WorldWideScience

Sample records for polarized shear waves

  1. Shear wave induced resonance elastography of spherical masses with polarized torsional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj Henni, Anis; Schmitt, Cédric; Trop, Isabelle; Cloutier, Guy

    2012-03-01

    Shear wave induced resonance (SWIR) is a technique for dynamic ultrasound elastography of confined mechanical inclusions. It was developed for breast tumor imaging and tissue characterization. This method relies on the polarization of torsional shear waves modeled with the Helmholtz equation in spherical coordinates. To validate modeling, an invitro set-up was used to measure and image the first three eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes of a soft sphere. A preliminary invivo SWIR measurement on a breast fibroadenoma is also reported. Results revealed the potential of SWIR elastography to detect and mechanically characterize breast lesions for early cancer detection.

  2. Second-harmonic generation in shear wave beams with different polarizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spratt, Kyle S., E-mail: sprattkyle@gmail.com; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F. [Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Austin, P. O. Box 8029, Austin, Texas 78713–8029, US (United States)

    2015-10-28

    A coupled pair of nonlinear parabolic equations was derived by Zabolotskaya [1] that model the transverse components of the particle motion in a collimated shear wave beam propagating in an isotropic elastic solid. Like the KZK equation, the parabolic equation for shear wave beams accounts consistently for the leading order effects of diffraction, viscosity and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity includes a cubic nonlinear term that is equivalent to that present in plane shear waves, as well as a quadratic nonlinear term that is unique to diffracting beams. The work by Wochner et al. [2] considered shear wave beams with translational polarizations (linear, circular and elliptical), wherein second-order nonlinear effects vanish and the leading order nonlinear effect is third-harmonic generation by the cubic nonlinearity. The purpose of the current work is to investigate the quadratic nonlinear term present in the parabolic equation for shear wave beams by considering second-harmonic generation in Gaussian beams as a second-order nonlinear effect using standard perturbation theory. In order for second-order nonlinear effects to be present, a broader class of source polarizations must be considered that includes not only the familiar translational polarizations, but also polarizations accounting for stretching, shearing and rotation of the source plane. It is found that the polarization of the second harmonic generated by the quadratic nonlinearity is not necessarily the same as the polarization of the source-frequency beam, and we are able to derive a general analytic solution for second-harmonic generation from a Gaussian source condition that gives explicitly the relationship between the polarization of the source-frequency beam and the polarization of the second harmonic.

  3. Focusing of Shear Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarinaro, Bruno; Espíndola, David; Coulouvrat, François; Pinton, Gianmarco

    2018-01-01

    Focusing is a ubiquitous way to transform waves. Recently, a new type of shock wave has been observed experimentally with high-frame-rate ultrasound: shear shock waves in soft solids. These strongly nonlinear waves are characterized by a high Mach number, because the shear wave velocity is much slower, by 3 orders of magnitude, than the longitudinal wave velocity. Furthermore, these waves have a unique cubic nonlinearity which generates only odd harmonics. Unlike longitudinal waves for which only compressional shocks are possible, shear waves exhibit cubic nonlinearities which can generate positive and negative shocks. Here we present the experimental observation of shear shock wave focusing, generated by the vertical motion of a solid cylinder section embedded in a soft gelatin-graphite phantom to induce linearly vertically polarized motion. Raw ultrasound data from high-frame-rate (7692 images per second) acquisitions in combination with algorithms that are tuned to detect small displacements (approximately 1 μ m ) are used to generate quantitative movies of gel motion. The features of shear shock wave focusing are analyzed by comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations of a retarded-time elastodynamic equation with cubic nonlinearities and empirical attenuation laws for soft solids.

  4. Parametric decay of linearly polarized shear Alfvén waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matteini, L.; Landi, S.; Del Zanna, L.; Velli, M.; Hellinger, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 37, October (2010), L20101/1-L20101/5 ISSN 0094-8276 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : numerical simulation * Alfvén waves Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.505, year: 2010

  5. Seismic shear waves as Foucault pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Ruigrok, Elmer; Shiomi, Katsuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Earth's rotation causes splitting of normal modes. Wave fronts and rays are, however, not affected by Earth's rotation, as we show theoretically and with observations made with USArray. We derive that the Coriolis force causes a small transverse component for P waves and a small longitudinal component for S waves. More importantly, Earth's rotation leads to a slow rotation of the transverse polarization of S waves; during the propagation of S waves the particle motion behaves just like a Foucault pendulum. The polarization plane of shear waves counteracts Earth's rotation and rotates clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere. The rotation rate is independent of the wave frequency and is purely geometric, like the Berry phase. Using the polarization of ScS and ScS2 waves, we show that the Foucault-like rotation of the S wave polarization can be observed. This can affect the determination of source mechanisms and the interpretation of observed SKS splitting.

  6. Shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieras, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Shear Alfven waves in an axisymmetric tokamak are examined within the framework of the linearized ideal MHD equations. Properties of the shear Alfven continuous spectrum are studied both analytically and numerically. Implications of these results in regards to low frequency rf heating of toroidally confined plasmas are discussed. The structure of the spatial singularities associated with these waves is determined. A reduced set of ideal MHD equations is derived to describe these waves in a very low beta plasma

  7. Wave anisotropy of shear viscosity and elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the theory of shear wave propagation in a "soft solid" material possessing anisotropy of elastic and dissipative properties. The theory is developed mainly for understanding the nature of the low-frequency acoustic characteristics of skeletal muscles, which carry important diagnostic information on the functional state of muscles and their pathologies. It is shown that the shear elasticity of muscles is determined by two independent moduli. The dissipative properties are determined by the fourth-rank viscosity tensor, which also has two independent components. The propagation velocity and attenuation of shear waves in muscle depend on the relative orientation of three vectors: the wave vector, the polarization vector, and the direction of muscle fiber. For one of the many experiments where attention was distinctly focused on the vector character of the wave process, it was possible to make a comparison with the theory, estimate the elasticity moduli, and obtain agreement with the angular dependence of the wave propagation velocity predicted by the theory.

  8. High-Q energy trapping of temperature-stable shear waves with Lamé cross-sectional polarization in a single crystal silicon waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizian, R.; Daruwalla, A.; Ayazi, F.

    2016-03-01

    A multi-port electrostatically driven silicon acoustic cavity is implemented that efficiently traps the energy of a temperature-stable eigen-mode with Lamé cross-sectional polarization. Dispersive behavior of propagating and evanescent guided waves in a ⟨100⟩-aligned single crystal silicon waveguide is used to engineer the acoustic energy distribution of a specific shear eigen-mode that is well known for its low temperature sensitivity when implemented in doped single crystal silicon. Such an acoustic energy trapping in the central region of the acoustic cavity geometry and far from substrate obviates the need for narrow tethers that are conventionally used for non-destructive and high quality factor (Q) energy suspension in MEMS resonators; therefore, the acoustically engineered waveguide can simultaneously serve as in-situ self-oven by passing large uniformly distributed DC currents through its body and without any concern about perturbing the mode shape or deforming narrow supports. Such a stable thermo-structural performance besides large turnover temperatures than can be realized in Lamé eigen-modes make this device suitable for implementation of ultra-stable oven-controlled oscillators. 78 MHz prototypes implemented in arsenic-doped single crystal silicon substrates with different resistivity are transduced by in- and out-of-plane narrow-gap capacitive ports, showing high Q of ˜43k. The low resistivity device shows an overall temperature-induced frequency drift of 200 ppm over the range of -20 °C to 80 °C, which is ˜15× smaller compared to overall frequency drift measured for the similar yet high resistivity device in the same temperature range. Furthermore, a frequency tuning of ˜2100 ppm is achieved in high resistivity device by passing 45 mA DC current through its body. Continuous operation of the device under such a self-ovenizing current over 10 days did not induce frequency instability or degradation in Q.

  9. A Hammer-Impact, Aluminum, Shear-Wave Seismic Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.

    2007-01-01

    Near-surface seismic surveys often employ hammer impacts to create seismic energy. Shear-wave surveys using horizontally polarized waves require horizontal hammer impacts against a rigid object (the source) that is coupled to the ground surface. I have designed, built, and tested a source made out of aluminum and equipped with spikes to improve coupling. The source is effective in a variety of settings, and it is relatively simple and inexpensive to build.

  10. Shear-wave splitting and moonquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimech, J. L.; Weber, R. C.; Savage, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    Shear-wave splitting is a powerful tool for measuring anisotropy in the Earth's crust and mantle, and is sensitive to geological features such as fluid filled cracks, thin alternating layers of rock with different elastic properties, and preferred mineral orientations caused by strain. Since a shear wave splitting measurement requires only a single 3-component seismic station, it has potential applications for future single-station planetary seismic missions, such as the InSight geophysical mission to Mars, as well as possible future missions to Europa and the Moon. Here we present a preliminary shear-wave splitting analysis of moonquakes detected by the Apollo Passive Seismic Experiment. Lunar seismic data suffers from several drawbacks compared to modern terrestrial data, including severe seismic scattering, low intrinsic attenuation, 10-bit data resolution, thermal spikes, and timing errors. Despite these drawbacks, we show that it is in principle possible to make a shear wave splitting measurement using the S-phase arrival of a relatively high-quality moonquake, as determined by several agreeing measurement criteria. Encouraged by this finding, we further extend our analysis to clusters of "deep moonquake" events by stacking multiple events from the same cluster together to further enhance the quality of the S-phase arrivals that the measurement is based on.

  11. Propagation of waves in shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fabrikant, A L

    1998-01-01

    The state of the art in a theory of oscillatory and wave phenomena in hydrodynamical flows is presented in this book. A unified approach is used for waves of different physical origins. A characteristic feature of this approach is that hydrodynamical phenomena are considered in terms of physics; that is, the complement of the conventionally employed formal mathematical approach. Some physical concepts such as wave energy and momentum in a moving fluid are analysed, taking into account induced mean flow. The physical mechanisms responsible for hydrodynamic instability of shear flows are conside

  12. Solitary drift waves in the presence of magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiss, J.D.; Horton, W.

    1982-07-01

    The two-component fluid equations describing electron drift and ion acoustic waves in a nonuniform magnetized plasma are shown to possess nonlinear two-dimensional solitary wave solutions. In the presence of magnetic shear, radiative shear damping is exponentially small in L/sub s//L/sub n/ for solitary drift waves, in contrast to linear waves

  13. An in silico framework to analyze the anisotropic shear wave mechanics in cardiac shear wave elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caenen, Annette; Pernot, Mathieu; Peirlinck, Mathias; Mertens, Luc; Swillens, Abigail; Segers, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is a potential tool to non-invasively assess cardiac muscle stiffness. This study focused on the effect of the orthotropic material properties and mechanical loading on the performance of cardiac SWE, as it is known that these factors contribute to complex 3D anisotropic shear wave propagation. To investigate the specific impact of these complexities, we constructed a finite element model with an orthotropic material law subjected to different uniaxial stretches to simulate SWE in the stressed cardiac wall. Group and phase speed were analyzed in function of tissue thickness and virtual probe rotation angle. Tissue stretching increased the group and phase speed of the simulated shear wave, especially in the direction of the muscle fiber. As the model provided access to the true fiber orientation and material properties, we assessed the accuracy of two fiber orientation extraction methods based on SWE. We found a higher accuracy (but lower robustness) when extracting fiber orientations based on the location of maximal shear wave speed instead of the angle of the major axis of the ellipsoidal group speed surface. Both methods had a comparable performance for the center region of the cardiac wall, and performed less well towards the edges. Lastly, we also assessed the (theoretical) impact of pathology on shear wave physics and characterization in the model. It was found that SWE was able to detect changes in fiber orientation and material characteristics, potentially associated with cardiac pathologies such as myocardial fibrosis. Furthermore, the model showed clearly altered shear wave patterns for the fibrotic myocardium compared to the healthy myocardium, which forms an initial but promising outcome of this modeling study.

  14. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere.

  15. Detection and monitoring of shear crack growth using S-P conversion of seismic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiriasari, A.; Bobet, A.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    A diagnostic method for monitoring shear crack initiation, propagation, and coalescence in rock is key for the detection of major rupture events, such as slip along a fault. Active ultrasonic monitoring was used in this study to determine the precursory signatures to shear crack initiation in pre-cracked rock. Prismatic specimens of Indiana limestone (203x2101x638x1 mm) with two pre-existing parallel flaws were subjected to uniaxial compression. The flaws were cut through the thickness of the specimen using a scroll saw. The length of the flaws was 19.05 mm and had an inclination angle with respect to the loading direction of 30o. Shear wave transducers were placed on each side of the specimen, with polarization parallel to the loading direction. The shear waves, given the geometry of the flaws, were normally incident to the shear crack forming between the two flaws during loading. Shear crack initiation and propagation was detected on the specimen surface using digital image correlation (DIC), while initiation inside the rock was monitored by measuring full waveforms of the transmitted and reflected shear (S) waves across the specimen. Prior to the detection of a shear crack on the specimen surface using DIC, transmitted S waves were converted to compressional (P) waves. The emergence of converted S-P wave occurs because of the presence of oriented microcracks inside the rock. The microcracks coalesce and form the shear crack observed on the specimen surface. Up to crack coalescence, the amplitude of the converted waves increased with shear crack propagation. However, the amplitude of the transmitted shear waves between the two flaws did not change with shear crack initiation and propagation. This is in agreement with the conversion of elastic waves (P- to S-wave or S- to P-wave) observed by Nakagawa et al., (2000) for normal incident waves. Elastic wave conversions are attributed to the formation of an array of oriented microcracks that dilate under shear stress

  16. Measurement and modelling of bed shear induced by solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.

    horizontal continental shelf. Measurements of bed shear stress, surface elevation and flow velocities were carried out. Periodic waves were also generated and the bed shear stresses measured over a horizontal bed were found to be comparable with the earlier...

  17. Parametric excitation of drift waves in a sheared slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranjes, J.; Weiland, J.

    1992-01-01

    The threshold for parametric excitation of drift waves in a sheared slab geometry is calculated for a pump wave that is a standing wave along the magnetic field, using the Hasegawa-Mima nonlinearity. The shear damping is counteracted by the parametric coupling and the eigenvalue problem is solved analytically using Taylor's strong coupling approximation. (au)

  18. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph F. Dietrich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s. The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed. The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France, point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France. More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies.

  19. Transtensional deformation of Montserrat revealed by shear wave splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Alan F.; Kendall, J.-Michael; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Baptie, Brian

    2015-09-01

    Here we investigate seismic anisotropy of the upper crust in the vicinity of Soufrière Hills volcano using shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis from volcano-tectonic (VT) events. Soufrière Hills, which is located on the island of Montserrat in the Lesser Antilles, became active in 1995 and has been erupting ever since with five major phases of extrusive activity. We use data recorded on a network of seismometers between 1996 and 2007 partially spanning three extrusive phases. Shear-wave splitting in the crust is often assumed to be controlled either by structural features, or by stress aligned cracks. In such a case the polarization of the fast shear wave (ϕ) would align parallel to the strike of the structure, or to the maximum compressive stress direction. Previous studies analyzing SWS in the region using regional earthquakes observed temporal variations in ϕ which were interpreted as being caused by stress perturbations associated with pressurization of a dyke. Our analysis, which uses much shallower sources and thus only samples the anisotropy of the upper few kilometres of the crust, shows no clear temporal variation. However, temporal effects cannot be ruled out, as large fluctuations in the rate of VT events over the course of the study period as well as changes in the seismic network configuration make it difficult to assess. Average delay times of approximately 0.2 s, similar in magnitude to those reported for much deeper slab events, suggest that the bulk of the anisotropy is in the shallow crust. We observe clear spatial variations in anisotropy which we believe are consistent with structurally controlled anisotropy resulting from a left-lateral transtensional array of faults which crosses the volcanic complex.

  20. Shear wavelength estimation based on inverse filtering and multiple-point shear wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazaki, Tomoaki; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Elastography provides important diagnostic information because tissue elasticity is related to pathological conditions. For example, in a mammary gland, higher grade malignancies yield harder tumors. Estimating shear wave speed enables the quantification of tissue elasticity imaging using time-of-flight. However, time-of-flight measurement is based on an assumption about the propagation direction of a shear wave which is highly affected by reflection and refraction, and thus might cause an artifact. An alternative elasticity estimation approach based on shear wavelength was proposed and applied to passive configurations. To determine the elasticity of tissue more quickly and more accurately, we proposed a new method for shear wave elasticity imaging that combines the shear wavelength approach and inverse filtering with multiple shear wave sources induced by acoustic radiation force (ARF). The feasibility of the proposed method was verified using an elasticity phantom with a hard inclusion.

  1. Explaining polarization reversals in STEREO wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, Breneman et al. (2011) reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (L plane transverse to the magnetic field showed that the transmitter waves underwent periodic polarization reversals. Specifically, their polarization would cycle through a pattern of right-hand to linear to left-hand polarization at a rate of roughly 200 Hz. The lightning whistlers were observed to be left-hand polarized at frequencies greater than the lower hybrid frequency and less than the transmitter frequency (21.4 kHz) and right-hand polarized otherwise. Only right-hand polarized waves in the inner radiation belt should exist in the frequency range of the whistler mode and these reversals were not explained in the previous paper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by ±200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo (1984) whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by ˜200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al. (2008).

  2. Measurements of upper mantle shear wave anisotropy from a permanent network in southern Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, S.A.C.; Valenzuela, R.W.; Ponce, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Upper mantle shear wave anisotropy under stations in southern Mexico was measured using records of SKS phases. Fast polarization directions where the Cocos plate subducts subhorizontally are oriented in the direction of the relative motion between the Cocos and North American plates, and are

  3. Characterizing the elastic shear modulus of a soft medium via a thermally induced elastic shear wave in thermodynamic equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng-Yi; Lee, Sanboh; Chen, Wei-Ru; Lee, Ming-Yih; Chou, Chien

    2018-03-01

    A novel method to characterize the elastic shear modulus of an isotropic, homogeneous and extremely soft material based on a thermally induced elastic shear wave (TIESW) under thermodynamic equilibrium at room temperature is proposed. The temporal evolution of the TIESW on the surface of a squared polyvinyl acetate (PVA) specimen is observed, while the oscillation frequency of the TIESW is measured by using a two-frequency polarized heterodyne interferometer. In experiments, the oscillation frequency of the TIESW in PVA specimens is in the range of 10‑3 Hz, which is equivalent to µPa on the elastic shear modulus. The features and advantages of the TIESW-based method in comparison to conventional methods are discussed.

  4. Measurement and modeling of bed shear stress under solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Guard, P.A.; Baldock, T.E.

    Direct measurements of bed shear stresses (using a shear cell apparatus) generated by non-breaking solitary waves are presented. The measurements were carried out over a smooth bed in laminar and transitional flow regimes (~ 10 sup (4) < R sub (e...

  5. Propagation of shear waves in viscoelastic medium at irregular boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Amares; Gupta, Shishir; Sharma, Vikash; Kumari, Pato

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to study the shear wave propagation in a viscoelastic layer over a semi-infinite viscoelastic half space due to irregularity in the viscoelastic layer. It is of great interest to study the propaga-tion of shear waves in the assumed medium having a non planar boundary due to its similarity to most of the real situations. The perturbation method is applied to find the displacement field. The effect of complex wave number on dissipation factor is analysed. Finally, as an application, the result obtained has been used to get the reflected field in viscoelastic layer when the shear wave is incident on an irregular boundary in the shape of parabolic irregularity as well as triangular notch. It is observed that the amplitude of this reflected wave decreases with increasing length of the notch, and increases with increasing depth of the irregularity.

  6. Comparison of bed shear under non-breaking and breaking solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    New experimental measurements of bed shear under solitary waves and solitary bores that represent tsunamis are presented. The total bed shear stress was measured directly using a shear cell apparatus. The solitary wave characteristics were measured...

  7. Drift Wave Test Particle Transport in Reversed Shear Profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Park, H.B.; Kwon, J.M.; Stronzzi, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Choi, D.I.

    1998-01-01

    Drift wave maps, area preserving maps that describe the motion of charged particles in drift waves, are derived. The maps allow the integration of particle orbits on the long time scale needed to describe transport. Calculations using the drift wave maps show that dramatic improvement in the particle confinement, in the presence of a given level and spectrum of E x B turbulence, can occur for q(r)-profiles with reversed shear. A similar reduction in the transport, i.e. one that is independent of the turbulence, is observed in the presence of an equilibrium radial electric field with shear. The transport reduction, caused by the combined effects of radial electric field shear and both monotonic and reversed shear magnetic q-profiles, is also investigated

  8. Explaining Polarization Reversals in STEREO Wave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L, B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently Breneman et al. reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (Lpaper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by +/-200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by 200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al.

  9. Modelling shear wave splitting observations from Wellington, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson-Pidgeon, Katrina; Savage, Martha K.

    2004-05-01

    Frequency-dependent anisotropy was previously observed at the permanent broad-band station SNZO, South Karori, Wellington, New Zealand. This has important implications for the interpretation of measurements in other subduction zones and hence for our understanding of mantle flow. This motivated us to make further splitting measurements using events recorded since the previous study and to develop a new modelling technique. Thus, in this study we have made 67 high-quality shear wave splitting measurements using events recorded at the SNZO station spanning a 10-yr period. This station is the only one operating in New Zealand for longer than 2 yr. Using a combination of teleseismic SKS and S phases and regional ScS phases provides good azimuthal coverage, allowing us to undertake detailed modelling. The splitting measurements indicate that in addition to the frequency dependence observed previously at this station, there are also variations with propagation and initial polarization directions. The fast polarization directions range between 2° and 103°, and the delay times range between 0.75 s and 3.05 s. These ranges are much larger than observed previously at SNZO or elsewhere in New Zealand. Because of the observed frequency dependence we measure the dominant frequency of the phase used to make the splitting measurement, and take this into account in the modelling. We fit the fast polarization directions fairly well with a two-layer anisotropic model with horizontal axes of symmetry. However, such a model does not fit the delay times or explain the frequency dependence. We have developed a new inversion method which allows for an inclined axis of symmetry in each of the two layers. However, applying this method to SNZO does not significantly improve the fit over a two-layer model with horizontal symmetry axes. We are therefore unable to explain the frequency dependence or large variation in delay time values with multiple horizontal layers of anisotropy, even

  10. Shear-coupled PL waves observed at the Kerguelen Isles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, O.; Maupin, V.

    2003-04-01

    S-waves generated by earthquakes in Indonesia and recorded at the seismological broadband station PAF on the Kerguelen Isles are usually followed by particularly large, long and monochromatic wavetrains. These wavetrains are not observed, or are not as prominent, for events at comparable epicentral distances in other source regions. They have a clear dominant period of about 20 seconds and last usually for more than 100s. They show slight normal dispersion, and have a prograde elliptical motion in the vertical propagation plane with largest amplitude on the radial component. These characteristics suggest that the observed waves are shear-coupled PL-waves, i.e., a phase which propagates partly as a mantle S-wave and partly as P-waves trapped in the crust. The P-wave portion of the propagation may occur close to the source, close to the receiver, or at both ends of the wavepath, over a significant portion of the epicentral distance. Observations at Kerguelen of strong shear-coupled PL waves from Indonesian earthquakes suggest a special crust and upper mantle structure in the region between the Kerguelen hotspot and the South-East Indian Ridge, 1000 km away. This includes the region where a special upper mantle anisotropic structure has been detected from surface wave polarisation anomalies. We analyse which implications the strong shear-coupled PL waves may have on the structure between the hotspot and the ridge.

  11. Seismic shear waves as Foucault pendulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snieder, Roel; Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Ruigrok, E.; Shiomi, K.

    2016-01-01

    Earth's rotation causes splitting of normal modes. Wave fronts and rays are, however, not affected by Earth's rotation, as we show theoretically and with observations made with USArray. We derive that the Coriolis force causes a small transverse component for P waves and a small longitudinal

  12. Shear wave splitting in the Isparta Angle, southwestern Turkey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    broadband station in the Isparta Angle,southwestern Turkey.We selected 21 good quality seismic events out of nearly 357 earthquakes and calculated splitting parameters (polarization direction of fast wave, and delay time between fast and ...

  13. Lithology and shear-wave velocity in Memphis, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, J.; Waldron, B.; Schweig, E.; Hwang, H.; Webbers, A.; Van Arsdale, R.; Tucker, K.; Williams, R.; Street, R.; Mayne, P.; Stephenson, W.; Odum, J.; Cramer, C.; Updike, R.; Hutson, S.; Bradley, M.

    2003-01-01

    We have derived a new three-dimensional model of the lithologic structure beneath the city of Memphis, Tennessee, and examined its correlation with measured shear-wave velocity profiles. The correlation is sufficiently high that the better-constrained lithologic model may be used as a proxy for shear-wave velocities, which are required to calculate site-amplification for new seismic hazard maps for Memphis. The lithologic model and its uncertainties are derived from over 1200 newly compiled well and boring logs, some sampling to 500 m depth, and a moving-least-squares algorithm. Seventy-six new shear-wave velocity profiles have been measured and used for this study, most sampling to 30 m depth or less. All log and velocity observations are publicly available via new web sites.

  14. Spatial Statistics of Deep-Water Ambient Noise; Dispersion Relations for Sound Waves and Shear Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Dispersion Relations for Sound Waves and Shear Waves Michael J. Buckingham Marine Physical Laboratory , Scripps Institution of Oceanography University...dry, were all from laboratory experiments, since no in situ broadband shear-wave data were available at the time. (Since then, Megan Ballard and...Texas, 11 March 2014. 5. My graduate student, Simon Freeman, won Outstanding Student Paper Award for “Array-based hydroacoustic characterization of P, S

  15. Particle simulation of drift waves in a sheared magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydora, R.D.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Tajima, T.

    1983-11-01

    Electrostatic properties of density gradient drift waves (the universal mode), in a sheared magnetic field, are studied using a two-and-one-half dimensional particle code. For the case of a single rational surface, the drift waves are found to be stable with an eigenmode structure that matches the linear theoretical prediction as long as the ion resonance point is well within the system. This applies to both even and odd parity modes with respect to the rational surface. The dependence on various parameters such as the shear length is examined

  16. Shear Alfven wave excitation by direct antenna coupling and fast wave resonant mode conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    Antenna coupling to the shear Alfven wave by both direct excitation and fast wave resonant mode conversion is modelled analytically for a plasma with a one dimensional linear density gradient. We demonstrate the existence of a shear Alfven mode excited directly by the antenna. For localised antennas, this mode propagates as a guided beam along the steady magnetic field lines intersecting the antenna. Shear Alfven wave excitation by resonant mode conversion of a fast wave near the Alfven resonance layer is also demonstrated and we prove that energy is conserved in this process. We compare the efficiency of these two mechanisms of shear Alfven wave excitation and present a simple analytical formula giving the ratio of the coupled powers. Finally, we discuss the interpretation of some experimental results. 45 refs., 7 figs

  17. Ion waves driven by shear flow in a relativistic degenerate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 86; Issue 5. Ion waves driven by shear flow in a relativistic degenerate ... Proceedings of the International Workshop/Conference on Computational Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science (IWCCMP-2015). Posted on November 27, 2015. Guest Editors: ...

  18. Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves and the wave-turbulence transition – Part 1: Vanishing mean shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Baumert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends a turbulence closure-like model for stably stratified flows into a new dynamic domain in which turbulence is generated by internal gravity waves rather than mean shear. The model turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, K balance, its first equation, incorporates a term for the energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. This energy source is in addition to the traditional shear production. The second variable of the new two-equation model is the turbulent enstrophy (Ω. Compared to the traditional shear-only case, the Ω-equation is modified to account for the effect of the waves on the turbulence time and space scales. This modification is based on the assumption of a non-zero constant flux Richardson number in the limit of vanishing mean shear when turbulence is produced exclusively by internal waves. This paper is part 1 of a continuing theoretical development. It accounts for mean shear- and internal wave-driven mixing only in the two limits of mean shear and no waves and waves but no mean shear, respectively.

    The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed by D'Asaro and Lien (2000b. At small energy density E of the internal wave field, the turbulent dissipation rate (ε scales like ε~E2. This is what is observed in the deep sea. With increasing E, after the wave-turbulence transition has been passed, the scaling changes to ε~E1. This is observed, for example, in the highly energetic tidal flow near a sill in Knight Inlet. The new model further exhibits a turbulent length scale proportional to the Ozmidov scale, as observed in the ocean, and predicts the ratio between the turbulent Thorpe and Ozmidov length scales well within the range observed in the ocean.

  19. Electron Cyclotron Waves Polarization in the TJII Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappa, A.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.; Wagner, D.

    2013-05-01

    This report describes the theoretical calculations related with the electron cyclotron (EC) waves polarization control in the TJII stellarator. Two main aspects will be distinguished: the determination of the vacuum polarization that the wave must exhibit if a given propagation mode in a cold plasma is desired and the calculation of the behavior of the grooved polarizers and other transmission systems used to launch the vacuum wave with the required polarization. (Author) 13 refs.

  20. Topics in the Analysis of Shear-Wave Propagation in Oblique-Plate Impact Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheidler, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This report addresses several topics in the theoretical analysis of shock waves, acceleration waves, and centered simple waves, with emphasis on the propagation of shear waves generated in oblique-plate impact tests...

  1. Instability of subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity shear waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, A; Nasraoui, S

    2013-12-01

    We study analytically the instability of the subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity waves excited by a (vertical) time-periodic shear for an inviscid and nondiffusive unbounded conducting fluid. Due to the fact that the magnetic potential induction is a Lagrangian invariant for magnetohydrodynamic Euler-Boussinesq equations, we show that plane-wave disturbances are governed by a four-dimensional Floquet system in which appears, among others, the parameter ɛ representing the ratio of the periodic shear amplitude to the vertical Brunt-Väisälä frequency N(3). For sufficiently small ɛ and when the magnetic field is horizontal, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the Floquet system following the method of Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004)]. We determine the width and the maximal growth rate of the instability bands associated with subharmonic resonances. We show that the instability of subharmonic resonance occurring in gravity shear waves has a maximal growth rate of the form Δ(m)=(3√[3]/16)ɛ. This instability persists in the presence of magnetic fields, but its growth rate decreases as the magnetic strength increases. We also find a second instability involving a mixing of hydrodynamic and magnetic modes that occurs for all magnetic field strengths. We also elucidate the similarity between the effect of a vertical magnetic field and the effect of a vertical Coriolis force on the gravity shear waves considering axisymmetric disturbances. For both cases, plane waves are governed by a Hill equation, and, when ɛ is sufficiently small, the subharmonic instability band is determined by a Mathieu equation. We find that, when the Coriolis parameter (or the magnetic strength) exceeds N(3)/2, the instability of the subharmonic resonance vanishes.

  2. Light-matter interactions in a polarization standing wave

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, X.; MacDonald, K.F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the application of polarization standing waves (PSW) to the coherent control of light-matter interactions in planar photonic nanostructures. Such waves, formed by counter-propagating (linear or circular) orthogonally polarized beams can uniquely detect polarization conversion, planar chirality and related asymmetric transmission effects.

  3. Shear-wave anisotropy of the upper and lower crusts estimated by stripping analysis of Ps-converted waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mitsumi; Oda, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    The anisotropic structure of the crust is investigated by measuring the shear-wave polarization anisotropy of the Ps phases converted at the Conrad and Moho discontinuities. The Ps-converted phases are identified on the P-wave receiver functions, which are constructed from teleseismic records at the F-net and Hi-net stations in the Kinki, Chugoku, Shikoku, and Kyushu districts in southwest Japan. The Ps phase traveling through an anisotropic layer undergoes shear-wave splitting, which is described by splitting parameters [fast polarization direction (FPD) and split time]. The upper and lower crustal anisotropies are estimated from the splitting parameters of the Conrad and Moho Ps phases, respectively, which are determined by a waveform cross-correlation method. To reliably estimate the lower crustal anisotropy, the Moho Ps phase is corrected for the shear-wave splitting effect in the upper crust by a stripping method because the upper crustal anisotropy masks the anisotropic behavior of the Ps phase in the lower crust. The split times estimated for the upper and lower crusts are less than 0.2 s, but their FPD characteristics differ from each other. The FPDs in the upper crust are predominantly in the E-W direction. The FPDs in the lower crust range from NW-SE to NE-SW in the region with the Philippine Sea (PHS) slab subduction, but from NE-SW to SE-NW in the region without slab subduction. Thus, seismic anisotropy exists in both the lower and upper crusts, and slab subduction significantly influences the lower crustal anisotropy. The most likely cause for the upper crustal anisotropy is the alignment of vertical cracks induced in the upper crust by the tectonic stress, while the lower crustal anisotropy is attributed to the lattice preferred orientation of rock-forming minerals along with ductile deformation of the lower crust.

  4. Phase Aberration and Attenuation Effects on Acoustic Radiation Force-Based Shear Wave Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Carolina; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Urban, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue elasticity is measured by shear wave elasticity imaging methods using acoustic radiation force to create the shear waves. Phase aberration and tissue attenuation can hamper the generation of shear waves for in vivo applications. In this study effects of phase aberration and attenuation in ultrasound focusing for creating shear waves were explored. This includes the effects of phase shifts and amplitude attenuation on shear wave characteristics such as shear wave amplitude, shear wave speed, shear wave center frequency and bandwidth. Two samples of swine belly tissue were used to create phase aberration and attenuation experimentally. To explore the phase aberration and attenuation effects individually, tissue experiments were complemented with ultrasound beam simulations using FOCUS and shear wave simulations using Finite Element Model (FEM) analysis. The ultrasound frequency used to generate shear waves was varied from 3.0 to 4.5 MHz. Results The measured acoustic pressure and resulting shear wave amplitude decreased approximately 40% to 90% with the introduction of the tissue samples. Acoustic intensity and shear wave displacement were correlated for both tissue samples, the resulting Pearson’s correlation coefficients were 0.99 and 0.97. Analysis of shear wave generation with tissue samples (Phase Aberration and Attenuation case), measured phase screen (Only Phase Aberration case) and FOCUS/FEM model (Only Attenuation case) showed that tissue attenuation affected the shear wave generation more than tissue aberration. Decreasing the ultrasound frequency helped maintain a focused beam for creation of shear waves in the presence of both phase aberration and attenuation. PMID:26742131

  5. Shear-wave splitting measurements – Problems and solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vecsey, Luděk; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Babuška, Vladislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 462, č. 1-4 (2008), s. 178-196 ISSN 0040-1951 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300120605; GA AV ČR IAA3012405; GA AV ČR IAA300120709 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : seismic anisotropy * shear-wave splitting * comparison of cross- correlation * eigenvalue * transverse minimization methods Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.677, year: 2008

  6. Driven transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.; Prasad, G.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    The linear dispersion properties of transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma are experimentally studied in a DC discharge device by exciting them in a controlled manner with a variable frequency external source. The dusty plasma is maintained in the strongly coupled fluid regime with (1 c ) where Γ is the Coulomb coupling parameter and Γ c is the crystallization limit. A dispersion relation for the transverse waves is experimentally obtained over a frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 2 Hz and found to show good agreement with viscoelastic theoretical results

  7. Measurement of the shear wave speed in a submerged plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A J; Cray, B A

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops an inverse method to estimate, in water, the shear wave speed in an isotropic, thick, elastomeric plate. The submerged plate is mechanically shaken and a scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure normal velocity on one surface. The temporal domain measurements are transformed into the frequency domain using a Fourier transform, then, the spatial domain measurements are transformed into the k x ,k y wavevector domain using two Fourier transforms. Once the data is in the wavevector-frequency domain, the propagation wavenumber of each specific wave type can be estimated by fitting a circle to each collection of spectral peaks. Using this measured estimate of the wavenumber corresponding to the propagating wave, the Newton-Raphson gradient method is applied (inserting the estimated wavenumber into to the theoretical dispersion curve equation for wave propagation in a fluid-loaded plate,) hence resulting in an estimate of the shear wave speed. An experiment is included to illustrate the method and statistical properties of the measurement are discussed.

  8. Histoscanning and shear wave ultrasound elastography for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Amosov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The shear wave ultrasound elastography is a recently developed ultrasound-based method in the clinical practice, which allows the qualitative visual and quantitative measurements of tissue stiffness. In the 2010 this technology of the shear wave was called Shear Wave Elastograhpy. Due to the front of the shear waves the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the tissue stiffness is possible.Objective is to examine the efficacy of the shear wave ultrasound elastography in the evaluation of the prevalence of the oncological disease in patients with the prostate cancer and to compare the obtained results with the routine method X-ray diagnostics.Materials and methods. From the april 2015 in the I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University Urology Clinic there were conducted 314 shear wave ultrasound elastography examinations of the prostate. The ultrasound system Aixplorer® by SuperSonic Imagine was used. This system provides information provided by B-mode and shear wave ultrasound elastography mode. The transrectal echograms were made in 6 dimensions, so called Q-boxes (3 demensions in the every lobe on the segments from the base to the apex, according to the biopsy zone. The unit of measurement was the mean value in the kilopaskals (kPa. All the patients were randomized into 3 groups. There were 146 men with the possible prostate cancer in the first group (prospective study, 120 men with the certain diagnosis of the prostate cancer in the second group (retrospective study and 48 healthy men in the third group (control study. In all the patients of the first and the second groups the routine complete examination, including the prostate specific antigen (PSA level examination, digital rectal examination (DRE, doppler transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS, histoscanning and ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE, was conducted. In the 229 patients of the first and the second groups the prostatectomy with the

  9. Switching the response of metasurfaces in polarization standing waves

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, X.; MacDonald, K.F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that standing waves of polarization, as opposed to intensity, can be engaged to coherently control light-matter interactions in planar photonic nanostructures, presenting unique opportunities for all-optical data processing and polarization-dependent molecular spectroscopy. Such waves, formed by counter-propagating (linear or circular) orthogonally polarized beams can, for example, uniquely detect polarization conversion, planar chirality and related asymmetric t...

  10. Surface waves on currents with arbitrary vertical shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Benjamin K.; Ellingsen, Simen Å.

    2017-04-01

    We study dispersion properties of linear surface gravity waves propagating in an arbitrary direction atop a current profile of depth-varying magnitude using a piecewise linear approximation and develop a robust numerical framework for practical calculation. The method has been much used in the past for the case of waves propagating along the same axis as the background current, and we herein extend and apply it to problems with an arbitrary angle between the wave propagation and current directions. Being valid for all wavelengths without loss of accuracy, the scheme is particularly well suited to solve problems involving a broad range of wave vectors, such as ship waves and Cauchy-Poisson initial value problems. We examine the group and phase velocities over different wavelength regimes and current profiles, highlighting characteristics due to the depth-variable vorticity. We show an example application to ship waves on an arbitrary current profile and demonstrate qualitative differences in the wake patterns between concave down and concave up profiles when compared to a constant shear profile with equal depth-averaged vorticity. We also discuss the nature of additional solutions to the dispersion relation when using the piecewise-linear model. These are vorticity waves, drifting vortical structures which are artifacts of the piecewise model. They are absent for a smooth profile and are spurious in the present context.

  11. Shear-free gravitational waves in an anisotropic universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, P.A.; O'Shea, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    We study gravitational waves propagating through an anisotropic Bianchi type I dust-filled universe (containing the Einstein-de Sitter universe as a special case). The waves are modeled as small perturbations of this background cosmological model and we choose a family of null hypersurfaces in this space-time to act as the histories of the wave fronts of the radiation. We find that the perturbations we generate can describe pure gravitational radiation if and only if the null hypersurfaces are shear-free. We calculate the gauge-invariant small perturbations explicitly in this case. How these differ from the corresponding perturbations when the background space-time is isotropic is clearly exhibited

  12. Observations of intense velocity shear and associated electrostatic waves near an auroral arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, M.C.; Carlson, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    An intense shear in plasma flow velocity of magnitude 20 (m/s)m -1 has been detected at the edge of an auroral arc. The region of shear appears to display structure with two characteristic scale sizes. The larger structures were of the order of a few kilometers in size and were identified by a deviation of the direction of the charge sheets crossed by the rocket from a direction parallel to the visible arc. As is shown in the companion paper (Carlson and Kelley, 1977), the average (undisturbed) charge sheet was parallel to the arc. These observations are consistent with television studies which often display such structures propagating along the edges of auroral forms. Additional intense irregularities were detected with characteristic wavelengths smaller than the scale size of the shear. The irregularities are discussed in light of the branches of a velocity shear driven instability suggested by several workers: the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability operating at the longest wavelengths and the drift shear instability at the shorter. Neither mode has wavelengths as short as those observed however. A velocity shear mechanism operating at wavelengths short in comparison with the shear scale length, such as those observed here, would be of significant geophysical importance. For example, it could be responsible for production of high-latitude irregularities which exist throughout the polar cap and for the short-wavelength waves responsible for intense 3-m backscatter during equatorial spread F conditions. Since the wavelengths produced by the short-wavelength mode are in the range of typical auroral E region radars, such data must be carefully checked for F region contamination

  13. The Peano-series solution for modeling shear horizontal waves in piezoelectric plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Ghozlen M.H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The shear horizontal (SH wave devices have been widely used in electroacoustic. To improve their performance, the phase velocity dispersion and the electromechanical coupling coefficient of the Lamb wave should be calculated exactly in the design. Therefore, this work is to analyze exactly the Lamb waves polarized in the SH direction in homogeneous plate pie.zoelectric material (PZT-5H. An alternative method is proposed to solve the wave equation in such a structure without using the standard method based on the electromechanical partial waves. This method is based on an analytical solution, the matricant explicitly expressed under the Peano series expansion form. Two types of configuration have been addressed, namely the open circuited and the short circuited. Results confirm that the SH wave provides a number of attractive properties for use in sensing and signal processing applications. It has been found that the phase velocity remains nearly constant for all values of h/λ (h is the plate thickness, λ the acoustic wavelength. Secondly the SH0 wave mode can provide very high electromechanical coupling. Graphical representations of electrical and mechanical amounts function of depth are made, they are in agreement with the continuity rules. The developed Peano technique is in agreement with the classical approach, and can be suitable with cylindrical geometry.

  14. Mapping tissue shear modulus on Thiel soft-embalmed mouse skin with shear wave optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shaozhen; Joy, Joyce; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative measurement of the mechanical properties of biological tissue is a useful assessment of its physiologic conditions, which may aid medical diagnosis and treatment of, e.g., scleroderma and skin cancer. Traditional elastography techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography and ultrasound elastography have limited scope of application on skin due to insufficient spatial resolution. Recently, dynamic / transient elastography are attracting more applications with the advantage of non-destructive measurements, and revealing the absolute moduli values of tissue mechanical properties. Shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) is a novel transient elastography method, which lays emphasis on the propagation of dynamic mechanical waves. In this study, high speed shear wave imaging technique was applied to a range of soft-embalmed mouse skin, where 3 kHz shear waves were launched with a piezoelectric actuator as an external excitation. The shear wave velocity was estimated from the shear wave images, and used to recover a shear modulus map in the same OCT imaging range. Results revealed significant difference in shear modulus and structure in compliance with gender, and images on fresh mouse skin are also compared. Thiel embalming technique is also proven to present the ability to furthest preserve the mechanical property of biological tissue. The experiment results suggest that SW-OCE is an effective technique for quantitative estimation of skin tissue biomechanical status.

  15. Hammering Yucca Flat, Part Two: Shear-Wave Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, T. S.; Abbott, R. E.; Knox, H. A.; Tang, D. G.; James, S. R.; Haney, M. M.; Hampshire, J. B., II

    2015-12-01

    In preparation for the next phase of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), we conducted an active-source seismic survey of Yucca Flat, Nevada, on the Nevada National Security Site. Results from this survey will be used to inform the geologic models associated with the SPE project. For this study, we used a novel 13,000 kilogram weight-drop seismic source to interrogate an 18-km North-South transect of Yucca Flat. Source points were spaced every 200 meters and were recorded by 350 to 380 3-component 2-Hz geophones with variable spacings of 10, 20, and 100 meters. We utilized the Refraction-Microtremor (ReMi) technique to create multiple 1D dispersion curves, which were then inverted for shear-wave velocity profiles using the Dix inversion method (Tsai and Haney, 2015). Each of these 1D velocity models was subsequently stitched together to create a 2D profile over the survey area. The dispersion results indicate a general decrease in surface-wave phase velocity to the south. This result is supported by slower shear-wave velocity sediments and increasing basin depth towards the survey's southern extent. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Forward and inverse viscoelastic wave scattering by irregular inclusions for shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Simon; Cloutier, Guy

    2017-10-01

    Inversion methods in shear wave elastography use simplifying assumptions to recover the mechanical properties of soft tissues. Consequently, these methods suffer from artifacts when applied to media containing strong stiffness contrasts, and do not provide a map of the viscosity. In this work, the shear wave field recorded inside and around an inclusion was used to estimate the viscoelastic properties of the inclusion and surrounding medium, based on an inverse problem approach assuming local homogeneity of both media. An efficient semi-analytical method was developed to model the scattering of an elastic wave by an irregular inclusion, based on a decomposition of the field by Bessel functions and on a decomposition of the boundaries as Fourier series. This model was validated against finite element modeling. Shear waves were experimentally induced by acoustic radiation force in soft tissue phantoms containing stiff and soft inclusions, and the displacement field was imaged at a high frame rate using plane wave imaging. A nonlinear least-squares algorithm compared the model to the experimental data and adjusted the geometrical and mechanical parameters. The estimated shear storage and loss moduli were in good agreement with reference measurements, as well as the estimated inclusion shape. This approach provides an accurate estimation of geometry and viscoelastic properties for a single inclusion in a homogeneous background in the context of radiation force elastography.

  17. Shear wave splitting and crustal anisotropy in the Eastern Ladakh-Karakoram zone, northwest Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Arpita; Hazarika, Devajit; Wadhawan, Monika

    2017-06-01

    Seismic anisotropy of the crust beneath the eastern Ladakh-Karakoram zone has been studied by shear wave splitting analysis of S-waves of local earthquakes and P-to-S or Ps converted phases originated at the crust-mantle boundary. The splitting parameters (Φ and δt), derived from S-wave of local earthquakes with shallow focal depths, reveal complex nature of anisotropy with NW-SE and NE oriented Fast Polarization directions (FPD) in the upper ∼22 km of the crust. The observed anisotropy in the upper crust may be attributed to combined effects of existing tectonic features as well as regional tectonic stress. The maximum delay time of fast and slow waves in the upper crust is ∼0.3 s. The Ps splitting analysis shows more consistent FPDs compared to S-wave splitting. The FPDs are parallel or sub parallel to the Karakoram fault (KF) and other NW-SE trending tectonic features existing in the region. The strength of anisotropy estimated for the whole crust is higher (maximum delay time δt: 0.75 s) in comparison to the upper crust. This indicates that the dominant source of anisotropy in the trans-Himalayan crust is confined within the middle and lower crustal depths. The predominant NW-SE trending FPDs consistently observed in the upper crust as well as in the middle and lower crust near the KF zone support the fact that the KF is a crustal-scale fault which extends at least up to the lower crust. Dextral shearing of the KF creates shear fabric and preferential alignment of mineral grains along the strike of the fault, resulting in the observed FPDs. A Similar observation in the Indus Suture Zone (ISZ) also suggests crustal scale deformation owing to the India-Asia collision.

  18. Nonlinear physics of shear Alfvén waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2014-02-01

    Shear Alfvén waves (SAW) play fundamental roles in thermonuclear plasmas of fusion interest, since they are readily excited by energetic particles in the MeV range as well as by the thermal plasma components. Thus, understanding fluctuation induced transport in burning plasmas requires understanding nonlinear SAW physics. There exist two possible routes to nonlinear SAW physics: (i) wave-wave interactions and the resultant spectral energy transfer; (ii) nonlinear wave-particle interactions of SAW instabilities with energetic particles. Within the first route, it is advantageous to understand and describe nonlinear processes in term of proximity of the system to the Alfvénic state, where wave-wave interactions are minimized due to the cancellation of Reynolds and Maxwell stresses. Here, various wave-wave nonlinear dynamics are elucidated in terms of how they break the Alfvénic state. In particular, we discuss the qualitative and quantitative modification of the SAW parametric decay process due to finite ion compressibility and finite ion Larmor radius. We also show that toroidal geometry plays a crucial role in the nonlinear excitation of zonal structures by Alfvén eigenmodes. Within the second route, the coherent nonlinear dynamics of structures in the energetic particle phase space, by which secular resonant particle transport can occur on meso- and macro-scales, must be addressed and understood. These "nonlinear equilibria" or "phase-space zonal structures" dynamically evolve on characteristic (fluctuation induced) turbulent transport time scales, which are generally of the same order of the nonlinear time scale of the underlying fluctuations. In this work, we introduce the general structure of nonlinear Schrödinger equations with complex integro-differential nonlinear terms, which govern these physical processes. To elucidate all these aspects, theoretical analyses are presented together with numerical simulation results.

  19. Nonlinear physics of shear Alfvén waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Shear Alfvén waves (SAW) play fundamental roles in thermonuclear plasmas of fusion interest, since they are readily excited by energetic particles in the MeV range as well as by the thermal plasma components. Thus, understanding fluctuation induced transport in burning plasmas requires understanding nonlinear SAW physics. There exist two possible routes to nonlinear SAW physics: (i) wave-wave interactions and the resultant spectral energy transfer; (ii) nonlinear wave-particle interactions of SAW instabilities with energetic particles. Within the first route, it is advantageous to understand and describe nonlinear processes in term of proximity of the system to the Alfvénic state, where wave-wave interactions are minimized due to the cancellation of Reynolds and Maxwell stresses. Here, various wave-wave nonlinear dynamics are elucidated in terms of how they break the Alfvénic state. In particular, we discuss the qualitative and quantitative modification of the SAW parametric decay process due to finite ion compressibility and finite ion Larmor radius. We also show that toroidal geometry plays a crucial role in the nonlinear excitation of zonal structures by Alfvén eigenmodes. Within the second route, the coherent nonlinear dynamics of structures in the energetic particle phase space, by which secular resonant particle transport can occur on meso- and macro-scales, must be addressed and understood. These 'nonlinear equilibria' or 'phase-space zonal structures' dynamically evolve on characteristic (fluctuation induced) turbulent transport time scales, which are generally of the same order of the nonlinear time scale of the underlying fluctuations. In this work, we introduce the general structure of nonlinear Schrödinger equations with complex integro-differential nonlinear terms, which govern these physical processes. To elucidate all these aspects, theoretical analyses are presented together with numerical simulation results

  20. Propagation of shear wave in nonlinear and dissipative medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeambrun, D.

    1995-01-01

    The civil engineering projects, like nuclear installations, submitted to vibrations or seismic motions, require the study of the soil behaviour underlying the site under intensive dynamic loading. In order to understand in depth the soil damping phenomenon, a propagation of a shear seismic wave in a dissipative medium has been numerically simulated. The computer code, based on a nonlinear hysteretic model using Newmark-Wilson and Newton-Raphson algorithms and variable spatial steps, passes through the difficulties related to acceleration discontinuities. The simulation should allow the identification of the soil parameters by comparison with in situ measures. (author)

  1. Inner-core shear-wave anisotropy and texture from an observation of PKJKP waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wookey, James; Helffrich, George

    2008-08-14

    Since the discovery of the Earth's core a century ago, and the subsequent discovery of a solid inner core (postulated to have formed by the freezing of iron) seismologists have striven to understand this most remote part of the deep Earth. The most direct evidence for a solid inner core would be the observation of shear-mode body waves that traverse it, but these phases are extremely difficult to observe. Two reported observations in short-period data have proved controversial. Arguably more successful have been studies of longer-period data, but such averaging limits the usefulness of the observations to reported sightings. We present two observations of an inner-core shear-wave phase at higher frequencies in stacked data from the Japanese High-Sensitivity Array, Hi-Net. From an analysis of timing, amplitude and waveform of the 'PKJKP' phase we derive constraints on inner-core compressional-wave velocity and shear attenuation at about 0.3 Hz which differ from standard isotropic core models. We can explain waveform features and can partially reconcile the otherwise large differences between core wavespeed and attenuation models that our observations apparently suggest if we invoke shear-wave anisotropy in the inner core. A simple model of an inner core composed of hexagonal close-packed iron with its c axis aligned perpendicular to the rotation axis yields anisotropy that is compatible with both the shear-wave anisotropy that we observe and the well-established 3 per cent compressional-wave anisotropy.

  2. Freely tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Xiao-Ping; Peng, Ru-Wen; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xu, Di-Hu; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    2015-02-18

    A freely tunable polarization rotator for broadband terahertz waves is demonstrated using a three-rotating-layer metallic grating structure, which can conveniently rotate the polarization of a linearly polarized terahertz wave to any desired direction with nearly perfect conversion efficiency. This low-cost, high-efficiency, and freely tunable device has potential applications as material analysis, wireless communication, and THz imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Coherent drift wave structures in sheared magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, P.J.; Horton, W.

    1993-01-01

    For the problem of calculating the coherent drift wave structures in sheared magnetic fields, the authors have found it useful to derive the governing nonlinear pde from a variational principle. The variational principle is based on the free energy functional F[var-phi] = ∫ V F(var-phi, ∇ var-phi, x)dx dy. The method is applied to the vortex with speed u derived in Su et al., given by ∇ 2 var-phi = (1 - v d /u) var-phi - S m 2 /u 2 (x - var-phi/u) (x - var-phi/2u) var-phi where space is measured in units of ρ s , var-phi = (eΦ/T e )(L n /ρ s ) and the magnetic shear parameter is S m . While the linearized problem (var-phi much-lt ux) describes the usual shear induced damping, nonlinear solutions with trapped flow (var-phi > ur 0 ) form nonlinear self-bound states, which are maxima of the free energy F. The authors discuss the analytic properties and the numerical procedures for solving these types of nonlinear pde's

  4. Study on Rayleigh Wave Inversion for Estimating Shear-wave Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Sanny

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave or ground roll is a noise in seismic body waves. However, how to use this noise for soil characterization is very interesting since Rayleigh wave phase velocity is a function of compression-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, density and layer thickness. In layered-medium Rayleigh wave velocity also depends on wavelength or frequency, and this phenomenon is called dispersion. Inversion procedure to get shear-wave velocity profile needs a priori information about the solution of the problem to limit the unknown parameters. The Lagrange multiplier method was used to solve the constrained optimization problems or well known as a smoothing parameter in inversion problems. The advantage of our inversion procedure is that it can guarantee the convergence of solution even though the field data is incomplete, insufficient, and inconsistent. The addition of smoothing parameter can reduce the time to converge. Beside numerical stability, the statistical stability is also involved in inversion procedure. In field experiment we extracted ground roll data from seismic refraction record. The dispersion curves had been constructed by applying f-k analysis and f-k dip filtering. The dispersion curves show the dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in layered media to frequency. The synthetic models also demonstrate the stability and the speed of inversion procedure.

  5. Utility of Shear Wave Elastography for Diagnosing Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Fukuhara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the utility of shear wave elastography (SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI for diagnosing chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT and to verify the effect of fibrotic thyroid tissue on shear wave velocity (SWV. The subjects were 229 patients with 253 normal thyroid lobes (controls and 150 CAT lobes. The SWV for CAT (2.47 ± 0.57 m/s was significantly higher than that for controls (1.59 ± 0.41 m/s (P<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve for CAT was 0.899, and the SWV cut-off value was 1.96 m/s. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 87.4%, 78.7%, and 85.1%, respectively. Levels of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies and thyroid isthmus thickness were correlated with tissue stiffness in CAT. However, there was no correlation between levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies and tissue stiffness. Quantitative SWE is useful for diagnosing CAT, and it is possible that SWE can be used to evaluate the degree of fibrosis in patients with CAT.

  6. Nonlinear modeling of stratified shear instabilities, wave breaking, and wave-topography interactions using vortex method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Divyanshu; Guha, Anirban

    2018-01-01

    Theoretical studies on linear shear instabilities often use simple velocity and density profiles (e.g., constant, piecewise) for obtaining good qualitative and quantitative predictions of the initial disturbances. Furthermore, such simple profiles provide a minimal model for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of otherwise elusive shear instabilities. However, except a few specific cases, the efficacy of simple profiles has remained limited to the linear stability paradigm. In this work, we have proposed a general framework that can simulate the fully nonlinear evolution of a variety of stratified shear instabilities as well as wave-wave and wave-topography interaction problems having simple piecewise constant and/or linear profiles. To this effect, we have modified the classical vortex method by extending the Birkhoff-Rott equation to multiple interfaces and, furthermore, have incorporated background shear across a density interface. The latter is more subtle and originates from the understanding that Bernoulli's equation is not just limited to irrotational flows but can be modified to make it applicable for piecewise linear velocity profiles. We have solved diverse problems that can be essentially reduced to the multiple interacting interfaces paradigm, e.g., spilling and plunging breakers, stratified shear instabilities like Holmboe and Taylor-Caulfield, jet flows, and even wave-topography interaction problems like Bragg resonance. Free-slip boundary being a vortex sheet, its effect can also be effectively captured using vortex method. We found that the minimal models capture key nonlinear features, e.g., wave breaking features like cusp formation and roll-ups, which are observed in experiments and/or extensive simulations with smooth, realistic profiles.

  7. A comparative study of strain and shear-wave elastography in an elasticity phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Jonathan F.; Pedersen, Malene R; Ewertsen, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of strain and shear-wave elastography for determining targets of varying stiffness in a phantom. The effect of target diameter on elastographic assessments and the effect of depth on shear-wave velocity were also investiga......OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of strain and shear-wave elastography for determining targets of varying stiffness in a phantom. The effect of target diameter on elastographic assessments and the effect of depth on shear-wave velocity were also...

  8. DISCRETE DEFORMATION WAVE DYNAMICS IN SHEAR ZONES: PHYSICAL MODELLING RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Bornyakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of earthquake migration along active fault zones [Richter, 1958; Mogi, 1968] and related theoretical concepts [Elsasser, 1969] have laid the foundation for studying the problem of slow deformation waves in the lithosphere. Despite the fact that this problem has been under study for several decades and discussed in numerous publications, convincing evidence for the existence of deformation waves is still lacking. One of the causes is that comprehensive field studies to register such waves by special tools and equipment, which require sufficient organizational and technical resources, have not been conducted yet.The authors attempted at finding a solution to this problem by physical simulation of a major shear zone in an elastic-viscous-plastic model of the lithosphere. The experiment setup is shown in Figure 1 (A. The model material and boundary conditions were specified in accordance with the similarity criteria (described in detail in [Sherman, 1984; Sherman et al., 1991; Bornyakov et al., 2014]. The montmorillonite clay-and-water paste was placed evenly on two stamps of the installation and subject to deformation as the active stamp (1 moved relative to the passive stamp (2 at a constant speed. The upper model surface was covered with fine sand in order to get high-contrast photos. Photos of an emerging shear zone were taken every second by a Basler acA2000-50gm digital camera. Figure 1 (B shows an optical image of a fragment of the shear zone. The photos were processed by the digital image correlation method described in [Sutton et al., 2009]. This method estimates the distribution of components of displacement vectors and strain tensors on the model surface and their evolution over time [Panteleev et al., 2014, 2015].Strain fields and displacements recorded in the optical images of the model surface were estimated in a rectangular box (220.00×72.17 mm shown by a dot-and-dash line in Fig. 1, A. To ensure a sufficient level of

  9. Alternating currents and shear waves in viscous electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenyakin, M.; Falkovich, G.

    2018-02-01

    Strong interaction among charge carriers can make them move like viscous fluid. Here we explore alternating current (ac) effects in viscous electronics. In the Ohmic case, incompressible current distribution in a sample adjusts fast to a time-dependent voltage on the electrodes, while in the viscous case, momentum diffusion makes for retardation and for the possibility of propagating slow shear waves. We focus on specific geometries that showcase interesting aspects of such waves: current parallel to a one-dimensional defect and current applied across a long strip. We find that the phase velocity of the wave propagating along the strip respectively increases/decreases with the frequency for no-slip/no-stress boundary conditions. This is so because when the frequency or strip width goes to zero (alternatively, viscosity go to infinity), the wavelength of the current pattern tends to infinity in the no-stress case and to a finite value in a general case. We also show that for dc current across a strip with a no-stress boundary, there are only one pair of vortices, while there is an infinite vortex chain for all other types of boundary conditions.

  10. Current status of musculoskeletal application of shear wave elastography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jeong Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Hanyang University School of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Woo Kyoung [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Ultrasonography (US) is a very powerful diagnostic modality for the musculoskeletal system due to the ability to perform real-time dynamic high-resolution examinations with the Doppler technique. In addition to acquiring morphologic data, we can now obtain biomechanical information by quantifying the elasticity of the musculoskeletal structures with US elastography. The earlier diagnosis of degeneration and the ability to perform follow-up evaluations of healing and the effects of treatment are possible. US elastography enables a transition from US-based inspection to US-based palpation in order to diagnose the characteristics of tissue. Shear wave elastography is considered the most suitable type of US elastography for the musculoskeletal system. It is widely used for tendons, ligaments, and muscles. It is important to understand practice guidelines in order to enhance reproducibility. Incorporating viscoelasticity and overcoming inconsistencies among manufacturers are future tasks for improving the capabilities of US elastography.

  11. Theory of sheared flow generation by applied radio frequency waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of employing rf to generate sheared flows in the edge plasma is of great interest as a means of accessing improved regimes of tokamak confinement. Here, we develop an electromagnetic nonlinear eikonal theory (with k perpendicular ρ∼1 and k/k unrestricted) of the rf force terms which drive poloidal flow. Various cancellations, e.g., amongst parts of the electromagnetic and Reynolds stress terms, are exhibited analytically. At the heart of our calculation is the derivation of the nonlinear kinetic pressure tensor Π. A general expression for Π is obtained in terms of simple moments of the linear distribution function. In the electrostatic limit, the resulting nonlinear forces are expressible entirely in terms of the linear dielectric susceptibility tensor χ. Application to the ion Bernstein wave case, with retention of all Bessel function sums, is presented. Comparison is made to simpler approximate calculations

  12. Approximate Dispersion Relations for Waves on Arbitrary Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen, S. À.; Li, Y.

