Provision of passive means to reactor core decay heat removal enhances the nuclear power plant (NPP safety and availability. In the earlier Indian pressurised heavy water reactors (IPHWRs, like the 220 MWe and the 540 MWe, crash cooldown from the steam generators (SGs is resorted to mitigate consequences of station blackout (SBO. In the 700 MWe PHWR currently being designed an additional passive decay heat removal (PDHR system is also incorporated to condense the steam generated in the boilers during a SBO. The sustainability of natural circulation in the various heat transport systems (i.e., primary heat transport (PHT, SGs, and PDHRs under station blackout depends on the corresponding system's coolant inventories and the coolant circuit configurations (i.e., parallel paths and interconnections. On the primary side, the interconnection between the two primary loops plays an important role to sustain the natural circulation heat removal. On the secondary side, the steam lines interconnections and the initial inventory in the SGs prior to cooldown, that is, hooking up of the PDHRs are very important. This paper attempts to open up discussions on the concept and the core issues associated with passive systems which can provide continued heat sink during such accident scenarios. The discussions would include the criteria for design, and performance of such concepts already implemented and proposes schemes to be implemented in the proposed 700 MWe IPHWR. The designer feedbacks generated, and critical examination of performance analysis results for the added passive system to the existing generation II & III reactors will help ascertaining that these safety systems/inventories in fact perform in sustaining decay heat removal and augmenting safety.

  4. Ratchetting behavior of primary heat transport (PHT) piping material SA-333 carbon steel subjected to cyclic loads at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, S.; Desai, Y.M.; Kant, T.; Reddy, G.R.; Gupta, C.; Chakravarthy, J.K.

    2004-01-01

    Ratchetting behavior of SA-333 Gr. 6 carbon steel used as primary heat transport (PHT) piping material has been investigated with three constitutive models proposed by Armstrong-Frederick, Chaboche and Ohno-Wang involving different hardening rules. Performance of the above mentioned models have been evaluated for a broad set of uniaxial and biaxial loading histories. The uniaxial ratchetting simulations have been performed for a range of stress ratios (R) by imposing different stress amplitudes and mean stress conditions. Numerical simulations indicated significant ratchetting and opening of hysteresis loop for negative stress ratio with constant mean stress. Application of cyclic stress without mean stress (R = -1.0) has been observed to produce negligible ratchet-strain accumulation in the material. Simulation under the biaxial stress condition was based on modeling of an internally pressurized thin walled pipe subjected to cyclic bending load. Numerical results have been validated with the experiments as per simulation conditions. All three models have been found to predict the observed accumulation of circumferential strain with increasing number of cycles. However, the Armstrong Frederick (A-F) model was found to be inadequate in simulating the ratchetting response for both uniaxial as well as biaxial loading cases. The A-F model actually over-predicted the ratchetting strain in comparison with the experimental strain values. On the other hand, results obtained with the Chaboche and the Ohno-Wang models for both the uniaxial as well as biaxial loading histories have been observed to closely simulate the experimental results. The Ohno-Wang model resulted in better simulation for the presents sets of experimental results in comparison with the Chaboche model. It can be concluded that the Ohno-Wang model suited well compared to the Chaboche model for above sets of uniaxial and biaxial loading histories. (authors)

  5. Plasma structure within poleward-moving cusp/cleft auroral transients: EISCAT Svalbard radar observations and an explanation in terms of large local time extent of events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    Full Text Available We report high-resolution observations of the southward-IMF cusp/cleft ionosphere made on December 16th 1998 by the EISCAT (European incoherent scatter Svalbard radar (ESR, and compare them with observations of dayside auroral luminosity, as seen at a wavelength of 630 nm by a meridian scanning photometer at Ny Ålesund, and of plasma flows, as seen by the CUTLASS (co-operative UK twin location auroral sounding system Finland HF radar. The optical data reveal a series of poleward-moving transient red-line (630 nm enhancements, events that have been associated with bursts in the rate of magnetopause reconnection generating new open flux. The combined observations at this time have strong similarities to predictions of the effects of soft electron precipitation modulated by pulsed reconnection, as made by Davis and Lockwood (1996; however, the effects of rapid zonal flow in the ionosphere, caused by the magnetic curvature force on the newly opened field lines, are found to be a significant additional factor. In particular, it is shown how enhanced plasma loss rates induced by the rapid convection can explain two outstanding anomalies of the 630 nm transients, namely how minima in luminosity form between the poleward-moving events and how events can re-brighten as they move poleward. The observations show how cusp/cleft aurora and transient poleward-moving auroral forms appear in the ESR data and the conditions which cause enhanced 630 nm emission in the transients: they are an important first step in enabling the ESR to identify these features away from the winter solstice when supporting auroral observations are not available.

    Key words: Ionosphere (polar ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause; cusp and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  6. Plasma structure within poleward-moving cusp/cleft auroral transients: EISCAT Svalbard radar observations and an explanation in terms of large local time extent of events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available We report high-resolution observations of the southward-IMF cusp/cleft ionosphere made on December 16th 1998 by the EISCAT (European incoherent scatter Svalbard radar (ESR, and compare them with observations of dayside auroral luminosity, as seen at a wavelength of 630 nm by a meridian scanning photometer at Ny Ålesund, and of plasma flows, as seen by the CUTLASS (co-operative UK twin location auroral sounding system Finland HF radar. The optical data reveal a series of poleward-moving transient red-line (630 nm enhancements, events that have been associated with bursts in the rate of magnetopause reconnection generating new open flux. The combined observations at this time have strong similarities to predictions of the effects of soft electron precipitation modulated by pulsed reconnection, as made by Davis and Lockwood (1996; however, the effects of rapid zonal flow in the ionosphere, caused by the magnetic curvature force on the newly opened field lines, are found to be a significant additional factor. In particular, it is shown how enhanced plasma loss rates induced by the rapid convection can explain two outstanding anomalies of the 630 nm transients, namely how minima in luminosity form between the poleward-moving events and how events can re-brighten as they move poleward. The observations show how cusp/cleft aurora and transient poleward-moving auroral forms appear in the ESR data and the conditions which cause enhanced 630 nm emission in the transients: they are an important first step in enabling the ESR to identify these features away from the winter solstice when supporting auroral observations are not available.Key words: Ionosphere (polar ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause; cusp and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  7. Simultaneous FPI and TMA Measurements of the Lower Thermospheric Wind in the Vicinity of the Poleward Expanding Aurora After Substorm Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Kubota, Ken; Morinaga, Takatoshi; Tsuda, Takuo T.; Kurihara, Junichi; Larsen, Miguel F.; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Cai, Lei

    2017-10-01

    Lower thermospheric wind fluctuations in the vicinity of an auroral arc immediately before and after a substorm onset were examined by analyzing data from a ground-based green line Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI; optical wavelength of 557.7 nm) at Tromsø, Norway, and in situ measurements from a trimethyl aluminum (TMA) trail released from a sounding rocket launched during the Dynamics and Energetics of the Lower Thermosphere in Aurora 2 (DELTA-2) campaign on 26 January 2009. Soon after the rocket launch but before disappearance of the TMA trail, a substorm onset occurred. The DELTA-2 TMA experiment appears to be the first case in which the substorm onset occurred during the TMA wind measurement. It is known that energy dissipation induced by the ionospheric closure current is compacted at the poleward side of the discrete arc in the ionospheric morning cell. Both FPI and TMA measurements were made at the poleward side, but the FPI measured winds nearer to the poleward edge of the arc than the TMA by 110-130 km. The FPI winds at distance of 53-74 km relative to the arc edge showed clear fluctuations immediately after the substorm onset, but there was no obvious similar fluctuation in the TMA-measured winds. The difference in the response at the two locations suggests that energy dissipation sufficient to be detected as the FPI/TMA wind perturbations was confined to the area from the poleward edge of the arc to a relative distance shorter than 163-203 km but longer than 53-74 km in this event.

  8. Exceptional Air Mass Transport and Dynamical Drivers of an Extreme Wintertime Arctic Warm Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Hanin; Boettcher, Maxi; Grams, Christian M.; Joos, Hanna; Pfahl, Stephan; Wernli, Heini

    2017-12-01

    At the turn of the years 2015/2016, maximum surface temperature in the Arctic reached record-high values, exceeding the melting point, which led to a strong reduction of the Arctic sea ice extent in the middle of the cold season. Here we show, using a Lagrangian method, that a combination of very different airstreams contributed to this event: (i) warm low-level air of subtropical origin, (ii) initially cold low-level air of polar origin heated by surface fluxes, and (iii) strongly descending air heated by adiabatic compression. The poleward transport of these warm airstreams occurred along an intense low-level jet between a series of cyclones and a quasi-stationary anticyclone. The complex 3-D configuration that enabled this transport was facilitated by continuous warm conveyor belt ascent into the upper part of the anticyclone. This study emphasizes the combined role of multiple transport processes and transient synoptic-scale dynamics for establishing an extreme Arctic warm event.

  9. Thermal ionization and plasma state of high temperature vapor of UO2, Cs, and Na: Effect on the heat and radiation transport properties of the vapor phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karow, H.U.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with the question how far the thermophysical state and the convective and radiative heat transport properties of vaporized reactor core materials are affected by the thermal ionization existing in the actual vapor state. The materials under consideration here are: nuclear oxide fuel (UO 2 ), Na (as the LMFBR coolant material), and Cs (alkaline fission product, partly retained in the fuel of the core zone). (orig./RW) [de

  10. Numerical model to simulate the isotopic and heat release and transport through the geosphere from a geological repository of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo Lopez, A.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this research is to simulate the isotopic and heat release and transport through the geosphere, from a geological repository of high level nuclear waste. in order to achieve it, different physical processes, that have to do with the problem, are considered: groundwater flow, radioactive decay, nuclide dissolution in groundwater, heat generation, mass and heat transport. Some of these phenomena are related among the, which allows to build a coupled model,which is the starting point to generate a FORTRAN code. The flow and transport models are developed in two spatial dimensions and are integrated in space by means of a finite volume method. The time integration is fulfilled by a θ-method. Moreover, the advection-diffusion equation is solved by two finite volume techniques. In the first one a linear interpolation is used whereas in the second it is used a quadratic one. Also, a consistency an stability study of both methods is carried out in order to compare their stability zones and the errors appearing. Stability is analysed by applying the von Neumann method, which is based upon Fourier series. Although it is a classical technique when dealing with finite-difference schemes, it is here applied to two finite volume schemes. (Author)

  11. Effects of orbital forcing on atmosphere and ocean heat transports in Holocene and Eemian climate simulations with a comprehensive Earth system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fischer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orbital forcing does not only exert direct insolation effects, but also alters climate indirectly through feedback mechanisms that modify atmosphere and ocean dynamics and meridional heat and moisture transfers. We investigate the regional effects of these changes by detailed analysis of atmosphere and ocean circulation and heat transports in a coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-biosphere general circulation model (ECHAM5/JSBACH/MPI-OM. We perform long term quasi equilibrium simulations under pre-industrial, mid-Holocene (6000 years before present – yBP, and Eemian (125 000 yBP orbital boundary conditions. Compared to pre-industrial climate, Eemian and Holocene temperatures show generally warmer conditions at higher and cooler conditions at lower latitudes. Changes in sea-ice cover, ocean heat transports, and atmospheric circulation patterns lead to pronounced regional heterogeneity. Over Europe, the warming is most pronounced over the north-eastern part in accordance with recent reconstructions for the Holocene. We attribute this warming to enhanced ocean circulation in the Nordic Seas and enhanced ocean-atmosphere heat flux over the Barents Shelf in conduction with retreat of sea ice and intensified winter storm tracks over northern Europe.

  12. Integrating distributed temperature sensing and geological characterization to quantify spatiotemporal variability in subsurface heat transport within the Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. F. F.; Stumpf, A.; Luo, Y.; Kumar, P.

    2015-12-01

    data show that the temperature variations in amplitudes and trends are correlated with previous characterizations of the geology and hydrogeological properties. Through continuous collection of data, we hope to understand how subsurface heat transport is correlated with climate change and agricultural practices on a larger temporal scale.

  13. Thermochemical cycles for the heat and cold long-range transport. Final report of the PRI 9.2 Cold transport. Annual report of the PR 2-8; Cycles thermochimiques pour le transport de chaleur et de froid a longue distance. Rapport final du PRI 9.2. Transport de froid. Rapport annuel du PR 2-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, L.; Tondeur, D. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique (LSGC), 54 - Nancy (France); Mazet, N.; Neveu, P.; Stitou, D.; Spinner, B. [Institut de Science et de Genie des Materiaux et Procedes (IMP), 66 - Perpignan (France)

    2004-07-01

    This PRI deals with the use of thermochemical processes, based on solid-gas reversible transformation, to transfer heat of cold at long-range distance (> 10 km), in order to enhance the energy efficiency. Four main aspects have been studied to confirm the process feasibility: the process identification and the operating conditions, the selection of compatible reagents, the design of an auto-thermal reactor and the gas transport impact on the global performances. (A.L.B.)

  14. Modeling transverse heating and outflow of ionospheric ions from the dayside cusp/cleft. 1 A parametric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bouhram

    Full Text Available The transport patterns of non-thermal H + and O + field-aligned flows from the dayside cusp/cleft, associated with transverse heating by means of wave-particle interactions and in combination with the poleward motion due to the magnetospheric convection are investigated. This has been accomplished by developing a steady-state, two-dimensional, trajectory-based code. The ion heating is modelled by means of a Monte Carlo technique, via the process of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR, with the electromagnetic left-hand circular polarized component of a broad-band, extremely low-frequency (BBELF turbulence. The altitude dependence of ICR heating from 1000 km to 3 Earth radii (RE is modelled by a power law spectrum, with an index a, and a parameter w0 that is proportional to the spectral density at a referenced gyrofrequency. Because of the finite latitudinal extent of the cusp/cleft, the incorporation of the horizontal convection drift leads to a maximum residence time tD of the ions when being energized. A large set of simulations has been computed so as to study the transport patterns of the H + and O + bulk parameters as a function of tD , a, and w0. Residence time effects are significant in O + density patterns while negligible for H +. When comparing the results with analytical one-dimensional theories (Chang et al., 1986; Crew et al., 1990, we find that mean ion energies and pitch angles at the poleward edge of the heating region are slightly influenced by tD and may be used as a probe of ICR parameters ( a, w0. Conversely, poleward of the heating region, upward velocity and mean energy dispersive patterns depend mainly on tD (e.g. the magnitude of the convection drift with latitudinal profiles varying versus

  15. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Delucchi, Mark

    2003-01-01

    This report documents changes to the methods and data in a recently revised version of the greenhouse-gas emissions model originally documented in Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from the Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity, ANL/ESD/TM-22, Volumes 1 and 2, Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (ANL), Illinois (DeLuchi, 1991, 1993). The revised Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM) calculates energy use, air-pollutant emissions, and CO2-equivalent emissions o...

