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Sample records for polarized luminescence cpl

  1. Helical Oligonaphthodioxepins Showing Intense Circularly Polarized Luminescence (CPL) in Solution and in the Solid State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaishi, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Hinoide, Sakiko; Ema, Tadashi

    2017-07-12

    A series of oligonaphthodioxepins was synthesized, revealing a helically arranged octamer, (R,R,R,R,R,R,R)-3, which showed intense circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) both in solution and in the solid state. The fluorescence quantum yields (Φ FL ) in solution and in the solid state were 0.90 and 0.22, respectively, and the g lum values in solution and in the solid state were +2.2×10 -3 and +7.0×10 -3 , respectively. This is one of the highest solid-state CPL g lum values yet reported. The high Φ FL and g lum values were due to the rigidity, as well as to the fact that (R,R,R,R,R,R,R)-3 was a non-planar molecule. Moreover, (R,R,R,R,R,R,R)-3 was highly stable both chemically and stereochemically. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Amplification of Circularly Polarized Luminescence through Triplet-Triplet Annihilation-Based Photon Upconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jianlei; Duan, Pengfei; Li, Xianggao; Liu, Minghua

    2017-07-26

    Amplification of circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) is demonstrated in a triplet-triplet annihilation-based photon upconversion (TTA-UC) system. When chiral binaphthyldiamine acceptors are sensitized with an achiral Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP) in solution, upconverted circularly polarized luminescence (UC-CPL) were observed for the first time, in which the positive or negative circularly polarized emission could be obtained respectively, following the molecular chirality of the acceptors (R/S). More interestingly, one order of magnitude amplification of the dissymmetry factor g lum in UC-CPL was obtained in comparison with the normal promoted CPL. The multistep photophysical process of TTA-UC including triplet-triplet energy transfer (TTET) and triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) have been suggested to enhance the UC-CPL, which provided a new strategy to design CPL materials with a higher dissymmetry factor.

  3. Helically labile bis(haloBODIPYs): an advantageous platform for the development of CPL-SOMs

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, C��sar; S��nchez-Carnerero, Esther M.; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L.; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R.; Ortiz, Mar��a J.; L��pez-Arbeloa, ����igo; Ba��uelos, Jorge; Cohovi, Komlan D.; Lunkley, Jamie L.; Muller, Gilles; de la Moya, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Simple organic molecules (SOM) based on bis(haloBODIPY) are shown to enable circularly polarized luminescence (CPL), giving rise to a new structural design for technologically valuable CPL-SOMs. The established design comprises together synthetic accessibility, labile helicity, possibility of reversing the handedness of the circularly polarized emission, and reactive functional groups, making it unique and attractive as advantageous platform for the development of smart CPL-SOMs.

  4. A solid-state dedicated circularly polarized luminescence spectrophotometer: Development and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Takunori; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Masayuki; Takamoto, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    A new solid-state dedicated circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) instrument (CPL-200CD) was successfully developed for measuring true CPL spectra for optically anisotropic samples on the basis of the Stokes-Mueller matrix approach. Electric components newly installed in the CPL-200CD include a pulse motor-driven sample rotation holder and a 100 kHz lock-in amplifier to achieve the linearly polarized luminescence measurement, which is essential for obtaining the true CPL signal for optically anisotropic samples. An acquisition approach devised for solid-state CPL analysis reduces the measurement times for a data set by ca. 98% compared with the time required in our previous method. As a result, the developed approach is very effective for samples susceptible to light-induced degradation. The theory and implementation of the method are described, and examples of its application to a CPL sample with macroscopic anisotropies are provided. An important advantage of the developed instrument is its ability to obtain molecular information for both excited and ground states because circular dichroism measurements can be performed by switching the monochromatic light to white light without rearrangement of the sample.

  5. Circularly Polarized Luminescence of Curium: A New Characterization of the 5f Actinide Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ga-Lai; Andolina, Christopher M.; Xu, Jide; Luu, Vinh; Rutkowski, Philip X.; Muller, Gilles; Shuh, David K.; Gibson, John K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2012-01-01

    A key distinction between the lanthanide (4f) and actinide (5f) transition elements is the increased role of f-orbital covalent bonding in the latter. Circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) is an uncommon but powerful spectroscopy which probes the electronic structure of chiral, luminescent complexes or molecules. While there are many examples of CPL spectra for the lanthanides, this report is the first for an actinide. Two chiral, octadentate chelating ligands based on orthoamide phenol (IAM) were used to complex curium(III). While the radioactivity kept the amount of material limited to micromole amounts, the spectra of the highly luminescent complexes showed significant emission peak-shifts between the different complexes, consistent with ligand field effects previously observed in luminescence spectra. PMID:22920726

  6. Strong Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Highly Emissive Terbium Complexes in Aqueous Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, Amanda; Lunkley, Jamie; Muller, Gilles; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-03-15

    Two luminescent terbium(III) complexes have been prepared from chiral ligands containing 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) antenna chromophores and their non-polarized and circularly-polarized luminescence properties have been studied. These tetradentate ligands, which form 2:1 ligand/Tb{sup III} complexes, utilize diaminocyclohexane (cyLI) and diphenylethylenediamine (dpenLI) backbones, which we reasoned would impart conformational rigidity and result in Tb{sup III} complexes that display both large luminescence quantum yield ({phi}) values and strong circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) activities. Both Tb{sup III} complexes are highly emissive, with {phi} values of 0.32 (dpenLI-Tb) and 0.60 (cyLI-Tb). Luminescence lifetime measurements in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O indicate that while cyLI-Tb exists as a single species in solution, dpenLI-Tb exists as two species: a monohydrate complex with one H{sub 2}O molecule directly bound to the Tb{sup III} ion and a complex with no water molecules in the inner coordination sphere. Both cyLI-Tb and dpenLI-Tb display increased CPL activity compared to previously reported Tb{sup III} complexes made with chiral IAM ligands. The CPL measurements also provide additional confirmation of the presence of a single emissive species in solution in the case of cyLI-Tb, and multiple emissive species in the case of dpenLI-Tb.

  7. Oxygen-Bridged Diphenylnaphthylamine as a Scaffold for Full-Color Circularly Polarized Luminescent Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hidetaka; Tanaka, Kazuo; Morisaki, Yasuhiro; Chujo, Yoshiki; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro

    2017-05-19

    An oxygen-bridged diphenylnaphthylamine with a helical shape was designed and synthesized as a key scaffold for circularly polarized luminescent (CPL) materials. The introduction of electron-withdrawing groups, such as formyl and 2,2-dicyanovinyl substituents at the naphthyl moiety in this skeleton effectively decreases the LUMO level and thus allows a tuning of the band gap. The prepared model compounds exhibit intense CPL signals with a dissymmetry factor (g value) of 10 -3 both in CH 2 Cl 2 solutions and in the solid states. The emission colors of these derivatives are influenced both by the substituents as well as by solvent effects, covering the whole visible region from blue to deep red.

  8. Circularly Polarized Luminescence in Enantiopure Europium and Terbium Complexes with Modular, All-Oxygen Donor Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Michael; Do, King; Ingram, Andrew; Moore, Evan; Muller, Gilles; Raymond, Kenneth

    2009-06-04

    The modular syntheses of three new octadentate, enantiopure ligands are reported, one with the bidentate chelating unit 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) and two with bidentate 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO) units. A new design principle is introduced for the chiral, non-racemic hexamines which constitute the central backbones for the presented class of ligands. The terbium(III) complex of the IAM ligand, as well as the europium(III) complexes of the 1,2-HOPO ligands, are synthesized and characterized by various techniques (NMR, UV, CD, luminescence spectroscopy). All species exhibit excellent stability and moderate to high luminescence efficiency (quantum yields {phi}{sub Eu} = 0.05-0.08 and {phi}{sub Tb} = 0.30-0.57) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. Special focus is put onto the properties of the complexes in regard to circularly polarized luminescence (CPL). The maximum luminescence dissymmetry factors (glum) in aqueous solution are high with |glum|max = 0.08-0.40. Together with the very favorable general properties (good stability, high quantum yields, long lifetimes), the presented lanthanide complexes can be considered as good candidates for analytical probes based on CPL in biologically relevant environments.

  9. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from a Pyrene-Cyclodextrin Supra-Dendron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuening; Yang, Dong; Han, Jianlei; Zhou, Jin; Jin, Qingxian; Liu, Minghua; Duan, Pengfei

    2018-04-19

    Soft nanomaterials with circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) have been currently attracting great interests. Here, we report a pyrene-containing π-peptide dendrons hydrogel, which showed 1D and 2D nanostructures with varied CPL activities. It was found that the individual dendron formed hydrogels in a wide pH range (3-12) and self-assembled into helices with pH-tuned pitches. Through chirality transfer, the pyrene unit could show CPL originated from both the monomer and excimer bands. When cyclodextrin was introduced, different supra-dendrons were obtained with β-cyclodextrin (PGAc@β-CD) and γ-cyclodextrin (PGAc@γ-CD) through host-guest interactions, respectively. Interestingly, the PGAc@β-CD and PGAc@γ-CD supra-dendrons self-assembled into 2D nanosheet and entangled nanofibers, respectively, showing cyclodextrin induced circularly polarized emission from both the monomer and excimer bands of pyrene moiety. Thus, through a simple host-guest interaction, both the nanostructures and the chiroptical activities could be modulated.

  10. Calculation of the vibrationally resolved, circularly polarized luminescence of d-camphorquinone and (S,S)-trans-beta-hydrindanone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Benjamin; Autschbach, Jochen

    2010-08-02

    Circularly polarized luminescence (CPL), the differential emission of left- and right-handed circularly polarized light from a molecule, is modeled by using time-dependent density functional theory. Calculations of the CPL spectra for the first electronic excited states of d-camphorquinone and (S,S)-trans-beta-hydrindanone under the Franck-Condon approximation and using various functionals are presented, as well as calculations of absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra. The functionals B3LYP, BHLYP, and CAM-B3LYP are employed, along with the TZVP and aug-cc-pVDZ Gaussian-type basis sets. For the lowest-energy transitions, all functionals and basis sets perform comparably, with the long-range-corrected CAM-B3LYP better reproducing the excitation energy of camphorquinone but leading to a blue shift with respect to experiment for hydrindanone. The vibrationally resolved spectra of camphorquinone are very well reproduced in terms of peak location, widths, shapes, and intensities. The spectra of hydrindanone are well reproduced in terms of overall envelope shape and width, as well as the lack of prominent vibrational structure in the emission and CPL spectra. Overall the simulated spectra compare well with experiment, and reproduce the band shapes, emission red shifts, and presence or absence of visible vibrational fine structure.

  11. Creative Platform Learning (CPL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jonna Langeland; Hansen, Søren

    Creative Platform Learning (CPL) er en pædagogisk metode, der skaber foretagsomme og innovative elever, der kan anvende deres kreativitet til at lære nyt. Ifølge den nye skolereform skal Innovation og entreprenørskab tydeliggøres i alle fag. I CPL er det en integreret del af undervisningen...

  12. Ligand Induced Circular Dichroism and Circularly Polarized Luminescence in CdSe Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohgha, Urice; Deol, Kirandeep K.; Porter, Ashlin G.; Bartko, Samuel G.; Choi, Jung Kyu; Leonard, Brian M.; Varga, Krisztina; Kubelka, Jan; Muller, Gilles; Balaz, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Chiral thiol capping ligands L- and D-cysteines induced modular chiroptical properties in achiral cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QDs). Cys-CdSe prepared from achiral oleic acid capped CdSe by post-synthetic ligand exchange displayed size-dependent electronic circular dichroism (CD) and circularly polarized luminescence (CPL). Opposite CPL signals were measured for the CdSe QDs capped with D- and L-cysteine. The CD profile and CD anisotropy varied with size of CdSe nanocrystals with largest anisotropy observed for CdSe nanoparticles of 4.4 nm. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR (MAS ssNMR) experiments suggested bidentate interaction between cysteine and the surface of CdSe. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations verified that attachment of L- and D-cysteine to the surface of model (CdSe)13 nanoclusters induces measurable opposite CD signals for the exitonic band of the nanocluster. The chirality was induced by the hybridization of highest occupied CdSe molecular orbitals with those of the chiral ligand. PMID:24200288

  13. CPL: Common Pipeline Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    ESO CPL Development Team

    2014-02-01

    The Common Pipeline Library (CPL) is a set of ISO-C libraries that provide a comprehensive, efficient and robust software toolkit to create automated astronomical data reduction pipelines. Though initially developed as a standardized way to build VLT instrument pipelines, the CPL may be more generally applied to any similar application. The code also provides a variety of general purpose image- and signal-processing functions, making it an excellent framework for the creation of more generic data handling packages. The CPL handles low-level data types (images, tables, matrices, strings, property lists, etc.) and medium-level data access methods (a simple data abstraction layer for FITS files). It also provides table organization and manipulation, keyword/value handling and management, and support for dynamic loading of recipe modules using programs such as EsoRex (ascl:1504.003).

  14. The use of lanthanide luminescence as a reporter in the solid state: Desymmetrization of the prochiral layers of γ-zirconium phosphate/phosphonate and circularly polarized luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Ernesto; Jiménez, Laura; de Victoria-Rodriguez, María; Luu, Vinh; Muller, Gilles; Juanes, Olga; Rodríguez-Ubis, Juan Carlos

    2013-03-15

    Solid-state CPL measurements were performed for the first time on hybrid, laminar materials based on γ-ZrP pillared with organic diphosphonates. Ad hoc optically pure diphosphonates were synthesized and the luminescence properties of their complexation with Tb(III) were verified in solution. CD and CPL measurements showed that the bistriazolylpyridine chromophores bonded to the metal provided an effective chiral environment that produced significant signals. In the case of the γ-ZrP-derived materials, experimental evidence and simple molecular modeling hinted to the occurrence of supramolecular chirality in the particles, induced by the intrinsic dissymmetry of the organic diphosphonates or by the intercalation of chiral species such as 1-phenethylamine. Chirality at the supramolecular level was revealed in the solid state by the CPL signals measured from reporter Tb(III) ions intercalated in the hybrid matrix.

  15. Marine plants may polarize remote Fucus eggs via luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2005-01-01

    Fucus zygotes can be polarized by many environmental vectors. These include those created by pieces of all the intertidal marine plants tested. At distances of up to 5-10 mm away from such pieces, Fucus zygotes form their intitial outgrowths or germinate towards them. Earlier papers had inferred that this so-called 'thallus effect' is mediated by diffusing molecules. The present reinvestigation indicates that the thallus effect is exerted by influences that can go right through glass barriers. This indicates action via luminescence. This luminescence may come from bacteria growing in biofilms on the similar surfaces of these otherwise unrelated source plants. Moreover, this directive luminescence is inferred to lie at wavelengths in the red or longer and may take the form of more or less coherent biophotons. (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Polarization memory of white luminescence of Ag nanoclusters dispersed in glass host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A S; Tikhomirov, V K; Moshchalkov, V V

    2012-09-10

    A mechanism for white luminescence of Ag nanoclusters dispersed in oxyfluoride glass host has been revealed by studying a temperature dependence of its polarization memory. The spectral dependence of the polarization memory indicates the presence of a variety of Ag nanoclusters, particularly emitting in the blue, green and red. Temperature activated intercluster energy transfer has been found responsible for white luminescence. The means for increasing luminescence quantum yield have been suggested. This efficient white luminescence may be used in highly demanded devices, such as luminescent lamps, displays, color phosphors for LEDs, photovoltaic devices based on down shifting of solar spectrum.