    2017-12-01

    An approximate dispersion relation is derived and presented for linear surface waves atop a shear current whose magnitude and direction can vary arbitrarily with depth. The approximation, derived to first order of deviation from potential flow, is shown to produce good approximations at all wavelengths for a wide range of naturally occuring shear flows as well as widely used model flows. The relation reduces in many cases to a 3-D generalization of the much used approximation by Skop (1987), developed further by Kirby and Chen (1989), but is shown to be more robust, succeeding in situations where the Kirby and Chen model fails. The two approximations incur the same numerical cost and difficulty. While the Kirby and Chen approximation is excellent for a wide range of currents, the exact criteria for its applicability have not been known. We explain the apparently serendipitous success of the latter and derive proper conditions of applicability for both approximate dispersion relations. Our new model has a greater range of applicability. A second order approximation is also derived. It greatly improves accuracy, which is shown to be important in difficult cases. It has an advantage over the corresponding second-order expression proposed by Kirby and Chen that its criterion of accuracy is explicitly known, which is not currently the case for the latter to our knowledge. Our second-order term is also arguably significantly simpler to implement, and more physically transparent, than its sibling due to Kirby and Chen.Plain Language SummaryIn order to answer key questions such as how the ocean surface affects the climate, erodes the coastline and transports nutrients, we must understand how waves move. This is not so easy when depth varying currents are present, as they often are in coastal waters. We have developed a modeling tool for accurately predicting wave properties in such situations, ready for use, for example, in the complex oceanographic computer models. Our

  13. On the interaction of deep water waves and exponential shear currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Cang, Jie; Liao, Shi-Jun

    2009-05-01

    A train of periodic deep-water waves propagating on a steady shear current with a vertical distribution of vorticity is investigated by an analytic method, namely the homotopy analysis method (HAM). The magnitude of the vorticity varies exponentially with the magnitude of the stream function, while remaining constant on a particular streamline. The so-called Dubreil-Jacotin transformation is used to transfer the original exponentially nonlinear boundary-value problem in an unknown domain into an algebraically nonlinear boundary-value problem in a known domain. Convergent series solutions are obtained not only for small amplitude water waves on a weak current but also for large amplitude waves on a strong current. The nonlinear wave-current interaction is studied in detail. It is found that an aiding shear current tends to enlarge the wave phase speed, sharpen the wave crest, but shorten the maximum wave height, while an opposing shear current has the opposite effect. Besides, the amplitude of waves and fluid velocity decay over the depth more quickly on an aiding shear current but more slowly on an opposing shear current than that of waves on still water. Furthermore, it is found that Stokes criteria of wave breaking is still valid for waves on a shear current: a train of propagating waves on a shear current breaks as the fiuid velocity at crest equals the wave phase speed. Especially, it is found that the highest waves on an opposing shear current are even higher and steeper than that of waves on still water. Mathematically, this analytic method is rather general in principle and can be employed to solve many types of nonlinear partial differential equations with variable coefficients in science, finance and engineering.

  14. Dust-acoustic waves modulational instability and rogue waves in a polarized dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzit, Omar; Tribeche, Mouloud [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Plasma Physics Group, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2015-10-15

    The polarization force-induced changes in the dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) modulational instability (MI) are examined. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that governs the MI of the DAWs is obtained. It is found that the effect of the polarization term R is to narrow the wave number domain for the onset of instability. The amplitude of the wave envelope decreases as R increases, meaning that the polarization force effects render weaker the associated DA rogue waves. The latter may therefore completely damp in the vicinity of R ∼ 1, i.e., as the polarization force becomes close to the electrostatic one (the net force acting on the dust particles becomes vanishingly small). The DA rogue wave profile is very sensitive to any change in the restoring force acting on the dust particles. It turns out that the polarization effects may completely smear out the DA rogue waves.

  15. Dispersion properties of transverse waves in electrically polarized BECs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, Pavel A; Kuz'menkov, L S

    2014-01-01

    Further development of the method of quantum hydrodynamics in applications for Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) is presented. To consider the evolution of polarization direction along with particle movement, we have developed a corresponding set of quantum hydrodynamic equations. It includes equations of the polarization evolution and the polarization-current evolution along with the continuity equation and the Euler equation (the momentum-balance equation). Dispersion properties of the transverse waves, including the electromagnetic waves propagating through the BECs, are considered. To this end, we consider a full set of the Maxwell equations for the description of electromagnetic field dynamics. This approximation gives us the possibility of considering the electromagnetic waves along with the matter waves. We find a splitting of the electromagnetic-wave dispersion on two branches. As a result, we have four solutions, two for the electromagnetic waves and two for the matter waves; the last two are the concentration-polarization waves appearing as a generalization of the Bogoliubov mode. We also find that if the matter wave propagates perpendicular to the external electric field then the dipolar contribution does not disappear (as it follows from our generalization of the Bogoliubov spectrum). A small dipolar frequency shift exists in this case due to the transverse electric field of perturbation. (paper)

  16. Variability and origin of seismic anisotropy across eastern Canada: Evidence from shear wave splitting measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Bastow, I. D.; Forte, A. M.; Hobbs, T. E.; Calvel, A.; Gonzalez-Monteza, A.; Schow, B.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of seismic anisotropy in continental regions are frequently interpreted with respect to past tectonic processes, preserved in the lithosphere as "fossil" fabrics. Models of the present-day sublithospheric flow (often using absolute plate motion as a proxy) are also used to explain the observations. Discriminating between these different sources of seismic anisotropy is particularly challenging beneath shields, whose thick (≥200 km) lithospheric roots may record a protracted history of deformation and strongly influence underlying mantle flow. Eastern Canada, where the geological record spans ˜3 Ga of Earth history, is an ideal region to address this issue. We use shear wave splitting measurements of core phases such as SKS to define upper mantle anisotropy using the orientation of the fast-polarization direction ϕ and delay time δt between fast and slow shear wave arrivals. Comparison with structural trends in surface geology and aeromagnetic data helps to determine the contribution of fossil lithospheric fabrics to the anisotropy. We also assess the influence of sublithospheric mantle flow via flow directions derived from global geodynamic models. Fast-polarization orientations are generally ENE-WSW to ESE-WNW across the region, but significant lateral variability in splitting parameters on a ≤100 km scale implies a lithospheric contribution to the results. Correlations with structural geologic and magnetic trends are not ubiquitous, however, nor are correlations with geodynamically predicted mantle flow directions. We therefore consider that the splitting parameters likely record a combination of the present-day mantle flow and older lithospheric fabrics. Consideration of both sources of anisotropy is critical in shield regions when interpreting splitting observations.

  17. Statistics of polarization and Stokes parameters of stochastic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, M. J.; Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2004-09-01

    Several theories now exist to describe the probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the electric field strength, intensity, and power of signals. In this work, a model is developed for the PDFs of the polarization properties of the superposition of multiple transverse wave populations. The polarization of each transverse wave population is described by a polarization ellipse with fixed axial ratio and polarization angle, and PDFs for the field strength and phase. Wave populations are vectorially added, and expressions found for the Stokes parameters I , U , Q , and V , as well as the degrees of linear and circular polarization, and integral expressions for their statistics. In this work, lognormal distributions are chosen for the electric field, corresponding to stochastic growth, and polarization PDFs are numerically calculated for the superposition of orthonormal mode populations, which might represent the natural modes emitted by a source. Examples are provided of the superposition of linear, circular, and elliptically polarized wave populations in cases where the component field strength PDFs are the same, and where one field strength PDF is dominant.

  18. Polarization speckles and generalized Stokes vector wave: a review [invited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeda, Mitsuo; Wang, Wei; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    Stokes parameters proposed by Korotkova and Wolf, and introduce its time-domain representation to describe the space-time evolution of the correlation between random electric vector fields at two different space-time points. This time-domain generalized Stokes vector, with components similar to those......We review some of the statistical properties of polarization-related speckle phenomena, with an introduction of a less known concept of polarization speckles and their spatial degree of polarization. As a useful means to characterize twopoint vector field correlations, we review the generalized...... of the beam coherence polarization matrix proposed by Gori, is shown to obey the wave equation in exact analogy to a coherence function of scalar fields. Because of this wave nature, the time-domain generalized Stokes vector is referred to as generalized Stokes vector wave in this paper....

  19. Multiband Circular Polarizer Based on Fission Transmission of Linearly Polarized Wave for X-Band Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farman Ali Mangi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiband circular polarizer based on fission transmission of linearly polarized wave for x-band application is proposed, which is constructed of 2 × 2 metallic strips array. The linear-to-circular polarization conversion is obtained by decomposing the linearly incident x-polarized wave into two orthogonal vector components of equal amplitude and 90° phase difference between them. The innovative approach of “fission transmission of linear-to-circular polarized wave” is firstly introduced to obtain giant circular dichroism based on decomposition of orthogonal vector components through the structure. It means that the incident linearly polarized wave is converted into two orthogonal components through lower printed metallic strips layer and two transmitted waves impinge on the upper printed strips layer to convert into four orthogonal vector components at the end of structure. This projection and transmission sequence of orthogonal components sustain the chain transmission of electromagnetic wave and can achieve giant circular dichroism. Theoretical analysis and microwave experiments are presented to validate the performance of the structure. The measured results are in good agreement with simulation results. In addition, the proposed circular polarizer exhibits the optimal performance with respect to the normal incidence. The right handed circularly polarized wave is emitted ranging from 10.08 GHz to 10.53 GHz and 10.78 GHz to 11.12 GHz, while the left handed circular polarized wave is excited at 10.54 GHz–10.70 GHz and 11.13 GHz–11.14 GHz, respectively.

  20. Shear-wave anisotropy reveals pore fluid pressure-induced seismicity in the U.S. midcontinent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Keith A; Tsoflias, George P; Bidgoli, Tandis S; Watney, W Lynn

    2017-12-01

    Seismicity in the U.S. midcontinent has increased by orders of magnitude over the past decade. Spatiotemporal correlations of seismicity to wastewater injection operations have suggested that injection-related pore fluid pressure increases are inducing the earthquakes. We present direct evidence linking earthquake occurrence to pore pressure increase in the U.S. midcontinent through time-lapse shear-wave ( S -wave) anisotropy analysis. Since the onset of the observation period in 2010, the orientation of the fast S -wave polarization has flipped from inline with the maximum horizontal stress to inline with the minimum horizontal stress, a change known to be associated with critical pore pressure buildup. The time delay between fast and slow S -wave arrivals exhibits increased variance through time, which is common in critical pore fluid settings. Near-basement borehole fluid pressure measurements indicate pore pressure increase in the region over the earthquake monitoring period.

  1. Shear-Wave Splitting Within the Southeastern Carpathian Arc, Transylvanian Basin, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, A. C.; Russo, R. M.; Mocanu, V. I.; Munteanu, L.

    2012-12-01

    We present 75 new measurements of shear wave splitting at 4 temporary broadband seismic stations that we deployed in the Transylvanian Basin within the Carpathian Arc, Romania. The Tisza-Dacia terranes, which form the basement of this basin, were accommodated in the space between the thick, old, rigid and cold East European Platform and the Moesian Platform during the Miocene. This movement was driven by the subduction of a part of the Tethys Ocean, which led to the formation of Carpathian orogen system. In Romania, the mountains are divided into the Eastern Carpathians, at the limit of Transylvanian Basin and the East European Platform along the Tornquist-Teisseyre Suture Zone, and the Southern Carpathians, at the limit with Moesian Platform. They connect to the West of the Carpathian Bend Zone where a very active high velocity seismic body generates intermediate depth earthquakes between 70 and 200 km beneath the Vrancea seismogenic zone. We analyzed splitting of SKS and SKKS phases recorded at epicentral distances between 87 and 150 degrees using the method of Silver and Chan (1991). We estimated splitting parameters, fast shear polarization azimuth and delay time, using both weighted averages of individual splitting measurements (Helffrich et al., 1994) and simultaneous linearization of all clearly recorded SK(K)S waves (Wolfe and Silver, 1998). For COMD, located at the contact of the Carpathian Bend Zone and Transylvanian Basin, we obtained a fast shear polarization azimuth trending NE-SW, parallel to the contact and to the strike of the Vrancea seismic body. For 10 suitable events recorded at IACB, at the contact of the Neogene Volcanic zone with the Eastern Carpathians, we did not observe any splitting; we consider the station splitting to be null. The fast shear polarization azimuth for PMAR, at the limit between Tisza-Dacia block and Southern Carpathians thrust belt, and at CHDM, within the Transylvanian Basin, is NW-SE similar to a regional splitting

  2. Stochastic electron dynamics due to drift waves in a sheared magnetic field and other drift motion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1986-12-01

    Electron motion in a single electrostatic wave in a sheared magnetic field is shown to become stochastic in the presence of a second wave at an amplitude well below that obtained from the overlapping pendulum resonance approximation. The enhanced stochasticity occurs for low parallel velocity electrons for which the parallel trapping motion from eE/sub parallel//m interacts strongly with the E x B trapping motion due to the presence of magnetic shear. The guiding-center equations for single particle electron orbits in given fields are investigated using both analytical and numerical techniques. The model assumes a slab magnetic field geometry with shear and two electrostatic plane waves propagating at an angle with respect to each other. Collisions and the self-consistent effect of the electron motion upon the fields are ignored. The guiding-center motion in an inertial reference frame moving in phase with the two waves is given by a two degree-of-freedom, autonomous Hamiltonian system. The single wave particle motion may be reduced to a two parameter family of one degree-of-freedom Hamiltonians which bifurcate from a pendulum phase space to a topology with three chains of elliptic and hyperbolic fixed points separated in radius about the mode-rational surface. In the presence of a perturbing wave with a different helicity, electrons in the small parallel velocity regime become stochastic at an amplitude scaling as the fourth root of the wave potential. The results obtained for stochastic motion apply directly to the problem of electron diffusion in drift waves occurring in toroidal fusion confinement devices. The effect of an adiabatically changing radial electric field upon guiding-center orbits in tokamaks is also investigated. This perturbation causes a radial polarization drift of trapped particle tokamak orbits

  3. 3D mapping of elastic modulus using shear wave optical micro-elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Qi, Li; Miao, Yusi; Ma, Teng; Dai, Cuixia; Qu, Yueqiao; He, Youmin; Gao, Yiwei; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Elastography provides a powerful tool for histopathological identification and clinical diagnosis based on information from tissue stiffness. Benefiting from high resolution, three-dimensional (3D), and noninvasive optical coherence tomography (OCT), optical micro-elastography has the ability to determine elastic properties with a resolution of ~10 μm in a 3D specimen. The shear wave velocity measurement can be used to quantify the elastic modulus. However, in current methods, shear waves are measured near the surface with an interference of surface waves. In this study, we developed acoustic radiation force (ARF) orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) to visualize shear waves in 3D. This method uses acoustic force perpendicular to the OCT beam to excite shear waves in internal specimens and uses Doppler variance method to visualize shear wave propagation in 3D. The measured propagation of shear waves agrees well with the simulation results obtained from finite element analysis (FEA). Orthogonal acoustic excitation allows this method to measure the shear modulus in a deeper specimen which extends the elasticity measurement range beyond the OCT imaging depth. The results show that the ARFOE-OCE system has the ability to noninvasively determine the 3D elastic map. PMID:27762276

  4. Quantifying spasticity in individual muscles using shear wave elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah F. Eby, BS

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is common following stroke; however, high subject variability and unreliable measurement techniques limit research and treatment advances. Our objective was to investigate the use of shear wave elastography (SWE to characterize the spastic reflex in the biceps brachii during passive elbow extension in an individual with spasticity. The patient was a 42-year-old right-hand-dominant male with history of right middle cerebral artery-distribution ischemic infarction causing spastic left hemiparesis. We compared Fugl-Meyer scores (numerical evaluation of motor function, sensation, motion, and pain, Modified Ashworth scores (most commonly used clinical assessment of spasticity, and SWE measures of bilateral biceps brachii during passive elbow extension. We detected a catch that featured markedly increased stiffness of the brachialis muscle during several trials of the contralateral limb, especially at higher extension velocities. SWE was able to detect velocity-related increases in stiffness with extension of the contralateral limb, likely indicative of the spastic reflex. This study offers optimism that SWE can provide a rapid, real-time, quantitative technique that is readily accessible to clinicians for evaluating spasticity.

  5. Estimation of shear wave speed in the human uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, L C; Feltovich, H; Palmeri, M L; Dahl, J J; Munoz del Rio, A; Hall, T J

    2014-04-01

    To explore spatial variability within the cervix and the sensitivity of shear wave speed (SWS) to assess softness/stiffness differences in ripened (softened) vs unripened tissue. We obtained SWS estimates from hysterectomy specimens (n = 22), a subset of which were ripened (n = 13). Multiple measurements were made longitudinally along the cervical canal on both the anterior and posterior sides of the cervix. Statistical tests of differences in the proximal vs distal, anterior vs posterior and ripened vs unripened cervix were performed with individual two-sample t-tests and a linear mixed model. Estimates of SWS increase monotonically from distal to proximal longitudinally along the cervix, they vary in the anterior compared to the posterior cervix and they are significantly different in ripened vs unripened cervical tissue. Specifically, the mid position SWS estimates for the unripened group were 3.45 ± 0.95 m/s (anterior; mean ± SD) and 3.56 ± 0.92 m/s (posterior), and 2.11 ± 0.45 m/s (anterior) and 2.68 ± 0.57 m/s (posterior) for the ripened group (P < 0.001). We propose that SWS estimation may be a valuable research and, ultimately, diagnostic tool for objective quantification of cervical stiffness/softness. Copyright © 2013 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Influence of Base Oil Polarity on the Transient Shear Flow of Biodegradable Lubricating Greases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Fiedler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this study is to elucidate the physical mechanisms influencing the transient flow behavior of lubricating greases based on biogenic oleochemicals from a polarity point of view. This includes the mutually interacting influence of base oil polarity and thickening agents on the rheologically-measured mechanical structural degradation in transient shear flow. Due to the high temperature dependence of Keesom forces in the background of polar-active bond mechanisms, the analysis of the transient flow response as a function of temperature allows to attribute the observed influences to differences in base oil polarity. In general, clay-thickened greases show a greater tendency to be rheologically influenced by base oil polarities than soap-thickened lubricating greases.

  7. Spiky soliton in circular polarized Alfven wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Y.H.; Sanuki, H.; Konno, K.; Wadati, M.

    1979-06-01

    A new type of nonlinear evolution equation for the Alfven waves, propagating parallel to the magnetic field, is now registered to the completely integrable family of nonlinear evolution equations. In spite of the extensive studies of Kaup and Newell, and of Kawata and Inoue, these analysis have been dealing with solutions for restricted boundary conditions. The present paper presents full account of stationary solitary wave solutions for the plane wave boundary condition. The obtained results exhibit peculiar structure of spiky modulation of amplitude and phase, which arises from the derivative nonlinear coupling term. A nonlinear equation for complex amplitude associated with the carrier wave is shown to be a mixed type of nonlinear Schroedinger equation, having and ordinary cubic nonlinear term and the derivative of cubic nonlinear term. (author)

  8. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Hashemiyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort.

  9. New pure shear elastic surface waves in magneto-electro-elastic half-space

    OpenAIRE

    Melkumyan, Arman

    2006-01-01

    Pure shear surface waves guided by the free surface of a magneto-electro-elastic material are investigated. Three surface waves are obtained for various magneto-electrical conditions on the free surface of the magneto-electro-elastic half-space. The velocities of propagation and the existence conditions for each of these waves are obtained in explicit exact form.

  10. Polarized seismic and solitary waves run-up at the sea bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, L. C.C.; Zainal, A. A.; Faisal, S. Y. [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2012-09-26

    The polarization effects in hydrodynamics are studied. Hydrodynamic equation for the nonlinear wave is used along with the polarized solitary waves and seismic waves act as initial waves. The model is then solved by Fourier spectral and Runge-Kutta 4 methods, and the surface plot is drawn. The output demonstrates the inundation behaviors. Consequently, the polarized seismic waves along with the polarized solitary waves tend to generate dissimilar inundation which is more disastrous.

  11. Circularly polarized millimeter-wave imaging for personnel screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Lechelt, Wayne M.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.

    2005-05-01

    A novel polarimetric millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for concealed weapon detection applications. Wideband millimeter-wave imaging systems developed at PNNL utilize low-power, coherent, millimeter-wave illumination in the 10-100 GHz range to form high-resolution images of personnel. Electromagnetic waves in these frequency ranges easily penetrate most clothing materials and are reflected from the body and any concealed items. Three-dimensional images are formed using computer image reconstruction algorithms developed to mathematically focus the received wavefronts scattered from the target. Circular polarimetric imaging can be employed to obtain additional information from the target. Circularly polarized waves incident on relatively smooth reflecting targets are typically reversed in their rotational handedness, e.g. left-hand circular polarization (LHCP) is reflected to become right-hand circular polarization (RHCP). An incident wave that is reflected twice (or any even number) of times prior to returning to the transceiver, has its handedness preserved. Sharp features such as wires and edges tend to return linear polarization, which can be considered to be a sum of both LHCP and RHCP. These characteristics can be exploited for personnel screening by allowing differentiation of smooth features, such as the body, and sharper features present in many concealed items. Additionally, imaging artifacts due to multipath can be identified and eliminated. Laboratory imaging results have been obtained in the 10-20 GHz frequency range and are presented in this paper.

  12. A study on crustal shear wave splitting in the western part of the Banda arc-continent collision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syuhada, E-mail: hadda9@gmail.com [Graduate Research on Earthquake and Active Tectonics-ITB, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Research Centre for Physics - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Puspiptek Serpong 15314,Indonesia (Indonesia); Hananto, Nugroho D. [Research Centre for Geotechnology -LIPI, Jl. Sangkuriang (Kompleks LIPI) Bandung 40135 (Indonesia); Puspito, Nanang T.; Yudistira, Tedi [Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering ITB, Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Anggono, Titi [Research Centre for Physics - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Puspiptek Serpong 15314,Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    We analyzed shear wave splitting parameters from local shallow (< 30 km) earthquakes recorded at six seismic stations in the western part of the Banda arc-continent collision. We determined fast polarization and delay time for 195 event-stations pairs calculated from good signal-to-noise ratio waveforms. We observed that there is evidence for shear wave splitting at all stations with dominant fast polarization directions oriented about NE-SW, which are parallel to the collision direction of the Australian plate. However, minor fast polarization directions are oriented around NW-SE being perpendicular to the strike of Timor through. Furthermore, the changes in fast azimuths with the earthquake-station back azimuth suggest that the crustal anisotropy in the study area is not uniform. Splitting delay times are within the range of 0.05 s to 0.8 s, with a mean value of 0.29±0.18 s. Major seismic stations exhibit a weak tendency increasing of delay times with increasing hypocentral distance suggesting the main anisotropy contribution of the shallow crust. In addition, these variations in fast azimuths and delay times indicate that the crustal anisotropy in this region might not only be caused by extensive dilatancy anisotropy (EDA), but also by heterogeneity shallow structure such as the presence of foliations in the rock fabric and the fracture zones associated with active faults.

  13. A study on crustal shear wave splitting in the western part of the Banda arc-continent collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syuhada; Hananto, Nugroho D.; Puspito, Nanang T.; Yudistira, Tedi; Anggono, Titi

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed shear wave splitting parameters from local shallow (< 30 km) earthquakes recorded at six seismic stations in the western part of the Banda arc-continent collision. We determined fast polarization and delay time for 195 event-stations pairs calculated from good signal-to-noise ratio waveforms. We observed that there is evidence for shear wave splitting at all stations with dominant fast polarization directions oriented about NE-SW, which are parallel to the collision direction of the Australian plate. However, minor fast polarization directions are oriented around NW-SE being perpendicular to the strike of Timor through. Furthermore, the changes in fast azimuths with the earthquake-station back azimuth suggest that the crustal anisotropy in the study area is not uniform. Splitting delay times are within the range of 0.05 s to 0.8 s, with a mean value of 0.29±0.18 s. Major seismic stations exhibit a weak tendency increasing of delay times with increasing hypocentral distance suggesting the main anisotropy contribution of the shallow crust. In addition, these variations in fast azimuths and delay times indicate that the crustal anisotropy in this region might not only be caused by extensive dilatancy anisotropy (EDA), but also by heterogeneity shallow structure such as the presence of foliations in the rock fabric and the fracture zones associated with active faults.

  14. Factors influencing the stiffness of fibroadenomas at shear wave elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elseedawy, M.; Whelehan, P.; Vinnicombe, S.; Thomson, K.; Evans, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To identify which features of fibroadenomas are associated with false-positive findings at shear wave elastography (SWE). Materials and methods: A total of 151 patients with histologically confirmed fibroadenomata were identified from a prospective database, from a single breast unit. The following features were assessed by two observers who were unaware of the SWE findings: patient age, grey-scale ultrasound lesion diameter (<15 or ≥15 mm), distance from the lesion to skin, composition of surrounding tissue (fatty, mixed or dense), and source of referral (screening or symptomatic). Statistical analysis was carried out using the chi-square test. Results: A statistically significant positive association was found between grey-scale ultrasound lesion size and lesion stiffness. Twenty-nine of 70 (41%) lesions ≥15 mm were stiff, versus 10 of 81 (12%) <15 mm (p=0.001). Patient age, distance from the lesion to skin, make-up of surrounding tissue, and source were not significantly associated with stiffness. Conclusion: Fibroadenomas giving false-positive SWE results tend to be larger in size than those that do not. More compression of adjacent normal tissue is assumed to be the cause of the present findings. As previous studies have shown that large cancers tend to be stiffer than smaller cancers, it may be appropriate to vary the quantitative cut-off value used for benign/malignant differentiation in SWE according to lesion size. - Highlights: • Fibroadenomas giving false positive SWE results tend to be larger in size. • More compression of adjacent normal tissue is assumed to be the cause of our findings. • The age of the patient is not related to fibroadenoma stiffness.

  15. Shear wave sonoelastography in infants with congenital muscular torticollis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gi Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Kwon, Dae Gil

    2018-02-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is characterized by shortening or excessive contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying SCM stiffness using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) sonoelastography in infants with CMT. Twenty infants with an SCM thickness greater than 10 mm with or without involvement of the entire SCM length (limitation of neck rotation passive range of motion [PROM]: group 1S >30°, group 1M = 15°-30°) and 12 infants with an SCM thickness smaller than 10 mm with or without involvement of any part of SCM (group 2) were included. The SCM thickness was measured using real time B-mode ultrasound, and the local SCM shear wave velocity (SWV) and subcutaneous fat layer using ARFI sonoelastography. The neck rotation PROM was significantly greater in group 1S (36.5° ± 5.3°) than in group 1M (18.8° ± 4.9°; P SCM in the affected side (2.96 ± 0.99 m/s) was significantly higher than that in the unaffected side (1.50 ± 0.30 m/s; P SCM was significantly higher in group 1S than in group 1M. There was significant correlation between the degree of PROM deficit of neck rotation and the SWV of the affected SCM (r = .75; P SCM in relationship to the limitation of neck rotation PROM in infants with CMT, if there was no difference in SCM thickness among infants.

  16. Monitoring polymer properties using shear horizontal surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Dana Y; Millard, Paul J; Pereira da Cunha, Mauricio

    2009-10-01

    Real-time, nondestructive methods for monitoring polymer film properties are increasingly important in the development and fabrication of modern polymer-containing products. Online testing of industrial polymer films during preparation and conditioning is required to minimize material and energy consumption, improve the product quality, increase the production rate, and reduce the number of product rejects. It is well-known that shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) propagation is sensitive to mass changes as well as to the mechanical properties of attached materials. In this work, the SH-SAW was used to monitor polymer property changes primarily dictated by variations in the viscoelasticity. The viscoelastic properties of a negative photoresist film were monitored throughout the ultraviolet (UV) light-induced polymer cross-linking process using SH-SAW delay line devices. Changes in the polymer film mass and viscoelasticity caused by UV exposure produced variations in the phase velocity and attenuation of the SH-SAW propagating in the structure. Based on measured polymer-coated delay line scattering transmission responses (S(21)) and the measured polymer layer thickness and density, the viscoelastic constants c(44) and eta(44) were extracted. The polymer thickness was found to decrease 0.6% during UV curing, while variations in the polymer density were determined to be insignificant. Changes of 6% in c(44) and 22% in eta(44) during the cross-linking process were observed, showing the sensitivity of the SH-SAW phase velocity and attenuation to changes in the polymer film viscoelasticity. These results indicate the potential for SH-SAW devices as online monitoring sensors for polymer film processing.

  17. Polarizer design for millimeter-wave plasma diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipold, Frank; Salewski, Mirko; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2013-01-01

    by birefringent windows, the microwave receivers can be designed to be more compact at lower cost. Sapphire windows (a-cut) as well as grooved high density polyethylene windows can serve this purpose. The sapphire window can be designed such that the calculated transmission of the wave energy is better than 99......Radiation from magnetized plasmas is in general elliptically polarized. In order to convert the elliptical polarization to linear polarization, mirrors with grooved surfaces are currently employed in our collective Thomson scattering diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade. If these mirrors can be substituted...

  18. Renal shear wave velocity by acoustic radiation force impulse did not reflect advanced renal impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Tomoaki; Koda, Masahiko; Sugihara, Takaaki; Sugihara, Shinobu; Okamoto, Toshiaki; Miyoshi, Kenichi; Matono, Tomomitsu; Hosho, Keiko; Mae, Yukari; Iyama, Takuji; Fukui, Takeaki; Fukuda, Satoko; Munemura, Chishio; Isomoto, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse is a noninvasive method for evaluating tissue elasticity on ultrasound. Renal shear wave velocity measured by this technique has not been fully investigated in patients with renal disease. The aim of the present study was to compare renal shear wave velocity in end-stage renal disease patients and that in patients without chronic kidney disease and to investigate influencing factors. Renal shear wave velocities were measured in 59 healthy young subjects (control group), 31 subjects without chronic kidney disease (non-CKD group), and 39 end-stage renal disease patients (ESRD group). Each measurement was performed 10 times at both kidneys, and the mean value of eight of 10 measurements, excluding the maximum and minimum values, was compared. Renal shear wave velocity could be measured in all subjects. Renal shear wave velocity in the control group was higher than in the non-CKD group and in the ESRD group, and no difference was found between the non-CKD group and the ESRD group. Age and depth were negatively correlated to the renal shear wave velocity. In multiple regression analysis, age and depth were independent factors for renal shear wave velocity, while renal impairment was not. There was no difference between the non-CKD group and the ESRD group, even when ages were matched and depth was adjusted. Renal shear wave velocity was not associated with advanced renal impairment. However, it reflected alteration of renal aging, and this technique may be useful to detect renal impairment in the earlier stages. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  19. Single Tracking Location Methods Suppress Speckle Noise in Shear Wave Velocity Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Elegbe, Etana C.; McAleavey, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    In ultrasound-based elastography methods, the estimation of shear wave velocity typically involves the tracking of speckle motion due to an applied force. The errors in the estimates of tissue displacement, and thus shear wave velocity, are generally attributed to electronic noise and decorrelation due to physical processes. We present our preliminary findings on another source of error, namely, speckle-induced bias in phase estimation. We find that methods that involve tracking in a single l...

  20. Sketches of a hammer-impact, spiked-base, shear-wave source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbrouck, W.P.

    1983-01-01

    Generation of shear waves in shallow seismic investigations (those to depths usually less than 100 m) can be accomplished by horizontally striking with a hammer either the end of a wood plank or metal structure embedded at the ground surface. The dimensioned sketches of this report are of a steel, hammer-impact, spiked-base, shear-wave source. It has been used on outcrops and in a desert environment and for conducting experiments on the effect of rotating source direction.

  1. Crustal Anisotropy Beneath the Western Segment of North Anatolian Fault Zone from Local Shear-Wave Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuncu Poyraz, S.; Teoman, U.; Kahraman, M.; Turkelli, N.; Rost, S.; Thompson, D. A.; Houseman, G.

    2014-12-01

    Shear-wave splitting from local earthquakes provides valuable knowledge on anisotropy of the upper crust. Upper-crustal anisotropy is widely interpreted as due to aligned fluid-filled cracks or pores. Differential stress is thought to close cracks aligned perpendicular to the maximum principal stress and leaves cracks open that are aligned perpendicular to the minimum horizontal compressional stress. In other cases local shear-wave splitting has been found to be aligned with regional faulting. Temporal variations in local splitting patterns might provide hints of changes in stress orientation related to earthquakes or volcanoes. North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) is a large-scale continental strike slip fault system originating at the Karlıova Junction in the east where it intersects the East Anatolian Fault (EAF) and extends west cutting across the entire Northern Turkey towards the Aegean Sea and the mainland Greece. Our primary focus is to provide constraints on the crustal anisotropy beneath the western segment of the North Anatolian Fault Zone with the use of a data set collected from a dense temporary seismic network consisting of 70 stations that was deployed in early May 2012 and operated for 18 months in the Sakarya region and the surroundings during the Faultlab experiment. For the local shear wave splitting analysis, out of 1344 events, we extracted 90 well located earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 2.0. Local shear-wave splitting makes use of earthquakes close to and nearly directly below the recording station. Incidence angles of less than 45 degrees were used to avoid the free-surface effect and resulting non-linear particle motion. Basically, two essential parameters for each station-event pair is needed for shear wave splitting calculations. One of them is fast polarization direction (ɸ) and the other is delay time (δt) between the fast and slow components of the shear wave. In this study, delay times vary between 0,02 and 0,25 seconds

  2. Metasurfaces for Terahertz Waves Polarization Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Zalkovskij, Maksim

    in the visible, near infrared or microwave regimes these issues in principle have strong alternatives via a conventional optics or electromagnetic approaches, at terahertz (THz) frequencies metamaterials are often considered as being the unique solution for the encountered problems. Several approaches involving...... that the maximal conversion efficiency with a single metamaterial surface is 50 % in transmission and up to 90% in reflection. However, a double layer transmission converter and a single layer with a metallic mirror can have 100% polarization conversion efficiency. We tested our conclusions numerically reaching...

  3. Detectability of inflationary gravitational waves with microwave background polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamionkowski, M.; Kosowsky, A.

    1998-01-01

    Inflation predicts specific relations between the amplitudes and spectral indices of the primordial spectrum of density (scalar metric) perturbations and gravitational waves (tensor metric perturbations). Detection of a stochastic gravitational-wave background is essential for identifying this unmistakable signature. Polarization of the cosmic microwave background can isolate these tensor modes in a model-independent way and thereby circumvent the cosmic-variance limit to detecting a small tensor signal with only a temperature map. Here we assess the detectability of a gravity-wave background with a temperature and polarization map. For detector sensitivities better than 10 endash 20μK√ (sec) , the sensitivity to a tensor signal is always dominated by the polarization map. With a detector sensitivity of order 1μK√ (sec) , polarization could improve on a temperature-map sensitivity to tensor modes by two to three orders of magnitude. Even a small amount of reionization substantially enhances tensor-mode detectability. We also argue that the sensitivity of the Planck Surveyor to tensor modes is significantly improved with polarization, even taking into account the resulting degradation of the intensity determination in the high-frequency channels. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  4. Estimation of the gravitational wave polarizations from a nontemplate search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, Irene; Drago, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy is just beginning, after the recent success of the four direct detections of binary black hole (BBH) mergers and the first observation from a binary neutron star inspiral, with the expectation of many more events to come. Given the possibility to detect waves from not exactly modeled astrophysical processes, it is fundamental to be ready to calculate the polarization waveforms in the case of searches using nontemplate algorithms. In such a case, the waveform polarizations are the only quantities that contain direct information about the generating process. We present the performance of a new valuable tool to estimate the inverse solution of gravitational wave transient signals, starting from the analysis of the signal properties of a nontemplate algorithm that is open to a wider class of gravitational signals not covered by template algorithms. We highlight the contributions to the wave polarization associated with the detector response, the sky localization, and the polarization angle of the source. In this paper we present the performances of such a method and its implications by using two main classes of transient signals, resembling the limiting case for most simple and complicated morphologies. The performances are encouraging for the tested waveforms: the correlation between the original and the reconstructed waveforms spans from better than 80% for simple morphologies to better than 50% for complicated ones. For a nontemplate search these results can be considered satisfactory to reconstruct the astrophysical progenitor.

  5. Shear Wave Splitting analysis of borehole microseismic reveals weak azimuthal anisotropy hidden behind strong VTI fabric of Lower Paleozoic shales in northern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Wojciech; Verdon, James; Malinowski, Michał; Trojanowski, Jacek

    2017-04-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy plays a key-role in hydraulic fracturing experiments, since it provides information on stress orientation and pre-existing fracture system presence. The Lower Paleozoic shale plays in northern Poland are characterized by a strong (15-18%) Vertical Transverse Isotropy (VTI) fabric which dominates weak azimuthal anisotropy being of order of 1-2%. A shear wave travelling in the subsurface after entering an anisotropic medium splits into two orthogonally polarized waves travelling with different velocities. Splitting parameters which can be assessed using a microseismic array are polarization of the fast shear wave and time delay between two modes. Polarization of the fast wave characterizes the anisotropic system on the wave path while the time delay is proportional to the magnitude of anisotropy. We employ Shear Wave Splitting (SWS) technique using a borehole microseismic dataset collected during a hydraulic stimulation treatment located in northern Poland, to image fracture strike masked by a strong VTI signature. During the inversion part, the VTI background parameters were kept constant using information from 3D seismic (VTI model used for pre-stack depth migration). Obtained fracture azimuths averaged over fracturing stages are consistent with the available XRMI imager logs from the nearby vertical well, however they are different from the large-scale maximum stress direction (by 40-45 degrees). Inverted Hudson's crack density (ca. 2%) are compatible with the low shear-wave anisotropy observed in the cross-dipole sonic logs (1-2%). This work has been funded by the Polish National Centre for Research and Development within the Blue Gas project (No BG2/SHALEMECH/14). Data were provided by the PGNiG SA. Collaboration with University of Bristol was supported within TIDES COST Action ES1401.

  6. Modeling Gravitational Waves to Test GR Dispersion and Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Rhondale; Chen, Yanbei; Isi, Maximilliano

    2017-01-01

    Given continued observation runs from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory Scientific Collaboration, further gravitational wave (GW) events will provide added constraints on beyond-general relativity (b-GR) theories. One approach, independent of the GW generation mechanism at the source, is to look at modification to the GW dispersion and propagation, which can accumulate over vast distances. Generic modification of GW propagation can also, in certain b-GR theories, impact the polarization content of GWs. To this end, a comprehensive approach to testing the dispersion and polarization content is developed by modeling anisotropic deformations to the waveforms' phase, along with birefringence effects and corollary consequences for b-GR polarizations, i.e., breathing, vector, and longitudinal modes. Such an approach can be mapped to specific theories like Lorentz violation, amplitude birefringence in Chern-Simons, and provide hints at additional theories to be included. An overview of data analysis routines to be implemented will also be discussed.

  7. Shear wave elastography in medullary thyroid carcinoma diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Dobruch-Sobczak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave elastography (SWE is a modern method for the assessment of tissue stiffness. There has been a growing interest in the use of this technique for characterizing thyroid focal lesions, including preoperative diagnostics. Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the clinical usefulness of SWE in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC diagnostics. Materials and methods: A total of 169 focal lesions were identifi ed in the study group (139 patients, including 6 MTCs in 4 patients (mean age: 45 years. B-mode ultrasound and SWE were performed using Aixplorer (SuperSonic, Aix-en-Provence, with a 4–15 MHz linear probe. The ultrasound was performed to assess the echogenicity and echostructure of the lesions, their margin, the halo sign, the height/width ratio (H/W ratio, the presence of calcifi cations and the vascularization pattern. This was followed by an analysis of maximum and mean Young’s (E modulus values for MTC (EmaxLR, EmeanLR and the surrounding thyroid tissues (EmaxSR, EmeanSR, as well as mean E-values (EmeanLRz for 2 mm region of interest in the stiffest zone of the lesion. The lesions were subject to pathological and/or cytological evaluation. Results: The B-mode assessment showed that all MTCs were hypoechogenic, with no halo sign, and they contained micro- and/ or macrocalcifi cations. Ill-defi ned lesion margin were found in 4 out of 6 cancers; 4 out of 6 cancers had a H/W ratio > 1. Heterogeneous echostructure and type III vascularity were found in 5 out of 6 lesions. In the SWE, the mean value of EmaxLR for all of the MTCs was 89.5 kPa and (the mean value of EmaxSR for all surrounding tissues was 39.7 kPa Mean values of EmeanLR and EmeanSR were 34.7 kPa and 24.4 kPa, respectively. The mean value of EmeanLRz was 49.2 kPa. Conclusions: SWE showed MTCs as stiffer lesions compared to the surrounding tissues. The lesions were qualifi ed for fi ne needle aspiration biopsy based on B-mode assessment. However, the diagnostic algorithm

  8. Modeling interface shear behavior of granular materials using micro-polar continuum approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, Babak; Noorzad, Ali; Alsaleh, Mustafa I.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the authors have focused on the shear behavior of interface between granular soil body and very rough surface of moving bounding structure. For this purpose, they have used finite element method and a micro-polar elasto-plastic continuum model. They have shown that the boundary conditions assumed along the interface have strong influences on the soil behavior. While in the previous studies, only very rough bounding interfaces have been taken into account, the present investigation focuses on the rough, medium rough and relatively smooth interfaces. In this regard, plane monotonic shearing of an infinite extended narrow granular soil layer is simulated under constant vertical pressure and free dilatancy. The soil layer is located between two parallel rigid boundaries of different surface roughness values. Particular attention is paid to the effect of surface roughness of top and bottom boundaries on the shear behavior of granular soil layer. It is shown that the interaction between roughness of bounding structure surface and the rotation resistance of bounding grains can be modeled in a reasonable manner through considered Cosserat boundary conditions. The influence of surface roughness is investigated on the soil shear strength mobilized along the interface as well as on the location and evolution of shear localization formed within the layer. The obtained numerical results have been qualitatively compared with experimental observations as well as DEM simulations, and acceptable agreement is shown.

  9. Stimulated polarization wave process in spin 3/2 chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, G. B.

    2007-01-01

    Stimulated wave of polarization, triggered by a flip of a single spin, presents a simple model of quantum amplification. Recently, it has been demonstrated that, in an idealized one-dimensional Ising spin 1/2 chain with nearest-neighbor interactions and realistic spin 1/2 chain including the natural dipole-dipole interactions, irradiated by a weak resonant transverse field, a wave of flipped spins can be triggered by a single spin flip. Here we focuse on control of polarization wave in chain of spin 3/2, where the nuclear quadrupole interaction is dominant. Results of simulations for 1D spin chains and rings with up to five spins are presented.

  10. Determination of Shear Properties in the Upper Seafloor Using Seismo-acoustic Interface Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frivik, Svein Arne

    1998-12-31

    This thesis develops methods for recording and analysis of seismo-acoustic interface waves for determination of shear wave velocity as a function of depth and includes this in standard refraction seismic surveying. It investigates different techniques for estimation of dispersion characteristics of the interface waves and demonstrates that multi sensor spectral estimation techniques improve the dispersion estimates. The dispersion estimate of the fundamental interface wave mode is used as input to an object function for a model based linearized inversion. The inversion scheme provides an estimate of the shear wave velocity as a function of depth. Three field surveys were performed. Data were acquired with a standard bottom deployed refraction seismic hydrophone array containing 24 or 48 receivers, with a receiver spacing of 2.5 m. Explosive charges were used as sources. The recording time was increased from 0.5 to 8 s, compared to standard refraction seismic surveys. Shear wave velocity and shear modulus estimates were obtained from all the sites. At one of the sites, geotechnically obtained shear wave parameters were available, and a comparison between the two techniques were performed. the result of the comparison is promising and shows the potential of the technique. Although the result of applying the processing scheme to all three data sets is promising, it appears that survey parameters, like source-array spacing, receiver spacing and type of source might have been optimized for better performance. Based on this limitation, a new processing scheme and a new array configuration is proposed for surveys which integrates the recording and processing of both compressional waves and shear waves. 89 refs., 65 refs., 19 tabs.

  11. Investigation of the Maule, Chile rupture zone using seismic attenuation tomography and shear wave splitting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Megan Elizabeth

    The Maule, Chile 2010 Mw 8.8 earthquake afforded the opportunity to study the rupture zone (33°S-38°S) in detail using aftershocks recorded by the rapid-response IRIS CHAMP seismic network. We used measurements of differential S to P seismic attenuation to characterize the attenuation structure of the South American crust and upper mantle wedge. We implemented an evolving time window to determine Qs-1 values using a spectral ratio method and incorporated these measurements into a bounded linear inequality least squares inversion to solve for Qs -1 in a 3D volume. On a large-scale, we observe an east-dipping low attenuation feature, consistent with the location of the Nazca oceanic slab, and image progressively greater attenuation as we move towards the surface of our model. A dramatic feature in our model is a large, low-attenuation body in the same location where Hicks et al. (2014) resolved a high P wave velocity anomaly in their velocity tomography model. We calculated the shear wave splitting intensity of the Maule rupture zone by implementing the multichannel method of Chevrot (2000) which calculates the splitting intensity of teleseismic SK(K)S phases and splitting parameters, ϕ and deltat. The results we obtained show an overall fast direction with a strong component of trench parallel splitting and very few trench normal splits. The fast directions do not parallel the Nazca APM, but are instead dominated by splits rotated 40°-50° counter-clockwise from Nazca APM. Based on these data, we see little evidence for sub-slab entrained mantle flow and invoke the trench-parallel retrograde flow model as an explanation for our measurements. We developed an extended splitting intensity method to allow for use of the upgoing S phase from Maule aftershocks, utilizing the initial event polarization. For this local dataset, we observe three dominant fast directions oriented N20°W, N40°E, and N10°W-20°E and a subset of fast directions trending N60°-90°E which

  12. Added value of Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the ultrasound assessment of breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianculescu, Victor; Ciolovan, Laura Maria; Dunant, Ariane; Vielh, Philippe; Mazouni, Chafika; Delaloge, Suzette; Dromain, Clarisse; Blidaru, Alexandru; Balleyguier, Corinne

    2014-05-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions. Conventional B-mode and elasticity imaging were used to evaluate 110 breast lesions. Elastographic assessment of breast tissue abnormalities was done using a shear wave based technique, Virtual Touch IQ (VTIQ), implemented on a Siemens Acuson S3000 ultrasound machine. Tissue mechanical properties were interpreted as two-dimensional qualitative and quantitative colour maps displaying relative shear wave velocity. Wave speed measurements in m/s were possible at operator defined regions of interest. The pathologic diagnosis was established on samples obtained by ultrasound guided core biopsy or fine needle aspiration. BIRADS based B-mode evaluation of the 48 benign and 62 malignant lesions achieved 92% sensitivity and 62.5% specificity. Subsequently performed VTIQ elastography relying on visual interpretation of the colour overlay displaying relative shear wave velocities managed similar standalone diagnostic performance with 92% sensitivity and 64.6% specificity. Lesion and surrounding tissue shear wave speed values were calculated and a significant difference was found between the benign and malignant populations (Mann-Whitney U test, pBIRADS 4a masses, we reached overall levels of 92% sensitivity and 72.9% specificity. VTIQ qualitative and quantitative elastography has the potential to further characterise B-mode detected breast lesions, increasing specificity and reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in MCF7 cell modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) in MCF7 cell modules (comprised of MCF7 cells and collagen) and based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with an OCT swept source wavelength sweep imaging system. Acoustic radiation force was applied to the MCF7 cell constructs. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the acoustic radiation force, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these modules. The OCT phase maps are acquired with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system. We also calculated the tissue mechanical properties based on the propagating shear waves in the MCF7 + collagen phantoms using the Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) of an ultrasound transducer, and measured the shear wave speed with the OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future studies of mechanical property measurements of breast cancer structures, with applications in the study of breast cancer pathologies.

  14. Prediction of shear wave velocity using empirical correlations and artificial intelligence methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahoo Maleki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Good understanding of mechanical properties of rock formations is essential during the development and production phases of a hydrocarbon reservoir. Conventionally, these properties are estimated from the petrophysical logs with compression and shear sonic data being the main input to the correlations. This is while in many cases the shear sonic data are not acquired during well logging, which may be for cost saving purposes. In this case, shear wave velocity is estimated using available empirical correlations or artificial intelligent methods proposed during the last few decades. In this paper, petrophysical logs corresponding to a well drilled in southern part of Iran were used to estimate the shear wave velocity using empirical correlations as well as two robust artificial intelligence methods knows as Support Vector Regression (SVR and Back-Propagation Neural Network (BPNN. Although the results obtained by SVR seem to be reliable, the estimated values are not very precise and considering the importance of shear sonic data as the input into different models, this study suggests acquiring shear sonic data during well logging. It is important to note that the benefits of having reliable shear sonic data for estimation of rock formation mechanical properties will compensate the possible additional costs for acquiring a shear log.

  15. Prediction of shear wave velocity using empirical correlations and artificial intelligence methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Shahoo; Moradzadeh, Ali; Riabi, Reza Ghavami; Gholami, Raoof; Sadeghzadeh, Farhad

    2014-06-01

    Good understanding of mechanical properties of rock formations is essential during the development and production phases of a hydrocarbon reservoir. Conventionally, these properties are estimated from the petrophysical logs with compression and shear sonic data being the main input to the correlations. This is while in many cases the shear sonic data are not acquired during well logging, which may be for cost saving purposes. In this case, shear wave velocity is estimated using available empirical correlations or artificial intelligent methods proposed during the last few decades. In this paper, petrophysical logs corresponding to a well drilled in southern part of Iran were used to estimate the shear wave velocity using empirical correlations as well as two robust artificial intelligence methods knows as Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Back-Propagation Neural Network (BPNN). Although the results obtained by SVR seem to be reliable, the estimated values are not very precise and considering the importance of shear sonic data as the input into different models, this study suggests acquiring shear sonic data during well logging. It is important to note that the benefits of having reliable shear sonic data for estimation of rock formation mechanical properties will compensate the possible additional costs for acquiring a shear log.

  16. High resolution 3-D shear wave velocity structure in South China from surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, S.; Guo, Z.; Chen, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    Using continuous data from a total of 638 seismic stations, including 484 from CEArray between 2008 and 2013 and 154 from SINOPROBE between 2014 and 2015, we perform both ambient noise and earthquake Rayleigh wave tomography across South China. Combining Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 6and 40s periods from ambient noise tomography and Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 20and 140s from teleseismic two-plane-wave tomography, we obtain phase velocity maps between 6 and140 s periods. We then invert Rayleigh wave phase velocity to construct a 3-D shear wave velocity structure of South China by Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Similar to other inversion results, our results correspond topography well. Moreover, our results also reveal that velocity structure of the eastern South China in mantle depth is similar to eastern North China, the core of the western South China, Sichuan Block (SB),still exists thick lithosphere. However, owing to much more data employed and some data quality control techniques in this research, our results reveal more detailed structures. Along Qinling-Dabie Orogenic Belt (QDOB), North-South Gravity Lineament (NSGL) and the Sichuan-Yunnan Rhombic Block (SYRB), there are obvious high speed anomalies in depths of 10-20 km, which possibly imply ancient intrusions. Moreover, it seems that Tancheng-Lujiang Fault Zone (TLFZ) has already cut through QDOB, forming a deep fracture cutting through the crust of the whole China continent. Although SB still exists thick lithosphere, there are indications for thermal erosion. At the same time, the lithosphere of the central SYRB seems to be experiencing delamination process, obviously forming a barrier to prevent the hot Tibetan Plateau (TP) mantle material from flowing further southeast. Upwelling hot mantle material possibly triggered by this delamination process might be the cause of the Emeishan Large Igneous Province. There exists an intercontinental low velocity layer in the crust of the TP

  17. Multi-Channel Optical Coherence Elastography Using Relative and Absolute Shear-Wave Time of Flight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Elyas

    Full Text Available Elastography, the imaging of elastic properties of soft tissues, is well developed for macroscopic clinical imaging of soft tissues and can provide useful information about various pathological processes which is complementary to that provided by the original modality. Scaling down of this technique should ply the field of cellular biology with valuable information with regard to elastic properties of cells and their environment. This paper evaluates the potential to develop such a tool by modifying a commercial optical coherence tomography (OCT device to measure the speed of shear waves propagating in a three-dimensional (3D medium. A needle, embedded in the gel, was excited to vibrate along its long axis and the displacement as a function of time and distance from the needle associated with the resulting shear waves was detected using four M-mode images acquired simultaneously using a commercial four-channel swept-source OCT system. Shear-wave time of arrival (TOA was detected by tracking the axial OCT-speckle motion using cross-correlation methods. Shear-wave speed was then calculated from inter-channel differences of TOA for a single burst (the relative TOA method and compared with the shear-wave speed determined from positional differences of TOA for a single channel over multiple bursts (the absolute TOA method. For homogeneous gels the relative method provided shear-wave speed with acceptable precision and accuracy when judged against the expected linear dependence of shear modulus on gelatine concentration (R2 = 0.95 and ultimate resolution capabilities limited by 184μm inter-channel distance. This overall approach shows promise for its eventual provision as a research tool in cancer cell biology. Further work is required to optimize parameters such as vibration frequency, burst length and amplitude, and to assess the lateral and axial resolutions of this type of device as well as to create 3D elastograms.

  18. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-09-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. © 2015.

  19. Modulational instability of ultra-low-frequency shear dust Alfvén waves in a plasma medium of positive and negatively charged dust fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamun, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of finite amplitude ultra-low-frequency shear dust Alfvén (SDA) waves, and their modulational instability in a magnetized plasma medium of positive and negatively charged dust fluids have been theoretically investigated by using the reductive perturbation method. The derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived to examine the stability analysis of such SDA waves. It is found that the SDA waves propagating in such an opposite polarity dust plasma medium are modulationally unstable, and that the instability criterion and the growth rate of these unstable SDA waves in such a novel opposite polarity dust plasma medium are found to be significantly different from those in electron–ion or electron–positron plasma media. The implications of the present investigation in different space environments and laboratory devices are briefly discussed.

  20. Modeling Transversely Isotropic, Viscoelastic, Incompressible Tissue-like Materials with Application in Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions. PMID:25591921

  1. Research on definition of hard rock shear wave velocity of site for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhenkun; Xia Zufeng

    2013-01-01

    Background: The definition of hard rock shear wave velocity is one of the most critical issues in the work of site selection. Purpose: To make a definition of hard rock site on which the model can be assumed as fixed-base condition, a series of research had been done. Several possible hard rock site soil models were developed. Methods: Shear wave velocity of hard rock had been assumed from 1100 m/s to 3200 m/s. For each case, free field analysis and soil structure analysis had been performed. And responses in soil and key nodes of structure were compared. Results: In free field analysis, responses of models that shear wave velocity below 2400 m/s decreased a lot. In SSI analysis, structure responses didn't change much when shear wave velocity was above 2400 m/s. Conclusions: 2400 m/s was the lowest shear wave velocity for hard rock site for fixed-base assumption. (authors)

  2. Modeling transversely isotropic, viscoelastic, incompressible tissue-like materials with application in ultrasound shear wave elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Bo; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W; Brigham, John C

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions. (paper)

  3. Global Subducting Slab Entrainment of Oceanic Asthenosphere: Re-examination of Sub-Slab Shear-Wave Splitting Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, T.; Liu, L.; Kawakatsu, H.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanic asthenosphere is characterized as a low seismic velocity, low viscosity, and strongly anisotropic channel separating from the oceanic lithosphere through a sharp shear wave velocity contrast. It has been a great challenge to reconcile all these observations and ultimately illuminate the fate of oceanic asthenosphere near convergent plate margins. Sub-slab shear wave splitting patterns are particularly useful to address the fate of oceanic asthenosphere since they are directly linked to deformation induced by the mantle flow beneath the subducting slab. To address slab entrainment of oceanic asthenosphere through shear wave splitting, it is important to recognize that oceanic asthenosphere is characterized by azimuthal anisotropy (1-3%) as well as strong P wave and S wave radial anisotropy (3-7%) for horizontally travelling P wave (VPH > VPV) and S wave (VSH > VSV), making it effectively an orthorhombic medium. Here we show that entrained asthenosphere predicts sub-slab SKS splitting pattern, where the fast splitting direction changes from predominantly trench-normal under shallow subduction zones to predominantly trench-parallel under relatively steep subduction zones. This result can be recognized by the 90 degrees shift in the polarization of the fast wave at about 20 degrees incident angle, where VSH equals to VSV forming a classical point singularity (Crampin, 1991). The thickness of the entrained asthenosphere is estimated to be on the order of 100 km, which predicts SKS splitting time varying from 0.5 seconds to 2 seconds. After briefly discussing improvement of the millefeuille model (Kawakatsu et al. 2009) of the asthenosphere upon this new constraint and long wave Backus averaging of orthorhombic solid and melt, we will illustrate that, in the range of observed trench migration speed, dynamic models of 2-D mantle convection with temperature-dependent viscosity do support thick subducting slab entrainment of asthenosphere under ranges of

  4. Lower hybrid waves instability in a velocity–sheared inhomogenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An electrostatic linear kinetic analysis of velocity-sheared inhomogeneous charged dust streaming parallel to a magnetic field in plasma is presented. Excited mode and the growth rates are derived in the lower hybrid-like mode regime, with collisional effects included. In the case where the drift velocity u is very small the ...

  5. Primordial gravitational waves measurements and anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yu Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Searching for the signal of primordial gravitational waves in the B-modes (BB power spectrum is one of the key scientific aims of the cosmic microwave background (CMB polarization experiments. However, this could be easily contaminated by several foreground issues, such as the interstellar dust grains and the galactic cyclotron electrons. In this paper we study another mechanism, the cosmic birefringence, which can be introduced by a CPT-violating interaction between CMB photons and an external scalar field. Such kind of interaction could give rise to the rotation of the linear polarization state of CMB photons, and consequently induce the CMB BB power spectrum, which could mimic the signal of primordial gravitational waves at large scales. With the recently released polarization data of BICEP2 and the joint analysis data of BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck, we perform a global fitting analysis on constraining the tensor-to-scalar ratio r by considering the polarization rotation angle [α(nˆ] which can be separated into a background isotropic part [α¯] and a small anisotropic part [Δα(nˆ]. Since the data of BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments have already been corrected by using the “self-calibration” method, here we mainly focus on the effects from the anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation angle. We find that including Δα(nˆ in the analysis could slightly weaken the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, when using current CMB polarization measurements. We also simulate the mock CMB data with the BICEP3-like sensitivity. Very interestingly, we find that if the effects of the anisotropic polarization rotation angle could not be taken into account properly in the analysis, the constraints on r will be dramatically biased. This implies that we need to break the degeneracy between the anisotropies of the CMB polarization rotation angle and the CMB primordial tensor perturbations, in order to measure the signal of primordial

  6. Horizontal shear wave scattering from a nonwelded interface observed by magnetic resonance elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazoglou, S; Hamhaber, U; Braun, J; Sack, I

    2007-01-01

    A method based on magnetic resonance elastography is presented that allows measuring the weldedness of interfaces between soft tissue layers. The technique exploits the dependence of shear wave scattering at elastic interfaces on the frequency of vibration. Experiments were performed on gel phantoms including differently welded interfaces. Plane wave excitation parallel to the planar interface with corresponding motion sensitization enabled the observation of only shear-horizontal (SH) wave scattering. Spatio-temporal filtering was applied to calculate scattering coefficients from the amplitudes of the incident, transmitted and reflected SH-waves in the vicinity of the interface. The results illustrate that acoustic wave scattering in soft tissues is largely dependent on the connectivity of interfaces, which is potentially interesting for imaging tissue mechanics in medicine and biology

  7. Material characterization of in vivo and in vitro porcine brain using shear wave elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanczyk, Caryn A; Palmeri, Mark L; Bass, Cameron R

    2015-03-01

    Realistic computer simulation of closed head trauma requires accurate mechanical properties of brain tissue, ideally in vivo. A substantive deficiency of most existing experimental brain data is that properties were identified through in vitro mechanical testing. This study develops a novel application of shear wave elasticity imaging to assess porcine brain tissue shear modulus in vivo. Shear wave elasticity imaging is a quantitative ultrasound technique that has been used here to examine changes in brain tissue shear modulus as a function of several experimental and physiologic parameters. Animal studies were performed using two different ultrasound transducers to explore the differences in physical response between closed skull and open skull arrangements. In vivo intracranial pressure in four animals was varied over a relevant physiologic range (2-40 mmHg) and was correlated with shear wave speed and stiffness estimates in brain tissue. We found that stiffness does not vary with modulation of intracranial pressure. Additional in vitro porcine specimens (n = 14) were used to investigate variation in brain tissue stiffness with temperature, confinement, spatial location and transducer orientation. We observed a statistically significant decrease in stiffness with increased temperature (23%) and an increase in stiffness with decreasing external confinement (22-37%). This study determined the feasibility of using shear wave elasticity imaging to characterize porcine brain tissue both in vitro and in vivo. Our results underline the importance of temperature- and skull-derived boundary conditions to brain stiffness and suggest that physiologic ranges of intracranial pressure do not significantly affect in situ brain tissue properties. Shear wave elasticity imaging allowed for brain material properties to be experimentally characterized in a physiologic setting and provides a stronger basis for assessing brain injury in computational models. Copyright © 2015 World

  8. Shear-wave elastography of the liver and spleen identifies clinically significant portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Christian; Bogs, Christopher; Verlinden, Wim

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Clinically significant portal hypertension (CSPH) is associated with severe complications and decompensation of cirrhosis. Liver stiffness measured either by transient elastography (TE) or Shear-wave elastography (SWE) and spleen stiffness by TE might be helpful in the diagnosis...... of CSPH. We recently showed the algorithm to rule-out CSPH using sequential liver- (L-SWE) and spleen-Shear-wave elastography (S-SWE). This study investigated the diagnostic value of S-SWE for diagnosis of CSPH. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-eight cirrhotic patients with pressure gradient measurements...... were included into this prospective multicentre study. L-SWE was measured in 155 patients, S-SWE in 112 patients, and both in 109 patients. RESULTS: Liver-shear-wave elastography and S-SWE correlated with clinical events and decompensation. SWE of liver and spleen revealed strong correlations...

  9. Imaging off-plane shear waves with a two-dimensional phononic crystal lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang Chenyu; Luan Pigang

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional flat phononic crystal (PC) lens for focusing off-plane shear waves is proposed. The lens consists of a triangular lattice hole-array, embedded in a solid matrix. The self-collimation effect is employed to guide the shear waves propagating through the lens along specific directions. The Dirichlet-to-Neumann maps (DtN) method is employed to calculate the band structure of the PC, which can avoid the problems of bad convergence and fake bands automatically in the void-solid PC structure. When the lens is illuminated by the off-plane shear waves emanating from a point source, a subwavelength image appears in the far-field zone. The imaging characteristics are investigated by calculating the displacement fields explicitly using the multiple scattering method, and the results are in good agreement with the ray-trace predictions. Our results may provide insights for designing new phononic devices.

  10. Gravitational Wave Polarizations in f (R Gravity and Scalar-Tensor Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Yungui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory opens a new era to use gravitational waves to test alternative theories of gravity. We investigate the polarizations of gravitational waves in f (R gravity and Horndeski theory, both containing scalar modes. These theories predict that in addition to the familiar + and × polarizations, there are transverse breathing and longitudinal polarizations excited by the massive scalar mode and the new polarization is a single mixed state. It would be very difficult to detect the longitudinal polarization by interferometers, while pulsar timing array may be the better tool to detect the longitudinal polarization.

  11. Gravitational Wave Polarizations in f (R) Gravity and Scalar-Tensor Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yungui; Hou, Shaoqi

    2018-01-01

    The detection of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory opens a new era to use gravitational waves to test alternative theories of gravity. We investigate the polarizations of gravitational waves in f (R) gravity and Horndeski theory, both containing scalar modes. These theories predict that in addition to the familiar + and × polarizations, there are transverse breathing and longitudinal polarizations excited by the massive scalar mode and the new polarization is a single mixed state. It would be very difficult to detect the longitudinal polarization by interferometers, while pulsar timing array may be the better tool to detect the longitudinal polarization.

  12. 3D shear wave velocity structure revealed with ambient noise tomography on a DAS array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.