  16. Environmental data book 2011. Estimated emission factors for fuels, electricity, heat and transport in Sweden; Miljoefaktaboken 2011. Uppskattade emissionsfaktorer foer braenslen, el, vaerme och transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gode, Jenny; Martinsson, Fredrik; Hagberg, Linus; Oeman, Andreas; Hoeglund, Jonas; Palm, David

    2011-04-15

    The environmental data book summarizes current and general emission factors for most fuels and sources of Swedish electricity and heat and to power vehicles. Emission data are compiled for wood fuels, energy crops, bio-oils, waste fuels, fossil fuels and peat, biofuels, wind power, hydro power, nuclear power and solar power

  17. Workshop day on ``films and droplets heat transport``; Journee d`etude sur ``le transport de chaleur par films ou gouttelettes``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This workshop day was organized by the French society of thermal engineers (SFT). This compilation of proceedings comprises 9 papers dealing with: the effect of droplets evaporation on a poly-dispersed jet under pressure (application to combustion chambers of diesel engines); effect of two-phase heat exchanges on the performances of a piston engine; heat and mass transfers in the entering region of a laminar liquid film; mass transfer at the interface of a free or sheared turbulent film; measurement of gasoline films thickness using laser induced fluorescence - evaluation of the evaporation quickness using several tracers (application to the intake manifold of port-injected and of indirect injection spark ignition engines); heat transfers and condensation inside ducts for the evacuation of combustion products; evaporation of a climbing film on a wall with discontinuous fins (application to the ebullition in heat exchangers); temperature measurement of droplets in a mono-dispersed jet using IR technique and refractometry; influence of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence on the vaporization of fuel droplets. (J.S.)

  18. Energy transport, polar amplification, and ITCZ shifts in the GeoMIP G1 ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Russotto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The polar amplification of warming and the ability of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ to shift to the north or south are two very important problems in climate science. Examining these behaviors in global climate models (GCMs running solar geoengineering experiments is helpful not only for predicting the effects of solar geoengineering but also for understanding how these processes work under increased carbon dioxide (CO2. Both polar amplification and ITCZ shifts are closely related to the meridional transport of moist static energy (MSE by the atmosphere. This study examines changes in MSE transport in 10 fully coupled GCMs in experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP, in which the solar constant is reduced to compensate for the radiative forcing from abruptly quadrupled CO2 concentrations. In G1, poleward MSE transport decreases relative to preindustrial conditions in all models, in contrast to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5 abrupt4xCO2 experiment, in which poleward MSE transport increases. We show that since poleward energy transport decreases rather than increases, and local feedbacks cannot change the sign of an initial temperature change, the residual polar amplification in the G1 experiment must be due to the net positive forcing in the polar regions and net negative forcing in the tropics, which arise from the different spatial patterns of the simultaneously imposed solar and CO2 forcings. However, the reduction in poleward energy transport likely plays a role in limiting the polar warming in G1. An attribution study with a moist energy balance model shows that cloud feedbacks are the largest source of uncertainty regarding changes in poleward energy transport in midlatitudes in G1, as well as for changes in cross-equatorial energy transport, which are anticorrelated with ITCZ shifts.

  19. Energy transport, polar amplification, and ITCZ shifts in the GeoMIP G1 ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russotto, Rick D.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2018-02-01

    The polar amplification of warming and the ability of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to shift to the north or south are two very important problems in climate science. Examining these behaviors in global climate models (GCMs) running solar geoengineering experiments is helpful not only for predicting the effects of solar geoengineering but also for understanding how these processes work under increased carbon dioxide (CO2). Both polar amplification and ITCZ shifts are closely related to the meridional transport of moist static energy (MSE) by the atmosphere. This study examines changes in MSE transport in 10 fully coupled GCMs in experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP), in which the solar constant is reduced to compensate for the radiative forcing from abruptly quadrupled CO2 concentrations. In G1, poleward MSE transport decreases relative to preindustrial conditions in all models, in contrast to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) abrupt4xCO2 experiment, in which poleward MSE transport increases. We show that since poleward energy transport decreases rather than increases, and local feedbacks cannot change the sign of an initial temperature change, the residual polar amplification in the G1 experiment must be due to the net positive forcing in the polar regions and net negative forcing in the tropics, which arise from the different spatial patterns of the simultaneously imposed solar and CO2 forcings. However, the reduction in poleward energy transport likely plays a role in limiting the polar warming in G1. An attribution study with a moist energy balance model shows that cloud feedbacks are the largest source of uncertainty regarding changes in poleward energy transport in midlatitudes in G1, as well as for changes in cross-equatorial energy transport, which are anticorrelated with ITCZ shifts.

  20. Snowpack redistribution, vegetation feedbacks, and advective heat transport controls on ground thermal regimes and hydrologic response in zero-order hillslope drainage features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushlow, C. R.; Godsey, S.; Sawyer, A. H.

    2017-12-01

    The impact of intensification of the Arctic hydrologic cycle depends on regional and local changes in precipitation, evaporation, and ground thaw. Upland Arctic hillslope hydrology may differ from responses in other Arctic systems because of changes in hydrologic connectivity and ground thermal response to warming. Here we examine hydrologic and ground thermal patterns from six zero-order hillslope features called water tracks on Alaska's North Slope. We find that water tracks' hydrologic response is slower than that of nearby streams and rivers, suggesting that water tracks are responsible for the prolonged summer flood response in larger water bodies rather than the immediate post-storm response as previously expected. We also compare non-water track hillslope and water track ground thermal regimes, and in contrast to water tracks in the High Arctic, we find that the upland water tracks thaw more deeply than non-track hillslope, and remain thawed for up to two months longer than hillslope soils in the winter. Finally, we use the multi-phase model SUTRA-ICE to examine the relative roles of varying winter snowpack thickness, vegetation feedbacks on ground thermal characteristics, and advective heat transport on the observed ground thermal regimes. Wind redistributes snow from non-track hillslopes into water tracks because of slight topographic depressions and differences in vegetation characteristics in the water tracks. These deeper snowpacks can better insulate the ground from cold winter air temperatures. Past work has suggested that advective heat transport in Arctic systems is minimal because of low hydraulic conductivity below a shallow organic soil horizon. However, we explore whether the persistence of flows for weeks or months longer in water tracks than non-track hillslopes may lead to significant advective heat transport in these systems.

  1. Heat indicators of oxidative stress, inflammation and metal transport show dependence of cadmium pollution history in the liver of female zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing-Ling; Guo, Sai-Nan; Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Lv, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Jia-Lang; Xia, Hu

    2017-10-01

    Environmental stressors such as high temperature and metal exposure may occur sequentially, simultaneously, previously in aquatic ecosystems. However, information about whether responses to high temperature depend on Cd exposure history is still unknown in fish. Zebrafish were exposed to 0 (group 1), 2.5 (group 2) and 5μg/L (group 3) cadmium (Cd) for 10 weeks, and then each group was subjected to Cd-free water maintained at 26°C and 32°C for 7days respectively. 26 indicators were used to compare differences between 26°C and 32°C in the liver of female zebrafish, including 5 biochemical indicators (activity of Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT and iNOS; LPO; MT protein), 8 molecular indicators of oxidative stress (mRNA levels of Nrf2, Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT, HSF1, HSF2, HSP70, MTF-1 and MT), 5 molecular indicators of inflammation (mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS and NF-κB), 8 molecular indicators of metal transport (mRNA levels of, ZnT1, ZnT5, ZIP8, ZIP10, ATP7A, ATP7B and CTR1). All biochemical indicators were unchanged in group 1 and changed in group 2 and 3. Contrarily, differences were observed in almost all of molecular indicators of inflammation and metal transport in group 1, about half in group 2, and few in group 3. We also found that all molecular indicators of oxidative stress in group 2 and fewer in group 1 and 3 were significantly affected by heat. Our data indicated that heat indicators of oxidative stress, inflammation and metal transport showed dependence of previous cadmium exposure in the liver of zebrafish, emphasizing metal pollution history should be carefully considered when evaluating heat stress in fish. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. A Galerkin, finite-element analysis of steady-state flow and heat transport in the shallow hydrothermal system in the East Mesa area, Imperial Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    A steady-state simulation model was applied to the shallow hydrothermal system in the East Mesa area of Imperial Valley, Calif. The steady-state equations of flow and heat transport were solved by use of a Galerkin, finite-element method. A solution was obtained by iterating between the temperature and pressure equations, using updated densities and viscosities. Temperature and pressure were obtained for each node, and corresponding head values were calculated. The simulated temperature and pressure patterns correlated well with the observed patterns. Additional data, mainly from test drilling, would be required for construction of a similar model of the deep hydrothermal system.

  3. Temperature in the Primary Heat Transport Pump Bearing of the Nuclear Power Plant 'Embalse Rio Tercero' in view of the Cutting of the Service Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffo, J.L

    2001-01-01

    This study contains the analysis of the Primary Heat Transport Pump Bearing of the Nuclear Power Plant 'Embalse Rio Tercero', Cordoba, Argentine, in view of the cutting of the Service Water refrigeration which cools the Gland Seal System.This takes two ways: One is the study of the temperature rise of the water that cools the carbon bearing and the time involved.This is supported upon manuals and drawings.The other, on the temperature distribution in different operating conditions.This has been done by the simulation of the normal and transient conditions in the software COSMOS/M

  4. Melting heat transport of nanofluidic problem over a Riga plate with erratic thickness: Use of Keller Box scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Iqbal

    Full Text Available Present article is a study of stagnation point flow over Riga plate with erratic thickness. Riga plate is an electromagnetic surface in which electrodes are assembled alternatively. This arrangement generates electromagnetic hydrodynamic behavior in the fluid flow. This is an attempt to investigate influence of melting heat, thermal radiation and viscous dissipation effects on Riga plate. A traversal electric and magnetic fields are produced by Riga plate. It causes Lorentz force parallel to wall which contributes in directing flow pattern. Physical problem is modeled and reduced nonlinear system is solved numerically. Comparative analysis is carried out between solutions obtained by Keller Box Method and shooting technique with Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method of order 5. It is noted that melting heat transfer reduces temperature distribution whereas radiation parameter upsurge it. Velocity is accelerated by modified Hartman number and Eckert number contributes in raising temperature. Keywords: Keller Box method, Computational design, Melting heat transfer, Stagnation point, Viscous dissipation, Thermal radiation

  5. Aloe vera enhances the innate immune response of pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus) after transport stress and combined heat killed Aeromonas hydrophila infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanuzzo, Fábio S; Sabioni, Rafael E; Montoya, Luz Natalia F; Favero, Gisele; Urbinati, Elisabeth C

    2017-06-01

    In this study, pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus) were fed with diets containing Aloe vera for 10 days prior to transport stress and infection with heat killed Aeromonas hydrophila. A. vera is popular around the world due to its medicinal properties, including immunostimulatory effects which was observed in this study. The results show that transport causes immunosuppression, an effect that was prevented by A. vera. Specifically, A. vera prevented reductions of both leukocyte respiratory burst and hemolytic activity of complement system caused by transport. Further, fish fed with A. vera also showed significantly higher leukocyte respiratory burst, serum lysozyme concentrations and activity of complement system 24 h after bacterial infection. Additionally, we observed that A. vera may modulate the innate response through activation of complement system during bacterial immune stimulation. In summary, A. vera extract enhanced innate immune parameters and consequently the ability of fish to cope with pathogens following transport stress. These findings show that A. vera has promise for use in aquaculture and add further evidence that medicinal herbs added to fish feed assist to prevent disease outbreaks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Core Flooding Experiments and Reactive Transport Modeling of Seasonal Heat Storage in the Hot Deep Gassum Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmslykke, Hanne D.; Kjøller, Claus; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal storage of excess heat in hot deep aquifers is considered to optimize the usage of commonly available energy sources. The chemical effects of heating the Gassum Sandstone Formation to up to 150 degrees C is investigated by combining laboratory core flooding experiments with petrographic...... analysis and geochemical modeling. Synthetic formation water is injected into two sets of Gassum Formation samples at 25, 50 (reservoir temperature), 100, and 150 degrees C with a velocity of 0.05 and 0.1 PV/h, respectively. Results show a significant increase in the aqueous concentration of silicium...

  7. Tokamak electron heat transport by direct numerical simulation of small scale turbulence; Transport de chaleur electronique dans un tokamak par simulation numerique directe d'une turbulence de petite echelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labit, B

    2002-10-01

    In a fusion machine, understanding plasma turbulence, which causes a degradation of the measured energy confinement time, would constitute a major progress in this field. In tokamaks, the measured ion and electron thermal conductivities are of comparable magnitude. The possible sources of turbulence are the temperature and density gradients occurring in a fusion plasma. Whereas the heat losses in the ion channel are reasonably well understood, the origin of the electron losses is more uncertain. In addition to the radial velocity associated to the fluctuations of the electric field, electrons are more affected than ions by the magnetic field fluctuations. In experiments, the confinement time can be conveniently expressed in terms of dimensionless parameters. Although still somewhat too imprecise, these scaling laws exhibit strong dependencies on the normalized pressure {beta} or the normalized Larmor radius, {rho}{sub *}. The present thesis assesses whether a tridimensional, electromagnetic, nonlinear fluid model of plasma turbulence driven by a specific instability can reproduce the dependence of the experimental electron heat losses on the dimensionless parameters {beta} and {rho}{sub *}. The investigated interchange instability is the Electron Temperature Gradient driven one (ETG). The model is built by using the set of Braginskii equations. The developed simulation code is global in the sense that a fixed heat flux is imposed at the inner boundary, leaving the gradients free to evolve. From the nonlinear simulations, we have put in light three characteristics for the ETG turbulence: the turbulent transport is essentially electrostatic; the potential and pressure fluctuations form radially elongated cells called streamers; the transport level is very low compared to the experimental values. The thermal transport dependence study has shown a very small role of the normalized pressure, which is in contradiction with the Ohkama's formula. On the other hand

  8. Heat Transfer Processes for the Thermal Energy Balance of Organisms. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, R. D.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module describes heat transfer processes involved in the exchange of heat…

  9. How Irreversible Heat Transport Processes Drive Earth's Interdependent Thermal, Structural, and Chemical Evolution Providing a Strongly Heterogeneous, Layered Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, A.; Criss, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Because magmatism conveys radioactive isotopes plus latent heat rapidly upwards while advecting heat, this process links and controls the thermal and chemical evolution of Earth. We present evidence that the lower mantle-upper mantle boundary is a profound chemical discontinuity, leading to observed heterogeneities in the outermost layers that can be directly sampled, and construct an alternative view of Earth's internal workings. Earth's beginning involved cooling via explosive outgassing of substantial ice (mainly CO) buried with dust during accretion. High carbon content is expected from Solar abundances and ice in comets. Reaction of CO with metal provided a carbide-rich core while converting MgSiO3 to olivine via oxidizing reactions. Because thermodynamic law (and buoyancy of hot particles) indicates that primordial heat from gravitational segregation is neither large nor carried downwards, whereas differentiation forced radioactive elements upwards, formation of the core and lower mantle greatly cooled the Earth. Reference conductive geotherms, calculated using accurate and new thermal diffusivity data, require that heat-producing elements are sequestered above 670 km which limits convection to the upper mantle. These irreversible beginnings limit secular cooling to radioactive wind-down, permiting deduction of Earth's inventory of heat-producing elements from today's heat flux. Coupling our estimate for heat producing elements with meteoritic data indicates that Earth's oxide content has been underestimated. Density sorting segregated a Si-rich, peridotitic upper mantle from a refractory, oxide lower mantle with high Ca, Al and Ti contents, consistent with diamond inclusion mineralogy. Early and rapid differentiation means that internal temperatures have long been buffered by freezing of the inner core, allowing survival of crust as old as ca.4 Ga. Magmatism remains important. Melt escaping though stress-induced fractures in the rigid lithosphere imparts a

  10. Pulsating Heat Pipes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An advanced heat transport technology is presented that can enable space nuclear power systems to transfer reactor heat, convert heat into electricity, reject waste...