  17. Hybrid silica luminescent materials based on lanthanide-containing lyotropic liquid crystal with polarized emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selivanova, N.M., E-mail: natsel@mail.ru [Kazan National Research Technological University, 68 Karl Marx Str., Kazan 420015 (Russian Federation); Vandyukov, A.E.; Gubaidullin, A.T. [A.E. Arbuzov Institute of Organic and Physical Chemistry of the Kazan Scientific Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 8 Acad. Arbuzov Str., Kazan 420088 (Russian Federation); Galyametdinov, Y.G. [Kazan National Research Technological University, 68 Karl Marx Str., Kazan 420015 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    This paper represents the template method for synthesis of hybrid silica films based on Ln-containing lyotropic liquid crystal and characterized by efficient luminescence. Luminescence films were prepared in situ by the sol–gel processes. Lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) mesophases C{sub 12}H{sub 25}O(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub 10}H/Ln(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}O containing Ln (III) ions (Dy, Tb, Eu) were used as template. Polarized optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and FT-IR-spectroscopy were used for characterization of liquid crystal mesophases and hybrid films. The morphology of composite films was studied by the atomic force microscopy method (AFM). The optical properties of the resulting materials were evaluated. It was found that hybrid silica films demonstrate significant increase of their lifetime in comparison with an LLC system. New effects of linearly polarized emission revealed for Ln-containing hybrid silica films. Polarization in lanthanide-containing hybrid composites indicates that silica precursor causes orientation of emitting ions. - Highlights: • We suggest a new simple approach for creating luminescence hybrid silica films. • Ln-containing hybrid silica films demonstrate yellow, green and red emissions. • Tb(III)-containing hybrid film have a high lifetime. • We report effects of linearly polarized emission in hybrid film.

  18. Electrical and luminescent properties and deep traps spectra of N-polar GaN films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.Y.; Smirnov, N.B.; Govorkov, A.V.; Sun, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Cho, Y.S.; Lee, I.-H.; Han, J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrical and luminescent properties of N-polar undoped GaN films grown using low temperature GaN buffers on on-axis and miscut sapphire and on-axis AlN buffers are compared to the properties of Ga-polar films grown on low temperature GaN buffers. It is shown that the concentration of residual donors increases by about an order of magnitude for on-axis N-polar growth and by two orders of magnitude for off-axis growth compared to Ga-polar films. On-axis films for both Ga-polar and N-polar polarities show the presence of n + interfacial layers greatly influencing the apparent electron concentration and mobility deduced from capacitance-voltage C-V measurements. These interfacial layers are much less prominent in the miscut N-polar films. Growth on N-polar greatly increases the concentration of electron traps with activation energy of 0.9 eV possibly related to Ga-interstitials.

  19. Luminescent systems based on the isolation of conjugated PI systems and edge charge compensation with polar molecules on a charged nanostructured surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Zhao, Bin; Geohegan, David B.; Styers-Barnett, David J.; Hu, Hui

    2014-07-15

    A photoluminescent or electroluminescent system and method of making a non-luminescent nanostructured material into such a luminescent system is presented. The method of preparing the luminescent system, generally, comprises the steps of modifying the surface of a nanostructured material to create isolated regions to act as luminescent centers and to create a charge imbalance on the surface; applying more than one polar molecule to the charged surface of the nanostructured material; and orienting the polar molecules to compensate for the charge imbalance on the surface of the nanostructured material. The compensation of the surface charge imbalance by the polar molecules allows the isolated regions to exhibit luminescence.

  20. CPL - a way to increase student's commitment, involvement and collaboration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velling, Louise Ærthøj; Larsen, Mette Yde

    students and lecturers indicated that CPL as didactics is difficult directly to adapt in teaching in higher educational level. However, the evaluation indicated that some elements from CPL contributed in a positive way by increasing student’s involvement and commitment. Also a better collaboration between...... the students was indicated as well as a strengthened social environment in the class. Based on the experiment, our hypothesis is that the chosen 3 CPL activities will increase the students commitment and involvement in the lectures as well as provide the students with better collaborative competencies....

  1. Luminescence nanothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaque, Daniel; Vetrone, Fiorenzo

    2012-07-01

    The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed.The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed. This work was supported by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (Project S2009/MAT-1756), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia (MAT2010-16161) and by Caja Madrid Foundation.

  2. Investigation and modeling of CPL mask profiles using OCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsuan-Chen; Lin, Ren-Hao; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Huang, Cheng-Hsuan; Lien, Ta-Cheng; Chen, Chia-Jen; Lee, Gaston; Lee, Hsin-Chang; Yen, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Mask profile of chromeless phase-shifting lithography (CPL) defined by OCD has been investigated. In CPL masks, unbalanced bombardments caused by different ion accelerations lead to the formation of micro-notch structures. A better understanding of micro-notch structures is essential for quality gating of mask processes to improve of CPL mask profiles. By measuring 12 of 16 elements of Mueller matrix, we are able to set up a model to simulate the depth of micro-notch structure profile which shows good correlation with TEM images. Moreover, values of CD, quartz etching depth and side wall angle acquired by OCD are presented and compared with those obtained by SEM, TEM and AFM, respectively.

  3. HURRICANE AND SEVERE STORM SENTINEL (HS3) GLOBAL HAWK CLOUD PHYSICS LIDAR (CPL) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Global Hawk Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) dataset includes measurements gathered by the CPL instrument during the HS3...

  4. Polarization-resolved two-photon luminescence microscopy of V-groove arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, J.; Novikov, S. M.; Holmgaard, T.

    2012-01-01

    Using two-photon luminescence (TPL) microscopy and local reflection spectroscopy we investigate electromagnetic field enhancement effects from a mu m-sized composition of 450-nm-deep V-grooves milled by focused ion beam in a thick gold film and assembled to feature, within the same structure, ind...... obtained to evaluation of local field enhancements using TPL microscopy, especially when investigating extended structures exhibiting different radiation channels, are discussed. (C)2011 Optical Society of America......Using two-photon luminescence (TPL) microscopy and local reflection spectroscopy we investigate electromagnetic field enhancement effects from a mu m-sized composition of 450-nm-deep V-grooves milled by focused ion beam in a thick gold film and assembled to feature, within the same structure...

  5. Characterization of the antigenicity of Cpl1, a surface protein of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jian-Piao; Liu, Ling-Li; To, Kelvin K W; Lau, Candy C Y; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Guo, Yong-Hui; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Che, Xiao-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans is an important fungal pathogen. The capsule is a well established virulence factor and a target site for diagnostic tests. The CPL1 gene is required for capsular formation and virulence. The protein product Cpl1 has been proposed to be a secreted protein, but the characteristics of this protein have not been reported. Here we sought to characterize Cpl1. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Cpl1 of C. neoformans var. neoformans and the Cpl1 orthologs identified in C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii formed a distinct cluster among related fungi; while the putative ortholog found in Trichosporon asahii was distantly related to the Cryptococcus cluster. We expressed Cpl1 abundantly as a secreted His-tagged protein in Pichia pastoris. The protein was used to immunize guinea pigs and rabbits for high titer mono-specific polyclonal antibody that was shown to be highly specific against the cell wall of C. neoformans var. neoformans and did not cross react with C. gattii, T. asahii, Aspergillus spp., Candida spp. and Penicillium spp. Using the anti-Cpl1 antibody, we detected Cpl1 protein in the fresh culture supernatant of C. neoformans var. neoformans and we showed by immunostaining that the Cpl1 protein was located on the surface. The Cpl1 protein is a specific surface protein of C. neoformans var. neoformans. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  6. Evaluation of SNAP cPL, Spec cPL, VetScan cPL Rapid Test, and Precision PSL Assays for the Diagnosis of Clinical Pancreatitis in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cridge, H; MacLeod, A G; Pachtinger, G E; Mackin, A J; Sullivant, A M; Thomason, J M; Archer, T M; Lunsford, K V; Rosenthal, K; Wills, R W

    2018-03-01

    The sensitivity, specificity, and agreement of 4 diagnostic assays (SNAP canine pancreatic lipase (cPL), specific cPL (Spec cPL), VetScan cPL Rapid Test, and Precision PSL) for pancreatitis in dogs have not been directly compared. To determine the level of agreement among each of the 4 assays and a clinical suspicion score, level of agreement among the assays, and sensitivity and specificity of each assay in a clinically relevant patient group. Fifty client-owned dogs with clinical signs of gastrointestinal disease. Prospective study. History, physical examination, complete blood count, serum biochemistry, abdominal ultrasound examination, and the 4 diagnostic assays for pancreatitis were performed. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to determine the level of agreement between each assay and a clinical suspicion score determined by a panel of 5 board-certified veterinary internists. The ICC between the clinical suspicion score and the 4 assays were SNAP cPL, 0.61; Spec cPL, 0.68; VetScan cPL Rapid Test, 0.68; and Precision PSL, 0.60. The sensitivities of the assays ranged from 73.9 to 100.0%, whereas the specificities were SNAP cPL, 71.1-77.8%; Spec cPL, 74.1-81.1%; VetScan cPL Rapid Test, 76.9-83.8%; and Precision PSL, 64.0-74.3%. A good to excellent level of agreement was demonstrated among the 4 assays. The previously unreported sensitivity and specificity of the VetScan cPL Rapid Test were 73.9-83.3% and 76.9-83.8%, respectively. Results of any of the 4 diagnostic assays alone, in the absence of supporting clinical findings, are insufficient to establish a diagnosis of clinical pancreatitis in dogs. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. A polarity-driven nanometric luminescence asymmetry in AlN/GaN heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tizei, L. H. G., E-mail: luiz.tizei@u-psud.fr; Meuret, S.; March, K.; Kociak, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS-UMR 8502, Orsay 91405 (France); Hestroffer, K.; Auzelle, T.; Daudin, B. [CEA-CNRS Group Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, Institut Neel/CNRS-Université J. Fourier and CEA Grenoble, INAC, SP2M, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-10-06

    Group III Nitrides nanowires are well suited materials for the design of light emitting devices. The internal electric field created by spontaneaous and piezoelectric polarizations in these materials poses some difficulties, but also possible solutions, towards this goal. Here, we report on the high spatial asymmetry of the cathodoluminescence intensity across a GaN quantum well embedded in an AlN nanowire, when a 60 keV, 1 nm wide electron beam is scanned over this heterostructure. This asymmetry is remarkable between positions at different sides of the quantum well. We interpret this asymmetry as originating from the different drift directions of carriers due to the internal electric field. This interpretation is corroborated by the direct determination of the polarity with convergent beam electron diffraction. A precise knowledge of hole mobility and diffusion coefficients would allow an estimate of the electric field in the AlN segment of the nanowire.

  8. Uncovering the Circular Polarization Potential of Chiral Photonic Cellulose Films for Photonic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongzhi; Li, Wanru; Li, Wen; Wang, Xiaojun; Tang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Sean Xiao-An; Xu, Yan

    2018-02-12

    Circularly polarized light (CPL) is central to photonic technologies. A key challenge lies in developing a general route for generation of CPL with tailored chiroptical activity using low-cost raw materials suitable for scale-up. This study presents that cellulose films with photonic bandgaps (PBG) and left-handed helical sense have an intrinsic ability for circular polarization leading to PBG-based CPL with extraordinary |g | values, well-defiend handedness, and tailorable wavelength by the PBG change. Using such cellulose films, incident light ranging from near-UV to near-IR can be transformed to passive L-CPL and R-CPL with viewing-side-dependent handedness and |g | values up to 0.87, and spontaneous emission transformed to R-CPL emission with |g | values up to 0.68. Unprecedented evidence is presented with theoretical underpinning that the PBG effect can stimulate the R-CPL emission. The potential of cellulose-based CPL films for polarization-based encryption is illustrated. The evaporation-induced self-assembly coupled with nanoscale mesogens of cellulose nanocrystals opens new venues for technological advances and enables a versatile strategy for rational design and scalable manufacturing of organic and inorganic CPL films for photonic applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. GPM Ground Validation Cloud Physics LiDAR (CPL) OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) OLYMPEX dataset consists of extinction profiles, layer optical depth, layer lidar ratio, and aircraft parameter...

  10. Efficient three-photon luminescence with strong polarization dependence from a scintillating silicate glass co-doped with Gd3+ and Tb3+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Can; Zhang, Cheng-Yun; Deng, Hai-Dong; Liu, Guang-Yin; Lan, Sheng; Qian, Qi-; Yang, Zhong-Min; Gopal, Achanta Venu

    2013-03-11

    Efficient three-photon luminescence (3PL) from a scintillating silicate glass co-doped with Gd(3+) and Tb(3+) was generated by using a focused femtosecond laser beam at 800 nm. Four emission bands centered at 496, 541, 583, and 620 nm were identified as the electronic transitions between the energy levels of Tb(3+) followed by three-photon absorption (3PA) in Gd(3+) and Tb(3+) and the resonant energy transfer from Gd(3+) to Tb(3+). More interestingly, a strong polarization dependence of the 3PL was observed and it is ascribed to the polarization dependent 3PA in Gd(3+) and Tb(3+) and/or the angular distribution of photogenerated electrons in the glass.

  11. Delivery of the endolysin Cpl-1 by inhalation rescues mice with fatal pneumococcal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehn, Jan M; Fischer, Katja; Reppe, Katrin; Gutbier, Birgitt; Tschernig, Thomas; Hocke, Andreas C; Fischetti, Vincent A; Löffler, Jutta; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Witzenrath, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Pneumonia is associated with a high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the most common cause of pneumonia, and pneumococcal antibiotic resistance is increasing. The purified bacteriophage endolysin Cpl-1 rapidly and specifically kills pneumococci. We tested the hypothesis that a single dose of recombinant aerosolized Cpl-1 would rescue mice with severe pneumococcal pneumonia. Female C57Bl/6 mice (aged 8-12 weeks) were transnasally infected with pneumococci. When severe pneumonia was established 24 h after infection, mice were treated with 25 μL of aerosolized Cpl-1. Survival was monitored for 10 days and the pulmonary and systemic bacterial burdens were assessed. Furthermore, cytokines were quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung morphology was analysed histologically. The endolysin efficiently reduced pulmonary bacterial counts and averted bacteraemia. Although concentrations of inflammatory cytokines were increased shortly after Cpl-1 inhalation, mice recovered rapidly, as shown by increasing body weight, and inflammatory infiltrates resolved in the lungs, leading to a reduction in mortality of 80%. Administration of Cpl-1 by inhalation may offer a new therapeutic perspective for the treatment of pneumococcal lung infection.

  12. Luminescence Instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an introduction to instrumentation for stimulated luminescence studies, with special focus on luminescence dating using the natural dosimeters, quartz and feldspars. The chapter covers basic concepts in luminescence detection, and thermal and optical stimulation, and reference...