    2017-12-01

    An 8700-m Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) cable was deployed at Brady's Hot Springs, Nevada in March 2016 in a 1.5 by 0.5 km study area. The layout of the DAS array was designed with a zig-zag geometry to obtain relatively uniform areal and varied angular coverage, providing very dense coverage with a one-meter channel spacing. This array continuously recorded signals of a vibroseis truck, earthquakes, and traffic noise during the 15-day deployment. As shown in a previous study (Zeng et al., 2017), ambient noise tomography can be applied to DAS continuous records to image shear wave velocity structure in the near surface. To avoid effects of the vibroseis truck operation, only continuous data recorded during the nighttime was used to compute noise cross-correlation functions for channel pairs within a given linear segment. The frequency band of whitening was set at 5 to 15 Hz and the length of the cross-correlation time window was set to 60 second. The phase velocities were determined using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) methodology. The phase velocity dispersion curve was then used to invert for shear wave velocity profiles. A preliminarily velocity model at Brady's Hot Springs (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 2015) was used as the starting model and the sensitivity kernels of Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities were computed with this model. As the sensitivity kernel shows, shear wave velocity in the top 200 m can be constrained with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities in our frequency band. With the picked phase velocity data, the shear wave velocity structure can be obtained via Occam's inversion (Constable et al., 1987; Lai 1998). Shear wave velocity gradually increases with depth and it is generally faster than the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (2015) model. Furthermore, that model has limiting constraints at shallow depth. The strong spatial variation is interpreted to reflect the different sediments and

  13. Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging With Cascaded Dual-Polarity Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Guo, Yuexin; Lee, Wei-Ning

    2018-04-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound imaging using plane or diverging waves, instead of focused beams, has advanced greatly the development of novel ultrasound imaging methods for evaluating tissue functions beyond anatomical information. However, the sonographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of ultrafast imaging remains limited due to the lack of transmission focusing, and thus insufficient acoustic energy delivery. We hereby propose a new ultrafast ultrasound imaging methodology with cascaded dual-polarity waves (CDWs), which consists of a pulse train with positive and negative polarities. A new coding scheme and a corresponding linear decoding process were thereby designed to obtain the recovered signals with increased amplitude, thus increasing the SNR without sacrificing the frame rate. The newly designed CDW ultrafast ultrasound imaging technique achieved higher quality B-mode images than coherent plane-wave compounding (CPWC) and multiplane wave (MW) imaging in a calibration phantom, ex vivo pork belly, and in vivo human back muscle. CDW imaging shows a significant improvement in the SNR (10.71 dB versus CPWC and 7.62 dB versus MW), penetration depth (36.94% versus CPWC and 35.14% versus MW), and contrast ratio in deep regions (5.97 dB versus CPWC and 5.05 dB versus MW) without compromising other image quality metrics, such as spatial resolution and frame rate. The enhanced image qualities and ultrafast frame rates offered by CDW imaging beget great potential for various novel imaging applications.

  14. Propagation of shear waves in an irregular magnetoelastic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    type wave equation, for isotropic layer sandwiched between two isotropic half spaces, in the absence of magnetic field and irregularity. The effects of depth of irregularity and monoclinic-magnetoelastic coupling parameters on dispersion curves ...

  15. Existence of Shear Horizontal Surface Waves in a Magneto-Electro-Elastic Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei-Yi, Wei; Dai-Ning, Fang; Jin-Xi, Liu

    2009-01-01

    The existence of shear horizontal surface waves in a magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) half-space with hexagonal (6mm) symmetry is investigated. The surface of the MEE half-space is mechanically free, but subjected to four types of electromagnetic boundary conditions. These boundary conditions are electrically open/magnetically closed, electrically open/magnetically open, electrically closed/magnetically open and electrically closed/magnetically closed. It is shown that except for the electrically open/magnetically closed condition, the three other sets of electromagnetic boundary conditions allow the propagation of shear horizontal surface waves

  16. Single tracking location methods suppress speckle noise in shear wave velocity estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elegbe, Etana C; McAleavey, Stephen A

    2013-04-01

    In ultrasound-based elastography methods, the estimation of shear wave velocity typically involves the tracking of speckle motion due to an applied force. The errors in the estimates of tissue displacement, and thus shear wave velocity, are generally attributed to electronic noise and decorrelation due to physical processes. We present our preliminary findings on another source of error, namely, speckle-induced bias in phase estimation. We find that methods that involve tracking in a single location, as opposed to multiple locations, are less sensitive to this source of error since the measurement is differential in nature and cancels out speckle-induced phase errors.

  17. High resolution shear wave reflection surveying for hydrogeological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.J.; Clark, J.C.

    1992-08-01

    The high resolution S-wave method has been developed to be a powerful tool in mapping subsurface lithology and in conducting groundwater investigations. The research has demonstrated that the resolution obtainable using S-waves in a Coastal Plain environment is more than double than that obtained using conventional reflection, which already offers a higher resolution than any other surface method. Where the mapping of thin clay layers functioning as aquitards or thin sand layers functioning as aquifers are critical to the understanding of groundwater flow, S-wave reflections offer unparalleled possibilities for nondestructive exploration. The field experiment at Cooke Crossroads, South Carolina enabled the detection and mapping of beds in the thickness range of one to three feet. The S-wave reflection technique, in combination with conventional P-wave reflection, has potential to directly detect confined and unconfined aquifers. This is a breakthrough technology that still requires additional research before it can be applied on a commercial basis. Aquifer systems were interpreted from the test data at Cooke Crossroads consistent with theoretical model. Additional research is need in assessing the theoretical response of P- and S-waves to subsurface interfaces within unconsolidated sediments of varying moisture content and lithology. More theoretical modeling and in situ testing are needed to bring our knowledge of these phenomena to the level that oil and gas researchers have done for fluids in sandstones

  18. Shear-wave splitting beneath western United States in relation to plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özalaybey, Serdar; Savage, Martha K.

    1995-09-01

    We have examined shear wave splitting in teleseismic shear waves from 26 broadband stations in the western United States. Fast polarization directions (ϕ) and delay times (δt) show spatial variations that are coherent within geologic provinces. Stations located near the San Andreas fault show clear evidence for fault-parallel anisotropy in the crust and upper mantle (115-125 km thickness). This can be explained by the finite strain associated with the relative plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates. The lateral extent of this strain field is probably narrow to the west, because stations 55 km west of the San Andreas fault do not show fault-parallel anisotropy in southern California. Station LAC located 80 km east of the San Andreas fault shows large fault-parallel anisotropy. This suggests that the Pacific-North American plate boundary in the mantle might be displaced to the east in southern California. A deeper E-W oriented fast direction of anisotropy underlies the fault-parallel anisotropic layer in the vicinity of the San Andreas fault. An E-W fast feature is also present beneath the western Basin and Range and the foothills of the Sierra-Nevada, although local variations are present. The magnitude of delay times suggests that this feature resides in the asthenosphere. We interpret this feature as the asthenospheric flow in the slabless window left behind the Farallon plate. The flow-induced anisotropy may partially be frozen-in at shallow depths. Station ORV is located near the southern edge of the Gorda slab where no anisotropy is detected. The absence of anisotropy at this location could therefore mark a boundary between Farallon associated flow and regions where E-W oriented asthenospheric flow did not occur. The lack of evidence for NE-SW fast orientation within the Walker Lane Shear Belt of western Nevada suggests that this crustal feature does not extend into the mantle or that is not as well developed as that beneath the San

  19. Excitation of a surface wave by an s-polarized electromagnetic wave incident upon a boundary of a dense magnetoactive plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragila, R.; Vukovic, S.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of surfave waves that are associated with a boundary between a rare plasma and a dense magnetoactive plasma and that propagate along a dc magnetic field are investigated. It is shown that the presence of the magnetic field introduces symmetry in terms of the polarization of the incident electromagnetic wave that excites the surface waves. A surface wave excited by an incident p-polarized (s-polarized) electromagnetic wave leaks in the form of an s-polarized (p-polarized) electromagnetic wave. The rate of rotation of polarization is independent of the polarization of the incident wave. Because a surface wave can leak in the form of an s-polarized electromagnetic wave, it can also be pumped by such a wave, and conditions were found for excitation of a surface wave by an s-polarized incident electromagnetic wave

  20. SplitRacer - a semi-automatic tool for the analysis and interpretation of teleseismic shear-wave splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Miriam Christina; Rümpker, Georg

    2017-04-01

    We present a semi-automatic, graphical user interface tool for the analysis and interpretation of teleseismic shear-wave splitting in MATLAB. Shear wave splitting analysis is a standard tool to infer seismic anisotropy, which is often interpreted as due to lattice-preferred orientation of e.g. mantle minerals or shape-preferred orientation caused by cracks or alternating layers in the lithosphere and hence provides a direct link to the earth's kinematic processes. The increasing number of permanent stations and temporary experiments result in comprehensive studies of seismic anisotropy world-wide. Their successive comparison with a growing number of global models of mantle flow further advances our understanding the earth's interior. However, increasingly large data sets pose the inevitable question as to how to process them. Well-established routines and programs are accurate but often slow and impractical for analyzing a large amount of data. Additionally, shear wave splitting results are seldom evaluated using the same quality criteria which complicates a straight-forward comparison. SplitRacer consists of several processing steps: i) download of data per FDSNWS, ii) direct reading of miniSEED-files and an initial screening and categorizing of XKS-waveforms using a pre-set SNR-threshold. iii) an analysis of the particle motion of selected phases and successive correction of the sensor miss-alignment based on the long-axis of the particle motion. iv) splitting analysis of selected events: seismograms are first rotated into radial and transverse components, then the energy-minimization method is applied, which provides the polarization and delay time of the phase. To estimate errors, the analysis is done for different randomly-chosen time windows. v) joint-splitting analysis for all events for one station, where the energy content of all phases is inverted simultaneously. This allows to decrease the influence of noise and to increase robustness of the measurement

  1. Excitation of instability waves in a two-dimensional shear layer by sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.

    1978-01-01

    The excitation of instability waves in a plane compressible shear layer by sound waves is studied. The problem is formulated mathematically as an inhomogeneous boundary-value problem. A general solution for abitrary incident sound wave is found by first constructing the Green's function of the problem. Numerical values of the coupling constants between incident sound waves and excited instability waves for a range of flow Mach number are calculated. The effect of the angle of incidence in the case of a beam of acoustic waves is analyzed. It is found that for moderate subsonic Mach numbers a narrow beam aiming at an angle between 50 to 80 deg to the flow direction is most effective in exciting instability waves.

  2. Shear Wave Propagation in Multilayered Medium including an Irregular Fluid Saturated Porous Stratum with Rigid Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation is concerned with the study of propagation of shear waves in an anisotropic fluid saturated porous layer over a semi-infinite homogeneous elastic half-space lying under an elastic homogeneous layer with irregularity present at the interface with rigid boundary. The rectangular irregularity has been taken in the half-space. The dispersion equation for shear waves is derived by using the perturbation technique followed by Fourier transformation. Numerically, the effect of irregularity present is analysed. It is seen that the phase velocity is significantly influenced by the wave number and the depth of the irregularity. The variations of dimensionless phase velocity against dimensionless wave number are shown graphically for the different size of rectangular irregularities with the help of MATLAB.

  3. 2D instabilities of surface gravity waves on a linear shear current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francius, Marc; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Periodic 2D surface water waves propagating steadily on a rotational current have been studied by many authors (see [1] and references therein). Although the recent important theoretical developments have confirmed that periodic waves can exist over flows with arbitrary vorticity, their stability and their nonlinear evolution have not been much studied extensively so far. In fact, even in the rather simple case of uniform vorticity (linear shear), few papers have been published on the effect of a vertical shear current on the side-band instability of a uniform wave train over finite depth. In most of these studies [2-5], asymptotic expansions and multiple scales method have been used to obtain envelope evolution equations, which allow eventually to formulate a condition of (linear) instability to long modulational perturbations. It is noted here that this instability is often referred in the literature as the Benjamin-Feir or modulational instability. In the present study, we consider the linear stability of finite amplitude two-dimensional, periodic water waves propagating steadily on the free surface of a fluid with constant vorticity and finite depth. First, the steadily propagating surface waves are computed with steepness up to very close to the highest, using a Fourier series expansions and a collocation method, which constitutes a simple extension of Fenton's method [6] to the cases with a linear shear current. Then, the linear stability of these permanent waves to infinitesimal 2D perturbations is developed from the fully nonlinear equations in the framework of normal modes analysis. This linear stability analysis is an extension of [7] to the case of waves in the presence of a linear shear current and permits the determination of the dominant instability as a function of depth and vorticity for a given steepness. The numerical results are used to assess the accuracy of the vor-NLS equation derived in [5] for the characteristics of modulational

  4. Polarization speed meter for gravitational-wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Andrew R.; McKenzie, Kirk; Chen, Yanbei; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Chow, Jong H.; McClelland, David E.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a modified configuration of an advanced gravitational-wave detector that is a speed-meter-type interferometer with improved sensitivity with respect to quantum noise. With the addition of polarization-controlling components to the output of an arm cavity Michelson interferometer, an orthogonal polarization state of the interferometer can be used to store signal, returning it later with opposite phase to cancel position information below the storage bandwidth of the opposite mode. This modification provides an alternative to an external kilometer-scale Fabry-Pérot cavity, as presented in earlier work of Purdue and Chen [Phys. Rev. D 66, 122004 (2002)]. The new configuration requires significantly less physical infrastructure to achieve speed meter operation. The quantity of length and alignment degrees of freedom is also reduced. We present theoretical calculations to show that such a speed meter detector is capable of beating the strain sensitivity imposed by the standard quantum limit over a broad range of frequencies for Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory-like parameters. The benefits and possible difficulties of implementing such a scheme are outlined. We also present results for tuning of the speed meter by adjusting the degree of polarization coupling, a novel possibility that does not exist in previously proposed designs, showing that there is a smooth transition from speed meter operation to that of a signal-recycling Michelson behavior.

  5. Drift wave shear damping annulment due to parametric coupling and magnetic field variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, T.A.; Jovanovic, D.; Vranjes, J.; Weiland, J.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear suppression of the drift wave shear damping by the simultaneous action of a strong standing pump wave and of the magnetic field variation along the magnetic field line is studied using a version of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. The threshold for the parametric destabilization is calculated as a function of the plasma parameters. Destabilization occurs due to the elimination of the energy convection towards the dissipative layer, by both the linear toroidal coupling and nonlinear parametric coupling

  6. Reliable protocol for shear wave elastography of lower limb muscles at rest and during passive stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Guillaume; Kheireddine, Walid; Vergari, Claudio; Bonneau, Dominique; Thoreux, Patricia; Rouch, Philippe; Tanter, Mickael; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Skalli, Wafa

    2015-09-01

    Development of shear wave elastography gave access to non-invasive muscle stiffness assessment in vivo. The aim of the present study was to define a measurement protocol to be used in clinical routine for quantifying the shear modulus of lower limb muscles. Four positions were defined to evaluate shear modulus in 10 healthy subjects: parallel to the fibers, in the anterior and posterior aspects of the lower limb, at rest and during passive stretching. Reliability was first evaluated on two muscles by three operators; these measurements were repeated six times. Then, measurement reliability was compared in 11 muscles by two operators; these measurements were repeated three times. Reproducibility of shear modulus was 0.48 kPa and repeatability was 0.41 kPa, with all muscles pooled. Position did not significantly influence reliability. Shear wave elastography appeared to be an appropriate and reliable tool to evaluate the shear modulus of lower limb muscles with the proposed protocol. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Added value of Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the ultrasound assessment of breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ianculescu, Victor; Ciolovan, Laura Maria; Dunant, Ariane; Vielh, Philippe; Mazouni, Chafika; Delaloge, Suzette; Dromain, Clarisse; Blidaru, Alexandru; Balleyguier, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic performance of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions. Materials and methods: Conventional B-mode and elasticity imaging were used to evaluate 110 breast lesions. Elastographic assessment of breast tissue abnormalities was done using a shear wave based technique, Virtual Touch IQ (VTIQ), implemented on a Siemens Acuson S3000 ultrasound machine. Tissue mechanical properties were interpreted as two-dimensional qualitative and quantitative colour maps displaying relative shear wave velocity. Wave speed measurements in m/s were possible at operator defined regions of interest. The pathologic diagnosis was established on samples obtained by ultrasound guided core biopsy or fine needle aspiration. Results: BIRADS based B-mode evaluation of the 48 benign and 62 malignant lesions achieved 92% sensitivity and 62.5% specificity. Subsequently performed VTIQ elastography relying on visual interpretation of the colour overlay displaying relative shear wave velocities managed similar standalone diagnostic performance with 92% sensitivity and 64.6% specificity. Lesion and surrounding tissue shear wave speed values were calculated and a significant difference was found between the benign and malignant populations (Mann–Whitney U test, p < 0.0001). By selecting a lesion cut-off value of 3.31 m/s we achieved 80.4% sensitivity and 73% specificity. Applying this threshold only to BIRADS 4a masses, we reached overall levels of 92% sensitivity and 72.9% specificity. Conclusion: VTIQ qualitative and quantitative elastography has the potential to further characterise B-mode detected breast lesions, increasing specificity and reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies

  8. Added value of Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the ultrasound assessment of breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianculescu, Victor; Ciolovan, Laura Maria [Radiology Department, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Dunant, Ariane [Department of Statistics, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Vielh, Philippe [Department of Biopathology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Mazouni, Chafika [Department of Surgery, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Delaloge, Suzette [Department of Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Dromain, Clarisse [Radiology Department, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Blidaru, Alexandru [Department of Surgery, Bucharest Institute of Oncology, Bucharest (Romania); Balleyguier, Corinne, E-mail: corinne.balleyguier@gustaveroussy.fr [Radiology Department, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); UMR 8081, IR4M, Paris-Sud University, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic performance of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions. Materials and methods: Conventional B-mode and elasticity imaging were used to evaluate 110 breast lesions. Elastographic assessment of breast tissue abnormalities was done using a shear wave based technique, Virtual Touch IQ (VTIQ), implemented on a Siemens Acuson S3000 ultrasound machine. Tissue mechanical properties were interpreted as two-dimensional qualitative and quantitative colour maps displaying relative shear wave velocity. Wave speed measurements in m/s were possible at operator defined regions of interest. The pathologic diagnosis was established on samples obtained by ultrasound guided core biopsy or fine needle aspiration. Results: BIRADS based B-mode evaluation of the 48 benign and 62 malignant lesions achieved 92% sensitivity and 62.5% specificity. Subsequently performed VTIQ elastography relying on visual interpretation of the colour overlay displaying relative shear wave velocities managed similar standalone diagnostic performance with 92% sensitivity and 64.6% specificity. Lesion and surrounding tissue shear wave speed values were calculated and a significant difference was found between the benign and malignant populations (Mann–Whitney U test, p < 0.0001). By selecting a lesion cut-off value of 3.31 m/s we achieved 80.4% sensitivity and 73% specificity. Applying this threshold only to BIRADS 4a masses, we reached overall levels of 92% sensitivity and 72.9% specificity. Conclusion: VTIQ qualitative and quantitative elastography has the potential to further characterise B-mode detected breast lesions, increasing specificity and reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies.

  9. Strip waves in vibrated shear-thickening wormlike micellar solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, T; Deegan, R D

    2010-06-01

    We present an instability in vertically vibrated dilute wormlike micellar solutions. Above a critical driving acceleration the fluid forms elongated solitary domains of high amplitude waves. We model this instability using a Mathieu equation modified to account for the non-Newtonian character of the fluid. We find that our model successfully reproduces the observed transitions.

  10. Viscoelastic properties of soft gels: comparison of magnetic resonance elastography and dynamic shear testing in the shear wave regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, R. J.; Clayton, E. H.; Bayly, P. V.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is used to quantify the viscoelastic shear modulus, G*, of human and animal tissues. Previously, values of G* determined by MRE have been compared to values from mechanical tests performed at lower frequencies. In this study, a novel dynamic shear test (DST) was used to measure G* of a tissue-mimicking material at higher frequencies for direct comparison to MRE. A closed-form solution, including inertial effects, was used to extract G* values from DST data obtained between 20 and 200 Hz. MRE was performed using cylindrical 'phantoms' of the same material in an overlapping frequency range of 100-400 Hz. Axial vibrations of a central rod caused radially propagating shear waves in the phantom. Displacement fields were fit to a viscoelastic form of Navier's equation using a total least-squares approach to obtain local estimates of G*. DST estimates of the storage G' (Re[G*]) and loss modulus G'' (Im[G*]) for the tissue-mimicking material increased with frequency from 0.86 to 0.97 kPa (20-200 Hz, n = 16), while MRE estimates of G' increased from 1.06 to 1.15 kPa (100-400 Hz, n = 6). The loss factor (Im[G*]/Re[G*]) also increased with frequency for both test methods: 0.06-0.14 (20-200 Hz, DST) and 0.11-0.23 (100-400 Hz, MRE). Close agreement between MRE and DST results at overlapping frequencies indicates that G* can be locally estimated with MRE over a wide frequency range. Low signal-to-noise ratio, long shear wavelengths and boundary effects were found to increase residual fitting error, reinforcing the use of an error metric to assess confidence in local parameter estimates obtained by MRE.

  11. A Shear-Wave Seismic System to Look Ahead of a Tunnel Boring Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharadwaj, Pawan; Drijkoningen, G.G.; Mulder, W.A.; Tscharner, Thomas; Jenneskens, Rob

    2016-01-01

    The Earth’s properties, composition and structure ahead of a tunnel boring machine (TBM) should be mapped for hazard assessment during excavation. We study the use of seismic-exploration techniques for this purpose. We focus on a seismic system for soft soils, where shear waves are better and easier

  12. Quality factor due to roughness scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in nanoresonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we study the quality factor associated with dissipation due to scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves by random self-affine roughness. It is shown that the quality factor is strongly influenced by both the surface roughness exponent H and the roughness amplitude w to

  13. Identification and inversion of converted shear waves: case studies from the European North Atlantic continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Jennifer D.; White, Robert S.; Christie, Philip A. F.

    2009-10-01

    Wide-angle shear wave arrivals, converted from compressional to shear waves at crustal interfaces, enable crustal Vp/Vs ratios to be determined which provide valuable constraint on geological interpretations. Analysis of the converted shear wave phases represents the next logical step in characterizing the crustal structure and composition following multichannel seismic structural imaging and tomographic inversion of the wide-angle compressional wave phases. In this offshore study across two passive margins extending from stretched continental to fully oceanic crust, the high-data density (2-10 km ocean bottom seismometer, OBS, spacing) and a consistent, efficient conversion interface produced shear wave data sets suitable for traveltime inversion. The shear waves were recorded by three orthogonal geophones in each OBS. Arrival phases, visible to 180 km offset, were identified using their arrival times, moveout velocities and particle motions. Across the North Atlantic volcanic rifted continental margins studied, breakup was accompanied by the eruption of large volumes of basalts of the North Atlantic Igneous Province. The interface between post-volcanic sediments and the top of the basalts provides the dominant conversion boundary across the oceanic crust and the continent-ocean transition. However, the shear wave data quality was significantly diminished at the continental ends of the profiles where the thick basalt flows and hence this conversion interface feathers out and crustal attenuation increases. Initial modelling of the converted shear wave phases was carried out using a layer-based approach with arrivals converted on the way up used to constrain the Vp/Vs ratio of the post-volcanic sedimentary sequence beneath each OBS. To produce a model with continuous crustal S-wave velocities, the compressional wave velocities beneath the sediment-top basalt interface were transformed into starting shear wave velocities using a constant value of Vp/Vs and the

  14. Optical coating on a corrugated surface to align the polarization of an unpolarized wave without loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Yi Jun

    2017-12-01

    A multilayer comprising birefringent thin films is devised to present to function as a polarization beam splitter and waveplate simultaneously. By arranging such a multilayer on a right triangle-shaped corrugated surface, a polarizer is realized to align the randomly oscillating electric field of an unpolarized wave into a linear polarized wave without loss.

  15. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. - Highlights: • Shear horizontal wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. • Calculations on band structure and transmission show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. • Finite element method confirms that waves in band gaps are spatially enhanced and stopped by the graded units. • The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially

  16. Quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography for noncontact mechanical characterization of myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging low-coherence imaging technique that provides noninvasive assessment of tissue biomechanics with high spatial resolution. Among various OCE methods, the capability of quantitative measurement of tissue elasticity is of great importance for tissue characterization and pathology detection across different samples. Here we report a quantitative OCE technique, termed quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (Q-SWI-OCT), which enables noncontact measurement of tissue Young's modulus based on the ultra-fast imaging of the shear wave propagation inside the sample. A focused air-puff device is used to interrogate the tissue with a low-pressure short-duration air stream that stimulates a localized displacement with the scale at micron level. The propagation of this tissue deformation in the form of shear wave is captured by a phase-sensitive OCT system running with the scan of the M-mode imaging over the path of the wave propagation. The temporal characteristics of the shear wave is quantified based on the cross-correlation of the tissue deformation profiles at all the measurement locations, and linear regression is utilized to fit the data plotted in the domain of time delay versus wave propagation distance. The wave group velocity is thus calculated, which results in the quantitative measurement of the Young's modulus. As the feasibility demonstration, experiments are performed on tissuemimicking phantoms with different agar concentrations and the quantified elasticity values with Q-SWI-OCT agree well with the uniaxial compression tests. For functional characterization of myocardium with this OCE technique, we perform our pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with two studies, including 1) elasticity difference of cardiac muscle under relaxation and contract conditions and 2) mechanical heterogeneity of the heart introduced by the muscle fiber orientation. Our results suggest the

  17. Feasibility of waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for shallow shear-wave velocity using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Tsoflias, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface wave inversion for shallow shear (S)-wave velocity relies on the generation of dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. This constrains the method to only laterally homogeneous (or very smooth laterally heterogeneous) earth models. Waveform inversion directly fits waveforms on seismograms, hence, does not have such a limitation. Waveforms of Rayleigh waves are highly related to S-wave velocities. By inverting the waveforms of Rayleigh waves on a near-surface seismogram, shallow S-wave velocities can be estimated for earth models with strong lateral heterogeneity. We employ genetic algorithm (GA) to perform waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for S-wave velocities. The forward problem is solved by finite-difference modeling in the time domain. The model space is updated by generating offspring models using GA. Final solutions can be found through an iterative waveform-fitting scheme. Inversions based on synthetic records show that the S-wave velocities can be recovered successfully with errors no more than 10% for several typical near-surface earth models. For layered earth models, the proposed method can generate one-dimensional S-wave velocity profiles without the knowledge of initial models. For earth models containing lateral heterogeneity in which case conventional dispersion-curve-based inversion methods are challenging, it is feasible to produce high-resolution S-wave velocity sections by GA waveform inversion with appropriate priori information. The synthetic tests indicate that the GA waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves has the great potential for shallow S-wave velocity imaging with the existence of strong lateral heterogeneity. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Integration of SH seismic reflection and Love-wave dispersion data for shear wave velocity determination over quick clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comina, Cesare; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Polom, Ulrich; Socco, Laura Valentina

    2017-09-01

    Quick clay is a water-saturated formation originally formed through flocculation and deposition in a marine to brackish environment. It is subsequently leached to low salinity by freshwater flow. If its strength decreases, then the flocculated structure collapses leading to landslides of varying destructiveness. Leaching can result in a reduction of the undisturbed shear strength of these clays and suggestions exist that a reduction in shear wave velocities is also possible. Integration of SH seismic reflection and Love-wave dispersion data was undertaken, in an area near the Göta River in southwest Sweden, to evaluate the potential of shear wave velocity imaging for detecting quick clays. Seismic reflection processing evidenced several geologically interesting interfaces related to the probable presence of quick clays (locally confirmed by boreholes) and sand-gravelly layers strongly contributing to water circulation within them. Dispersion data were extracted with a Gaussian windowing approach and inverted with a laterally constrained inversion using a priori information from the seismic reflection imaging. The inversion of dispersion curves has evidenced the presence of a low velocity layer (lvl, with a velocity reduction of ca. 30 per cent) probably associable to quick clays. This velocity reduction is enough to produce detectable phase-velocity differences in the field data and to achieve a better velocity resolution if compared to reflection seismic velocity analyses. The proposed approach has the potential of a comprehensive determination of the shear wave velocity distribution in the shallow subsurface. A sensitivity analysis of Love-wave dispersion data is also presented underlining that, despite limited dispersion of the data set and the velocity-reducing effect of quick-clay leaching, the proposed interpretation procedure arises as a valuable approach in quick clay and other lvl identification.

  19. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertz, Ruediger S., E-mail: ruediger.goertz@uk-erlangen.de; Schuderer, Johanna, E-mail: Johanna@schuderer-floss.de; Strobel, Deike, E-mail: deike.strobel@uk-erlangen.de; Pfeifer, Lukas, E-mail: Lukas.Pfeifer@uk-erlangen.de; Neurath, Markus F., E-mail: Markus.Neurath@uk-erlangen.de; Wildner, Dane, E-mail: Dane.Wildner@uk-erlangen.de

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • ARFI elastography of the pancreas is feasible. • Shear wave velocities in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma are higher than those occurring in normal tissue. • ARFI values considerable overlap between different pathologies. - Abstract: Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. Material and methods: In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. Results: A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n = 21) and lipomatosis (n = 30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3 m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n = 35), chronic pancreatitis (n = 53) and adenocarcinoma (n = 52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n = 4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62 m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74 m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. Conclusion: ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities.

  20. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953...

  1. TH-A-207B-00: Shear-Wave Imaging and a QIBA US Biomarker Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of tissue elastic properties is a relatively new and powerful approach to one of the oldest and most important diagnostic tools. Imaging of shear wave speed with ultrasound is has been added to most high-end ultrasound systems. Understanding this exciting imaging mode aiding its most effective use in medicine can be a rewarding effort for medical physicists and other medical imaging and treatment professionals. Assuring consistent, quantitative measurements across the many ultrasound systems in a typical imaging department will constitute a major step toward realizing the great potential of this technique and other quantitative imaging. This session will target these two goals with two presentations. A. Basics and Current Implementations of Ultrasound Imaging of Shear Wave Speed and Elasticity - Shigao Chen, Ph.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Introduction: Importance of tissue elasticity measurement Strain vs. shear wave elastography (SWE), beneficial features of SWE The link between shear wave speed and material properties, influence of viscosity Generation of shear waves External vibration (Fibroscan) ultrasound radiation force Point push Supersonic push (Aixplorer) Comb push (GE Logiq E9) Detection of shear waves Motion detection from pulse-echo ultrasound Importance of frame rate for shear wave imaging Plane wave imaging detection How to achieve high effective frame rate using line-by-line scanners Shear wave speed calculation Time to peak Random sample consensus (RANSAC) Cross correlation Sources of bias and variation in SWE Tissue viscosity Transducer compression or internal pressure of organ Reflection of shear waves at boundaries B. Elasticity Imaging System Biomarker Qualification and User Testing of Systems – Brian Garra, M.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Goals Review the need for quantitative medical imaging Provide examples of quantitative imaging biomarkers Acquaint the participant with the purpose of the RSNA Quantitative Imaging

  2. The radiation of sound by the instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation generated by instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer is solved. The solution provided is valid up to the acoustic far-field region. It represents a significant improvement over the solution obtained by classical hydrodynamic-stability theory which is essentially a local solution with the acoustic radiation suppressed. The basic instability-wave solution which is valid in the shear layer and the near-field region is constructed in terms of an asymptotic expansion using the method of multiple scales. This solution accounts for the effects of the slightly divergent mean flow. It is shown that the multiple-scales asymptotic expansion is not uniformly valid far from the shear layer. Continuation of this solution into the entire upper half-plane is described. The extended solution enables the near- and far-field pressure fluctuations associated with the instability wave to be determined. Numerical results show that the directivity pattern of acoustic radiation into the stationary medium peaks at 20 degrees to the axis of the shear layer in the downstream direction for supersonic flows. This agrees qualitatively with the observed noise-directivity patterns of supersonic jets.

  3. Phase change measurement of ultrasonic shear waves on reflection from a curing epoxy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, S; Lanyon, B

    2005-01-01

    Simple modelling shows that an ultrasonic shear wave with a frequency in the megahertz range, travelling in an elastic medium, that is subsequently reflected at normal incidence from an interface with a viscous medium will undergo a phase change equivalent to a temporal shift of the order of nanoseconds for realistic material properties. This suggests a new technique to observe and characterize curing epoxy adhesives in a reflection geometry that is preferable in many industrial situations. It has been shown by previous workers that in the case of reflection from a classic viscous liquid only the phase or the amplitude need to be measured in order to return the viscosity of the liquid. This paper explores the more general case for a viscoelastic substance where both amplitude and phase must be measured in order to return the viscosity and elastic modulus of the material under investigation. Non-contact electromagnetic acoustic transducers, generating wideband shear wave pulses in the 0.5-8 MHz frequency range, are used to perform ultrasonic measurements of a shear wave reflected from the interface of an aluminium-curing epoxy resin sample. The viscosity and the shear elastic modulus of the epoxy resin sample are calculated over the cure cycle. As expected the accuracy is limited by significant measurement errors in the reflected amplitude

  4. Ultrasound viscoelasticity assessment using an adaptive torsional shear wave propagation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouared, Abderrahmane [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, University of Montréal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM), Montréal, Québec H2X 0A9, Canada and Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Kazemirad, Siavash; Montagnon, Emmanuel [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, University of Montréal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM), Montréal, Québec H2X 0A9 (Canada); Cloutier, Guy, E-mail: guy.cloutier@umontreal.ca [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, University of Montréal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM), Montréal, Québec H2X 0A9 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Radio-Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Different approaches have been used in dynamic elastography to assess mechanical properties of biological tissues. Most techniques are based on a simple inversion based on the measurement of the shear wave speed to assess elasticity, whereas some recent strategies use more elaborated analytical or finite element method (FEM) models. In this study, a new method is proposed for the quantification of both shear storage and loss moduli of confined lesions, in the context of breast imaging, using adaptive torsional shear waves (ATSWs) generated remotely with radiation pressure. Methods: A FEM model was developed to solve the inverse wave propagation problem and obtain viscoelastic properties of interrogated media. The inverse problem was formulated and solved in the frequency domain and its robustness to noise and geometric constraints was evaluated. The proposed model was validated in vitro with two independent rheology methods on several homogeneous and heterogeneous breast tissue-mimicking phantoms over a broad range of frequencies (up to 400 Hz). Results: Viscoelastic properties matched benchmark rheology methods with discrepancies of 8%–38% for the shear modulus G′ and 9%–67% for the loss modulus G″. The robustness study indicated good estimations of storage and loss moduli (maximum mean errors of 19% on G′ and 32% on G″) for signal-to-noise ratios between 19.5 and 8.5 dB. Larger errors were noticed in the case of biases in lesion dimension and position. Conclusions: The ATSW method revealed that it is possible to estimate the viscoelasticity of biological tissues with torsional shear waves when small biases in lesion geometry exist.

  5. Internal inspection of reinforced concrete for nuclear structures using shear wave tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Aging of reinforced concrete used for worldwide nuclear structures is increasing and necessitating evaluation. • Nondestructive evaluation is a tool for assessing the condition of reinforced concrete of nuclear structures. • Ultrasonic shear wave tomography as a stress wave technique has begun to be utilized for investigation of concrete material. • A study using ultrasonic shear wave tomography indicates anomalies vital to the long-term operation of the structure. • The use of this technique has shown to successfully evaluate the internal state of reinforced concrete members. - Abstract: Reinforced concrete is important for nuclear related structures. Therefore, the integrity of structural members consisting of reinforced concrete is germane to the safe operation and longevity of these facilities. Many issues that reduce the likelihood of safe operation and longevity are not visible on the surface of reinforced concrete material. Therefore, an investigation of reinforced concrete material should include techniques which will allow peering into the concrete member and determining its internal state. The performance of nondestructive evaluations is pursuant to this goal. Some of the categories of nondestructive evaluations are electrochemical, magnetism, ground penetrating radar, and ultrasonic testing. A specific ultrasonic testing technique, namely ultrasonic shear wave tomography, is used to determine presence and extent of voids, honeycombs, cracks perpendicular to the surface, and/or delamination. This technique, and others similar to it, has been utilized in the nuclear industry to determine structural conditions

  6. Shear wave velocity structure of northern and North-Eastern Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kebede, F.; Mammo, T.; Panza, G.F.; Vuan, A.; Costa, G.

    1995-10-01

    The non-linear inversion technique known as hedgehog is utilized to define the average crustal structure of North and North-Eastern Ethiopia. To accomplish the task a two dimensional frequency-time analysis is performed to obtain Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves. Six earthquakes recorded by the broad-band digital seismograph installed at the Geophysical Observatory of Addis Ababa University are utilized. The crustal structure between the Gulf of Tadjura (western Gulf of Aden) and Addis Ababa crossing southern Afar (path I) can be approximated by a total thickness of about 22 km with average S-wave velocity in the range 2.3 - 3.9 km/s. The crust-mantle transition is poorly developed at greater depths and the shear wave velocity ranges from 4.0 km/s to 4.3 km/s. If the effect of the plateau part is taken into account the average total crustal thickness is found to be less than 18 km and the average S-wave velocity varies in the range 2.4 - 3.9 km/s. The low shear wave velocity under the Afar crust is consistent with the result of other geophysical studies. For path II, which passes through the border of the Western Ethiopian plateau, the average crustal structure is found to be approximated by a thickness of about 40 km and average S-wave velocity between 3.0 km/s and 3.9 km/s. The crust overlies a lithospheric mantle with a shear wave velocity in the range 4.1-4.4 km/s. (author). 37 refs, 11 figs, 4 tabs

  7. A Numerical Simulation of Base Shear Forces and Moments Exerted by Waves on Large Diameter Pile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-liang Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of the dynamic variation of wave force diameter of pile foundation for offshore wind turbines, wave force and moment of large diameter pile foundation can be calculated. In this paper, simulation technique is used to calculate the wave force and moment of different large diameter pile foundation, and the base shear force and moment of the interval 20-degree phase angle are obtained by the base line of the pile. Under the action of a certain load, the complete stress variation of the pile foundation is obtained. According to the basic principle of diffraction theory, the process curve of large diameter pile, and analysis of wave force, diffraction force changes in a certain period of time interval. The results show that the wave after the large diameter pile formed around the vortex, large diameter pile base shear, and moment dynamic change is nonlinear in a complete cycle, the diameter of the pile increases by 0.5 m, and the wave force increases by about 5%, the results show that it provides certain reference value for the offshore pile foundation pile with large diameter primary site. Some significant results for practical application are discussed.

  8. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and wave propagation at the San Jose, California, dense seismic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.; Harmsen, S.; Zerva, A.

    2003-01-01

    Ground-motion records from a 52-element dense seismic array near San Jose, California, are analyzed to obtain site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and plane-wave propagation characteristics. The array, located on the eastern side of the Santa Clara Valley south of the San Francisco Bay, is sited over the Evergreen basin, a 7-km-deep depression with Miocene and younger deposits. Site response values below 4 Hz are up to a factor of 2 greater when larger, regional records are included in the analysis, due to strong surface-wave development within the Santa Clara Valley. The pattern of site amplification is the same, however, with local or regional events. Site amplification increases away from the eastern edge of the Santa Clara Valley, reaching a maximum over the western edge of the Evergreen basin, where the pre-Cenozoic basement shallows rapidly. Amplification then decreases further to the west. This pattern may be caused by lower shallow shear-wave velocities and thicker Quaternary deposits further from the edge of the Santa Clara Valley and generation/trapping of surface waves above the shallowing basement of the western Evergreen basin. Shear-wave velocities from the inversion of site response spectra based on smaller, local earthquakes compare well with those obtained independently from our seismic reflection/refraction measurements. Velocities from the inversion of site spectra that include larger, regional records do not compare well with these measurements. A mix of local and regional events, however, is appropriate for determination of site response to be used in seismic hazard evaluation, since large damaging events would excite both body and surface waves with a wide range in ray parameters. Frequency-wavenumber, plane-wave analysis is used to determine the backazimuth and apparent velocity of coherent phases at the array. Conventional, high-resolution, and multiple signal characterization f-k power spectra and stacked slowness power spectra are

  9. The MaCWAVE program to study gravity wave influences on the polar mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Goldberg

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available MaCWAVE (Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending VErtically was a highly coordinated rocket, ground-based, and satellite program designed to address gravity wave forcing of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT. The MaCWAVE program was conducted at the Norwegian Andøya Rocket Range (ARR, 69.3° N in July 2002, and continued at the Swedish Rocket Range (Esrange, 67.9° N during January 2003. Correlative instrumentation included the ALOMAR MF and MST radars and RMR and Na lidars, Esrange MST and meteor radars and RMR lidar, radiosondes, and TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite measurements of thermal structures. The data have been used to define both the mean fields and the wave field structures and turbulence generation leading to forcing of the large-scale flow. In summer, launch sequences coupled with ground-based measurements at ARR addressed the forcing of the summer mesopause environment by anticipated convective and shear generated gravity waves. These motions were measured with two 12-h rocket sequences, each involving one Terrier-Orion payload accompanied by a mix of MET rockets, all at ARR in Norway. The MET rockets were used to define the temperature and wind structure of the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Terrier-Orions were designed to measure small-scale plasma fluctuations and turbulence that might be induced by wave breaking in the mesosphere. For the summer series, three European MIDAS (Middle Atmosphere Dynamics and Structure rockets were also launched from ARR in coordination with the MaCWAVE payloads. These were designed to measure plasma and neutral turbulence within the MLT. The summer program exhibited a number of indications of significant departures of the mean wind and temperature structures from ``normal" polar summer conditions, including an unusually warm mesopause and a slowing of the formation of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE and noctilucent clouds (NLC. This

  10. Shear-wave velocity structure of young Atlantic Lithosphere from dispersion analysis and waveform modelling of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Lange, Dietrich; Schippkus, Sven

    2016-04-01

    The lithosphere is the outermost solid layer of the Earth and includes the brittle curst and brittle uppermost mantle. It is underlain by the asthenosphere, the weaker and hotter portion of the mantle. The boundary between the brittle lithosphere and the asthenosphere is call the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, or LAB. The oceanic lithosphere is created at spreading ridges and cools and thickens with age. Seismologists define the LAB by the presence of a low shear wave velocity zone beneath a high velocity lid. Surface waves from earthquakes occurring in young oceanic lithosphere should sample lithospheric structure when being recorded in the vicinity of a mid-ocean ridge. Here, we study group velocity and dispersion of Rayleigh waves caused by earthquakes occurring at transform faults in the Central Atlantic Ocean. Earthquakes were recorded either by a network of wide-band (up to 60 s) ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 15°N or at the Global Seismic Network (GSN) Station ASCN on Ascension Island. Surface waves sampling young Atlantic lithosphere indicate systematic age-dependent changes of group velocities and dispersion of Rayleigh waves. With increasing plate age maximum group velocity increases (as a function of period), indicating cooling and thickening of the lithosphere. Shear wave velocity is derived inverting the observed dispersion of Rayleigh waves. Further, models derived from the OBS records were refined using waveform modelling of vertical component broadband data at periods of 15 to 40 seconds, constraining the velocity structure of the uppermost 100 km and hence in the depth interval of the mantle where lithospheric cooling is most evident. Waveform modelling supports that the thickness of lithosphere increases with age and that velocities in the lithosphere increase, too.

  11. In Vivo Measures of Shear Wave Speed as a Predictor of Tendon Elasticity and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jack A; Biedrzycki, Adam H; Lee, Kenneth S; DeWall, Ryan J; Brounts, Sabrina H; Murphy, William L; Markel, Mark D; Thelen, Darryl G

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential for ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) to measure tissue elasticity and ultimate stress in both intact and healing tendons. The lateral gastrocnemius (Achilles) tendons of 41 New Zealand white rabbits were surgically severed and repaired with growth factor coated sutures. SWE imaging was used to measure shear wave speed (SWS) in both the medial and lateral tendons pre-surgery, and at 2 and 4 wk post-surgery. Rabbits were euthanized at 4 wk, and both medial and lateral tendons underwent mechanical testing to failure. SWS significantly (p tendons. SWS was significantly (p tendon elastic modulus (r = 0.52) and ultimate stress (r = 0.58). Thus, ultrasound SWE is a potentially promising non-invasive technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical integrity of pre-operative and post-operative tendons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Thee-Dimensional Single-Track-Location Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollender, Peter; Lipman, Samantha L; Trahey, Gregg E

    2017-12-01

    Conventional multiple-track-location shear wave elasticity imaging (MTL-SWEI) is a powerful tool for noninvasively estimating tissue elasticity. The resolution and noise levels of MTL-SWEI systems, however, are limited by ultrasound speckle. Single-track-location SWEI (STL-SWEI) is a novel variant which fixes the position of the tracking beam and modulates the push location to effectively cancel out the effects of speckle-induced bias. We present here a 3-D STL-SWEI system, which provides full suppression of lateral and elevation speckle bias for high-resolution volumetric elasticity imaging, and requires no spatial smoothing to make accurate measurements of shear wave speed. We demonstrate and analyze the system's performance in homogeneous and layered elasticity phantoms.

  13. Solitary waves on inclined films: their characteristics and the effects on wall shear stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tihon, J. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Serifi, K.; Argyriadi, K.; Bontozoglou, V. [University of Thessaly, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Volos (Greece)

    2006-07-15

    The properties of solitary waves, developing from inlet disturbances of controlled frequency along an inclined film flow, are systematically studied experimentally and computationally. Time-variations of film height and wall shear stress are measured, using respectively a capacitance probe and an electrodiffusion sensor. Computational data are provided from simulations performed by a Galerkin finite element scheme. The height and spacing of solitary humps, their phase velocity and the wavelength of the preceding capillary ripples are reported as functions of the Reynolds number (10shear stress modulation imposed by the passage of solitary waves is studied experimentally and computationally as a function of Re. Distinct nonlinear characteristics are noted, including a steep maximum and a negative minimum, with the effects intensifying at intermediate Re. All computer predictions are found to be in good quantitative agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  14. Shear-wave velocity compilation for Northridge strong-motion recording sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Fumal, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    Borehole and other geotechnical information collected at the strong-motion recording sites of the Northridge earthquake of January 17, 1994 provide an important new basis for the characterization of local site conditions. These geotechnical data, when combined with analysis of strong-motion recordings, provide an empirical basis to evaluate site coefficients used in current versions of US building codes. Shear-wave-velocity estimates to a depth of 30 meters are derived for 176 strong-motion recording sites. The estimates are based on borehole shear-velocity logs, physical property logs, correlations with physical properties and digital geologic maps. Surface-wave velocity measurements and standard penetration data are compiled as additional constraints. These data as compiled from a variety of databases are presented via GIS maps and corresponding tables to facilitate use by other investigators.

  15. Laser generation and detection of longitudinal and shear acoustic waves in a diamond anvil cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigarev, Nikolay; Zinin, Pavel; Ming Lichung; Amulele, George; Bulou, Alain; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2008-01-01

    Laser ultrasonics in a point-source-point-receiver configuration is applied for the evaluation of elastic properties of nontransparent materials in a diamond anvil cell at high pressures. Measurement of both longitudinal and shear acoustic wave velocities in an iron foil at pressures up to 23 GPa does not require any information in addition to the one obtained by all-optical pump-probe technique

  16. Solitary Waves on Inclined Films: Their Characteristics and the Effect on Wall Shear Stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihon, Jaroslav; Serifi, K.; Argyriadi, K.; Bontozoglou, V.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 1 (2006), s. 79-89 ISSN 0723-4864 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072914 Grant - others:HPMT(XE) CT/2000/00074 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : wavy film flow * solitary waves * wall shear stress Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.112, year: 2006

  17. Deviation of longitudinal and shear waves in austenitic stainless steel weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Reimann, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    One of the difficulties associated with the ultrasonic inspection of stainless steel weld metal is the deviation of the ultrasonic beams. This can lead to errors in determining both the location and size of reflectors. The present paper compares experimental and theoretical data related to beam steering for longitudinal and shear waves in a sample of 308 SS weld metal. Agreement between predicted and measured beam deviations is generally good. Reasons for discrepancies are discussed

  18. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Ruediger S; Schuderer, Johanna; Strobel, Deike; Pfeifer, Lukas; Neurath, Markus F; Wildner, Dane

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n=21) and lipomatosis (n=30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n=35), chronic pancreatitis (n=53) and adenocarcinoma (n=52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n=4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of Shear Wave Generation by Decoupled and Partially Coupled Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-31

    The explosive source is on scale relative to the cavity size. Two factors suggest that both explosions m ight act as spherical seism ic sources...REFERENCES Baker, G. E., H. Xu, and J. L. Stevens (2009), Generation of Shear Waves from Explosions in Water-Filled Cavities, submitted to Bull. Seism ...I: Seismic Spectrum Scaling, Bull. Seism . Soc. Am., 61, 1675-1692 Murphy, J. (1969), Discussion of Paper by D. Springer, M. Denny, J. Healy, and W

  20. Preliminary investigation of ultrasonic shear wave holography with a view to the inspection of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, E.E.; Clare, A.B.; Shepherd, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    The manner in which holography would fit into the general scheme of pressure vessel inspection is discussed. Compared to conventional A, B and C presentations holography requires a different processing of the ultrasonic signal and a mechanical scan which may be more demanding than that normally provided for a C display. Preliminary results are presented of the examination of artificial defects in steel plate using shear wave holography. (author)

  1. Nonlinear standing shear Alfven waves in the Earth`s magnetosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankin, R.; Frycz, P.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Samson, J. C. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    1994-11-01

    We present theory and numerical simulations of strong nonlinear effects in standing shear Alfven waves (SAWs) in the Earth`s magnetosphere, which is modeled as a finite size box with straight magnetic lines and (partially) reflecting boundaries. In a low beta plasma it is shown that the ponderomotive force can lead to a large-amplitude SAW spatial harmonic generation due to nonlinear coupling between the SAW and a slow magnetosonic wave. The nonlinear coupling leads to secularly growing frequency shifts, and in the case of driven systems, nonlinear dephasing can lead to saturation of the driven wave fields. The results are discussed on the context of their possible relevance to the theory of standing ionospheric cavity wave modes and field line resonances in the high-latitude magnetosphere.

  2. The MaCWAVE program to study gravity wave influences on the polar mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Goldberg

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available MaCWAVE (Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending VErtically was a highly coordinated rocket, ground-based, and satellite program designed to address gravity wave forcing of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT. The MaCWAVE program was conducted at the Norwegian Andøya Rocket Range (ARR, 69.3° N in July 2002, and continued at the Swedish Rocket Range (Esrange, 67.9° N during January 2003. Correlative instrumentation included the ALOMAR MF and MST radars and RMR and Na lidars, Esrange MST and meteor radars and RMR lidar, radiosondes, and TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite measurements of thermal structures. The data have been used to define both the mean fields and the wave field structures and turbulence generation leading to forcing of the large-scale flow. In summer, launch sequences coupled with ground-based measurements at ARR addressed the forcing of the summer mesopause environment by anticipated convective and shear generated gravity waves. These motions were measured with two 12-h rocket sequences, each involving one Terrier-Orion payload accompanied by a mix of MET rockets, all at ARR in Norway. The MET rockets were used to define the temperature and wind structure of the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Terrier-Orions were designed to measure small-scale plasma fluctuations and turbulence that might be induced by wave breaking in the mesosphere. For the summer series, three European MIDAS (Middle Atmosphere Dynamics and Structure rockets were also launched from ARR in coordination with the MaCWAVE payloads. These were designed to measure plasma and neutral turbulence within the MLT. The summer program exhibited a number of indications of significant departures of the mean wind and temperature structures from ``normal" polar summer conditions, including an unusually warm mesopause and

  3. Transmural transverse stiffness estimation in vascular shear wave imaging: A simulation and phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuexin; Lo, Ho Yuen; Lee, Wei-Ning

    2017-05-01

    Shear wave imaging has emerged as a potential non-invasive technique for the quantitative assessment of the arterial shear modulus. Nonetheless, the arterial elasticity estimation in the transverse direction has been overlooked compared with the longitudinal direction, and the estimated transmural stiffness has rarely been evaluated. Accurate depiction of the transverse stiffness across the thin arterial wall warrants comprehensive characterization in both normal and pathological conditions. This study estimated the transmural arterial shear modulus in both the longitudinal ( μ Long) and transverse directions ( μ Trans) using group ( c T) and phase velocities ( c p h) in finite element models and hollow cylindrical tissue-mimicking phantoms with various shape factors. The results were validated against mechanical testing. Zero-order antisymmetric Lamb wave and circumferential Lamb type wave models were considered in the longitudinal and transverse directions of the thin-walled hollow cylinder, respectively. The results derived from the model with the thin plate assumption confirmed that c T underestimated μ Long and μ Trans. Unlike the c p h-based μ Long estimates that were in excellent agreement with measured values, the c p h-based μ Trans estimates were found to be comparable to c p h-based μ Long at the inner wall but increased radially outward. Transmural μ Trans estimation using c p h was demonstrated to be feasible for thin-walled hollow cylinders but necessitated careful account of the wall geometry, in particular the shape factor.

  4. Shear wave prediction using committee fuzzy model constrained by lithofacies, Zagros basin, SW Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroodi, Sadjad Kazem; Ghafoori, Mohammad; Ansari, Hamid Reza; Lashkaripour, Golamreza; Ghanadian, Mostafa

    2017-02-01

    The main purpose of this study is to introduce the geological controlling factors in improving an intelligence-based model to estimate shear wave velocity from seismic attributes. The proposed method includes three main steps in the framework of geological events in a complex sedimentary succession located in the Persian Gulf. First, the best attributes were selected from extracted seismic data. Second, these attributes were transformed into shear wave velocity using fuzzy inference systems (FIS) such as Sugeno's fuzzy inference (SFIS), adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference (ANFIS) and optimized fuzzy inference (OFIS). Finally, a committee fuzzy machine (CFM) based on bat-inspired algorithm (BA) optimization was applied to combine previous predictions into an enhanced solution. In order to show the geological effect on improving the prediction, the main classes of predominate lithofacies in the reservoir of interest including shale, sand, and carbonate were selected and then the proposed algorithm was performed with and without lithofacies constraint. The results showed a good agreement between real and predicted shear wave velocity in the lithofacies-based model compared to the model without lithofacies especially in sand and carbonate.

  5. Shear wave velocity of the healthy thyroid gland in children with acoustic radiation force impulse elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan Bilgici, Meltem; Sağlam, Dilek; Delibalta, Semra; Yücel, Serap; Tomak, Leman; Elmalı, Muzaffer

    2018-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is a kind of shear wave elastography that can be used in children for differentiating thyroid pathologies. Possible changes in the healthy thyroid gland in children may create difficulties in the use of shear wave velocities (SWV) in thyroid pathologies. The aim of this study was to define the normal values of SWV for the healthy thyroid gland in children, elucidate the correlation of the SWV values with potential influencing factors, and evaluate intra-operator reproducibility of the SWV. Between January 2015 and December 2015, a total of 145 healthy children (81 girls, 64 boys; mean age, 10.5 ± 3.14 years; range 6-17 years) were enrolled in the study. The SWV and volume of the thyroid gland were determined. The mean shear wave velocity of the thyroid gland was 1.22 ± 0.20 m/s. There was no correlation between age and the mean SWV of the thyroid gland (Spearman Rho = 0.049, p = 0.556). There was also no correlation between the thyroid gland volume or BSA and the mean SWV. The only correlation detected was between BSA and total thyroid gland volume (p thyroid gland in children was determined. There was no correlation between the SWV of the thyroid gland and age, BSA, or thyroid gland volume.

  6. Shear wave velocity versus quality factor: results from seismic noise recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxberger, Tobias; Pilz, Marco; Parolai, Stefano

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of the shear wave velocity (vs) and shear wave quality factor (Qs) for the shallow structure below a site is necessary to characterize its site response. In the past, methods based on the analysis of seismic noise have been shown to be very efficient for providing a sufficiently accurate estimation of the vs versus depth at reasonable costs for engineering seismology purposes. In addition, a slight modification of the same method has proved to be able to provide realistic Qs versus depth estimates. In this study, data sets of seismic noise recorded by microarrays of seismic stations in different geological environments of Europe and Central Asia are used to calculate both vs and Qs versus depth profiles. Analogous to the generally adopted approach in seismic hazard assessment for mapping the average shear wave velocity in the uppermost 30 m (vs30) as a proxy of the site response, this approach was also applied to the quality factor within the uppermost 30 m (Qs30). A slightly inverse correlation between both parameters is found based on a methodological consistent determination for different sites. Consequently, a combined assessment of vs and Qs by seismic noise analysis has the potential to provide a more comprehensive description of the geological structure below a site.

  7. Bayesian inversion of surface-wave data for radial and azimuthal shear-wave anisotropy, with applications to central Mongolia and west-central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenna, Matteo; Lebedev, Sergei

    2018-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy provides important information on the deformation history of the Earth's interior. Rayleigh and Love surface-waves are sensitive to and can be used to determine both radial and azimuthal shear-wave anisotropies at depth, but parameter trade-offs give rise to substantial model non-uniqueness. Here, we explore the trade-offs between isotropic and anisotropic structure parameters and present a suite of methods for the inversion of surface-wave, phase-velocity curves for radial and azimuthal anisotropies. One Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) implementation inverts Rayleigh and Love dispersion curves for a radially anisotropic shear velocity profile of the crust and upper mantle. Another McMC implementation inverts Rayleigh phase velocities and their azimuthal anisotropy for profiles of vertically polarized shear velocity and its depth-dependent azimuthal anisotropy. The azimuthal anisotropy inversion is fully non-linear, with the forward problem solved numerically at different azimuths for every model realization, which ensures that any linearization biases are avoided. The computations are performed in parallel, in order to reduce the computing time. The often challenging issue of data noise estimation is addressed by means of a Hierarchical Bayesian approach, with the variance of the noise treated as an unknown during the radial anisotropy inversion. In addition to the McMC inversions, we also present faster, non-linear gradient-search inversions for the same anisotropic structure. The results of the two approaches are mutually consistent; the advantage of the McMC inversions is that they provide a measure of uncertainty of the models. Applying the method to broad-band data from the Baikal-central Mongolia region, we determine radial anisotropy from the crust down to the transition-zone depths. Robust negative anisotropy (Vsh < Vsv) in the asthenosphere, at 100-300 km depths, presents strong new evidence for a vertical component of asthenospheric

  8. On the use of the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute's prototype seabed-coupled shear wave vibrator for shallow soil characterization - I. Acquisition and processing of multimodal surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, Maarten; Madshus, Christian; Socco, Valentina L.; Maraschini, Margherita; Sparrevik, Per M.; Westerdahl, Harald; Duffaut, Kenneth; Skomedal, Eiliv; Bjørnarâ, Tore I.

    2011-04-01

    Pure shear wave data are only very rarely acquired for offshore site investigations and exploration. Here, we present details of a novel, seabed-coupled, shear wave vibrator and field data recorded by a densely populated, multicomponent ocean-bottom cable, to improve shallow soil characterization. The prototype shear wave vibrator uses vibroseis technology adopted for marine environments through its instalment on top of a suction anchor, assuring seabed coupling in combination with self-weight penetration. The prototype is depth rated to 1500 m water depth, and can be rotated while installed in the seabed. The philosophy is to acquire fully complementary seismic data to conventional P- and P-to-S-converted waves, in particular for 2-D profiling, VSP (vertical seismic profiling) or monitoring purposes, thereby exploiting advantages of shear waves over compressional waves for determining, for example, anisotropy, small-strain shear modulus and excess pore pressures/effective stress. The source was primarily designed for reservoir depths. However, significant energy is emitted as surface waves, which provide detailed geotechnical information through mapping of shear wave velocities in potentially high resolution of the upper soil units. To fully utilize pure shear wave content, a proper analysis of surface waves is paramount, due to the proximity of surface wave propagation speed with shear wave velocities. The experiment was carried out in the northern North Sea in 364 m water depth. Cable dragging was necessary to obtain close receiver spacing (2.5 m effective spacing), with total line length of 600 m. Frequency-waveform transforms reveal both Scholte and Love waves. Up to six surface wave modes are identified, that is, fundamental mode and several higher surface wave modes. The occurrence of these two different dispersive surface wave types with well-resolved higher modes allows for a unique analysis and inversion scheme for high-resolution mapping of physical

  9. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave speeds in compacted, polycrystalline ice lh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on laboratory measurements of compressional- and shear-wave speeds in a compacted, polycrystalline ice-Ih sample. The sample was made from triply distilled water that had been frozen into single crystal ice, ground into small grains, and sieved to extract the 180–250 µm diameter fraction. Porosity was eliminated from the sample by compacting the granular ice between a hydraulically driven piston and a fixed end plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Based on simultaneous compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements, we calculated Poisson's ratio and compressional-wave, bulk, and shear moduli from –20 to –5°C and 22 to 33 MPa.

  10. A New Kind of Circular Polarization Leaky-Wave Antenna Based on Substrate Integrated Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new kind of circular polarization leaky-wave antenna with N-shaped slots cut in the upper side of substrate integrated waveguide (SIW is investigated and presented. The radiation pattern and polarization axial ratio of the leaky-wave antenna are studied. The results show that the width of N-shaped slots has significant effect on the circular polarization property of the antenna. By properly choosing structural parameters, the SIW based leaky-wave antenna can realize circular polarization with excellent axial ratio in 8 GHz satellite band.

  11. On the Dynamics of Two-Dimensional Capillary-Gravity Solitary Waves with a Linear Shear Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dali Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical study of the dynamics of two-dimensional capillary-gravity solitary waves on a linear shear current is presented in this paper. The numerical method is based on the time-dependent conformal mapping. The stability of different kinds of solitary waves is considered. Both depression wave and large amplitude elevation wave are found to be stable, while small amplitude elevation wave is unstable to the small perturbation, and it finally evolves to be a depression wave with tails, which is similar to the irrotational capillary-gravity waves.

  12. Surface effects on anti-plane shear waves propagating in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Chunli; Chen, Weiqiu; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-01-01

    Material surfaces may have a remarkable effect on the mechanical behavior of magneto-electro-elastic (or multiferroic) structures at nanoscale. In this paper, a surface magneto-electro-elasticity theory (or effective boundary condition formulation), which governs the motion of the material surface of magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates, is established by employing the state-space formalism. The properties of anti-plane shear (SH) waves propagating in a transversely isotropic magneto-electro-elastic plate with nanothickness are investigated by taking surface effects into account. The size-dependent dispersion relations of both antisymmetric and symmetric SH waves are presented. The thickness-shear frequencies and the asymptotic characteristics of the dispersion relations considering surface effects are determined analytically as well. Numerical results show that surface effects play a very pronounced role in elastic wave propagation in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates, and the dispersion properties depend strongly on the chosen surface material parameters of magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates. As a consequence, it is possible to modulate the waves in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates through surface engineering. (paper)

  13. Shear-wave sonoelastography for assessing masseter muscle hardness in comparison with strain sonoelastography: study with phantoms and healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariji, Yoshiko; Nakayama, Miwa; Nishiyama, Wataru; Nozawa, Michihito; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Shear-wave sonoelastography is expected to facilitate low operator dependency, high reproducibility and quantitative evaluation, whereas there are few reports on available normative values of in vivo tissue in head and neck fields. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliabilities on measuring hardness using shear-wave sonoelastography and to clarify normal values of masseter muscle hardness in healthy volunteers. Methods Phantoms with known hardness ranging from 20 to 140 kPa were scanned with shear-wave sonoelastography, and inter- and intraoperator reliabilities were examined compared with strain sonoelastography. The relationships between the actual and measured hardness were analyzed. The masseter muscle hardness in 30 healthy volunteers was measured using shear-wave sonoelastography. The inter- and intraoperator intraclass correlation coefficients were almost perfect. Strong correlations were seen between the actual and measured hardness. The mean hardness of the masseter muscles in healthy volunteers was 42.82 ± 5.56 kPa at rest and 53.36 ± 8.46 kPa during jaw clenching. The hardness measured with shear-wave sonoelastography showed high-level reliability. Shear-wave sonoelastography may be suitable for evaluation of the masseter muscles.