  11. Parallel transport of long mean-free-path plasma along open magnetic field lines: Parallel heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zehua; Tang Xianzhu

    2012-01-01

    In a long mean-free-path plasma where temperature anisotropy can be sustained, the parallel heat flux has two components with one associated with the parallel thermal energy and the other the perpendicular thermal energy. Due to the large deviation of the distribution function from local Maxwellian in an open field line plasma with low collisionality, the conventional perturbative calculation of the parallel heat flux closure in its local or non-local form is no longer applicable. Here, a non-perturbative calculation is presented for a collisionless plasma in a two-dimensional flux expander bounded by absorbing walls. Specifically, closures of previously unfamiliar form are obtained for ions and electrons, which relate two distinct components of the species parallel heat flux to the lower order fluid moments such as density, parallel flow, parallel and perpendicular temperatures, and the field quantities such as the magnetic field strength and the electrostatic potential. The plasma source and boundary condition at the absorbing wall enter explicitly in the closure calculation. Although the closure calculation does not take into account wave-particle interactions, the results based on passing orbits from steady-state collisionless drift-kinetic equation show remarkable agreement with fully kinetic-Maxwell simulations. As an example of the physical implications of the theory, the parallel heat flux closures are found to predict a surprising observation in the kinetic-Maxwell simulation of the 2D magnetic flux expander problem, where the parallel heat flux of the parallel thermal energy flows from low to high parallel temperature region.

  12. PORFLO - a continuum model for fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transport in porous media. Model theory, numerical methods, and computational tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runchal, A.K.; Sagar, B.; Baca, R.G.; Kline, N.W.

    1985-09-01

    Postclosure performance assessment of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in flood basalts at Hanford requires that the processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transport be numerically modeled at appropriate space and time scales. A suite of computer models has been developed to meet this objective. The theory of one of these models, named PORFLO, is described in this report. Also presented are a discussion of the numerical techniques in the PORFLO computer code and a few computational test cases. Three two-dimensional equations, one each for fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transport, are numerically solved in PORFLO. The governing equations are derived from the principle of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in a stationary control volume that is assumed to contain a heterogeneous, anisotropic porous medium. Broad discrete features can be accommodated by specifying zones with distinct properties, or these can be included by defining an equivalent porous medium. The governing equations are parabolic differential equations that are coupled through time-varying parameters. Computational tests of the model are done by comparisons of simulation results with analytic solutions, with results from other independently developed numerical models, and with available laboratory and/or field data. In this report, in addition to the theory of the model, results from three test cases are discussed. A users' manual for the computer code resulting from this model has been prepared and is available as a separate document. 37 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs

  13. Impact of thermal conductivity models on the coupling of heat transport, oxygen diffusion, and deformation in (U, Pu)O nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Stan, Marius; Crapps, Justin; Yun, Di

    2013-02-01

    We study the coupled thermal transport, oxygen diffusion, and thermal expansion in a generic nuclear fuel rod consisting of a (U) fuel pellet separated by a helium gap from zircaloy cladding. Steady-state and time-dependent finite-element simulations with a variety of initial- and boundary-value conditions are used to study the effect of the Pu content, y, and deviation from stoichiometry, x, on the temperature and deformation profiles in this fuel element. We find that the equilibrium radial temperature and deformation profiles are most sensitive to x at small values of y. For larger values of y, the effects of oxygen and Pu content are equally important. Following a change in the heat-generation rate, the centerline temperature, the radial deformation of the fuel pellet, and the centerline deviation from stoichiometry track each other closely in (U,Pu)O, as the characteristic time scales of the heat transport and oxygen diffusion are similar. This result is different from the situation observed in the case of UO fuels.

  14. The low temperature specific heat and electrical transport, magnetic properties of Pr{sub 0.65}Ca{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Zhiyong, E-mail: zyhan@cauc.edu.cn

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic properties, electrical transport properties, and low temperature specific heat of polycrystalline perovskite manganese oxide Pr{sub 0.65}Ca{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} have been investigated experimentally. It is found that there exists cluster glass state in the sample at low temperature besides the antiferromagnetic insulating state. With the increase of magnetic field, antiferromagnetic insulating state converts to ferromagnetic metal state and the Debye temperature decreases gradually. In addition, the low temperature electron specific heat in zero magnetic field is obviously larger than that of ordinary rare-earth manganites oxide and this phenomenon is related to the itinerant electrons in ferromagnetic cluster state and the disorder in Pr{sub 0.65}Ca{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3}. - Highlights: • There exists cluster glass state in the sample at low temperature besides the antiferromagnetic insulating state. • With the increase of magnetic field, antiferromagnetic insulating state converts to ferromagnetic metal state. • Low temperature electron specific heat in zero magnetic field is larger than that of ordinary rare-earth manganites oxide.

  15. Hydromagnetic transport phenomena from a stretching or shrinking nonlinear nanomaterial sheet with Navier slip and convective heating: A model for bio-nano-materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M. J.; Bég, O. Anwar; Amin, N.

    2014-11-01

    Steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic laminar free convective boundary layer slip flow of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid from a translating stretching/shrinking sheet in a quiescent fluid is studied. A convective heating boundary condition is incorporated. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and following the implementation of a linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth fifth order method from Maple. Validation of the Maple solutions is achieved with previous non-magnetic published results. The effects of the emerging thermophysical parameters; namely, stretching/shrinking, velocity slip, magnetic field, convective heat transfer and buoyancy ratio parameters, on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration (nanoparticle fraction) are depicted graphically and interpreted at length. It is found that velocity increases whilst temperature and concentration reduce with the velocity slip. Magnetic field causes to reduce velocity and enhances temperature and concentration. Velocity, temperature as well as concentration rises with convective heating parameter. The study is relevant to the synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids of potential interest in wound treatments, skin repair and smart coatings for biological devices.

  16. Hydromagnetic transport phenomena from a stretching or shrinking nonlinear nanomaterial sheet with Navier slip and convective heating: A model for bio-nano-materials processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M.J., E-mail: jashim_74@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, American International University-Bangladesh, Banani Dhaka 1213 (Bangladesh); Bég, O. Anwar [Gort Engovation Research (Propulsion/Biomechanics), Gabriel' s Wing House, 15 Southmere Ave., Bradford, BD7 3NU England (United Kingdom); Amin, N. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-11-15

    Steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic laminar free convective boundary layer slip flow of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid from a translating stretching/shrinking sheet in a quiescent fluid is studied. A convective heating boundary condition is incorporated. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and following the implementation of a linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg fourth fifth order method from Maple. Validation of the Maple solutions is achieved with previous non-magnetic published results. The effects of the emerging thermophysical parameters; namely, stretching/shrinking, velocity slip, magnetic field, convective heat transfer and buoyancy ratio parameters, on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration (nanoparticle fraction) are depicted graphically and interpreted at length. It is found that velocity increases whilst temperature and concentration reduce with the velocity slip. Magnetic field causes to reduce velocity and enhances temperature and concentration. Velocity, temperature as well as concentration rises with convective heating parameter. The study is relevant to the synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids of potential interest in wound treatments, skin repair and smart coatings for biological devices. - Highlights: • This paper analyses MHD slip flow of nofluid with convective boundary conditions. • Group method is used to transform governing equations into similarity equations. • The Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method is used for numerical computations. • The study is relevant to synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids.

  17. Optimisation of the hot conditioning of carbon steel surfaces of primary heat transport system of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran Kumar, M.; Gaonkar, Krishna; Ghosh, Swati; Kain, Vivekanand; Bojinov, Martin; Saario, Timo

    2010-06-01

    Hot conditioning operation of the primary heat transport system is an important step prior to the commissioning of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. One of the major objectives of the operation is to develop a stable and protective magnetite layer on the inner surfaces of carbon steel piping. The correlation between stable magnetite film growth on carbon steel surfaces and the period of exposure to hot conditioning environment is generally established by a combination of weight change measurements and microscopic/morphological observations of the specimens periodically removed during the operation. In the present study, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at room temperature is demonstrated as an alternate, quantitative technique to arrive at an optimal duration of the exposure period. Specimens of carbon steel were exposed for 24, 35 and 48 h during hot conditioning of primary heat transport system of two Indian PHWRs. The composition and morphology of oxide films grown during exposure was characterized by X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy. Further, ex situ electrochemical impedance spectra of magnetite films formed after each exposure were measured, in 1 ppm Li + electrolyte at room temperature as a function of potential in a range of -0.8 to +0.3 VSCE. The defect density of the magnetite films formed after each exposure was estimated by Mott-Schottky analysis of capacitances extracted from the impedance spectra. Further the ionic resistance of the oxide was also extracted from the impedance spectra. Defect density was observed to decrease with increase in exposure time and to saturate after 35 h, indicating stabilisation of the barrier layer part of the magnetite film. The values of the ionic transport resistance start to increase after 35-40 h of exposure. The quantitative ability of EIS technique to assess the film quality demonstrates that it can be used as a supplementary tool to the thickness and morphological characterizations of samples

  18. Optimisation of the hot conditioning of carbon steel surfaces of primary heat transport system of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiran Kumar, M.; Gaonkar, Krishna; Ghosh, Swati; Kain, Vivekanand; Bojinov, Martin; Saario, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Hot conditioning operation of the primary heat transport system is an important step prior to the commissioning of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. One of the major objectives of the operation is to develop a stable and protective magnetite layer on the inner surfaces of carbon steel piping. The correlation between stable magnetite film growth on carbon steel surfaces and the period of exposure to hot conditioning environment is generally established by a combination of weight change measurements and microscopic/morphological observations of the specimens periodically removed during the operation. In the present study, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at room temperature is demonstrated as an alternate, quantitative technique to arrive at an optimal duration of the exposure period. Specimens of carbon steel were exposed for 24, 35 and 48 h during hot conditioning of primary heat transport system of two Indian PHWRs. The composition and morphology of oxide films grown during exposure was characterized by X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy. Further, ex situ electrochemical impedance spectra of magnetite films formed after each exposure were measured, in 1 ppm Li + electrolyte at room temperature as a function of potential in a range of -0.8 to +0.3 V SCE . The defect density of the magnetite films formed after each exposure was estimated by Mott-Schottky analysis of capacitances extracted from the impedance spectra. Further the ionic resistance of the oxide was also extracted from the impedance spectra. Defect density was observed to decrease with increase in exposure time and to saturate after 35 h, indicating stabilisation of the barrier layer part of the magnetite film. The values of the ionic transport resistance start to increase after 35-40 h of exposure. The quantitative ability of EIS technique to assess the film quality demonstrates that it can be used as a supplementary tool to the thickness and morphological characterizations of samples

  19. A parameterization of large-scale heat transport in mid-latitudes. Part II. Stationary waves and the Ferrel cell

    OpenAIRE

    Sasamori, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Based on the recent studies by Andrews and McIntyre (1976) and Boyd (1976) a simple equation is formulated to calculate the mean meridional circulation forced by the stationary planetary waves and the latent heat release and its correlation with the stationary planetary waves. The westerly momentum equation and the thermodynamic equation are combined to form a single linear equation for the meridional circulation based on the assumption that the momentum dissipates exclusively in the lowest l...

  20. Implementation of fully coupled heat and mass transport model to determine the behaviour of timber elements in fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pečenko, Robert; Huč, Sabina; Turk, Goran

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present results of numerical analysis of timber beam exposed to fire. The numerical procedure is divided into two physically separated but closely related phases. In the first phase coupled problem of moisture and heat transfer over the timber beam is numerically solved using the...... the enhanced finite element method. The results of the first computational stage were used as the input data for the numerical analysis of mechanical response of timber element....

  1. Impact of Heat and Mass Transfer during the Transport of Nitrogen in Coal Porous Media on Coal Mine Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobo Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of liquid nitrogen injection is an important technique in the field of coal mine fire prevention. However, the mechanism of heat and mass transfer of cryogenic nitrogen in the goaf porous medium has not been well accessed. Hence, the implementation of fire prevention engineering of liquid nitrogen roughly relied on an empirical view. According to the research gap in this respect, an experimental study on the heat and mass transfer of liquid nitrogen in coal porous media was proposed. Overall, the main mechanism of liquid nitrogen fire prevention technology in the coal mine is the creation of an inert and cryogenic atmosphere. Cryogenic nitrogen gas vapor cloud, heavier than the air, would cause the phenomenon of “gravity settling” in porous media firstly. The cryogen could be applicable to diverse types of fires, both in the openings and in the enclosures. Implementation of liquid nitrogen open-injection technique in Yangchangwan colliery achieved the goals of fire prevention and air-cooling. Meanwhile, this study can also provide an essential reference for the research on heat and mass transfer in porous media in the field of thermal physics and engineering.

  2. Geothermal heating, diapycnal mixing and the abyssal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Emile-Geay

    2009-06-01

    near-surface temperature gradients onto the bottom, thereby altering the density structure that supports a geothermal circulation. For strong vertical mixing rates, geothermal heating enhances the AABW cell by about 15% (2.5 Sv and heats up the last 2000 m by ~0.15°C, reaching a maximum of by 0.3°C in the deep North Pacific. Prescribing a realistic spatial distribution of the heat flux acts to enhance this temperature rise at mid-depth and reduce it at great depth, producing a more modest increase in overturning than in the uniform case. In all cases, however, poleward heat transport increases by ~10% in the Southern Ocean. The three approaches converge to the conclusion that geothermal heating is an important actor of abyssal dynamics, and should no longer be neglected in oceanographic studies.