  13. Cpl6: The New Extensible, High-Performance Parallel Coupler forthe Community Climate System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, Anthony P.; Jacob, Robert L.; Kauffman, Brain; Bettge,Tom; Larson, Jay; Ong, Everest; Ding, Chris; He, Yun

    2005-03-24

    Coupled climate models are large, multiphysics applications designed to simulate the Earth's climate and predict the response of the climate to any changes in the forcing or boundary conditions. The Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is a widely used state-of-art climate model that has released several versions to the climate community over the past ten years. Like many climate models, CCSM employs a coupler, a functional unit that coordinates the exchange of data between parts of climate system such as the atmosphere and ocean. This paper describes the new coupler, cpl6, contained in the latest version of CCSM,CCSM3. Cpl6 introduces distributed-memory parallelism to the coupler, a class library for important coupler functions, and a standardized interface for component models. Cpl6 is implemented entirely in Fortran90 and uses Model Coupling Toolkit as the base for most of its classes. Cpl6 gives improved performance over previous versions and scales well on multiple platforms.

  14. Study of Photosensitivity as a Function of Polarization for UV-Light in Optical Fibre using Blue Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Canning, John; Gregersen, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The difference in photosensitivity between S and P polarized light is investigated. Polarisation dependent scattering at the fibre-air surface and UV-induced alignment are shown to be of no importance, but indications of radially parasitic defects sites are found.......The difference in photosensitivity between S and P polarized light is investigated. Polarisation dependent scattering at the fibre-air surface and UV-induced alignment are shown to be of no importance, but indications of radially parasitic defects sites are found....

  15. From Antenna to Assay: Lessons Learned in Lanthanide Luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Evan; Samuel, Amanda; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-09-25

    these chromophores as a tool to guide ligand design. Additionally we have investigated chiral IAM ligands that yield Tb(III) complexes possessing both high quantum yield values and strong circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) activity. To efficiently sensitize Eu(III) emission, we have utilized ligands based on the 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one (1,2-HOPO) chelate, which are remarkable since they combine both excellent photophysical properties in addition to exceptional aqueous stabilities. A more compete understanding of this chromophore has been achieved by combining low temperature phosphorescence measurements with the same TD-DFT approach used with the IAM system. Also, Eu(III) complexes with strong CPL activity have been obtained through preparation of chiral 1,2-HOPO ligands. Using the unique spectroscopic properties of Eu(III), we have also undertaken the kinetic analysis of radiative and non-radiative decay pathways for a series of complexes, which has highlighted the importance of the metal ion symmetry on the ensuing photophysical properties. Lastly, the commercial development of a Tb-IAM compound that offers improved performance in the common HTRF platform and has the potential to vastly improve the sensitivity of measurements carried out using this technique is presented.

  16. Polarization memory of blue and red luminescence from nanocrystalline porous silicon treated by high-pressure water vapor annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelloz, B.; Koyama, H.; Koshida, N.

    2008-01-01

    The polarization memory (PM) effect in the blue and red photoluminescence (PL) of p-type porous Si (PS) treated by high-pressure water vapor annealing (HWA) has been investigated. HWA induces a significant blue PL emission at about 450 nm, together with a drastic enhancement of the red PL intensity. The polarization memory of the red emission band is anisotropic and is in agreement with emission from quantum sized Si nanocrystals, whereas that of the blue band is high and isotropic, indicating an emission mechanism related to localized states in the amorphous Si oxide surrounding the Si skeleton of the PS layer after HWA. HWA does not induce any blue emission in PS that was electrochemically oxidized (ECO) beforehand because the electrochemically grown oxide tends to prevent the formation of blue-emitting amorphous oxide upon HWA. The PM of ECO-PS at low emission energies is anisotropic, but in a direction 45 deg. rotated compared to that of PS treated by HWA. This unique behavior may be related to the electrical nature of electrochemical oxidation. HWA increases the PM of ECO-PS. This could be attributed to the enhanced passivation induced by HWA

  17. Single-molecule detection of chaperonin dynamics through polarization rotation modulation of CdSe QD luminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru; Araki, Daisuke; Miyashita, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Koudai; Arita, Mayuno; Yohda, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    We report our recent trials examining the single-molecule three-dimensional (3D) detection of protein conformational dynamics at room temperature. Using molecular chaperones as model proteins and cadmium selenide (CdSe) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as nanometer-scale probes, we monitored the temporal evolution of ATP-induced conformation changes with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging technique in buffer solutions. The two-dimensional (2D) degenerate nature of the emission dipoles of the QDs, due to the uniaxial wurtzite crystal structure, made it possible to capture the 3D orientation using a polarization modulation technique in real time. The temporal resolution was half the period of analyzer rotation. Although still insufficient, the obtained signals suggest possible 3D detection of specific motions, which supports the two-step conformational changes triggered by ATP attachment. - Highlights: • We report our recent trials examining the single-molecule three-dimensional (3D) detection of protein conformational dynamics at room temperature. • Using molecular chaperones as model proteins and cadmium selenide (CdSe) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as nanometer-scale probes, we monitored the temporal evolution of ATP-induced conformation changes with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging technique in buffer solutions. • The two-dimensional (2D) degenerate nature of the emission dipoles of the QDs, due to the uniaxial wurtzite crystal structure, made it possible to capture the 3D orientation using a polarization modulation technique in real time. • The temporal resolution was half the period of analyzer rotation. • Although still insufficient, the obtained signals suggest possible 3D detection of specific motions, which supports the two-step conformational changes triggered by ATP attachment

  18. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2013-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materials in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2012-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materials in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  1. luminescence properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gd3+, Tb3+ and Lu3+ in MTiO3 (M = Mg and Sr) luminescence properties. 1085. Table 4. Phosphorescence properties of phosphors. Radiation. Radiation. Radiation. Undoped–doped. Phosphors intensity/a.u. colour wavelength (nm) radiation difference. MgTiO3. 600. Yellow. 514. –. MgTiO3:1 %Tb3+. 415. Yellow. 514.

  2. luminescence properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    EDX analysis were taken with LEO 440 model scanning electron microscope using an accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The excitation and emission spectra of phosphors were recorded by Perkin Elmer LS 45 model luminescence spec- trophotometer with xenon lamp. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of phosphors were.

  3. Sliding Mode Controller and Lyapunov Redesign Controller to Improve Microgrid Stability: A Comparative Analysis with CPL Power Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eklas Hossain

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To mitigate the microgrid instability despite the presence of dense Constant Power Load (CPL loads in the system, a number of compensation techniques have already been gone through extensive research, proposed, and implemented around the world. In this paper, a storage based load side compensation technique is used to enhance stability of microgrids. Besides adopting this technique here, Sliding Mode Controller (SMC and Lyapunov Redesign Controller (LRC, two of the most prominent nonlinear control techniques, are individually implemented to control microgrid system stability with desired robustness. CPL power is then varied to compare robustness of these two control techniques. This investigation revealed the better performance of the LRC system compared to SMC to retain stability in microgrid with dense CPL load. All the necessary results are simulated in Matlab/Simulink platform for authentic verification. Reasons behind inferior SMC performance and ways to mitigate that are also discussed. Finally, the effectiveness of SMC and LRC systems to attain stability in real microgrids is verified by numerical analysis.

  4. Three-Way-Switchable (Right/Left/OFF) Selective Reflection of Circularly Polarized Light on Solid Thin Films of Helical Polymer Blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yuuya; Uno, Makoto; Suginome, Michinori

    2016-06-13

    Two poly(quinoxaline-2,3-diyl) copolymers bearing miscibility-enhancing 8-chlorooctyloxy and (S)-2-methylbutoxy or n-butoxy side chains were synthesized. After annealing in CHCl3 vapor, a polymer-blend film of these copolymers exhibited selective reflection of right-handed circularly polarized light (CPL) in the visible region. The handedness of the CPL reflected was completely inverted upon annealing of the film in THF vapor. Annealing in n-hexane vapor resulted in the phase separation of the polymer blend, which turned the selective reflection off. This three-way-switchable reflection, that is, reflection of right-handed or left-handed CPL, together with an OFF state, could be observed visually through right- and left-handed CPL filters. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Luminescent screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.-I.

    1982-01-01

    Luminescent screens which are useful for such purposes as intensifying screens for radiographs are comprised of a support bearing a layer of finely divided particles of a phosphor dispersed in a cross-linked polymeric matrix formed by heat-curing of a coating composition comprising an unsaturated cross-linkable polymer, a polymerizable acrylic monomer, a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer, and a heat-activatable polymerization initiator. The phosphor layer includes voids formed by evaporation of an evaporable component which is present in the coating composition from which such layer is formed. (author)

  6. Thermal stability of Cpl-7 endolysin from the streptococcus pneumoniae bacteriophage Cp-7; cell wall-targeting of its CW_7 motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Noemí; Rico-Lastres, Palma; García, Ernesto; García, Pedro; Menéndez, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Endolysins comprise a novel class of selective antibacterials refractory to develop resistances. The Cpl-7 endolysin, encoded by the Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteriophage Cp-7, consists of a catalytic module (CM) with muramidase activity and a cell wall-binding module (CWBM) made of three fully conserved CW_7 repeats essential for activity. Firstly identified in the Cpl-7 endolysin, CW_7 motifs are also present in a great variety of cell wall hydrolases encoded, among others, by human and live-stock pathogens. However, the nature of CW_7 receptors on the bacterial envelope remains unknown. In the present study, the structural stability of Cpl-7 and the target recognized by CW_7 repeats, relevant for exploitation of Cpl-7 as antimicrobial, have been analyzed, and transitions from the CM and the CWBM assigned, using circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry. Cpl-7 stability is maximum around 6.0-6.5, near the optimal pH for activity. Above pH 8.0 the CM becomes extremely unstable, probably due to deprotonation of the N-terminal amino-group, whereas the CWBM is rather insensitive to pH variation and its structural stabilization by GlcNAc-MurNAc-l-Ala-d-isoGln points to the cell wall muropeptide as the cell wall target recognized by the CW_7 repeats. Denaturation data also revealed that Cpl-7 is organized into two essentially independent folding units, which will facilitate the recombination of the CM and the CWBM with other catalytic domains and/or cell wall-binding motifs to yield new tailored chimeric lysins with higher bactericidal activities or new pathogen specificities.

  7. Thermal stability of Cpl-7 endolysin from the streptococcus pneumoniae bacteriophage Cp-7; cell wall-targeting of its CW_7 motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Bustamante

    Full Text Available Endolysins comprise a novel class of selective antibacterials refractory to develop resistances. The Cpl-7 endolysin, encoded by the Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteriophage Cp-7, consists of a catalytic module (CM with muramidase activity and a cell wall-binding module (CWBM made of three fully conserved CW_7 repeats essential for activity. Firstly identified in the Cpl-7 endolysin, CW_7 motifs are also present in a great variety of cell wall hydrolases encoded, among others, by human and live-stock pathogens. However, the nature of CW_7 receptors on the bacterial envelope remains unknown. In the present study, the structural stability of Cpl-7 and the target recognized by CW_7 repeats, relevant for exploitation of Cpl-7 as antimicrobial, have been analyzed, and transitions from the CM and the CWBM assigned, using circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry. Cpl-7 stability is maximum around 6.0-6.5, near the optimal pH for activity. Above pH 8.0 the CM becomes extremely unstable, probably due to deprotonation of the N-terminal amino-group, whereas the CWBM is rather insensitive to pH variation and its structural stabilization by GlcNAc-MurNAc-l-Ala-d-isoGln points to the cell wall muropeptide as the cell wall target recognized by the CW_7 repeats. Denaturation data also revealed that Cpl-7 is organized into two essentially independent folding units, which will facilitate the recombination of the CM and the CWBM with other catalytic domains and/or cell wall-binding motifs to yield new tailored chimeric lysins with higher bactericidal activities or new pathogen specificities.

  8. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  9. Solid polymer films exhibiting handedness-switchable, full-color-tunable selective reflection of circularly polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yuuya; Takagi, Keisuke; Suginome, Michinori

    2014-07-16

    Poly(quinoxaline-2,3-diyl)s bearing (S)-2-methylbutyl, n-butyl, and 8-chlorooctyl groups as side chains were synthesized to fabricate dry solid polymer thin films. These films exhibited selective reflection of right-handed circular polarized light (CPL) in the visible region after annealing in CHCl3 vapor at room temperature. The handedness of reflected CPL was inverted to the left after annealing in 1,2-dichloroethane vapor. It was also found that the color of a particular single film along with the handedness of reflected CPL were fully tuned reversibly, upon exposure of the film to the vapor of various mixtures of chloroform and 1,2-dichloroethane in different ratios.

  10. Chirality Emergence in Thin Solid Films of Amino Acids by Polarized Light from Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashahiro Adachi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most attractive hypothesis for the origin of homochirality in terrestrial bioorganic compounds is that a kind of “chiral impulse” as an asymmetric excitation source induced asymmetric reactions on the surfaces of such materials such as meteorites or interstellar dusts prior to the existence of terrestrial life (Cosmic Scenario. To experimentally introduce chiral structure into racemic films of amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine, isovaline, etc., we irradiated them with linearly polarized light (LPL from synchrotron radiation and circularly polarized light (CPL from a free electron laser. After the irradiation, we evaluated optical anisotropy by measuring the circular dichroism (CD spectra and verified that new Cotton peaks appeared at almost the same peak position as those of the corresponding non-racemic amino acid films. With LPL irradiation, two-dimensional anisotropic structure expressed as linear dichroism and/or linear birefringence was introduced into the racemic films. With CPL irradiation, the signs of the Cotton peaks exhibit symmetrical structure corresponding to the direction of CPL rotation. This indicates that some kinds of chiral structure were introduced into the racemic film. The CD spectra after CPL irradiation suggest the chiral structure should be derived from not only preferential photolysis but also from photolysis-induced molecular structural change. These results suggest that circularly polarized light sources in space could be associated with the origin of terrestrial homochirality; that is, they would be effective asymmetric exciting sources introducing chiral structures into bio-organic molecules or complex organic compounds.

  11. Chirality Emergence in Thin Solid Films of Amino Acids by Polarized Light from Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Shinojima, Hiroyuki; Seyama, Michiko; Ueno, Yuko; Kaneko, Takeo; Kobayashi, Kensei; Mita, Hajime; Adachi, Mashahiro; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    One of the most attractive hypothesis for the origin of homochirality in terrestrial bioorganic compounds is that a kind of “chiral impulse” as an asymmetric excitation source induced asymmetric reactions on the surfaces of such materials such as meteorites or interstellar dusts prior to the existence of terrestrial life (Cosmic Scenario). To experimentally introduce chiral structure into racemic films of amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine, isovaline, etc.), we irradiated them with linearly polarized light (LPL) from synchrotron radiation and circularly polarized light (CPL) from a free electron laser. After the irradiation, we evaluated optical anisotropy by measuring the circular dichroism (CD) spectra and verified that new Cotton peaks appeared at almost the same peak position as those of the corresponding non-racemic amino acid films. With LPL irradiation, two-dimensional anisotropic structure expressed as linear dichroism and/or linear birefringence was introduced into the racemic films. With CPL irradiation, the signs of the Cotton peaks exhibit symmetrical structure corresponding to the direction of CPL rotation. This indicates that some kinds of chiral structure were introduced into the racemic film. The CD spectra after CPL irradiation suggest the chiral structure should be derived from not only preferential photolysis but also from photolysis-induced molecular structural change. These results suggest that circularly polarized light sources in space could be associated with the origin of terrestrial homochirality; that is, they would be effective asymmetric exciting sources introducing chiral structures into bio-organic molecules or complex organic compounds. PMID:19742124

  12. Luminescent beam stop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Diane; Morton, Simon A.

    2017-10-25

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to beam stops. In one aspect, a device comprises a luminescent material, a beam stop plate, and an optical fiber. The luminescent material is a parallelepiped having a first side and a second side that are squares and having a third side that is a rectangle or a square. The first side and the second side are perpendicular to the third side. The beam stop plate is attached to the first side of the luminescent material. The optical fiber has a first end and a second end, with the first end of the optical fiber attached to the third side of the luminescent material.