  14. Towards a new tool to develop a 3-D shear-wave velocity model from converted waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colavitti, Leonardo; Hetényi, György

    2017-04-01

    The main target of this work is to develop a new method in which we exploit converted waves to construct a fully 3-D shear-wave velocity model of the crust. A reliable 3-D model is very important in Earth sciences because geological structures may vary significantly in their lateral dimension. In particular, shear-waves provide valuable complementary information with respect to P-waves because they usually guarantee a much better correlation in terms of rock density and mechanical properties, reducing the interpretation ambiguities. Therefore, it is fundamental to develop a new technique to improve structural images and to describe different lithologies in the crust. In this study we start from the analysis of receiver functions (RF, Langston, 1977), which are nowadays largely used for structural investigations based on passive seismic experiments, to map Earth discontinuities at depth. The RF technique is also commonly used to invert for velocity structure beneath single stations. Here, we plan to combine two strengths of RF method: shear-wave velocity inversion and dense arrays. Starting from a simple 3-D forward model, synthetic RFs are obtained extracting the structure along a ray to match observed data. During the inversion, thanks to a dense stations network, we aim to build and develop a multi-layer crustal model for shear-wave velocity. The initial model should be chosen simple to make sure that the inversion process is not influenced by the constraints in terms of depth and velocity posed at the beginning. The RFs inversion represents a complex problem because the amplitude and the arrival time of different phases depend in a non-linear way on the depth of interfaces and the characteristics of the velocity structure. The solution we envisage to manage the inversion problem is the stochastic Neighbourhood Algorithm (NA, Sambridge, 1999a, b), whose goal is to find an ensemble of models that sample the good data-fitting regions of a multidimensional parameter

  15. Piezoelectricity induced defect modes for shear waves in a periodically stratified supperlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliposyan, Davit

    2018-01-01

    Properties of shear waves in a piezoelectric stratified periodic structure with a defect layer are studied for a superlattice with identical piezoelectric materials in a unit cell. Due to the electro-mechanical coupling in piezoelectric materials the structure exhibits defect modes in the superlattice with full transmission peaks both for full contact and electrically shorted interfaces. The results show an existence of one or two transmission peaks depending on the interfacial conditions. In the long wavelength region where coupling between electro-magnetic and elastic waves creates frequency band gaps the defect layer introduces one or two defect modes transmitting both electro-magnetic and elastic energies. Other parameters affecting the defect modes are the thickness of the defect layer, differences in refractive indexes and the magnitude of the angle of the incident wave. The results of the paper may be useful in the design of narrow band filters or multi-channel piezoelectric filters.

  16. Shallow shear-wave reflection seismics in the tsunami struck Krueng Aceh River Basin, Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Polom

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the project "Management of Georisk" (MANGEONAD of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR, Hanover, high resolution shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam, North Sumatra in cooperation with the Government of Indonesia, local counterparts, and the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences, Hanover. The investigations were expected to support classification of earthquake site effects for the reconstruction of buildings and infrastructure as well as for groundwater exploration. The study focussed on the city of Banda Aceh and the surroundings of Aceh Besar. The shear-wave seismic surveys were done parallel to standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests to support subsequent site specific statistical calibration. They were also partly supplemented by shallow p-wave seismics for the identification of (a elastic subsurface parameters and (b zones with abundance of groundwater. Evaluation of seismic site effects based on shallow reflection seismics has in fact been found to be a highly useful method in Aceh province. In particular, use of a vibratory seismic source was essential for successful application of shear-wave seismics in the city of Banda Aceh and in areas with compacted ground like on farm tracks in the surroundings, presenting mostly agricultural land use areas. We thus were able to explore the mechanical stiffness of the subsurface down to 100 m depth, occasionally even deeper, with remarkably high resolution. The results were transferred into geotechnical site classification in terms of the International Building Code (IBC, 2003. The seismic images give also insights into the history of the basin sedimentation processes of the Krueng Aceh River delta, which is relevant for the exploration of new areas for construction of safe foundations of buildings and for identification of fresh water aquifers in the tsunami

  17. High-n ideal and resistive shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chen, L.; Chance, M.S.

    1984-05-01

    Ideal and resistive MHD equations for the shear Alfven waves are studied in a low-β toroidal model by employing the high-n ballooning formalism. The ion sound effects are neglected. For an infinite shear slab, the ideal MHD model gives rise to a continuous spectrum of real frequencies and discrete eigenmodes (Alfven-Landau modes) with complex frequencies. With toroidal coupling effects due to nonuniform toroidal magnetic field, the continuum is broken up into small continuum bands and new discrete toroidal eigenmodes can exist inside the continuum gaps. Unstable ballooning eigenmodes are also introduced by the bad curvature when β > β/sub c/. The resistivity (n) can be considered perturbatively for the ideal modes. In addition, four branches of resistive modes are induced by the resistivity: (1) Resistive entropy modes which are stable (Δ' < 0) with frequencies approaching zero as n/sup 3/5/, (3) Resistive periodic shear Alfven waves which approach the finite frequency end points of the continuum bands and n/sup 1/2, and (4) Resistive ballooning modes which are purely growing with growth rate proportional to eta/sup 1/3/β/sup 2/3/ as eta → O and β → O

  18. Subsurface structure of the Nojima fault from dipole shear velocity/anisotropy and borehole Stoneley wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, H. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Yamamoto, H.; Brie, A.

    1996-10-01

    Fracture and permeability in the fault zone of the active fault drilling at the Nojima fault were evaluated from acoustic waveforms. There were several permeable intervals in the fault zone. There was strong Stoneley wave attenuation, very large S-Se below the fault and in the interval above the fault. In the fault zone, there were also several short intervals where S-Se was very large; 667 m-674 m and 706 m-710 m. In these intervals, the Stoneley attenuation was large, but there was no Stoneley reflection from within the interval. Reflections were observed at the upper and lower boundaries, going away from the bed up above, and down below. In this well, the shear wave was very strongly attenuated at and below the fault zone. The fast shear azimuth changed at the fault. The slowness anisotropy was fairly strong above the fault from 602 m to 612 m, but smaller below the fault. The changes in fast shear azimuth were much more pronounced near the fault, which suggested a strong influence of the fault. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Polarization and Compressibility of Oblique Kinetic Alfven Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunana, Peter; Goldstein, M. L.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Laveder, D.; Zank, G. P.

    2012-01-01

    Even though solar wind, as a collisionless plasma, is properly described by the kineticMaxwell-Vlasov description, it can be argued that much of our understanding of solar wind observational data comes from an interpretation and numerical modeling which is based on a fluid description of magnetohydrodynamics. In recent years, there has been a significant interest in better understanding the importance of kinetic effects, i.e. the differences between the kinetic and usual fluid descriptions. Here we concentrate on physical properties of oblique kinetic Alfvn waves (KAWs), which are often recognized as one of the key ingredients in the solar wind turbulence cascade. We use three different fluid models with various degrees of complexity and calculate polarization and magnetic compressibility of oblique KAWs (propagation angle q = 88), which we compare to solutions derived from linear kinetic theory. We explore a wide range of possible proton plasma b = [0.1,10.0] and a wide range of length scales krL = [0.001,10.0]. It is shown that the classical isotropic two-fluid model is very compressible in comparison with kinetic theory and that the largest discrepancy occurs at scales larger than the proton gyroscale. We also show that the two-fluid model contains a large error in the polarization of electric field, even at scales krL 1. Furthermore, to understand these discrepancies between the two-fluid model and the kinetic theory, we employ two versions of the Landau fluid model that incorporate linear low-frequency kinetic effects such as Landau damping and finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections into the fluid description. It is shown that Landau damping significantly reduces the magnetic compressibility and that FLR corrections (i.e. nongyrotropic contributions) are required to correctly capture the polarization.We also show that, in addition to Landau damping, FLR corrections are necessary to accurately describe the damping rate of KAWs. We conclude that kinetic effects

  20. Towards a new technique to construct a 3D shear-wave velocity model based on converted waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, G.; Colavitti, L.

    2017-12-01

    A 3D model is essential in all branches of solid Earth sciences because geological structures can be heterogeneous and change significantly in their lateral dimension. The main target of this research is to build a crustal S-wave velocity structure in 3D. The currently popular methodologies to construct 3D shear-wave velocity models are Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) and Local Earthquake Tomography (LET). Here we propose a new technique to map Earth discontinuities and velocities at depth based on the analysis of receiver functions. The 3D model is obtained by simultaneously inverting P-to-S converted waveforms recorded at a dense array. The individual velocity models corresponding to each trace are extracted from the 3D initial model along ray paths that are calculated using the shooting method, and the velocity model is updated during the inversion. We consider a spherical approximation of ray propagation using a global velocity model (iasp91, Kennett and Engdahl, 1991) for the teleseismic part, while we adopt Cartesian coordinates and a local velocity model for the crust. During the inversion process we work with a multi-layer crustal model for shear-wave velocity, with a flexible mesh for the depth of the interfaces. The RFs inversion represents a complex problem because the amplitude and the arrival time of different phases depend in a non-linear way on the depth of interfaces and the characteristics of the velocity structure. The solution we envisage to manage the inversion problem is the stochastic Neighbourhood Algorithm (NA, Sambridge, 1999), whose goal is to find an ensemble of models that sample the good data-fitting regions of a multidimensional parameter space. Depending on the studied area, this method can accommodate possible independent and complementary geophysical data (gravity, active seismics, LET, ANT, etc.), helping to reduce the non-linearity of the inversion. Our first focus of application is the Central Alps, where a 20-year long dataset of

  1. Polarization attraction using counter-propagating waves in optical fiber at telecommunication wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitois, S; Fatome, J; Millot, G

    2008-04-28

    In this work, we report the experimental observation of a polarization attraction process which can occur in optical fibers at telecommunication wavelengths. More precisely, we have numerically and experimentally shown that a polarization attractor, based on the injection of two counter-propagating waves around 1.55microm into a 2-m long high nonlinear fiber, can transform any input polarization state into a unique well-defined output polarization state.

  2. Quantifying the passive stretching response of human tibialis anterior muscle using shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Terry K; Guo, Jing-Yi; Cohen, Jeffrey H; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying passive stretching responses of individual muscles helps the diagnosis of muscle disorders and aids the evaluation of surgical/rehabilitation treatments. Utilizing an animal model, we demonstrated that shear elastic modulus measured by supersonic shear wave elastography increases linearly with passive muscle force. This study aimed to use this state-of-the-art technology to study the relationship between shear elastic modulus and ankle dorsi-plantarflexion angle of resting tibialis anterior muscles and extract physiologically meaningful parameters from the elasticity-angle curve to better quantify passive stretching responses. Elasticity measurements were made at resting tibialis anterior of 20 healthy subjects with the ankle positioned from 50° plantarflexion to up to 15° dorsiflexion at every 5° for two cycles. Elasticity-angle data was curve-fitted by optimizing slack angle, slack elasticity, and rate of increase in elasticity within a piecewise exponential model. Elasticity-angle data of all subjects were well fitted by the piecewise exponential model with coefficients of determination ranging between 0.973 and 0.995. Mean (SD) of slack angle, slack elasticity, and rate of increase in elasticity were 10.9° (6.3°), 5.8 (1.9) kPa, and 0.0347 (0.0082) respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients of each parameter were 0.852, 0.942, and 0.936 respectively, indicating excellent test-retest reliability. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using supersonic shear wave elastography to quantify passive stretching characteristics of individual muscle and provided preliminary normative values of slack angle, slack elasticity, and rate of increase in elasticity for human tibialis anterior muscles. Future studies will investigate diagnostic values of these parameters in clinical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrical access to critical coupling of circularly polarized waves in graphene chiral metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Teun-Teun; Oh, Sang Soon; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Park, Hyun Sung; Hess, Ortwin; Min, Bumki; Zhang, Shuang

    2017-09-01

    Active control of polarization states of electromagnetic waves is highly desirable because of its diverse applications in information processing, telecommunications, and spectroscopy. However, despite the recent advances using artificial materials, most active polarization control schemes require optical stimuli necessitating complex optical setups. We experimentally demonstrate an alternative-direct electrical tuning of the polarization state of terahertz waves. Combining a chiral metamaterial with a gated single-layer sheet of graphene, we show that transmission of a terahertz wave with one circular polarization can be electrically controlled without affecting that of the other circular polarization, leading to large-intensity modulation depths (>99%) with a low gate voltage. This effective control of polarization is made possible by the full accessibility of three coupling regimes, that is, underdamped, critically damped, and overdamped regimes by electrical control of the graphene properties.

  4. Multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW of models with high shear-wave velocity contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Peterie, S.; Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Schwenk, T.

    2011-01-01

    We use the multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW method to analyze synthetic seismic data calculated using models with high shear-wave velocity Vs contrast. The MASW dispersion-curve images of the Rayleigh wave are obtained using various sets of source-offset and spread-size configurations from the synthetic seismic data and compared with the theoretically calculated fundamental- and higher-mode dispersion-curves. Such tests showed that most of the dispersion-curve images are dominated by higher-mode energy at the low frequencies, especially when analyzing data from long receiver offsets and thus significantly divert from numerically expected dispersion-curve trends, which can lead to significant Vs overestimation. Further analysis showed that using data with relatively short spread lengths and source offsets can image the desired fundamental-mode of the Rayleigh wave that matches the numerically expected dispersion-curve pattern. As a result, it was concluded that it might be possible to avoid higher-mode contamination at low frequencies at sites with high Vs contrast by appropriate selection of spread size and seismic source offset. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  5. Polarization-Based Tests of Gravity with the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Callister

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The direct observation of gravitational waves with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo offers novel opportunities to test general relativity in strong-field, highly dynamical regimes. One such opportunity is the measurement of gravitational-wave polarizations. While general relativity predicts only two tensor gravitational-wave polarizations, general metric theories of gravity allow for up to four additional vector and scalar modes. The detection of these alternative polarizations would represent a clear violation of general relativity. The LIGO-Virgo detection of the binary black hole merger GW170814 has recently offered the first direct constraints on the polarization of gravitational waves. The current generation of ground-based detectors, however, is limited in its ability to sensitively determine the polarization content of transient gravitational-wave signals. Observation of the stochastic gravitational-wave background, in contrast, offers a means of directly measuring generic gravitational-wave polarizations. The stochastic background, arising from the superposition of many individually unresolvable gravitational-wave signals, may be detectable by Advanced LIGO at design sensitivity. In this paper, we present a Bayesian method with which to detect and characterize the polarization of the stochastic background. We explore prospects for estimating parameters of the background and quantify the limits that Advanced LIGO can place on vector and scalar polarizations in the absence of a detection. Finally, we investigate how the introduction of new terrestrial detectors like Advanced Virgo aid in our ability to detect or constrain alternative polarizations in the stochastic background. We find that, although the addition of Advanced Virgo does not notably improve detection prospects, it may dramatically improve our ability to estimate the parameters of backgrounds of mixed polarization.

  6. Concurrent Visualization of Acoustic Radiation Force Displacement and Shear Wave Propagation with 7T MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    Full Text Available Manual palpation is a common and very informative diagnostic tool based on estimation of changes in the stiffness of tissues that result from pathology. In the case of a small lesion or a lesion that is located deep within the body, it is difficult for changes in mechanical properties of tissue to be detected or evaluated via palpation. Furthermore, palpation is non-quantitative and cannot be used to localize the lesion. Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS can also be used to evaluate the properties of biological tissues non-invasively. In this study, an MRgFUS system combines high field (7T MR and 3 MHz focused ultrasound to provide high resolution MR imaging and a small ultrasonic interrogation region (~0.5 x 0.5 x 2 mm, as compared with current clinical systems. MR-Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI provides a reliable and efficient method for beam localization by detecting micron-scale displacements induced by ultrasound mechanical forces. The first aim of this study is to develop a sequence that can concurrently quantify acoustic radiation force displacements and image the resulting transient shear wave. Our motivation in combining these two measurements is to develop a technique that can rapidly provide both ARFI and shear wave velocity estimation data, making it suitable for use in interventional radiology. Secondly, we validate this sequence in vivo by estimating the displacement before and after high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU ablation, and we validate the shear wave velocity in vitro using tissue-mimicking gelatin and tofu phantoms. Such rapid acquisitions are especially useful in interventional radiology applications where minimizing scan time is highly desirable.

  7. Potential use of point shear wave elastography for the pancreas: A single center prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawada, Natsuko, E-mail: kawada-na@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Department of Gastroenterology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Tanaka, Sachiko, E-mail: sachi686@cocoa.plala.or.jp [Osaka Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, 1-6-107, Morinomiya, Johtoh, Osaka 536-8588 (Japan); Uehara, Hiroyuki, E-mail: uehara-hi@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Ohkawa, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: okawa-ka@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Yamai, Takuo, E-mail: yamai-ta@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Takada, Ryoji, E-mail: takada-ry@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Shiroeda, Hisakazu, E-mail: shiroeda@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Arisawa, Tomiyasu, E-mail: tarisawa@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Tomita, Yasuhiko, E-mail: tomota-ya@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    Aim: Clinical use of point shear wave elastography for the liver has been established, however, few studies demonstrated its usefulness for the pancreas. A prospective study was conducted to clarify its feasibility for the pancreas and its usefulness for the identification of high risk group for pancreatic cancer. Patients and methods: Consecutive eighty-five patients underwent point shear wave elastography for the pancreas. The success rate of shear wave velocity (SWV) measurement, that is the number of successful measurements over total 10 measurements, was recorded. The SWV of the pancreas measured at non-tumorous area was compared between patients with and without pancreatic cancer. Factors associated with high SWV were determined by logistic regression model. Results: Sixty patients were included, of these 18 had pancreatic cancer. The success rate of 100% was achieved at the head, the body and the tail of the pancreas in 80%, 83%, and 68% of the patients, respectively. The success rate of ≥80% was achieved in 100%, 100%, and 96% of the patients, respectively. Although mean SWV of the pancreas harboring pancreatic cancer tended to be higher compared with that of the pancreas without cancer (1.51 ± 0.45 m/s vs 1.43 ± 0.28 m/s), they did not reach statistical significance. Multivariate analysis showed that increased amount of alcohol intake was associated with high SWV. Conclusion: The SWV of the pancreas was measured with excellent success rate. However, tendency of higher SWV obtained from the pancreas harboring pancreatic cancer needed to be further investigated.

  8. Plasma turbulence driven by transversely large-scale standing shear Alfvén waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Rao, Sathyanarayan

    2012-01-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study generation of turbulence consisting of transversely small-scale dispersive Alfvén and electrostatic waves when plasma is driven by a large-scale standing shear Alfvén wave (LS-SAW). The standing wave is set up by reflecting a propagating LS-SAW. The ponderomotive force of the standing wave generates transversely large-scale density modifications consisting of density cavities and enhancements. The drifts of the charged particles driven by the ponderomotive force and those directly caused by the fields of the standing LS-SAW generate non-thermal features in the plasma. Parametric instabilities driven by the inherent plasma nonlinearities associated with the LS-SAW in combination with the non-thermal features generate small-scale electromagnetic and electrostatic waves, yielding a broad frequency spectrum ranging from below the source frequency of the LS-SAW to ion cyclotron and lower hybrid frequencies and beyond. The power spectrum of the turbulence has peaks at distinct perpendicular wave numbers (k ⊥ ) lying in the range d e −1 -6d e −1 , d e being the electron inertial length, suggesting non-local parametric decay from small to large k ⊥ . The turbulence spectrum encompassing both electromagnetic and electrostatic fluctuations is also broadband in parallel wave number (k || ). In a standing-wave supported density cavity, the ratio of the perpendicular electric to magnetic field amplitude is R(k ⊥ ) = |E ⊥ (k ⊥ )/|B ⊥ (k ⊥ )| ≪ V A for k ⊥ d e A is the Alfvén velocity. The characteristic features of the broadband plasma turbulence are compared with those available from satellite observations in space plasmas.

  9. The polarization evolution of electromagnetic waves as a diagnostic method for a motional plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokhi, Alireza; Mehdian, Hassan; Hajisharifi, Kamal; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2017-12-01

    The polarization evolution of electromagnetic (EM) radiation propagating through an electron beam-ion channel system is studied in the presence of self-magnetic field. Solving the fluid-Maxwell equations to obtain the medium dielectric tensor, the Stokes vector-Mueller matrix approach is employed to determine the polarization of the launched EM wave at any point in the propagation direction, applying the space-dependent Mueller matrix on the initial polarization vector of the wave at the plasma-vacuum interface. Results show that the polarization evolution of the wave is periodic in space along the beam axis with the specified polarization wavelength. Using the obtained results, a novel diagnostic method based on the polarization evolution of the EM waves is proposed to evaluate the electron beam density and velocity. Moreover, to use the mentioned plasma system as a polarizer, the fraction of the output radiation power transmitted through a motional plasma crossed with the input polarization is calculated. The results of the present investigation will greatly contribute to design a new EM amplifier with fixed polarization or EM polarizer, as well as a new diagnostic approach for the electron beam system where the polarimetric method is employed.

  10. Multi-Channel Optical Coherence Elastography Using Relative and Absolute Shear-Wave Time of Flight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elyas, Eli; Grimwood, Alex; Erler, Janine Terra

    2017-01-01

    Elastography, the imaging of elastic properties of soft tissues, is well developed for macroscopic clinical imaging of soft tissues and can provide useful information about various pathological processes which is complementary to that provided by the original modality. Scaling down...... propagating in a three-dimensional (3D) medium. A needle, embedded in the gel, was excited to vibrate along its long axis and the displacement as a function of time and distance from the needle associated with the resulting shear waves was detected using four M-mode images acquired simultaneously using...

  11. Correlation of Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography with Pathological Analysis in a Xenografic Tumour Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elyas, Eli; Papaevangelou, Efthymia; Alles, Erwin J

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential value of ultrasound (US) shear wave elastography (SWE) in assessing the relative change in elastic modulus in colorectal adenocarcinoma xenograft models in vivo and investigate any correlation with histological analysis. We sought to test...... = 0.37, p = 0.008). Irinotecan administration caused significant delay in the tumour growth (p = 0.02) when compared to control, but no significant difference in elastic modulus was detected. Histological analysis revealed a significant correlation between tumour necrosis and elastic modulus (r = -0...

  12. Anisotropic Velocity Structure near the Alpine Fault, New Zealand, from Shear Wave Splitting of Local Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. K.; Boese, C. M.; Townend, J.

    2015-12-01

    We use shear wave splitting of local earthquakes to characterize seismic anisotropy along the central portion of the transpressive, plate-bounding Alpine Fault and surrounding the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) boreholes. We combine data from the SAMBA network of 2 Hz borehole seismometers, the DFDP10 short-period surface network, and the GeoNet broadband network. Using the MFAST automatic shear wave splitting program applied to hand-picked S arrivals, 1.5 years of data yielded 15,902 measurements. Of these, 1291 measurements from 23 stations were of high quality (grades of A or B); their fast azimuths exhibit three predominant trends: one NE/SW, subparallel to the Alpine Fault, one perpendicular to it and the third E-W. The last of these, observed at the six stations closest to the fault, is roughly parallel to the maximum principal stress direction. Some stations show a single population of fast directions and others show two or more populations. We consider that the orientations are likely caused by a combination of stress-controlled, crack-induced anisotropy and structure-controlled anisotropy associated with the fault fabric and its interaction with the dominantly schistose rocks in the region. Delay times for the highest-quality measurements average 0.067±0.002 s, consistent with small splitting of the high-frequency phases (dominant frequencies 6.9±0.07 Hz) with short path lengths (4.5±0.09 s travel-time). If the anisotropy is present along the entire path, the percentage anisotropy is 1. 5%. However, delay times do not increase much with hypocentral distance, suggesting near-surface effects are dominant and hence that anisotropy is larger near the surface. To ensure the shear-wave splitting results do not depend on the particular algorithm used, a second semi-automated processing routine with different shear-wave splitting criteria is applied. A comparison of the results is anticipated to help to eliminate any possible artefacts.

  13. Shear-wave elastography in breast ultrasonography: the state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youk, Ji Hyun; Gweon, Hye Mi; Son, Eun Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Shear-wave elastography (SWE) is a recently developed ultrasound technique that can visualize and measure tissue elasticity. In breast ultrasonography, SWE has been shown to be useful for differentiating benign breast lesions from malignant breast lesions, and it has been suggested that SWE enhances the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography, potentially improving the specificity of conventional ultrasonography using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System criteria. More recently, not only has SWE been proven useful for the diagnosis of breast cancer, but has also been shown to provide valuable information that can be used as a preoperative predictor of the prognosis or response to chemotherapy.

  14. Shear-wave elastography in breast ultrasonography: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Youk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shear-wave elastography (SWE is a recently developed ultrasound technique that can visualize and measure tissue elasticity. In breast ultrasonography, SWE has been shown to be useful for differentiating benign breast lesions from malignant breast lesions, and it has been suggested that SWE enhances the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography, potentially improving the specificity of conventional ultrasonography using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System criteria. More recently, not only has SWE been proven useful for the diagnosis of breast cancer, but has also been shown to provide valuable information that can be used as a preoperative predictor of the prognosis or response to chemotherapy.

  15. Solitons and Vortices of Shear-Flow-Modified Dust Acoustic Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Usman; Saleem, Hamid; Shan, Shaukat Ali

    2018-01-01

    Shear-flow-driven instability and a modified nonlinear dust acoustic wave (mDAW) are investigated in a dusty plasma. In the nonlinear regime a one dimensional mDAW produces pulse-type solitons and in the two-dimensional case, the dipolar vortex solutions are obtained. This investigation is relevant to magnetospheres of planets such as Saturn and Jupiter as well as dusty interstellar clouds. Here, the theoretical model is applied to Saturn's F-rings, and shape of the nonlinear electric field structures is discussed.

  16. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic regionn, California ( USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C.; Ho-Liu, P.; Rinn, D.; Hiroo, Kanamori

    1988-01-01

    We use seismograms of local earthquakes to image relative shear wave attenuation structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of E California. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles, indicating strong lateral variations in S wave attenuation in the area. 3-D images of the relative S wave attenuation structure are obtained from forward modeling and a back projection inversion of the amplitude data. The results indicate regions within a 20 by 30 by 10 km volume of the shallow crust (one shallower than 5 km) that severely attenuate SV waves passing through them. These anomalies lie beneath the Indian Wells Valley, 30 km S of the Coso volcanic field, and are coincident with the epicentral locations of recent earthquake swarms. No anomalous attenuation is seen beneath the Coso volcanic field above about 5 km depth. Geologic relations and the coincidence of anomalously slow P wave velocities suggest that the attenuation anomalies may be related to magmatism along the E Sierra front.-from Authors

  17. The nonlinear effects on the characteristics of gravity wave packets: dispersion and polarization relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-D. Zhang

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing the results of the numerical simulations of nonlinear propagation of three Gaussian gravity-wave packets in isothermal atmosphere individually, the nonlinear effects on the characteristics of gravity waves are studied quantitatively. The analyses show that during the nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packets the mean flows are accelerated and the vertical wavelengths show clear reduction due to nonlinearity. On the other hand, though nonlinear effects exist, the time variations of the frequencies of gravity wave packets are close to those derived from the dispersion relation and the amplitude and phase relations of wave-associated disturbance components are consistent with the predictions of the polarization relation of gravity waves. This indicates that the dispersion and polarization relations based on the linear gravity wave theory can be applied extensively in the nonlinear region.Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides

  18. Shear-wave reflection imaging using a MEMS-based 3C landstreamer and a vertical impact source - an esker study in SW Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodic, Bojan; Malehmir, Alireza; Maries, Georgiana; Ahokangas, Elina; Mäkinen, Joni; Pasanen, Antti

    2017-04-01

    Higher resolution of S-wave seismic data compared to the P-wave ones are attractive for the researches working with the seismic methods. This is particularly true for near-surface applications due to significantly lower shear-wave velocities of unconsolidated sediments. Shear-wave imaging, however, poses certain restrictions on both source and receiver selections and also processing strategies. With three component (3C) seismic receivers becoming more affordable and used, shear-wave imaging from vertical sources is attracting more attention for near-surface applications. Theoretically, a vertical impact source will always excite both P- and S-waves although the excited S-waves are radially polarized (SV). There is an exchange of seismic energy between the vertical and radial component of the seismic wavefield. Additionally, it is theoretically accepted that there is no energy conversion or exchange from vertical into the transverse (or SH) component of the seismic wavefield, and the SH-waves can only be generated using SH sources. With the objectives of imaging esker structure (glacial sediments), water table and depth to bedrock, we conducted a seismic survey in Virttaankangas, in southwestern Finland. A bobcat-mounted vertical drop hammer (500 kg) was used as the seismic source. To obtain better source coupling, a 75×75×1.5 cm steel plate was mounted at the bottom of the hammer casing and all the hits made on this plate after placing it firmly on the ground at every shot point. For the data recording, we used a state-of-the-art comprising of 100 units, 240 m-long, 3C MEMS (micro electro-mechanical system) based seismic landstreamer developed at Uppsala University. Although the focus of the study was on the vertical component data, careful inspection of the transverse (SH) component of the raw data revealed clear shear wave reflections (normal moveout velocities ranging from 280-350 m/s at 50 m depth) on several shot gathers. This indicated potential for their

  19. Analytical treatment of particle motion in circularly polarized slab-mode wave fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Cedric; Vainio, Rami; Spanier, Felix

    2018-02-01

    Wave-particle interaction is a key process in particle diffusion in collisionless plasmas. We look into the interaction of single plasma waves with individual particles and discuss under which circumstances this is a chaotic process, leading to diffusion. We derive the equations of motion for a particle in the fields of a magnetostatic, circularly polarized, monochromatic wave and show that no chaotic particle motion can arise under such circumstances. A novel and exact analytic solution for the equations is presented. Additional plasma waves lead to a breakdown of the analytic solution and chaotic particle trajectories become possible. We demonstrate this effect by considering a linearly polarized, monochromatic wave, which can be seen as the superposition of two circularly polarized waves. Test particle simulations are provided to illustrate and expand our analytical considerations.

  20. The stability of internal transport barriers to MHD ballooning modes and drift waves: A formalism for low magnetic shear and for velocity shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Hastie, R.J.; Webster, A.J.; Wilson, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    Tokamak discharges with internal transport barriers (ITBs) provide improved confinement, so it is important to understand their stability properties. The stability to an important class of modes with high wave-numbers perpendicular to the magnetic field, is usually studied with the standard ballooning transformation and eikonal approach. However, ITBs are often characterised by radial q profiles that have regions of negative or low magnetic shear and by radially sheared electric fields. Both these features affect the validity of the standard method. A new approach to calculating stability in these circumstances is developed and applied to ideal MHD ballooning modes and to micro-instabilities responsible for anomalous transport. (author)

  1. Acute effects of static stretching on the hamstrings using shear elastic modulus determined by ultrasound shear wave elastography: Differences in flexibility between hamstring muscle components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umegaki, Hiroki; Ikezoe, Tome; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Nishishita, Satoru; Kobayashi, Takuya; Fujita, Kosuke; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-08-01

    Static stretching (SS) with hip flexion and knee extension is often used to stretch the hamstrings. However, it is unclear whether there are the differences in the acute effect of this SS maneuver on flexibility between each component of the hamstrings, namely the semitendinosus (ST), semimembranosus (SM), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles. The aims of this study were to investigate the acute effects of SS on the flexibility of the individual muscle components of the hamstrings, and to examine the difference in the acute effect of SS between these components using shear elastic modulus as the index of muscle flexibility. Twenty healthy men (age, 23.4 ± 2.3 years) volunteered for this study. The shear elastic modulus of the ST, SM and BF muscles were measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) 5 min of SS. Measurements of shear elastic modulus were taken with the knee at 90° (slack position) and 45° (extension position) of flexion. In all muscles, the shear elastic modulus at both knee angles decreased significantly after SS. The percentage change in the shear elastic modulus from PRE to POST in the muscles at 45° of knee flexion was greatest in the SM. These results suggest that SS with hip flexion and knee extension has acute effects on increasing flexibility of the hamstring muscle components, especially the SM muscle. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Asymmetric first order shear horizontal guided waves propagation in a tapered plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jiu-Jiu; Song, Guang-Huang; Han, Xu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, through numerical simulation of the first order shear horizontal guided waves propagation in a homogeneous tapered plate, we have realized sound unidirectional transmission based on the mode conversion mechanism. We also find that the contrast transmission ratio of unidirectional transmission is highly influenced by the slope angle of tapered edge. And the working frequency range of the asymmetric transmission can be easily controlled by the height of tapered surface or the thickness of slab. This asymmetric system shows potentially significant applications in various sound devices. - Highlights: • We study the sound unidirectional transmission for SH 1 guided wave in a homogeneous tapered plate. • The contrast transmission ratio of unidirectional transmission is highly influenced by the slope angle. • The working frequency range of unidirectional transmission can be easily controlled by structure parameters

  3. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kogia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Guided Wave Testing (GWT using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH0 waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C.

  4. Waveform Modeling of the Crust and Upper Mantle Using S, Sp, SsPmP, and Shear-Coupled PL Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-10

    and excitation of shear-coupled Pl waves with distance and corresponding phase velocity ( Vph )-period (T) curve: αN and βN are the P and S wave...Pulliam and Sen, 2005) (b) Propagation characteristics and excitation of shear-coupled Pl waves with distance and corresponding phase velocity ( Vph

  5. A variable-frequency structural health monitoring system based on omnidirectional shear horizontal wave piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Qiang; Miao, Hongchen; Li, Faxin

    2018-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is of great importance for engineering structures as it may detect the early degradation and thus avoid life and financial loss. Guided wave based inspection is very useful in SHM due to its capability for long distance and wide range monitoring. The fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave based method should be most promising since SH0 is the unique non-dispersive wave mode in plate-like structures. In this work, a sparse array SHM system based on omnidirectional SH wave piezoelectric transducers (OSH-PT) was proposed and the multi data fusion method was used for defect inspection in a 2 mm thick aluminum plate. Firstly, the performances of three types OSH-PTs was comprehensively compared and the thickness-poled d15 mode OSH-PT used in this work was demonstrated obviously superior to the other two. Then, the signal processing method and imaging algorithm for this SHM system was presented. Finally, experiments were carried out to examine the performance of the proposed SHM system in defect localization and imaging. Results indicated that this SHM system can locate a through hole as small as 0.12λ (4 mm) in diameter (where λ is the wavelength corresponding to the central operation frequency) under frequencies from 90 to 150 kHz. It can also locate multiple defects accurately based on the baseline subtraction method. Obviously, this SHM system can detect larger areas with sparse sensors because of the adopted single mode, non-dispersive and low frequency SH0 wave which can propagate long distance with small attenuation. Considering its good performances, simple data processing and sparse array, this SH0 wave-based SHM system is expected to greatly promote the applications of guided wave inspection.

  6. The Western Bohemia Uppermost Crust Shear Wave Velocities from Love Wave Dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolínský, Petr; Brokešová, Johana

    -, č. 11 (2007), s. 101-120 ISSN 1383-4649 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460602; GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/1780 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : frequency–time analysis * group velocity * Love wave dispersion Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.769, year: 2007

  7. Polarization Statistics on 0.01 Hz Waves in the Lunar Plasma Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, S. K.; Halekas, J. S.; Harada, Y.; Farrell, W. M.; McFadden, J. P.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2017-12-01

    One generating mechanism for waves in the lunar plasma environment is through the process of resonant interactions with non-solar wind ions. In particular, this mechanism is believed to be a main generator of waves that lie near the ion cyclotron frequency; around 0.01 Hz. Both left-handed and right-handed polarization in the spacecraft frame has been observed for waves in this frequency range. Due to the effects of Doppler shift from the solar wind, the intrinsic polarization of the waves is not necessarily the same as their polarization in the spacecraft frame. A significant source of non-solar wind ions is incoming solar wind protons that are reflected by localized crustal magnetic fields on the lunar surface. Previous statistical studies have looked at the distribution of non-solar wind ions and 0.01 Hz waves around the Moon, and how they are influenced by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. Here we investigate the polarization statistics of 0.01 Hz waves around the Moon using ARTEMIS data from August 2011 through December 2016. Initial statistics on observation rates and location indicate that waves that appear left-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame are more common and have a broader spatial distribution around the Moon; waves that appear right-hand polarized are less frequently observed and are more centralized to the dawn side of the Moon. We further investigate how the distributions are related to IMF direction and lunar phase, and we make comparisons between non-solar wind ion distributions and polarization distributions. Additionally, we use a combination of wave analysis and ion tracing simulations to examine the intrinsic properties of these waves.

  8. Fracture characterization using frequency-dependent shear wave anisotropy analysis of microseismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harrasi, O. H.; Kendall, J.-M.; Chapman, M.

    2011-05-01

    The presence of fractures in hydrocarbon reservoirs can enhance porosity and permeability, and consequently increase production. The use of seismic anisotropy to characterize fracture systems has gained much interest in the last two decades. However, estimating fracture sizes from observations of seismic anisotropy has not been possible. Recent work has shown that frequency-dependent anisotropy (FDA) is very sensitive to the length-scale of the causative mechanism for the anisotropy. In this study, we observe FDA in a microseismic data set acquired from a carbonate gas field in Oman. The frequency-dependent shear wave anisotropy observations are modelled using a poroelastic model, which considers fluid communication between grain size pore spaces and larger scale fractures. A grid search is performed over fracture parameters (radius, density and strike) to find the model that best fits the real data. The results show that fracture size varies from the microscale within the shale cap rocks, to the metre-scale within the gas reservoir, to the centimetre-scale within the non-producing part of the carbonate formation. The lateral variation in fracture density agrees with previous conclusions from ordinary shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis. Cumulatively, the results show the potential for characterizing fracture systems using observations of FDA.

  9. Mantle upwelling beneath Madagascar: evidence from receiver function analysis and shear wave splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jonathan D.; Eakin, Caroline M.

    2017-07-01

    Crustal receiver functions have been calculated from 128 events for two three-component broadband seismomenters located on the south coast (FOMA) and in the central High Plateaux (ABPO) of Madagascar. For each station, crustal thickness and V p / V s ratio were estimated from H- κ plots. Self-consistent receiver functions from a smaller back-azimuthal range were then selected, stacked and inverted to determine shear wave velocity structure as a function of depth. These results were corroborated by guided forward modeling and by Monte Carlo error analysis. The crust is found to be thinner (39 ± 0.7 km) beneath the highland center of Madagascar compared to the coast (44 ± 1.6 km), which is the opposite of what would be expected for crustal isostasy, suggesting that present-day long wavelength topography is maintained, at least in part, dynamically. This inference of dynamic support is corroborated by shear wave splitting analyses at the same stations, which produce an overwhelming majority of null results (>96 %), as expected for vertical mantle flow or asthenospheric upwelling beneath the island. These findings suggest a sub-plate origin for dynamic support.

  10. Statistical correlations of shear wave velocity and penetration resistance for soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, Ünal

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, the correlation between shear wave velocity and standard penetration test blow counts (SPT-N) is investigated. The study focused primarily on the correlation of SPT-N and shear wave velocity (Vs) for several soil categories: all soils, sand, silt and clay-type soils. New empirical formulae are suggested to correlate SPT-N and Vs, based on a dataset collected in a part of Eskişehir settlement in the western central Anatolia region of Turkey. The formulae are based on geotechnical soundings and active and passive seismic experiments. The new and previously suggested formulae showing correlations between uncorrected SPT-N and Vs have been compared and evaluated by using the same dataset. The results suggest that better correlations in estimation of Vs are acquired when the uncorrected blow counts are used. The blow count is a major parameter and the soil type has no significant influence on the results. In cohesive soils, the plasticity contents and, in non-cohesive soils except for gravels, the graded contents have no significant effect on the estimation of Vs. The results support most of the conclusions of earlier studies. These practical relationships developed between SPT-N and Vs should be used with caution in geotechnical engineering and should be checked against measured Vs.

  11. Added value of point shear-wave elastography in the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Choi, Dae Seob; Bae, Kyungsoo; Cho, Jae Min; Jeong, Chi Young; Kim, Hyun Ok

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the added value of point shear-wave elastography (pSWE) in the diagnostic performance of conventional US for diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. B-mode and colour Doppler US and pSWE were performed prospectively in 216 patients with clinically suspected acute cholecystitis. The morphology and mural vascularity of the gallbladder and median shear wave velocity (SWV) of the right liver were evaluated. Two observers independently reviewed conventional US images and subsequently reviewed combined conventional US and pSWE images. Mean SWVs of the acute cholecystitis group (n = 91) were significantly higher than those of the control group (n = 85) in the right liver within 2 cm lateral to the gallbladder (1.56 versus 1.03 m/s, 1.39 versus 1.04 m/s, P cholecystitis improved significantly from 0.790 and 0.777 to 0.963 and 0.962, respectively, after additional review of pSWE images (P cholecystitis when compared with conventional US alone. • In acute cholecystitis, stiffness of the right liver increases adjacent to the gallbladder. • The cut-off value for diagnosing acute cholecystitis was 1.29 or 1.16 m/s. • Adding pSWE to conventional US improves the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis.

  12. Shear-wave velocity-based probabilistic and deterministic assessment of seismic soil liquefaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, R.; Moss, R.E.S.; Thompson, E.M.; Seed, R.B.; Cetin, K.O.; Der Kiureghian, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Tokimatsu, K.

    2013-01-01

    Shear-wave velocity (Vs) offers a means to determine the seismic resistance of soil to liquefaction by a fundamental soil property. This paper presents the results of an 11-year international project to gather new Vs site data and develop probabilistic correlations for seismic soil liquefaction occurrence. Toward that objective, shear-wave velocity test sites were identified, and measurements made for 301 new liquefaction field case histories in China, Japan, Taiwan, Greece, and the United States over a decade. The majority of these new case histories reoccupy those previously investigated by penetration testing. These new data are combined with previously published case histories to build a global catalog of 422 case histories of Vs liquefaction performance. Bayesian regression and structural reliability methods facilitate a probabilistic treatment of the Vs catalog for performance-based engineering applications. Where possible, uncertainties of the variables comprising both the seismic demand and the soil capacity were estimated and included in the analysis, resulting in greatly reduced overall model uncertainty relative to previous studies. The presented data set and probabilistic analysis also help resolve the ancillary issues of adjustment for soil fines content and magnitude scaling factors.

  13. Quantitative assessment of Thiel soft-embalmed human cadavers using shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Joyce; McLeod, Graeme; Lee, Nhan; Munirama, Shilpa; Corner, George; Eisma, Roos; Cochran, Sandy

    2015-11-01

    Thiel soft-embalmed human cadavers are increasingly being used as a model to train surgeons and anesthetists because they look and feel like patients. However, there is a need to validate quantitatively the tissue properties of this model. Thus, the main objective of this study was to measure the elasticity of tissue in the Thiel soft-embalmed cadaver, using results in the literature for human volunteers for comparison. Two independent ultrasound-trained operators measured the elasticity (Youngs modulus), E, of the thyroid, parotid and submandibular glands, the gastrocnemius and masseter muscles and the supraspinatus tendon in six Thiel soft-embalmed human cadavers using quantitative shear wave elastography. Each measurement was repeated 10 times. The elasticity values of Thiel soft-embalmed human cadavers were compared with human values reported in the literature. The relationship between elasticity and gender, age at death and number of days after embalming was also investigated. Elasticity data for the cadavers displayed similar patterns as in the literature for human volunteers. The results show a positive correlation between Young's modulus (YM) and time after embalming, but no correlation with cadaver age at death or gender. The stiffness of the Thiel embalmed soft cadaver was validated against historical human data, confirming the life-like quality of the cadavers. Our results indicate that shear wave elastography is a promising tool to evaluate the stiffness of Thiel embalmed soft cadavers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. In silico simulation and in vitro evaluation of an elastomeric scaffold using ultrasonic shear wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiao; Nie, Erwei; Zhu, Yanying; Hong, Yi

    2018-03-01

    Biodegradable elastomeric scaffolds for soft tissue repair represent a growing area of biomaterials research. Mechanical strength is one of the key factors to consider in the evaluation of candidate materials and the designs for tissue scaffolds. It is desirable to develop non-invasive evaluation methods of the mechanical property of scaffolds which would provide options for monitoring temporal mechanical property changes in situ. In this paper, we conduct in silico simulation and in vitro evaluation of an elastomeric scaffold using a novel ultrasonic shear wave imaging (USWI). The scaffold is fabricated from a biodegradable elastomer, poly(carbonate urethane) urea using salt leaching method. A numerical simulation is performed to test the robustness of the developed inversion algorithm for the elasticity map reconstruction which will be implemented in the phantom experiment. The generation and propagation of shear waves in a homogeneous tissue-mimicking medium with a circular scaffold inclusion is simulated and the elasticity map is well reconstructed. A PVA phantom experiment is performed to test the ability of USWI combined with the inversion algorithm to non-invasively characterize the mechanical property of a porous, biodegradable elastomeric scaffold. The elastic properties of the tested scaffold can be easily differentiated from the surrounding medium in the reconstructed image. The ability of the developed method to identify the edge of the scaffold and characterize the elasticity distribution is demonstrated. Preliminary results in this pilot study support the idea of applying the USWI based method for non-invasive elasticity characterization of tissue scaffolds.

  15. Polarization properties of low frequency electromagnetic cyclotron waves associated with magnetic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.; Huang, J.

    2018-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed that there are a large number of low frequency electromagnetic cyclotron waves (ECWs) occurring in and around magnetic clouds (MCs) that are common magnetic structures in interplanetary space. Using magnetic field data from the STEREO spacecraft, this paper investigates polarization properties of ECWs associated with 120 MCs. Results show that the ECWs are highly transverse, strongly polarized waves with large ellipticities. Specifically, almost all of the waves take place with the ratios of transverse power to total power higher than 0.94, polarization degrees greater than 0.85, and ellipticities larger than 0.5. The mean values of these quantities can be up to 0.99, 0.96, 0.85, respectively. In particular, there is a tendency of ellipticities decreasing with respect to the wave normal angles for ECWs with left handed polarization. The decreasing tendency is consistent with the recent theory and simulation results.

  16. Evolution of full stokes parameters in polarized radiative transfer of electron cyclotron waves on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idei, H.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Tsumori, K.; Watari, T.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Takita, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Ohkubo, K.; Sakakibara, S.; Narihara, K.; Yamada, I.; Tanaka, K.; Morisaki, T.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Nakanishi, H.; Ohdachi, S.; Emoto, M.; Matsuoka, K.; Motojima, O.; Fujiwara, M. [LHD Experimental Group, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, 509-5292 (Japan); Notake, T. [Nagoya University, Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    To study polarized radiative transfer of electron cyclotron waves, a general equation of polarization evolution that includes the effects of both birefringence and dichroism is dealt with. Full Stokes parameters are used to describe the polarization state and the absorption rate in the equation. The evolution equation on polarization state is able to treat general cases in which two polarization states of Eigenmodes are not necessary to be orthogonal. Using this equation, a single absorption rate in second harmonic electron cyclotron heating is investigated on the Large Helical Device. (authors)

  17. A test of a mechanical multi-impact shear-wave seismic source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, David M.; Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.

    2001-01-01

    We modified two gasoline-engine-powered earth tampers, commonly used as compressional-(P) wave seismic energy sources for shallow reflection studies, for use as shear(S)-wave energy sources. This new configuration, termed ?Hacker? (horizontal Wacker?), is evaluated as an alternative to the manual sledgehammer typically used in conjunction with a large timber held down by the front wheels of a vehicle. The Hacker maximizes the use of existing equipment by a quick changeover of bolt-on accessories as opposed to the handling of a separate source, and is intended to improve the depth of penetration of S-wave data by stacking hundreds of impacts over a two to three minute period. Records were made with a variety of configurations involving up to two Hackers simultaneously then compared to a reference record made with a sledgehammer. Preliminary results indicate moderate success by the higher amplitude S-waves recorded with the Hacker as compared to the hammer method. False triggers generated by the backswing of the Hacker add unwanted noise and we are currently working to modify the device to eliminate this effect. Correlation noise caused by insufficient randomness of the Hacker impact sequence is also a significant noise problem that we hope to reduce by improving the coupling of the Hacker to the timber so that the operator has more control over the impact sequence.

  18. Shear-wave seismic reflection imaging and impedance inversion for a near-surface point-bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, N. W.; Morrison, M.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Odom, B.; Clift, P. D.; Olson, E.; Gostic, A.

    2017-12-01

    Imaging and inversion of SH-waves are useful to detect, map, and quantitatively characterize near-surface point-bar strata. We conduct a horizontally-polarized (SH) reflection survey across and along a near-surface (9 - 40 m) downstream point-bar. We invert for shear-impedance profiles and correlate our interpretation to electrical conductivity (EC) logs in adjacent wells to study the internal architecture and lithology of point-bars. We acquire two common-midpoint (CMP) SH-wave seismic reflection lines at False River (Point Coupee Parish, Louisiana). A 104 m long seismic line (L1) is oriented orthogonal (NW - SE) to point-bar strike. A second line (L2) is 48 m long and set parallel to point-bar strike (NE - SW). Two EC wells lie 33 m apart. Both wells are parallel with respect to the L1 survey and offset from it by 15 m. EC log measurements range from 1 - 25 m depth. Interference of Love-waves prevents seismic imaging at depths less than 9 m. The L1 and L2 data sets are inverted for shear-impedance using a model-based band-limited impedance (BLIMP) algorithm that incorporates a low-frequency velocity model. This model is also used for the depthing processing. The L1 cross-section shows coherent dipping reflection events ( 4 - 7º) from 0.15 - 0.35 s (10 - 40 m). The corresponding shear-impedance profile also reveals coherent and dipping impedance contrasts that grow in magnitude with increasing depth. The L2 cross-section shows comparatively less dip ( 1º) as well as sharper and shallower continuity of reflection events (0.1 - 0.28 s TWT or 9 - 25 m). Depth-converted (TVD) seismic amplitudes and impedance values correlate to near-surface point-bar geology via superposition of log data. The first well (W5) shows distinct EC local maxima (+50 - 70 mS/m) at 14.5 and 15.5 m depth that correlate well with the seismic amplitudes and impedance values from both L1 and L2 data sets. The second well (W7) shows comparatively lower local maxima (+40 - 60 mS/m) but at greater

  19. Crustal seismic anisotropy beneath Shillong plateau - Assam valley in North East India: Shear-wave splitting analysis using local earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Antara; Baruah, Santanu; Piccinini, Davide; Saikia, Sowrav; Phukan, Manoj K.; Chetia, Monisha; Kayal, J. R.

    2017-10-01

    We present crustal anisotropy estimates constrained by shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis using local earthquakes in the Shillong plateau and Assam valley area, North East India (NE India) region. Splitting parameters are determined using an automated cross-correlation (CC) method. We located 330 earthquakes recorded by 17 broadband seismic stations during 2001-2014 in the study area. Out of these 330 events, seismograms of 163 events are selected for the SWS analysis. Relatively small average delay times (0.039-0.084 s) indicate existence of moderate crack density in the crust below the study area. It is found that fast polarization directions vary from station to station depending on the regional stress system as well as geological conditions. The spatial pattern of crustal anisotropy in the area is controlled mostly by tectonic movement of the Indian plate towards NE. Presence of several E-W and N-S trending active faults in the area also play an important role on the observed pattern of crustal anisotropy.

  20. Spin-wave propagation and spin-polarized electron transport in single-crystal iron films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladii, O.; Halley, D.; Henry, Y.; Bailleul, M.

    2017-11-01

    The techniques of propagating spin-wave spectroscopy and current-induced spin-wave Doppler shift are applied to a 20-nm-thick Fe/MgO(001) film. The magnetic parameters extracted from the position of the spin-wave resonance peaks are very close to those tabulated for bulk iron. From the zero-current propagating wave forms, a group velocity of 4 km/s and an attenuation length of about 6 μ m are extracted for 1.6-μ m -wavelength spin wave at 18 GHz. From the measured current-induced spin-wave Doppler shift, we extract a surprisingly high degree of spin polarization of the current of 83 % , which constitutes the main finding of this work. This set of results makes single-crystalline iron a promising candidate for building devices utilizing high-frequency spin waves and spin-polarized currents.

  1. Topological events in polarization resolved angular patterns of nematic liquid crystal cells at varying ellipticity of incident wave

    OpenAIRE

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Vovk, Roman G.

    2008-01-01

    We study the angular structure of polarization of light transmitted through a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell by analyzing the polarization state as a function of the incidence angles and the polarization of the incident wave. The polarization resolved angular patterns emerging after the NLC cell illuminated by the convergent light beam are described in terms of the polarization singularities such as C-points (points of circular polarization) and L-lines (lines of linear polarization). For ...

  2. Polarization Insensitive Wavelength Conversion Based on Four-Wave Mixing in a Silicon Nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Hu, Hao; Peucheret, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, polarization-insensitive wavelength conversion of a 10 Gb/s NRZ-OOK data signal based on four-wave mixing in a silicon nanowire with bit-error rate measurements.......We experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, polarization-insensitive wavelength conversion of a 10 Gb/s NRZ-OOK data signal based on four-wave mixing in a silicon nanowire with bit-error rate measurements....

  3. Shear wave crustal velocity model of the Western Bohemian Massif from Love wave phase velocity dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolínský, Petr; Málek, Jiří; Brokešová, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2011), s. 81-104 ISSN 1383-4649 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460602; GA AV ČR IAA300460705; GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/1780 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : love waves * phase velocity dispersion * frequency-time analysis Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.326, year: 2011 www.springerlink.com/content/w3149233l60111t1/

  4. Nonplanar electrostatic shock waves in an opposite polarity dust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Amina

    2017-05-30

    May 30, 2017 ... The coexistence of positively and negatively charged dust grains has been observed in the Earth's mesosphere [11,12] as well as in cometary tails and comae [6]. The propagation of various types of nonlinear waves in dusty plasmas, viz., dust-acoustic (DA) waves [13], dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) waves [14,15] ...

  5. Slot-dimer babinet metamaterials as polarization shapers for terahertz waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Chigrin, D. N.; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically study optical properties of free-standing metallic membranes patterned with an array of two-slot elements (dimers) comprising two rectangular slots of different dimensions and orientation. It is shown that these structures feature extraordinary optical transmission with strong...... and spectrally selective polarization conversion capabilities. The output polarization is highly dependent on the dimer geometry, which can be used in the design of compact polarization shapers for terahertz waves....

  6. Ion sense of polarization of the electromagnetic wave field in the electron whistler frequency band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lundin

    Full Text Available It is shown that the left-hand (or ion-type sense of polarization can appear in the field interference pattern of two plane electron whistler waves. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the ion-type polarized wave electric fields can be accompanied by the presence at the same observation point of electron-type polarized wave magnetic fields. The registration of ion-type polarized fields with frequencies between the highest ion gyrofrequency and the electron gyrofrequency in a cold, overdense plasma is a sufficient indication for the existence of an interference wave pattern, which can typically occur near artificial or natural reflecting magnetospheric plasma regions, inside waveguides (as in helicon discharges, for example, in fields resonantly emitted by beams of charged particles or, in principle, in some self-sustained, nonlinear wave field structures. A comparison with the conventional spectral matrix data processing approach is also presented in order to facilitate the calculations of the analyzed polarization parameters.

    Key words. Ionosphere (wave propagation Radio science (waves in plasma Space plasma physics (general or miscellaneous

  7. Ion sense of polarization of the electromagnetic wave field in the electron whistler frequency band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lundin

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the left-hand (or ion-type sense of polarization can appear in the field interference pattern of two plane electron whistler waves. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the ion-type polarized wave electric fields can be accompanied by the presence at the same observation point of electron-type polarized wave magnetic fields. The registration of ion-type polarized fields with frequencies between the highest ion gyrofrequency and the electron gyrofrequency in a cold, overdense plasma is a sufficient indication for the existence of an interference wave pattern, which can typically occur near artificial or natural reflecting magnetospheric plasma regions, inside waveguides (as in helicon discharges, for example, in fields resonantly emitted by beams of charged particles or, in principle, in some self-sustained, nonlinear wave field structures. A comparison with the conventional spectral matrix data processing approach is also presented in order to facilitate the calculations of the analyzed polarization parameters.Key words. Ionosphere (wave propagation Radio science (waves in plasma Space plasma physics (general or miscellaneous

  8. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  9. Vector wave diffraction pattern of slits masked by polarizing devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This calls for a systematic study of diffraction properties of different apertures using polarization-sensitive devices. In the present paper, we have studied the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of slits masked by different kinds of polarizing devices which introduce a phase difference between the two orthogonal components of the ...

  10. Bistable polarization switching in a continuous wave ruby laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Afzal, R. Sohrab

    1988-01-01

    Bistability in the output power, polarization state, and mode volume of an argon-ion laser pumped single mode ruby laser at 6943 A has been observed. The laser operates in a radially confined mode which exhibits hysteresis and bistability only when the pump polarization is parallel to the c-axis.

  11. The diagnostic performance of shear-wave elastography for liver fibrosis in children and adolescents: A systematic review and diagnostic meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Rye; Suh, Chong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Lee, Jin Seong; Cho, Young Ah; Jung, Ah Young

    2018-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of shear-wave elastography for determining the severity of liver fibrosis in children and adolescents. An electronic literature search of PubMed and EMBASE was conducted. Bivariate modelling and hierarchical summary receiver-operating-characteristic modelling were performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of shear-wave elastography. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses according to the modality of shear-wave imaging and the degree of liver fibrosis were also performed. Twelve eligible studies with 550 patients were included. Shear-wave elastography showed a summary sensitivity of 81 % (95 % CI: 71-88) and a specificity of 91 % (95 % CI: 83-96) for the prediction of significant liver fibrosis. The number of measurements of shear-wave elastography performed was a significant factor influencing study heterogeneity. Subgroup analysis revealed shear-wave elastography to have an excellent diagnostic performance according to each degree of liver fibrosis. Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) had a higher sensitivity (pwave elastography is an excellent modality for the evaluation of the severity of liver fibrosis in children and adolescents. Compared with ARFI, SSI showed better diagnostic performance for prediction of significant liver fibrosis. • Shear-wave elastography is beneficial for determining liver fibrosis severity in children. • Shear-wave elastography showed summary sensitivity of 81 %, specificity of 91 %. • SSI showed better diagnostic performance than ARFI for significant liver fibrosis.

  12. Clinical acceptance testing and scanner comparison of ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zaiyang; Tradup, Donald J; Song, Pengfei; Stekel, Scott F; Chen, Shigao; Glazebrook, Katrina N; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J

    2018-03-15

    Because of the rapidly growing use of ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) in clinical practices, there is a significant need for development of clinical physics performance assessment methods for this technology. This study aims to report two clinical medical physicists' tasks: (a) acceptance testing (AT) of SWE function on ten commercial ultrasound systems for clinical liver application and (b) comparison of SWE measurements of targets across vendors for clinical musculoskeletal application. For AT, ten GE LOGIQ E9 XDclear 2.0 scanners with ten C1-6-D and ten 9L-D transducers were studied using two commercial homogenous phantoms. Five measurements were acquired at two depths for each scanner/transducer pair by two operators. Additional tests were performed to access effects of different coupling media, phantom locations and operators. System deviations were less than 5% of group mean or three times standard deviation; therefore, all systems passed AT. A test protocol was provided based on results that no statistically significant difference was observed between using ultrasound gel and salt water for coupling, among different phantom locations, and that interoperator and intraoperator coefficient of variation was less than 3%. For SWE target measurements, two systems were compared - a Supersonic Aixplorer scanner with a SL10-2 and a SL15-4 transducer, and an abovementioned GE scanner with 9L-D transducer. Two stepped cylinders with diameters of 4.05-10.40 mm were measured both longitudinally and transaxially. Target shear wave speed quantification was performed using an in-house MATLAB program. Using the target shear wave speed deduced from phantom specs as a reference, SL15-4 performed the best at the measured depth. However, it was challenging to reliably measure a 4.05 mm target for either system. The reported test methods and results could provide important information when dealing with SWE-related tasks in the clinical environment. © 2018 The Authors

  13. Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness: Temporal Assessment With Quantitative MRI and Shear-Wave Ultrasound Elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Christoph A; Buck, Florian M; Dyer, Linda; Flück, Martin; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Rosskopf, Andrea B

    2017-02-01

    The objective of our study was to assess delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) over time using quantitative MRI and shear-wave ultrasound (US) elastography. Five male (mean age ± SD, 39.6 ± 4.6 years) and five female (30.6 ± 13.5 years) volunteers underwent 1.5-T MRI before and after (15 minutes, 1 day, 3 days, 7 days) performing unilateral eccentric resistance exercise of the elbow flexor muscles. The MRI examinations included fluid-sensitive, DWI, and diffusion-tensor imaging sequences of the distal upper arm. Muscle edema, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA) were assessed. US of the brachialis muscle was performed before and after (15 minutes, 12 hours, 1 day, 2 days, 3 days, 7 days) exercise to measure mean shear-wave velocity (SWV). Pain and muscle tightness were assessed. For men, muscle edema was moderate and peaked 3 days after exercise; for women, muscle edema was mild and peaked 1-3 days after exercise. ADC was highest 3 days after exercise in men (mean, 1809.22 × 10 -6 mm 2 /s; before exercise, 1529.88 × 10 -6 mm 2 /s) and women (1741.90 × 10 -6 mm 2 /s; before exercise, 1475.80 × 10 -6 mm 2 /s). FA dropped from 361.00 in men and 389.00 in women before exercise to a minimum of 252.12 and 321.28, respectively, 3 days after exercise. Mean SWV increased after exercise in men (before exercise, 3.00 ± 0.30 m/s; peak [15 minutes after exercise], 4.04 ± 0.90 m/s) and women (before, 2.82 ± 0.40 m/s; peak [1 day after exercise], 3.23 ± 0.40 m/s) and subsequently returned to normal. In men, the ADC values of the brachialis muscle positively correlated with mean SWV (r = 0.92, p = 0.028). FA negatively correlated with pain in men (r = -0.993, p = 0.001) Muscle edema outlasted clinical symptoms in most volunteers. FA inversely correlates with pain and may be a useful imaging parameter for assessment of DOMS. Shear-wave US elastography shows a temporary increase of muscle stiffness after DOMS-inducing exercise but does not

  14. Arbitrary amplitude dust kinetic Alfvén solitary waves in the presence of polarization force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpreet; Kaur, Nimardeep; Saini, N. S.