  3. Long-term trends of typhoon-induced rainfall over Taiwan: in situ evidence of poleward shift of typhoons in western North Pacific in recent decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ting-Yu; Oey, Leo; Huang, Shiming; Chou, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Tracks of tropical cyclones or typhoons in the western North Pacific have recently been shown to shift northward in the past several decades; the poleward shift has been attributed to the expansion of the tropics due to climate warming. Here we use 64-year, hourly rainfall observations around Taiwan, and take advantage of the unique terrain and geographic location of the island with respect to typhoon tracks, to show that since 1950 the typhoon-related rainfalls have been rising on the western side of the island, but decreasing on the eastern side. We show that these extraordinary rainfall patterns, despite the smallness of Taiwan, are indicative of a northward shift of typhoons related to the changes in the wind fields and surface warming over the Indian and Pacific tropical/subtropical regions.

  4. What Has Controlled the Poleward Migration of Annual Averaged Location of Tropical Cyclone Lifetime Maximum Intensity Over the Western North Pacific Since 1961?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jinjie; Klotzbach, Philip J.

    2018-01-01

    The long-term tendency of the average latitude at which tropical cyclones (TCs) reach their lifetime maximum intensity (LMI) over the western North Pacific (WNP) is investigated in this study. Despite the post-1961 significant poleward shift in the annual mean LMI latitude, the migration rate is nonuniform on decadal timescales, having an insignificant trend and a significant increasing trend before and after 1980, respectively. Interdecadal fluctuations of TC genesis latitude (φG) as well as increases in latitudinal distance between genesis position and LMI location (Δφ) are both responsible for the observed LMI latitude trends. The former is linked to the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), which favors TCs forming in the northwestern (southeastern) quadrant of the WNP in negative (positive) IPO phases. The latter primarily results from the continuous warming of WNP sea surface temperature, which further increases the maximum potential intensity and extends the region favorable for TC development to higher latitudes.

  5. Stefan-Maxwell Relations and Heat Flux with Anisotropic Transport Coefficients for Ionized Gases in a Magnetic Field with Application to the Problem of Ambipolar Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnichenko, A. V.; Marov, M. Ya.

    2018-01-01

    The defining relations for the thermodynamic diffusion and heat fluxes in a multicomponent, partially ionized gas mixture in an external electromagnetic field have been obtained by the methods of the kinetic theory. Generalized Stefan-Maxwell relations and algebraic equations for anisotropic transport coefficients (the multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, electric and thermoelectric conductivity coefficients as well as the thermal diffusion ratios) associated with diffusion-thermal processes have been derived. The defining second-order equations are derived by the Chapman-Enskog procedure using Sonine polynomial expansions. The modified Stefan-Maxwell relations are used for the description of ambipolar diffusion in the Earth's ionospheric plasma (in the F region) composed of electrons, ions of many species, and neutral particles in a strong electromagnetic field.

  6. Finite Volume schemes on unstructured grids for non-local models: Application to the simulation of heat transport in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudon, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.goudon@inria.fr [Team COFFEE, INRIA Sophia Antipolis Mediterranee (France); Labo. J.A. Dieudonne CNRS and Univ. Nice-Sophia Antipolis (UMR 7351), Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 02 (France); Parisot, Martin, E-mail: martin.parisot@gmail.com [Project-Team SIMPAF, INRIA Lille Nord Europe, Park Plazza, 40 avenue Halley, F-59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France)

    2012-10-15

    In the so-called Spitzer-Haerm regime, equations of plasma physics reduce to a nonlinear parabolic equation for the electronic temperature. Coming back to the derivation of this limiting equation through hydrodynamic regime arguments, one is led to construct a hierarchy of models where the heat fluxes are defined through a non-local relation which can be reinterpreted as well by introducing coupled diffusion equations. We address the question of designing numerical methods to simulate these equations. The basic requirement for the scheme is to be asymptotically consistent with the Spitzer-Haerm regime. Furthermore, the constraints of physically realistic simulations make the use of unstructured meshes unavoidable. We develop a Finite Volume scheme, based on Vertex-Based discretization, which reaches these objectives. We discuss on numerical grounds the efficiency of the method, and the ability of the generalized models in capturing relevant phenomena missed by the asymptotic problem.

  7. Relation between heat of vaporization, ion transport, molar volume, and cation-anion binding energy for ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, Oleg

    2009-09-10

    A number of correlations between heat of vaporization (H(vap)), cation-anion binding energy (E(+/-)), molar volume (V(m)), self-diffusion coefficient (D), and ionic conductivity for 29 ionic liquids have been investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that employed accurate and validated many-body polarizable force fields. A significant correlation between D and H(vap) has been found, while the best correlation was found for -log(DV(m)) vs H(vap) + 0.28E(+/-). A combination of enthalpy of vaporization and a fraction of the cation-anion binding energy was suggested as a measure of the effective cohesive energy for ionic liquids. A deviation of some ILs from the reported master curve is explained based upon ion packing and proposed diffusion pathways. No general correlations were found between the ion diffusion coefficient and molecular volume or the diffusion coefficient and cation/anion binding energy.

  8. Electron and heat transport in porphyrin-based single-molecule transistors with electro-burnt graphene electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatef Sadeghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the charge and thermal transport properties of a porphyrin-based single-molecule transistor with electro-burnt graphene electrodes (EBG using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method and density functional theory. The porphyrin-based molecule is bound to the EBG electrodes by planar aromatic anchor groups. Due to the efficient π–π overlap between the anchor groups and graphene and the location of frontier orbitals relative to the EBG Fermi energy, we predict HOMO-dominated transport. An on–off ratio as high as 150 is predicted for the device, which could be utilized with small gate voltages in the range of ±0.1 V. A positive thermopower of +280 μV/K is predicted for the device at the theoretical Fermi energy. The sign of the thermopower could be changed by tuning the Fermi energy. By gating the junction and changing the Fermi energy by +10 meV, this can be further enhanced to +475 μV/K. Although the electrodes and molecule are symmetric, the junction itself can be asymmetric due to different binding configurations at the electrodes. This can lead to rectification in the current–voltage characteristic of the junction.

  9. Modeling thermal dynamics of active layer soils and near-surface permafrost using a fully coupled water and heat transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yueyang; Zhuang, Qianlai; O'Donnell, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    Thawing and freezing processes are key components in permafrost dynamics, and these processes play an important role in regulating the hydrological and carbon cycles in the northern high latitudes. In the present study, we apply a well-developed soil thermal model that fully couples heat and water transport, to simulate the thawing and freezing processes at daily time steps across multiple sites that vary with vegetation cover, disturbance history, and climate. The model performance was evaluated by comparing modeled and measured soil temperatures at different depths. We use the model to explore the influence of climate, fire disturbance, and topography (north- and south-facing slopes) on soil thermal dynamics. Modeled soil temperatures agree well with measured values for both boreal forest and tundra ecosystems at the site level. Combustion of organic-soil horizons during wildfire alters the surface energy balance and increases the downward heat flux through the soil profile, resulting in the warming and thawing of near-surface permafrost. A projection of 21st century permafrost dynamics indicates that as the climate warms, active layer thickness will likely increase to more than 3 meters in the boreal forest site and deeper than one meter in the tundra site. Results from this coupled heat-water modeling approach represent faster thaw rates than previously simulated in other studies. We conclude that the discussed soil thermal model is able to well simulate the permafrost dynamics and could be used as a tool to analyze the influence of climate change and wildfire disturbance on permafrost thawing.

  10. Channel size influence on the heat flux density at zero net mass flow in the non-linear transport regime between 1.2 and 2.1 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Lee, J. M.; Sun, G. S.

    1987-01-01

    Porous media and narrow ducts of simple shape at zero net mass flow (ZNMF) are used to investigate the influence of pore size on the entropy/heat convection rate at ZNMF. The study is relevant to the development of specific types of phase separators. Previous work on heat transport by convection is extended to porous media without mass loss. The experimental results show the influence of pore size on heat flux for permeabilities between 10 to the -8th and 10 to the -6th sq cm. ZNMF plug data are found to be similar to results obtained for vapor liquid phase separation.

  11. Cooling the intact loop of primary heat transport system using shut down cooling system after events such as LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Icleanu, D.L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to model the Shutdown Cooling System operation for CANDU 6 NPP in case of LOCA accident, using Flowmaster calculation code by delimiting models and setting calculation assumptions and input data for hydraulic analysis, and and assumptions for the calculation and input data for calculating thermal performance check heat exchangers that are part of this system. The Flowmaster V7.8 code provides system engineers with a powerful tool to investigate pressure surge, pressure drop, flow rate, temperature and system response times - removing the uncertainty from fluid flow systems. Flowmaster is a one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic calculation code for dimensioning, analyzing and verifying the pipeline systems operation. Each component of Flowmaster is a mathematical model for an equipment that is included in a facility. Selected components are connected via nodes in order to form a network, which constitutes a computerized model of the system. Analyzing the parameters of the cooling system for all cooling processes considered it was found that the values obtained for thermal-hydraulic parameters, as well as the duration up to reaching specified limits fall within the design values of the system. This document is made up of an abstract and the slides of the presentation

  12. Evolution of Late Pliocene heat transport to high latitudes: Centennial-scale d18O and Mg/Ca-based temperature records from ODP Site 984 (Bjorn Drift).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, G.; Sarnthein, M.; Weinelt, M.; Lea, D.; Erlenkeuser, H.

    2003-04-01

    A general increase in surface water salinity and deep ventilation in the Carribean after 4.2 Ma suggests that the final closure of the Panama Isthmus may have led to an increased heat transport to the northern high latitudes (Haug &Tiedemann, 1998). In turn, this enhanced transport may have provided additional moisture for the built-up of the Greenland ice sheet, as reflected by a sudden increase in ice rafting in the northern North Atlantic after 2.7 Ma (Jansen et al. 2000). To test this hypothesis, we compare sea surface and deep-water temperature records at ODP Site 984. Sediments at this site monitor the surface water inflow to the Greenland Sea. In particular, we focus on two time windows i) 3.1 - 3.4 Ma, prior to, and ii) 2.6 - 2.9 Ma, subsequent to the onset of Quaternary-style glaciation. Major objectives are to search for precursor signals for the major climatic change about 2.74 Ma ago and to trace back short-term Dansgaard-Oescher climate instability, in particular, whether it is a feature specific of Late Pleistocene scenarios with the presence of large continental ice sheets. Multicentennial-scale sea surface temperature records based on Mg/Ca and d18O data of the planktonic foraminifer Globigerina bulloides (ODP Site 984) are employed to trace variations in the strength of the Irminger Current. First results suggest that glacial-to-interglacial amplitudes only reached 2 C (8-10 C) in the older interval and increased to 5 C (8-13 C) during the younger time window and thus indeed confirm an enhanced transport of warm water to high latitudes after the final closure of Panama. In contrast, the d18O amplitudes of 1per mil (1.8-2.8 per mil) remain constant over both time windows, either reflecting a parallel increase in salinity transport and/or a significant waxing of ice volume along with the closure.

  13. Temperature and impurity transport studies of heated tokamak plasmas by means of a collisional-radiative model of x-ray emission from Mo30+ to Mo39+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacella, D.; Fournier, K. B.; Zerbini, M.; Finkenthal, M.; Mattioli, M.; May, M. J.; Goldstein, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    This work presents and interprets, by means of detailed atomic calculations, observations of L-shell (n=3→n=2) transitions in highly ionized molybdenum, the main intrinsic heavy impurity in the Frascati tokamak upgrade plasmas. These hot plasmas were obtained by additional electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), at the frequency of 140 Ghz, during the current ramp-up phase of the discharge. Injecting 400 kW on axis and 800 kW slightly off axis, the peak central electron temperature reached 8.0 and 7.0 keV, respectively, for a time much longer than the ionization equilibrium time of the molybdenum ions. X-ray emissions from rarely observed high charge states, Mo 30+ to Mo 39+ , have been studied with moderate spectral resolution (λ/Δλ∼150) and a time resolution of 5 ms. A sophisticated collisional-radiative model for the study of molybdenum ions in plasmas with electron temperature in the range 4-20 keV is presented. The sensitivity of the x-ray emission to the temperature and to impurity transport processes is discussed. This model has been then used to investigate two different plasma scenarios. In the first regime the ECRH heating occurs on axis during the current ramp up phase, when the magnetic shear is evolving from negative to zero up to the half radius. The spectrum is well reproduced with the molybdenum ions in coronal equilibrium and with a central impurity peaking. In the second regime, at the beginning of the current flat top when magnetic shear is monotonic and sawtoothing activity is appearing, the lowest charge states (Mo 33+ to Mo 30+ ), populated off axis, are affected by anomalous transport and the total molybdenum profile is found to be flat up to the half radius. We conclude with the presentation of ''synthetic spectra'' computed for even higher temperature plasmas that are expected in future experiments with higher ECRH power input. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  14. Coordinated Cluster, ground-based instrumentation and low-altitude satellite observations of transient poleward-moving events in the ionosphere and in the tail lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    Full Text Available During the interval between 8:00–9:30 on 14 January 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft were moving from the central magnetospheric lobe, through the dusk sector mantle, on their way towards intersecting the magnetopause near 15:00 MLT and 15:00 UT. Throughout this interval, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR at Longyearbyen observed a series of poleward-moving transient events of enhanced F-region plasma concentration ("polar cap patches", with a repetition period of the order of 10 min. Allowing for the estimated solar wind propagation delay of 75 ( ± 5 min, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF had a southward component during most of the interval. The magnetic footprint of the Cluster spacecraft, mapped to the ionosphere using the Tsyganenko T96 model (with input conditions prevailing during this event, was to the east of the ESR beams. Around 09:05 UT, the DMSP-F12 satellite flew over the ESR and showed a sawtooth cusp ion dispersion signature that also extended into the electrons on the equatorward edge of the cusp, revealing a pulsed magnetopause reconnection. The consequent enhanced ionospheric flow events were imaged by the SuperDARN HF backscatter radars. The average convection patterns (derived using the AMIE technique on data from the magnetometers, the EISCAT and SuperDARN radars, and the DMSP satellites show that the associated poleward-moving events also convected over the predicted footprint of the Cluster spacecraft. Cluster observed enhancements in the fluxes of both electrons and ions. These events were found to be essentially identical at all four spacecraft, indicating that they had a much larger spatial scale than the satellite separation of the order of 600 km. Some of the events show a correspondence between the lowest energy magnetosheath electrons detected by the PEACE instrument on Cluster (10–20 eV and the topside ionospheric enhancements seen by the ESR (at 400–700 km. We suggest that a potential barrier at the

  15. Coordinated Cluster, ground-based instrumentation and low-altitude satellite observations of transient poleward-moving events in the ionosphere and in the tail lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available During the interval between 8:00–9:30 on 14 January 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft were moving from the central magnetospheric lobe, through the dusk sector mantle, on their way towards intersecting the magnetopause near 15:00 MLT and 15:00 UT. Throughout this interval, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR at Longyearbyen observed a series of poleward-moving transient events of enhanced F-region plasma concentration ("polar cap patches", with a repetition period of the order of 10 min. Allowing for the estimated solar wind propagation delay of 75 ( ± 5 min, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF had a southward component during most of the interval. The magnetic footprint of the Cluster spacecraft, mapped to the ionosphere using the Tsyganenko T96 model (with input conditions prevailing during this event, was to the east of the ESR beams. Around 09:05 UT, the DMSP-F12 satellite flew over the ESR and showed a sawtooth cusp ion dispersion signature that also extended into the electrons on the equatorward edge of the cusp, revealing a pulsed magnetopause reconnection. The consequent enhanced ionospheric flow events were imaged by the SuperDARN HF backscatter radars. The average convection patterns (derived using the AMIE technique on data from the magnetometers, the EISCAT and SuperDARN radars, and the DMSP satellites show that the associated poleward-moving events also convected over the predicted footprint of the Cluster spacecraft. Cluster observed enhancements in the fluxes of both electrons and ions. These events were found to be essentially identical at all four spacecraft, indicating that they had a much larger spatial scale than the satellite separation of the order of 600 km. Some of the events show a correspondence between the lowest energy magnetosheath electrons detected by the PEACE instrument on Cluster (10–20 eV and the topside ionospheric enhancements seen by the ESR (at 400–700 km. We suggest that a potential barrier at the

  16. Method and means for heating buildings in a district heating system with waste heat from a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margen, P.H.E.