  13. Sensitivity and specificity of canine pancreas-specific lipase (cPL) and other markers for pancreatitis in 70 dogs with and without histopathologic evidence of pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, S; Marks, S L; Kass, P H; Luff, J A; Keller, S M; Johnson, E G; Murphy, B

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a common disorder in dogs for which the antemortem diagnosis remains challenging. To compare the sensitivity and specificity of serum markers for pancreatitis in dogs with histopathologic evidence of pancreatitis or lack thereof. Seventy dogs necropsied for a variety of reasons in which the pancreas was removed within 4 hours of euthanasia and serological markers were evaluated within 24 hours of death. Prospective study: Serum was analyzed for amylase and lipase activities, and concentrations of canine trypsin-like immunoreactivity (cTLI) and canine pancreas-specific lipase (cPL). Serial transverse sections of the pancreas were made every 2 cm throughout the entire pancreas and reviewed using a semiquantitative histopathologic grading scheme. The sensitivity for the Spec cPL (cutoff value 400 μg/L) was 21 and 71% in dogs with mild (n = 56) or moderate-severe pancreatitis (n = 7), and 43 and 71% (cutoff value 200 μg/L), respectively. The sensitivity for the cTLI, serum amylase, and lipase in dogs with mild or moderate-severe pancreatitis was 30 and 29%; 7 and 14%; and 54 and 71%, respectively. The specificity for the Spec cPL based on 7 normal pancreata was 100 and 86% (cutoff value 400 and 200 μg/L, respectively), whereas the specificity for the cTLI, serum amylase, and lipase activity was 100, 100, and 43%, respectively. The Spec cPL demonstrated the best overall performance characteristics (sensitivity and specificity) compared to other serum markers for diagnosing histopathologic lesions of pancreatitis in dogs. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. The arabidopsis RNA binding protein with K homology motifs, SHINY1, interacts with the C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1 to repress stress-inducible gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafu Jiang

    Full Text Available The phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD of the RNA polymerase II plays crucial roles in transcription and mRNA processing. Previous studies showed that the plant CTD phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1 dephosphorylates Ser-5-specific CTD and regulates abiotic stress response in Arabidopsis. Here, we report the identification of a K-homology domain-containing protein named SHINY1 (SHI1 that interacts with CPL1 to modulate gene expression. The shi1 mutant was isolated from a forward genetic screening for mutants showing elevated expression of the luciferase reporter gene driven by a salt-inducible promoter. The shi1 mutant is more sensitive to cold treatment during vegetative growth and insensitive to abscisic acid in seed germination, resembling the phenotypes of shi4 that is allelic to the cpl1 mutant. Both SHI1 and SHI4/CPL1 are nuclear-localized proteins. SHI1 interacts with SHI4/CPL1 in vitro and in vivo. Loss-of-function mutations in shi1 and shi4 resulted in similar changes in the expression of some stress-inducible genes. Moreover, both shi1 and shi4 mutants display higher mRNA capping efficiency and altered polyadenylation site selection for some of the stress-inducible genes, when compared with wild type. We propose that the SHI1-SHI4/CPL1 complex inhibits transcription by preventing mRNA capping and transition from transcription initiation to elongation.

  15. Luminescence techniques: Instrumentation and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes techniques, instruments and methods used in luminescence dating and environmental dosimetry in many laboratories around the world. These techniques are based on two phenomena - thermally stimulated luminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. The most commonly used...... luminescence stimulation and detection techniques are reviewed and information is given on recent developments in instrument design and on the stale of the art in luminescence measurements and analysis. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  16. Circular polarization observed in bioluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnberg, Hans; Meijer, E.W.; Hummelen, J.C.; Dekkers, H.P.J.M.; Schippers, P.H.; Carlson, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    While investigating circular polarization in luminescence, and having found it in chemiluminescence, we have studied bioluminescence because it is such a widespread and dramatic natural phenomenon. We report here that left and right lanterns of live larvae of the fireflies, Photuris lucicrescens and

  17. BG2003 luminescent spectrograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huhou

    2004-01-01

    A new equipment for luminescent spectrograph has been created. The prototype is named BG2003. It is qualified for running. Dating with selected frequency optical luminescence means that the wavelength of the stimulating source and the emission photons can be selected. Then, one can use this equipment to do the separation of the minerals in the fine grains sample for the fine grains dating technique. And also it may be effective to resolve many problems for the minerals authentication. A new optical separate technique will be created and developed in mineralogy. (authors)

  18. The luminescent concentrator. Stability issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slooff, L.H.; Budel, T.; Burgers, A.R.; Bakker, N.J. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O.Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Buechtemann, A.; Danz, R. [Fraunhofer-Institute for Applied Polymer Research, Geiselbergstr.69, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Meyer, T.; Meyer, A. [Solaronix SA, Rue de l' Ouriette 129, CH-1170 Aubonne (Switzerland)

    2007-08-15

    One of the major challenges in the research on luminescent concentrators is the lifetime of the luminescent polymer plates. There are some commercial plates available, but data on lifetime are very limited, especially when dedicated to applications like the luminescent concentrator. In this paper we report stability experiments on luminescent concentrator plates, aged under continuous white light illumination, outdoor conditions and high intensity monochromatic illumination. The results show that the lifetime strongly depends on the organic luminescent dye in the plate. The best materials exhibit an initial decrease in performance of about 20% and then remain more or less stable. It is shown that the degradation is not caused by UV illumination.

  19. Agreement of serum Spec cPL with the 1,2-o-dilauryl-rac-glycero glutaric acid-(6'-methylresorufin) ester (DGGR) lipase assay and with pancreatic ultrasonography in dogs with suspected pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kook, P H; Kohler, N; Hartnack, S; Riond, B; Reusch, C E

    2014-01-01

    Spec cPL is the most sensitive and specific test for diagnosing pancreatitis in dogs. Its results have not been compared to those of the 1,2-o-dilauryl-rac-glycero-3-glutaric acid-(6'-methylresorufin) ester (DGGR) lipase assay or those of abdominal ultrasonography. To investigate agreement of Spec cPL with DGGR lipase activity and pancreatic ultrasonography in dogs with suspected pancreatitis. One hundred and forty-two dogs. DGGR lipase activity (reference range, 24-108 U/L) and Spec cPL were measured using the same sample. The time interval between ultrasonography and lipase determinations was pancreatic ultrasonography and the 2 tests were assessed using Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ). DGGR lipase (>108, >216 U/L) and Spec cPL (>200 μg/L) had κ values of 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-0.9) and 0.70 (CI, 0.58-0.82). DGGR lipase (>108, >216 U/L) and Spec cPL (>400 μg/L) had κ values of 0.55 (CI, 0.43-0.67) and κ of 0.80 (CI, 0.71-0.9). An ultrasonographic diagnosis of pancreatitis and DGGR lipase (>108, >216 U/L) had κ values of 0.29 (CI, 0.14-0.44) and 0.35 (CI, 0.18-0.52). Ultrasonographically diagnosed pancreatitis and Spec cPL (>200, >400 μg/L) had κ values of 0.25 (CI, 0.08-0.41) and 0.27 (CI, 0.09-0.45). Although both lipase assays showed high agreement, agreement between ultrasonography and lipase assays results was only fair. Because lipase results are deemed more accurate, ultrasonography results should be interpreted carefully. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. Bioinspired Mesoporous Chiral Nematic Graphitic Carbon Nitride Photocatalysts modulated by Polarized Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wensheng; Hong, Wei; Sun, Lu; Yu, Di; Yu, Dingshan; Chen, Xudong

    2018-01-10

    Endowing materials with chirality and exploring the responses of the material under circularly polarized light (CPL) can enable further insight into the physical and chemical properties of the semiconductors to be gained, thus expanding on optoelectronic applications. Herein a bioinspired mesoporous chiral nematic graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) for efficient hydrogen evolution with polarized light modulation based on chiral nematic cellulose nanocrystal films prepared through silica templating is described. The mesoporous nematic chiral g-C 3 N 4 exhibits an ultrahigh hydrogen evolution rate of 219.9 μmol h -1 (for 20 mg catalyst), corresponding to a high enhancement factor of 55 when compared to the bulk g-C 3 N 4 under λ>420 nm irradiation. Furthermore, the chiral g-C 3 N 4 material exhibits unique photocatalytic activity modulated by CPL within the absorption region. This CPL-assisted photocatalytic regulation strategy holds great promise for a wide range of applications including optical devices, asymmetric photocatalysis, and chiral recognition/separation. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  2. Luminescence study of spodumene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotani, S.; Fujii, A.T.; Antonini, R.; Pontuschka, W.M.; Rabani, S.R.; Furtado, W.W.

    1990-02-01

    A comparative study is made of the luminescence of five kinds of spodumene from Minas Gerais, Brazil, studied previously by optical absorption spectroscopy. Natural gemstones are used which, in the course of the experiments, were irradiated with X-rays. (L.C.) [pt

  3. New luminescent materials and filters for Luminescent Solar Concentrators

    OpenAIRE

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Ronda, C.R.; Keur, W.C.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    In a Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC), short-wavelength light isconverted by a luminescent material into long-wavelength light, which is guided towards a photovoltaic cell. In principle, an LSC allows for high concentration, but in practice this is prevented by lossmechanisms like limited sunlight absorption, limited quantum efficiency and high self absorption. To tackle these problems, a suitable luminescent material is needed. Another important loss mechanism is the escape of luminescen...

  4. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  5. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, David N.; Kiel, Johnathan L.; Batishko, Charles R.; Stahl, Kurt A.

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  6. Luminescent solar concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugce Tosun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent solar concentrator (LSC is a device that has luminescent molecules embedding or topping polymeric or glass waveguide to generate electricity from sunlight with a photovoltaic cell attachment. LSCs can be employed both in small and large scale projects, independent on the direction or angle of the surface with respect to the sun, promising more freedom for integration in urban environments compared to the traditional PV systems. The aim of the SEB&C PDEng project is to investigate the applicability of this innovative technology in the built environment and to bridge the gap of knowledge linking societal, design and technological aspects. The final goal is to exhibit potential application concepts of LSC developed by co-creative methods at SPARK campus which is a hub for open innovation in built environment. Necessity of a paradigm shift towards sustainable and smart cities came into being due to the significant increase in energy demand of the buildings. The challenge is to increase renewable sources in the energy mix while designing aesthetic environments. Thus, building integrated renewable energy technologies represent a great opportunity to help overcome this current challenge. Smart energy, energy efficiency and use of renewable sources are key aspects to be considered nowadays and many innovative technologies need further exploitation to be commercially viable, such as luminescent solar concentrator.

  7. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  8. New luminescent materials and filters for Luminescent Solar Concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Ronda, C.R.; Keur, W.C.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    In a Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC), short-wavelength light isconverted by a luminescent material into long-wavelength light, which is guided towards a photovoltaic cell. In principle, an LSC allows for high concentration, but in practice this is prevented by lossmechanisms like limited

  9. Luminescence dating of Netherland's sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we revity: 1) the development of the methodology, 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands' sediments;

  10. Luminescence dating of Netherlands’ sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we review: 1) the development of the methodology; 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands’ sediments;

  11. Luminescence studies of semiconductor electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, J.J.; Kooij, Ernst S.; Meulenkamp, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results of in-situ luminescence studies of semiconductor electrodes. Three classes of materials are considered: single crystal compound semiconductors, porous silicon and semiconducting oxides doped with luminescent ions. We show how photoluminescence (PL) and

  12. Luminescence from metals and insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, O.H.

    1985-01-01

    The term luminescence is normally applied to light emission that is not explainable by the mechanisms discussed by the other speakers in this meeting. Specifically, it is not transition radiation, surface plasmon radiation, or bremsstrahlung. One normally thinks of luminescence as arising from one-electron transitions within a medium. This talk consists of an overview of luminescence from condensed matter under irradiation by either energetic particles or photons. The author begins with organic molecules, where luminescence is best understood, and then discusses inorganic insulators and metals. Finally, the dependence of yield upon projectile species and velocity is discussed, and predictions are made concerning the relative effectiveness of electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms in exciting luminescence

  13. Boron clusters in luminescent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Thilagar, Pakkirisamy

    2016-01-21

    In recent times, luminescent materials with tunable emission properties have found applications in almost all aspects of modern material sciences. Any discussion on the recent developments in luminescent materials would be incomplete if one does not account for the versatile photophysical features of boron containing compounds. Apart from triarylboranes and tetra-coordinate borate dyes, luminescent materials consisting of boron clusters have also found immense interest in recent times. Recent studies have unveiled the opportunities hidden within boranes, carboranes and metalloboranes, etc. as active constituents of luminescent materials. From simple illustrations of luminescence, to advanced applications in LASERs, OLEDs and bioimaging, etc., the unique features of such compounds and their promising versatility have already been established. In this review, recent revelations about the excellent photophysical properties of such materials are discussed.

  14. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  15. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  16. LUMINESCENCE DETERMINATION OF ETODOLAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Yegorova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, simple and rapid method for determination of non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drug – etodolac (Et in washings from surfaces of pharmaceutical equipment have been proposed. The intensity of native luminescence of water-n-propanol solutions of etodolac (λex= 274 nm; λlum= 350 nm was used as the analytical signal. The calibration graph is linear in the concentration range 0.014-2.3 μg/ml, the limit of detection is 0.5 ng/ml.

  17. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  18. Enhanced radiation detectors using luminescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardeny, Zeev V.; Jeglinski, Stefan A.; Lane, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    A radiation detecting device comprising a radiation sensing element, and a layer of luminescent material to expand the range of wavelengths over which the sensing element can efficiently detect radiation. The luminescent material being selected to absorb radiation at selected wavelengths, causing the luminescent material to luminesce, and the luminescent radiation being detected by the sensing element. Radiation sensing elements include photodiodes (singly and in arrays), CCD arrays, IR detectors and photomultiplier tubes. Luminescent materials include polymers, oligomers, copolymers and porphyrines, Luminescent layers include thin films, thicker layers, and liquid polymers.