    2018-02-01

    In this investigation, the effect of polarization force on dust kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (DKASWs) in a magnetized dusty plasma consisting of dust fluid, electrons, and positively charged ions is studied. By incorporating density non-uniformity and polarization force in the fluid model equations, the energy balance equation is derived, and from the expression for Sagdeev pseudopotential, the existence conditions for solitary structures in terms of Mach number are determined. From the numerical analysis of Sagdeev pseudopotential, compressive and rarefactive DKASWs at sub- and super-Alfvénic speeds are observed. These waves are significantly affected by varying polarization force, angle of propagation, plasma beta, and Mach number.

  15. Selection of Shear Horizontal Wave Transducers for Robotic Nondestructive Inspection in Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Choi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Harsh environments and confined spaces require that nondestructive inspections be conducted with robotic systems. Ultrasonic guided waves are well suited for robotic systems because they can provide efficient volumetric coverage when inspecting for various types of damage, including cracks and corrosion. Shear horizontal guided waves are especially well suited for robotic inspection because they are sensitive to cracks oriented perpendicular or parallel to the wave propagation direction and can be generated with electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs and magnetostrictive transducers (MSTs. Both types of transducers are investigated for crack detection in a stainless steel plate. The MSTs require the robot to apply a compressive normal force that creates frictional force coupling. However, the coupling is observed to be very dependent upon surface roughness and surface debris. The EMATs are coupled through the Lorentz force and are thus noncontact, although they depend on the lift off between transducer and substrate. After comparing advantages and disadvantages of each transducer for robotic inspection the EMATs are selected for application to canisters that store used nuclear fuel.

  16. Modifications of Surface Wave Discrimination Filter Based on the Polarization Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutlu, Y. A.; Sayil, N.

    2007-01-01

    The polarization properties of Love and Rayleigh waves are utilized to design Surface Wave Discrimination Filter. Filtering process for a selected window length and moving interval is that the amplitudes at each frequency on vertical, radial and transverse components are weighted according to how closely the theoretical three-dimensional particle motion pattern. In this study, weighted functions have been modified for epicenteral distances smaller than about 2200 km to corresponding with angular distribution of polarization parameters obtained from computed synthetic seismograms. Modified Surface Wave Discrimination Filter has been tested on synthetic seismograms and digital three-components broadband records at Trabzon earthquake station

  17. The role of shear wave elastography in the assessment of placenta previa-accreta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alıcı Davutoglu, Ebru; Ariöz Habibi, Hatice; Ozel, Ayşegül; Yuksel, Mehmet Aytac; Adaletli, Ibrahim; Madazlı, Riza

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the value of shear wave elastography (SWE) in the prediction of morbidly adherent placenta. Forty-three women with normal placental location and 26 women with anteriorly localized placenta previa were recruited for this case-control study. Placental elasticity values in both the groups were determined by SWE imaging. SWE values were higher in the placenta previa group in all regions than in normal localized placentas (p placenta previa with and without morbidly adherent placenta (p > .05). Placental stiffness is significantly higher in placenta previa than normal localized placentas. However, we could not demonstrate any statistically significant difference in the elasticity values between the placenta previa with and without accreta.

  18. Smooth muscle cells of penis in the rat: noninvasive quantification with shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Jie; Qiao, Xiao-Hui; Gao, Feng; Bai, Ming; Li, Fan; Du, Lian-Fang; Xing, Jin-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of cavernosum play an important role in erection. It is of great significance to quantitatively analyze the level of SMCs in penis. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of shear wave elastography (SWE) on evaluating the level of SMCs in penis quantitatively. Twenty healthy male rats were selected. The SWE imaging of penis was carried out and then immunohistochemistry analysis of penis was performed to analyze the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin in penis. The measurement index of SWE examination was tissue stiffness (TS). The measurement index of immunohistochemistry analysis was positive area percentage of alpha smooth muscle actin (AP). Sixty sets of data of TS and AP were obtained. The results showed that TS was significantly correlated with AP and the correlation coefficient was -0.618 (p penis was successfully quantified in vivo with SWE. SWE can be used clinically for evaluating the level of SMCs in penis quantitatively.

  19. Calculation of high frequency ultrasonic signals for shear wave insonification in solid material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, V; Langenberg, K J; Chakhlov, S

    2004-04-01

    The goal of the theoretical part is to simulate an automatic ultrasonic inspection with contact technique shear wave probes, where the high frequency signals are captured and used to perform a reconstruction based on the synthetic aperture focusing method "SAFT". Therefore the ultrasonic probe, the scanning path and the defects are parameters in a CAD model. The scattering behavior of the defect is calculated by the Kirchhoff approximation in its elastodynamic version. The result of the simulation--the high frequency data--and the result of the SAFT-reconstructions are compared with experimental results on a steel test block with side drilled and flat bottom holes. The model is validated by the experiment. One of the applications of the model is to identify multiple reflections.

  20. Effect of Calcifications on Breast Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography: An Investigational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Gregory

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of macrocalcifications and clustered microcalcifications associated with benign breast masses on shear wave elastography (SWE.SuperSonic Imagine (SSI and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE were performed on three sets of phantoms to investigate how calcifications of different sizes and distributions influence measured elasticity. To demonstrate the effect in vivo, three female patients with benign breast masses associated with mammographically-identified calcifications were evaluated by CUSE.Apparent maximum elasticity (Emax estimates resulting from individual macrocalcifications (with diameters of 2mm, 3mm, 5mm, 6mm, 9mm, 11mm, and 15mm showed values over 50 kPa for all cases, which represents more than 100% increase over background (~21kPa. We considered a 2cm-diameter circular region of interest for all phantom experiments. Mean elasticity (Emean values varied from 26 kPa to 73 kPa, depending on the macrocalcification size. Highly dense clusters of microcalcifications showed higher Emax values than clusters of microcalcification with low concentrations, but the difference in Emean values was not significant.Our results demonstrate that the presence of large isolated macrocalcifications and highly concentrated clusters of microcalcifications can introduce areas with apparent high elasticity in SWE. Considering that benign breast masses normally have significantly lower elasticity values than malignant tumors, such areas with high elasticity appearing due to presence of calcification in benign breast masses may lead to misdiagnosis.

  1. Analytical reverse time migration: An innovation in imaging of infrastructures using ultrasonic shear waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi, Aziz; Khazanovich, Lev

    2018-04-11

    The emergence of ultrasonic dry point contact (DPC) transducers that emit horizontal shear waves has enabled efficient collection of high-quality data in the context of a nondestructive evaluation of concrete structures. This offers an opportunity to improve the quality of evaluation by adapting advanced imaging techniques. Reverse time migration (RTM) is a simulation-based reconstruction technique that offers advantages over conventional methods, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique. RTM is capable of imaging boundaries and interfaces with steep slopes and the bottom boundaries of inclusions and defects. However, this imaging technique requires a massive amount of memory and its computation cost is high. In this study, both bottlenecks of the RTM are resolved when shear transducers are used for data acquisition. An analytical approach was developed to obtain the source and receiver wavefields needed for imaging using reverse time migration. It is shown that the proposed analytical approach not only eliminates the high memory demand, but also drastically reduces the computation time from days to minutes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Depth of anisotropy in the North American craton from surface wave polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, V.; Pettersen, O.

    2009-04-01

    Analysis of P-wave traveltimes has shown the the North American craton is characterized by a coherent pattern of anisotropy with significant dip of the fast axis in some regions. The depth distribution of the anisotropy is however little constrained by P-wave analysis, limiting the geodynamical interpretation of the model. Surface wave polarizations are very sensitive to dip of anisotropy and can provide the missing depth-constraint to the model. We present an analysis of surface wave polarizations recorded at a number of stations on the North American craton. We show that the frequency range in which we do not observe polarization anomalies implies that the dipping anisotropy is not located in the upper part of the lithosphere.

  3. LITHOSTRATIGRAPHY AND SHEAR-WAVE VELOCITY IN THE CRYSTALLIZED TOPOPAH SPRING TUFF, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. BUESCH; K.H. STOKOE; M. SCHUHEN

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of the seismic response of the proposed spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is in part based on the seismic properties of the host rock, the 12.8-million-year-old Topopah Spring Tuff. Because of the processes that formed the tuff, the densely welded and crystallized part has three lithophysal and three nonlithophysal zones, and each zone has characteristic variations in lithostratigraphic features and structures of the rocks. Lithostratigraphic features include lithophysal cavities, rims on lithophysae and some fractures, spots (which are similar to rims but without an associated cavity or aperture), amounts of porosity resulting from welding, crystallization, and vapor-phase corrosion and mineralization, and fractures. Seismic properties, including shear-wave velocity (V s ), have been measured on 38 pieces of core, and there is a good ''first order'' correlation with the lithostratigraphic zones; for example, samples from nonlithophysal zones have larger V s values compared to samples from lithophysal zones. Some samples have V s values that are beyond the typical range for the lithostratigraphic zone; however, these samples typically have one or more fractures, ''large'' lithophysal cavities, or ''missing pieces'' relative to the sample size. Shear-wave velocity data measured in the tunnels have similar relations to lithophysal and nonlithophysal rocks; however, tunnel-based values are typically smaller than those measured in core resulting from increased lithophysae and fracturing effects. Variations in seismic properties such as V s data from small-scale samples (typical and ''flawed'' core) to larger scale traverses in the tunnels provide a basis for merging our understanding of the distributions of lithostratigraphic features (and zones) with a method to scale seismic properties

  4. LITHOSTRATIGRAPHY AND SHEAR-WAVE VELOCITY IN THE CRYSTALLIZED TOPOPAH SPRING TUFF, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. BUESCH; K.H. STOKOE; M. SCHUHEN

    2006-03-20

    Evaluation of the seismic response of the proposed spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is in part based on the seismic properties of the host rock, the 12.8-million-year-old Topopah Spring Tuff. Because of the processes that formed the tuff, the densely welded and crystallized part has three lithophysal and three nonlithophysal zones, and each zone has characteristic variations in lithostratigraphic features and structures of the rocks. Lithostratigraphic features include lithophysal cavities, rims on lithophysae and some fractures, spots (which are similar to rims but without an associated cavity or aperture), amounts of porosity resulting from welding, crystallization, and vapor-phase corrosion and mineralization, and fractures. Seismic properties, including shear-wave velocity (V{sub s}), have been measured on 38 pieces of core, and there is a good ''first order'' correlation with the lithostratigraphic zones; for example, samples from nonlithophysal zones have larger V{sub s} values compared to samples from lithophysal zones. Some samples have V{sub s} values that are beyond the typical range for the lithostratigraphic zone; however, these samples typically have one or more fractures, ''large'' lithophysal cavities, or ''missing pieces'' relative to the sample size. Shear-wave velocity data measured in the tunnels have similar relations to lithophysal and nonlithophysal rocks; however, tunnel-based values are typically smaller than those measured in core resulting from increased lithophysae and fracturing effects. Variations in seismic properties such as V{sub s} data from small-scale samples (typical and ''flawed'' core) to larger scale traverses in the tunnels provide a basis for merging our understanding of the distributions of lithostratigraphic features (and zones) with a method to scale seismic properties.

  5. Value of shear-wave elastography in the diagnosis of symptomatic invasive lobular breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Y.T.; Vinnicombe, S.; Whelehan, P.; Thomson, K.; Evans, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the contribution of shear-wave elastography (SWE) in diagnosing invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) in symptomatic patients. Materials and methods: A retrospective case-controlled study of 52 patients with ILC and 52 patients with invasive ductal cancer (IDC), matched for age and tumour size, was performed. Breast density and mammographic and greyscale ultrasound features were graded using Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification by two radiologists, blinded to SWE and pathology findings. Forty-four benign lesions were also included. The sensitivity of SWE was assessed, using a cut-off value of 50 kPa for mean elasticity. Statistical significance was evaluated using Chi-square and Chi-square for trend tests. Results: Mean age for both ILC and IDC groups was 67 years. Mean size for ILC was 44 mm and IDC was 37 mm. The sensitivity for detection of ILC and IDC for mammography, greyscale ultrasound, and SWE were 79% versus 87%, 87% versus 98%, 94% versus 100%, respectively. SWE had significantly higher sensitivities than mammography for the detection of both ILC and IDC (p = 0.012 and p = 0.001, respectively). SWE was not significantly more sensitive than greyscale ultrasound for the detection of either tumour type. Four (8%) lobular cancers were benign/normal at both mammography and greyscale ultrasound, but suspicious on SWE. The incremental gain in sensitivity by using SWE in ILC was statistically significant compared to IDC (p = 0.01). Conclusion: SWE can diagnose lobular cancers that have benign/normal findings on conventional imaging as suspicious. - Highlights: • Sensitivity of shear-wave elastography (SWE) for detecting lobular cancers is 94%. • Sensitivity of SWE for detecting invasive ductal cancers is 100%. • SWE is more sensitive than mammography for detecting ductal and lobular cancers. • SWE can diagnose ILC as suspicious, which are benign/normal on conventional imaging

  6. Assessment of impact factors on shear wave based liver stiffness measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Wenwu, E-mail: lingwenwubing@163.com [Department of Ultrasound, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Lu, Qiang, E-mail: wsluqiang@126.com [Department of Ultrasound, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Quan, Jierong, E-mail: quanjierong@163.com [Department of Ultrasound, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Ma, Lin, E-mail: malin2010US@163.com [Department of Ultrasound, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Luo, Yan, E-mail: huaxiluoyan@gmail.com [Department of Ultrasound, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Shear wave based ultrasound elastographies have been implemented as non-invasive methods for quantitative assessment of liver stiffness. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies that have investigated impact factors on liver stiffness measurement (LSM). Moreover, standard examination protocols for LSM are still lacking in clinical practice. Our study aimed to assess the impact factors on LSM to establish its standard examination protocols in clinical practice. We applied shear wave based elastography point quantification (ElastPQ) in 21 healthy individuals to determine the impact of liver location (segments I–VIII), breathing phase (end-inspiration and end-expiration), probe position (sub-costal and inter-costal position) and examiner on LSM. Additional studies in 175 healthy individuals were also performed to determine the influence of gender and age on liver stiffness. We found significant impact of liver location on LSM, while the liver segment V displayed the lowest coefficient of variation (CV 21%). The liver stiffness at the end-expiration was significantly higher than that at the end-inspiration (P = 2.1E−05). The liver stiffness was 8% higher in men than in women (3.8 ± 0.7 kPa vs. 3.5 ± 0.4 kPa, P = 0.0168). In contrast, the liver stiffness was comparable in the different probe positions, examiners and age groups (P > 0.05). In conclusion, this study reveals significant impact from liver location, breathing phase and gender on LSM, while furthermore strengthening the necessity for the development of standard examination protocols on LSM.

  7. Effects of age and pathology on shear wave speed of the human rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Timothy G; Dischler, Jack; Davis, Leah; Labyed, Yassin; Siegal, Daniel S; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and often repaired surgically, but post-operative repair tissue healing, and shoulder function can be unpredictable. Tear chronicity is believed to influence clinical outcomes, but conventional clinical approaches for assessing tear chronicity are subjective. Shear wave elastography (SWE) is a promising technique for assessing soft tissue via estimates of shear wave speed (SWS), but this technique has not been used extensively on the rotator cuff. Specifically, the effects of age and pathology on rotator cuff SWS are not well known. The objectives of this study were to assess the association between SWS and age in healthy, asymptomatic subjects, and to compare measures of SWS between patients with a rotator cuff tear and healthy, asymptomatic subjects. SWE images of the supraspinatus muscle and intramuscular tendon were acquired from 19 asymptomatic subjects and 11 patients with a rotator cuff tear. Images were acquired with the supraspinatus under passive and active (i.e., minimal activation) conditions. Mean SWS was positively associated with age in the supraspinatus muscle and tendon under passive and active conditions (p ≤ 0.049). Compared to asymptomatic subjects, patients had a lower mean SWS in their muscle and tendon under active conditions (p ≤ 0.024), but no differences were detected under passive conditions (p ≥ 0.783). These findings identify the influences of age and pathology on SWS in the rotator cuff. These preliminary findings are an important step toward evaluating the clinical utility of SWE for assessing rotator cuff pathology. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:282-288, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Rac1 regulates neuronal polarization through the WAVE complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahirovic, Sabina; Hellal, Farida; Neukirchen, Dorothee

    2010-01-01

    the physiological function of Rac1 in neuronal development, we have generated a conditional knock-out mouse, in which Rac1 is ablated in the whole brain. Rac1-deficient cerebellar granule neurons, which do not express other Rac isoforms, showed impaired neuronal migration and axon formation both in vivo...... and in vitro. In addition, Rac1 ablation disrupts lamellipodia formation in growth cones. The analysis of Rac1 effectors revealed the absence of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family verprolin-homologous protein (WAVE) complex from the plasma membrane of knock-out growth cones. Loss of WAVE...... function inhibited axon growth, whereas overexpression of a membrane-tethered WAVE mutant partially rescued axon growth in Rac1-knock-out neurons. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of the WAVE complex effector Arp2/3 also reduced axon growth. We propose that Rac1 recruits the WAVE complex...

  9. Effects of a poloidally asymmetric ionization source on toroidal drift wave stability and the generation of sheared parallel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.S.; Diamond, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of a poloidally asymmetric ionization source on both dissipative toroidal drift wave stability and the generation of mean sheared parallel flow are examined. The first part of this work extends the development of a local model of ionization-driven drift wave turbulence [Phys. Fluids B 4, 877 (1992)] to include the effects of magnetic shear and poloidal source asymmetry, as well as poloidal mode coupling due to both magnetic drifts and the source asymmetry. Numerical and analytic investigation confirm that ionization effects can destabilize collisional toroidal drift waves. However, the mode structure is determined primarily by the magnetic drifts, and is not overly effected by the poloidal source asymmetry. The ionization source drives a purely inward particle flux, which can explain the anomalously rapid uptake of particles which occurs in response to gas puffing. In the second part of this work, the role poloidal asymmetries in both the source and turbulent particle diffusion play in the generation of sheared mean parallel flow is examined. Analysis indicates that predictions of sonic parallel shear flow [v parallel (r)∼c s ] are an unphysical result of the assumption of purely parallel flow (i.e., v perpendicular =0) and the neglect of turbulent parallel momentum transport. Results indicate that the flow produced is subcritical to the parallel shear flow instability when diamagnetic effects are properly considered

  10. Diffuse shear wave imaging: toward passive elastography using low-frame rate spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Zorgani, Ali; Lescanne, Maxime; Boccara, Claude; Fink, Mathias; Catheline, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can map the stiffness of biological tissue by imaging mechanical perturbations (shear waves) propagating in the tissue. Most shear wave elastography (SWE) techniques rely on active shear sources to generate controlled displacements that are tracked at ultrafast imaging rates. Here, we propose a noise-correlation approach to retrieve stiffness information from the imaging of diffuse displacement fields using low-frame rate spectral-domain OCT. We demonstrated the method on tissue-mimicking phantoms and validated the results by comparison with classic ultrafast SWE. Then we investigated the in vivo feasibility on the eye of an anesthetized rat by applying noise correlation to naturally occurring displacements. The results suggest a great potential for passive elastography based on the detection of natural pulsatile motions using conventional spectral-domain OCT systems. This would facilitate the transfer of OCT-elastography to clinical practice, in particular, in ophthalmology or dermatology.

  11. Feasibility of transient elastography versus real-time two-dimensional shear wave elastography in difficult-to-scan patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staugaard, Benjamin; Christensen, Peer Brehm; Mössner, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Transient elastography (TE) is hampered in some patients by failures and unreliable results. We hypothesized that real time two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2D-SWE), the FibroScan XL probe, and repeated TE exams, could be used to obtain reliable liver stiffness...

  12. Shear wave velocity structure of the lower crust in southern Africa: evidence for compositional heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic terrains

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kgaswane, EM

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available . For large parts of both Archaean and Proterozoic terrains, the velocity models obtained from the inversions show shear wave velocities =4.0 km/s below ~20–30 km depth, indicating a predominantly mafic lower crust. However, for much of the Kimberley terrain...

  13. Polarization-resolved characterization of plasmon waves supported by an anisotropic metasurface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samusev, Anton; Mukhin, Ivan; Malureanu, Radu

    2017-01-01

    Optical metasurfaces have great potential to form a platform for manipulation of surface waves. A plethora of advanced surface-wave phenomena such as negative refraction, self-collimation and channeling of 2D waves can be realized through on-demand engineering of dispersion properties of a periodic...... metasurface. In this letter, we report on polarization-resolved measurement of dispersion of plasmon waves supported by an anisotropic metasurface. We demonstrate that a subdiffractive array of strongly coupled resonant plasmonic nanoparticles supports both TE and TM plasmon modes at optical frequencies...... polarization degree of freedom for surface waves, our results open new routes for designing planar on-chip devices for surface photonics....

  14. Polarized Microwave Background Technologies for Inflationary Gravitational Wave Detection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The detection of primordial gravitational waves (PGWs) from the epoch of inflation is one of the next majors goals in cosmology. These PGWs leave a signature on the...

  15. Exact scattering and diffraction of antiplane shear waves by a vertical edge crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaur, Deng-How

    2010-06-01

    Scattering and diffraction problems of a vertical edge crack connected to the surface of a half space are considered for antiplane shear wave incidence. The method of separation of variables is adopted to derive an exact series solution. The total displacement field is expressed as infinite series containing products of radial and angular Mathieu functions with unknown coefficients. An exact analytical determination of unknown coefficients is carried out by insuring the vanishing of normal stresses on crack faces. Frequency-domain results are given for extremely near, near, and far fields, whereas time-domain ones are for horizontal surface and subsurface motions. Comparisons with published data for the dynamic stress intensity factor show good agreement. The exact analytical nature of proposed solutions can be applied very conveniently and rapidly to high-frequency steady-state cases, enhancing the computation efficiency in transient cases when performing the fast Fourier transform. A sampled set of time slices for underground wave propagation benefits the interpretation of scattering and diffraction phenomena induced by a vertical edge crack.

  16. Drift wave spectra and enhanced transport in plasmas with magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A.; Hasselberg, G.

    1982-01-01

    We investigate the potentialities of nonlinear scattering of waves off ions as a stabilizing mechanism of drift turbulence in plasmas with magnetic shear. The failure of the random phase averaging procedure and the local character of the interaction in frequency space are the starting point of a reformulation of weak turbulence theory. In particular, the usual integral equation is transformed into a system of two first order differential equations coupling the spectra I(ksub(theta)) and I(ksub(theta) -1 ). The density fluctuation spectrum, which is obtained analytically, has some desirable features in reference to experiment. Firstly, |eta tilde|ksub(theta) 2 behaves asymptotically (ksub(theta) → infinity) as ksub(theta) -4 ; secondly, the high mode numbers (ksub(theta)asub(s) >1) contribute about 80% to the cross field diffusion while the low mode numbers (ksub(theta)asub(s) <1) provide about 80% of the squared density fluctuation. In discussing the transport properties we emphasize the possible role of anomalous heat transfer from electrons to ions. The spectrum of convective cells formed in the interaction of drift waves is obtained; their contribution to the diffusion is found to be negligible, at least in the plasma core. (author)

  17. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Zheng

    2016-05-11

    We investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by conducting H-κ stacking analysis and jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). The study region, the Arabian plate, is traditionally divided into the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform: The Arabian shield itself is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (locally known as harrats). The Arabian platform is primarily covered by 8 to 10 km of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. Our results reveal high Vp/Vs ratios in the region of Harrat Lunayyir, which are interpreted as solidified magma intrusions from old magmatic episodes in the shield. Our results also indicate slow velocities and large upper mantle lid temperatures below the southern and northern tips of the Arabian shield, when compared with the values obtained for the central shield. We argue that our inferred patterns of lid velocity and temperature are due to heating by thermal conduction from the Afar plume (and, possibly, the Jordan plume), and that volcanism in western Arabia may result from small-scale adiabatic ascent of magma diapirs.

  18. Analytical study of dispersion relations for shear horizontal wave propagation in plates with periodic stubs

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-08-01

    The coupled mode theory with coupling of diffraction modes and waveguide modes is usually used on the calculations of transmission and reflection coefficients for electromagnetic waves traveling through periodic sub-wavelength structures. In this paper, I extend this method to derive analytical solutions of high-order dispersion relations for shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in elastic plates with periodic stubs. In the long wavelength regime, the explicit expression is obtained by this theory and derived specially by employing an effective medium. This indicates that the periodical stubs are equivalent to an effective homogenous layer in the long wavelength. Notably, in the short wavelength regime, high-order diffraction modes in the plate and high-order waveguide modes in the stubs are considered with modes coupling to compute the band structures. Numerical results of the coupled mode theory fit pretty well with the results of the finite element method (FEM). In addition, the band structures\\' evolution with the height of the stubs and the thickness of the plate shows clearly that the method can predict well the Bragg band gaps, locally resonant band gaps and high-order symmetric and anti-symmetric thickness-twist modes for the periodically structured plates. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  19. A microfluidic device to apply shear stresses to polarizing ciliated airway epithelium using air flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Dennis; Waddell, Thomas K; McGuigan, Alison P

    2014-11-01

    Organization of airway epithelium determines ciliary beat direction and coordination for proper mucociliary clearance. Fluidic shear stresses have the potential to influence ciliary organization. Here, an in vitro fluidic flow system was developed for inducing long-term airflow shear stresses on airway epithelium with a view to influencing epithelial organization. Our system consists of a fluidic device for cell culture, integrated into a humidified airflow circuit. The fluidic device has a modular design and is made from a combination of polystyrene and adhesive components incorporated into a 6-well filter membrane insert. We demonstrate the system operates within physiologically relevant shear and pressure ranges and estimate the shear stress exerted on the epithelial cell layer as a result of air flow using a computational model. For both the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS2B and primary human tracheal airway epithelial cells, we demonstrate that cells remain viable within the device when exposed to airflow for 24 h and that normal differentiation and cilia formation occurs. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of our device for exploring the impact of exposing cells to airflow: our tool enables quantification of cytoskeletal organization, and is compatible with in situ bead assays to assess the orientation of cilia beating.

  20. Liquefaction assessment based on combined use of CPT and shear wave velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bán, Zoltán; Mahler, András; Győri, Erzsébet

    2017-04-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the most devastating secondary effects of earthquakes and can cause significant damage in built infrastructure. For this reason liquefaction hazard shall be considered in all regions where moderate-to-high seismic activity encounters with saturated, loose, granular soil deposits. Several approaches exist to take into account this hazard, from which the in-situ test based empirical methods are the most commonly used in practice. These methods are generally based on the results of CPT, SPT or shear wave velocity measurements. In more complex or high risk projects CPT and VS measurement are often performed at the same location commonly in the form of seismic CPT. Furthermore, VS profile determined by surface wave methods can also supplement the standard CPT measurement. However, combined use of both in-situ indices in one single empirical method is limited. For this reason, the goal of this research was to develop such an empirical method within the framework of simplified empirical procedures where the results of CPT and VS measurements are used in parallel and can supplement each other. The combination of two in-situ indices, a small strain property measurement with a large strain measurement, can reduce uncertainty of empirical methods. In the first step by careful reviewing of the already existing liquefaction case history databases, sites were selected where the records of both CPT and VS measurement are available. After implementing the necessary corrections on the gathered 98 case histories with respect to fines content, overburden pressure and magnitude, a logistic regression was performed to obtain the probability contours of liquefaction occurrence. Logistic regression is often used to explore the relationship between a binary response and a set of explanatory variables. The occurrence or absence of liquefaction can be considered as binary outcome and the equivalent clean sand value of normalized overburden corrected cone tip

  1. Shear-wave velocity of marine sediments offshore Taiwan using ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Tse; Lin, Jing-Yi; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Yeh, Yi-Chin; Cheng, Win-Bin

    2017-04-01

    Seismic ambient noise technology has many advantages over the traditional two-station method. The most important one is that noise is happening all the time and it can be widely and evenly distributed. Thus, the Green's Function of any station pair can be obtained through the data cross-correlation process. Many related studies have been performed to estimate the velocity structures based on the inland area. Only a few studies were reported for the marine area due to the relatively shorter recording time of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) deployment and the high cost of the marine experiment. However, the understanding about the shear-wave velocity (Vs) of the marine sediments is very crucial for the hazard assessment related to submarine landslides, particularly with the growing of submarine resources exploration. In this study, we applied the ambient noise technique to four OBS seismic networks located offshore Taiwan in the aim of getting more information about the noise sources and having the preliminary estimation for the Vs of the marine sediments. Two of the seismic networks were deployed in the NE part of Taiwan, near the Ryukyu subduction system, whereas the others were in the SW area, on the continental margin rich in gas hydrate. Generally, ambient seismic noise could be associated with wind, ocean waves, rock fracturing and anthropogenic activity. In the southwestern Taiwan, the cross-correlation function obtained from two seismic networks indicate similar direction, suggestion that the source from the south part of the network could be the origin of the noise. However, the two networks in the northeastern Taiwan show various source direction, which could be caused by the abrupt change of bathymetry or the volcanic degassing effect frequently observed by the marine geophysical method in the area. The Vs determined from the dispersion curve shows a relatively higher value for the networks in the Okinawa Trough (OT) off NE Taiwan than that in the

  2. Raman backscattering of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves propagating along a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraghechi, B.; Willett, J.e.

    1979-01-01

    The stimulated Raman backscattering of an intense electromagnetic wave propagating in the extraordinary mode along a uniform, static magnetic field is considered. The dispersion relation for a homogeneous magnetized plasma in the presence of the circularly polarized pump waves is developed in the cold-plasma approximation with the pump frequency above the plasma frequency. Formulas are derived for the threshold νsub(OT) of the parametric instability and for the growth rate γ of the backscattered extraordinary wave and Langmuir wave. The effects of the magnetic field parallel to the direction of propagation on νsub(0T) and γ are studied numerically. (author)

  3. Circular Polarizations of Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae: A Clear Indication of Rapid Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Takami; Nakamura, Ko; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-04-15

    We propose to employ the circular polarization of gravitational waves emitted by core-collapse supernovae as an unequivocal indication of rapid rotation deep in their cores just prior to collapse. It has been demonstrated by three dimensional simulations that nonaxisymmetric accretion flows may develop spontaneously via hydrodynamical instabilities in the postbounce cores. It is not surprising, then, that the gravitational waves emitted by such fluid motions are circularly polarized. We show, in this Letter, that a network of the second generation detectors of gravitational waves worldwide may be able to detect such polarizations up to the opposite side of the Galaxy as long as the rotation period of the core is shorter than a few seconds prior to collapse.

  4. TH-A-207B-01: Basics and Current Implementations of Ultrasound Imaging of Shear Wave Speed and Elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of tissue elastic properties is a relatively new and powerful approach to one of the oldest and most important diagnostic tools. Imaging of shear wave speed with ultrasound is has been added to most high-end ultrasound systems. Understanding this exciting imaging mode aiding its most effective use in medicine can be a rewarding effort for medical physicists and other medical imaging and treatment professionals. Assuring consistent, quantitative measurements across the many ultrasound systems in a typical imaging department will constitute a major step toward realizing the great potential of this technique and other quantitative imaging. This session will target these two goals with two presentations. A. Basics and Current Implementations of Ultrasound Imaging of Shear Wave Speed and Elasticity - Shigao Chen, Ph.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Introduction: Importance of tissue elasticity measurement Strain vs. shear wave elastography (SWE), beneficial features of SWE The link between shear wave speed and material properties, influence of viscosity Generation of shear waves External vibration (Fibroscan) ultrasound radiation force Point push Supersonic push (Aixplorer) Comb push (GE Logiq E9) Detection of shear waves Motion detection from pulse-echo ultrasound Importance of frame rate for shear wave imaging Plane wave imaging detection How to achieve high effective frame rate using line-by-line scanners Shear wave speed calculation Time to peak Random sample consensus (RANSAC) Cross correlation Sources of bias and variation in SWE Tissue viscosity Transducer compression or internal pressure of organ Reflection of shear waves at boundaries B. Elasticity Imaging System Biomarker Qualification and User Testing of Systems – Brian Garra, M.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Goals Review the need for quantitative medical imaging Provide examples of quantitative imaging biomarkers Acquaint the participant with the purpose of the RSNA Quantitative Imaging

  5. A threshold value in Shear Wave elastography to rule out malignant thyroid nodules: A reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veyrieres, J.-B., E-mail: jbveyrieres@hotmail.fr [Département d’imagerie médicale, Hôpital d’Instruction des Armées St Anne, Bd Saint Anne, BP 20545 Toulon cedex (France); Albarel, F., E-mail: frederique.albarel@ap-hm.fr [Département médical d’endocrinologie et des pathologies métaboliques, Hôpital Universitaire la Timone, Assistance publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille, 264 rue Saint Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Lombard, J. Vaillant, E-mail: Josiane.vaillant@ap-hm.fr [Département d’imagerie médicale, Hôpital Universitaire la Timone, Assistance publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille, 264 rue Saint Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Berbis, J., E-mail: Julie.berbis@ap-hm.fr [Département de santé publique, Université de Médecine, 27, Bd Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Sebag, F., E-mail: frederic.sebag@ap-hm.fr [Département de chirurgie des pathologies endocriniennes et métaboliques, Hôpital Universitaire la Timone, Assistance publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille, 264 rue Saint Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); and others

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: To evaluate hability of a threshold value in ShearWave™ elastography to rule out malignant thyroid nodules while studying its pertinence in association with morphological signs. Equipment and methods: 148 patients (110 women and 38 men; 52.5 y.o. 15.8) referred for surgery of thyroid nodules underwent standard ultrasound as well as elastography. Characteristics of the morphological signs and maximum elastographic index were calculated in relation to histology. Association of morphological signs alone and then of elastography was also evaluated. One hundred and fifty one nodules were studied on a double-blind basis. Results: 297 nodules were studied. Thirty-five cancers were detected (11.6%). Elastographic index was higher in malignant nodules (115 kPa 60.4) than in benign nodules (41 kPa 25.8) (p < 0.001, Student's t-test). Cut off value of 66 kPa was the best to discriminate malignant nodules with a sensitivity of 80% (CI 95%, 62.5; 90.9) and a specificity of 90.5% (CI 95%, 86.1; 93.6) (p = 0.0001). Association of elastography and morphological ultrasound signs presented a sensitivity of 97% (CI 95%, 83.3; 99.8) and a negative predictive value of 99.5% (CI 95%, 95.6; 99.9). Interobserver reproducibility proved to be excellent with an interclass correlation of 0.97 (CI 95%, 0.96; 0.98) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The 66 kPa threshold in Shear Wave elastography is the best ultrasound sign to rule out malignant thyroid nodules. The method is simple, quantitative, reproducible and usable in the study of nodules larger than 3 cm. Progress must still be made in the study of calcified nodules and follicular tumors.

  6. Numerical analysis on interactions of vortex, shock wave, and exothermal reaction in a supersonic planar shear layer laden with droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhaoxin; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Longxi

    2018-03-01

    The analysis on the interactions of a large-scale shearing vortex, an incident oblique shock wave, and a chemical reaction in a planar shear layer is performed by numerical simulations. The reacting flows are obtained by directly solving the multi-species Navier-Stokes equations in the Eulerian frame, and the motions of individual point-mass fuel droplets are tracked in the Lagrangian frame considering the two-way coupling. The influences of shock strength and spray equivalence ratio on the shock-vortex interaction and the induced combustion are further studied. Under the present conditions, the incident shock is distorted by the vortex evolution to form the complicated waves including an incident shock wave, a multi-refracted wave, a reflected wave, and a transmitted wave. The local pressure and temperature are elevated by the shock impingement on the shearing vortex, which carries flammable mixtures. The chemical reaction is mostly accelerated by the refracted shock across the vortex. Two different exothermal reaction modes could be distinguished during the shock-vortex interaction as a thermal mode, due to the additional energy from the incident shock, and a local quasi detonation mode, due to the coupling of the refracted wave with reaction. The former mode detaches the flame and shock wave, whereas the latter mode tends to occur when the incident shock strength is higher and local equivalence ratio is higher approaching to the stoichiometric value. The numerical results illustrate that those two modes by shock-vortex interaction depend on the structure of the post-shock flame kernel, which may be located either in the vortex-braids of post-shock flows or in the shock-vortex interaction regime.

  7. Polarization of concave domains by traveling wave pinning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Bialecki

    Full Text Available Pattern formation is one of the most fundamental yet puzzling phenomena in physics and biology. We propose that traveling front pinning into concave portions of the boundary of 3-dimensional domains can serve as a generic gradient-maintaining mechanism. Such a mechanism of domain polarization arises even for scalar bistable reaction-diffusion equations, and, depending on geometry, a number of stationary fronts may be formed leading to complex spatial patterns. The main advantage of the pinning mechanism, with respect to the Turing bifurcation, is that it allows for maintaining gradients in the specific regions of the domain. By linking the instant domain shape with the spatial pattern, the mechanism can be responsible for cellular polarization and differentiation.

  8. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    Naturally occurring geologic heterogeneity is an important, but often overlooked, aspect of seismic wave propagation. This dissertation presents a strategy for modeling the effects of heterogeneity using a combination of geostatistics and Finite Difference simulation. In the first chapter, I discuss my motivations for studying geologic heterogeneity and seis- mic wave propagation. Models based upon fractal statistics are powerful tools in geophysics for modeling heterogeneity. The important features of these fractal models are illustrated using borehole log data from an oil well and geomorphological observations from a site in Death Valley, California. A large part of the computational work presented in this disserta- tion was completed using the Finite Difference Code E3D. I discuss the Python-based user interface for E3D and the computational strategies for working with heterogeneous models developed over the course of this research. The second chapter explores a phenomenon observed for wave propagation in heteroge- neous media - the generation of unexpected shear wave phases in the near-source region. In spite of their popularity amongst seismic researchers, approximate methods for modeling wave propagation in these media, such as the Born and Rytov methods or Radiative Trans- fer Theory, are incapable of explaining these shear waves. This is primarily due to these method's assumptions regarding the coupling of near-source terms with the heterogeneities and mode conversion. To determine the source of these shear waves, I generate a suite of 3D synthetic heterogeneous fractal geologic models and use E3D to simulate the wave propaga- tion for a vertical point force on the surface of the models. I also present a methodology for calculating the effective source radiation patterns from the models. The numerical results show that, due to a combination of mode conversion and coupling with near-source hetero- geneity, shear wave energy on the order of 10% of the

  9. Nonplanar electrostatic shock waves in an opposite polarity dust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been carried out on the propagation of nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) dust-acoustic shock waves (DASHWs) in a collisionless four-component unmagnetized dusty plasmasystem containing massive, micron-sized, positively and negatively charged inertial dust grains along with ...

  10. Analysis of Seismic Anisotropy Across Central Anatolia by Shear Wave Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamir, Dilekcan; Abgarmi, Bizhan; Arda Özacar, A.

    2014-05-01

    Analysis of Seismic Anisotropy Across Central Anatolia by Shear Wave Splitting Dilekcan Pamir, Bizhan Abgarmi, A. Arda Özacar Department of Geological Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU), Dumlupinar Bulvari 1, 06800 Ankara, Turkey Central Anatolia holds the key to connect the theories about the ongoing tectonic escape, the African Plate subduction along Cyprus Arc and the indenter-style collision of Arabian Plate along Bitlis Suture. However, the shear wave splitting measurements which are needed to characterize seismic anisotropy are very sparse in the region. Recently, seismic data recorded by national seismic networks (KOERI, ERI-DAD) with dense coverage, provided a unique opportunity to analyze the effect of present slab geometry (slab tears, slab break-off) on mantle deformation and test different models of anisotropy forming mechanisms. In this study, the anisotropic structure beneath the Central Anatolia is investigated via splitting of SKS and SKKS phases recorded at 46 broadband seismic stations. Our measurements yielded 1171 well-constrained splitting and 433 null results. Overall, the region displays NE-SW trending fast splitting directions and delay times on the order of 1 sec. On the other hand, a large number of stations which are spatially correlated with Cyprus Slab, Neogene volcanism and major tectonic structures present significant back azimuthal variations on splitting parameters that cannot be explained by one-layered anisotropy with horizontal symmetry. Thus, we have modeled anisotropy for two-layered structures using a forward approach and identified NE-SW trending fast splitting directions with delay times close to 1 sec at the lower layer and N-S, NW-SE trending fast splitting with limited time delays (0.1 - 0.3 sec) at the upper layer. Fast directions and delay times of the lower layer are similar to one-layered anisotropy and parallel or sub-parallel to the absolute plate motions which favors asthenospheric flow model

  11. Urban shear-wave reflection seismics: Reconstruction support by combined shallow seismic and engineering geology investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, U.; Guenther, A.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, P.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    After the big 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the massive reconstruction activities in the Aceh province (Northern Sumatra) were promoted by the Republic of Indonesia and the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development. The aims of the project MANGEONAD (Management of Georisk Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam). are to establish geoscientific on the ground support for a sustainable development and management of save building constructions, lifelines, infrastructure and also natural resources. Therefore, shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in close combination to engineering geology investigations in the period between 2005-2009 since depth and internal structure of the Krueng Aceh River delta (mainly young alluvial sediments) were widely unknown. Due to the requirements in the densely populated Banda Aceh region, lacking also traffic infrastructure, a small and lightweight engineering seismic setup of high mobility and high subsurface resolution capability was chosen. The S-wave land streamer system with 48 channels was applied successfully together with the ELVIS vibratory source using S- and P-waves on paved roads within the city of Banda Aceh. The performance of the S-wave system enabled the detailed seismic investigation of the shallow subsurface down to 50-150 m depth generating shaking frequencies between 20 Hz to 200 Hz. This also provides depth information extending the maximum depths of boreholes and Standard Penetrometer Testings (SPT), which could only be applied to max. 20 m depth. To integrate the results gained from all three methods, and further to provide a fast statistical analysis tool for engineering use, the Information System Engineering Geology (ISEG, BGR) was developed. This geospatial information tool includes the seismic data, all borehole information, geotechnical SPT and laboratory results from samples available in the investigation area. Thereby, the geotechnical 3D analysis of the subsurface units is enabled. The

  12. Effect of polarization force on large amplitude dust kinetic Alfvén waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Kohli, R.; Kaur, N.; Saini, N. S.

    2018-01-01

    Effect of polarization force on dust kinetic Alfvén waves (DKAWs) has been studied in this paper. We incorporated the effect of polarization in fluid model equations and derived the expression for Sagdeev pseudopotential. From the numerical analysis, it is seen that DKAWs are significantly affected by the variation of polarization force, plasma beta and Mach number. This study may be useful in understanding the formation of coherent nonlinear structures and diagnostics of dusts in laboratory as well as in space/astrophysical plasma environments.

  13. Maslov shear-waveforms in highly anisotropic shales and implications for shear-wave splitting analyses; Formes d`onde transversales de Maslov dans les argiles fortement anisotropes et implications dans les analyses de birefringence des ondes transversales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caddick, J. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Kendall, J.M.; Raymer, D.G. [Western Geophysical, Middlesex (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1998-09-01

    Shales are the most common sedimentary rocks in hydrocarbon environments often forming the source rock and trapping rock for a reservoir. Due to the platy nature of the constituent grains, shales are commonly anisotropic. In this paper we calculate seismic waveforms for highly anisotropic shales using Maslow asymptotic theory (MAT). This theory is an extension of classical ray theory which provides valid waveforms in regions of caustics (wavefront folding) where ray theory amplitudes are unstable. Asymptotic ray theory (ART) is based on the Fermat or geometrical ray which connects the source and receiver. In contrast, the Maslov solution integrates the contributions from neighbouring non-Fermat rays. Ray-paths, travel-times, amplitudes and synthetic seismograms are presented for three highly anisotropic shales using a very simple 1D model comprised of an anisotropic shale overlying an isotropic shale. The ART waveforms fail to account for complex waveform effects due to triplications. In comparison, the MAT waveforms predict nonsingular amplitudes at wavefront cusps and it predicts the diffracted signals from these cusps. A Maslov solution which integrates ray contributions over a single slowness component will break down when rays focus in 3D (at a point rather than along a line). One of the tested shales shows such a point caustic and integration over 2 slowness components is required to remove the amplitude singularity. Finally, we examine the effects of wavefront triplications on Alford rotations which are used to estimate shear-wave splitting. In such cases, the rotation successfully finds the fast shear-wave polarization, but it can be unreliable in its estimate of the time separation. (authors) 21 refs.

  14. Polarization state of an inhomogenously refracted compressional-wave induced at interface between two anisotropic rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Lin; Li, Wenya; Zhao, Jie; Han, Yonglan; Liang, Meng; Ding, Pengfei; Zhao, Meishan

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the polarization states of an inhomogenously refracted P-wave induced from the interface of two anisotropic rocks. Two realistic physical models have been studied: Model-1 is an interface between anisotropic shale and Taylor sandstone; Model-2 is an interface between anisotropic shale and oil shale. For each model, an analytical expression of the polarization states was derived and its elliptical-polarization trajectory was examined. It is shown that an anomalous incident-angle leads not only to a sudden elliptical-polarization directional variation but also to an abrupt change in size and shape of its elliptical-polarization trajectory. The calculated results and analyses provide a theoretical base for the understandings of an anomalous incident-angle recently reported in the literature [e.g., Fa, Fa, Zhang, Ding, Gong, Li, Li, Tang, and Zhao (2015). Sci. Rep. 5, 12700].

  15. Hybrid ANFIS with ant colony optimization algorithm for prediction of shear wave velocity from a carbonate reservoir in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Fattahi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave velocity (Vs data are key information for petrophysical, geophysical and geomechanical studies. Although compressional wave velocity (Vp measurements exist in almost all wells, shear wave velocity is not recorded for most of elderly wells due to lack of technologic tools. Furthermore, measurement of shear wave velocity is to some extent costly. This study proposes a novel methodology to remove aforementioned problems by use of hybrid adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS with ant colony optimization algorithm (ACO based on fuzzy c–means clustering (FCM and subtractive clustering (SCM. The ACO is combined with two ANFIS models for determining the optimal value of its user–defined parameters. The optimization implementation by the ACO significantly improves the generalization ability of the ANFIS models. These models are used in this study to formulate conventional well log data into Vs in a quick, cheap, and accurate manner. A total of 3030 data points was used for model construction and 833 data points were employed for assessment of ANFIS models. Finally, a comparison among ANFIS models, and six well–known empirical correlations demonstrated ANFIS models outperformed other methods. This strategy was successfully applied in the Marun reservoir, Iran.

  16. Shock wave polarizations and optical metrics in the Born and the Born–Infeld electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minz, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.minz@alumni.tu-berlin.de [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Borzeszkowski, Horst-Heino von, E-mail: borzeszk@mailbox.tu-berlin.de [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Chrobok, Thoralf, E-mail: tchrobok@mailbox.tu-berlin.de [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Schellstede, Gerold, E-mail: schellst@physik.fu-berlin.de [ZARM (Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity), Universität Bremen, Am Fallturm, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    We analyze the behavior of shock waves in nonlinear theories of electrodynamics. For this, by use of generalized Hadamard step functions of increasing order, the electromagnetic potential is developed in a series expansion near the shock wave front. This brings about a corresponding expansion of the respective electromagnetic field equations which allows for deriving relations that determine the jump coefficients in the expansion series of the potential. We compute the components of a suitable gauge-normalized version of the jump coefficients given for a prescribed tetrad compatible with the shock front foliation. The solution of the first-order jump relations shows that, in contrast to linear Maxwell’s electrodynamics, in general the propagation of shock waves in nonlinear theories is governed by optical metrics and polarization conditions describing the propagation of two differently polarized waves (leading to a possible appearance of birefringence). In detail, shock waves are analyzed in the Born and Born–Infeld theories verifying that the Born–Infeld model exhibits no birefringence and the Born model does. The obtained results are compared to those ones found in literature. New results for the polarization of the two different waves are derived for Born-type electrodynamics.

  17. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  18. Shear Wave Structure Beneath Texas and Its Implication for the Opening of The Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y.; Li, A.

    2016-12-01

    It has been widely accepted that the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) was opened by the counterclockwise rotation of the Yucatan block away from the Texas-Louisiana margin during 140-160 Ma. However, little is known about the geodynamic cause of this rotation. We aim to find clues about the opening of the GOM using a high-resolution, 3D model in Texas with a focus on the coastal plane. We have conducted Rayleigh wave tomography using ambient noise and earthquake data recorded at the USArray TA stations and obtained phase velocity maps for 25 periods from 6 s to 166 s, which are utilized to build a 3-D shear wave velocity model in the crust and upper mantle above 200 km. The Laurentian craton is characterized by high-velocity anomalies, and the low-velocity anomalies mainly appear in the coastal plane. High-velocity maximums are observed following the Ouachita Belt in the entire crust and the uppermost mantle and are correlated with known uplifts. We interpreted these deep-rooted uplifts as accreted island arc materials during the Ouachita collision, which supports the argument of a strong Ouachita lithosphere that helped to confine the thin transition crust to its east and south in the Gulf coast. The most significant low-velocity region is imaged in southeast Texas from the lower crust to at least 200 km depth. This anomaly aligns on the Keathley Canyon hotspot track in the GOM and could be caused by a combination of high temperature, partial melting, and high volatile content. We associate this low-velocity column with a past asthenosphere upwelling that could have originated from the tear of the subducted slab during the Ouachita orogeny. The plume-like upwelling in southeast Texas is probably the main driving force for the opening of the Gulf of Mexico.

  19. Estimation of Shear Wave Speed in the Rhesus Macaques Uterine Cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Drehfal, Lindsey C.; Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M.; Guerrero, Quinton W.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Simmons, Heather A.; Feltovich, Helen; Hall, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical softness is a critical parameter in pregnancy. Clinically, preterm birth is associated with premature cervical softening and post-dates birth is associated with delayed cervical softening. In practice, the assessment of softness is subjective, based on digital examination. Fortunately, objective, quantitative techniques to assess softness and other parameters associated with microstructural cervical change are emerging. One of these is shear wave speed (SWS) estimation. In principle, this allows objective characterization of stiffness because waves travel more slowly in softer tissue. We are studying SWS in humans and rhesus macaques, the latter in order to accelerate translation from bench to bedside. For the current study, we estimated SWS in ex vivo cervices of rhesus macaques, n=24 nulliparous (never given birth) and n=9 multiparous (delivered at least 1 baby). Misoprostol (a prostaglandin used to soften human cervices prior to gynecological procedures) was administered to 13 macaques prior to necropsy (nulliparous: 7, multiparous: 6). SWS measurements were made at predetermined locations from the distal to proximal end of the cervix on both the anterior and posterior cervix, with 5 repeat measures at each location. The intent was to explore macaque cervical microstructure, including biological and spatial variability, to elucidate the similarities and differences between the macaque and the human cervix in order to facilitate future in vivo studies. We found that SWS is dependent on location in the normal nonpregnant macaque cervix, as in the human cervix. Unlike the human cervix, we detected no difference between ripened and unripened rhesus macaque cervix samples, nor nulliparous versus multiparous samples, although we observed a trend toward stiffer tissue in nulliparous samples. We found rhesus macaque cervix to be much stiffer than human, which is important for technique refinement. These findings are useful for guiding study of cervical

  20. An Empirical Algorithm for Wave Retrieval from Co-Polarization X-Band SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizeng Shao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we proposed an empirical algorithm for significant wave height (SWH retrieval from TerraSAR-X/TanDEM (TS-X/TD-X X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR co-polarization (vertical-vertical (VV and horizontal-horizontal (HH images. As the existing empirical algorithm at X-band, i.e., XWAVE, is applied for wave retrieval from HH-polarization TS-X/TD-X image, polarization ratio (PR has to be used for inverting wind speed, which is treated as an input in XWAVE. Wind speed encounters saturation in tropical cyclone. In our work, wind speed is replaced by normalized radar cross section (NRCS to avoiding using SAR-derived wind speed, which does not work in high winds, and the empirical algorithm can be conveniently implemented without converting NRCS in HH-polarization to NRCS in VV-polarization by using X-band PR. A total of 120 TS-X/TD-X images, 60 in VV-polarization and 60 in HH-polarization, with homogenous wave patterns, and the coincide significant wave height data from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF reanalysis field at a 0.125° grid were collected as a dataset for tuning the algorithm. The range of SWH is from 0 to 7 m. We then applied the algorithm to 24 VV and 21 HH additional SAR images to extract SWH at locations of 30 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA National Data Buoy Center (NDBC buoys. It is found that the algorithm performs well with a SWH stander deviation (STD of about 0.5 m for both VV and HH polarization TS-X/TD-X images. For large wave validation (SWH 6–7 m, we applied the empirical algorithm to a tropical cyclone Sandy TD-X image acquired in 2012, and obtained good result with a SWH STD of 0.3 m. We concluded that the proposed empirical algorithm works for wave retrieval from TS-X/TD-X image in co-polarization without external sea surface wind information.

  1. Vector wave diffraction pattern of slits masked by polarizing devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (7) where X = πud is the observation plane coordinate. If an analyser P(θ) is placed at the output side whose transmission axis makes an angle θ with the chosen x-axis, the vector wave amplitude obtained at the observation plane is then given by. F(u)WA = P(θ)F(u), where. P(θ) = ∣. ∣. ∣. ∣ cos2 θ sin θ cos θ sin θ cos θ.

  2. A polarized digital shearing speckle pattern interferometry system based on temporal wavelet transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ziang; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Wang, Shengjia; Yang, Dong; Yuan, Hao; Qin, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Digital shearing speckle pattern interferometry (DSSPI) has been recognized as a practical tool in testing strain. The DSSPI system which is based on temporal analysis is attractive because of its ability to measure strain dynamically. In this paper, such a DSSPI system with Wollaston prism has been built. The principles and system arrangement are described and the preliminary experimental result of the displacement-derivative test of an aluminum plate is shown with the wavelet transformation method and the Fourier transformation method. The simulations have been conducted with the finite element method. The comparison of the results shows that quantitative measurement of displacement-derivative has been realized.

  3. Very Broadband Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion (0.06 - 60 Hz) and Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Under Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, K. A.; Bilek, S. L.; Patton, H. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Stead, R.; Pancha, A.; White, R.

    2009-12-01

    Earth structure plays an important role in the generation of seismic waves for all sources. Nowhere is this more evident than at near-surface depths where man-made sources, such as explosions, are conducted. For example, short-period Rayleigh waves (Rg) are excited and propagate in the upper 2 km of Earth's crust. The importance of Rg in the generation of S waves from explosion sources through near-source scattering depends greatly on the shear-wave velocity structure at very shallow depths. Using three distinct datasets, we present a very broadband Rayleigh-wave phase velocity dispersion curve for the Yucca Flat (YF) region of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first dataset consists of waveforms of historic NTS explosions recorded on regional seismic networks and will provide information for the lowest frequencies (0.06-0.3 Hz). The second dataset is comprised of waveforms from a non-nuclear explosion on YF recorded at near-local distances and will be used for mid-range frequencies (0.2-1.5 Hz). The third dataset contains high-frequency waveforms recorded from refraction microtremor surveys on YF. This dataset provides information between 1.5 and 60 Hz. Initial results from the high frequency dataset indicate velocities range from 0.45-0.9 km/s at 1.5 Hz and 0.25-0.45 km/s at 60 Hz. The broadband nature of the dispersion curve will allow us to invert for the shear-wave velocity structure to 10 km depth, with focus on shallow depths where nuclear tests were conducted in the YF region. The velocity model will be used by researchers as a tool to aid the development of new explosion source models that incorporate shear wave generation. The new model can also be used to help improve regional distance yield estimation and source discrimination for small events.

  4. Intra-and interobserver reproducibility of shear wave elastography for evaluation of the breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Min Ji [Dept. of Radiology, Gil Hospital, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate reproducibility of shear wave elastography (SWE) for breast lesions within and between observers and compare the reproducibility of SWE features. For intraobserver reproducibility, 225 masses with 208 patients were included; and two consecutive SWE images were acquired by each observer. For interobserver reproducibility, SWE images of the same mass were obtained by another observer before surgery in 40 patients. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to determine intra- and interobserver reproducibility. Intraobserver reliability for mean elasticity (Emean) and maximum elasticity (Emax) were excellent (ICC = 0.803, 0.799). ICC for SWE ratio and minimum elasticity (Emin) were fair to good (ICC = 0.703, 0.539). Emean showed excellent ICC regardless of histopathologic type and tumor size. Emax, SWE ratio and Emin represented excellent or fair to good reproducibility based on histopathologic type and tumor size. In interobserver study, ICC for Emean, Emax and SWE ratio were excellent. Emean, Emax and SWE ratio represented excellent ICC irrespective of histopathologic type. ICC for Emean was excellent regardless of tumor size. SWE ratio and Emax showed fair to good interobserver reproducibility based on tumor size. Emin represented poor interobserver reliability. Emean in SWE was highly reproducible within and between observers.

  5. Qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastography for breast masses: how it correlates to quantitative measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Ko, Kyung Hee; Jung, Hae Kyoung; Lee, Jong Tae

    2013-12-01

    To determine the correlation of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) pattern classification to quantitative SWE measurements and whether it is representative of quantitative SWE values with similar performances. From October 2012 to January 2013, 267 breast masses of 236 women (mean age: 45.12 ± 10.54 years, range: 21-88 years) who had undergone ultrasonography (US), SWE, and subsequent biopsy were included. US BI-RADS final assessment and qualitative and quantitative SWE measurements were recorded. Correlation between pattern classification and mean elasticity, maximum elasticity, elasticity ratio and standard deviation were evaluated. Diagnostic performances of grayscale US, SWE parameters, and US combined to SWE values were calculated and compared. Of the 267 breast masses, 208 (77.9%) were benign and 59 (22.1%) were malignant. Pattern classifications significantly correlated with all quantitative SWE measurements, showing highest correlation with maximum elasticity, r = 0.721 (P0.05). Pattern classification shows high correlation to maximum stiffness and may be representative of quantitative SWE values. When combined to grayscale US, SWE improves specificity of US. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 2D-Shear Wave Elastography in the Evaluation of Parathyroid Lesions in Patients with Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Golu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. 2D-shear wave elastography (2D-SWE is a relatively new elastographic technique. The aim of the present study is to determine the values of the elasticity indexes (EI measured by 2D-SWE in parathyroid benign lesions (adenomas or hyperplasia and to establish if this investigation is helpful for the preoperative identification of the parathyroid adenoma. Material and Methods. The study groups were represented by 22 patients with primary or tertiary hyperparathyroidism, diagnosed by specific tests, and 43 healthy controls, in whom the thyroid parenchyma was evaluated, in order to compare the EI of the thyroid tissue with those of the parathyroid lesions. Results. The mean EI measured by 2D-SWE in the parathyroid lesions was 10.2 ± 4.9 kPa, significantly lower than that of the normal thyroid parenchyma (19.5 ± 7.6 kPa; p=0.007, indicating soft tissue. For a cutoff value of 12.5 kPa, the EI assessed by 2D-SWE had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 86% (AUC = 0.949; p<0.001 for predicting parathyroid lesions. Conclusion. A value lower than 12.5 kPa for the mean EI measured by 2D-SWE can be used to confirm that the lesion/nodule is a parathyroid adenoma.

  7. Deep learning based classification of breast tumors with shear-wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Wei; Suo, Jingfeng; Wang, Congzhi; Shi, Jun; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to build a deep learning (DL) architecture for automated extraction of learned-from-data image features from the shear-wave elastography (SWE), and to evaluate the DL architecture in differentiation between benign and malignant breast tumors. We construct a two-layer DL architecture for SWE feature extraction, comprised of the point-wise gated Boltzmann machine (PGBM) and the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM). The PGBM contains task-relevant and task-irrelevant hidden units, and the task-relevant units are connected to the RBM. Experimental evaluation was performed with five-fold cross validation on a set of 227 SWE images, 135 of benign tumors and 92 of malignant tumors, from 121 patients. The features learned with our DL architecture were compared with the statistical features quantifying image intensity and texture. Results showed that the DL features achieved better classification performance with an accuracy of 93.4%, a sensitivity of 88.6%, a specificity of 97.1%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.947. The DL-based method integrates feature learning with feature selection on SWE. It may be potentially used in clinical computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of extent of skin involvement in scleroderma using shear wave elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Wakhlu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis [SSc] is a rare autoimmune disease which manifests as fibrosis in the skin and other internal organs. Conventionally, the modified Rodnan skin score (MRSS has been used to quantify the extent of skin fibrosis (resulting in skin tightness in SSc. This technique, although widely validated, is limited by the requirement of a trained, experienced assessor. Recent literature suggests that utilization of the objective ultrasound-based assessment of skin fibrosis utilizing shear wave elastography (SWE may be a more robust technique to detect early skin tightness in SSc. Methods: We evaluated the use of SWE (assessed by an experienced radiologist in 24 patients with SSc compared with 16 healthy controls. Results: Our patients were predominantly females, with median disease duration of 1.5 years and median MRSS of 17. There was minimal intraobserver variation in the assessment of SWE. Patients with SSc had higher SWE values (mean elasticity [Emean] compared to healthy controls at most assessed sites for the MRSS. The Emeancorrelated significantly at all sites with the MRSS scores. At the sites where MRSS was scored as 0 (normal, the Emeanin patients with SSc was higher when compared with similarly clinical normal skin in patients with SSc, suggesting potential early involvement of these areas of the skin with fibrosis. Conclusion: SWE is a promising tool to objectively assess skin fibrosis in SSc and may be useful in detecting early, subclinical skin involvement in this disease.