    1975-01-01

    The waste heat from a thermal power plant is transported through a municipal heating network to a plurality of buildings to be heated. The quantity of heat thus supplied to the buildings is higher than that required for the heating of the buildings. The excess heat is released from the buildings to the atmosphere in the form of hot air

  17. Development of algorithms for using satellite meteorological data sets to study global transport of stratospheric aerosols and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Want, P. H.; Deepak, A.

    1985-01-01

    The utilization of stratospheric aerosol and ozone measurements obtained from the NASA developed SAM II and SAGE satellite instruments were investigated for their global scale transports. The stratospheric aerosols showed that during the stratospheric warming of the winter 1978 to 1979, the distribution of the zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio in the northern high latitude exhibited distinct changes. Dynamic processes might have played an important role in maintenance role in maintenance of this zonal mean distribution. As to the stratospheric ozone, large poleward ozone transports are shown to occur in the altitude region from 24 km to 38 km near 55N during this warming. This altitude region is shown to be a transition region of the phase relationship between ozone and temperature waves from an in-phase one above 38 km. It is shown that the ozone solar heating in the upper stratosphere might lead to enhancement of the damping rate of the planetary waves due to infrared radiation alone in agreement with theoretical analyses and an earlier observational study.

  18. A Bayesian reliability study on motorized valves for the emergency core cooling, heat transport isolation and shutdown cooling systems at Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.E.; Rennick, D.F.; Nainer, A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this is to examine operational data on 32 motorized valves in the emergency core cooling, shutdown cooling and heat transport isolation systems and determine if the evidence would support a reduction in testing frequency of these valves. The methodology used is to examine the data which has accumulated on motorized valve failures since Gentilly-2 first entered service, compare these data with similar data from other sources, and determine whether the evidence indicate that demand-based, wear out type failure mechanisms play a significant role in the recorded failures. The statistical data are then updated, using a Bayesian updating procedure, to obtain revised time based failure rates and demand based probabilities of failure on demand for the motorized valves. The revised failure rates and probabilities are then applied to the fault tree models for the systems of interest to determine what effects there would be, with the current test intervals and with extended test intervals, on the probability of failure of the systems. (author)

  19. A dynamically consistent analysis of circulation and transports in the southwestern Weddell Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yaremchuk

    Full Text Available An inverse model is applied for the analysis of hydrographic and current meter data collected on the repeat WOCE section SR4 in the Weddell Sea in 1989–1992. The section crosses the Weddell Sea cyclonic gyre from Kapp Norvegia to the northern end of the Antarctic Peninsula. The concepts of geostrophy, conservation of planetary vorticity and hydrostatics are combined with advective balances of active and passive properties to provide a dynamically consistent circulation pattern. Our variational assimilation scheme allows the calculation of three-dimensional velocities in the section plane. Current speeds are small except along the coasts where they reach up to 12 cm/s. We diagnose a gyre transport of 34 Sverdrup which is associated with a poleward heat transport of 28×1012 W corresponding to an average heat flux of 15 Wm–2 in the Weddell Sea south of the transect. This exceeds the estimated local flux on the transect of 2 Wm–2. As the transect is located mostly in the open ocean, we conclude that the shelf areas contribute significantly to the ocean-atmosphere exchange and are consequently key areas for the contribution of the Weddell Sea to global ocean ventilation. Conversion of water masses occuring south of the section transform 6.6±1.1 Sv of the inflowing warm deep water into approximately equal amounts of Weddell Sea deep water and Weddell Sea bottom water. The volume transport of surface water equals in the in- and outflow. This means that almost all newly formed surface water is involved in the deep and bottom water formation. Comparison with the results obtained by pure velocity interpolation combined with a hydrographic data subset indicates major differences in the derived salt transports and the water mass conversion of the surface water. The differences can be explained by deviations in the structure of the upper ocean currents to which shelf areas contribute significantly. Additionally a

  20. Hybrid Heat Pipes for High Heat Flux Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The thermal transport requirements for future spacecraft missions continue to increase, approaching several kilowatts. At the same time the heat acquisition areas...

  1. Hybrid Heat Pipes for High Heat Flux Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The thermal transport requirements for future spacecraft missions continue to increase, approaching several kilowatts. At the same time the heat acquisition areas...

  2. Documentation and verification of VST2D; a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heat-solute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heatsolute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic, 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density (VST2D). VST2D was developed to help understand the effects of natural and anthropogenic factors on quantity and quality of variably saturated ground-water systems. The model solves simultaneously for one or more dependent variables (pressure, temperature, and concentration) at nodes in a horizontal or vertical mesh using a quasi-linearized general minimum residual method. This approach enhances computational speed beyond the speed of a sequential approach. Heterogeneous and anisotropic conditions are implemented locally using individual element property descriptions. This implementation allows local principal directions to differ among elements and from the global solution domain coordinates. Boundary conditions can include time-varying pressure head (or moisture content), heat, and/or concentration; fluxes distributed along domain boundaries and/or at internal node points; and/or convective moisture, heat, and solute fluxes along the domain boundaries; and/or unit hydraulic gradient along domain boundaries. Other model features include temperature and concentration dependent density (liquid and vapor) and viscosity, sorption and/or decay of a solute, and capability to determine moisture content beyond residual to zero. These features are described in the documentation together with development of the governing equations, application of the finite-element formulation (using the Galerkin approach), solution procedure, mass and energy balance considerations, input requirements, and output options. The VST2D model was verified, and results included solutions for problems of water transport under isohaline and isothermal conditions, heat transport under isobaric and isohaline conditions, solute transport under isobaric and isothermal conditions, and coupled water-heat

  3. Screening for suitable areas for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage within the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium using coupled groundwater flow and heat transport modelling tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anibas, Christian; Kukral, Janik; Touhidul Mustafa, Syed Md; Huysmans, Marijke

    2017-04-01

    Urban areas have a great potential for shallow geothermal systems. Their energy demand is high, but currently they have only a limited potential to cover their own energy demand. The transition towards a low-carbon energy regime offers alternative sources of energy an increasing potential. Urban areas however pose special challenges for the successful exploitation of shallow geothermal energy. High building densities limit the available space for drillings and underground investigations. Urban heat island effects and underground structures influence the thermal field, groundwater pollution and competing water uses limit the available subsurface. To tackle these challenges in the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium two projects 'BruGeo' and the recently finished 'Prospective Research of Brussels project 2015-PRFB-228' address the investigation in urban geothermal systems. They aim to identify the key factors of the underground with respect to Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) installations like thermal properties, aquifer thicknesses, groundwater flow velocities and their heterogeneity. Combined numerical groundwater and heat transport models are applied for the assessment of both open and closed loop shallow geothermal systems. The Brussels Capital Region comprises of the Belgian Capital, the City of Brussels and 18 other municipalities covering 161 km2 with almost 1.2 million inhabitants. Beside the high population density the Brussels Capital Region has a pronounced topography and a relative complex geology. This is both a challenge and an opportunity for the exploitation of shallow geothermal energy. The most important shallow hydrogeological formation in the Brussels-Capital Region are the Brussels Sands with the Brussels Sands Aquifer. Scenarios where developed using criteria for the hydrogeological feasibility of ATES installations such as saturated aquifer thickness, groundwater flow velocity and the groundwater head below surface. The Brussels Sands

  4. Equatorial Kelvin waves generated in the western tropical Pacific Ocean trigger mass and heat transport within the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Richard E.; Davis, Earl E.

    2017-07-01

    Sequences of correlated seafloor temperature, current velocity, and acoustic backscatter events recorded at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites at 4300 m depth in the Middle America Trench have been inferred to result from tidally induced turbidity currents generated in the vicinity of the 3300 m deep sill at the southern end of the trench. New data from the borehole observatories extend the temperature records to 11 years (November 2002 to December 2013) and confirm the highly episodic nature of the events. We present satellite altimetry data and ocean circulation model results to show that event timing is correlated with intraseasonal Kelvin wave motions in the equatorial Pacific. The observed temperature events had a mean (±1 standard deviation) occurrence interval of 61 (±24) days, which spans the periods of the first two baroclinic modes. Lag times between peak bottom water temperatures at the ODP sites and the passage of eastward-propagating Kelvin wave crests at locations in the eastern equatorial Pacific are consistent with the time for mode-1 waves to propagate to the southern end of the trench at a mean phase speed of 2.0 m s-1. Findings indicate that Kelvin wave currents augment tidal motions in the vicinity of the sill, triggering turbidity currents that travel northwestward along the trench axis at mean speeds of ˜0.1 m s-1. We conclude that mode-1 (or, possibly, mixed mode-1 and mode-2) baroclinic Kelvin waves generated by large-scale atmospheric processes in the western tropical Pacific lead to heat and mass transport deep within Middle America Trench in the eastern tropical Pacific.

  5. Comparative study of Monte Carlo particle transport code PHITS and nuclear data processing code NJOY for PKA energy spectra and heating number under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Y.; Ogawa, T.

    2016-01-01

    The modelling of the damage in materials irradiated by neutrons is needed for understanding the mechanism of radiation damage in fission and fusion reactor facilities. The molecular dynamics simulations of damage cascades with full atomic interactions require information about the energy distribution of the Primary Knock on Atoms (PKAs). The most common process to calculate PKA energy spectra under low-energy neutron irradiation is to use the nuclear data processing code NJOY2012. It calculates group-to-group recoil cross section matrices using nuclear data libraries in ENDF data format, which is energy and angular recoil distributions for many reactions. After the NJOY2012 process, SPKA6C is employed to produce PKA energy spectra combining recoil cross section matrices with an incident neutron energy spectrum. However, intercomparison with different processes and nuclear data libraries has not been studied yet. Especially, the higher energy (~5 MeV) of the incident neutrons, compared to fission, leads to many reaction channels, which produces a complex distribution of PKAs in energy and type. Recently, we have developed the event generator mode (EGM) in the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System PHITS for neutron incident reactions in the energy region below 20 MeV. The main feature of EGM is to produce PKA with keeping energy and momentum conservation in a reaction. It is used for event-by-event analysis in application fields such as soft error analysis in semiconductors, micro dosimetry in human body, and estimation of Displacement per Atoms (DPA) value in metals and so on. The purpose of this work is to specify differences of PKA spectra and heating number related with kerma between different calculation method using PHITS-EGM and NJOY2012+SPKA6C with different libraries TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 for fusion relevant materials

  6. Identification of Tumor Antigen AF20 as Glycosylated Transferrin Receptor 1 in Complex with Heat Shock Protein 90 and/or Transporting ATPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Shapiro

    Full Text Available We previously isolated AF20, a murine monoclonal antibody that recognizes a cell surface glycoprotein of approximately 90-110 kDa. The AF20 antigen is specifically expressed in human hepatoma and colon cancer cell lines, and thus could serve as a cancer biomarker. To uncover the molecular identity of the AF20 antigen, a combination of ion-exchange chromatography, immunoprecipitation, and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was employed to purify the AF20 antigen followed by trypsin digestion and mass spectrometry. Surprisingly, three host proteins were thus purified from human hepatoma and colon cancer cell lines: transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, and Na+/K+ ATPase or Mg++ ATPase. Co-immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis confirmed interaction among the three proteins. However, only the cDNA encoding TFR1 conferred strong cell surface staining by the AF20 antibody following its transient transfection into a cell line lacking endogenous AF20. In support of the molecular identity of AF20 as TFR1, diferric but not iron-free transferrin could prevent AF20 antigen-antibody interaction during immunoprecipitation. Moreover, very similar patterns of AF20 and TFR1 overexpression was documented in colon cancer tissues. In conclusion, AF20 is glycosylated TFR1. This finding could explain the molecular structure of AF20, its cell surface localization, as well as overexpression in cancer cells. Glycosylated TFR1 should serve as a usefulness target for anti-cancer therapy, or a vehicle for delivery of anti-tumor drugs with high affinity and specificity. The biological significance of the complex formation between TFR1, HSP90, and/or transporting ATPase warrants further investigation.