  19. Optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Bogard, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The use of Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) for radiation dosimetry has become increasingly popular in recent years. The OSL method is based on luminescence emitted from semiconductor materials stimulated with specific wavelengths of light, after being exposed to ionizing radiation. The OSL intensity is a function of the radiation dose absorbed by the material. This work complements previous studies by the authors of the thermoluminescence (TL) response by SiO 2 commercial optical fiber exposed to ionizing radiation and provides preliminary results describing some of the material's OSL properties. Linear OSL response to beta radiation dose, along with a consistent shape of the photon emission curve with time, were observed using a green/blue OSL excitation laser. The reproducibility of OSL response after repeated irradiations and the change in intensity with time were also examined. The search and characterization of materials that exhibit this OSL response, in parallel with the continued development of OSL methodology and instrumentation, is an important scientific and commercial issue. (Author)

  20. Luminescence dating in archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintle, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating is routinely applied to burnt lithic material. Simple fires are capable of enabling stones weighing a few hundred grams to reach 450 o C, thus zeroing the TL signal. TL dates have been obtained for Upper and Lower Paleolithic sites in Europe and the Near East. TL dating continues to be used for dating pottery and for authentification of ceramic works of art. Some recent studies report the use of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) (also know as photoluminescence) for dating very small samples of quartz, e.g. from small pieces of pottery or frm metallurgical slag The major recent advance has been in the development of a reliable laboratory procedure for using the OSL signal from quartz to obtain the past radiation exposure. The quartz OSL signal is extremely sensitive to light and is reduced to a negligible level on exposure to direct sunlight for radionuclides during burial, signal to date san.sized quartz grains extracted from sediments, The OSL signal is stimulated by 470 nm light from emitting diodes and the detected using flirters centred on 340 nm A similar signal can be obtained from feldspar grain when are exposed to infrared wavelengths around 880 nm. The infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals is also rapidly depleted by exposure to sunlight, and dating of colluvial deposits from archaeological sites has been reported

  1. The luminescent concentrator illuminated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slooff, L.H.; Kinderman, R.; Burgers, A.R.; Van Roosmalen, J.A.M. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Buechtemann, A.; Danz, R. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research, Geiselbergstr. 69, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Meyer, T.B. [Solaronix SA, Rue de l' Ouriette 129, CH-1170 Aubonne (Switzerland); Chatten, A.J.; Farell, D.; Barnham, K.W.J. [Physics Department, Imperial College London, SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15

    Luminescent concentrator (LC) plates with different dyes were combined with standard multicrystalline silicon solar cells. External quantum efficiency measurements were performed, showing an increase in electrical current of the silicon cell (under AM1.5, 1 sun conditions, at normal incidence) compared to a bare cell. The influence of dye concentration and plate dimensions are addressed. The best results show a 1.7 times increase in the current from the LC/silicon cell compared to the silicon cell alone. This corresponds to an increase in power conversion efficiency of the silicon cell from 15 to 25%. To broaden the absorption spectrum of the LC, a second dye was incorporated in the LC plates. This results in a relative increase of 5-8% with respect to the one dye LC, giving a maximum power conversion efficiency of 26% on cell area. Using an extended ray-tracing model transmission, reflection and external quantum efficiency spectra were simulated and compared with measured spectra. The simulations deliver the luminescent quantum efficiencies of the two dyes as well as the background absorption by the polymer host. It is found that the quantum efficiency of the red emitting dye is 87%, which is one of the major loss factors in the measured LC. Using ray-tracing simulations it can be predicted that increasing the quantum efficiency to 95% would reduce this loss by almost 30%.

  2. Temperature lags of luminescence measurements in a commercial luminescence reader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitis, George [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kiyak, Nafiye G. [ISIK University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Physics Department, Sile, 34980 Istanbul (Turkey); Polymeris, George S., E-mail: gspolymeris@ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Beşevler, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-09-15

    The temperature recorded in thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence equipments is not the temperature of the sample but that of the heating element on which the thermocouple is attached. Depending upon the rate of heating, a temperature difference appears between the samples and the heating element, termed as temperature lag, which could have serious effects on the curve shapes and trapping parameters. In the present work the temperature lag effect is studied in a newly developed luminescence equipment measuring both thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. It is found that the temperature lag could be large for heating rates above 2 K/s and it is strongly dependent upon the sample holder. A simple approximation method is proposed in order to both predict as well as correct for temperature lag effects in luminescence measurements.

  3. Persistent luminescence nanothermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Rodríguez, Emma; López-Peña, Gabriel; Montes, Eduardo; Lifante, Ginés; García Solé, José; Jaque, Daniel; Diaz-Torres, Luis Armando; Salas, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    Persistent phosphorescence nanoparticles emitting in the red and near-infrared spectral regions are strongly demanded as contrast nanoprobes for autofluorescence free bioimaging and biosensing. In this work, we have developed Sr4Al14O25:Eu2+, Cr3+, Nd3+ nanopowders that produce persistent red phosphorescence peaking at 694 nm generated by Cr3+ ions. This emission displays temperature sensitivity in the physiological temperature range (20-60 °C), which makes these nanoparticles potentially useful as fluorescence (contactless) nanothermometers operating without requiring optical excitation. Nd3+ ions, which act as shallow electron traps for the red Cr3+ persistent emission, also display infrared emission bands, extending the fluorescence imaging capability to the second biological window. This unique combination of properties makes these nanoparticles multifunctional luminescent probes with great potential applications in nanomedicine.

  4. Reflection measurements for luminescent powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    Luminescent materials are useful in applications varying from lighting and display technologies to document security features and medical research, amongst many others. Measurement of the excitation range is an important consideration, and absorption bands are often determined from a decrease in the measured diffuse reflectance of the material using a ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Such a system may provide questionable results when used to measure the reflectance of a luminescence material, which is demonstrated for a Tb doped silica phosphor, because the system cannot differentiate between the reflected light and luminescence. It is shown that more reliable results are achieved for this phosphor by measuring the reflectance using a synchronous zero-offset scan in a fluorescence spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere. This method is therefore recommended instead of traditional reflectance measurements using a UV-vis spectrophotometer for luminescent powders.

  5. Hybrid fluorescent layer emitting polarized light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadimasoudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanorods have anisotropic absorption and emission properties. In this work a hybrid luminescent layer is produced based on a mixture of CdSe/CdS nanorods dispersed in a liquid crystal that is aligned by an electric field and polymerized by UV illumination. The film emits light with polarization ratio 0.6 (polarization contrast 4:1. Clusters of nanorods in liquid crystal can be avoided by applying an AC electric field with sufficient amplitude. This method can be made compatible with large-scale processing on flexible transparent substrates. Thin polarized light emitters can be used in LCD backlights or solar concentrators to increase the efficiency.

  6. Luminescent phosphor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to luminescent phosphors and in particular those phosphors which emit ultra-violet radiation when struck by X-rays. The formula of the phosphor is Lasub(1-x-y-z-a)Gdsub(x)Cesub(y)Tbsub(z)Thsub(a)XO 4 in which X represents phosphorus atoms, arsenic atoms or a mixture of phosphorus and arsenic atoms, x is 0.01 to 0.50 and preferably 0.05 to 0.30, y is 0 or up to 0.50, z is 0 or up to 0.10 and preferably 0 or up to 0.02, a is 0 or up to 0.02, and when X represents phosphor atoms alone y + z + a is at least 0.01. The phosphors emit strong ultra-violet radiation when irradiated by X-rays and so can be used in intensifying screens particularly where the photographic material is UV radiation sensitive. In this case the overall emission should be in the 250-400 nm wavelength range. Another use is in the emission coating of cathode ray tubes. Details of the characteristics of various compositions are given with examples of preparation and emission spectra. (UK)

  7. Goldenphilicity: Luminescent gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansores, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the solids and molecules different types of bonds are presented depending on the involved atoms, covalent bonds are common among elements of open shell, where more bond orbitals are filled than anti bond orbitals. It is expected that ionic bonds among closed shell atoms which have charges of opposite sign. Bonds type Van der Waals are presented among molecules which have a bipolar moment. It would not be expected bonds among zero charge species, or more generally with the same nominal charge and in any case the attractive forces would be very small. In fact it is expected that two metallic cations to be repelled each other. There recently is evidence that in organic or organometallic compounds could exist attractive interactions between two cations of the d 8 -d 10 -s 2 families. These bonds are weak but stronger than those of Van der Waals. They are compared with the hydrogen bonds. In this work it was reviewed some examples in which the goldenphilicity plays an important role in the luminescence that the gold complexes present. Examples of mono, bi and trinuclear and the structures that these organometallic compounds could take are examined. (Author)

  8. Method of measuring luminescence of a material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven D.

    2015-12-15

    A method of measuring luminescence of a material is disclosed. The method includes applying a light source to excite an exposed material. The method also includes amplifying an emission signal of the material. The method further includes measuring a luminescent emission at a fixed time window of about 10 picoseconds to about 10 nanoseconds. The luminescence may be radio photoluminescence (RPL) or optically stimulated luminescence (OSL).

  9. Self absorption in luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumer, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators are photovoltaic devices made of thin transparent material, in which luminescent particles are dispersed. The incident light enters the device through its large facets and is subsequently absorbed by the luminescent particles, which re-emit it whilst changing its

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and luminescence property ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3.4 Luminescence properties of 1. The solid state luminescence property of 1 along with free ligand was investigated at room temperature. On photoexcitation at 365 nm, a characteristic peak at. 583 nm was observed in the emission spectrum of. 1 (figure 6). The yellow luminescence observed at. 583 nm is possibly due to ...

  11. How far are luminescence properties predictable?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasse, G.

    Our knowledge of the luminescence of isolators has increased considerably during the past decade. As a consequence it has become possible to understand the luminescence of technically important phosphors and even to predict efficient luminescent materials. We first illustrate how emission spectra of

  12. Luminescent materials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2015-01-01

    It is pertinent to note that Luminescence phenomenon has once again occupied a central stage with the announcement of Nobel Prize in October 2014 to three Japanese scientists. The discovery of Galium Nitride proved to be a revolutionary step forward in creation of Blue LEDs. With the advent of LED lamps we now have more long-lasting and more efficient alternatives to older light sources. The Volume under reference consists of 9 Chapters, written by experts in the area of Luminescent Materials. First 5 Chapters are contributed as Review Papers and the last 4 are based on Research Papers.Chapter

  13. Thermally stimulated luminescence and photoluminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-13

    Jan 13, 2012 ... Peltier cooled photo-multiplier tube as detector (Jain et al. 2008). The acquisition and analysis of the data were carried out by F-900 software supplied by Edinburgh Analytical. Instruments, UK. Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) glow curves were recorded using home-built unit between. 300 and ...

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 4. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent properties of lanthanide-doped NaLaF 4 nanoparticles. JIGMET LADOL HEENA KHAJURIA SONIKA KHAJURIA ... Keywords. Citric acid; X-ray diffraction; down-conversion emission; energy transfer.

  15. Advances in luminescence instrument systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Bulur, E.; Duller, G.A.T.

    2000-01-01

    We report on recent advances in the development of luminescence measurement systems and techniques at Riso. These include: (1) optical stimulation units based on new-generation powerful blue light (470 nm) emitting diodes providing up to 28 mW/cm(2) for OSL measurements; (2) an infrared (830 nm...

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 4. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent properties of lanthanide-doped NaLaF 4 nanoparticles. JIGMET LADOL HEENA KHAJURIA SONIKA KHAJURIA HAQ NAWAZ SHEIKH. Volume 39 Issue 4 August 2016 pp 943-952 ...

  17. Polarized luminescence of mesogeneous semiconductors; Polarisierte Lumineszenz mesogener Halbleiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauhof, Marcus

    2008-07-01

    In this work, a homologous series of di-2,5-[(ethylhexyl)-oxy] substituted oligo(p-phenylene-vinylenes) with p-(decyloxyl)-phenyl endgroups was tested for its suitability as emitting material in light-emitting diodes which are able to emit linearly polarised light. The liquid crystalline character of the OPV-derivatives was utilised for the fabrication of highly orientated organic layers. Different polymers were tested as orientation layers. The best results were obtained with PTFE layers. In this way, a dichroic ratio for photoluminescence of DPL=16.3 could be obtained for the OPV pentamer. For the other oligomers, a decreasing photoluminescence dichroism was found for a decreasing number of oligomeric units: The measured dichroic ratios were DPL=12.1 for the tetramer, DPL=10.9 for the trimer and DPL=3.5 for the dimer. Using PTFE orientation layers, polarised OLEDs containing the different OPV derivatives as emitting material and Alq3 as electron-conducting material could be fabricated. The best results were obtained for the pentamer OLED: At an applied voltage of 20 V a luminance of approximately 400 Cd/m{sup 2} and an efficiency of 2.7-10{sup -2} Cd/W were measured. An electroluminescence dichroism of DEL=8.7 for the pentamer OLED, DEL=8.5 for the tetramer, DEL=4.2 for the trimer and DEL=1.9 for the dimer could be achieved. The threshold voltages of the series of OPVs were found to be increasing with decreasing chain length. The second part of this work documents the modification of the high-vacuum evaporation apparatus and the construction of a sample holder for the OLED fabrication. (orig.)

  18. Enantiomeric excesses induced in amino acids by ultraviolet circularly polarized light irradiation of extraterrestrial ice analogs: A possible source of asymmetry for prebiotic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modica, Paola; De Marcellus, Pierre; D'Hendecourt, Louis Le Sergeant; Meinert, Cornelia; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of meteoritic amino acids with enantiomeric excesses of the L-form (ee L ) has suggested that extraterrestrial organic materials may have contributed to prebiotic chemistry and directed the initial occurrence of the ee L that further led to homochirality of amino acids on Earth. A proposed mechanism for the origin of ee L in meteorites involves an asymmetric photochemistry of extraterrestrial ices by UV circularly polarized light (CPL). We have performed the asymmetric synthesis of amino acids on achiral extraterrestrial ice analogs by VUV CPL, investigating the chiral asymmetry transfer at two different evolutionary stages at which the analogs were irradiated (regular ices and/or organic residues) and at two different photon energies (6.6 and 10.2 eV). We identify 16 distinct amino acids and precisely measure the L-enantiomeric excesses using the enantioselective GC × GC-TOFMS technique in five of them: α-alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, valine, and norvaline, with values ranging from ee L = –0.20% ± 0.14% to ee L = –2.54% ± 0.28%. The sign of the induced ee L depends on the helicity and the energy of CPL, but not on the evolutionary stage of the samples, and is the same for all five considered amino acids. Our results support an astrophysical scenario in which the solar system was formed in a high-mass star-forming region where icy grains were irradiated during the protoplanetary phase by an external source of CPL of a given helicity and a dominant energy, inducing a stereo-specific photochemistry.

  19. Luminescence Properties of ScPO{sub 4} Single Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boatner, L.A.; Trukhin, A.N.

    1999-08-16

    Flux-grown ScPO{sub 4} single crystals exhibit a number of luminescence bands in their x-ray-excited luminescence spectra - including sharp lines arising from rare-earth elements plus a number of broad bands at 5.6 cV, 4.4 eV, and 3 eV. The band at 5.6 eV was attributed to a self-trapped exciton (STE) [l], and it could be excited at 7 eV and higher energies. This luminescence is strongly polarized (P = 70 %) along the optical axes of the crystal and exhibits a kinetic decay time constant that varies from several ns at room temperature to {approximately}10 {micro}s at 60 K and up to {approximately}1 ms at 10 K. It is assumed that the STE is localized on the SC ions. The band at 3 eV can be excited in the range of the ScPO{sub 4} crystal transparency (decay time = 3 to 4 {micro}s.) This band is attributed to a lead impurity that creates different luminescence centers. At high temperatures, the band at 4.4 eV is dominant in the x-ray-excited TSL and afterglow spectra. Its intensity increases with irradiation time beginning at zero at the initial irradiation time. The 4.4 eV band does not appear in a fast process under a pulsed electron beam, showing that accumulation is necessary for its observation. A sample of ScPO{sub 4} doped with vanadium exhibited a prevalent band at 4.4 eV at T = 480 K.