  9. Repeatability of shear wave elastography in liver fibrosis phantoms—Evaluation of five different systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to assess and validate the repeatability and agreement of quantitative elastography of novel shear wave methods on four individual tissue-mimicking liver fibrosis phantoms with different known Young’s modulus. We used GE Logiq E9 2D-SWE, Philips iU22 ARFI (pSWE), Samsung TS80A SWE (pSWE), Hitachi Ascendus (SWM) and Transient Elastography (TE). Two individual investigators performed all measurements non-continued and in parallel. The methods were evaluated for inter- and intraobserver variability by intraclass correlation, coefficient of variation and limits of agreement using the median elastography value. All systems used in this study provided high repeatability in quantitative measurements in a liver fibrosis phantom and excellent inter- and intraclass correlations. All four elastography platforms showed excellent intra-and interobserver agreement (interclass correlation 0.981–1.000 and intraclass correlation 0.987–1.000) and no significant difference in mean elasticity measurements for all systems, except for TE on phantom 4. All four liver fibrosis phantoms could be differentiated by quantitative elastography, by all platforms (pphantoms with higher Young’s modulus. All platforms had a coefficient of variation in the range 0.00–0.21 for all four phantoms, equivalent to low variance and high repeatability. PMID:29293527

  10. A preliminary study of shear wave elastography for the evaluation of unilateral palpable undescended testes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ucar, Ayse Kalyoncu, E-mail: Aysekucar@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, KMPasa, Istanbul, 34098 (Turkey); Alis, Deniz, E-mail: denizalis@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, KMPasa, Istanbul, 34098 (Turkey); Samanci, Cesur, E-mail: cesursamanci@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, KMPasa, Istanbul, 34098 (Turkey); Aslan, Mine, E-mail: mineus_77@yahoo.com [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, KMPasa, Istanbul, 34098 (Turkey); Habibi, Hatice Arioz, E-mail: arioz.hatice@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, KMPasa, Istanbul, 34098 (Turkey); Dikici, Atilla Suleyman, E-mail: drsuleymandikici@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, KMPasa, Istanbul, 34098 (Turkey); Namdar, Yesim, E-mail: namdaryesim@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, KMPasa, Istanbul, 34098 (Turkey); Gultekin, Mehmet Hamza, E-mail: mhamzagultekin@hotmail.com [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Department of Urology, KMPasa, Istanbul, 34098 (Turkey); Onal, Bulent, E-mail: bulonal@yahoo.com [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Department of Urology, KMPasa, Istanbul, 34098 (Turkey); Adaletli, Ibrahim, E-mail: iadaletli@yahoo.com [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, KMPasa, Istanbul, 34098 (Turkey)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Testicular biopsy is no longer recommended in the management of undescended testes. • SWE yields valuable quantitative information about the histological properties tissues by assessing stiffness. • Mean stiffness values of undescended testes were significantly higher than those of the contralateral descended testes. • SWE seems to be a useful sonographic technique to assess damage to the undescended testis. • SWE might replace testicular biopsy in the management of undescended testes. - Abstract: Objectives: We sought to compare unilateral palpable undescended testes and contralateral descended testes using shear wave elastography (SWE) to show potential quantitative differences in elasticity patterns, which might reflect the histologic features. Methods: Approval for this prospective study was obtained from the local ethics committee. A total of 29 patients (mean age, 7.52 years; range, 1–18 years) with unilateral palpable undescended testes and contralateral descended testes were examined by greyscale ultrasonography and SWE between February 2015 and April 2016. The volume and the elasticity of each testicle were the main factors evaluated. Results: There was no difference between undescended testes and contralateral descended testes in terms of volume. However, a significant difference was evident in SWE-derived quantitative data. Conclusions: SWE seems to be a useful sonographic technique to predict histologic features of the undescended testicle, which might replace testicular biopsy in modern management of the undescended testis.

  11. Qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastography for breast masses: How it correlates to quantitative measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jung Hyun, E-mail: lvjenny0417@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Kyung Hee, E-mail: yourheeya@cha.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hae Kyoung, E-mail: AA40501@cha.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Tae, E-mail: jtlee@cha.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To determine the correlation of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) pattern classification to quantitative SWE measurements and whether it is representative of quantitative SWE values with similar performances. Methods: From October 2012 to January 2013, 267 breast masses of 236 women (mean age: 45.12 ± 10.54 years, range: 21–88 years) who had undergone ultrasonography (US), SWE, and subsequent biopsy were included. US BI-RADS final assessment and qualitative and quantitative SWE measurements were recorded. Correlation between pattern classification and mean elasticity, maximum elasticity, elasticity ratio and standard deviation were evaluated. Diagnostic performances of grayscale US, SWE parameters, and US combined to SWE values were calculated and compared. Results: Of the 267 breast masses, 208 (77.9%) were benign and 59 (22.1%) were malignant. Pattern classifications significantly correlated with all quantitative SWE measurements, showing highest correlation with maximum elasticity, r = 0.721 (P < 0.001). Sensitivity was significantly decreased in US combined to SWE measurements to grayscale US: 69.5–89.8% to 100.0%, while specificity was significantly improved: 62.5–81.7% to 13.9% (P < 0.001). Area under the ROC curve (A{sub z}) did not show significant differences between grayscale US to US combined to SWE (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Pattern classification shows high correlation to maximum stiffness and may be representative of quantitative SWE values. When combined to grayscale US, SWE improves specificity of US.

  12. Renal shear wave velocity and estimated glomerular filtration rate in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Costanza; Brugnara, Milena; Micciolo, Rocco; Cecchetto, Mariangela; Zuffante, Michele; Bucci, Alessandra; Zaffanello, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A shear wave velocity (SWV) value obtained by the acoustic radiation force impulse technique depends on tissue elasticity. We investigated the relationship between SWV values and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in children with chronic kidney disease. A total of 29 patients were enrolled in the study. There were 18 primary and 11 secondary cases of vesicoureteral reflux. eGFR was calculated using Schwartz's formulas (2012). Partial eGFR for each kidney was assessed by multiplying the eGFR by the percentage of renal function measured by means of renal (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy. All ultrasound tests were done by a single qualified technician using a convex probe (frequency 4 MHz) on an S-2000 system. The mean SWV values of the two kidneys were significantly and negatively correlated with eGFR calculated with both univariate (cystatin C [Cys C] and multivariate (creatinine, Cys C, and nitrogen) equations. Of all the formulae, the strongest correlation was obtained with eGFR (Cys C). SWV of the renal cortex correlates with the eGFR of patients affected by malformative uropathies. Nevertheless, this technique needs standardization and validation.

  13. Temperature dependence of immunoreactions using shear horizontal surface acoustic wave immunosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogai, Takashi; Yatsuda, Hiromi; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, which are antibody-antigen reactions, on a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) immunosensor is described. The immunosensor is based on a reflection-type delay line on a 36° Y-cut 90° X-propagation quartz substrate, where the delay line is composed of a floating electrode unidirectional transducer (FEUDT), a grating reflector, and a sensing area between them. In order to evaluate the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, human serum albumin (HSA) antigen-antibody reactions are investigated. The SH-SAW immunosensor chip is placed in a thermostatic chamber and the changes in the SH-SAW velocity resulting from the immunoreactions are measured at different temperatures. As a result, it is observed that the HSA immunoreactions are influenced by the ambient temperature and that higher temperatures provide more active reactions. In order to analyze the immunoreactions, an analytical approach using an exponential fitting method for changes in SH-SAW velocity is employed.

  14. Dispersion and Polarization of Surface Waves Trapped in High Aspect Ratio Electrode Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laude, Vincent; Dühring, Maria Bayard; Moubchir, Hanane

    2007-01-01

    .Phys., 90(5):2492, 2001; Appl. Phys. Lett., 89:083515, 2006.) an experimental and theoretical analysis of the transduction of SAW under a metallic array of electrodes with a large aspect ratio on a piezoelectric substrate, whereby allowing the electrode height to become larger than one wavelength...... additional results on the polarization and the dispersion of the surface waves trapped by high aspect ratio electrode arrays. A finite element model, including periodic boundary conditions along the propagation direction and a perfectly matched layer (PML) to absorb waves away from the surface...... wave vector values....

  15. Polarization properties of Gendrin mode waves observed in the Earth's magnetosphere: observations and theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Verkhoglyadova

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We show a case of an outer zone magnetospheric electromagnetic wave propagating at the Gendrin angle, within uncertainty of the measurements. The chorus event occurred in a "minimum B pocket". For the illustrated example, the measured angle of wave propagation relative to the ambient magnetic field θkB was 58°±4°. For this event the theoretical Gendrin angle was 62°. Cold plasma model is used to demonstrate that Gendrin mode waves are right-hand circularly polarized, in excellent agreement with the observations.

  16. Circularly polarized few-optical-cycle solitons in the short-wave-approximation regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblond, Herve [Laboratoire de Photonique d' Angers, EA 4464, Universite d' Angers, 2 Boulevard Lavoisier, F-49045 Angers Cedex 01 (France); Triki, Houria [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Badji Mokhtar University, Post Office Box 12, 23000 Annaba (Algeria); Mihalache, Dumitru [Laboratoire de Photonique d' Angers, EA 4464, Universite d' Angers, 2 Boulevard Lavoisier, F-49045 Angers Cedex 01 (France); Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), 407 Atomistilor, RO-077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Academy of Romanian Scientists, 54 Splaiul Independentei, RO-050094 Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-08-15

    We consider the propagation of few-cycle pulses (FCPs) beyond the slowly varying envelope approximation in media in which the dynamics of constituent atoms is described by a two-level Hamiltonian by taking into account the wave polarization. We consider the short-wave approximation, assuming that the resonance frequency of the two-level atoms is well below the inverse of the characteristic duration of the optical pulse. By using the reductive perturbation method (multiscale analysis), we derive from the Maxwell-Bloch-Heisenberg equations the governing evolution equations for the two polarization components of the electric field in the first order of the perturbation approach. We show that propagation of circularly polarized (CP) few-optical-cycle solitons is described by a system of coupled nonlinear equations, which reduces in the scalar case to the standard sine Gordon equation describing the dynamics of linearly polarized FCPs in the short-wave-approximation regime. By direct numerical simulations, we calculate the lifetime of CP FCPs, and we study the transition to two orthogonally polarized single-humped pulses as a generic route of their instability.

  17. Uncertainty Estimation of Shear-wave Velocity Structure from Bayesian Inversion of Microtremor Array Dispersion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosso, S. E.; Molnar, S.; Cassidy, J.

    2010-12-01

    Bayesian inversion of microtremor array dispersion data is applied, with evaluation of data errors and model parameterization, to produce the most-probable shear-wave velocity (VS) profile together with quantitative uncertainty estimates. Generally, the most important property characterizing earthquake site response is the subsurface VS structure. The microtremor array method determines phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh surface waves from multi-instrument recordings of urban noise. Inversion of dispersion curves for VS structure is a non-unique and nonlinear problem such that meaningful evaluation of confidence intervals is required. Quantitative uncertainty estimation requires not only a nonlinear inversion approach that samples models proportional to their probability, but also rigorous estimation of the data error statistics and an appropriate model parameterization. A Bayesian formulation represents the solution of the inverse problem in terms of the posterior probability density (PPD) of the geophysical model parameters. Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods are used with an efficient implementation of Metropolis-Hastings sampling to provide an unbiased sample from the PPD to compute parameter uncertainties and inter-relationships. Nonparametric estimation of a data error covariance matrix from residual analysis is applied with rigorous a posteriori statistical tests to validate the covariance estimate and the assumption of a Gaussian error distribution. The most appropriate model parameterization is determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), which provides the simplest model consistent with the resolving power of the data. Parameter uncertainties are found to be under-estimated when data error correlations are neglected and when compressional-wave velocity and/or density (nuisance) parameters are fixed in the inversion. Bayesian inversion of microtremor array data is applied at two sites in British Columbia, the area of highest seismic risk in

  18. Scalar evolution equations for shear waves in incompressible solids: a simple derivation of the Z, ZK, KZK and KP equations

    KAUST Repository

    Destrade, M.

    2010-12-08

    We study the propagation of two-dimensional finite-amplitude shear waves in a nonlinear pre-strained incompressible solid, and derive several asymptotic amplitude equations in a simple, consistent and rigorous manner. The scalar Zabolotskaya (Z) equation is shown to be the asymptotic limit of the equations of motion for all elastic generalized neo-Hookean solids (with strain energy depending only on the first principal invariant of Cauchy-Green strain). However, we show that the Z equation cannot be a scalar equation for the propagation of two-dimensional shear waves in general elastic materials (with strain energy depending on the first and second principal invariants of strain). Then, we introduce dispersive and dissipative terms to deduce the scalar Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP), Zabolotskaya-Khokhlov (ZK) and Khokhlov- Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equations of incompressible solid mechanics. © 2010 The Royal Society.

  19. Single- and Multiple- Track Location Shear Wave and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging: Matched Comparison of Contrast, CNR, and Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollender, Peter J.; Rosenzweig, Stephen J.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) use the dynamic response of tissue to impulsive mechanical stimulus to characterize local elasticity. A variant of conventional, multiple track location SWEI (MTL-SWEI), denoted single track location SWEI (STL-SWEI) offers the promise of creating speckle-free shear wave images. This work compares the three imaging modalities using a high push and track beam density combined acquisition sequence to image inclusions of different sizes and contrasts. STL-SWEI is shown to have significantly higher CNR than MTL-SWEI, allowing for operation at higher resolution. ARFI and STL-SWEI perform similarly in the larger inclusions, with STL-SWEI providing better visualization of small targets ≤2.5 mm in diameter. The processing of each modality introduces different trade-offs between smoothness and resolution of edges and structures; these are discussed in detail. PMID:25701531

  20. The value of shear wave elastography in the quantification of corpus cavernosum penis rigidity and its alteration with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Ercan; Turkay, Rustu; Nalbant, Mustafa Orhan; Yenice, Mustafa Gurkan; Tugcu, Volkan

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to measure corpus cavernosum (CC) penis rigidity with shear wave elastography (SWE) in healthy volunteers and to evaluate the change of rigidity with age. SWE was performed in 60 healthy volunteers (age range 20-71, mean 47±12,83 years). Volunteers were divided into 2 groups by age (Group 1 age penis (proximal, middle and glans penis) on both sides of CC. All values of SWE (in kilo Pascal) were noted along with volunteers' ages. The measurements were done both with transverse (T) and longitudinal (L) sections. We compared all SW values of penis parts and their alterations with age. The shear wave elastography values of CC penis increased with increasing age (ppenis (ppenis (ppenis rigidity and its alteration with age. These data may create a new approach in the evaluation process and treatment options for penile pathologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Viscoelastic characterization of elliptical mechanical heterogeneities using a semi-analytical shear-wave scattering model for elastometry measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagnon, Emmanuel; Hadj-Henni, Anis; Schmitt, Cédric; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical model of shear wave scattering by a viscoelastic elliptical structure embedded in a viscoelastic medium, and its application in the context of dynamic elastography imaging. The commonly used assumption of mechanical homogeneity in the inversion process is removed introducing a priori geometrical information to model physical interactions of plane shear waves with the confined mechanical heterogeneity. Theoretical results are first validated using the finite element method for various mechanical configurations and incidence angles. Secondly, an inverse problem is formulated to assess viscoelastic parameters of both the elliptic inclusion and its surrounding medium, and applied in vitro to characterize mechanical properties of agar–gelatin phantoms. The robustness of the proposed inversion method is then assessed under various noise conditions, biased geometrical parameters and compared to direct inversion, phase gradient and time-of-flight methods. The proposed elastometry method appears reliable in the context of estimating confined lesion viscoelastic parameters. (paper)

  2. Polarization properties of optical phase conjugation by two-photon resonant degenerate four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauranen, Martti; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Malcuit, Michelle S.; Boyd, Robert W.

    1989-08-01

    We develop a semiclassical theory of the polarization properties of phase conjugation by two-photon resonant degenerate four-wave mixing. The theory includes the effects of saturation by the pump waves. We solve the density-matrix equations of motion in steady state for a nonlinear medium consisting of stationary atoms with a ground and excited state connected by two-photon transitions. As an illustration of the general results, we consider an S0-->S0 two-photon transition, which is known to lead to perfect polarization conjugation in the limit of third-order theory. We show that the fidelity of the polarization-conjugation process is degraded for excessively large pump intensities. The degradation can occur both due to transfer of population to the excited state and due to nonresonant Stark shifts. Theoretical results are compared to those of a recent experiment [Malcuit, Gauthier, and Boyd, Opt. Lett. 13, 663 (1988)].

  3. Unidirectional evanescent-wave coupling from circularly polarized electric and magnetic dipoles: An angular spectrum approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Michela F.; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Zayats, Anatoly V.; Rodríguez-Fortuño, Francisco J.

    2017-06-01

    Unidirectional evanescent-wave coupling from circularly polarized dipole sources is one of the most striking types of evidence of spin-orbit interactions of light and an inherent property of circularly polarized dipoles. Polarization handedness self-determines propagation direction of guided modes. In this paper, we compare two different approaches currently used to describe this phenomenon: the first requires the evaluation of the coupling amplitude between dipole and waveguide modes, while the second is based on the calculation of the angular spectrum of the dipole. We present an analytical expression of the angular spectrum of dipole radiation, unifying the description for both electric and magnetic dipoles. The symmetries unraveled by the implemented formalism show the existence of specific terms in the dipole spectrum which can be recognized as being directly responsible for directional evanescent-wave coupling. This provides a versatile tool for both a comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon and a fully controllable engineering of directionality of guided modes.

  4. Effect of hip and knee position on tensor fasciae latae elongation during stretching: An ultrasonic shear wave elastography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Jun; Ikezoe, Tome; Nishishita, Satoru; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Umegaki, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Fujita, Kosuke; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-12-01

    Decreased flexibility of the tensor fasciae latae is one factor that causes iliotibial band syndrome. Stretching has been used to improve flexibility or tightness of the muscle. However, no studies have investigated the effective stretching position for the tensor fasciae latae using an index to quantify muscle elongation in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hip rotation and knee angle on tensor fasciae latae elongation during stretching in vivo using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Twenty healthy men participated in this study. The shear elastic modulus of the tensor fasciae latae was calculated using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Stretching was performed at maximal hip adduction and maximal hip extension in 12 different positions with three hip rotation conditions (neutral, internal, and external rotations) and four knee angles (0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°). Two-way analysis of variance showed a significant main effect for knee angle, but not for hip rotation. The post-hoc test for knee angle indicated that the shear elastic modulus at 90° and 135° were significantly greater than those at 0° and 45°. Our results suggest that adding hip rotation to the stretching position with hip adduction and extension may have less effect on tensor fasciae latae elongation, and that stretching at >90° of knee flexion may effectively elongate the tensor fasciae latae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Universal power law of the gravity wave manifestation in the AIM CIPS polar mesospheric cloud images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We aim to extract a universal law that governs the gravity wave manifestation in polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs. Gravity wave morphology and the clarity level of display vary throughout the wave population manifested by the PMC albedo data. Higher clarity refers to more distinct exhibition of the features, which often correspond to larger variances and a better-organized nature. A gravity wave tracking algorithm based on the continuous Morlet wavelet transform is applied to the PMC albedo data at 83 km altitude taken by the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS instrument to obtain a large ensemble of the gravity wave detections. The horizontal wavelengths in the range of  ∼ 20–60 km are the focus of the study. It shows that the albedo (wave power statistically increases as the background gets brighter. We resample the wave detections to conform to a normal distribution to examine the wave morphology and display clarity beyond the cloud brightness impact. Sample cases are selected at the two tails and the peak of the normal distribution to represent the full set of wave detections. For these cases the albedo power spectra follow exponential decay toward smaller scales. The high-albedo-power category has the most rapid decay (i.e., exponent  =  −3.2 and corresponds to the most distinct wave display. The wave display becomes increasingly blurrier for the medium- and low-power categories, which hold the monotonically decreasing spectral exponents of −2.9 and −2.5, respectively. The majority of waves are straight waves whose clarity levels can collapse between the different brightness levels, but in the brighter background the wave signatures seem to exhibit mildly turbulent-like behavior.

  6. Universal power law of the gravity wave manifestation in the AIM CIPS polar mesospheric cloud images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Pingping; Yue, Jia; Russell, James M., III; Siskind, David E.; Randall, Cora E.

    2018-01-01

    We aim to extract a universal law that governs the gravity wave manifestation in polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). Gravity wave morphology and the clarity level of display vary throughout the wave population manifested by the PMC albedo data. Higher clarity refers to more distinct exhibition of the features, which often correspond to larger variances and a better-organized nature. A gravity wave tracking algorithm based on the continuous Morlet wavelet transform is applied to the PMC albedo data at 83 km altitude taken by the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument to obtain a large ensemble of the gravity wave detections. The horizontal wavelengths in the range of ˜ 20-60 km are the focus of the study. It shows that the albedo (wave) power statistically increases as the background gets brighter. We resample the wave detections to conform to a normal distribution to examine the wave morphology and display clarity beyond the cloud brightness impact. Sample cases are selected at the two tails and the peak of the normal distribution to represent the full set of wave detections. For these cases the albedo power spectra follow exponential decay toward smaller scales. The high-albedo-power category has the most rapid decay (i.e., exponent = -3.2) and corresponds to the most distinct wave display. The wave display becomes increasingly blurrier for the medium- and low-power categories, which hold the monotonically decreasing spectral exponents of -2.9 and -2.5, respectively. The majority of waves are straight waves whose clarity levels can collapse between the different brightness levels, but in the brighter background the wave signatures seem to exhibit mildly turbulent-like behavior.

  7. Radio wave propagation in the Martian polar deposits: models and implications for radar sounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyushin, Ya. A.

    In the present study the propagation of electromagnetic waves in the northern polar ice sheet of Mars is considered Several different scenarios of the structure of the polar deposits and composition of the ice compatible with previously published observational data are proposed Both analytical and numerical simulations of ultra wide band chirp radar pulse propagating through the cap are performed Approximate approach based on the non-coherent theory of the radiative transfer in layered media has been applied to the problem of the propagation of radar pulses in the polar caps Both 1D and 2D and 3D geometry applicable to the orbital and landed radar instruments are studied The side clutter and phase distortions of the signal are also addressed analyzed The possibilities of retrieval of the geological information depending on transparency of the polar cap for radio waves are discussed If the polar cap is relatively transparent the echo from the base of the sheet should be clearly distinctive and interpretable in terms of basal topography of the cap In the case of moderate optical thickness coherent basal echo is corrupted by strong multiple scattering in the layered structure However some conclusions about basal conditions could be made from the signals for example the subglacial lakes may be detected Finally optically thick polar caps prevent any sounding of the base so only the medium itself can be characterized by GPR measurements e g the impurity content in the ice can be found Ilyushin Y A R Seu

  8. The value of shear wave elastography in the quantification of corpus cavernosum penis rigidity and its alteration with age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inci, Ercan, E-mail: ercan@inci.com [Radiology Department, University of Health Sciences Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Bakirkoy, Istanbul (Turkey); Turkay, Rustu, E-mail: rustuturkay@hotmail.com [Radiology Department, University of Health Sciences Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Bakirkoy, Istanbul (Turkey); Nalbant, Mustafa Orhan, E-mail: musnalbant88@hotmail.com [Radiology Department, University of Health Sciences Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Bakirkoy, Istanbul (Turkey); Yenice, Mustafa Gurkan, E-mail: yenicegurkan@gmail.com [Urology Department, University of Health Sciences Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Bakirkoy, Istanbul (Turkey); Tugcu, Volkan, E-mail: volkantugcu@yahoo.com [Urology Department, University of Health Sciences Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Bakirkoy, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Shear wave elastography is a new method that can calculate tissue stiffness. • The structure of corpus cavernosum is mainly responsible for erectile function. • The corpus cavernosum rigidity can be used to evaluate tissue structure. • Shear wave elastography can provide information regarding penile structure. - Abstract: Objective: The goal of this study was to measure corpus cavernosum (CC) penis rigidity with shear wave elastography (SWE) in healthy volunteers and to evaluate the change of rigidity with age. Methods: SWE was performed in 60 healthy volunteers (age range 20–71, mean 47 ± 12,83 years). Volunteers were divided into 2 groups by age (Group 1 age <50, group 2 age ≥50). We assessed SWE in 3 parts of penis (proximal, middle and glans penis) on both sides of CC. All values of SWE (in kilo Pascal) were noted along with volunteers’ ages. The measurements were done both with transverse (T) and longitudinal (L) sections. We compared all SW values of penis parts and their alterations with age. Results: The shear wave elastography values of CC penis increased with increasing age (p < 0,01). There was no significant difference between both sides of CC penis (p < 0,05). We calculated no significant difference between T and L sections of all parts of penis (p < 0,05). Conclusions: SWE can provide noninvasive quantitative data of CC penis rigidity and its alteration with age. These data may create a new approach in the evaluation process and treatment options for penile pathologies.

  9. The value of shear wave elastography in the quantification of corpus cavernosum penis rigidity and its alteration with age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inci, Ercan; Turkay, Rustu; Nalbant, Mustafa Orhan; Yenice, Mustafa Gurkan; Tugcu, Volkan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Shear wave elastography is a new method that can calculate tissue stiffness. • The structure of corpus cavernosum is mainly responsible for erectile function. • The corpus cavernosum rigidity can be used to evaluate tissue structure. • Shear wave elastography can provide information regarding penile structure. - Abstract: Objective: The goal of this study was to measure corpus cavernosum (CC) penis rigidity with shear wave elastography (SWE) in healthy volunteers and to evaluate the change of rigidity with age. Methods: SWE was performed in 60 healthy volunteers (age range 20–71, mean 47 ± 12,83 years). Volunteers were divided into 2 groups by age (Group 1 age <50, group 2 age ≥50). We assessed SWE in 3 parts of penis (proximal, middle and glans penis) on both sides of CC. All values of SWE (in kilo Pascal) were noted along with volunteers’ ages. The measurements were done both with transverse (T) and longitudinal (L) sections. We compared all SW values of penis parts and their alterations with age. Results: The shear wave elastography values of CC penis increased with increasing age (p < 0,01). There was no significant difference between both sides of CC penis (p < 0,05). We calculated no significant difference between T and L sections of all parts of penis (p < 0,05). Conclusions: SWE can provide noninvasive quantitative data of CC penis rigidity and its alteration with age. These data may create a new approach in the evaluation process and treatment options for penile pathologies.

  10. Effects of Medium Characteristics on Laser RCS of Airplane with E-Wave Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam El-Ocla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plane wave incidence should be postulated to have an authentic target detection. Practically, the plane wave is incapable usually of keeping its power in the far field especially when propagating through an inhomogeneous medium. Consequently, we assume an incident beam wave with a finite width around the target. In this work, we calculate numerically a laser radar cross section (LRCS of conducting targets having smooth cross sections with inflection points such as airplane in random media. Effects of fluctuations intensity of random media on the LRCS performance are studied in this paper. E-wave polarization (E-wave incidence is considered while the mean target size is approximately twice the wavelength.

  11. Least-squares wave-front reconstruction of Shack-Hartmann sensors and shearing interferometers using multigrid techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    This article details a multigrid algorithm that is suitable for least-squares wave-front reconstruction of Shack-Hartmann and shearing interferometer wave-front sensors. The algorithm detailed in this article is shown to scale with the number of subapertures in the same fashion as fast Fourier transform techniques, making it suitable for use in applications requiring a large number of subapertures and high Strehl ratio systems such as for high spatial frequency characterization of high-density plasmas, optics metrology, and multiconjugate and extreme adaptive optics systems

  12. Shear wave splitting as a diagnostic of variable anisotropic structure of the upper mantle beneath central Fennoscandia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vecsey, Luděk; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Kozlovskaya, E.; Babuška, Vladislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 438, č. 1-4 (2007), s. 57-77 ISSN 0040-1951 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3012405; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300120605 Grant - others:Academy of Finland(FI) 208068; Academy of Finland(FI) 107991 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : shear wave splitting * joint inversion of body wave anisotropic parameters * 3D anisotropic model of mantle lithosphere Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.729, year: 2007

  13. Specimen ferromagnetism and the behaviour of electromagnetic ultrasonic shear-wave transducers below and above the Curie point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, T.S.

    1981-04-01

    Interest in the potentialities of electromagnetic ultrasonic transducers for non-destructive testing was re-awakened about 1968 and since then a goodly number of articles have appeared concerning transducers design, performance and use. The aim of this report is to fill a gap by describing the relations between theoretical and actual performance of shear-wave transducers, used on magnetic and on non-magnetic specimens: in particular to trace the phenomena occuring as the temperature of a magnetic specimen (mild steel) is raised through the Curie point. At the transmitting transducer generation of ultrasonic wave is almost exclusively by Lorentz forces applied to the skin of the specimen; at the receiver transduction is via Faraday induction. Wave attenuation in mild steel above the curie point hampers the use of shear waves, but does not render unusable there. An anomaly in performance with mild steel specimens just above the Curie temperature is discussed, which necessitates a brief consideration of electromagnetic longitudinal wave transducers, where the need to invoke magnetostriction as a dominant phenomenon is expressed. (Auhtor)

  14. Simulations of large winds and wind shears induced by gravity wave breaking in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a fully nonlinear two-dimensional (2-D numerical model, we simulated gravity waves (GWs breaking and their contributions to the formation of large winds and wind shears in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT. An eddy diffusion coefficient is used in the 2-D numerical model to parameterize realistic turbulent mixing. Our study shows that the momentum deposited by breaking GWs accelerates the mean wind. The resultant large background wind increases the GW's apparent horizontal phase velocity and decreases the GW's intrinsic frequency and vertical wavelength. Both the accelerated mean wind and the decreased GW vertical wavelength contribute to the enhancement of wind shears. This, in turn, creates a background condition that favors the occurrence of GW instability, breaking, and momentum deposition, as well as mean wind acceleration, which further enhances the wind shears. We find that GWs with longer vertical wavelengths and faster horizontal phase velocity can induce larger winds, but they may not necessarily induce larger wind shears. In addition, the background temperature can affect the time and height of GW breaking, thus causing accelerated mean winds and wind shears.

  15. Shear wave velocity model beneath CBJI station West Java, Indonesia from joint inversion of teleseismic receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanungkalit, R. H.; Anggono, T.; Syuhada; Amran, A.; Supriyanto

    2018-03-01

    Earthquake signal observations around the world allow seismologists to obtain the information of internal structure of the Earth especially the Earth’s crust. In this study, we used joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities to investigate crustal structure beneath CBJI station in West Java, Indonesia. Receiver function were calculated from earthquakes with magnitude more than 5 and at distance 30°-90°. Surface wave group velocities were calculated using frequency time analysis from earthquakes at distance of 30°- 40°. We inverted shear wave velocity model beneath the station by conducting joint inversion from receiver functions and surface wave dispersions. We suggest that the crustal thickness beneath CBJI station, West Java, Indonesia is about 35 km.

  16. Visualizing the phenomena of wave interference, phase-shifting and polarization by interactive computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ortega, Uriel; Dirckx, Joris

    2015-09-01

    In this manuscript a computer based simulation is proposed for teaching concepts of interference of light (under the scheme of a Michelson interferometer), phase-shifting and polarization states. The user can change some parameters of the interfering waves, such as their amplitude and phase difference in order to graphically represent the polarization state of a simulated travelling wave. Regarding to the interference simulation, the user is able to change the wavelength and type of the interfering waves by selecting combinations between planar and Gaussian profiles, as well as the optical path difference by translating or tilting one of the two mirrors in the interferometer setup, all of this via a graphical user interface (GUI) designed in MATLAB. A theoretical introduction and simulation results for each phenomenon will be shown. Due to the simulation characteristics, this GUI can be a very good non-formal learning resource.

  17. Upper mantle anisotropy beneath Australia and Tahiti from P wave polarization: Implications for real-time earthquake location

    OpenAIRE

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.,; Barruol, Guilhem; Kennett, Brian L. N.; Bokelmann, Goetz; Reymond, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    International audience; We report measurements of long-period P wave polarization (P pol) in Australia and Tahiti made by combining modeling of the polarization deviation and harmonic analysis. The analysis of the deviation of the horizontal polarization of the P wave as a function of event back azimuth may be used to obtain information about (1) sensor misorientation, (2) dipping discontinuities, (3) seismic anisotropy, and (4) velocity heterogeneities beneath a seismic station. The results ...

  18. Comparison between shear wave dispersion magneto motive ultrasound and transient elastography for measuring tissue-mimicking phantom viscoelasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Thiago W J; Sampaio, Diego R Thomaz; Bruno, Alexandre Colello; Pavan, Theo Z; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2015-12-01

    Several methods have been developed over the last several years to analyze the mechanical properties of soft tissue. Elastography, for example, was proposed to evaluate soft tissue stiffness in an attempt to reduce the need for invasive procedures, such as breast biopsies; however, its qualitative nature and the fact that it is operator-dependent have proven to be limitations of the technique. Quantitative shearwave- based techniques have been proposed to obtain information about tissue stiffness independent of the operator. This paper describes shear wave dispersion magnetomotive ultrasound (SDMMUS), a new shear-wave-based method in which a viscoelastic medium labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles is displaced by an external tone burst magnetic field. As in magnetomotive ultrasound (MMUS), SDMMUS uses ultrasound to detect internal mechanical vibrations induced by the interaction between a magnetic field and magnetic nanoparticles. These vibrations generated shear waves that were evaluated to estimate the viscoelastic properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms. These phantoms were manufactured with different concentrations of gelatin and labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles. The elasticity and viscosity obtained with SDMMUS agreed well with the results obtained by traditional ultrasound-based transient elastography.

  19. Comparison Between Neck and Shoulder Stiffness Determined by Shear Wave Ultrasound Elastography and a Muscle Hardness Meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Ryota; Kusama, Saki

    2015-08-01

    The goals of this study were to compare neck and shoulder stiffness values determined by shear wave ultrasound elastography with those obtained with a muscle hardness meter and to verify the correspondence between objective and subjective stiffness in the neck and shoulder. Twenty-four young men and women participated in the study. Their neck and shoulder stiffness was determined at six sites. Before the start of the measurements, patients rated their present subjective symptoms of neck and shoulder stiffness on a 6-point verbal scale. At all measurement sites, the correlation coefficients between the values of muscle hardness indices determined by the muscle hardness meter and shear wave ultrasound elastography were not significant. Furthermore, individuals' subjective neck and shoulder stiffness did not correspond to their objective symptoms. These results suggest that the use of shear wave ultrasound elastography is essential to more precisely assess neck and shoulder stiffness. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Anisotropic polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel phantom for shear wave elastography in fibrous biological soft tissue: a multimodality characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelin, Simon; Bernal, Miguel; Deffieux, Thomas; Papadacci, Clément; Nahas, Amir; Boccara, Claude; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu; Flaud, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Shear wave elastography imaging techniques provide quantitative measurement of soft tissues elastic properties. Tendons, muscles and cerebral tissues are composed of fibers, which induce a strong anisotropic effect on the mechanical behavior. Currently, these tissues cannot be accurately represented by existing elastography phantoms. Recently, a novel approach for orthotropic hydrogel mimicking soft tissues has been developed (Millon et al 2006 J. Biomed. Mater. Res. B 305–11). The mechanical anisotropy is induced in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel by stretching the physical crosslinks of the polymeric chains while undergoing freeze/thaw cycles. In the present study we propose an original multimodality imaging characterization of this new transverse isotropic (TI) PVA hydrogel. Multiple properties were investigated using a large variety of techniques at different scales compared with an isotropic PVA hydrogel undergoing similar imaging and rheology protocols. The anisotropic mechanical (dynamic and static) properties were studied using supersonic shear wave imaging technique, full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) strain imaging and classical linear rheometry using dynamic mechanical analysis. The anisotropic optical and ultrasonic spatial coherence properties were measured by FFOCT volumetric imaging and backscatter tensor imaging, respectively. Correlation of mechanical and optical properties demonstrates the complementarity of these techniques for the study of anisotropy on a multi-scale range as well as the potential of this TI phantom as fibrous tissue-mimicking phantom for shear wave elastographic applications. (paper)

  1. Anisotropic polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel phantom for shear wave elastography in fibrous biological soft tissue: a multimodality characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelin, Simon; Bernal, Miguel; Deffieux, Thomas; Papadacci, Clément; Flaud, Patrice; Nahas, Amir; Boccara, Claude; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-11-01

    Shear wave elastography imaging techniques provide quantitative measurement of soft tissues elastic properties. Tendons, muscles and cerebral tissues are composed of fibers, which induce a strong anisotropic effect on the mechanical behavior. Currently, these tissues cannot be accurately represented by existing elastography phantoms. Recently, a novel approach for orthotropic hydrogel mimicking soft tissues has been developed (Millon et al 2006 J. Biomed. Mater. Res. B 305-11). The mechanical anisotropy is induced in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel by stretching the physical crosslinks of the polymeric chains while undergoing freeze/thaw cycles. In the present study we propose an original multimodality imaging characterization of this new transverse isotropic (TI) PVA hydrogel. Multiple properties were investigated using a large variety of techniques at different scales compared with an isotropic PVA hydrogel undergoing similar imaging and rheology protocols. The anisotropic mechanical (dynamic and static) properties were studied using supersonic shear wave imaging technique, full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) strain imaging and classical linear rheometry using dynamic mechanical analysis. The anisotropic optical and ultrasonic spatial coherence properties were measured by FFOCT volumetric imaging and backscatter tensor imaging, respectively. Correlation of mechanical and optical properties demonstrates the complementarity of these techniques for the study of anisotropy on a multi-scale range as well as the potential of this TI phantom as fibrous tissue-mimicking phantom for shear wave elastographic applications.

  2. A finite element model to study the effect of tissue anisotropy on ex vivo arterial shear wave elastography measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, D A; Debusschere, N; Caenen, A; Iannaccone, F; Pernot, M; Swillens, A; Segers, P

    2017-07-07

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an ultrasound (US) diagnostic method for measuring the stiffness of soft tissues based on generated shear waves (SWs). SWE has been applied to bulk tissues, but in arteries it is still under investigation. Previously performed studies in arteries or arterial phantoms demonstrated the potential of SWE to measure arterial wall stiffness-a relevant marker in prediction of cardiovascular diseases. This study is focused on numerical modelling of SWs in ex vivo equine aortic tissue, yet based on experimental SWE measurements with the tissue dynamically loaded while rotating the US probe to investigate the sensitivity of SWE to the anisotropic structure. A good match with experimental shear wave group speed results was obtained. SWs were sensitive to the orthotropy and nonlinearity of the material. The model also allowed to study the nature of the SWs by performing 2D FFT-based and analytical phase analyses. A good match between numerical group velocities derived using the time-of-flight algorithm and derived from the dispersion curves was found in the cross-sectional and axial arterial views. The complexity of solving analytical equations for nonlinear orthotropic stressed plates was discussed.

  3. Clinical application of qualitative assessment for breast masses in shear-wave elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gweon, Hye Mi; Youk, Ji Hyun; Son, Eun Ju; Kim, Jeong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the interobserver agreement and the diagnostic performance of various qualitative features in shear-wave elastography (SWE) for breast masses. Materials and methods: A total of 153 breast lesions in 152 women who underwent B-mode ultrasound and SWE before biopsy were included. Qualitative analysis in SWE was performed using two different classifications: E values (Ecol; 6-point color score, Ehomo; homogeneity score and Esha; shape score) and a four-color pattern classification. Two radiologists reviewed five data sets: B-mode ultrasound, SWE, and combination of both for E values and four-color pattern. The BI-RADS categories were assessed B-mode and combined sets. Interobserver agreement was assessed using weighted κ statistics. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity were analyzed. Results: Interobserver agreement was substantial for Ecol (κ = 0.79), Ehomo (κ = 0.77) and four-color pattern (κ = 0.64), and moderate for Esha (κ = 0.56). Better-performing qualitative features were Ecol and four-color pattern (AUCs, 0.932 and 0.925) compared with Ehomo and Esha (AUCs, 0.857 and 0.864; P < 0.05). The diagnostic performance of B-mode ultrasound (AUC, 0.950) was not significantly different from combined sets with E value and with four color pattern (AUCs, 0.962 and 0.954). When all qualitative values were negative, leading to downgrade the BI-RADS category, the specificity increased significantly from 16.5% to 56.1% (E value) and 57.0% (four-color pattern) (P < 0.001) without improvement in sensitivity. Conclusion: The qualitative SWE features were highly reproducible and showed good diagnostic performance in suspicious breast masses. Adding qualitative SWE to B-mode ultrasound increased specificity in decision making for biopsy recommendation

  4. Shear-wave ultrasound elastography of the liver in normal-weight and obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Smita Sane; Youssfi, Mostafa; Patel, Mittun; Hu, Houchun H; Shaibi, Gabriel Q; Towbin, Richard B

    2017-12-01

    Background The identification and subsequent management of liver diseases in children is challenging due to the lack of non-invasive imaging biomarkers. Ultrasound shear-wave elastography (US-SWE) is an emerging imaging technique which can quantitatively assess liver stiffness and may be useful as a tool in the management of liver disease in overweight and obese children. Purpose To evaluate US-SWE velocities of the liver in normal-weight and obese children, to correlate US-SWE findings with age and body-mass-index (BMI), and to compare US-SWE values with qualitative assessment (i.e. normal versus abnormal echogenicity) of the liver by conventional US. Material and Methods A cohort of 300 children (mean age, 9.9 ± 5.3 years; age range, 0.06-18.9 years) were studied, comprising 176 normal-weight and 124 obese participants. In each patient, both US-SWE and conventional US of the liver were obtained. Three pediatric radiologists individually and in consensus determined whether liver parenchyma was of normal or abnormal echogenicity. Results US-SWE velocities differed between normal-weight and obese children (1.08 ± 0.14 versus 1.44 ± 0.39 m/s; P normal-weight children ( P normal-appearing livers (1.53 ± 0.38 vs. 1.17 ± 0.27). The difference was not significant in the normal-weight group. Conclusion US-SWE provides a useful quantitative imaging biomarker for evaluating liver stiffness in children.

  5. Shear wave elastography of thyroid nodules for the prediction of malignancy in a large scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ah Young; Son, Eun Ju; Han, Kyunghwa; Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Park, Cheong Soo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate the usefulness of shear wave elastography (SWE) in predicting thyroid malignancy with a large-scale quantitative SWE data. This restrospective study included 476 thyroid nodules in 453 patients who underwent gray-scale US and SWE before US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNA) or surgical excision were included. Gray-scale findings and SWE elasticity indices (EIs) were retrospectively reviewed and compared between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. The optimal cut-off values of EIs for predicting malignancy were determined. The diagnostic performances of gray-scale US and SWE for predicting malignancy were analyzed. The diagnostic performance was compared between the gray-scale US findings only and the combined use of gray-scale US findings with SWEs. All EIs of malignant thyroid nodules were significantly higher than those of benign nodules (p≤.001). The optimal cut-off value of each EI for predicting malignancy was 85.2kPa of Emean, 94.0kPa of Emax, 54.0kPa of Emin. Emean (OR 3.071, p=.005) and Emax (OR 3.015, p=.003) were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy. Combined use of gray-scale US findings and each EI showed elevated sensitivity (95.0-95.5% vs 92.9%, p≤.005) and AUC (0.820-0.834 vs 0.769, p≤.005) for predicting malignancy, compared with the use of only gray-scale US findings. Quantitative parameters of SWE were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy and SWE evaluation combined with gray-scale US was adjunctive to the diagnostic performance of gray-scale US for predicting thyroid malignancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Shear-Wave Elastography for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma can Improve Prediction of Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ah Young; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Son, Eun Ju; Youk, Ji Hyun

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the elasticity index of shear-wave elastography (SWE) can predict cervical lymph node (LN) metastasis of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). This retrospective study included 363 patients with a surgical diagnosis of PTC who underwent preoperative SWE evaluation. The elasticity indices of PTC (E mean , E max , E min , E ratio-p , and E ratio-m ) and gray-scale ultrasound (US) parameters (extrathyroidal extension, multifocality, and cervical LN metastasis) were correlated with the pathologic staging parameters. The optimal cutoff values for the elasticity indices were determined for the prediction of cervical LN metastasis, and diagnostic performance was compared between gray-scale US and the combined application of gray-scale US and SWE. The findings showed E mean and E max to be associated with central LN metastasis (P = 0.037) and E min to be associated with lateral LN metastasis (P = 0.015). An E mean value higher than 124 kPa or an E max value higher than 138 kPa with suspicious gray-scale US findings improved the sensitivity and area under the curve (AUC) for predicting central LN metastasis (sensitivity, 45.4 and 44.6 % vs. 28 %, P predicting lateral LN metastasis (sensitivity, 95.8 vs. 75 %, P = 0.025; AUC, 0.924 vs. 0.871, P = 0.047). The quantitative elasticity index of PTC on preoperative SWE could be useful for predicting cervical LN metastasis.

  7. Value of shear-wave elastography in the diagnosis of symptomatic invasive lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Y T; Vinnicombe, S; Whelehan, P; Thomson, K; Evans, A

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the contribution of shear-wave elastography (SWE) in diagnosing invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) in symptomatic patients. A retrospective case-controlled study of 52 patients with ILC and 52 patients with invasive ductal cancer (IDC), matched for age and tumour size, was performed. Breast density and mammographic and greyscale ultrasound features were graded using Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification by two radiologists, blinded to SWE and pathology findings. Forty-four benign lesions were also included. The sensitivity of SWE was assessed, using a cut-off value of 50 kPa for mean elasticity. Statistical significance was evaluated using Chi-square and Chi-square for trend tests. Mean age for both ILC and IDC groups was 67 years. Mean size for ILC was 44 mm and IDC was 37 mm. The sensitivity for detection of ILC and IDC for mammography, greyscale ultrasound, and SWE were 79% versus 87%, 87% versus 98%, 94% versus 100%, respectively. SWE had significantly higher sensitivities than mammography for the detection of both ILC and IDC (p = 0.012 and p = 0.001, respectively). SWE was not significantly more sensitive than greyscale ultrasound for the detection of either tumour type. Four (8%) lobular cancers were benign/normal at both mammography and greyscale ultrasound, but suspicious on SWE. The incremental gain in sensitivity by using SWE in ILC was statistically significant compared to IDC (p = 0.01). SWE can diagnose lobular cancers that have benign/normal findings on conventional imaging as suspicious. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Liver failure after hepatectomy: A risk assessment using the pre-hepatectomy shear wave elastography technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hong, E-mail: han.hong@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, No. 180 Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Hu, Hao; Xu, Ya Dan [Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, No. 180 Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wang, Wen Ping, E-mail: puguang61@126.com [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, No. 180 Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ding, Hong; Lu, Qing [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, No. 180 Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of liver stiffness (LS) measurements utilizing the Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) technique for predicting post-hepatectomy liver failure (PHLF) among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: Data from eighty consecutive patients who were undergoing hepatectomy for HCC were prospectively identified and evaluated with preoperative SWE. The SWE was measured with advanced ultrasound equipment (Philips EPIQ7; Philips Healthcare, Seattle, WA, USA). PHLF classification was defined according to the International Study Group of Liver Surgery Recommendations (ISGLS). Results: SWE was successfully performed in 77 patients. According to the ISGLS criteria, PHLF occurred in 35.1% of patients (27 patients), including 2/25 patients with Grade A/B, respectively. Elevated SWE values (P = 0.002) and histological cirrhosis (P = 0.003) were independent predictors of PHLF according to the multivariate analysis. Patients with SWE values higher than or equal to 6.9 kPa were identified at higher risk of PHLF (area under the curve: 0.843, sensitivity: 77.8% and specificity: 78.0%). Postoperative dynamic course of the median the Model For End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score showed irregular changes among patients with an SWE >6.9 kPa. Patients with an SWE <6.9 kPa, postoperative dynamic course of the median MELD score gradually decreased. Conclusion: LS measured with SWE is a valid and reliable method for the prediction of PHLF grade A/B among patients with HCC. SWE could become a routine examination for the preoperative evaluation of PHLF.

  9. 2-dimensional shear wave elastography: Interobserver agreement and factors related to interobserver discrepancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibo Yoon

    Full Text Available To evaluate the interobserver reproducibility of two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2D-SWE in measuring liver stiffness (LS and to investigate factors related to liver 2D-SWE.A prospective study was conducted between August 2011 and August 2012 in rheumatoid arthritis patients who had been treated with methotrexate. Interobserver reproducibility of 2D-SWE was evaluated, and the relationship between interobserver difference in LS and related factors was analyzed using linear regression analyses. We considered age, sex, alanine transaminase, cholesterol, body mass index (BMI, and waist circumference as clinical factors, and the mean value of standard deviation (SDM, its difference between two examiners, mean diameter of the regions of interest (ROIM, and its difference in the elasticity map as investigation factors. The cut-off value for significant factors to predict interobserver discrepancies in LS-based fibrosis stage was also inspected.In total, 176 patients were enrolled. The intraclass correlation coefficient between the two examiners was 0.784. In the univariate analysis, SDM and ROIM were independently associated with interobserver differences in LS as well as BMI, waist circumference, and the difference of ROI, but SDM and ROIM were the only ones significantly related in multivariate analysis (p<0.001 and p = 0.021, respectively. The best cut-off value for SDM in predicting interobserver discrepancy in LS-based fibrosis stage was 1.4.Interobserver reproducibility of 2D-SWE for measuring LS was good and SDM was the most significantly associated factor with interobserver differences in LS and interobserver discordance in LS-based fibrosis stage.

  10. A new qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastograghy for solid breast mass evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Rui; Li, Jing; Guo, Song

    2017-02-01

    To examine the efficacy of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) in the classification and evaluation of solid breast masses, and to compare this method with conventional ultrasonograghy (US), quantitative SWE parameters and qualitative SWE classification proposed before. From April 2015 to March 2016, 314 consecutive females with 325 breast masses who decided to undergo core needle biopsy and/or surgical biopsy were enrolled. Conventional US and SWE were previously performed in all enrolled subjects. Each mass was classified by two different qualitative classifications. One was established in our study, herein named the Qual1. Qual1 could classify the SWE images into five color patterns by the visual evaluations: Color pattern 1 (homogeneous pattern); Color pattern 2 (comparative homogeneous pattern); Color pattern 3 (irregularly heterogeneous pattern); Color pattern 4 (intralesional echo pattern); and Color pattern 5 (the stiff rim sign pattern). The second qualitative classification was named Qual2 here, and included a four-color overlay pattern classification (Tozaki and Fukuma, Acta Radiologica, 2011). The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessment and quantitative SWE parameters were recorded. Diagnostic performances of conventional US, SWE parameters, and combinations of US and SWE parameters were compared. With pathological results as the gold standard, of the 325 examined breast masses, 139 (42.77%) samples were malignant and 186 (57.23%) were benign. The Qual1 showed a higher Az value than the Qual2 and quantitative SWE parameters (all Ppattern 1 for downgrading and Qual1=Color pattern 5 for upgrading the BI-RADS categories, we obtained the highest Az value (0.951), and achieved a significantly higher specificity (86.56%, P=0.002) than that of the US (81.18%) with the same sensitivity (94.96%). The qualitative classification proposed in this study may be representative of SWE parameters and has potential to be relevant assistance in

  11. Utility of Shear Wave Elastography for Differentiating Biliary Atresia From Infantile Hepatitis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoman; Qian, Linxue; Jia, Liqun; Bellah, Richard; Wang, Ning; Xin, Yue; Liu, Qinglin

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential utility of shear wave elastography (SWE) for diagnosis of biliary atresia and for differentiating biliary atresia from infantile hepatitis syndrome by measuring liver stiffness. Thirty-eight patients with biliary atresia and 17 patients with infantile hepatitis syndrome were included, along with 31 healthy control infants. The 3 groups underwent SWE. The hepatic tissue of each patient with biliary atresia had been surgically biopsied. Statistical analyses for mean values of the 3 groups were performed. Optimum cutoff values using SWE for differentiation between the biliary atresia and control groups were calculated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The mean SWE values ± SD for the 3 groups were as follows: biliary atresia group, 20.46 ± 10.19 kPa; infantile hepatitis syndrome group, 6.29 ± 0.99 kPa; and control group, 6.41 ± 1.08 kPa. The mean SWE value for the biliary atresia group was higher than the values for the control and infantile hepatitis syndrome groups (P syndrome groups were not statistically different. The ROC analysis showed a cutoff value of 8.68 kPa for differentiation between the biliary atresia and control groups. The area under the ROC curve was 0.997, with sensitivity of 97.4%, specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 96.9%. Correlation analysis suggested a positive correlation between SWE values and age for patients with biliary atresia, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.463 (P syndrome.

  12. Shear wave anisotropy beneath the Sierra Nevada range: Implications for lithospheric foundering and upper mantle flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, N. B.; Bastow, I. D.; Owens, T. J.; Zandt, G.; Jones, C. H.; Gilbert, H.

    2007-12-01

    Recent work asserts that the garnet-rich Sierra Nevada batholith root has undergone foundering since the early Cenozoic. The Sierra Nevada EarthScope Project (SNEP), undertaken to gain a better understanding of this phenomena, consists of a network of ~80 broadband seismometers spaced at ~25 km from ~37.0N to 40.5N. We use the Silver and Chan method to determine shear wave splitting parameters (dt and φ) for teleseismic SKS phases recorded at SNEP and US Array Transportable Array stations in the region. We find dt>1.1s and φ approximately in the E-NE direction over most of the batholith. Splitting of this magnitude cannot be accounted for solely in the crust, and our results, therefore, have significant implications for upper mantle flow beneath the region. At latitude ~39N to 40N, from the western Sierra Nevada range across our study area to central Nevada, we observe dtGorda-Juan de Fuca Plate. Such a flow pattern is also consistent with the circular pattern of splitting measurements that exist in the broader California and Western Nevada region. We observe subtle variations in splitting parameters as a function of backazimuth primarily at stations situated on the western foothills of the Sierra Nevada. These complexities may be indicative of either a two-layer or dipping layer structure beneath the batholith that may be associated with on- going lithospheric foundering beneath the Sierran range. Additionally, in the southern part of our study area, we note a reduction in dt for arrivals that sample the high Vp Isabella anomaly - an upper mantle downwelling thought to be a result of recent lithospheric foundering.

  13. [Application of shear wave elastography in the evaluation of neck-shoulder myofascial pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Ding-ding; Gao, Jing-hua; Liu, Guang-hui; Wang, Shang-quan

    2016-02-01

    To study clinical value of shear wave elastography (SWE) in the evaluation of neck-shoulder myofascial pain syndrome. From December 2013 to July 2014,30 patients diagnosed as neck-shoulder myofascial pain syndrome were in the treatment group,including 17 males and 13 females, with an average age of (44 ± 3) years old. Thirty healthy people were in the control group, including 22 males and 8 females, with a mean age of (37 ± 5) years old. The patients in the treatment group were treated with manipulation, once every other day, total 7 times. The SWE was used to detect tension part of trapezius muscle of patients in the treatment group before and after treatment, as well as to detect muscle belly at the descending part of trapezius muscle in the control group. The tissue elasticity and Yang's modulus value were recorded and compared. The tissue elasticity chart of patients in the treatment group before treatment was mainly greenish blue with the score of 3.70 ± 1.53, and the Yang's modulus was (43.4 ± 15.6) kPa. The tissue elasticity figure after treatment was mainly blue with the score of 2.40 ± 0.87, and the Yang's modulus was (29.0 ± 5.9) kPa. Whereas in the control group, the tissue elasticity figure was mainly blue with the score of 1.60 ± 0.72, and the Yang's modulus was (24.0 ± 7.6) kPa. These were statistical differences between the two groups (P = 0.000). SWE can be used as an evaluation method of manipulation treatment for neck-shoulder myofascial pain syndrome, which is an objective and sensitive detection method.

  14. Clinical application of qualitative assessment for breast masses in shear-wave elastography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gweon, Hye Mi; Youk, Ji Hyun, E-mail: jhyouk@yuhs.ac; Son, Eun Ju; Kim, Jeong-Ah

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the interobserver agreement and the diagnostic performance of various qualitative features in shear-wave elastography (SWE) for breast masses. Materials and methods: A total of 153 breast lesions in 152 women who underwent B-mode ultrasound and SWE before biopsy were included. Qualitative analysis in SWE was performed using two different classifications: E values (Ecol; 6-point color score, Ehomo; homogeneity score and Esha; shape score) and a four-color pattern classification. Two radiologists reviewed five data sets: B-mode ultrasound, SWE, and combination of both for E values and four-color pattern. The BI-RADS categories were assessed B-mode and combined sets. Interobserver agreement was assessed using weighted κ statistics. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity were analyzed. Results: Interobserver agreement was substantial for Ecol (κ = 0.79), Ehomo (κ = 0.77) and four-color pattern (κ = 0.64), and moderate for Esha (κ = 0.56). Better-performing qualitative features were Ecol and four-color pattern (AUCs, 0.932 and 0.925) compared with Ehomo and Esha (AUCs, 0.857 and 0.864; P < 0.05). The diagnostic performance of B-mode ultrasound (AUC, 0.950) was not significantly different from combined sets with E value and with four color pattern (AUCs, 0.962 and 0.954). When all qualitative values were negative, leading to downgrade the BI-RADS category, the specificity increased significantly from 16.5% to 56.1% (E value) and 57.0% (four-color pattern) (P < 0.001) without improvement in sensitivity. Conclusion: The qualitative SWE features were highly reproducible and showed good diagnostic performance in suspicious breast masses. Adding qualitative SWE to B-mode ultrasound increased specificity in decision making for biopsy recommendation.

  15. Shear-wave elastography contributes to accurate tumour size estimation when assessing small breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, R; Thompson, J M; Moussa, O; Vinnicombe, S; Evans, A

    2014-12-01

    To assess whether the size of peritumoural stiffness (PTS) on shear-wave elastography (SWE) for small primary breast cancers (≤15 mm) was associated with size discrepancies between grey-scale ultrasound (GSUS) and final histological size and whether the addition of PTS size to GSUS size might result in more accurate tumour size estimation when compared to final histological size. A retrospective analysis of 86 consecutive patients between August 2011 and February 2013 who underwent breast-conserving surgery for tumours of size ≤15 mm at ultrasound was carried out. The size of PTS stiffness was compared to mean GSUS size, mean histological size, and the extent of size discrepancy between GSUS and histology. PTS size and GSUS were combined and compared to the final histological size. PTS of >3 mm was associated with a larger mean final histological size (16 versus 11.3 mm, p size of >3 mm was associated with a higher frequency of underestimation of final histological size by GSUS of >5 mm (63% versus 18%, p size led to accurate estimation of the final histological size (p = 0.03). The size of PTS was not associated with margin involvement (p = 0.27). PTS extending beyond 3 mm from the grey-scale abnormality is significantly associated with underestimation of tumour size of >5 mm for small invasive breast cancers. Taking into account the size of PTS also led to accurate estimation of the final histological size. Further studies are required to assess the relationship of the extent of SWE stiffness and margin status. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Shear-Wave Splitting and Crustal Anisotropy in the Shillong-Mikir Plateau of Northeast India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Dipok K.; Hazarika, Devajit; Paul, Arpita; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Borgohain, Jayanta Madhab

    2018-01-01

    Seismic anisotropy of crust beneath the Shillong-Mikir Plateau and the surrounding regions of northeast India have been investigated with the help of splitting analysis of S-wave of local earthquakes. We estimate a total 83 pairs of splitting parameters ( Φ and δt) from 67 local shallow focus earthquakes (depth ≤ 32 km) recorded by the 10 broadband seismological stations operated in the study region. The results show delay times ranging from 0.02 to 0.2 s, which correspond to anisotropy up to 4%, suggesting significant strength of anisotropy in the study region. Fast polarization direction ( Φ) in the Shillong Plateau shows mostly NW-SE trend in the western part and NE-SW trend in the northern part. Φs near Kopili fault (KF) follows NW-SE trend. Φ at most of the stations in the study region is consistent with the local stress orientation, suggesting that the anisotropy is mainly caused by preferentially aligned cracks responding to the stress field. On the other hand, anisotropy observed near the KF is due to aligned macroscopic fracture related to strike-slip movement in the fault zone.

  17. Broadband asymmetric transmission of linearly polarized electromagnetic waves based on chiral metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Lincy; Yogesh, N.; Subramanian, V.

    2018-01-01

    The giant optical activity of chiral metamaterials (CMMs) holds great potential for tailoring the polarization state of an electromagnetic (EM) wave. In controlling the polarization state, the aspect of asymmetric transmission (AT), where a medium allows the EM radiation to pass through in one direction while restricting it in the opposite direction, adds additional degrees of freedom such as one-way channelling functionality. In this work, a CMM formed by a pair of mutually twisted slanted complementary metal strips is realized for broadband AT accompanied with cross-polarization (CP) conversion for linearly polarized EM waves. Numerically, the proposed ultra-thin (˜λ/42) CMM shows broadband AT from 8.58 GHz to 9.73 GHz (bandwidth of 1.15 GHz) accompanied with CP transmission magnitude greater than 0.9. The transmission and reflection spectra reveal the origin of the asymmetric transmission as the direction sensitive cross polarization conversion and anisotropic electric coupling occurring in the structure which is then elaborated with the surface current analysis and electric field distribution within the structure. An experiment is carried out to verify the broadband AT based CP conversion of the proposed CMM at microwave frequencies, and a reliable agreement between numerical and experimental results is obtained. Being ultra-thin, the reported broadband AT based CP conversion of the proposed CMM is useful for controlling radiation patterns in non-reciprocal EM devices and communication networks.

  18. Simulation of nonlinear transient elastography: finite element model for the propagation of shear waves in homogeneous soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, W; Bel-Brunon, A; Catheline, S; Combescure, A; Rochette, M

    2018-01-01

    In this study, visco-hyperelastic Landau's model, which is widely used in acoustical physic field, is introduced into a finite element formulation. It is designed to model the nonlinear behaviour of finite amplitude shear waves in soft solids, typically, in biological tissues. This law is used in finite element models based on elastography, experiments reported in Jacob et al, the simulations results show a good agreement with the experimental study: It is observed in both that a plane shear wave generates only odd harmonics and a nonplane wave generates both odd and even harmonics in the spectral domain. In the second part, a parametric study is performed to analyse the influence of different factors on the generation of odd harmonics of plane wave. A quantitative relation is fitted between the odd harmonic amplitudes and the non-linear elastic parameter of Landau's model, which provides a practical guideline to identify the non-linearity of homogeneous tissues using elastography experiment. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Crustal shear wave velocity structure in the northeastern Tibet based on the Neighbourhood algorithm inversion of receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenbo; Xu, Tao; Liang, Chuntao; Wu, Chenglong; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2018-03-01

    The northeastern (NE) Tibet records and represents the far-field deformation response of the collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates in the Cenozoic time. Over the past two decades, studies have revealed the existence of thickened crust in the NE Tibet, but the thickening mechanism is still in debate. We deployed a passive-source seismic profile with 22 temporary broad-band seismic stations in the NE Tibet to investigate the crustal shear wave velocity structure in this region. We selected 288 teleseismic events located in the west Pacific subduction zone near Japan with similar ray path to calculate P-wave receiver functions. Neighbourhood algorithm method is applied to invert the shear wave velocity beneath stations. The inversion result shows a low-velocity zone (LVZ) is roughly confined to the Songpan-Ganzi block and Kunlun mountains and extends to the southern margin of Gonghe basin. Considering the low P-wave velocity revealed by the wide-angle reflection-refraction seismic experiment and high ratio of Vp/Vs based on H-κ grid searching of the receiver functions in this profile, LVZ may be attributed to partial melting induced by temperature change. This observation appears to be consistent with the crustal ductile deformation in this region derived from other geophysical investigations.

  20. Investigating Gravity Waves in Polar Mesospheric Clouds Using Tomographic Reconstructions of AIM Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, V. P.; Taylor, M. J.; Doyle, T. E.; Zhao, Y.; Pautet, P.-D.; Carruth, B. L.; Rusch, D. W.; Russell, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    This research presents the first application of tomographic techniques for investigating gravity wave structures in polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) imaged by the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size instrument on the NASA AIM satellite. Albedo data comprising consecutive PMC scenes were used to tomographically reconstruct a 3-D layer using the Partially Constrained Algebraic Reconstruction Technique algorithm and a previously developed "fanning" technique. For this pilot study, a large region (760 × 148 km) of the PMC layer (altitude 83 km) was sampled with a 2 km horizontal resolution, and an intensity weighted centroid technique was developed to create novel 2-D surface maps, characterizing the individual gravity waves as well as their altitude variability. Spectral analysis of seven selected wave events observed during the Northern Hemisphere 2007 PMC season exhibited dominant horizontal wavelengths of 60-90 km, consistent with previous studies. These tomographic analyses have enabled a broad range of new investigations. For example, a clear spatial anticorrelation was observed between the PMC albedo and wave-induced altitude changes, with higher-albedo structures aligning well with wave troughs, while low-intensity regions aligned with wave crests. This result appears to be consistent with current theories of PMC development in the mesopause region. This new tomographic imaging technique also provides valuable wave amplitude information enabling further mesospheric gravity wave investigations, including quantitative analysis of their hemispheric and interannual characteristics and variations.