  7. The influence of ascorbic acid on the oxygen consumption and the heat production by the cells of wheat seedling roots with their mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibited at complexes I and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, L.K.; Rakhmatullina, D.F.; Ogorodnikova, T.I.; Alyabyev, A.J.; Minibayeva, F.V.; Loseva, N.L.; Mityashina, S.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of exogenous ascorbic acid (AsA) on oxidative phosphorylation was studied using wheat seedling roots. Treatment of them with AsA stimulated the rates of oxygen consumption and the heat production and caused a decrease of the respiratory coefficient. The increase in respiration was prevented by inhibitors of ascorbate oxidase, diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and of cytochrome oxidase, cyanide (KCN). Exogenous AsA sharply stimulated the rate of oxygen consumption of roots when complexes I and III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain were inhibited by rotenone and antimycin A, respectively, while the rates of heat production did not change significantly. It is concluded that AsA is a potent energy substrate, which can be used in conditions of failing I and III complexes in the mitochondrial electron transport chain

  8. Motion of the dayside polar cap boundary during substorm cycles: II. Generation of poleward-moving events and polar cap patches by pulses in the magnetopause reconnection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Using data from the EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter VHF and CUTLASS (Co-operative UK Twin-Located Auroral Sounding System HF radars, we study the formation of ionospheric polar cap patches and their relationship to the magnetopause reconnection pulses identified in the companion paper by Lockwood et al. (2005. It is shown that the poleward-moving, high-concentration plasma patches observed in the ionosphere by EISCAT on 23 November 1999, as reported by Davies et al. (2002, were often associated with corresponding reconnection rate pulses. However, not all such pulses generated a patch and only within a limited MLT range (11:00-12:00 MLT did a patch result from a reconnection pulse. Three proposed mechanisms for the production of patches, and of the concentration minima that separate them, are analysed and evaluated: (1 concentration enhancement within the patches by cusp/cleft precipitation; (2 plasma depletion in the minima between the patches by fast plasma flows; and (3 intermittent injection of photoionisation-enhanced plasma into the polar cap. We devise a test to distinguish between the effects of these mechanisms. Some of the events repeat too frequently to apply the test. Others have sufficiently long repeat periods and mechanism (3 is shown to be the only explanation of three of the longer-lived patches seen on this day. However, effect (2 also appears to contribute to some events. We conclude that plasma concentration gradients on the edges of the larger patches arise mainly from local time variations in the subauroral plasma, via the mechanism proposed by Lockwood et al. (2000.

  9. Moist synoptic transport of carbon dioxide along midlatitude storm tracks, transport uncertainty, and implications for carbon dioxide flux estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazoo, Nicholas C.

    Mass transport along moist isentropic surfaces on baroclinic waves represents an important component of the atmospheric heat engine that operates between the equator and poles. This is also an important vehicle for tracer transport, and is correlated with ecosystem metabolism because large-scale baroclinicity and photosynthesis are both driven seasonally by variations in solar radiation. In this research, I pursue a dynamical framework for explaining atmospheric transport of CO2 by synoptic weather systems at middle and high latitudes. A global model of atmospheric tracer transport, driven by meteorological analysis in combination with a detailed description of surface fluxes, is used to create time varying CO2 distributions in the atmosphere. Simulated mass fluxes of CO2 are then decomposed into a zonal monthly mean component and deviations from the monthly mean in space and time. Mass fluxes of CO2 are described on moist isentropic surfaces to represent frontal transport along storm tracks. Forward simulations suggest that synoptic weather systems transport large amounts of CO2 north and south in northern mid-latitudes, up to 1 PgC month-1 during winter when baroclinic wave activity peaks. During boreal winter when northern plants respire, warm moist air, high in CO2, is swept upward and poleward along the east side of baroclinic waves and injected into the polar vortex, while cold dry air, low in CO 2, that had been transported into the polar vortex earlier in the year is advected equatorward. These synoptic eddies act to strongly reduce seasonality of CO2 in the biologically active mid-latitudes by 50% of that implied by local net ecosystem exchange while correspondingly amplifying seasonality in the Arctic. Transport along stormtracks is correlated with rising, moist, cloudy air, which systematically hides this CO2 transport from satellite observing systems. Meridional fluxes of CO2 are of comparable magnitude as surface exchange of CO2 in mid-latitudes, and

  10. Validation of measured poleward TEC gradient using multi-station GPS with Artificial Neural Network based TEC model in low latitude region for developing predictive capability of ionospheric scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, D.; Paul, A.

    2017-12-01

    The equatorial ionosphere shows sharp diurnal and latitudinal Total Electron Content (TEC) variations over a major part of the day. Equatorial ionosphere also exhibits intense post-sunset ionospheric irregularities. Accurate prediction of TEC in these low latitudes is not possible from standard ionospheric models. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based Vertical TEC (VTEC) model has been designed using TEC data in low latitude Indian longitude sector for accurate prediction of VTEC. GPS TEC data from the stations Calcutta (22.58°N, 88.38°E geographic, magnetic dip 32°), Baharampore (24.09°N, 88.25°E geographic, magnetic dip 35°) and Siliguri (26.72°N, 88.39°E geographic; magnetic dip 40°) are used as training dataset for the duration of January 2007-September 2011. Poleward VTEC gradients from northern EIA crest to region beyond EIA crest have been calculated from measured VTEC and compared with that obtained from ANN based VTEC model. TEC data from Calcutta and Siliguri are used to compute VTEC gradients during April 2013 and August-September 2013. It has been observed that poleward VTEC gradient computed from ANN based TEC model has shown good correlation with measured values during vernal and autumnal equinoxes of high solar activity periods of 2013. Possible correlation between measured poleward TEC gradients and post-sunset scintillations (S4 ≥ 0.4) from northern crest of EIA has been observed in this paper. From the observation, a suitable threshold poleward VTEC gradient has been proposed for possible occurrence of post-sunset scintillations at northern crest of EIA along 88°E longitude. Poleward VTEC gradients obtained from ANN based VTEC model are used to forecast possible ionospheric scintillation after post-sunset period using the threshold value. It has been observed that these predicted VTEC gradients obtained from ANN based VTEC model can forecast post-sunset L-band scintillation with an accuracy of 67% to 82% in this dynamic low latitude

  11. Numerical study of the heat and material transport in the absorption of water vapour in aqueous LiBr solution; Numerische Untersuchung des Waerme- und Stofftransports bei der Absorption von Wasserdampf in waessriger LiBr-Loesung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olbricht, Michael; Buchholz, Niklas; Fries, Simon; Addy, Joseph; Luke, Andrea [Kassel Univ. (Germany). Fachgebiet Technische Thermodynamik

    2016-07-01

    In absorption refrigerating machines with the working-material pair water/lithium bromide usually falling-film apparatuses are applied as absorbers, evaporators, and condensers. These are often performed as horizontal tube bundes. As critical, the process limiting component in the literature the absorper is called, because of which the their running, coupled heat and material transport processes are more detailedly theoretically studied. For this a model was developed, which maps starting from analytically describable physical connections the transport processes in the apparatus. The flow in the tube bundle is hereby divided in two sections, the flow in the liquid film on the tubes and the drop fall between the tubes. The basic equations are numerically solved under given boundary conditions, whereby for the description of the drop fall phase addititonally semi-empirical calculation approaches are used. The results are elucidated by means of concentration and temperature profiles in the film. A distinctly faster formation of the temperature boundary layer than the concentration boundary layer in the fim is shown, which makes the material transport to the limiting transport process in the absorber, which is already known from experimental studies.The physical plausibility of the model is by means of this fact confirmed by an analysis of the coupled transport processes by means of dimensionless characteristic numbers. Furthermore from the results an improvement of the heat and material transport at diminishing of the tube diameter can be derived. Just so by the results of the study an estimation method for the quality of the absorber by means of the subcooling is shown.

  12. Effect of river excavation on a bank filtration site - assessing transient surface water - groundwater interaction by 3D heat and solute transport modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Oswald, S. E.; Munz, M.; Strasser, D.

    2017-12-01

    Bank filtration is widely used either as main- or pre-treatment process for water supply. The colmation of the river bottom as interface to groundwater plays a key role for hydraulic control of flow paths and location of several beneficial attenuation processes, such as pathogen filtration, mixing, biodegradation and sorption. Along the flow path, mixing happens between the `young' infiltrated water and ambient `old' groundwater. To clarify the mechanisms and their interaction, modelling is often used for analysing spatial and temporal distribution of the travelling time, quantifying mixing ratios, and estimating the biochemical reaction rates. As the most comprehensive tool, 2-D or 3-D spatially-explicit modelling is used in several studies, and for area with geological heterogeneity, the adaptation of different natural tracers could constrain the model in respect to model non-uniqueness and improve the interpretation of the flow field. In our study, we have evaluated the influence of a river excavation and bank reconstruction project on the groundwater-surface water exchange at a bank filtration site. With data from years of field site monitoring, we could include besides heads and temperature also the analysis of stable isotope data and ions to differentiate between infiltrated water and groundwater. Thus, we have set up a 3-D transient heat and mass transport groundwater model, taking the strong local geological heterogeneity into consideration, especially between river and water work wells. By transferring the effect of the river excavation into a changing hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed, model could be calibrated against both water head and temperature time-series observed. Finally, electrical conductivity dominated by river input was included as quasi-conservative tracer. The `triple' calibrated, transient model was then used to i) understand the flow field and quantify the long term changes in infiltration rate and distribution brought by the

  13. Mesoscopic photon heat transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojanen, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir-Wingreen-Landauer-typ......We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir......-Wingreen-Landauer-type of conductance formula, which gives the photonic heat current through an arbitrary circuit element coupled to two dissipative reservoirs at finite temperatures. As an illustration we present an exact solution for the case when the intermediate circuit can be described as an electromagnetic resonator. We discuss...

  14. Estimating the Velocity and Transport of the East Australian Current using Argo, XBT, and Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, N. V.; Roemmich, D. H.; Gille, S. T.

    2016-02-01

    Western Boundary Currents (WBCs) are the strongest ocean currents in the subtropics, and constitute the main pathway through which warm water-masses transit from low to mid-latitudes in the subtropical gyres of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Heat advection by WBCs has a significant impact on heat storage in subtropical mode waters formation regions and at high latitudes. The possibility that the magnitude of WBCs might change under greenhouse gas forcing has raised significant concerns. Improving our knowledge of WBC circulation is essential to accurately monitor the oceanic heat budget. Because of the narrowness and strong mesoscale variability of WBCs, estimation of WBC velocity and transport places heavy demands on any potential sampling scheme. One strategy for studying WBCs is to combine complementary data sources. High-resolution bathythermograph (HRX) profiles to 800-m have been collected along transects crossing the East Australian Current (EAC) system at 3-month nominal sampling intervals since 1991. EAC transects, with spatial sampling as fine as 10-15 km, are obtained off Brisbane (27°S) and Sydney (34°S), and crossing the related East Auckland Current north of Auckland. Here, HRX profiles collected since 2004 off Brisbane are merged with Argo float profiles and 1000 m trajectory-based velocities to expand HRX shear estimates to 2000-m and to estimate absolute geostrophic velocity and transport. A method for combining altimetric data with HRX and Argo profiles to mitigate temporal aliasing by the HRX transects and to reduce sampling errors in the HRX/Argo datasets is described. The HRX/Argo/altimetry-based estimate of the time-mean poleward alongshore transport of the EAC off Brisbane is 18.3 Sv, with a width of about 180 km, and of which 3.7 Sv recirculates equatorward on a similar spatial scale farther offshore. Geostrophic transport anomalies in the EAC at 27°S show variability of ± 1.3 Sv at interannual time scale related to ENSO. The

  15. Characteristics of merging at the magnetopause inferred from dayside 557.7-nm all-sky images: IMF drivers of poleward moving auroral forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Maynard

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We combine in situ measurements from Cluster with high-resolution 557.7 nm all-sky images from South Pole to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of merging on the dayside magnetopause. Variations of 557.7 nm emissions were observed at a 6 s cadence at South Pole on 29 April 2003 while significant changes in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF clock angle were reaching the magnetopause. Electrons energized at merging sites are the probable sources for 557.7 nm cusp emissions. At the same time Cluster was crossing the pre-noon cusp in the Northern Hemisphere. The combined observations confirm results of a previous study that merging events can occur at multiple sites simultaneously and vary asynchronously on time scales of 10 s to 3 min (Maynard et al., 2004. The intensity of the emissions and the merging rate appear to vary with changes in the IMF clock angle, IMF BX and the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. Most poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs reflect responses to changes in interplanetary medium rather than to local processes. The changes in magnetopause position required by increases in dynamic pressure are mediated by merging and result in the generation of PMAFs. Small (15–20% variations in dynamic pressure of the solar wind are sufficient to launch PMAFs. Changes in IMF BX create magnetic flux compressions and rarefactions in the solar wind. Increases (decreases in IMF BX strengthens |B| near northern (southern hemisphere merging sites thereby enhancing merging rates and triggering PMAFs. When correlating responses in the two hemispheres, the presence of significant IMF BX also requires that different lag-times be applied to ACE measurements acquired ~0.1 AU upstream of Earth. Cluster observations set lag times for merging at Northern Hemisphere sites; post-noon optical emissions set times of Southern Hemisphere merging. All-sky images and magnetohydrodynamic simulations indicate that merging occurs in multiple

  16. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  17. District heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The papers presented at this meeting dealt with an international comparison of district heating, the Swiss district heating network, political aspects of nuclear district heating, nuclear and non-nuclear sources for district heating. 17 figs., 6 tabs

  18. Microscale and nanoscale heat transfer fundamentals and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sobhan, CB

    2008-01-01

    Preface Introduction to Microscale Heat Transfer Microscale Heat Transfer: A Recent Avenue in Energy Transport State of the Art: Some Introductory Remarks Overview of Microscale Transport Phenomena Discussions on Size-Effect Behavior Fundamental Approach for Microscale Heat Transfer Introduction to Engineering Applications of Microscale Heat Transfer Microscale Heat Conduction Review of Conduction Heat Transfer Conduction at the Microscale Space and Timescales Fundamental Approach Thermal Conductivity Boltzmann Equation and Phonon Transport Conduction in Thin Films

  19. Radial flow heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  20. Numerical model to simulate the isotopic and heat release and transport through the geosphere from a geological repository of radioactive wastes; Un modelo numerico para la simulacion de transporte de calor y liberacion de materia en un almacenamiento profundo de residuos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo Lopez, A. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this research is to simulate the isotopic and heat release and transport through the geosphere, from a geological repository of high level nuclear waste. in order to achieve it, different physical processes, that have to do with the problem, are considered: groundwater flow, radioactive decay, nuclide dissolution in groundwater, heat generation, mass and heat transport. Some of these phenomena are related among the, which allows to build a coupled model,which is the starting point to generate a FORTRAN code. The flow and transport models are developed in two spatial dimensions and are integrated in space by means of a finite volume method. The time integration is fulfilled by a {theta}-method. Moreover, the advection-diffusion equation is solved by two finite volume techniques. In the first one a linear interpolation is used whereas in the second it is used a quadratic one. Also, a consistency an stability study of both methods is carried out in order to compare their stability zones and the errors appearing. Stability is analysed by applying the von Neumann method, which is based upon Fourier series. Although it is a classical technique when dealing with finite-difference schemes, it is here applied to two finite volume schemes. (Author)

  1. District heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    By request of the Dutch Lower House the Netherlands Court of Audit examined the profitability or loss-making of district heating projects between 2001 and 2003. District heating supplies heat to consumers for heating their houses and providing warm tap water. The heat is supplied via warm water that runs through a network of pipes. In the Netherlands, about 250,000 households use district heating. The request by the Dutch Lower House to conduct research on district heating coheres with the initiative District Heating Bill. The bill aims to legally guarantee the supply and affordability of heat for consumers of district heating. [mk] [nl

  2. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catton, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics (pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger design.