  20. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2016-02-18

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  1. A polarized photoluminescence study of strained layer GaAs photocathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    Photoluminescence measurements have been made on a set of epitaxially grown strained GaAs photocathode structures. The photocathodes are designed to exhibit a strain-induced enhancement of the electron spin polarization obtainable by optical pumping with circularly polarized radiation of near band gap energy. For the case of non-strained GaAs, the degree of spin polarization is limited to 50% by crystal symmetry. Under an appropriate uniaxial compression or tension, however, the valence band structure near the gap minimum is modified such that a spin polarization of 100% is theoretically possible. A total of nine samples with biaxial compressive strains ranging from zero to ∼0.8% are studied. X-ray diffraction analysis, utilizing Bragg reflections, is used to determine the crystal lattice structure of the samples. Luminescence spectra and luminescence circular polarization data are obtained at room temperature, ∼78 K and ∼12 K. The degree of luminescence circular polarization is used as a relative measure of the photo-excited electron spin polarization. The room temperature luminescence circular polarization data is compared with the measured electron spin polarization when the samples are used as electron photo-emitters with a negative electron affinity surface preparation. The luminescence data is also analyzed in conjunction with the crystal structure data with the goal of understanding the strain dependent valence band structure, optical pumping characteristics and spin depolarization mechanisms of the photocathode structures. A simple model is used to describe the luminescence data, obtained for the set of samples. Within the assumptions of the model, the deformation potentials a, b and d for GaAs are determined. The measured values are a = -10.16±.21 eV, b = -2.00±.05 eV and d = -4.87±.29 eV. Good agreement with published values of the deformation potentials provides support for the model used to describe the data

  2. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO 4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO 2 F 2 . Studies on the effect of added LiNO 3 or Na 2 WO 4 ·2H 2 O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF 6 content of WF 6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF 6

  3. Luminescent Solar Concentrators – a low cost photovoltaics alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The development and current status of luminescent solar concentrators is reviewed. These solar concentrators generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species; presently mainly organic dye molecules are used as luminescent species, however semiconductor nanocrystals

  4. Luminescence of LiH(D):Ru monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabirzyanov, A.A.; Oparin, D.V.; Pilipenko, G.I.; Gavrilov, F.F.

    1993-01-01

    Luminescence of lithium hydride (deuteride) activated by ruthenium is recorded for the first time. The features connected with the structure and oscillations of the basic lattice are detected in luminescence spectrum. The qualitative model of luminescence spectrum is suggested

  5. Lanthanide Organic Framework Luminescent Thermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, João; Brites, Carlos D S; Carlos, Luís D

    2016-10-10

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are excellent platforms for engineering luminescence properties as their building blocks, metal ions, linkers, and guest ions or molecules, are all potential sources of light emission. Temperature is one of the most important physical properties affecting the dynamics and viability of natural and engineered systems. Because the luminescence of certain lanthanide-bearing MOFs changes considerably with temperature, in the last few years, these materials have been explored as optical thermometers, especially in temperature sensing based on the intensity ratios of two separate electronic transitions. This review discusses the main concepts and ideas assisting the design of such ratiometric thermometers, and identifies the main challenges presented to this nascent field: develop nanothermometers for bio-applications and nanomedicine; understand the energy transfer mechanisms determining the thermal sensitivity; achieve effective primary thermometers; realize multifunctional nanothermometers; integrate Ln 3+ -based thermometers in commercial products. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Material for a luminescent solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A material for use in a luminescent solar concentrator, formed by ceramitizing the luminescent ion Cr/sup 3 +/ with a transparent ceramic glass containing mullite. The resultant material has tiny Cr/sup 3 +/-bearing crystallites dispersed uniformly through an amorphous glass. The invention combines the high luminescent efficiency of Cr/sup 3 +/ in the crystalline phase with the practical and economical advantages of glass technology.

  7. Modern luminescence spectroscopy of minerals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gaft, Michael; Panczer, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence Spectroscopy of Minerals and Materials presents an overview of the general concepts in luminescence spectroscopy as well as experimental methods and their interpretation. Special emphasis is laid on the fluorescence lifetime and the determination of time-resolved spectra. This method enables the exposure of new luminescence in minerals previously hidden by more intensive centers. Specialists in the fields of solid state physics, chemistry and spectroscopy will find a wealth of new information in this unique book.

  8. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  9. A portable luminescence dating instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kook, M.H.; Murray, A.S.; Lapp, Torben

    2011-01-01

    in both continuous wave and pulsed mode; photon counting can be gated such that it is active only during the pulse off-period. There are also two bleaching light sources (470nm, 5W and 940nm, 3W), and the luminescence signals can be regenerated using a cold-cathode 30kV X-ray tube, delivering ∼0.06Gy.s−1...

  10. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  11. Luminescence studies on phosphor screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayiotakis, G.; Nomikos, C.; Bakas, A.; Proimos, B.

    1994-01-01

    We report our results on x-ray phosphor screens prepared of some new materials focusing attention on their efficiency under fluoroscopy conditions, on optimization conditions and on comparisons among the various materials. All data are presented in absolute values. A theoretical model is presented, that takes into account the granular structure of the screens, permitting the explanation and prediction of the luminescence properties of the screens. (authors)

  12. Sensitization effects of supramolecular assemblies on the luminescence of terbium-ion prulifloxacin complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hong; Yi Chongyue; Li Xue; Fang Fang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang Yajiang, E-mail: yjyang@mail.hust.edu.c [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Luminescence enhancement of terbium-ion prulifloxacin complexes (Tb(III)-PUFX) in supramolecular hydrogels formed by assembly of 1,3:2,4-di-O-benzylidene-D-sorbitol (DBS) was investigated by steady-state fluorescence, varying temperature fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence. The luminescence images show that Tb(III)-PUFX were dispersed in the DBS gels. The luminescence intensity of Tb(III)-PUFX in the DBS gels was significantly increased in comparison with that in corresponding aqueous solutions. The varying temperature fluorescent spectra show that the luminescence intensity of Tb(III)-PUFX decreased with an increase in the temperature. This implies that the luminescence enhancement of Tb(III)-PUFX is related to the dissociation and the formation of the DBS assemblies. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show slower rotational motion in DBS gels in comparison with that in the corresponding aqueous solutions. This may be ascribed to a unique microstructure of three-dimensional network formed by DBC aggregates, resulting in deactivation of the nonradiative relaxation. The images of field emission scanning electron microscopy and polarized optical microscopy indicate that the morphology of the DBS assemblies was not influenced upon addition of Tb(III)-PUFX to the DBS gels.

  13. Luminescent Organic Semiconducting Langmuir Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agina, Elena V; Mannanov, Artur A; Sizov, Alexey S; Vechter, Olga; Borshchev, Oleg V; Bakirov, Artem V; Shcherbina, Maxim A; Chvalun, Sergei N; Konstantinov, Vladislav G; Bruevich, Vladimir V; Kozlov, Oleg V; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S; Paraschuk, Dmitry Yu; Ponomarenko, Sergei A

    2017-05-31

    In recent years, monolayer organic field-effect devices such as transistors and sensors have demonstrated their high potential. In contrast, monolayer electroluminescent organic field-effect devices are still in their infancy. One of the key challenges here is to create an organic material that self-organizes in a monolayer and combines efficient charge transport with luminescence. Herein, we report a novel organosilicon derivative of oligothiophene-phenylene dimer D2-Und-PTTP-TMS (D2, tetramethyldisiloxane; Und, undecylenic spacer; P, 1,4-phenylene; T, 2,5-thiophene; TMS, trimethylsilyl) that meets these requirements. The self-assembled Langmuir monolayers of the dimer were investigated by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray reflectometry, and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, and their semiconducting properties were evaluated in organic field-effect transistors. We found that the best uniform, fully covered, highly ordered monolayers were semiconducting. Thus, the ordered two-dimensional (2D) packing of conjugated organic molecules in the semiconducting Langmuir monolayer is compatible with its high-yield luminescence, so that 2D molecular aggregation per se does not preclude highly luminescent properties. Our findings pave the way to the rational design of functional materials for monolayer organic light-emitting transistors and other optoelectronic devices.

  14. Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1999-01-01

    Since the pioneering work by Huntley et al. (1985), optical dating is being increasingly recognised as an important technique for establishing a time frame of deposition of sediments (Aitken, 1998). Optical dating differs from thermoluminescence (TL) dating in that visible/infrared light from lasers or LEDs (light-emitting-diodes) is used as a means of stimulation, in contrast to thermal stimulation. It has several advantages over TL dating: (i) the resetting of the OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) clock is more effective than that of TL clock; for sediments transported under water or in other situations where the sediment grains have undergone inhomogeneous bleaching, this property ensures that ages based on optical dating are generally more reliable than TL ages, (ii) the optical dating technique is non-destructive, and multiple readouts of the optical signal is possible; this feature has resulted in the development of single-aliquot and single-grain protocols (Murray and Wintle, 1999; Banerjee et al. 1999), (iii) the sample is not heated as in TL; thus, spurious luminescence is avoided and there is a significant reduction in blackbody radiation. Dating of materials which change phase on heating is also practical, and finally, (iv) thermal quenching of luminescence is negligible, allowing accurate estimation of kinetic parameters using standard techniques and providing access to deep OSL traps. This characteristic may be helpful in extending the limits of optical dating beyond the last 150 ka from a global point of view

  15. Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2014-09-23

    An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

  16. Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2018-01-23

    An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

  17. Discuss on luminescence dose data analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinhua; Xiao Wuyun; Ai Xianyun; Shi Zhilan; Liu Ying

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development of luminescence dose data measurement and processing technology. General design planning of luminescence dose data measurement and processing technology is put forward with the diverse demands. The emphasis is focused on dose data processing method, luminescence curve analysis method, using of network, mechanics of communication among computers, data base management system of individual dose in this paper. The main methods and skills used in this technology as well as their advantages are also discussed. And it offers general design references for development luminescence dose data processing software. (authors)

  18. Probing the effects of ligand isomerism in chiral luminescent lanthanide supramolecular self-assemblies: a europium "Trinity Sliotar" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, Oxana; Kitchen, Jonathan A; Lincheneau, Christophe; Peacock, Robert D; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2013-11-25

    "Trinity Sliotar" family: Chiral ligands containing pyridyl and naphthalene moieties were synthesized and characterized. These ligands were successfully used for the synthesis of Eu(III) bundles where chirality of the ligand is successfully transferred onto the lanthanide centre resulting in circularly polarized red luminescence. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  20. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  1. Kinetics of infrared stimulated luminescence from feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Sohbati, Reza; Guralnik, Benny

    2015-01-01

    thermal and optical, of the infrared stimulated luminescence signal from feldspar. Based on the application of this model, it is concluded that different infra-red stimulated luminescence emissions (UV, blue, yellow and far-red) follow the same kinetics, and, therefore, involve participation of the same...... in feldspar. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. Violet stimulated luminescence: geo- or thermochronometer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Guralnik, Benny; Porat, N.

    2015-01-01

    The method of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is widely used, but generally limited to the past ~0.1 million years (Ma) due to early saturation of the desired signal. Violet stimulated luminescence (VSL) of quartz has previously been shown as a promising alternative...

  3. Receptor-Targeted Luminescent Silver Bionanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunschoten, Anton; Chin, Patrick T.K.; Buckle, Tessa; Linden, van der Marte; Barendregt, Arjan; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Leeuwen, van Fijs W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag-NC) provide the next generation in bionanoparticles, wherein the luminescence (650 nm) and large Stokes shift of these inorganic nanoclusters are favorable for biological imaging. By combining these characteristics with those of human serum albumin (HSA; a protein

  4. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  5. Thermal quenching of luminescence processes in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Duller, G.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    of these processes is, in general, thermally dependent, and leads either to enhancement or quenching of the luminescence with increasing temperature. Previous studies have measured the combined thermal activation characteristics of all three processes, and show a strong dependence on stimulation energy....... In this article, an initial attempt is made to isolate only the recombination part of the luminescence cycle, and determine its thermal characteristics separately. A Variety of luminescence transitions are examined in a range of both alkali and plagioclase feldspars; three distinct emission types are identified...... of the defect. The third category is the most difficult to analyse since it involves irreversible changes in the luminescence characteristics with increasing temperature; we consider these to be due to thermally-induced destruction or creation of luminescence centres. Most of the alkali and plagioclase...

  6. Luminescence detection of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The need for forensic tests to identify irradiated foods has been widely recognised at a time of growing international trade in such products and impending changes in UK and EEC legislation to control the process. This paper outlines the requirements for and of such tests, and discusses recent developments in luminescence approaches aimed at meeting the needs of public analysts, retailers and consumers. Detecting whether or not food has been irradiated, and if so to what dose, is one of the challenges which food irradiation poses to the scientist. (author)

  7. Functional silk: colored and luminescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansil, Natalia C; Koh, Leng Duei; Han, Ming-Yong

    2012-03-15

    Silkworm silk is among the most widely used natural fibers for textile and biomedical applications due to its extraordinary mechanical properties and superior biocompatibility. A number of physical and chemical processes have also been developed to reconstruct silk into various forms or to artificially produce silk-like materials. In addition to the direct use and the delicate replication of silk's natural structure and properties, there is a growing interest to introduce more new functionalities into silk while maintaining its advantageous intrinsic properties. In this review we assess various methods and their merits to produce functional silk, specifically those with color and luminescence, through post-processing steps as well as biological approaches. There is a highlight on intrinsically colored and luminescent silk produced directly from silkworms for a wide range of applications, and a discussion on the suitable molecular properties for being incorporated effectively into silk while it is being produced in the silk gland. With these understanding, a new generation of silk containing various functional materials (e.g., drugs, antibiotics and stimuli-sensitive dyes) would be produced for novel applications such as cancer therapy with controlled release feature, wound dressing with monitoring/sensing feature, tissue engineering scaffolds with antibacterial, anticoagulant or anti-inflammatory feature, and many others. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. NON-RACEMIC AMINO ACID PRODUCTION BY ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION OF ACHIRAL INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS WITH CIRCULARLY POLARIZED LIGHT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marcellus, Pierre; Nuevo, Michel; Danger, Gregoire; Deboffle, Dominique; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Louis; Meinert, Cornelia; Filippi, Jean-Jacques; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Nahon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The delivery of organic matter to the primitive Earth via comets and meteorites has long been hypothesized to be an important source for prebiotic compounds such as amino acids or their chemical precursors that contributed to the development of prebiotic chemistry leading, on Earth, to the emergence of life. Photochemistry of inter/circumstellar ices around protostellar objects is a potential process leading to complex organic species, although difficult to establish from limited infrared observations only. Here we report the first abiotic cosmic ice simulation experiments that produce species with enantiomeric excesses (e.e.'s). Circularly polarized ultraviolet light (UV-CPL) from a synchrotron source induces asymmetric photochemistry on initially achiral inter/circumstellar ice analogs. Enantioselective multidimensional gas chromatography measurements show significant e.e.'s of up to 1.34% for ( 13 C)-alanine, for which the signs and absolute values are related to the helicity and number of CPL photons per deposited molecule. This result, directly comparable with some L excesses measured in meteorites, supports a scenario in which exogenous delivery of organics displaying a slight L excess, produced in an extraterrestrial environment by an asymmetric astrophysical process, is at the origin of biomolecular asymmetry on Earth. As a consequence, a fraction of the meteoritic organic material consisting of non-racemic compounds may well have been formed outside the solar system. Finally, following this hypothesis, we support the idea that the protosolar nebula has indeed been formed in a region of massive star formation, regions where UV-CPL of the same helicity is actually observed over large spatial areas.