  1. Observation of nuclear spin waves in spin-polarized atomic hydrogen gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johson, B.R.; Denker, J.S.; Bigelow, N.; Levy, L.P.; Freed, J.H.; Lee, D.M.

    1984-04-23

    We have observed narrow, distinct resonances in the NMR spectrum of dilute spin-polarized atomic hydrogen gas (nroughly-equal10/sup 16/ atoms/cm/sup 3/). The dependence of the observed spectra on temperature, density, polarization, and magnetic field gradient is consistent with theoretical predictions for spin-wave excitations damped by diffusion. We have measured the parameter ..mu.., which is a measure of the importance of exchange effects in spin transport processes, and the diffusion coefficient D/sub 0/, both of which are in reasonable agreement with theory.

  2. Pitch Angle Scattering of Upgoing Electron Beams in Jupiter's Polar Regions by Whistler Mode Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, S. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Clark, G.; Mauk, B. H.; Bolton, S. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Levin, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    The Juno spacecraft's Jupiter Energetic-particle Detector Instrument has observed field-aligned, unidirectional (upgoing) electron beams throughout most of Jupiter's entire polar cap region. The Waves instrument detected intense broadband whistler mode emissions occurring in the same region. In this paper, we investigate the pitch angle scattering of the upgoing electron beams due to interactions with the whistler mode waves. Profiles of intensity versus pitch angle for electron beams ranging from 2.53 to 7.22 Jovian radii show inconsistencies with the expected adiabatic invariant motion of the electrons. It is believed that the observed whistler mode waves perturb the electron motion and scatter them away from the magnetic field line. The diffusion equation has been solved by using diffusion coefficients which depend on the magnetic intensity of the whistler mode waves.

  3. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  4. The difference in passive tension applied to the muscles composing the hamstrings - Comparison among muscles using ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masatoshi; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Umegaki, Hiroki; Nishishita, Satoru; Kobayashi, Takuya; Fujita, Kosuke; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ibuki, Satoko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-08-01

    Hamstring muscle strain is one of the most common injuries in sports. Therefore, to investigate the factors influencing hamstring strain, the differences in passive tension applied to the hamstring muscles at the same knee and hip positions as during terminal swing phase would be useful information. In addition, passive tension applied to the hamstrings could change with anterior or posterior tilt of the pelvis. The aims of this study were to investigate the difference in passive tension applied to the individual muscles composing the hamstrings during passive elongation, and to investigate the effect of pelvic position on passive tension. Fifteen healthy men volunteered for this study. The subject lay supine with the angle of the trunk axis to the femur of their dominant leg at 70° and the knee angle of the dominant leg fixed at 30° flexion. In three pelvic positions ("Non-Tilt", "Anterior-Tilt" and "Posterior-Tilt"), the shear elastic modulus of each muscle composing the hamstrings (semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and biceps femoris) was measured using an ultrasound shear wave elastography. The shear elastic modulus of semimembranosus was significantly higher than the others. Shear elastic modulus of the hamstrings in Anterior-Tilt was significantly higher than in Posterior-Tilt. Passive tension applied to semimembranosus is higher than the other muscles when the hamstring muscle is passively elongated, and passive tension applied to the hamstrings increases with anterior tilt of the pelvis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Unpinning of rotating spiral waves in cardiac tissues by circularly polarized electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Pan, De-Bei; Li, Bing-Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Spiral waves anchored to obstacles in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmia. To unpin these anchored spirals, comparing to high-voltage side-effect traditional therapies, wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by the uniform electric field (UEF) has provided a low-voltage alternative. Here we provide a new approach using WEH induced by the circularly polarized electric field (CPEF), which has higher success rate and larger application scope than UEF, even with a lower voltage. And we also study the distribution of the membrane potential near an obstacle induced by CPEF to analyze its mechanism of unpinning. We hope this promising approach may provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmia.

  6. Anomalous Tunneling of Spin Wave in Polar State of Spin-1 BEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Shohei; Ohashi, Yoji; Kato, Yusuke

    2012-01-01

    We investigate tunneling properties of collective spin-wave excitations in the polar state of a spin-1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Within the mean-field theory at T = 0, we show that when the condensate is in the critical supercurrent state, the spin wave mode exhibits perfect transmission through a nonmagnetic potential barrier in the low energy limit, unless the strength of a spin-independent interaction c o equals that of a spin-dependent interaction c o Such an anomalous tunneling behavior is absent in the case of a magnetic barrier. We also clarify a scaling law of the transmission probability as a function of the mode energy.

  7. Anomalous Tunneling of Spin Wave in Polar State of Spin-1 BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Shohei; Kato, Yusuke; Ohashi, Yoji

    2012-12-01

    We investigate tunneling properties of collective spin-wave excitations in the polar state of a spin-1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Within the mean-field theory at T = 0, we show that when the condensate is in the critical supercurrent state, the spin wave mode exhibits perfect transmission through a nonmagnetic potential barrier in the low energy limit, unless the strength of a spin-independent interaction co equals that of a spin-dependent interaction co Such an anomalous tunneling behavior is absent in the case of a magnetic barrier. We also clarify a scaling law of the transmission probability as a function of the mode energy.

  8. All-dielectric metasurface realizing giant asymmetric transmission for linearly polarized wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weikang; Kang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chuan; Tang, Dengfei; Dong, Jianfeng

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a kind of chiral all-dielectric metasurface is demonstrated numerically to achieve giant asymmetric transmission (AT) in fiber communication region. The incoming polarized electromagnetic wave excites magnetic and electric resonances and the resonances in AT spectrum coincide with eigen frequencies of this structure. The all dielectric metasurface shows more excellent properties compared with its metal counterpart. AT is influenced significantly by material permittivity as well as unit cell period. The concept of all-dielectric metasurface offers a new way to manipulate electromagnetic waves and the phenomenon remains effective in other frequencies.

  9. Generation of neutron standing waves at total reflection of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Nikitenko, Yu.V.; Kozhevnikov, S.V.; Radu, F.; Kruijs, R.; Rekveldt, M.Th.

    1999-01-01

    The regime of neutron standing waves at reflection of polarized thermal neutrons from the structure glass/Cu (1000 A Angstrom)/Ti (2000 A Angstrom)/Co (60 A Angstrom)/Ti (300 A Angstrom) in a magnetic field directed at an angle to the sample plane is realized. The intensity of neutrons with a particular spin projection on the external magnetic field direction appears to be a periodic function of the neutron wavelength and the glancing angle of the reflected beam. It is shown that the neutron standing wave regime can be a very sensitive method for the determination of changes in the spatial position of magnetic noncollinear layers. (author)

  10. Propagation of sound waves through a linear shear layer: A closed form solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Closed form solutions are presented for sound propagation from a line source in or near a shear layer. The analysis was exact for all frequencies and was developed assuming a linear velocity profile in the shear layer. This assumption allowed the solution to be expressed in terms of parabolic cyclinder functions. The solution is presented for a line monopole source first embedded in the uniform flow and then in the shear layer. Solutions are also discussed for certain types of dipole and quadrupole sources. Asymptotic expansions of the exact solutions for small and large values of Strouhal number gave expressions which correspond to solutions previously obtained for these limiting cases.

  11. Propagation of sound waves through a linear shear layer - A closed form solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Closed form solutions are presented for sound propagation from a line source in or near a shear layer. The analysis is exact for all frequencies and is developed assuming a linear velocity profile in the shear layer. This assumption allows the solution to be expressed in terms of parabolic cylinder functions. The solution is presented for a line monopole source first embedded in the uniform flow and then in the shear layer. Solutions are also discussed for certain types of dipole and quadrupole sources. Asymptotic expansions of the exact solutions for small and large values of Strouhal number give expressions which correspond to solutions previously obtained for these limiting cases.

  12. Ultra-High-Speed Travelling Wave Protection of Transmission Line Using Polarity Comparison Principle Based on Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional polarity comparison based travelling wave protection, using the initial wave information, is affected by initial fault angle, bus structure, and external fault. And the relationship between the magnitude and polarity of travelling wave is ignored. Because of the protection tripping and malfunction, the further application of this protection principle is affected. Therefore, this paper presents an ultra-high-speed travelling wave protection using integral based polarity comparison principle. After empirical mode decomposition of the original travelling wave, the first-order intrinsic mode function is used as protection object. Based on the relationship between the magnitude and polarity of travelling wave, this paper demonstrates the feasibility of using travelling wave magnitude which contains polar information as direction criterion. And the paper integrates the direction criterion in a period after fault to avoid wave head detection failure. Through PSCAD simulation with the typical 500 kV transmission system, the reliability and sensitivity of travelling wave protection were verified under different factors’ affection.

  13. The role of viscosity estimation for oil-in-gelatin phantom in shear wave based ultrasound elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Dong, Changfeng; Yin, Yin; Chen, Xin; Guo, Yanrong; Zheng, Yi; Shen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Tianfu; Zhang, Xinyu; Chen, Siping

    2015-02-01

    Shear wave based ultrasound elastography utilizes mechanical excitation or acoustic radiation force to induce shear waves in deep tissue. The tissue response is monitored to obtain elasticity information about the tissue. During the past two decades, tissue elasticity has been extensively studied and has been used in clinical disease diagnosis. However, biological soft tissues are viscoelastic in nature. Therefore, they should be simultaneously characterized in terms of elasticity and viscosity. In this study, two shear wave-based elasticity imaging methods, shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) and acoustic radiation force impulsive (ARFI) imaging, were compared. The discrepancy between the measurements obtained by the two methods was analyzed, and the role of viscosity was investigated. To this end, four types of gelatin phantoms containing 0%, 20%, 30% and 40% castor oil were fabricated to mimic different viscosities of soft tissue. For the SDUV method, the shear elasticity μ1 was 3.90 ± 0.27 kPa, 4.49 ± 0.16 kPa, 2.41 ± 0.33 kPa and 1.31 ± 0.09 kPa; and the shear viscosity μ2 was 1.82 ± 0.31 Pa•s, 2.41 ± 0.35 Pa•s, 2.65 ± 0.13 Pa•s and 2.89 ± 0.14 Pa•s for 0%, 20%, 30% and 40% oil, respectively in both cases. For the ARFI measurements, the shear elasticity μ was 7.30 ± 0.20 kPa, 8.20 ± 0.31 kPa, 7.42 ± 0.21 kPa and 5.90 ± 0.36 kPa for 0%, 20%, 30% and 40% oil, respectively. The SDUV results demonstrated that the elasticity first increased from 0% to 20% oil and then decreased for the 30% and 40% oil. The viscosity decreased consistently as the concentration of castor oil increased from 0% to 40%. The elasticity measured by ARFI showed the same trend as that of the SDUV but exceeded the results measured by SDUV. To clearly validate the impact of viscosity on the elasticity estimation, an independent measurement of the elasticity and viscosity by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was conducted on these four types of gelatin

  14. Polarization dependence of the spin-density-wave excitations in single-domain chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeni, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Roessli, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 75 - Paris (France); Sternlieb, B.J. [Brookhaven (United States); Lorenzo, E. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France); Werner, S.A. [Missouri (United States)

    1997-09-01

    A polarized neutron scattering experiment has been performed with a single-Q, single domain sample of chromium in a magnetic field of 4 T. It is confirmed that the longitudinal fluctuations are enhanced for small energy transfers and that the spin wave modes with {delta}S parallel to Q and {delta}S perpendicular to Q are similar. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 2 refs.

  15. Wave normal angles of magnetospheric chorus emissions observed on the Polar spacecraft

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haque, N.; Spasojevic, M.; Santolík, Ondřej; Inan, U. S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 115, - (2010), A00F07/1-A00F07/12 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA301120601 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ME 842 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : chorus * wave normal * Polar spacecraft Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  16. Effect of pathological heterogeneity on shear wave elasticity imaging in the staging of deep venous thrombosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Liu

    Full Text Available We aimed to observe the relationship between the pathological components of a deep venous thrombus (DVT, which was divided into three parts, and the findings on quantitative ultrasonic shear wave elastography (SWE to increase the accuracy of thrombus staging in a rabbit model.A flow stenosis-induced vein thrombosis model was used, and the thrombus was divided into three parts (head, body and tail, which were associated with corresponding observation points. Elasticity was quantified in vivo using SWE over a 2-week period. A quantitative pathologic image analysis (QPIA was performed to obtain the relative percentages of the components of the main clots.DVT maturity occurred at 2 weeks, and the elasticity of the whole thrombus and the three parts (head, body and tail showed an increasing trend, with the Young's modulus values varying from 2.36 ± 0.41 kPa to 13.24 ± 1.71 kPa; 2.01 ± 0.28 kPa to 13.29 ± 1.48 kPa; 3.27 ± 0.57 kPa to 15.91 ± 2.05 kPa; and 1.79 ± 0.36 kPa to 10.51 ± 1.61 kPa, respectively. Significant increases occurred on different days for the different parts: the head showed significant increases on days 4 and 6; the body showed significant increases on days 4 and 7; and the tail showed significant increases on days 3 and 6. The QPIA showed that the thrombus composition changed dynamically as the thrombus matured, with the fibrin and calcium salt deposition gradually increasing and the red blood cells (RBCs and platelet trabecula gradually decreasing. Significant changes were observed on days 4 and 7, which may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi. Significant heterogeneity was observed between and within the thrombi.Variations in the thrombus components were generally consistent between the SWE and QPIA. Days 4 and 7 after thrombus induction may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi in rabbit models. A dynamic examination of the same part of the thrombus

  17. The Formation of Laurentia: Evidence from Shear Wave Splitting and Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, M. V.; Bastow, I. D.; Rawlinson, N.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.

    2017-12-01

    The northern Hudson Bay region of Canada comprises several Archean cratonic nuclei, assembled by Paleoproterozoic orogenies including the 1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO) and Rinkian-Nagssugtoqidian Orogen (NO). Questions remain about how similar in scale and nature these orogens were compared to modern orogens like the Himalayas. Also in question is whether the thick Laurentian cratonic root below Hudson Bay is stratified, with a seismically-fast Archean core underlain by a lower, younger, thermal layer. We investigate these problems via shear-wave splitting and teleseismic tomography using up to 25 years of data from 65 broadband seismic stations across northern Hudson Bay. The results of the complementary studies comprise the most comprehensive study to date of mantle seismic velocity and anisotropy in northern Laurentia. Splitting parameter patterns are used to interpret multiple layers, lithospheric boundaries, dipping anisotropy, and deformation zone limits for the THO and NO. Source-side waveguide effects from Japan and the Aleutian trench are observed despite the tomographic data being exclusively relative arrival time. Mitigating steps to ensure data quality are explained and enforced. In the Hudson Strait, anisotropic fast directions (φ) generally parallel the THO, which appears in tomographic images as a strong low velocity feature relative to the neighbouring Archean cratons. Several islands in northern Hudson Bay show short length-scale changes in φ coincident with strong velocity contrasts. These are interpreted as distinct lithospheric blocks with unique deformational histories, and point to a complex, rather than simple 2-plate, collisional history for the THO. Strong evidence is presented for multiple anisotropic layers beneath Archean zones, consistent with the episodic development model of cratonic keels (e.g., Yuan & Romanowicz 2010). We show via both tomographic inversion models and SKS splitting patterns that southern Baffin Island was

  18. Shear wave elastography of thyroid nodules for the prediction of malignancy in a large scale study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ah Young; Son, Eun Ju; Han, Kyunghwa; Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Park, Cheong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Elasticity indices of malignant thyroid nodules were higher than those of benign. •High elasticity indices were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy. •SWE evaluation could be useful as adjunctive tool for thyroid cancer diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study is to validate the usefulness of shear wave elastography (SWE) in predicting thyroid malignancy with a large-scale quantitative SWE data. Methods: This restrospective study included 476 thyroid nodules in 453 patients who underwent gray-scale US and SWE before US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNA) or surgical excision were included. Gray-scale findings and SWE elasticity indices (EIs) were retrospectively reviewed and compared between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. The optimal cut-off values of EIs for predicting malignancy were determined. The diagnostic performances of gray-scale US and SWE for predicting malignancy were analyzed. The diagnostic performance was compared between the gray-scale US findings only and the combined use of gray-scale US findings with SWEs. Results: All EIs of malignant thyroid nodules were significantly higher than those of benign nodules (p ≤ .001). The optimal cut-off value of each EI for predicting malignancy was 85.2 kPa of E mean , 94.0 kPa of E max , 54.0 kPa of E min . E mean (OR 3.071, p = .005) and E max (OR 3.015, p = .003) were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy. Combined use of gray-scale US findings and each EI showed elevated sensitivity (95.0–95.5% vs 92.9%, p ≤ .005) and AUC (0.820–0.834 vs 0.769, p ≤ .005) for predicting malignancy, compared with the use of only gray-scale US findings. Conclusions: Quantitative parameters of SWE were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy and SWE evaluation combined with gray-scale US was adjunctive to the diagnostic performance of gray-scale US for predicting thyroid malignancy

  19. Shear wave anisotropy in the Eastern Himalaya, Burmese arc and adjoining regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalampally, R. K.; Saikia, D.; Singh, A.; Roy, S.; Panuganti, S. R.; Lyngdoh, A. C.

    2017-12-01

    This study presents new results of 231 shear wave splitting and 395 "Null" measurements at 58 broadband seismic stations installed in the hitherto less investigated eastern Himalaya, Burmese arc and adjoining regions. The analysis reveals complex patterns of anisotropy, with significant variations in delay times. The fast polarisation directions (FPD) at stations within the Himalaya, Burmese Arc and the foredeep are coherent, parallel to the strike of the orogens. Measurements within the eastern and central Arunachal Himalaya are predominantly "Null''. However, in the western and central parts, these are relatively small, centered at 0.7s. The FPDs follow the trends of major tectonic features like the Main Boundary Thrust and the Main Central Thrust in the central segment of Arunachal Himalaya. In the Burmese arc region, the delay times show a large variability (0.4-2.1s). The Assam foredeep exhibits splitting delays in the range 0.5 to 1.2 s, with the FPDs trending nearly EW to NE. The FPDs parallel to the strike of the mountain belts can be best explained in terms of a coherently deformed lithospheric mantle under the compressional effects ensuing from the collision between India and Asia. Null measurements in regions like the Siang window may be due to a complex anisotropic pattern due to Indian plate interaction with Eurasia and Burma plates, causing different layers of anisotropic fabric with completely different orientations. Another possibility is the coincidence of source polarisation direction with the fast axis, since most of the waveforms analysed are from a narrow back azimuthal range of 100-125°. E-W oriented FPDs may coincide with the backazimuth of the source, resulting in smaller delays. Null measurements in eastern Himalaya may reflect cancellation of anisotropy caused by APM related flow (NE) and compressional effects of the Himalaya (EW). In the Bengal Basin, the Nulls could be due to two different mechanisms, namely, frozen anisotropic fabric

  20. A new qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastograghy for solid breast mass evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Rui, E-mail: congrui2684@163.com; Li, Jing, E-mail: lijing@sj-hospital.org; Guo, Song, E-mail: 21751735@qq.com

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Qualitative SWE classification proposed here was significantly better than quantitative SWE parameters. • Qualitative classification proposed here was better than the classification proposed before. • Qualitative classification proposed here could obtain higher specificity without a loss of sensitivity. - Abstract: Objectives: To examine the efficacy of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) in the classification and evaluation of solid breast masses, and to compare this method with conventional ultrasonograghy (US), quantitative SWE parameters and qualitative SWE classification proposed before. Methods: From April 2015 to March 2016, 314 consecutive females with 325 breast masses who decided to undergo core needle biopsy and/or surgical biopsy were enrolled. Conventional US and SWE were previously performed in all enrolled subjects. Each mass was classified by two different qualitative classifications. One was established in our study, herein named the Qual1. Qual1 could classify the SWE images into five color patterns by the visual evaluations: Color pattern 1 (homogeneous pattern); Color pattern 2 (comparative homogeneous pattern); Color pattern 3 (irregularly heterogeneous pattern); Color pattern 4 (intralesional echo pattern); and Color pattern 5 (the stiff rim sign pattern). The second qualitative classification was named Qual2 here, and included a four-color overlay pattern classification (Tozaki and Fukuma, Acta Radiologica, 2011). The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessment and quantitative SWE parameters were recorded. Diagnostic performances of conventional US, SWE parameters, and combinations of US and SWE parameters were compared. Results: With pathological results as the gold standard, of the 325 examined breast masses, 139 (42.77%) samples were malignant and 186 (57.23%) were benign. The Qual1 showed a higher Az value than the Qual2 and quantitative SWE parameters (all P < 0.05). When applying Qual1

  1. Restoration of s-polarized evanescent waves and subwavelength imaging by a single dielectric slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Gawhary, Omar; Schilder, Nick J; Costa Assafrao, Alberto da; Pereira, Silvania F; Paul Urbach, H

    2012-01-01

    It was predicted a few years ago that a medium with negative index of refraction would allow for perfect imaging. Although no material has been found so far that behaves as a perfect lens, some experiments confirmed the theoretical predictions in the near-field, or quasi-static, regime where the behaviour of a negative index medium can be mimicked by a thin layer of noble metal, such as silver. These results are normally attributed to the excitation of surface plasmons in the metal, which only leads to the restoration of p-polarized evanescent waves. In this work, we show that the restoration of s-polarized evanescent waves and, correspondingly, sub-wavelength imaging by a single dielectric slab are possible. Specifically, we show that at λ = 632 nm a thin layer of GaAs behaves as a superlens for s-polarized waves. Replacing the single-metal slab by a dielectric is not only convenient from a technical point of view, it being much easier to deposit and control the thickness and flatness of dielectric films than metal ones, but also invites us to re-think the connection between surface plasmon excitation and the theory of negative refraction. (paper)

  2. Upper-Mantle Shear Velocities beneath Southern California Determined from Long-Period Surface Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Polet, J.; Kanamori, H.

    1997-01-01

    We used long-period surface waves from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by the TERRAscope network to determine phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh waves up to periods of about 170 sec and of Love waves up to about 150 sec. This enabled us to investigate the upper-mantle velocity structure beneath southern California to a depth of about 250 km. Ten and five earthquakes were used for Rayleigh and Love waves, respectively. The observed surface-wave dispersion shows a clear Love/Rayleigh-wave d...

  3. Identification process based on shear wave propagation within a phantom using finite element modelling and magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Gwladys E; Charleux, Fabrice; Ho Ba Tho, Marie-Christine; Bensamoun, Sabine F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), based on shear wave propagation generated by a specific driver, is a non-invasive exam performed in clinical practice to improve the liver diagnosis. The purpose was to develop a finite element (FE) identification method for the mechanical characterisation of phantom mimicking soft tissues investigated with MRE technique. Thus, a 3D FE phantom model, composed of the realistic MRE liver boundary conditions, was developed to simulate the shear wave propagation with the software ABAQUS. The assumptions of homogeneity and elasticity were applied to the FE phantom model. Different ranges of mesh size, density and Poisson's ratio were tested in order to develop the most representative FE phantom model. The simulated wave displacement was visualised with a dynamic implicit analysis. Subsequently, an identification process was performed with a cost function and an optimisation loop provided the optimal elastic properties of the phantom. The present identification process was validated on a phantom model, and the perspective will be to apply this method on abdominal tissues for the set-up of new clinical MRE protocols that could be applied for the follow-up of the effects of treatments.

  4. Velocity and attenuation of shear waves in the phantom of a muscle-soft tissue matrix with embedded stretched fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2016-09-01

    We develop a theory of the elasticity moduli and dissipative properties of a composite material: a phantom simulating muscle tissue anisotropy. The model used in the experiments was made of a waterlike polymer with embedded elastic filaments imitating muscle fiber. In contrast to the earlier developed phenomenological theory of the anisotropic properties of muscle tissue, here we obtain the relationship of the moduli with characteristic sizes and moduli making up the composite. We introduce the effective elasticity moduli and viscosity tensor components, which depend on stretching of the fibers. We measure the propagation velocity of shear waves and the shear viscosity of the model for regulated tension. Waves were excited by pulsed radiation pressure generated by modulated focused ultrasound. We show that with increased stretching of fibers imitating muscle contraction, an increase in both elasticity and viscosity takes place, and this effect depends on the wave propagation direction. The results of theoretical and experimental studies support our hypothesis on the protective function of stretched skeletal muscle, which protects bones and joints from trauma.

  5. A combined analysis of basaltic melting and shear wave velocity anomalies to constrain dynamic support of western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöcking, Marthe; White, Nicky; Maclennan, John; Fitton, Godfrey

    2017-04-01

    The region of western North America that encompasses the Basin and Range Province, the Snake River Plain and the Colorado Plateau is about 2 km higher than cratonic North America. This topographic difference broadly coincides with variations in lithospheric thickness (i.e. Mexico, and inverse modeling of regional drainage networks together suggest that this regional uplift occurred during Cenozoic time in at least two discrete phases. Earthquake tomographic models have imaged low velocity material beneath the bulk of western North America, including a ring-shaped anomaly encompassing the Colorado Plateau itself. Basaltic magmatism coincides with these low velocity zones and indicates an overall increase in melt volume at 40 Ma, as well as an abrupt change from lithospheric to asthenospheric signatures at 5 Ma. To investigate the quantitative relationship between seismic velocity anomalies and basaltic magmatism, we have analyzed >260 samples from volcanic centers throughout western North America for major, trace and rare earth elements using ICP-MS and XRF techniques. For asthenospheric samples, we observe a correlation between slow shear wave velocity anomalies and basaltic geochemistry. Using a combination of petrologic observations, forward and inverse modeling of major and rare earth elements, and shear wave velocity anomalies from tomographic models, we determine depth of melting and melt fraction. We explore the possibility that volatiles, anomalous source composition and/or temperature can give rise to basaltic magmatism and regional uplift. We then calculate mantle temperatures from shear wave velocity profiles beneath each volcanic field. In this way, we exploit a variety of approaches to constrain lithospheric thickness and mantle potential temperature. Our combined geochemical and geophysical results yield excess temperatures of 50-80 °C beneath a 60 km thin lithospheric plate. A dynamic topographic model of progressive lithospheric erosion over

  6. Deep ReMi Imaging - Mapping Shear-Wave Velocities to 1 km Depth and Greater Using Refraction Microtremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J. N.; Pancha, A.; Munger, D.; Law, C.; Adams, D.; Mick, T. M.; Pullammanappallil, S. K.

    2016-12-01

    The Refraction Microtremor (ReMi) surface-wave technique, in use since 2002, has become a standard tool for assessing urban shear-wave velocities for engineering applications. ReMi is effective for site-class studies as well as assessing ground conditions, including 1D and 2D velocity-depth profiling to shallow depths of approximately 100 m. Over the last few years, we have successfully extended the application of the method to depths greater than 1 km. The use of deep ReMi, which relies primarily on ambient noise, for estimation of shear-wave velocities to kilometer depths, allows for mapping the thickness and velocity of deep urban basins. Accurate 3D modeling and calibration of recorded earthquake ground motions in urban areas is one use of deep ReMi results. Such models have the potential to be an essential part of seismic hazard evaluation. We present results from several deep ReMi studies conducted in the Reno-area and Tahoe basins of Nevada and California. Wireless instruments coupled with low-frequency geophones deployed in 3-km-long arrays across the densely populated urban environment acquired data in 2012, 2014, and 2015. In addition to mapping basement as deep as 900 m, the lateral velocity variations reveal deep-seated fault structure in the initial studies. A study of the Reno-area basin in 2016 employed arrays of 90 IRIS-PASSCAL Texans, 15 and 22 km long. This data set appears to constrain a sub-basin interface between Tertiary volcanics and Mesozoic basement at 1-2 km depth. Characterization of shear velocity at greater than 100 m depth, to basement, along with previously unknown faults, is vital towards quantifying earthquake ground motion and seismic hazard potential in geologically complex urban basins. Our measurements will allow Nevada communities to become more resilient against natural hazards.

  7. Non-invasive assessment of kidney allograft fibrosis with shear wave elastography: A radiological-pathological correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Maggie Km; Law, Helen Kw; Tse, Kin Sun; Chan, Kwok Wah; Chan, Gary Cw; Yap, Desmond Yh; Mok, Maggie My; Kwan, Lorraine Py; Tang, Sydney Cw; Choy, Bo Ying; Chan, Tak Mao

    2018-02-14

    To evaluate the use of shear wave elastography in assessment of kidney allograft tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Shear wave elastography assessment was carried out by two independent operators in kidney transplant recipients who underwent allograft biopsy for clinical indications (i.e. rising creatinine >15% or proteinuria >1 g/day). Allograft biopsies were interpreted by the same pathologist according to the 2013 Banff Classification. A total of 40 elastography scans were carried out (median creatinine 172.5 μmol/L [interquartile range 133.8-281.8 μmol/L]). Median tissue stiffness at the cortex (22.6 kPa [interquartile range 18.8-25.7 kPa] vs 22.3 kPa [interquartile range 19.0-26.5 kPa], P = 0.70) and medulla (15.0 kPa [interquartile range 13.7-18.0 kPa] vs 15.6 kPa [interquartile range 14.4-18.2 kPa]) showed no significant differences between the two observers. Interobserver agreement was satisfactory (intraclass correlation coefficient of the cortex 0.84, 95% CI 0.70-0.92 and intraclass correlation coefficient of the medulla 0.88, 95% CI 0.78-0.94). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for detection of tubulointerstitial fibrosis were estimated to be 0.75 (95% CI 0.61-0.89), 0.85 (95% CI 0.75-0.95) and 0.65 (95% CI 0.53-0.78) for cortical, medullary tissue stiffness and serum creatinine, respectively. Shear wave elastography can be used as a non-invasive tool to evaluate kidney allograft fibrosis with reasonable interobserver agreement and superior test performance to serum creatinine in detecting early tubulointerstitial fibrosis. © 2018 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. Length-scales of Slab-induced Asthenospheric Deformation from Geodynamic Modeling, Mantle Deformation Fabric, and Synthetic Shear Wave Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadamec, M. A.; MacDougall, J.; Fischer, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    The viscosity structure of the Earth's interior is critically important, because it places a first order constraint on plate motion and mantle flow rates. Geodynamic models using a composite viscosity based on experimentally derived flow laws for olivine aggregates show that lateral viscosity variations emerge in the upper mantle due to the subduction dynamics. However, the length-scale of this transition is still not well understood. Two-dimensional numerical models of subduction are presented that investigate the effect of initial slab dip, maximum yield stress (slab strength), and viscosity formulation (Newtonian versus composite) on the emergent lateral viscosity variations in the upper-mantle and magnitude of slab-driven mantle flow velocity. Significant viscosity reductions occur in regions of large flow velocity gradients due to the weakening effect of the dislocation creep deformation mechanism. The dynamic reductions in asthenospheric viscosity (less than 1018 Pa s) occur within approximately 500 km from driving force of the slab, with peak flow velocities occurring in models with a lower yield stress (weaker slab) and higher stress exponent. This leads to a sharper definition of the rheological base of the lithosphere and implies lateral variability in tractions along the base of the lithosphere. As the dislocation creep mechanism also leads to mantle deformation fabric, we then examine the spatial variation in the LPO development in the asthenosphere and calculate synthetic shear wave splitting. The models show that olivine LPO fabric in the asthenosphere generally increases in alignment strength with increased proximity to the slab, but can be transient and spatially variable on small length scales. The vertical flow fields surrounding the slab tip can produce shear-wave splitting variations with back-azimuth that deviate from the predictions of uniform trench-normal anisotropy, a result that bears on the interpretation of complexity in shear-wave

  9. Influence of wall thickness and diameter on arterial shear wave elastography: a phantom and finite element study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksuti, Elira; Bini, Fabiano; Fiorentini, Stefano; Blasi, Giulia; Urban, Matthew W.; Marinozzi, Franco; Larsson, Matilda

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative, non-invasive and local measurements of arterial mechanical properties could be highly beneficial for early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and follow up of treatment. Arterial shear wave elastography (SWE) and wave velocity dispersion analysis have previously been applied to measure arterial stiffness. Arterial wall thickness (h) and inner diameter (D) vary with age and pathology and may influence the shear wave propagation. Nevertheless, the effect of arterial geometry in SWE has not yet been systematically investigated. In this study the influence of geometry on the estimated mechanical properties of plates (h  =  0.5-3 mm) and hollow cylinders (h  =  1, 2 and 3 mm, D  =  6 mm) was assessed by experiments in phantoms and by finite element method simulations. In addition, simulations in hollow cylinders with wall thickness difficult to achieve in phantoms were performed (h  =  0.5-1.3 mm, D  =  5-8 mm). The phase velocity curves obtained from experiments and simulations were compared in the frequency range 200-1000 Hz and showed good agreement (R 2  =  0.80  ±  0.07 for plates and R 2  =  0.82  ±  0.04 for hollow cylinders). Wall thickness had a larger effect than diameter on the dispersion curves, which did not have major effects above 400 Hz. An underestimation of 0.1-0.2 mm in wall thickness introduces an error 4-9 kPa in hollow cylinders with shear modulus of 21-26 kPa. Therefore, wall thickness should correctly be measured in arterial SWE applications for accurate mechanical properties estimation.

  10. Shear wave velocities in the Pampean flat-slab region from Rayleigh wave tomography: Implications for slab and upper mantle hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Ryan; Gilbert, Hersh; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan; Warren, Linda; Calkins, Josh; Alvarado, Patricia; Anderson, Megan

    2012-11-01

    The Pampean flat-slab region, located in central Argentina and Chile between 29° and 34°S, is considered a modern analog for Laramide flat-slab subduction within western North America. Regionally, flat-slab subduction is characterized by the Nazca slab descending to ˜100 km depth, flattening out for ˜300 km laterally before resuming a more "normal" angle of subduction. Flat-slab subduction correlates spatially with the track of the Juan Fernandez Ridge, and is associated with the inboard migration of deformation and the cessation of volcanism within the region. To better understand flat-slab subduction we combine ambient-noise tomography and earthquake-generated surface wave measurements to calculate a regional 3D shear velocity model for the region. Shear wave velocity variations largely relate to changes in lithology within the crust, with basins and bedrock exposures clearly defined as low- and high-velocity regions, respectively. We argue that subduction-related hydration plays a significant role in controlling shear wave velocities within the upper mantle. In the southern part of the study area, where normal-angle subduction is occurring, the slab is visible as a high-velocity body with a low-velocity mantle wedge above it, extending eastward from the active arc. Where flat-slab subduction is occurring, slab velocities increase to the east while velocities in the overlying lithosphere decrease, consistent with the slab dewatering and gradually hydrating the overlying mantle. The hydration of the slab may be contributing to the excess buoyancy of the subducting oceanic lithosphere, helping to drive flat-slab subduction.

  11. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin solution of cut-off frequency for horizontal shear (SH) waves in various inhomogeneous thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoshan; Shi, Junping; Jin, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method is employed to study the cut-off frequencies of the horizontal shear waves in a freestanding functionally graded piezoelectric-piezomagnetic material film with the electrically and magnetically open boundary conditions. An analytical solution, which could be used in analyzing the problems of various functionally graded materials, is proven to have high precision by analytical analysis and a numerical example. The results reveal that the set of cut-off frequencies is a series of approximate arithmetic progressions. A theoretical foundation based on the relationship between the cut-off frequencies and the materials' gradient property is established for nondestructive evaluation.

  12. Wave influence on polar mesosphere summer echoes above Wasa: experimental and model studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dalin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive analysis of the wave activity in the Antarctic summer mesopause is performed using polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE measurements for December 2010–January 2011. The 2-day planetary wave is a statistically significant periodic oscillation in the power spectrum density of PMSE power. The strongest periodic oscillation in the power spectrum belongs to the diurnal solar tide; the semi-diurnal solar tide is found to be a highly significant harmonic oscillation as well. The inertial-gravity waves are extensively studied by means of PMSE power and wind components. The strongest gravity waves are observed at periods of about 1, 1.4, 2.5 and 4 h, with characteristic horizontal wavelengths of 28, 36, 157 and 252 km, respectively. The gravity waves propagate approximately in the west-east direction over Wasa (Antarctica. A detailed comparison between theoretical and experimental volume reflectivity of PMSE, measured at Wasa, is made. It is demonstrated that a new expression for PMSE reflectivity derived by Varney et al. (2011 is able to adequately describe PMSE profiles both in the magnitude and in height variations. The best agreement, within 30%, is achieved when mean values of neutral atmospheric parameters are utilized. The largest contribution to the formation and variability of the PMSE layer is explained by the ice number density and its height gradient, followed by wave-induced perturbations in buoyancy period and the turbulent energy dissipation rate.

  13. Wave influence on polar mesosphere summer echoes above Wasa: experimental and model studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S.; Hervig, M.; Mihalikova, M.; Mikhaylova, D.; Wolf, I.; Osepian, A.

    2012-08-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the wave activity in the Antarctic summer mesopause is performed using polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) measurements for December 2010-January 2011. The 2-day planetary wave is a statistically significant periodic oscillation in the power spectrum density of PMSE power. The strongest periodic oscillation in the power spectrum belongs to the diurnal solar tide; the semi-diurnal solar tide is found to be a highly significant harmonic oscillation as well. The inertial-gravity waves are extensively studied by means of PMSE power and wind components. The strongest gravity waves are observed at periods of about 1, 1.4, 2.5 and 4 h, with characteristic horizontal wavelengths of 28, 36, 157 and 252 km, respectively. The gravity waves propagate approximately in the west-east direction over Wasa (Antarctica). A detailed comparison between theoretical and experimental volume reflectivity of PMSE, measured at Wasa, is made. It is demonstrated that a new expression for PMSE reflectivity derived by Varney et al. (2011) is able to adequately describe PMSE profiles both in the magnitude and in height variations. The best agreement, within 30%, is achieved when mean values of neutral atmospheric parameters are utilized. The largest contribution to the formation and variability of the PMSE layer is explained by the ice number density and its height gradient, followed by wave-induced perturbations in buoyancy period and the turbulent energy dissipation rate.

  14. Comment on `The azimuthal dependence of surface wave polarization in a slightly anisotropic medium' by T. Tanimoto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Valérie

    2004-10-01

    This comment points out that the simple azimuthal dependence of the polarization anomalies derived in a recent paper by Tanimoto may not be valid for the Love wave fundamental mode in oceanic or tectonic regions as a result of strong coupling with the first Rayleigh wave overtone. More generally, I also point out the fact that polarization anomalies reflect partly the anisotropy away from the station and that this usually complicates the azimuthal pattern observed at single stations.

  15. Pressure-induced forces and shear stresses on rubble mound breakwater armour layers in regular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results from an experimental investigation of the pressure-induced forces in the core material below the main armour layer and shear stresses on the armour layer for a porous breakwater structure. Two parallel experiments were performed which both involved pore pressure...... measurements in the core material: (1) core material with an idealized armour layer made out of spherical objects that also allowed for detailed velocity measurements between and above the armour, and (2) core material with real rock armour stones. The same core material was applied through the entire...... and turbulence measurements showed that the large outward directed pressure gradients in general coincide, both in time and space, with the maximum bed-shear stresses on the armour layer based on the Reynolds-stresses. The bed-shear stresses were found to result in a Shields parameter in the same order...

  16. A 2D Daubechies finite wavelet domain method for transient wave response analysis in shear deformable laminated composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastos, C. V.; Theodosiou, T. C.; Rekatsinas, C. S.; Saravanos, D. A.

    2018-03-01

    An efficient numerical method is developed for the simulation of dynamic response and the prediction of the wave propagation in composite plate structures. The method is termed finite wavelet domain method and takes advantage of the outstanding properties of compactly supported 2D Daubechies wavelet scaling functions for the spatial interpolation of displacements in a finite domain of a plate structure. The development of the 2D wavelet element, based on the first order shear deformation laminated plate theory is described and equivalent stiffness, mass matrices and force vectors are calculated and synthesized in the wavelet domain. The transient response is predicted using the explicit central difference time integration scheme. Numerical results for the simulation of wave propagation in isotropic, quasi-isotropic and cross-ply laminated plates are presented and demonstrate the high spatial convergence and problem size reduction obtained by the present method.

  17. Electrostatic instabilities and nonlinear structures of low-frequency waves in nonuniform electron-positron-ion plasmas with shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, Arshad M.; Hasan, Asma; Azeem, M.; Saleem, H.

    2003-01-01

    It is found that the low-frequency ion acoustic and electrostatic drift waves can become unstable in uniform electron-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas due to the ion shear flow. In a collisional plasma a drift-dissipative instability can also take place. In the presence of collisions the temporal behavior of nonlinear drift-dissipative mode can be represented in the form of well-known Lorenz and Stenflo type equations that admit chaotic trajectories. On the other hand, a quasi-stationary solution of the mode coupling equations can be represented in the form of monopolar vortex. The results of the present investigation can be helpful in understanding electrostatic turbulence and wave phenomena in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

  18. Barotropic and baroclinic energy conversions associated with planetary wave forcing of the northern stratospheric polar vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberato, M. L. R.; Castanheira, J. M.; Dacamara, C. C.

    2009-04-01

    An analysis of the energy conversion of barotropic and baroclinic planetary waves for extended winter in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere is presented. The analysis is based on a three-dimensional normal mode expansion of the global circulation of the atmosphere (Castanheira et al. 2002; Liberato et al. 2007). This method allows separating the atmospheric circulation into planetary (Rossby) and inertio-gravity waves as well as characterising each type of wave by the respective zonal, meridional and vertical structures. The 3-D normal mode scheme further allows evaluating the contribution of each type of wave for the global total (i.e., kinetic + available potential) atmospheric energy. A brief overview of the normal mode energetics of the global atmospheric circulation is given, focusing on the energy conversions between barotropic and baroclinic components of different vertical and horizontal scales. The methodology is applied to the global NCEP/NCAR (National Centers for Environmental Prediction / National Center for Atmospheric Research) reanalysis data set, using extended winter (November to March) daily means of the horizontal wind components (u, v) and of the geopotential height, at the 17 standard pressure levels, with the spatial horizontal resolution available (2.5° regular grid) and spanning the period 1957-2008. Obtained results are then used to relate the variability of the stratospheric polar vortex to the variability of the energy of the forcing planetary waves. Barotropic and baroclinic energy conversions associated with planetary wave forcing of the northern winter polar vortex are finally analysed, during rapid stratospheric vortex decelerations and accelerations. Castanheira, J. M., H.-F. Graf, C. DaCamara, and A. Rocha, 2002: Using a physical reference frame to study global circulation variability. J. Atmos. Sci., 59, 1490-1501. Liberato, M. L. R., J. M. Castanheira, L. da la Torre, C. C. DaCamara and L. Gimeno, 2007: Wave Energy Associated

  19. Shear waves in near surface 3D media-SH-wavefield separation, refraction time migration and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelz, Susanne; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Mueller, Christof

    2009-05-01

    When investigating topographically irregular layers in the near surface with shear waves, it is of particular importance to consider the 3D-nature of wave propagation. Depending on the layer geometry and on the spatial arrangement of source- and receiver-points significant lateral ray bending can occur causing side-swipe traveltime effects and complicated polarisation patterns. As an example we present a study where 3D-shear wave refraction measurements were applied in order to reconstruct the geometry of a silted ancient harbour basin at the archaeological site of Miletus (West Turkey). Seismic signals were generated with a three-component vector force and recorded with three-component geophones arranged in 2D-arrays of 1 m grid spacing. Since a correct identification of refracted S-wave arrivals is a precondition to traveltime interpretation we investigated a method to decompose these wavefields with respect to their polarisation and azimuth of propagation. Taking advantage of the 2D-geophone arrangement we applied the following processing approach: In case of general lateral heterogeneity a decomposition can be performed by applying the curl and divergence operations to the vector wavefields recorded in 2D-arrays. The separated tangential and normal components to the wavefront in a plane are finally enhanced by combining the different force components in order to eliminate the radiation characteristics of the source. The decomposed wavefield was then the basis for 3D-refractor imaging through a newly formulated map migration of the refracted traveltime field. This technique was developed to map coherent basement structure on the meter-scale. Supplemental tomographic inversion using the refractor topography model as input provided a plausible velocity model, exhibiting characteristic anomalies such as a prominent low velocity zone overlain by a high velocity layer in the refractor. The seismic velocity structure suggests that the harbour basin was locally filled

  20. Evaluating the Benefit of Elevated Acoustic Output in Harmonic Motion Estimation in Ultrasonic Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yufeng; Palmeri, Mark L; Rouze, Ned C; Haystead, Clare M; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2018-02-01

    Harmonic imaging techniques have been applied in ultrasonic elasticity imaging to obtain higher-quality tissue motion tracking data. However, harmonic tracking can be signal-to-noise ratio and penetration depth limited during clinical imaging, resulting in decreased yield of successful shear wave speed measurements. A logical approach is to increase the source pressure, but the in situ pressures used in diagnostic ultrasound have been subject to a de facto upper limit based on the Food and Drug Administration guideline for the mechanical index (MI estimation yield by 27% at a focal depth of 5 cm, with larger yield increase in more difficult-to-image patients. High-MI tracking improved harmonic tracking data quality by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and decreasing jitter in the tissue motion data. We conclude that there is clinical benefit to use of elevated acoustic output in shear wave tracking, particularly in difficult-to-image patients. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Point shear wave elastography of the pancreas in patients with cystic fibrosis: a comparison with healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfahler, Matthias Hermann Christian; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Leichsenring, Michael; Graeter, Tilmann; Schmidt, Stefan Andreas; Wendlik, Inka; Lormes, Elisabeth; Schmidberger, Julian; Fabricius, Dorit

    2018-02-19

    Manifestations of cystic fibrosis in the pancreas are gaining in clinical importance as patients live longer. Conventional ultrasonography and point shear wave elastography (pSWE) imaging are non-invasive and readily available diagnostic methods that are easy to perform. The aim of this study was to perform conventional ultrasonography and obtain pSWE values in the pancreases of patients with cystic fibrosis and to compare the findings with those of healthy controls. 27 patients with cystic fibrosis (13 women/14 men; mean age 27.7 ± 13.7 years; range 9-58 years) and 60 healthy control subjects (30 women/30 men; mean age 30.3 ± 10.0 years; range 22-55 years) underwent examinations of the pancreas with conventional ultrasound and pSWE imaging. Patients with cystic fibrosis have an echogenic pancreatic parenchyma. We found cystic lesions of the pancreas in six patients. pSWE imaging of the pancreatic parenchyma gave significantly lower shear wave velocities in patients with cystic fibrosis than in the control group (1.01 m/s vs 1.30 m/s; p cystic fibrosis than in a healthy control population.

  2. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and damage in Los Gatos, California, from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Aftershock records of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are used to calculate site response in the frequency band of 0.5-10 Hz at 24 locations in Los Gatos, California, on the edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Two different methods are used: spectral ratios relative to a reference site on rock and a source/site spectral inversion method. These two methods complement each other and give consistent results. Site amplification factors are compared with surficial geology, thickness of alluvium, shallow shear-wave velocity measurements, and ground deformation and structural damage resulting from the Loma Prieta earthquake. Higher values of site amplification are seen on Quaternary alluvium compared with older Miocene and Cretaceous units of Monterey and Franciscan Formation. However, other more detailed correlations with surficial geology are not evident. A complex pattern of alluvial sediment thickness, caused by crosscutting thrust faults, is interpreted as contributing to the variability in site response and the presence of spectral resonance peaks between 2 and 7 Hz at some sites. Within the range of our field measurements, there is a correlation between lower average shear-wave velocity of the top 30 m and 50% higher values of site amplification. An area of residential homes thrown from their foundations correlates with high site response. This damage may also have been aggravated by local ground deformation. Severe damage to commercial buildings in the business district, however, is attributed to poor masonry construction.

  3. Near-surface shear-wave velocity measurements in unlithified sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, B.T.; Steeples, D.; Miller, R.; Ivanov, J.; Peterie, S.; Sloan, S.D.; McKenna, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    S-wave velocity can be directly correlated to material stiffness and lithology making it a valuable physical property that has found uses in construction, engineering, and environmental projects. This study compares different methods for measuring S-wave velocities, investigating and identifying the differences among the methods' results, and prioritizing the different methods for optimal S-wave use at the U. S. Army's Yuma Proving Grounds YPG. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves MASW and S-wave tomography were used to generate S-wave velocity profiles. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. A strong signal-to-noise ratio at the study site gives the MASW method promising resolution. S-wave first arrivals are picked on impulsive sledgehammer data which were then used for the tomography process. Three-component downhole seismic data were collected in-line with a locking geophone, providing ground truth to compare the data and to draw conclusions about the validity of each data set. Results from these S-wave measurement techniques are compared with borehole seismic data and with lithology data from continuous samples to help ascertain the accuracy, and therefore applicability, of each method. This study helps to select the best methods for obtaining S-wave velocities for media much like those found in unconsolidated sediments at YPG. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. Wave influence on polar mesosphere summer echoes above Wasa. Experimental and model studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S.; Mihalikova, M.; Mikhaylova, D.; Wolf, I. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Hervig, M. [GATS Inc., Driggs, ID (United States); Osepian, A. [Polar Geophysical Institute, Murmansk (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the wave activity in the Antarctic summer mesopause is performed using polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) measurements for December 2010-January 2011. The 2-day planetary wave is a statistically significant periodic oscillation in the power spectrum density of PMSE power. The strongest periodic oscillation in the power spectrum belongs to the diurnal solar tide; the semi-diurnal solar tide is found to be a highly significant harmonic oscillation as well. The inertial-gravity waves are extensively studied by means of PMSE power and wind components. The strongest gravity waves are observed at periods of about 1, 1.4, 2.5 and 4 h, with characteristic horizontal wavelengths of 28, 36, 157 and 252 km, respectively. The gravity waves propagate approximately in the west-east direction over Wasa (Antarctica). A detailed comparison between theoretical and experimental volume reflectivity of PMSE, measured at Wasa, is made. It is demonstrated that a new expression for PMSE reflectivity derived by Varney et al. (2011) is able to adequately describe PMSE profiles both in the magnitude and in height variations. The best agreement, within 30 %, is achieved when mean values of neutral atmospheric parameters are utilized. The largest contribution to the formation and variability of the PMSE layer is explained by the ice number density and its height gradient, followed by waveinduced perturbations in buoyancy period and the turbulent energy dissipation rate. (orig.)

  5. Wave disturbances in the polar ionosphere after a Vitim meteorite burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, V. D.; Ogloblina, O. F.; Tereshchenko, V. A.; Chernyakov, S. M.

    On September 24th, 2002, at 16:49 UT in the Mamsko-Chuisk region of the Irkutsk oblast of Russia it was a fall of a big meteorite. The fall was accompanied with light, acoustic, geomagnetic, seismic and mechanical phenomena which were recorded by ground and space means of observations. The meteorite has burst in the air at the altitude of 30 km with coordinates of the burst: 58.23 N, 113.46 E. After 17:00 UT there was recorded a sequence of small disturbances of the geomagnetic field and wavelike changes of amplitude of medium wave radioreflections at heights from 47 till 129 km in Tumanny (Murmansk oblast, Russia; 69.0 N, 35.7 E) which was situated at a distance of 4000 km from a place of the burst. It was gotten that after the burst three types of waves (magnetoacoustic, acoustic-gravitational and infraacoustic) spread in the polar mesosphere and lower ionosphere. Observable disturbances had periods of oscillations about 3-4, 5-6 and more than 9-10 minutes. A similarity characteristics of the wave indignations with analogous ones which were gotten earlier during investigations of effects of the Tungusk meteorite and the American space station "Skylab" falls and also a fact of a registration of a pressure wave on a net of microbarographs of PGI in Apatity permit to maintain that the source of the indignations in the polar ionosphere is the meteorite explosion. The hypothesis about wavequide spreading of atmospheric waves to large distance was confirmed.

  6. Acoustic and Shear-Wave Velocities in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Offshore Southwestern Taiwan: Tomography, Converted Waves Analysis and Reverse-Time Migration of OBS Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Schnurle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2.5-D combined seismic reflection and refraction survey has been conducted in the accretionary complex offshore of southwestern Taiwan where BSRs (Bottom Simulating Reflectors are highly concentrated and geochemical signals for the presence of gas hydrate are strong. In this study, we perform velocity analysis of the 6 4-component OBS (Ocean-Bottom Seismometer records along the southernmost transect of this seismic experiment. We utilize 3 independent methods in order to accurately determine the acoustic and shear-wave velocities of the sediments: 1-D Root Mean Square (RMS analysis of the P-P and P-S reflected events on individual datumed components, 2-D inversion of the P-P and P-S reflected and refracted events along the in-line transect, and 3-D acoustic inversion of the first arrivals. The principal sources of bias in the determination of the velocities are the 3-dimentional nature of the topography and the complexity of the underlying structures. The three methods result in consistent velocity profiles. Rapid lateral and vertical variations of the velocities are observed. We then investigate the large scale gas hydrate content through rock physic modeling: at the vertical of each OBS, shear-waves velocities are utilized to estimate the water-filled porosities, and the acoustic velocities predicted for a set of gas hydrate, quartz and clay contents are compared to the observed profiles.

  7. An experimental study on shock wave mitigation capability of polyurea and shear thickening fluid based suspension pads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Haris

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The present experimental study investigates shock wave mitigation capability of potentially new personal protective equipment (PPE suspension pads made from polyurea and shear thickening fluid (STF. The shock tube test results show that when placed behind Twaron fabric systems with thickness ranging from 2 mm to 18 mm, the replacement of conventional flexible foam pad with STF and STF-infused foam pads with the same thickness of 20 mm greatly reduces the normalized peak pressure (by about 72% for each pad. However, this benefit is partially offset by a large increase in the normalized impulse (by about 78% for the STF pad and 131% for the STF-infused foam pad which may cause the shock wave mitigation performance of these two pads to become less effective. Interestingly, the use of 4 mm thick polyurea pad can greatly reduce the normalized peak pressure and impulse as well (by about 74% and 49%, respectively. These results reveal that among the potentially new suspension pads tested, the polyurea pad displays the best shock wave mitigation performance. Therefore, polyurea has potential for use as a suspension pad in personal protective equipment requiring shock wave mitigation capability such as fabric ballistic vests, bomb suits and combat helmets.

  8. A transportable hybrid antenna-transmitter system for the generation of elliptically polarized waves for NVIS propagation research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvliet, Ben A.; Laanstra, Geert J.; van Maanen, Erik; Alsina-Pagès, Rosa M.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Slump, Cornelis H.; Schiphorst, Roelof

    2016-01-01

    For empirical research on Near Vertical Incidence Skywave (NVIS) characteristic wave propagation, a beacon transmitter system is needed that can be programmed to emit precisely defined elliptically and circularly polarized waves at high elevation angles. This paper proposes a novel hybrid

  9. Rogue waves driven by polarization instabilities in a long ring fiber oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpakov, S. A.; Kbashi, Hani; Sergeyev, Sergey

    2017-05-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical results of a study of a complex nonlinear polarization dynamics in a passively self-mode-locked erbium-doped fiber oscillator implemented in a ring configuration and operating near lasing threshold. The theoretical model consists of seven coupled non-linear equations and takes into account both orthogonal states of polarizations in the fiber. The experiment confirmed the existence of seven eigenfrequencies, predicted by the model due to polarization instability near lasing threshold. By adjusting the state of polarization of the pump and in-cavity birefringence we changed some eigenfrequencies from being different (non-degenerate state) to matching (degenerate state). The non-degenerate states of oscillator lead to the L-shaped probability distribution function and true rogue wave regime with a positive dominant Lyapunov exponent value between 1.4 and 2.6. Small detuning from partially degenerate case also leads to L-shaped probability distribution function with the tail trespassing eight standard deviations threshold, giving periodic patterns of pulses along with positive dominant Lyapunov exponent of a filtered signal between 0.6 and 3.2. The partial degeneration, in turn, guides to quasi-symmetric distribution and the value of dominant Lyapunov exponent of 42 which is a typical value for systems with a source of the strongly nonhomogeneous external noise.

  10. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  11. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  12. Turbulence-driven shear flow and self-regulating drift wave turbulence in a cylindrical plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng

    This dissertation provides an experimental test of the basic theory of the self-regulating drift wave turbulence (DWT)/sheared zonal flow (ZF) system in a cylindrical plasma device. The work is carried out from three approaches: the first explores the statistical properties of the turbulent Reynolds stress and its link to the ZF generation, the second investigates the dynamical behavior of the DWT/ZF system and the third investigates the variation of the DWT driven ZF verses magnetic field strength and ion-neutral drag. A radially sheared azimuthally symmetric plasma flow is generated by the DWT turbulent Reynolds stress which is directly measured by a multi-tip Langmuir probe. A statistical analysis shows that the cross-phase between the turbulent radial and azimuthal velocity components is the key factor determining the detailed Reynolds stress profile. The coincidence of the radial location of the non-Gaussian distribution of the turbulent Reynolds stress and the ion saturation current, as well as the properties of the joint probability distribution function (PDF) between the radial particle flux and turbulent Reynolds stress suggest that the bursts of the particle transport appear to be associated with radial transport of azimuthal momentum as well. The results link the behavior of the Reynolds stress, its statistical properties, generation of bursty radially going azimuthal momentum transport events, and the formation of the large-scale ZF. From both Langmuir probe and fast-faming imaging measurements this shear flow is found to evolve with low frequency (˜250-300Hz). The envelope of the higher frequency (above 5kHz) floating potential fluctuations associated with the DWT, the density gradient, and the turbulent radial particle flux are all modulated out of phase with the strength of the ZF. The divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress is also modulated at the same slow time scale in a phase-coherent manner consistent with a turbulence-driven shear flow

  13. Continuous wave protocol for simultaneous polarization and optical detection of P1-center electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, E. J.; Carvajal, B.; Samarth, N.

    2018-01-01

    The ready optical detection and manipulation of bright nitrogen vacancy center spins in diamond plays a key role in contemporary quantum information science and quantum metrology. Other optically dark defects such as substitutional nitrogen atoms (`P1 centers') could also become potentially useful in this context if they could be as easily optically detected and manipulated. We develop a relatively straightforward continuous wave protocol that takes advantage of the dipolar coupling between nitrogen vacancy and P1 centers in type 1b diamond to detect and polarize the dark P1 spins. By combining mutual spin flip transitions with radio frequency driving, we demonstrate the simultaneous optical polarization and detection of the electron spin resonance of the P1 center. This technique should be applicable to detecting and manipulating a broad range of dark spin populations that couple to the nitrogen vacancy center via dipolar fields, allowing for quantum metrology using these spin populations.

  14. Four-wave mixing using polarization grating induced thermal grating in liquids exhibiting circular dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, J.A.; Tong, W.G. [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Chandler, D.W.; Rahn, L.A. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility

    1995-04-01

    A novel four-wave mixing technique for the detection of circular dichroism in optically active liquid samples is demonstrated. When two cross-polarized laser beams are crossed at a small angle in a circular dichroic liquid a weak thermal grating is produced with a phase depending on the sign of the circular dichroism. The authors show that the polarization of one of the beams can be modified to allow coherent interference with an intensity-grating induced thermal grating. A probe beam scattering from the composite grating results in a signal that reveals the sign and magnitude of the circular dichroism. The use of this technique to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio in the presence of scattered light and laser intensity noise is discussed.

  15. Scalable Background-Limited Polarization-Sensitive Detectors for mm-wave Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostem, Karwan; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe A.; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin L.; Essinger-Hileman, Tom; Marriage, Tobias A.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We report on the status and development of polarization-sensitive detectors for millimeter-wave applications. The detectors are fabricated on single-crystal silicon, which functions as a low-loss dielectric substrate for the microwave circuitry as well as the supporting membrane for the Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers. The orthomode transducer (OMT) is realized as a symmetric structure and on-chip filters are employed to define the detection bandwidth. A hybridized integrated enclosure reduces the high-frequency THz mode set that can couple to the TES bolometers. An implementation of the detector architecture at Q-band achieves 90% efficiency in each polarization. The design is scalable in both frequency coverage, 30-300 GHz, and in number of detectors with uniform characteristics. Hence, the detectors are desirable for ground-based or space-borne instruments that require large arrays of efficient background-limited cryogenic detectors.

  16. Polarized Kink Waves in Magnetic Elements: Evidence for Chromospheric Helical Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stangalini, M.; Giannattasio, F. [INAF-OAR National Institute for Astrophysics, Via Frascati 33, I-00078 Monte Porzio Catone (RM) (Italy); Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Jafarzadeh, S. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Consolini, G.; Ermolli, I. [INAF-IAPS National Institute for Astrophysics, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Criscuoli, S. [NSO, National Solar Observatory, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Guglielmino, S. L.; Zuccarello, F., E-mail: marco.stangalini@inaf.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95125 Catania (Italy)

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, new high spatial resolution observations of the Sun's atmosphere have revealed the presence of a plethora of small-scale magnetic elements down to the resolution limit of the current cohort of solar telescopes (∼100–120 km on the solar photosphere). These small magnetic field concentrations, due to the granular buffeting, can support and guide several magnetohydrodynamic wave modes that would eventually contribute to the energy budget of the upper layers of the atmosphere. In this work, exploiting the high spatial and temporal resolution chromospheric data acquired with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope, and applying the empirical mode decomposition technique to the tracking of the solar magnetic features, we analyze the perturbations of the horizontal velocity vector of a set of chromospheric magnetic elements. We find observational evidence that suggests a phase relation between the two components of the velocity vector itself, resulting in its helical motion.

  17. Evaluation of polarization of embedded piezoelectrics by the thermal wave method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchaneck, Gunnar; Eydam, Agnes; Hu, Wenguo; Kranz, Burkhart; Drossel, Welf-Guntram; Gerlach, Gerald

    2012-09-01

    This work demonstrates the benefit of the thermal wave method for the evaluation of the polarization state of embedded piezoelectrics. Two types of samples were investigated: A low-temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC)/lead zirconate titanate (PZT) sensor-actuator and a macro-fiber composite (MFC) actuator. At modulation frequencies below 10 Hz, the pyroelectric response was governed by thermal losses to the embedding layers. Here, the sample behavior was described by a harmonically heated piezoelectric plate exhibiting heat losses to the environment characterized by a single thermal relaxation time.

  18. Bistable states of TM polarized non-linear waves guided by symmetric layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalache, D.

    1985-04-01

    Dispersion relations for TM polarized non-linear waves propagating in a symmetric single film optical waveguide are derived. The system consists of a layer of thickness d with dielectric constant epsilon 1 bounded at two sides by a non-linear medium characterized by the diagonal dielectric tensor epsilon 11 =epsilon 22 =epsilon 0 , epsilon 33 =epsilon 0 +α|E 3 | 2 , where E 3 is the normal electric field component. For sufficiently large d/lambda (lambda is the wavelength) we predict bistable states of both symmetric and antisymmetric modes provided that the power flow is the control parameter. (author)

  19. Degenerate four-wave mixing and polarization spectroscopy in NO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dominicis, Luigi; Fantoni, Roberta; Giorgi, Mariano

    2002-05-01

    Degenerate Four Wave Mixing (DFWM) and polarization spectroscopy (PS) have been used to detect traces of nitric dioxide in a static cell at room temperature and in a small flame from a laboratory Bunsen burner. The high resolution spectrum of the Douglas-Huber band has been recorded with both techniques. The role played by population and thermal gratings in the DFWM case has been investigated under various experimental conditions. PS measurements performed with 'orientation' and 'alignment' configurations allowed to resolve NO2 composite spectral features.