  3. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  4. Effect of Coolant Inventories and Parallel Loop Interconnections on the Natural Circulation in Various Heat Transport Systems of a Nuclear Power Plant during Station Blackout

    OpenAIRE

    Gaikwad, Avinash J.; Vijayan, P. K.; Bhartya, Sharad; Iyer, Kannan; Kumar, Rajesh; Contractor, A. D.; Lele, H. G.; Vhora, S. F.; Maurya, A. K.; Ghosh, A. K.; Kushwaha, H. S.

    2008-01-01

    Provision of passive means to reactor core decay heat removal enhances the nuclear power plant (NPP) safety and availability. In the earlier Indian pressurised heavy water reactors (IPHWRs), like the 220 MWe and the 540 MWe, crash cooldown from the steam generators (SGs) is resorted to mitigate consequences of station blackout (SBO). In the 700 MWe PHWR currently being designed an additional passive decay heat removal (PDHR) system is also incorporated to condense the steam generated in the b...

  5. Latitudinal Transport of Angular Momentum by Cellular Flows Observed with MDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.; Gilman, Peter A.; Beck, John G.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed Doppler velocity images from the MDI instrument on SOHO to determine the latitudinal transport of angular momentum by the cellular photospheric flows. Doppler velocity images from 60-days in May to July of 1996 were processed to remove the p-mode oscillations, the convective blue shift, the axisymmetric flows, and any instrumental artifacts. The remaining cellular flows were examined for evidence of latitudinal angular momentum transport. Small cells show no evidence of any such transport. Cells the size of supergranules (30,000 km in diameter) show strong evidence for a poleward transport of angular momentum. This would be expected if supergranules are influenced by the Coriolis force, and if the cells are elongated in an east-west direction. We find good evidence for just such an east-west elongation of the supergranules. This elongation may be the result of differential rotation shearing the cellular structures. Data simulations of this effect support the conclusion that elongated supergranules transport angular momentum from the equator toward the poles, Cells somewhat larger than supergranules do not show evidence for this poleward transport. Further analysis of the data is planned to determine if the direction of angular momentum transport reverses for even larger cellular structures. The Sun's rapidly rotating equator must be maintained by such transport somewhere within the convection zone.

  6. Class and Home Problems. Identify-Solve-Broadcast Your Own Transport Phenomenon: Student-Created YouTube Videos to Foster Active Learning in Mass and Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fei; Khera, Eshita

    2016-01-01

    Despite the instinctive perception of mass and heat transfer principles in daily life, productive learning in this course continues to be one of the greatest challenges for undergraduate students in chemical engineering. In an effort to enhance student learning in classroom, we initiated an innovative active-learning method titled…

  7. IMPACT OF HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM OPERATION AND LEAKAGE ON VENTILATION AND INTERCOMPARTMENT TRANSPORT: STUDIES IN UNOCCUPIED AND OCCUPIED TENNESSEE VALLEY HOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forced-air heating and air conditioning (HAC) systems caused an average and maximum increase in air infiltration rates of 1.8- and 4.3-fold, respectively, during brief whole-house studies of tracer gas decay In 39 occupied houses. An average Increase in air infiltration rate of 0...

  8. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir NEW OSHA- ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  9. Progress Report for Diffusion Welding of the NGNP Process Application Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E. Mizia; D.E. Clark; M.V. Glazoff; T.E. Lister; T.L. Trowbridge

    2011-04-01

    The NGNP Project is currently investigating the use of metallic, diffusion welded, compact heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary (reactor side) heat transport system to the secondary heat transport system. The intermediate heat exchanger will transfer this heat to downstream applications such as hydrogen production, process heat, and electricity generation. The channeled plates that make up the heat transfer surfaces of the intermediate heat exchanger will have to be assembled into an array by diffusion welding.

  10. Novel Wick Structures for Improved Heat Pipe Performance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Heat pipes are commonly used for transporting heat over relatively long distances with very low temperature drop. One of the limitations of heat pipes is the...

  11. Study of heat and synchrotron radiation transport in fusion tokamak plasmas. Application to the modelling of steady state and fast burn termination scenarios for the international experimental fusion reactor ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar Colome, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee]|[Universitat Polytechnica de Catalunya (Spain)

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to give a global scope of the problem of energy transport within a thermonuclear plasma in the context of its power balance and the implications when modelling ITER operating scenarios. This is made in two phases. First, by furnishing new elements to the existing models of heat and synchrotron radiation transport in a thermonuclear plasma. Second, by applying the improved models to plasma engineering studies of ITER operating scenarios. The scenarios modelled are the steady state operating point and the transient that appears to have the biggest technological implications: the fast burn termination. The conduction-convection losses are modelled through the energy confinement time. This parameter is empirically obtained from the existing experimental data, since the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In chapter 2 an expression for the energy confinement time is semi-analytically deduced from the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins local transport model. The current estimates of the synchrotron radiation losses are made with expressions of the dimensionless transparency factor deduced from a 0-dimensional cylindrical model proposed by Trubnikov in 1979. In chapter 3 realistic hypothesis for the cases of cylindrical and toroidal geometry are included in the model to deduce compact explicit expressions for the fast numerical computation of the synchrotron radiation losses. Numerical applications are provided for the cylindrical case. The results are checked against the existing models. In chapter 4, the nominal operating point of ITER and its thermal stability is studied by means of a 0-dimensional burn model of the thermonuclear plasma in ignition. This model is deduced by the elements furnished by the plasma particle and power balance. Possible heat overloading on the plasma facing components may provoke severe structural damage, implying potential safety problems related to tritium inventory and metal activation. In chapter 5, the assessment

  12. Nonequilibrium generalised Langevin equation for the calculation of heat transport properties in model 1D atomic chains coupled to two 3D thermal baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, H; Stella, L; Lorenz, C D; Kantorovich, L

    2017-04-28

    We use a generalised Langevin equation scheme to study the thermal transport of low dimensional systems. In this approach, the central classical region is connected to two realistic thermal baths kept at two different temperatures [H. Ness et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 174303 (2016)]. We consider model Al systems, i.e., one-dimensional atomic chains connected to three-dimensional baths. The thermal transport properties are studied as a function of the chain length N and the temperature difference ΔT between the baths. We calculate the transport properties both in the linear response regime and in the non-linear regime. Two different laws are obtained for the linear conductance versus the length of the chains. For large temperatures (T≳500 K) and temperature differences (ΔT≳500 K), the chains, with N>18 atoms, present a diffusive transport regime with the presence of a temperature gradient across the system. For lower temperatures (T≲500 K) and temperature differences (ΔT≲400 K), a regime similar to the ballistic regime is observed. Such a ballistic-like regime is also obtained for shorter chains (N≤15). Our detailed analysis suggests that the behaviour at higher temperatures and temperature differences is mainly due to anharmonic effects within the long chains.

  13. Proposal for a district heat supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alefeld, G.

    1976-01-01

    A district heating scheme is proposed which makes it possible to use the waste heat from power stations for the supply of households and industry. The heat is stored by evaporation of ammonia salts or liquids with dissolved salts. Both substances are transported on existing rail- or waterways to heating stations near the consumers, and the heat recovered by reaction of the two components. Then the product of reaction is transported back to the power stations, and reactivated by heat again. Based on a cost estimation, it can be shown that the proposed heat transport with heat trains or ships, at distances up to 100 km, results in heat costs which are to-day already below that of heat from fuel oil. The investment required for the heat transport system is unusually low due to the use of transport ways which already exist. The district heating system is not only favourable in respect of the environment, but actually reduces its present strain, both at the consumer and at the power stations. The technical advantages of the suggested concept, especially the possibility of introducing it in stages, are discussed. The consequences for the national economy regarding the safety of supply and the trade balance, as well as for the public transport undertakings, are obvious, and therefore not included in the paper. (orig.) [de

  14. Urban district heating using nuclear heat - a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beresovski, T.; Oliker, I.

    1979-01-01

    The use of heat from nuclear power plants is of great interest in connection with projected future expansions of large urban district heating systems. Oil price escalation and air pollution from increased burning of fossil fuels are substantial incentivers for the adoption of nuclear heat and power plants. The cost of the hot water piping system from the nuclear plant to the city is a major factor in determining the feasibility of using nuclear heat. To achieve reasonable costs, the heat load should be at least 1500 MW(th), transport temperatures 125-200 0 C and distances preferably 50 km or less. Heat may be extracted from the turbines of conventional power reactors. Alternatively, some special-purpose smaller reactors are under development which are specially suited to production of heat with little or no power coproduct. Many countries are conducting studies of future expansions of district heating systems to use nuclear heat. Several countries are developing technology suitable for this application. Actual experience with the use of nuclear heat for district heating is currently being gained only in the USSR, however. While district heating appears to be a desirable technology at a time of increasing fossil-fuel costs, the use of nuclear heat will require siting of nuclear plants within transmission radius of cities. The institutional barries toward use of nuclear heating will have to be overcome before the energy conservation potential of this approach can be realized on a significant scale. (author)

  15. Nuclear fuel transport flasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.H.; Fry, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear fuel transport flask has a surrounding structure carrying inwardly directed heat transfer fins additional to the normal outwardly directed heat transfer fins on the main body of the flask. The additional fins can be interleaved with the main fins, and the structure carrying the additional fins can either be a shroud or an open framework. (author)

  16. Determination of heat losses in the Cerro Prieto, Baja California, geothermal field steam transportation network based on the thermal insulation condition of the steam pipelines; Determinacion de perdidas de calor en la red de transporte de vapor del campo geotermico de Cerro Prieto, Baja California, con base en el estado fisico del aislamiento termico de vaporductos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovando Castelar, Rosember; Garcia Gutierrez, Alfonso; Martinez Estrella, Juan Ignacio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: rovando@iie.org.mx; Canchola Felix, Ismael; Jacobo Galvan, Paul; Miranda Herrera, Carlos; Mora Perez, Othon [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, Residencia General de Cerro Prieto, Mexicali, B.C. (Mexico)

    2011-07-15

    In Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (CPGF), the steam from producing wells is transported to power plants through a large and complex system of pipes thermally insulated with a 2 inches thick mineral wool or a fiber glass layer and an external aluminum or iron cover. The insulation material has been exposed to weather conditions during the field operation and has suffered density and thickness changes. In some cases the insulation has been lost completely, increasing heat transfer from the pipes to the environment. This paper analyzes the impact of the conditions of thermal insulation on heat losses in the CPGF steam-pipeline network. The heat losses are calculated by applying an iterative method to determine the surface temperature based on a heat balance calculated from the three basic mechanisms of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Finally, using length and diameter data corresponding to the condition of the thermal insulation of each pipeline-and field operation data, the overall heat losses are quantified for steam lines throughout the pipeline network in the field. The results allow us to evaluate the magnitude of the heat losses in comparison with the overall energy losses occurring during steam transport from wells to the power plants. [Spanish] En el Campo Geotermico de Cerro Prieto (CGCP), BC, el transporte de vapor desde los pozos hasta las plantas generadoras de electricidad se lleva a cabo mediante un extenso y complejo sistema de tuberias que tipicamente se encuentran aisladas termicamente con una capa de 2 pulgadas de material aislante a base de lana mineral o fibra de vidrio, y una proteccion mecanica de aluminio o hierro galvanizado. Debido a la exposicion a las condiciones meteorologicas a traves del tiempo de operacion del campo, el aislamiento ha experimentado cambios en su densidad y espesor y en ocasiones se ha perdido por completo, lo cual repercute en una mayor transferencia de calor de las tuberias hacia el medio ambiente

  17. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Macmichael, DBA

    1988-01-01

    A fully revised and extended account of the design, manufacture and use of heat pumps in both industrial and domestic applications. Topics covered include a detailed description of the various heat pump cycles, the components of a heat pump system - drive, compressor, heat exchangers etc., and the more practical considerations to be taken into account in their selection.

  18. Health economic assessment tools (HEAT) for walking and for cycling. Methodology and user guide.:Economic assessment of transport infrastructure and policies. 2014 Update

    OpenAIRE

    Kahlmeier, Sonja; Kelly, Paul; Foster, Charles; Gotschi, Thomas; Cavill, Nick; Dinsdale, Hywell; Woodcock, James; Schweizer, Christian; Rutter, Harry; Lieb, Christoph; Oja, Pekka; Racioppi, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The promotion of cycling and walking for everyday physical activity not only promotes health but can also have positive effects on the environment.This booklet summarizes the tools and guidance developed to facilitate this shift: the methodology for the economic assessment of transport infrastructure and policies in relation to the health effects of walking and cycling; systematic reviews of the economic and health literature; and guidance on applying the health economic assessment tools and ...

  19. Nuclear district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricateau, P.

    1976-01-01

    An economic study of nuclear district heating is concerned with: heat production, its transmission towards the area to be served and the distribution management towards the consumers. Foreign and French assessments show that the high cost of now existing techniques of hot water transport defines the competing limit distance between the site and township to be below some fifty kilometers for the most important townships (provided that the fuel price remain stationary). All studies converge towards the choice of a high transport temperature as soon as the distance is of some twenty kilometers. As for fossile energy saving, some new possibilities appear with process heat reactors; either PWR of about 1000MWth for large townships, or pool-type reactors of about 100MWth when a combination with an industrial steam supply occurs [fr

  20. Notes on HP1 a software package for simulating variably-saturated water flow, heat transport, solute transport, and biogeochemistry in porous media. HP1 Version 2.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, D.; Simunek, J.

    2010-01-01

    HP1 is a comprehensive modeling tool in terms of processes and reactions for simulating reactive transport and biogeochemical processes in variably-saturated porous media. HP1 results from coupling the water and solute transport model HYDRUS-1D (Simunek et al., 2009a) and PHREEQC-2 (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). This note provides an overview of how to set up and execute a HP1 project using version 2.2.002 of HP1 and version 4.13 of the graphical user interface (GUI) of HYDRUS-1D. A large part of this note are step-by-step instructions for selected examples involving mineral dissolution and precipitation, cation exchange, surface complexation and kinetic degradation networks. The implementation of variably-saturated flow conditions, changing boundary conditions, a layered soil profile or immobile water is also illustrated.

  1. Notes on HP1 a software package for simulating variably-saturated water flow, heat transport, solute transport, and biogeochemistry in porous media. HP1 Version 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, D.; Simunek, J.