  9. Automated multifunction apparatus for spectral and polarization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.N.; Kurakov, A.Ya.

    1992-01-01

    An automated spectral apparatus is described that is based on an SDL-2 spectrometer for spectral and polarization measurements with small specimens (0.15 x 0.15 mm) by the Fourier-coefficient method in the visible and ultraviolet regions over a wide range of temperatures. The absorption, dichroism, birefringence, and polarization orientation of natural waves are determined simultaneously in a single measurement cycle. Polarization-luminescence spectra can also be recorded from one region of the specimen without its adjustment. 3 refs., 3 figs

  10. Development of polarization magneto-optics of paramagnetic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapasskij, V.S.; Feofilov, P.P.

    1975-01-01

    The present status of the polarization magnetooptics of crystals containing paramagnetic ion impurities is reviewed. The paper discusses methods of measurement of circular magnetic anisotropy and results obtained in recent years in the field of conventional magnetooptical studies, e.g., magnetooptical activity in absorption spectra for intrinsic and impurity defects in crystals, luminescence magnetic circular polarization, anisotropy of magnetooptical activity in cubic crystals. The main emphasis is placed on new trends in polarization magnetooptics: studies of interactions of a spin system with a lattice, in particular, spin-lattice relaxation and spin memory effect, experiments in the double radiooptical resonance, studies of optical spin relaxation, nonlinear magnetooptical effects, etc

  11. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuto, H., E-mail: ryuto@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Musumeci, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania 95123 (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania 95123 (Italy)

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  12. Polymeric Luminescent Compositions Doped with Beta-Diketonates Boron Difluoride as Material for Luminescent Solar Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrebtov, A. A.; Fedorenko, E. V.; Reutov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we investigated polymeric luminescent compositions based on polystyrene doped with beta diketonates boron difluoride. Transparent films with effective absorption in the ultraviolet and blue regions of the spectrum were obtained. Polymeric luminescent compositions based on the mixture of dyes allow expanding the absorption region and increase the radiation shift. A luminescent solar concentrator consisting of a glass plate coated with such film can be used for photovoltaic window application.

  13. New cyanopyridone based luminescent liquid crystalline materials: synthesis and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N, Ahipa T; Adhikari, Airody Vasudeva

    2014-11-01

    A new series of 4-(3,4-bis(akyloxy)phenyl)-6-(4-((1-(4-cyano- or 4-nitro-benzyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)methoxy)phenyl)-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitriles carrying terminal di-alkoxy chain lengths (viz. octyloxy, decyloxy, dodecyloxy, tetradecyloxy and hexadodecyloxy) as well as terminal polar groups -CN or -NO2 have been designed and synthesized successfully as luminescent mesogens. Their thermotropic behaviors have been studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry and polarized optical microscopy. The supramolecular organizations in them were explored by the temperature dependent X-ray diffraction method and their photophysical properties were investigated using UV-visible and fluorescence spectral methods. The mesogenic study reveals that the presence of hydrogen bonds, as well as dimerization between the molecules, is mainly responsible for the formation of the ambient temperature hexagonal columnar phase (Colh) in the new molecules. Their photophysical study indicates that the compounds exhibit a strong absorption band at ∼370 nm and a blue emission band at ∼466 nm with good quantum yields of ∼0.62 when compared to quinine sulphate (Φf = 0.54) in chloroform. Also, the compounds show a slightly red shift in the absorption band with increased solvent polarity. In liquid crystalline films, they display a bathochromic shift in the emission band because of the intimate overlap of molecular cores in the hexagonal columnar phase.

  14. Luminescent solutions and films of new europium complexes with chelating ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Ivanov, Alexey V.; Borisova, Nataliya E.; Kaminskaya, Tatiana P.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.; Popov, Vladimir V.; Yuzhakov, Viktor I.

    2015-03-01

    The development of new complexes of rare earth elements (REE) with chelating organic ligands opens up the possibility of purposeful alteration in the composition and structure of the complexes, and therefore tuning their optical properties. New ligands possessing two pyridine rings in their structure were synthesized to improve coordination properties and photophysical characteristics of REE compounds. Complexes of trivalent europium with novel chelating ligands were investigated using luminescence and absorption spectroscopy, as well as atomic force microscopy. Luminescence properties of new compounds were studied both for solutions and films deposited on the solid support. All complexes exhibit the characteristic red luminescence of Eu (III) ion with the absolute lumenescence quantum yield in polar acetonitrile solution varying from 0.21 to 1.45 % and emission lifetime ranged from 0.1 to 1 ms. Excitation spectra of Eu coordination complexes correspond with absorption bands of chelating ligand. The energy levels of the triplet state of the new ligands were determined from the phosphorescence at 77 K of the corresponding Gd (III) complexes. The morphology of films of europium complexes with different substituents in the organic ligands was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It strongly depends both on the type of substituent in the organic ligand, and the rotation speed of the spin-coater. New europium complexes with chelating ligands containing additional pyridine fragments represent outstanding candidates for phosphors with improved luminescence properties.

  15. Nanocrystals for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Liam R; Knowles, Kathryn E; McDowall, Stephen; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-02-11

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) harvest sunlight over large areas and concentrate this energy onto photovoltaics or for other uses by transporting photons through macroscopic waveguides. Although attractive for lowering solar energy costs, LSCs remain severely limited by luminophore reabsorption losses. Here, we report a quantitative comparison of four types of nanocrystal (NC) phosphors recently proposed to minimize reabsorption in large-scale LSCs: two nanocrystal heterostructures and two doped nanocrystals. Experimental and numerical analyses both show that even the small core absorption of the leading NC heterostructures causes major reabsorption losses at relatively short transport lengths. Doped NCs outperform the heterostructures substantially in this critical property. A new LSC phosphor is introduced, nanocrystalline Cd(1-x)Cu(x)Se, that outperforms all other leading NCs by a significant margin in both small- and large-scale LSCs under full-spectrum conditions.

  16. Wireless Luminescence Integrated Sensors (WLIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, M.L.; Sayler, G.S. (Univ. Tennessee)

    2003-11-10

    The goal of this project was the development of a family of wireless, single-chip, luminescence-sensing devices to solve a number of difficult distributed measurement problems in areas ranging from environmental monitoring and assessment to high-throughput screening of combinatorial chemistry libraries. These wireless luminescence integrated sensors (WLIS) consist of a microluminometer, wireless data transmitter, and RF power input circuit all realized in a standard integrated circuit (IC) process with genetically engineered, whole-cell, bioluminescent bioreporters encapsulated and deposited on the IC. The end product is a family of compact, low-power, rugged, low-cost sensors. As part of this program they developed an integrated photodiode/signal-processing scheme with an rms noise level of 175 electrons/second for a 13-minute integration time, and a quantum efficiency of 66% at the 490-nm bioluminescent wavelength. this performance provided a detection limit of < 1000 photons/second. Although sol-gel has previously been used to encapsulate yeast cells, the reaction conditions necessary for polymerization (primarily low pH) have beforehand proven too harsh for bacterial cell immobilizations. Utilizing sonication methods, they have were able to initiate polymerization under pH conditions conductive to cell survival. both a toluene bioreporter (Pseudomonas putida TVA8) and a naphthalene bioreporter (Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44) were successfully encapsulated in sol-gel and shown to produce a fairly significant bioluminescent response. In addition to the previously developed naphthalene- and toluene-sensitive bioreporters, they developed a yeast-based xenoestrogen reporter. This technology has been licensed by Micro Systems Technologies, a startup company in Dayton, Ohio for applications in environmental containments monitoring, and for detecting weapons of mass destruction (i.e. homeland security).

  17. Luminescence of ions with s2 configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, A. van der.

    1980-01-01

    Some Bi 3+ -activated oxidic compounds show a red luminescence (e.g. BaSO 4 -Bi 3+ and Ca 2 P 2 O 7 -Bi 3+ ); others show an ultraviolet emission (e.g. LaGaO 3 -Bi 3+ and Ln 2 SO 6 -Bi 3+ (Ln=Y, La, Lu)). This thesis investigates which factors are responsible for these large differences in the position of the emission bands, which factors determine the occurrence of vibrational structure in the luminescence spectra of an s 2 ion and what the influence of the non-radiative processes in the 3 P multiplet is on the luminescence characteristics of the luminescent materials. (Auth.)

  18. Controlled fabrication of luminescent and magnetic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingxin; Zhong, Yucheng; Fan, Jing; Huang, Weiren

    2018-03-01

    Luminescent and magnetic multifunctional nanocomposite is in high demand and widely used in many scales, such as drug delivery, bioseparation, chemical/biosensors, and so on. Although lots of strategies have been successfully developed for the demand of multifunctional nanocomposites, it is not easy to prepare multifunctional nanocomposites by using a simple method, and satisfy all kinds of demands simultaneously. In this work, via a facile and versatile method, luminescent nanocrystals and magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through self-assembly under vigorous stirring and ultrasonic treatment. These multifunctional nanocomposites are not only water stable but also find wide application such as magnetic separation and concentration with a series of moderate speed, multicolor fluorescence at different emission wavelength, high efficiency of the excitation and emission, and so on. By changing different kinds of luminescent nanocrystals and controlling the amount of luminescent and magnetic nanoparticles, a train of multifunctional nanocomposites was successfully fabricated via a versatile and robust method.

  19. Luminescent Lariat Aza-Crown Ether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard König

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lariat ethers are interesting recognition motifs in supramolecular chemistry. The synthesis of a luminescent lariat ether with triglycol chain by azide–alkyne (Huisgen cycloaddition is presented.

  20. Application of luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Luminescence signals measured from minerals within bricks or ceramic samples can provide information about the absorbed radiation dose. This feature has for several years been used in dating archaeological and geological samples and recently luminescence techniques have been intensively used far...... retrospective assessment of accident doses received by the population after a nuclear accident. The development of new luminescence techniques after the Chernobyl accident has considerably improved the sensitivity and precision in the evaluation of accident doses. This paper reviews the development work......, especially on optically stimulated luminescence methods for retrospective assessment of accident doses carried out at Riso National Laboratory in collaboration with the University of Helsinki as part bf a joint European Union research project. We demonstrate that doses lower than 100 mGy can be measured from...

  1. Recent developments in luminescent solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sark, W. G. J. H. M.

    2014-10-01

    High efficiency photovoltaic devices combine full solar spectrum absorption and effective generation and collection of charge carriers, while commercial success depends on cost effectiveness in manufacturing. Spectrum modification using down shifting has been demonstrated in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) since the 1970s, as a cheap alternative for standard c-Si technology. LSCs consist of a highly transparent plastic plate, in which luminescent species are dispersed, which absorb incident light and emit light at a red-shifted wavelength, with high quantum efficiency. Material issues have hampered efficiency improvements, in particular re-absorption of light emitted by luminescent species and stability of these species. In this contribution, approaches are reviewed on minimizing re-absorption, which should allow surpassing the 10% luminescent solar concentrator efficiency barrier.

  2. Quartz as a natural luminescence dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preusser, Frank; Chithambo, Makaiko L.; Götte, Thomas; Martini, Marco; Ramseyer, Karl; Sendezera, Emmanuel J.; Susino, George J.; Wintle, Ann G.

    2009-12-01

    Luminescence from quartz is commonly used in retrospective dosimetry, in particular for the dating of archaeological materials and sediments from the Quaternary period. The phenomenon of luminescence is related to the interaction of natural radiation with mineral grains, by the activation of and subsequent trapping of electrons at defects within the quartz lattice. The latent luminescence signal (i.e. the trapped electrons) is released when the grains are exposed to stimulation energy in the form of light or heat. Despite the fact that quartz is most nominally pure SiO 2, the mineral forms in several different geological settings, i.e. under different pressure and temperature conditions. The luminescence emitted from quartz is complex and shows a variety of different components with diverse physical properties. This complexity is explained by the variety of defects in quartz that are either intrinsic (e.g., Si and O vacancies) or related to impurity atoms (e.g., Al or Ti). The concentration of impurity-related defects is dependent on the conditions of mineral formation or subsequent alteration. Experimental data have shown that the luminescence properties of quartz are highly variable with geological source and vary even at a grain-to-grain level within a sediment. As a consequence, caution is needed when making any general statements about the luminescence properties of quartz. When using luminescence measurements as a dating technique, it is necessary to adjust the measurement procedures for each geological provenance. Furthermore, some quartz has luminescence properties that make it problematic, or even unsuitable, for certain applications. These problems can arise from low and changing luminescence sensitivity, thermal transfer of trapped electrons, thermal instability of the trapped electrons and low saturation dose. Reviewing the present knowledge reveals that insufficient information is available either to unambiguously link distinctive lattice defects with

  3. Luminescence basic concepts, applications and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2014-01-01

    The word luminescence was first used by a German physicist, Eilhardt Wiedemann, in 1888. He also classified luminescence into six kinds according to the method of excitation. No better basis of classification is available today. He recognized photoluminescence, thermoluminescence, electroluminescence, crystalloluminescence, triboluminescence, and chemiluminescence. The designations are obvious, characterized by the prefix. This Volume consists of 9 Chapters, including 8 Review Papers and one Case Study. The first two papers are based on OLEDs. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been th

  4. Political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K.; Weibull, Jörgen W.

    2007-01-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  5. Political polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avinash K; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2007-05-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  6. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O.; Ramos, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  7. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ramos, A. P., E-mail: ederguidelli@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Quimica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  8. Chiroptical luminescence spectra of UO22+ in cubic Na[UO2(CH3COO)3] crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, D.M.; Metcalf, D.H.; Richardson, F.S.