  20. Analytic approximation to the scattering of antiplane shear waves by free surfaces of arbitrary shape via superposition of incident, reflected and diffracted rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Juan; Gomez, Juan; Saenz, Mario; Vergara, Juan

    2013-03-01

    The scattering induced by surface topographies of arbitrary shapes, submitted to horizontally polarized shear waves (SH) is studied analytically. In particular, we propose an analysis technique based on a representation of the scattered field like the superposition of incident, reflected and diffracted rays. The diffraction contribution is the result of the interaction of the incident and reflected waves, with the geometric singularities present in the surface topography. This splitting of the solution into different terms, makes the difference between our method and alternative numerical/analytical approaches, where the complete field is described by a single term. The contribution from the incident and reflected fields is considered using standard techniques, while the diffracted field is obtained using the idea of a ray as was introduced by the geometrical theory of diffraction. Our final solution however, is an approximation in the sense that, surface-diffracted rays are neglected while we retain the contribution from corner-diffracted rays and its further diffraction. These surface rays are only present when the problem has smooth boundaries combined with shadow zones, which is far from being the typical scenario in far-field earthquake engineering. The proposed technique was tested in the study of a combined hill-canyon topography and the results were compared with those of a boundary element algorithm. After considering only secondary sources of diffraction, a difference of 0.09 per cent (with respect to the incident field amplitude) was observed. The proposed analysis technique can be used in the interpretation of numerical and experimental results and in the preliminary prediction of the response in complex topographies.

  1. Fermi wave vector for the partially spin-polarized composite-fermion Fermi sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Jain, J. K.

    2017-12-01

    The fully spin-polarized composite-fermion (CF) Fermi sea at the half-filled lowest Landau level has a Fermi wave vector kF*=√{4 π ρe } , where ρe is the density of electrons or composite fermions, supporting the notion that the interaction between composite fermions can be treated perturbatively. Away from ν =1 /2 , the area is seen to be consistent with kF*=√{4 π ρe } for ν 1 /2 , where ρh is the density of holes in the lowest Landau level. This result is consistent with particle-hole symmetry in the lowest Landau level. We investigate in this article the Fermi wave vector of the spin-singlet CF Fermi sea (CFFS) at ν =1 /2 , for which particle-hole symmetry is not a consideration. Using the microscopic CF theory, we find that for the spin-singlet CFFS the Fermi wave vectors for up- and down-spin CFFSs at ν =1 /2 are consistent with kF*↑,↓=√{4 π ρe↑,↓ } , where ρe↑=ρe↓=ρe/2 , which implies that the residual interactions between composite fermions do not cause a nonperturbative correction for spin-singlet CFFS either. Our results suggest the natural conjecture that for arbitrary spin polarization the CF Fermi wave vectors are given by kF*↑=√{4 π ρe↑ } and kF*↓=√{4 π ρe↓ } .

  2. ACCELERATING WAVES IN POLAR CORONAL HOLES AS SEEN BY EIS AND SUMER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G. R.; Banerjee, D.; Teriaca, L.; Solanki, S.; Imada, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present EIS/Hinode and SUMER/SOHO observations of propagating disturbances detected in coronal lines in inter-plume and plume regions of a polar coronal hole. The observation was carried out on 2007 November 13 as part of the JOP196/HOP045 program. The SUMER spectroscopic observation gives information about fluctuations in radiance and on both resolved (Doppler shift) and unresolved (Doppler width) line-of-sight velocities, whereas EIS 40'' wide slot images detect fluctuations only in radiance but maximize the probability of overlapping field of view between the two instruments. From distance-time radiance maps, we detect the presence of propagating waves in a polar inter-plume region with a period of 15-20 minutes and a propagation speed increasing from 130 ± 14 km s -1 just above the limb to 330 ± 140 km s -1 around 160'' above the limb. These waves can be traced to originate from a bright region of the on-disk part of the coronal hole where the propagation speed is in the range of 25 ± 1.3 to 38 ± 4.5 km s -1 , with the same periodicity. These on-disk bright regions can be visualized as the base of the coronal funnels. The adjacent plume region also shows the presence of propagating disturbances with the same range of periodicity but with propagation speeds in the range of 135 ± 18 to 165 ± 43 km s -1 only. A comparison between the distance-time radiance map of the two regions indicates that the waves within the plumes are not observable (may be getting dissipated) far off-limb, whereas this is not the case in the inter-plume region. A correlation analysis was also performed to find out the time delay between the oscillations at several heights in the off-limb region, finding results consistent with those from the analysis of the distance-time maps. To our knowledge, this result provides first spectroscopic evidence of the acceleration of propagating disturbances in the polar region close to the Sun (within 1.2 R/R sun ), which provides clues to the

  3. 3D isotropic shear wave velocity structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system underneath the Alpine-Mediterranean Mobile belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Amr; Weidle, Christian; Christiano, Luigia; Lebedev, Sergei; Meier, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The Alpine-Mediterranean mobile belt is, tectonically, one of the most complicated and active regions in the world. Since the Mesozoic, collisions between Gondwana-derived continental blocks and Eurasia, due to the closure of a number of rather small ocean basins, have shaped the Mediterranean geology. During the late Mesozoic, it was dominated by subduction zones (e.g., in Anatolia, the Dinarides, the Carpathians, the Alps, the Apennines, and the Betics), which inverted the extensional regime, consuming the previously formed oceanic lithosphere, the adjacent passive continental margins and presumably partly also continental lithosphere. The location, distribution, and evolution of these subduction zones were mainly controlled by the continental or oceanic nature, density, and thickness of the lithosphere inherited from the Mesozoic rift after the European Variscan Orogeny. Despite the numerous studies that have attempted to characterize the lithosphere-asthenosphere structure in that area, details of the lithospheric structure and dynamics, as well as flow in the asthenosphere are, however, poorly known. A 3D shear-wave velocity structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the Mediterranean is investigated using new tomographic images obtained from surface wave tomography. An automated algorithm for inter-station phase velocity measurements is applied here to obtain both Rayleigh and Love fundamental mode phase velocities. We utilize a database consisting of more than 4000 seismic events recorded by more than 2000 broadband seismic stations within the area, provided by the European Integrated Data Archive (WebDc/EIDA) and IRIS. Moreover, for the first time, data from the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN), recorded by up to 25 broad band seismic stations, are also included in the analysis. For each station pair, approximately located on the same great circle path, the recorded waveforms are cross correlated and the dispersion curves of

  4. Quantitative assessment of thyroid gland elasticity with shear-wave elastography in pediatric patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Bayramoglu, Zuhal; Caliskan, Emine; Sari, Zeynep Nur Akyol; Adaletli, Ibrahim

    2018-01-18

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the most common autoimmune thyroid disorder in the pediatric age range. Measurement of thyroid gland size is an essential component in evaluation and follow-up of thyroid pathologies. Along with size, tissue elasticity is becoming a more commonly used parameter in evaluation of parenchyma in inflammatory diseases. The aim of the current study was to assess thyroid parenchyma elasticity by shear-wave elastography in pediatric patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis; and compare the elasticity values to a normal control group. In this study; thyroid glands of 59 patients with a diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis based on ultrasonographic and biochemical features, and 26 healthy volunteers without autoimmune thyroid disease and thyroid function disorders, were evaluated with shear-wave elastography. Patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis were further subdivided into three categories based on gray-scale ultrasonography findings as focal thyroiditis (grade 1), diffuse thyroiditis (grade 2), and fibrotic thyroid gland (grade 3). Patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (n = 59) had significantly higher elasticity values (14. 9 kPa; IQR 12.9-17.8 kPa) than control subjects (10.6 kPa; IQR 9.0-11.3 kPa) (p thyroiditis, 23 patients had focal thyroiditis involving less than 50% of the gland categorized as grade 1, 24 patients had diffuse involvement of the thyroid gland categorized as grade 2, and 12 patients had marked hyperechoic septations and pseudonodular appearance categorized as grade 3 on gray-scale ultrasound. Based on elastography, grade 3 patients had significantly higher elasticity values (19.7 kPa; IQR 17.8-21.5 kPa) than patients with grade 2 (15.5 kPa; IQR 14.5-17.8 kPa) and grade 1 thyroiditis (12.8 kPa; IQR 11.9-13.1 kPa) (p thyroiditis had significantly higher elasticity values than those with grade 1 thyroiditis (p thyroiditis. Our results indicate that shear-wave elastography could be used to evaluate the degree of

  5. SplitRacer - a new Semi-Automatic Tool to Quantify And Interpret Teleseismic Shear-Wave Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, M. C.; Rumpker, G.

    2017-12-01

    We have developed a semi-automatic, MATLAB-based GUI to combine standard seismological tasks such as the analysis and interpretation of teleseismic shear-wave splitting. Shear-wave splitting analysis is widely used to infer seismic anisotropy, which can be interpreted in terms of lattice-preferred orientation of mantle minerals, shape-preferred orientation caused by fluid-filled cracks or alternating layers. Seismic anisotropy provides a unique link between directly observable surface structures and the more elusive dynamic processes in the mantle below. Thus, resolving the seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere/asthenosphere is of particular importance for geodynamic modeling and interpretations. The increasing number of seismic stations from temporary experiments and permanent installations creates a new basis for comprehensive studies of seismic anisotropy world-wide. However, the increasingly large data sets pose new challenges for the rapid and reliably analysis of teleseismic waveforms and for the interpretation of the measurements. Well-established routines and programs are available but are often impractical for analyzing large data sets from hundreds of stations. Additionally, shear wave splitting results are seldom evaluated using the same well-defined quality criteria which may complicate comparison with results from different studies. SplitRacer has been designed to overcome these challenges by incorporation of the following processing steps: i) downloading of waveform data from multiple stations in mseed-format using FDSNWS tools; ii) automated initial screening and categorizing of XKS-waveforms using a pre-set SNR-threshold; iii) particle-motion analysis of selected phases at longer periods to detect and correct for sensor misalignment; iv) splitting analysis of selected phases based on transverse-energy minimization for multiple, randomly-selected, relevant time windows; v) one and two-layer joint-splitting analysis for all phases at one station by

  6. Multiparameter full waveform inversion of multicomponent ocean-bottom-cable data from the Valhall field. Part 2: imaging compressive-wave and shear-wave velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieux, Vincent; Brossier, Romain; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2013-09-01

    Multiparameter elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) is a promising technology that allows inferences to be made on rock and fluid properties, which thus narrows the gap between seismic imaging and reservoir characterization. Here, we assess the feasibility of 2-D vertical transverse isotropic visco-elastic FWI of wide-aperture multicomponent ocean-bottom-cable data from the Valhall oil field. A key issue is to design a suitable hierarchical data-driven and model-driven FWI workflow, the aim of which is to reduce the nonlinearity of the FWI. This nonlinearity partly arises because the shear (S) wavespeed can have a limited influence on seismic data in marine environments. In a preliminary stage, visco-acoustic FWI of the hydrophone component is performed to build a compressional (P)-wave velocity model, a density model and a quality-factor model, which provide the necessary background models for the subsequent elastic inversion. During the elastic FWI, the P and S wavespeeds are jointly updated in two steps. First, the hydrophone data are inverted to mainly update the long-to-intermediate wavelengths of the S wavespeeds from the amplitude-versus-offset variations of the P-P reflections. This S-wave velocity model is used as an improved starting model for the subsequent inversion of the better-resolving data recorded by the geophones. During these two steps, the P-wave velocity model is marginally updated, which supports the relevance of the visco-acoustic FWI results. Through seismic modelling, we show that the resulting visco-elastic model allows several P-to-S converted phases recorded on the horizontal-geophone component to be matched. Several elastic quantities, such as the Poisson ratio, and the ratio and product between the P and S wavespeeds, are inferred from the P-wave and S-wave velocity models. These attributes provide hints for the interpretation of an accumulation of gas below lithological barriers.

  7. Shear wave velocity investigation of soil liquefaction sites from the Tangshan, China M7.8 earthquake of 1976 using active and passive surface wave methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, Robert E; Tao, Xiaxin; Shi, Lijing; Shi, Hailiang

    2008-01-01

    An initial investigation of soil liquefaction sites from the July, 28 1976 Tangshan M7.8 earthquake was conducted between 1976 and 1978 by the National Ministry of Railways, China. These data are the basis of the ‘Chinese Method’ for assessment of liquefaction potential of silty-sand deposits, and are an important component of the worldwide data set for modern probabilistic methods for assessment of soil liquefaction using Bayesian updating and system reliability tools. We revisited 26 sites identified in the maps and published 198 report of the Ministry of Railways in order to investigate these locations with a suite of active- and passive-array surface wave methods. These sites are clustered along the north coast of the Bo Hai Sea in three areas: Lutai, Tianjin; Tangshan City and outlying village, Hebei; and Luannan county, Hebei. First, we gathered and evaluated the Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristics of the ground by comparing dispersion curves from the active source harmonic wave-spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method and the passive array Spatial Auto-Correlation method (SPAC). The dispersive properties of the liquefied ground as measured by these two methods were found to be almost identical. These tests were hybridized and the data sets merged in order to invert of shear wave velocities for analysis of liquefaction potential using a probabilistic framework. The data from high-values of seismic intensity near Tangshan city to low-intensities distant of the event in Luannan County segregate out into clusters of liquefied and non liquefied points clearly separated by liquefaction boundary curves developed from a large global data set of 310 sites

  8. Scattering of shear waves by a two-phase multiferroic sensor embedded in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Roohollah

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a robust methodology with several desirable features is developed for the determination of the magneto-electro-elastic fields of a shear (SH) wave scattered by a two-phase multiferroic fiber embedded in an infinite transversely isotropic piezoelectric or piezomagnetic medium. While the traditional wave-function expansion approach commonly used in the literature ceases to hold when the geometry of the obstacle is not symmetric, the present theory is capable of treating eccentric coating-fiber ensemble. To put its wide range of applicability in perspective, my analytical methodology is applied to several descriptive examples with various degrees of complexity. The calculated results reveals the profound influence of material properties of constituent phases, the thickness and eccentricity of coating layer, as well as the frequency of propagating SH-wave on the pertinent scattered fields induced by the multiferroic fiber. It is expected that the formulation and numerical results of this paper serve as a useful reference for the design and manufacture of multiferroic materials with a durable and yet reliable performance under dynamics loadings.

  9. Prediction of Compressional, Shear, and Stoneley Wave Velocities from Conventional Well Log Data Using a Committee Machine with Intelligent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoodeh, Mojtaba; Bagheripour, Parisa

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of compressional, shear, and Stoneley wave velocities, carried out by dipole sonic imager (DSI) logs, provides invaluable data in geophysical interpretation, geomechanical studies and hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. The presented study proposes an improved methodology for making a quantitative formulation between conventional well logs and sonic wave velocities. First, sonic wave velocities were predicted from conventional well logs using artificial neural network, fuzzy logic, and neuro-fuzzy algorithms. Subsequently, a committee machine with intelligent systems was constructed by virtue of hybrid genetic algorithm-pattern search technique while outputs of artificial neural network, fuzzy logic and neuro-fuzzy models were used as inputs of the committee machine. It is capable of improving the accuracy of final prediction through integrating the outputs of aforementioned intelligent systems. The hybrid genetic algorithm-pattern search tool, embodied in the structure of committee machine, assigns a weight factor to each individual intelligent system, indicating its involvement in overall prediction of DSI parameters. This methodology was implemented in Asmari formation, which is the major carbonate reservoir rock of Iranian oil field. A group of 1,640 data points was used to construct the intelligent model, and a group of 800 data points was employed to assess the reliability of the proposed model. The results showed that the committee machine with intelligent systems performed more effectively compared with individual intelligent systems performing alone.

  10. Quantum mechanical systems interacting with different polarizations of gravitational waves in noncommutative phase space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Anirban; Gangopadhyay, Sunandan; Saha, Swarup

    2018-02-01

    Owing to the extreme smallness of any noncommutative scale that may exist in nature, both in the spatial and momentum sector of the quantum phase space, a credible possibility of their detection lies in the gravitational wave (GW) detection scenario, where one effectively probes the relative length-scale variations ˜O [10-20-10-23] . With this motivation, we have theoretically constructed how a free particle and a harmonic oscillator will respond to linearly and circularly polarized gravitational waves if their quantum mechanical phase space has a noncommutative structure. We critically analyze the formal solutions which show resonance behavior in the responses of both free particle and HO systems to GW with both kind of polarizations. We discuss the possible implications of these solutions in detecting noncommutativity in a GW detection experiment. We use the currently available upper-bound estimates on various noncommutative parameters to anticipate the relative importance of various terms in the solutions. We also argue how the quantum harmonic oscillator system we considered here can be very relevant in the context of the resonant bar detectors of GW which are already operational.

  11. Altered stiffness of microchamber and macrochamber layers in the aged heel pad: Shear wave ultrasound elastography evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chueh-Hung Wu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: To compare shear modulus of heel pad microchamber and macrochamber layers between young and elderly people using shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWUE, with the intent to clarify age-related changes. Methods: This single-center prospective cross-sectional study was conducted between March, 2014 and March, 2016. Shear modulus of entire heel pad (Gentire, macrochamber layer (Gmac, and microchamber layer (Gmic were measured with SWUE. Results: Elderly participants (15 men, 15 women; age = 66.9 ± 6.2 years had significantly higher Gmic (103.8 ± 20.7 vs. 60.1 ± 9.8 kPa; p < 0.001 and Gentire (39.4 ± 10.5 vs. 34.1 ± 5.4 kPa; p = 0.005, but a significantly lower Gmac (21.7 ± 7.5 vs. 27.9 ± 4.9 kPa; p < 0.001 compared with those of young participants (15 men, 15 women; age = 26.4 ± 2.9 years. Positive correlations were observed between age and Gmic (r = 0.79, p < 0.001 and between age and Gentire (r = 0.28, p = 0.03, and negative correlation between age and Gmac (r = −0.46, p = 0.001. Conclusion: SWUE revealed that the heel pad macrochamber layer was slightly softer but the microchamber layer was exaggeratedly stiffer, making the entire heel pad stiffer in the elderly group than in the younger group, implying age-related compensation in heel pad layers to retain foot function. Keywords: Age, Elastography, Heel pad, Ultrasound

  12. Polarization and Compressibility of Oblique Kinetic Alfvén Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunana, P.; Goldstein, M. L.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Laveder, D.; Zank, G. P.

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that a complete description of the solar wind requires a kinetic description and that, particularly at sub-proton scales, kinetic effects cannot be ignored. It is nevertheless usually assumed that at scales significantly larger than the proton gyroscale rL , magnetohydrodynamics or its extensions, such as Hall-MHD and two-fluid models with isotropic pressures, provide a satisfactory description of the solar wind. Here we calculate the polarization and magnetic compressibility of oblique kinetic Alfvén waves and show that, compared with linear kinetic theory, the isotropic two-fluid description is very compressible, with the largest discrepancy occurring at scales larger than the proton gyroscale. In contrast, introducing anisotropic pressure fluctuations with the usual double-adiabatic (or CGL) equations of state yields compressibility values which are unrealistically low. We also show that both of these classes of fluid models incorrectly describe the electric field polarization. To incorporate linear kinetic effects, we use two versions of the Landau fluid model that include linear Landau damping and finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections. We show that Landau damping is crucial for correct modeling of magnetic compressibility, and that the anisotropy of pressure fluctuations should not be introduced without taking into account the Landau damping through appropriate heat flux equations. We also show that FLR corrections to all the retained fluid moments appear to be necessary to yield the correct polarization. We conclude that kinetic effects cannot be ignored even for krL Lt 1.

  13. Nonlinear waves in viscoelastic magnetized complex astroplasmas with polarized dust-charge variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papari Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonextensive nonthermal magnetized viscoelastic astrofluid, compositionally containing nonthermal electrons and ions together with massive polarized dust micro-spherical grains of variable electric charge, is allowed to endure weakly nonlinear perturbation around its equilibrium. The nonextensivity originating from the large-scale non-local effects is included via the Tsallis thermo-statistical distribution laws describing the lighter species. Assuming the equilibrium as a homogeneous hydrostatic one, the dust polarization effects are incorporated via the conventional homogeneous polarization force law. The perturbed fluid model evolves as a unique conjugate pair of coupled extended Korteweg-de Vries (e-KdV equations. A constructed numerical tapestry shows the collective excitations of a new pair of distinct classes of nonlinear mode structures in new parametric space. The first family indicates periodic electrostatic compressive eigenmodes in the form of soliton-chains. Likewise, the second one reveals gravitational rarefactive solitary patterns. Their microphysical multi-parametric dependencies of the eigen-patterns are illustratively analyzed and bolstered. The paper ends up with some promising implications and applications in the astro-cosmo-plasmic context of wave-induced accretive triggering processes responsible for gravitationally bounded (gravito-condensed astro-structure formation, such as stellesimals, planetsimals, etc.

  14. Nonlinear waves in viscoelastic magnetized complex astroplasmas with polarized dust-charge variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Papari; Karmakar, Pralay Kumar

    2018-01-01

    A nonextensive nonthermal magnetized viscoelastic astrofluid, compositionally containing nonthermal electrons and ions together with massive polarized dust micro-spherical grains of variable electric charge, is allowed to endure weakly nonlinear perturbation around its equilibrium. The nonextensivity originating from the large-scale non-local effects is included via the Tsallis thermo-statistical distribution laws describing the lighter species. Assuming the equilibrium as a homogeneous hydrostatic one, the dust polarization effects are incorporated via the conventional homogeneous polarization force law. The perturbed fluid model evolves as a unique conjugate pair of coupled extended Korteweg-de Vries (e-KdV) equations. A constructed numerical tapestry shows the collective excitations of a new pair of distinct classes of nonlinear mode structures in new parametric space. The first family indicates periodic electrostatic compressive eigenmodes in the form of soliton-chains. Likewise, the second one reveals gravitational rarefactive solitary patterns. Their microphysical multi-parametric dependencies of the eigen-patterns are illustratively analyzed and bolstered. The paper ends up with some promising implications and applications in the astro-cosmo-plasmic context of wave-induced accretive triggering processes responsible for gravitationally bounded (gravito-condensed) astro-structure formation, such as stellesimals, planetsimals, etc.

  15. Assessment of the mechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit by supersonic shear wave imaging elastography: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Mônica Marinho e Lima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This review aimed to describe the state of the art in muscle-tendon unit (MTU assessment by supersonic shear wave imaging (SSI elastography in states of muscle contraction and stretching, during aging, and in response to injury and therapeutic interventions. A consensus exists that MTU elasticity increases during passive stretching or contraction, and decreases after static stretching, electrostimulation, massage, and dry needling. There is currently no agreement regarding changes in the MTU due to aging and injury. Currently, the application of SSI for the purpose of diagnosis, rehabilitation, and physical training remains limited by a number of issues, including the lack of normative value ranges, the lack of consensus regarding the appropriate terminology, and an inadequate understanding of the main technical limitations of this novel technology.

  16. Double layer anisotropy beneath the New Madrid seismic zone and adjacent areas: insights from teleseismic shear wave splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moikwathai Dax Moidaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A total of 93 well-defined PKS, 54 SKKS, and 126 SKS shear-wave splitting parameters are determined at 25 broadband seismic stations in an approximately 1000 by 1000 km2 area centered at the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ in order to test the existence of two anisotropic layers and to map the direction and strength of mantle fabrics. The individual splitting parameters suggest a significant and systematic spatial and azimuthal variation in the splitting parameters. The azimuthal variations at most stations can be explained as the results of present SW ward asthenospheric flow and NNE trending lithospheric fabrics formed during past orogenic events. In the NMSZ, rift-parallel fast directions (potentially related to a long-rift flow and rift-orthogonal fast directions from small-scale mantle convection are not observed. In addition, reduction in splitting times as a result of vertical asthenospheric flow is not observed.

  17. Comparison of Tissue Stiffness Using Shear Wave Elastography in Men with Normal Testicular Tissue, Testicular Microlithiasis and Testicular Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Roland; Møller, Henrik; Osther, Palle Jørn Sloth

    2017-01-01

    elastography (SWE). Three SWE velocity measurements were assessed in each testicle. The patients were divided into three groups; men with normal testicular tissue (n=130), men with testicular microlithiasis (n=99) and men with testicular cancer (n=19). Results: We found a higher mean velocity in the group......Objectives: To compare elastography measurements in men with normal testicular tissue, testicular microlithiasis and testicular cancer. Methods: A total of 248 consecutive patients were included. All men provided written informed consent. Testicular stiffness was assessed using shear wave...... of patients with testicular cancer (1.92 m/s (95% CI 1.82-2.03)) compared to both the group with normal tissue (0.76 m/s (95% CI: 0.75-0.78)) (p

  18. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars

    The Carlsberg Fault zone is located in the N-S striking Höllviken Graben and traverses the city of Copenhagen. The fault zone is a NNW-SSE striking structure in direct vicinity to the transition zone of the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent small earthquakes indicate activity in the area......, although none of the mapped earthquakes appear to have occurred on the Carlsberg Fault. We examined the fault evolution by a combination of very high resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The chalk stratigraphy...... and the localization of the fault zone at depth was inferred from previous studies by other authors. We extrapolated the Jurassic and Triassic stratigraphy from the Pomeranian Bay to the area of investigation. The fault zone shows a flower structure in the Triassic as well as in Cretaceous sediments. The faulting...

  19. Development of site class and site coefficient maps of Semarang, Indonesia using field shear wave velocity data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partono Windu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The new Indonesian National Code for seismic resistance design (SNI-03-1726-2012 issued recently utilizes seismic response spectra for the whole area of the country. Site class and site coefficient are two parameters needed for designing response spectra. Site class can be estimated using average standard penetration test (N-SPT, average shear wave velocity (Vs and average un-drained shear strength (Su of top 30 meter soil deposit. Site coefficients can be predicted using probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA by implementing total probability theorem. To perform PSHA, Vs30 is a parameter needed for calculating ground motion at bedrock elevation. This paper presents the results of PSHA and site class analysis using Vs30 values estimated based on N-SPT results collected from 265 boring locations in Semarang. Seismic data in a radius of 500 km from Semarang were collected for PSHA. Site class and site coefficient maps are then developed for the whole study area.

  20. Shear-Wave Elastography for Detection of Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Diagnostic Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sungmin; Suh, Chong Hyun; Kim, Sang Youn; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study is to review the diagnostic performance of shear-wave elastography (SWE) in the detection of prostate cancer (PCa). The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases were searched up to December 23, 2016. We included diagnostic accuracy studies that used SWE for PCa detection with prostatectomy or biopsy used as the reference standard. The methodologic quality of the studies was evaluated by two independent reviewers using the revised Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool. The sensitivity and specificity of all studies were calculated. Results were pooled and plotted in a hierarchical summary ROC plot with further exploration done using meta-regression analysis and subgroup analysis. Eight studies (a total of 1028 patients) were evaluated. The pooled sensitivity was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.66-0.92) with a specificity of 0.85 (95% CI, 0.78-0.90) for the detection of PCa. Study design (prospective vs retrospective) was the only significant factor affecting heterogeneity (p analysis, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.64-0.94) and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.76-0.90), respectively, in studies using shear-wave speed imaging and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.64-0.94) and 0.86 (95% CI, 0.78-0.91), respectively, in studies based on per-lesion analysis. SWE shows good performance for the detection of PCa. However, specific recommendations regarding cutoff value cannot be made because of study heterogeneity.

  1. Hydrogeologic structure underlying a recharge pond delineated with shear-wave seismic reflection and cone penetrometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, S.S.; Pidlisecky, Adam; Knight, R.

    2009-01-01

    With the goal of improving the understanding of the subsurface structure beneath the Harkins Slough recharge pond in Pajaro Valley, California, USA, we have undertaken a multimodal approach to develop a robust velocity model to yield an accurate seismic reflection section. Our shear-wave reflection section helps us identify and map an important and previously unknown flow barrier at depth; it also helps us map other relevant structure within the surficial aquifer. Development of an accurate velocity model is essential for depth conversion and interpretation of the reflection section. We incorporate information provided by shear-wave seismic methods along with cone penetrometer testing and seismic cone penetrometer testing measurements. One velocity model is based on reflected and refracted arrivals and provides reliable velocity estimates for the full depth range of interest when anchored on interface depths determined from cone data and borehole drillers' logs. A second velocity model is based on seismic cone penetrometer testing data that provide higher-resolution ID velocity columns with error estimates within the depth range of the cone penetrometer testing. Comparison of the reflection/refraction model with the seismic cone penetrometer testing model also suggests that the mass of the cone truck can influence velocity with the equivalent effect of approximately one metre of extra overburden stress. Together, these velocity models and the depth-converted reflection section result in a better constrained hydrologic model of the subsurface and illustrate the pivotal role that cone data can provide in the reflection processing workflow. ?? 2009 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  2. A Study of the use of a Crystal as a `Quarter-Wave Plate' to Produce High Energy Circularly Polarized Photons

    CERN Multimedia

    Kononets, I

    2002-01-01

    %NA59 %title\\\\ \\\\We present a proposal to study the use of a crystal as a `quarter-wave plate' to produce high energy circularly polarized photons, starting from unpolarized electrons. The intention is to generate linearly polarized photons by letting electrons pass a crystalline target, where they interact coherently with the lattice nuclei. The photon polarization is subsequently turned into circular polarization after passing another crystal, which acts as a `quarter-wave plate'.

  3. Effect of face fracturing on shear wave coda quality factor estimated from acoustic emission events

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kgarume, T

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The dependency of the quality factor derived from S wave coda (Q(subc)) on frequency is analysed in order to understand the effect of fracturing ahead of a mining stope. Micro seismic events recorded using acoustic emission sensors in a mining...

  4. Influence of tides and gravity waves on layering processes in the polar summer mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hoffmann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE have been studied at Andenes (69° N, 16° E, Norway, using VHF radar observations since 1994. One remarkable feature of these observations is the fact that {during 50% of the time,} the radar echoes occur in the form of two or more distinct layers. In the case of multiple PMSE layers, statistical analysis shows that the lower layer occurs at a mean height of ~83.4 km, which is almost identical to the mean height of noctilucent clouds (NLC derived from observation with the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the same site. To investigate the layering processes microphysical model simulations under the influence of tidal and gravity waves were performed. In the presence of long period gravity waves, these model investigations predict an enhanced formation of multiple PMSE layer structures, where the lower layer is a consequence of the occurrence of the largest particles at the bottom of the ice cloud. This explains the coincidence of the lowermost PMSE layers and NLC. During periods with enhanced amplitudes of the semidiurnal tide, the observed NLC and PMSE show pronounced tidal structures comparable to the results of corresponding microphysical simulations. At periods with short period gravity waves there is a tendency for a decreasing occurrence of NLC and for variable weak PMSE structures.

  5. Unraveling the tectonic history of northwest Africa: Insights from shear-wave splitting, receiver functions, and geodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. S.; Becker, T. W.; Allam, A. A.; Alpert, L. A.; Di Leo, J. F.; Wookey, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The complex tectonic history and orogenesis in the westernmost Mediterranean are primarily due to Cenozoic convergence of Africa with Eurasia. The Gibraltar system, which includes the Rif Mountains of Morocco and the Betics in Spain, forms a tight arc around the Alboran Basin. Further to the south the Atlas Mountains of Morocco, an example of an intracontinental fold and thrust belt, display only modest tectonic shortening, yet have unusually high topography. To the south of the Atlas, the anti-Atlas is the oldest mountain range in the region, has the lowest relief, and extends toward the northern extent of the West African Craton. To help unravel the regional tectonics, we use new broadband seismic data from 105 stations across the Gibraltar arc into southern Morocco. We use shear wave splitting analysis for a deep (617 km) local S event and over 230 SKS events to infer azimuthal seismic anisotropy and we image the lithospheric structure with receiver functions. One of the most striking discoveries from these methods is evidence for localized, near vertical-offset deformation of both crust-mantle and lithosphere-asthenosphere interfaces at the flanks of the High Atlas. These offsets coincide with the locations of Jurassic-aged normal faults that were reactivated during the Cenozoic. This suggests that these lithospheric-scale discontinuities were involved in the formation of the Atlas and are still active. Shear wave splitting results show that the inferred stretching axes are aligned with the highest topography in the Atlas, suggesting asthenospheric shearing in mantle flow guided by lithospheric topography. Geodynamic modeling shows that the inferred seismic anisotropy may be produced by the interaction of mantle flow with the subducted slab beneath the Alboran, the West African Craton, and the thinned lithosphere beneath the Atlas. Isostatic modeling based on these lithospheric structure estimates indicates that lithospheric thinning alone does not explain the

  6. Mapped Chebyshev Pseudo-Spectral Method for Simulating the Shear Wave Propagation in the Plane of Symmetry of a Transversely Isotropic Viscoelastic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; McGough, Robert J.; Greenleaf, James F.; Urban, Matthew W.

    2017-01-01

    Shear wave elastography is a versatile technique that is being applied to many organs. However, in tissues that exhibit anisotropic material properties, special care must be taken to estimate shear wave propagation accurately and efficiently. A two-dimensional simulation method is implemented to simulate the shear wave propagation in the plane of symmetry in transversely isotropic viscoelastic media. The method uses a mapped Chebyshev pseudo-spectral method to calculate the spatial derivatives and an Adams-Bashforth-Moulton integrator with variable step sizes for time marching. The boundaries of the two-dimensional domain are surrounded by perfectly matched layers (PML) to approximate an infinite domain and minimize reflection errors. In an earlier work, we proposed a solution for estimating the apparent shear wave elasticity and viscosity of the spatial group velocity as a function of rotation angle through a low frequency approximation by a Taylor expansion. With the solver implemented in MATLAB, the simulated results in this paper match well with the theory. Compared to the finite element method (FEM) simulations we used before, the pseudo-spectral solver consumes less memory and is faster and achieves better accuracy. PMID:27221812

  7. High risk of misinterpreting liver and spleen stiffness using 2D shear-wave and transient elastography after a moderate or high calorie meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Maria; Thiele, Maja; Jansen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    ) and real-time 2-dimensional shear wave elastography (2D-SWE). Patients ingested a 625 kcal and a 1250 kcal liquid meal on two consecutive days. We measured liver and spleen elasticity, Controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) and portal flow at baseline and after 20, 40, 60, 120 and 180 minutes. Sixty...

  8. Evaluation of healthy muscle tissue by strain and shear wave elastography – Dependency on depth and ROI position in relation to underlying bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, Caroline; Carlsen, Jonathan Frederik; Christiansen, Iben Riishede

    2016-01-01

    and methods: Ten healthy volunteers (five males and five females) had their biceps brachii, gastrocnemius, and quadriceps muscle examined with strain- and shear wave elastography at three different depths and in regions located above bone and beside bone. Strain ratios were averaged from cine-loops of 10 s...

  9. Upper mantle structure of shear-waves velocities and stratification of anisotropy in the Afar Hotspot region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicilia, D.; Montagner, J.-P.; Cara, M.; Stutzmann, E.; Debayle, E.; Lépine, J.-C.; Lévêque, J.-J.; Beucler, E.; Sebai, A.; Roult, G.; Ayele, A.; Sholan, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Afar area is one of the biggest continental hotspots active since about 30 Ma. It may be the surface expression of a mantle "plume" related to the African Superswell. Central Africa is also characterized by extensive intraplate volcanism. Around the same time (30 Ma), volcanic activity re-started in several regions of the African plate and hotspots such as Darfur, Tibesti, Hoggar and Mount Cameroon, characterized by a significant though modest volcanic production. The interactions of mantle upwelling with asthenosphere, lithosphere and crust remain unclear and seismic anisotropy might help in investigating these complex interactions. We used data from the global seismological permanent FDSN networks (GEOSCOPE, IRIS, MedNet, GEO- FON, etc.), from the temporary PASSCAL experiments in Tanzania and Saudi Arabia and a French deployment of 5 portable broadband stations surrounding the Afar Hotspot. A classical two-step tomographic inversion from surface waves performed in the Horn of Africa with selected Rayleigh wave and Love wave seismograms leads to a 3D-model of both S V velocities and azimuthal anisotropy, as well as radial SH/ SV anisotropy, with a lateral resolution of 500 km. The region is characterized by low shear-wave velocities beneath the Afar Hotspot, the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden and East of the Tanzania Craton to 400 km depth. High velocities are present in the Eastern Arabia and the Tanzania Craton. The results of this study enable us to rule out a possible feeding of the Central Africa hotspots from the "Afar plume" above 150-200 km. The azimuthal anisotropy displays a complex pattern near the Afar Hotspot. Radial anisotropy, although poorly resolved laterally, exhibits S H slower than S V waves down to about 150 km depth, and a reverse pattern below. Both azimuthal and radial anisotropies show a stratification of anisotropy at depth, corresponding to different physical processes. These results suggest that the Afar hotspot has a different and

  10. Source study of local coalfield events using the modal synthesis of shear and surface waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacBeth, C.D.; Redmayne, D.W.

    1989-10-01

    Results from the BGS LOWNET array from the Midlothian coalfield in Scotland have been studied. Vertical component seismograms have been analysed using a waveform matching technique based on the modal summation method for constructing synthetic seismograms. Results of the analysis are applied to S and surface wave portions of the seismogram. Effects of different earth structures, source depths, source orientation, and type of event, rockburst or triggered earthquake 2-3 km from the mine workings, can be evaluated.

  11. Efficient implementation of an explicit partitioned shear and longitudinal wave propagation algorithm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolman, Radek; Cho, S.S.; Park, K.C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 7 (2016), s. 543-579 ISSN 0029-5981 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0288; GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/12/2315 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : stress wave propagation * finite element method * explicit time integrator * dispersion * minimal spurious oscillations * partitioned analysis Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 2.162, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1097-0207

  12. Quantification of Rock Damage from Small Explosions and Its Effect on Shear-Wave Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-15

    frozen and unfrozen rock: Experimental data collection and analysis. Submitted to Bull. Seism . Soc. Am. Brinkmann, J . R., (1987). The control of...1987). Spectral scaling of earthquakes in the Miramichi region of New Brunswick, Bull. Seism . Soc. Am., 77, 347-365. Cooper, P. W., (1996). Explosives...Sackman, and R. L. Taylor, (1977). Property determination and wave propagation in a block of Barre granite. Bull. Seism . Soc. Am., 67 (1), 87-102

  13. A New Method for Simulating Power Flow Density Focused by a Silicon Lens Antenna Irradiated with Linearly Polarized THz Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur Apriono

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A terahertz system uses dielectric lens antennas for focusing and collimating beams of terahertz wave radiation. Linearly polarized terahertz wave radiation has been widely applied in the terahertz system. Therefore, an accurate method for analyzing the power flow density in the dielectric lens antenna irradiated with the linearly polarized terahertz wave radiation is important to design the terahertz systems. In optics, ray-tracing method has been used to calculate the power flow density by a number density of rays. In this study, we propose a method of ray-tracing combined with Fresnel’s transmission, including transmittance and polarization of the terahertz wave radiation to calculate power flow density in a Silicon lens antenna. We compare power flow density calculated by the proposed method with the regular ray-tracing method. When the Silicon lens antenna is irradiated with linearly polarized terahertz wave radiation, the proposed method calculates the power flow density more accurately than the regular ray-tracing.

  14. Human responses to wave slamming vibration on a polar supply and research vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, H; Bekker, A

    2018-02-01

    A polar supply and research vessel is pre-disposed to wave slamming which has caused complaints among crew and researchers regarding interference with sleep, equipment use and research activities. The present work undertook to survey passenger claims of sleep interference, disturbed motor tasks and equipment damage as a result of wave slamming during normal operations of this vessel. The hypothesis was investigated that whole-body vibration metrics from ISO 2631-1 are potentially suitable for the prediction of human slamming complaints. Full-scale acceleration measurements were performed and wave slamming events were subsequently identified from the human weighted acceleration time histories. A daily diary survey was also conducted to gather the human response. The vibration caused by wave slamming was found to be strongly correlated with sleep disturbances and activity interference. Sleep and equipment use were found to be the most affected parameters by slamming. Daily vibration dose values were determined by accumulating the vibration as a result of slamming over 24 h periods. This metric accounted for increased magnitudes and frequency of slamming incidents and proved to be the best metric to represent human responses to slamming vibration. The greatest percentage of activities affected by slamming related to sleep regardless of daily cumulative VDV magnitude. More than 50% of the recorded responses related to sleep when the daily cumulative VDV ranged between 8.0 m/s 1.75 -10.0 m/s 1.75 . The peak vertical vibration levels recorded on the vessel reach magnitudes which are associated with sleep disturbance in environments where acoustic noise is present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Shear wave velocity structure in the lithosphere and asthenosphere across the Southern California continent and Pacific plate margin using inversion of Rayleigh wave data from the ALBACORE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Kohler, M. D.; Rathnayaka, S.; Escobar, L., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    The North American and Pacific plate boundary is a unique example of past subduction of an oceanic spreading center which has involved oceanic plate capture and inception of a continental transform boundary that juxtaposes continental and oceanic lithosphere on a single plate. The amphibious ALBACORE seismic project (Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment) deployed 34 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) on 15-35 Ma seafloor and offers a unique opportunity to compare the LAB in continental and oceanic lithosphere in one seismic study. Rayleigh waves were recorded simultaneously by our offshore array and 82 CISN network land stations from 2010-2011. Here we predict phase velocities for a starting shear wave velocity model for each of 5 regions in our study area and compare to observed phase velocities from our array in a least-squares sense that produces the best fit 1-D shear wave velocity structure for each region. Preliminary results for the deep ocean (seafloor 25-32 Ma) indicates high velocities reaching 4.5 km/s at depths of 50 km associated with the lithosphere for seafloor 25-32 Ma. A negative velocity gradient is observed below this which reaches a minimum of 4.0 km/s at 160 km depth. The mid-ocean region (age 13-25 Ma) indicates a slightly lower magnitude and shallower LVZ. The Inner Borderland displays the highest lithospheric velocities offshore reaching 4.8 km/s at 40 km depth indicating underplating. The base of the LVZ in the Borderland increases sharply from 4.0 km/s to 4.5 km/s at 80-150 km depth indicating partial melt and compositional changes. The LVZ displays a very gradual positive velocity gradient in all other regions such as the deep seafloor and continent reaching 4.5 km/s at 300 km depth. The deep ocean, Borderlands, and continental region each have unique lithospheric velocities, LAB depths, and LVZ character that indicate stark differences in mantle structure that occur on a

  16. Polarization study of non-resonant X-ray magnetic scattering from spin-density-wave modulation in chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsumi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    We present a polarization study of non-resonant X-ray magnetic scattering in pure chromium. Satellite reflections are observed at +/-Q and +/-2Q, where Q is the modulation wave vector of an itinerant spin-density-wave. The first and second harmonics are confirmed to have magnetic and charge origin, respectively, by means of polarimetry without using an analyzer crystal. This alternative technique eliminates intolerable intensity loss at an analyzer by utilizing the sample crystal also as an analyzer crystal

  17. Analysis of the Influence of a Uniform Hydrometeorological Formation on the Polarization Characteristics of an Electromagnetic Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalov, E. V.; Krivin, N. N.; Eshchenko, S. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    The influence of a homogeneous medium filled with water droplets on the polarization structure of electromagnetic waves propagating in it, emitted in series with horizontal and circular (e.g., right-handed) polarization, is considered. An approach is proposed for estimating the influence of the resulting transformation of the polarization structure on the magnitude of the modified radar reflectivity, based on the use of the functional dependence of the components of the Jones vector on the angle of ellipticity and the tilt angle of the polarization ellipse. A distinguishing feature of the proposed approach consists in the relationships calculated using it for determining the modified radar reflectivity, obtained for the case of backscattering by the medium, where the orientation of the polarization basis of the medium is different from that of the measurement basis. Estimates of the modified radar reflectivity have been obtained, allowing one to determine regions with elevated values of this parameter.

  18. Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2-D Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anurag; Morris, Philip J.

    2000-01-01

    A parallel numerical simulation of the radiation of sound from an acoustic source inside a 2-D jet is presented in this paper. This basic benchmark problem is used as a test case for scattering problems that are presently being solved by using the Impedance Mismatch Method (IMM). In this technique, a solid body in the domain is represented by setting the acoustic impedance of each medium, encountered by a wave, to a different value. This impedance discrepancy results in reflected and scattered waves with appropriate amplitudes. The great advantage of the use of this method is that no modifications to a simple Cartesian grid need to be made for complicated geometry bodies. Thus, high order finite difference schemes may be applied simply to all parts of the domain. In the IMM, the total perturbation field is split into incident and scattered fields. The incident pressure is assumed to be known and the equivalent sources for the scattered field are associated with the presence of the scattering body (through the impedance mismatch) and the propagation of the incident field through a non-uniform flow. An earlier version of the technique could only handle uniform flow in the vicinity of the source and at the outflow boundary. Scattering problems in non-uniform mean flow are of great practical importance (for example, scattering from a high lift device in a non-uniform mean flow or the effects of a fuselage boundary layer). The solution to this benchmark problem, which has an acoustic wave propagating through a non-uniform mean flow, serves as a test case for the extensions of the IMM technique.

  19. Interaction of Water Waves and a Submerged Parabolic Obstacle in the Presence of a Following Uniform/Shear Current Using RANS Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Lung Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper simulates regular waves propagating over a submerged parabolic obstacle in the presence of a uniform/shear current using a two-dimensional numerical model, named COBRAS (Cornell Breaking and Structure. The numerical model solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations and the free surface deformation is tracked using the volume of fluid method (VOF. The capability of the numerical model to simulate regular waves with a uniform or shear current over a constant water depth is first validated with available analytical solutions and experimental data. Comparisons among the experimental data, analytical solutions, and present numerical results show good agreements. Then, regular waves propagating over a submerged parabolic obstacle with a following current are investigated. Detailed discussions including those on the velocity and vorticity fields and the relation between free surface and vorticity are given.

  20. Shear wave experiments at the US site at the Grimsel laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.; Bluemling, P.; Sattel, G.

    1990-07-01

    As part of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) cooperative project with the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) of Switzerland, there have been a series of studies carried out at the Nagra underground test facility at Grimsel. The Grimsel test facility is several 3.5 meter diameter tunnels excavated with a tunnel boring machine in the southern Swiss Alps. The rock type is granitic, although there is a large variation in the granitic fabric throughout the facility. The work described here was the first phase of a multiyear project to evaluate and develop seismic imaging techniques for fracture detection and characterization for the use in siting underground nuclear waste facilities. Data from a crosshole tomographic survey in the Underground Seismic (US) site at the Nagra Grimsel test facility in Switzerland and successfully reprocessed to enhance the S-wave arrivals. The results indicate that in a saturated granite Vp/Vs ratios approach 2.0 in the fractured rock. These results indicate that S-wave data would be very useful for fracture detection, especially in detecting thinner fractures

  1. Shear velocity model for the westernmost Mediterranean from ambient noise and ballistic finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Villasenor, A.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; Harnafi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The westernmost Mediterranean comprises the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, separated by the Alboran Sea and the Algerian Basin. From north to south this region consists of the Pyrenees, resulting from Iberia-Eurasia collision; the Iberian Massif, which has been undeformed since the end of the Paleozoic; the Central System and Iberian Chain, regions with intracontinental Oligocene-Miocene deformation; the Gibraltar Arc (Betics, Rif and Alboran terranes), resulting from post-Oligocene subduction roll-back; and the Atlas Mountains. We analyzed data from recent broad-band array deployments and permanent stations in the area (IberArray and Siberia arrays, the PICASSO array, the University of Munster array, and the Spanish, Portuguese and Moroccan National Networks) to characterize its lithospheric structure. The combined array of 350 stations has an average interstation spacing of ~60 km. We calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise (periods 4 to 40 s) and teleseismic events (periods 20 to 167 s). We inverted the phase velocities to obtain a shear velocity model for the lithosphere to ~200 km depth. Our results correlate well with the surface expression of the main structural units with higher crustal velocity for the Iberian Massif than for the Alpine Iberia and Atlas Mountains. The Gibraltar Arc has lower crustal shear velocities than the regional average at all crustal depths. It also shows an arc shaped anomaly with high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) at shallow depths (volcanic fields in Iberia and Morocco, indicative of high temperatures at relatively shallow depths, and suggesting that the lithosphere has been removed beneath these areas.

  2. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  3. Cut-off frequencies of circumferential horizontal shear waves in various functionally graded cylinder shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoqin; Ren, Dawei; Cao, Xiaoshan; Wang, Ji

    2018-03-01

    In this study, cut-off frequencies of the circumferential SH waves in functionally graded piezoelectric-piezomagnetic material (FGPPM) cylinder shells with traction free, electrical and magnetic open boundary conditions are investigated analytically. The Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method is employed for solving differential equations with variable coefficients for general cases. For comparison, Bessel functions and Kummer functions are used for solving cut-off frequency problems in homogenous and ideal FGPPM cylinder shells. It is shown that the WKB solution for the cut-off frequencies has good precise. The set of cut-off frequencies is a series of approximate arithmetic progressions, for which the difference is a function of the density and the effective elastic parameter. The relationship between the difference and the gradient coefficient is described. These results provide theoretical guidance for the non-destructive evaluation of curved shells based on the cut-off frequencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  5. Spin-wave dynamics in Invar Fe65Ni35 studied by small-angle polarized neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brück, E.H.; Grigoriev, S.V.; Deriglazov, V.V.; Okorokov, A.I.; Dijk van, N.H.; Klaasse, J.C.P.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract. Spin dynamics in Fe65Ni35 Invar alloy has been studied by left-right asymmetry of small-angle polarized neutron scattering below TC=485 K in external magnetic fields of H=0.05-0.25 T inclined relative to the incident beam. The spin-wave stiffness D and the damping & were obtained by

  6. Shear-wave elastography and immunohistochemical profiles in invasive breast cancer: Evaluation of maximum and mean elasticity values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganau, Sergi; Andreu, Francisco Javier; Escribano, Fernanda; Martín, Amaya; Tortajada, Lidia; Villajos, Maite

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Shear wave elastography provides a quantitative assessment of the hardness of breast lesions. •The hardness of breast lesions correlates with lesion size: larger lesions are harder than smaller ones. •Histologic type and grade do not correlate clearly with elastography parameters. •HER2, luminal B HER2+, and triple-negative tumors have lower maximum hardness and mean hardness than other tumor types. •Half the tumors classified as BI-RADS 3 were luminal A and half were HER2. -- Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlations of maximum stiffness (Emax) and mean stiffness (Emean) of invasive carcinomas on shear-wave elastography (SWE) with St. Gallen consensus tumor phenotypes. Methods: We used an ultrasound system with SWE capabilities to prospectively study 190 women with 216 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers. We obtained one elastogram for each lesion. We correlated Emax and Emean with tumor size, histologic type and grade, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 expression, the Ki67 proliferation index, and the five St. Gallen molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B without HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2−), luminal B with HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2+), HER2, and triple negative. Results: Lesions larger than 20 mm had significantly higher Emax (148.04 kPa) and Emean (118.32 kPa) (P = 0.005) than smaller lesions. We found no statistically significant correlations between elasticity parameters and histologic type and grade or molecular subtypes, although tumors with HER2 overexpression regardless whether they expressed hormone receptors (luminal B HER2+ and HER2 phenotypes) and triple-negative tumors had lower Emax and Emean than the others. We assessed the B-mode ultrasound findings of the lesions with some of the Emax or Emean values less than or equal to 80 kPa; only four of these had ultrasound findings suggestive of a benign lesion (two with luminal A phenotype and two with HER2 phenotype). Conclusions: We

  7. Imaging the concealed section of the Whakatane fault below Whakatane city, New Zealand, with a shear wave land streamer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, Ulrich; Mueller, Christof; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    The Mw 7.1 Darfield Earthquake in September 2010 ruptured the surface along the Greendale Fault that was not known prior to the earthquake. The subsequent Mw 6.3 Christchurch earthquake in February 2011 demonstrated that concealed active faults have a significant risk potential for urban infrastructure and human life in New Zealand if they are located beneath or close to such areas. Mapping exposures and analysis of active faults incorporated into the National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) suggests that several thousands of these active structures are yet to be identified and have the potential to generate moderate to large magnitude earthquakes (i.e. magnitudes >5). Geological mapping suggests that active faults pass beneath, or within many urban areas in New Zealand, including Auckland, Blenheim, Christchurch, Hastings/Napier, Nelson, Rotorua, Taupo, Wellington, and Whakatane. Since no established methodology for routinely locating and assessing the earthquake hazard posed by concealed active faults is available, the principal objective of the presented study was to evaluate the usefulness of high-resolution shear wave seismic reflection profiling using a land streamer to locate buried faults in urban areas of New Zealand. During the survey carried out in the city of Whakatane in February 2015, the method was first tested over a well known surface outcrop of the Edgecumbe Fault 30 km south-west of Whakatane city. This allowed further to investigate the principle shear wave propagation characteristics in the unknown sediments, consisting mainly of effusive rock material of the Taupo volcanic zone mixed with marine transgression units. Subsequently the survey was continued within Whakatane city using night operation time slots to reduce the urban noise. In total, 11 profiles of 5.7 km length in high data quality were acquired, which clearly show concealed rupture structures of obviously different age in the shallow sediments down to 100 m depth. Subject to depth

  8. Shear-wave elastography and immunohistochemical profiles in invasive breast cancer: Evaluation of maximum and mean elasticity values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganau, Sergi, E-mail: sganau@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Andreu, Francisco Javier, E-mail: xandreu@tauli.cat [Pathology Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Escribano, Fernanda, E-mail: fescribano@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Martín, Amaya, E-mail: amartino@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Tortajada, Lidia, E-mail: ltortajada@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Villajos, Maite, E-mail: mvillajos@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Shear wave elastography provides a quantitative assessment of the hardness of breast lesions. •The hardness of breast lesions correlates with lesion size: larger lesions are harder than smaller ones. •Histologic type and grade do not correlate clearly with elastography parameters. •HER2, luminal B HER2+, and triple-negative tumors have lower maximum hardness and mean hardness than other tumor types. •Half the tumors classified as BI-RADS 3 were luminal A and half were HER2. -- Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlations of maximum stiffness (Emax) and mean stiffness (Emean) of invasive carcinomas on shear-wave elastography (SWE) with St. Gallen consensus tumor phenotypes. Methods: We used an ultrasound system with SWE capabilities to prospectively study 190 women with 216 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers. We obtained one elastogram for each lesion. We correlated Emax and Emean with tumor size, histologic type and grade, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 expression, the Ki67 proliferation index, and the five St. Gallen molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B without HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2−), luminal B with HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2+), HER2, and triple negative. Results: Lesions larger than 20 mm had significantly higher Emax (148.04 kPa) and Emean (118.32 kPa) (P = 0.005) than smaller lesions. We found no statistically significant correlations between elasticity parameters and histologic type and grade or molecular subtypes, although tumors with HER2 overexpression regardless whether they expressed hormone receptors (luminal B HER2+ and HER2 phenotypes) and triple-negative tumors had lower Emax and Emean than the others. We assessed the B-mode ultrasound findings of the lesions with some of the Emax or Emean values less than or equal to 80 kPa; only four of these had ultrasound findings suggestive of a benign lesion (two with luminal A phenotype and two with HER2 phenotype). Conclusions: We

  9. Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography for Liver Disease. A Critical Appraisal of the Many Actors on the Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscaglia, F; Salvatore, V; Mulazzani, L; Cantisani, V; Schiavone, C

    2016-02-01

    In the last 12 - 18 months nearly all ultrasound manufacturers have arrived to implement ultrasound shear wave elastography modality in their equipment for the assessment of chronic liver disease; the few remaining players are expected to follow in 2016.When all manufacturers rush to a new technology at the same time, it is evident that the clinical demand for this information is of utmost value. Around 1990, there was similar demand for color Doppler ultrasound; high demand for contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was evident at the beginning of this century, and around 2010 demand increased for strain elastography. However, some issues regarding the new shear wave ultrasound technologies must be noted to avoid misuse of the resulting information for clinical decisions. As new articles are expected to appear in 2016 reporting the findings of the new technologies from various companies, we felt that the beginning of this year was the right time to present an appraisal of these issues. We likewise expect that in the meantime EFSUMB will release a new update of the existing guidelines 1 2.The first ultrasound elastography method became available 13 years ago in the form of transient elastography with Fibroscan(®) 3. It was the first technique providing non-invasive quantitive information about the stiffness of the liver and hence regarding the amount of fibrosis in chronic liver disease 3. The innovation was enormous, since a non-invasive modality was finally available to provide findings otherwise achievable only by liver biopsy. In fact, prior to ultrasound elastography, a combination of conventional and Doppler ultrasound parameters were utilized to inform the physician about the presence of cirrhosis and portal hypertension 4. However, skilled operators were required, reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy were suboptimal, and it was not possible to differentiate the pre-cirrhotic stages of fibrosis. All these limitations were substantially improved by

  10. Design and performance of dual-polarization lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors for millimeter-wave polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrick, H.; Jones, G.; Johnson, B. R.; Abitbol, M. H.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bryan, S.; Day, P.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Flanigan, D.; Leduc, H. G.; Limon, M.; Mauskopf, P.; Miller, A.; Tucker, C.

    2018-02-01

    Aims: Lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) are an attractive technology for millimeter-wave observations that require large arrays of extremely low-noise detectors. We designed, fabricated and characterized 64-element (128 LEKID) arrays of horn-coupled, dual-polarization LEKIDs optimized for ground-based CMB polarimetry. Our devices are sensitive to two orthogonal polarizations in a single spectral band centered on 150 GHz with Δν/ν = 0.2. The 65 × 65 mm square arrays are designed to be tiled into the focal plane of an optical system. We demonstrate the viability of these dual-polarization LEKIDs with laboratory measurements. Methods: The LEKID modules are tested with an FPGA-based readout system in a sub-kelvin cryostat that uses a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The devices are characterized using a blackbody and a millimeter-wave source. The polarization properties are measured with a cryogenic stepped half-wave plate. We measure the resonator parameters and the detector sensitivity, noise spectrum, dynamic range, and polarization response. Results: The resonators have internal quality factors approaching 1 × 106. The detectors have uniform response between orthogonal polarizations and a large dynamic range. The detectors are photon-noise limited above 1 pW of absorbed power. The noise-equivalent temperatures under a 3.4 K blackbody load are 80%. The entire array is multiplexed on a single readout line, demonstrating a multiplexing factor of 128. The array and readout meet the requirements for 4 arrays to be read out simultaneously for a multiplexing factor of 512. Conclusions: This laboratory study demonstrates the first dual-polarization LEKID array optimized specifically for CMB polarimetry and shows the readiness of the detectors for on-sky observations.

  11. Role of acoustic radiation force impulse and shear wave velocity in prediction of preterm birth: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Arjit; Agarwal, Shubhra; Chandak, Shruti

    2017-01-01

    Background Preterm birth is one of the important causes of neonatal morbidity where we rely on subjective criteria such as modified Bishop's scoring and contemporary sonographic measurement of cervical length. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) is a technological advancement in elastography that can be employed in prediction of cervical softening and preterm labor. Purpose To evaluate the role of ARFI technique and shear wave velocity (SWV) estimates as a predictor of preterm birth and its comparison with other clinical and sono-elastographic measures. Material and Methods Thirty-four pregnant women (gestation age = 28-37 weeks age) showing features suggestive of preterm labor were included and evaluated with modified Bishop's score, cervical length by ultrasound (US), ARFI to derive Elastography index (EI), and SWV of the cervix. The patients were later divided into two groups, using the clinical outcome of preterm or term delivery. Results Twenty patients delivered at term (gestational age > 37 weeks) and 14 were preterm. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves showed SWV with highest sensitivity and specificity (93% and 90%, respectively) for the prediction of preterm birth at a cutoff value of 2.83 m/s. EI and modified Bishop's score were comparable to each other, but were less sensitive techniques. Conclusion Elastographic assessment of antenatal cervix is a novel technique of virtual palpation of internal os and can be utilized as an objective criterion for preterm birth prediction.

  12. Staging of Hepatic Fibrosis: Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography in the Same Individuals

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    Yoon, Jeong Hee [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Hyun Sik; Yu, Mi Hye; Joo, Ijin; Lee, Eun Sun; Sohn, Ji Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Boon [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To cross-validate liver stiffness (LS) measured on shear wave elastography (SWE) and on magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the same individuals. We included 94 liver transplantation (LT) recipients and 114 liver donors who underwent either MRE or SWE before surgery or biopsy. We determined the technical success rates and the incidence of unreliable LS measurements (LSM) of SWE and MRE. Among the 69 patients who underwent both MRE and SWE, the median and coefficient of variation (CV) of the LSM from each examination were compared and correlated. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve in both examinations were calculated in order to exclude the presence of hepatic fibrosis (HF). The technical success rates of MRE and SWE were 96.4% and 92.2%, respectively (p = 0.17), and all of the technical failures occurred in LT recipients. SWE showed 13.1% unreliable LSM, whereas MRE showed no such case (p < 0.05). There was moderate correlation in the LSM in both examinations (r = 0.67). SWE showed a significantly larger median LSM and CV than MRE. Both examinations showed similar diagnostic performance for excluding HF (Az; 0.989, 1.000, respectively). MRE and SWE show moderate correlation in their LSMs, although SWE shows higher incidence of unreliable LSMs in cirrhotic liver.

  13. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

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    Teresa Cañas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence.

  14. Stress- and Structure-Induced Anisotropy in Southern California From Two Decades of Shear Wave Splitting Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2017-10-01

    We measure shear wave splitting (SWS) parameters (i.e., fast direction and delay time) using 330,000 local earthquakes recorded by more than 400 stations of the Southern California Seismic Network (1995-2014). The resulting 232,000 SWS measurements (90,000 high-quality ones) provide a uniform and comprehensive database of local SWS measurements in Southern California. The fast directions at many stations are consistent with regional maximum compressional stress σHmax. However, several regions show clear deviations from the σHmax directions. These include linear sections along the San Andreas Fault and the Santa Ynez Fault, geological blocks NW to the Los Angeles Basin, regions around the San Jacinto Fault, the Peninsular Ranges near San Diego, and the Coso volcanic field. These complex patterns show that regional stresses and active faults cannot adequately explain the upper crustal anisotropy in Southern California. Other types of local structures, such as local rock types or tectonic features, also play significant roles.

  15. Visually assessed colour overlay features in shear-wave elastography for breast masses: quantification and diagnostic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gweon, Hye Mi; Youk, Ji Hyun; Son, Eun Ju; Kim, Jeong-Ah

    2013-03-01

    To determine whether colour overlay features can be quantified by the standard deviation (SD) of the elasticity measured in shear-wave elastography (SWE) and to evaluate the diagnostic performance for breast masses. One hundred thirty-three breast lesions in 119 consecutive women