    2010-01-15

    HP1 is a comprehensive modeling tool in terms of processes and reactions for simulating reactive transport and biogeochemical processes in variably-saturated porous media. HP1 results from coupling the water and solute transport model HYDRUS-1D (Simunek et al., 2009a) and PHREEQC-2 (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). This note provides an overview of how to set up and execute a HP1 project using version 2.2.002 of HP1 and version 4.13 of the graphical user interface (GUI) of HYDRUS-1D. A large part of this note are step-by-step instructions for selected examples involving mineral dissolution and precipitation, cation exchange, surface complexation and kinetic degradation networks. The implementation of variably-saturated flow conditions, changing boundary conditions, a layered soil profile or immobile water is also illustrated.

  2. Relativistic electron transport in a solid target: study of heating in the framework of inertial fusion; Transport d'electrons relativistes dans une cible solide: etude du chauffage dans le cadre de l'allumage rapide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinolli, E

    2003-04-15

    This work is dedicated to the study of the energy deposition of fast electrons in matter. This topic is of prime importance for inertial fusion driven by laser since relativistic electrons are produced in laser-matter interaction for a laser operating in ultra-intense regime. This thesis is made up of: a theoretical chapter dealing with the generation and transport of fast electrons, of 2 chapters reporting experimental data obtained with optical and X-rays diagnostics at the laser facilities of LULI in France and RAL in U.K., and of a chapter dedicated to the simulation of electron transport by using a Monte-Carlo code combined to a hybrid collisional-electromagnetic PIC code. A new spectrometer has been designed: the detection of K{alpha} rays coming from a fluorescent layer embedded in the target has allowed us to assess the size of the electron beam and the level of ionisation. (A.C.)

  3. Heat-pipe thermionic reactor concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm Pedersen, E.

    1967-01-01

    Main components are reactor core, heat pipe, thermionic converter, secondary cooling system, and waste heat radiator; thermal power generated in reactor core is transported by heat pipes to thermionic converters located outside reactor core behind radiation shield; thermionic emitters are in direct...... contact with outside envelope of heat pipes and collectors are in contact with liquid metal secondary cooling system that transfers waste heat to radiator....

  4. Heat Capacity Analysis Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findikakis, A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide heat capacity values for the host and surrounding rock layers for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heat capacity representations provided by this analysis are used in unsaturated zone (UZ) flow, transport, and coupled processes numerical modeling activities, and in thermal analyses as part of the design of the repository to support the license application. Among the reports that use the heat capacity values estimated in this report are the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' report, the ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' report, the ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, the Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms'' report, the ''Dike/Drift Interactions report, the Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' report, and the ''In-Drift Natural Convection and Condensation'' report. The specific objective of this study is to determine the rock-grain and rock-mass heat capacities for the geologic stratigraphy identified in the ''Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170031], Table 1-1). This report provides estimates of the heat capacity for all stratigraphic layers except the Paleozoic, for which the mineralogic abundance data required to estimate the heat capacity are not available. The temperature range of interest in this analysis is 25 C to 325 C. This interval is broken into three separate temperature sub-intervals: 25 C to 95 C, 95 C to 114 C, and 114 C to 325 C, which correspond to the preboiling, trans-boiling, and postboiling regimes. Heat capacity is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of material by one degree (Nimick and Connolly 1991 [DIRS 100690], p. 5). The rock-grain heat capacity is defined as the heat capacity of the rock solids (minerals), and does not include the effect of water that exists in the rock pores. By comparison, the rock-mass heat capacity considers the heat capacity of both solids and pore

  5. Gyrokinetic simulation of particle and heat transport in the presence of Wide orbits and strong profile variations in the Edge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkinen, J.A. [Euratom-Tekes Association, VTT, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S.; Kiviniemi, T.P. [Euratom-Tekes Association, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 2200, FI-02015 TKK (Finland); Ogando, F. [Euratom-Tekes Association, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 2200, FI-02015 TKK (Finland); Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C/ Juan del Rosal, 12 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-09-15

    A full f nonlinear 5D gyrokinetic electrostatic particle-in-cell code ELMFIRE using an implicit direct solution method for ion polarization drift and electron parallel velocity response to electric field and its validation are described. The developed code is applied for transport analysis in a tokamak plasma at steep pressure gradient. The role of turbulence and neoclassical equilibrium in determining the flux surface averaged radial electric field component are investigated, as well as the role of the latter in affecting the saturation level of the turbulence. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Brodowicz, Kazimierz; Wyszynski, M L; Wyszynski

    2013-01-01

    Heat pumps and related technology are in widespread use in industrial processes and installations. This book presents a unified, comprehensive and systematic treatment of the design and operation of both compression and sorption heat pumps. Heat pump thermodynamics, the choice of working fluid and the characteristics of low temperature heat sources and their application to heat pumps are covered in detail.Economic aspects are discussed and the extensive use of the exergy concept in evaluating performance of heat pumps is a unique feature of the book. The thermodynamic and chemical properties o

  7. Up-gradient transport in a probabilistic transport model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, J.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    The transport of particles or heat against the driving gradient is studied by employing a probabilistic transport model with a characteristic particle step length that depends on the local concentration or heat gradient. When this gradient is larger than a prescribed critical value, the standard....... These results supplement recent works by van Milligen [Phys. Plasmas 11, 3787 (2004)], which applied Levy distributed step sizes in the case of supercritical gradients to obtain the up-gradient transport. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics....

  8. Contrasting Heat Budget Dynamics During Two La Niña Marine Heat Wave Events Along Northwestern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiangtao; Lowe, Ryan J.; Ivey, Gregory N.; Jones, Nicole L.; Zhang, Zhenling

    2018-02-01

    Two marine heat wave events along Western Australia (WA) during the alternate austral summer periods of 2010/2011 and 2012/2013, both linked to La Niña conditions, severely impacted marine ecosystems over more than 12° of latitude, which included the unprecedented bleaching of many coral reefs. Although these two heat waves were forced by similar large-scale climate drivers, the warming patterns differed substantially between events. The central coast of WA (south of 22°S) experienced greater warming in 2010/2011, whereas the northwestern coast of WA experienced greater warming in 2012/2013. To investigate how oceanic and atmospheric heat exchange processes drove these different spatial patterns, an analysis of the ocean heat budget was conducted by integrating remote sensing observations, in situ mooring data, and a high-resolution (˜1 km) ocean circulation model (Regional Ocean Modeling System). The results revealed substantial spatial differences in the relative contributions made by heat advection and air-sea heat exchange between the two heat wave events. During 2010/2011, anomalous warming driven by heat advection was present throughout the region but was much stronger south of 22°S where the poleward-flowing Leeuwin Current strengthens. During 2012/2013, air-sea heat exchange had a much more positive (warming) influence on sea surface temperatures (especially in the northwest), and when combined with a more positive contribution of heat advection in the north, this can explain the regional differences in warming between these two La Niña-associated marine heat wave events.

  9. Heat and spin interconversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Yuichi; Matsuo, Mamoru; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eeiji

    2017-01-01

    Spin Seebeck and spin Peltier effects, which are mutual conversion phenomena of heat and spin, are discussed on the basis of the microscopic theory. First, the spin Seebeck effect, which is the spin-current generation due to heat current, is discussed. The recent progress in research on the spin Seebeck effect are introduced. We explain the origin of the observed sign changes of the spin Seebeck effect in compensated ferromagnets. Next, the spin Peltier effect, which is the heat-current generation due to spin current, is discussed. Finally, we show that the spin Seebeck and spin Peltier effects are summarized by Onsager's reciprocal relation and derive Kelvin's relation for the spin and heat transports. (author)

  10. Policies for Renewable Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    This paper builds on IEA publications, Deploying Renewables, Principles for Effective Policies and Deploying Renewables, Best and Future Policy Practice, that discuss the 'integrated policy approach,' whereby renewable energy technologies require different support policies at different stages of their maturity pathways. The paper discusses how the integrated policy approach applies to renewable heat. It attempts to provide guidance for policy-makers on renewable heat throughout the different phases of the policy lifecycle, allowing for the specific challenges of renewable heat and needs of the many stakeholders involved. Stimulating a market for heat involves challenges that are different and, often, more difficult to overcome than in the electricity and transport sectors.

  11. Radiative heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    The third edition of Radiative Heat Transfer describes the basic physics of radiation heat transfer. The book provides models, methodologies, and calculations essential in solving research problems in a variety of industries, including solar and nuclear energy, nanotechnology, biomedical, and environmental. Every chapter of Radiative Heat Transfer offers uncluttered nomenclature, numerous worked examples, and a large number of problems-many based on real world situations-making it ideal for classroom use as well as for self-study. The book's 24 chapters cover the four major areas in the field: surface properties; surface transport; properties of participating media; and transfer through participating media. Within each chapter, all analytical methods are developed in substantial detail, and a number of examples show how the developed relations may be applied to practical problems. It is an extensive solution manual for adopting instructors. Features: most complete text in the field of radiative heat transfer;...

  12. Serotonin transporter binding in the hypothalamus correlates negatively with tonic heat pain ratings in healthy subjects: A [11C]DASB PET study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    ) tonic noxious heat stimulus. PET data were analyzed using both volume-of-interest (VOI) and voxel-based approaches. VOI analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between tonic pain ratings and SERT binding in the hypothalamus (r = −0.59; p = 0.008), a finding confirmed by the parametric...... analysis revealed a positive correlation between pain tolerance and SERT binding in the hypothalamus (r = 0.53; p = 0.02) although this was not seen in the parametric analysis. These data extend our earlier observation that cortical 5-HT receptors co-determine responses to tonic but not to phasic pain....... The negative correlation between SERT binding in the hypothalamus and insula with tonic pain ratings suggests a possible serotonergic control of the role of these areas in the modulation or in the affective appreciation of pain....

  13. Numerical modelling of transient heat transport in a two-layered metal film using the fuzzy lattice Boltzmann method with α-cuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecka-Belkhayat, Alicja; Korczak, Anna

    2018-01-01

    In the paper a description of heat transfer in a one-dimensional two-layered metal film is considered. The fuzzy coupled lattice Boltzmann equations for electrons and phonons supplemented by appropriate boundary and initial conditions are applied to analyse the thermal process in a thin metal film. The model with fuzzy values of relaxation times and boundary-initial conditions for gold and titanium is proposed. The problem considered is solved by the fuzzy lattice Boltzmann method using α-cuts and the rules of directed interval arithmetic. The application of α-cuts allows one to avoid complicated arithmetical operations in the fuzzy numbers set. In the final part of the paper an example for a numerical solution is presented.

  14. Unique Outcomes of Internal Heat Generation and Thermal Deposition on Viscous Dissipative Transport of Viscoplastic Fluid over a Riga-Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Z.; Azhar, Ehtsham; Mehmood, Zaffar; Maraj, E. N.

    2018-01-01

    Boundary layer stagnation point flow of Casson fluid over a Riga plate of variable thickness is investigated in present article. Riga plate is an electromagnetic actuator consists of enduring magnets and gyrated aligned array of alternating electrodes mounted on a plane surface. Physical problem is modeled and simplified under appropriate transformations. Effects of thermal radiation and viscous dissipation are incorporated. These differential equations are solved by Keller Box Scheme using MATLAB. Comparison is given with shooting techniques along with Range-Kutta Fehlberg method of order 5. Graphical and tabulated analysis is drawn. The results reveal that Eckert number, radiation and fluid parameters enhance temperature whereas they contribute in lowering rate of heat transfer. The numerical outcomes of present analysis depicts that Keller Box Method is capable and consistent to solve proposed nonlinear problem with high accuracy.

  15. Theoretical study and design of a low-grade heat-driven pilot ejector refrigeration machine operating with butane and isobutane and intended for cooling of gas transported in a gas-main pipeline

    KAUST Repository

    Petrenko, V.O.

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes the construction and performance of a novel combined system intended for natural gas transportation and power production, and for cooling of gas transported in a gas-main pipeline. The proposed system includes a gas turbine compressor, a combined electrogenerating plant and an ejector refrigeration unit operating with a hydrocarbon refrigerant. The combined electrogenerating plant consists of a high-temperature steam-power cycle and a low-temperature hydrocarbon vapor power cycle, which together comprise a binary vapor system. The combined system is designed for the highest possible effectiveness of power generation and could find wide application in gas-transmission systems of gas-main pipelines. Application of the proposed system would enable year-round power generation and provide cooling of natural gas during periods of high ambient temperature operation. This paper presents the main results of a theoretical study and design performance specifications of a low-grade heat-driven pilot ejector refrigeration machine operating with butane and isobutane. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and IIR. All rights reserved.

  16. HEAT RECUPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Rovin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat recovery is an effective method of shortening specific energy consumption. new constructions of recuperators for heating and cupola furnaces have been designed and successfully introduced. two-stage recuperator with computer control providing blast heating up to 600 °C and reducing fuel consumption by 30% is of special interest.

  17. Numerical analysis for long-term stability of disposal facility considering thermal and hydraulic effect. Uncoupled analysis for long-term deformation of rock and buffer material and for transport of heat and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Masataka; Okada, Tetsumi; Hasegawa, Takuma

    2004-01-01

    For the early realization of HLW geological repository and for its rational and economical design and safety assessment, it is important to evaluate the stability of repository facilities in deep underground, where high temperature, earth pressure and underground water flow affect the stability. This report discusses the numerical approaches that are useful for attaining these objectives. One of the efficient approaches is to develop models capable of simulating coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (T-H-M) processes. Several T-H-M coupled simulation codes have been proposed and the international cooperative research project DECOVALEX has been held from 1991 in order to develop and validate the T-H-M coupled simulations. But mechanical models adopted in these simulation codes are too simple to be applied to the evaluation of long-term interaction of materials that show nonlinear mechanical behavior (especially in the case that surrounding rock is soft sedimentary rock). Before simulating the long-term and coupled phenomena, uncoupled simulations for four phenomena (creep behavior of surrounding rock mass, consolidation and deformation behavior of buffer material, transport of water, and transport of heat) are conducted using various parameters and boundary condition sets. From the results of those simulations, following conclusions are obtained: (1) swelling property of buffer material is important to evaluate mechanical behavior of barrier materials, (2) hydraulic properties of natural barrier can be more important than that of buffer material because suction effect of buffer material is so strong that transport of water in the buffer material is fast, (3) change of thermal properties and filling of gaps caused by water saturation of buffer material have a strong effect on the temperature field. On the next stage, we will develop a T-H-M coupled simulation code to evaluate the mechanical interaction between barrier materials based on the above study. (author)

  18. Heat shock protein 27-derived atheroprotection involves reverse cholesterol transport that is dependent on GM-CSF to maintain ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression in ApoE-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Adijiang, Ayinuer; Seibert, Tara; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Shi, Chunhua; Batulan, Zarah; O'Brien, Edward R

    2017-06-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that heat shock protein (HSP)-27 is protective against the development of experimental atherosclerosis, reducing plaque chole