    1992-01-01

    Steady-state chiroptical luminescence measurements are reported for cubic crystals of Na[UO 2 (CH 3 COO) 3 ]. These crystals belong to the enantiomorphic space group P2 1 3, with four molecules per unit cell, and each UO 2 (CH 3 COO) 3 - coordination unit has a chiral tris-bidentate chelate structure of C 3 symmetry. The UO 2 O' 6 coordination clusters (where O' denotes an acetate oxygen donor atom) also have chiral structures of C 3 point-group symmetry, but they deviate only slightly from an achiral D 3h symmetry. The luminescence observed for Na[UO 2 (CH 3 COO) 3 ] is assigned to transitions that originate from the lowest electronic excited state (II g ) of UO 2 2+ and terminate on the ground electronic state (Σ g + ). At least two types of UO 2 2+ species contribute to this luminescence, but the luminescence spectra can be analyzed in terms of separate majority species (or bulk site) contributions and minority species (or defect site) contributions. The luminescence spectra show zero-phonon origin lines, one-phonon false-origin lines, and vibronic progressions in the symmetric stretching mode (ν s ) of UO 2 2+ . The false-origin lines and the progressions based on these lines are essentially unpolarized. However, the origin lines and their progressions exhibit a very large degree of circular polarization, with emission dissymmetry factors of g em = 1.31 (majority species) and g em = 0.96 (minority species). The circularly polarized luminescence results for Σ g + left-arrow II g emission are compared to circular dichroism results for Σ g + → II g absorption, and the distribution of Σ g + ↔ II g electronic rotary strength among origin and vibronic lines is discussed within the context of vibronic optical activity theory

  9. Homogeneous Synthesis and Electroluminescence Device of Highly Luminescent CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Song; Yang, Yanchun; Kang, Xiaojiao; Wang, Lan; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2017-03-06

    Highly luminescent CsPbBr 3 perovskite nanocrystals (PNCs) are homogeneously synthesized by mixing toluene solutions of PbBr 2 and cesium oleate at room temperature in open air. We found that PbBr 2 can be easily dissolved in nonpolar toluene in the presence of tetraoctylammonium bromide, which allows us to homogeneously prepare CsPbBr 3 perovskite quantum dots and prevents the use of harmful polar organic solvents, such as N,N-dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. Additionally, this method can be extended to synthesize highly luminescent CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 perovskite quantum dots. An electroluminescence device with a maximal luminance of 110 cd/m 2 has been fabricated by using high-quality CsPbBr 3 PNCs as the emitting layer.

  10. Luminescence dating at Rose cottage cave: a progress report

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Woodborne, S

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Deal with infrared-stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence dates from Rose Cottage Cave in South Africa. Discrepancy between luminescence and radiocarbon dates; Concentration of radioactive elements in sediments before and after leaching...

  11. Polarized View of Supercooled Liquid Water Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven E.; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, where liquid droplets exist at temperatures below 0 C present a well known aviation hazard through aircraft icing, in which SLW accretes on the airframe. SLW clouds are common over the Southern Ocean, and climate-induced changes in their occurrence is thought to constitute a strong cloud feedback on global climate. The two recent NASA field campaigns POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX, based in Palmdale, California, January-February 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, based in Houston, Texas in August- September 2013) provided a unique opportunity to observe SLW clouds from the high-altitude airborne platform of NASA's ER-2 aircraft. We present an analysis of measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during these experiments accompanied by correlative retrievals from other sensors. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. It is a scanning sensor taking samples at 0.8deg intervals within 60deg from nadir in both forward and backward directions. This unique angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg. Simple parametric fitting algorithms applied to the polarized reflectance provide retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT),which allows retrieval of the droplet size distribution without assuming a size distribution shape. We present an overview of the RSP campaign datasets available from the NASA GISS website, as well as two detailed examples of the retrievals. In these case studies we focus on cloud fields with spatial features

  12. Europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syamchand, S.S.; Sony, G.

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanide based nanoparticles are receiving great attention ought to their excellent luminescent and magnetic properties and find challenging biomedical applications. Among the luminescent lanthanide NPs, europium based NPs (Eu-NPs) are better candidates for immunoassay and imaging applications. The Eu-NPs have an edge over quantum dots (QDs) by means of their stable luminescence, long fluorescence lifetime, sharp emission peaks with narrow band width, lack of blinking and biocompatibility. This review surveys the synthesis and properties of a variety of Eu-NPs consolidated from different research articles, for their applications in medicine and biology. The exquisite luminescent properties of Eu-NPs are explored for developing biomedical applications such as immunoassay and bioimaging including multimodal imaging. The biomedical applications of Eu-NPs are mostly diagnostic in nature and mainly focus on various key analytes present in biological systems. The luminescent properties of europium enabled NPs are influenced by a number of factors such as the site symmetry, the metal nanoparticles, metal ions, quantum dots, surfactants, morphology of Eu-NPs, crystal defect, phenomena like antenna effect and physical parameters like temperature. Through this review we explore and assimilate all the factors which affect the luminescence in Eu-NPs and coil a new thread of parameters that control the luminescence in Eu-NPs, which would provide further insight in developing Eu-based nanoprobes for future biomedical prospects. - Highlights: • The review describes 14 major factors that influence the luminescence properties of europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles (Eu-NPs). • Surveys different types of europium containing nanoparticles that have been reported for their biomedical applications. • Eu-NPs are conveniently divided into four different categories, based on the type of the substrates involved. The four categories are (1) virgin Eu-substrate based NPs; (2

  13. Monitoring Temperatures of Tires Using Luminescent Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencic, Timothy J

    2006-01-01

    A method of noncontact, optical monitoring of the surface temperature of a tire has been devised to enable the use of local temperature rise as an indication of potential or impending failures. The method involves the use of temperature-sensitive paint (or filler): Temperature-sensitive luminescent dye molecules or other luminescent particles are incorporated into a thin, flexible material coating the tire surface of interest. (Alternatively, in principle, the luminescent material could be incorporated directly into the tire rubber, though this approach has not yet been tested.) The coated surface is illuminated with shorter-wavelength light to excite longer-wavelength luminescence, which is observed by use of a charge-coupled-device camera or a photodetector (see Figure 1). If temporally constant illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the intensity response of the luminescence. If pulsed illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the time or frequency response of the luminescence. If sinusoidally varying illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the phase response of the luminescence. Unlike a prior method of monitoring the temperature at a fixed spot on a tire by use of a thermocouple, this method is not restricted to one spot and can, therefore, yield information on the spatial distribution of temperature: in particular, it enables the discovery of newly forming hot spots where damage may be starting. Also unlike in the thermocouple method, the measurements in this method are not vulnerable to breakage of wires in repeated flexing of the tire. Moreover, unlike in another method in which infrared radiation is monitored as an indication of surface temperature, the luminescence measurements in this method are not significantly affected by changes in infrared emissivity. This method has been

  14. Luminescence dating and palaeomagnetic age constraint on hominins from Sima de los Huesos, Atapuerca, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lee J; Demuro, Martina; Parés, Josep M; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Aranburu, Arantza; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2014-02-01

    Establishing a reliable chronology on the extensive hominin remains at Sima de los Huesos is critical for an improved understanding of the complex evolutionary histories and phylogenetic relationships of the European Middle Pleistocene hominin record. In this study, we use a combination of 'extended-range' luminescence dating techniques and palaeomagnetism to provide new age constraint on sedimentary infills that are unambiguously associated with the Sima fossil assemblage. Post-infrared-infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IR) dating of K-feldspars and thermally transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) dating of individual quartz grains provide weighted mean ages of 433 ± 15 ka (thousands of years) and 416 ± 19 ka, respectively, for allochthonous sedimentary horizons overlying the hominin-bearing clay breccia. The six replicate luminescence ages obtained for this deposit are reproducible and provide a combined minimum age estimate of 427 ± 12 ka for the underlying hominin fossils. Palaeomagnetic directions for the luminescence dated sediment horizon and underlying fossiliferous clays display exclusively normal polarities. These findings are consistent with the luminescence dating results and confirm that the hominin fossil horizon accumulated during the Brunhes Chron, i.e., within the last 780 ka. The new bracketing age constraint for the Sima hominins is in broad agreement with radiometrically dated Homo heidelbergensis fossil sites, such as Mauer and Arago, and suggests that the split of the H. neanderthalensis and H. sapiens lineages took place during the early Middle Pleistocene. More widespread numerical dating of key Early and Middle Pleistocene fossil sites across Europe is needed to test and refine competing models of hominin evolution. The new luminescence chronologies presented in this study demonstrate the versatility of TT-OSL and pIR-IR techniques and the potential role they could play in helping to refine evolutionary

  15. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Broer, D.J.; Debije, M.G.; Keur, W.C.; Meijerink, A.; Ronda, C.R.; Verbunt, P.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introducea phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardlyany reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator isthe large scattering of this

  16. Cerium luminescence in nd0 perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlur, A.A.; Happek, U.

    2010-01-01

    The luminescence of Ce 3+ in perovskite (ABO 3 ) hosts with nd 0 B-site cations, specifically Ca(Hf,Zr)O 3 and (La,Gd)ScO 3 , is investigated in this report. The energy position of the Ce 3+ excitation and emission bands in these perovskites is compared to those of typical Al 3+ perovskites; we find a Ce 3+ 5d 1 centroid shift and Stokes shift that are larger versus the corresponding values for the Al 3+ perovskites. It is also shown that Ce 3+ luminescence quenching is due to Ce 3+ photoionization. The comparison between these perovskites shows reasonable correlations between Ce 3+ luminescence quenching, the energy position of the Ce 3+ 5d 1 excited state with respect to the host conduction band, and the host composition. - Graphical abstract: Ce 3+ decay times versus temperature for perovskites with nd 0 B-site cations.

  17. Taking advantage of luminescent lanthanide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünzli, Jean-Claude G; Piguet, Claude

    2005-12-01

    Lanthanide ions possess fascinating optical properties and their discovery, first industrial uses and present high technological applications are largely governed by their interaction with light. Lighting devices (economical luminescent lamps, light emitting diodes), television and computer displays, optical fibres, optical amplifiers, lasers, as well as responsive luminescent stains for biomedical analysis, medical diagnosis, and cell imaging rely heavily on lanthanide ions. This critical review has been tailored for a broad audience of chemists, biochemists and materials scientists; the basics of lanthanide photophysics are highlighted together with the synthetic strategies used to insert these ions into mono- and polymetallic molecular edifices. Recent advances in NIR-emitting materials, including liquid crystals, and in the control of luminescent properties in polymetallic assemblies are also presented. (210 references.).

  18. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Luminescence dating of glaciofluvial deposits: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, I. M.; Mauz, B.; Chiverrell, R. C.; Lang, A.

    2009-12-01

    For glacigenic sediments, Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating offers an opportunity to date the time of deposition of quartz and feldspar minerals that are ubiquitous within the sediment matrix, rather than relying upon the chance occurrence of organic material for radiocarbon dating. The OSL dating signal or charge accumulates in crystal defects of individual quartz and feldspar minerals through exposure to environmental radiation within their depositional setting. The OSL signal within individual grains can be reset or bleached through exposure to daylight during transportation processes. Thus OSL dating of sediments attempts to determine the time elapsed since burial. Glacigenic sediments present considerable challenges for OSL dating not only in terms of poor bleaching of the OSL signal during the transport and deposition cycle, but also poor quartz luminescence characteristics which are often related to sediment provenance, the nature of the bedrock or source material, and the freshly eroded nature of many such deposits. This paper reviews luminescence dating techniques as applied to glaciofluvial sediments and explores the challenges that such deposits present to the technique. Successful application of OSL techniques can be judged in a number of ways: comparison with the 'independent' chronologies is prevalent in the literature, but recently the movement towards measurement of large numbers of small aliquots and single grains allows a more robust assessment of luminescence properties and behaviour for individual samples and ultimately more precise luminescence ages to be determined. For glaciofluvial sediments in particular, it is important to investigate the depositional sub-environment of each sample in relation to the chance of sufficient bleaching during transport and deposition. A lithofacies-based approach to sampling for optically stimulated luminescence dating of these sediments is suggested whereby hypothetically well-bleached deposits

  20. Lanthanide luminescence for functional materials and bio-sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseeva, Svetlana V; Bünzli, Jean-Claude G

    2010-01-01

    Recent startling interest for lanthanide luminescence is stimulated by the continuously expanding need for luminescent materials meeting the stringent requirements of telecommunication, lighting, electroluminescent devices, (bio-)analytical sensors and bio-imaging set-ups. This critical review describes the latest developments in (i) the sensitization of near-infrared luminescence, (ii) "soft" luminescent materials (liquid crystals, ionic liquids, ionogels), (iii) electroluminescent materials for organic light emitting diodes, with emphasis on white light generation, and (iv) applications in luminescent bio-sensing and bio-imaging based on time-resolved detection and multiphoton excitation (500 references).

  1. Two-photon luminescence microscopy of field enhancement at gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2005-01-01

    Using a reflection scanning optical microscope detecting two-photon luminescence (TPL) we have imaged square gold bumps positioned in a periodic array either on a smooth gold film or directly on a glass substrate. The second-harmonic (SH) and TPL response from these structures show both...... polarization and wavelength dependence. The gold bumps on gold film showed extremely high sensitivity to the incident field, with the strongest TPL response from the gold bumps being enhanced nearly 103 times compared to the TPL response from the smooth gold surface. For gold bumps directly on glass...

  2. Highly luminescent two dimensional excitons in atomically thin CdSe nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, O.; Pradhani, A.; Rath, S., E-mail: srath@iitbbs.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Toshali Bhawan, Satyanagar, Bhubaneswar 751 007 (India); Sahoo, P. K. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Sachivalaya marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Satpati, B. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2014-05-05

    Atomically thin Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) nanosheets have been synthesized using a surfactant mediated growth technique. The transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the presence of single layered nanosheets with thickness 1.31 nm and their stacking structures which are complemented by the small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The strongly bound and polarized character of two dimensional excitonic states with enhanced oscillator strength yielding distinct narrow blue luminescence has been observed from the CdSe nanosheets using room temperature based optical studies.

  3. Luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses with lead chalcogenides molecular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolobkova, E.V.; Kukushkin, D.S.; Nikonorov, N.V.; Shakhverdov, T.A.; Sidorov, A.I.; Vasiliev, V.N.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorophosphate glasses containing lead, selenium, and sulfur exhibit an intense luminescence in the 400–620 nm spectral region when excited by the 240–420 nm radiation. This luminescence is due to the presence of (PbSe) n and/or (PbS) n molecular clusters in the glasses, which appear in the as-prepared glasses before quantum dots formation. The thermal treatment at temperatures less than the glass transition temperature results in the red-shift of the luminescence bands and in an increase in the luminescence intensity. Heating the thermally treated glass samples leads to the reversible thermal quenching of the luminescence. - Highlights: • Fluorophosphate glasses with Pb, Se, and S ions contain (PbSe) n or (PbS) n molecular clusters. • (PbSe) n and (PbS) n molecular clusters possess luminescence in the visible with UV excitation. • Heating the glass leads to the reversible thermal quenching of the luminescence

  4. Enhancing and quenching luminescence with gold nanoparticle films: the influence of substrate on the luminescent properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelli, Eder José; Baffa, Oswaldo; Ramos, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) films were sputtered over glass and aluminum substrates to enhance optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), a luminescent technique employed for radiation detection, from x-ray irradiated NaCl nanocrystals. The AuNP films deposited over glass led to enhanced-OSL emission, whereas the AuNP films deposited on aluminum substrates quenched the OSL emission. The enhanced-OSL intensity is proportional to the optical density of the film's plasmon resonance band at the stimulation wavelength. For the case of the AuNP/aluminum films, the luminescence quenching diminishes, and OSL intensity partially recovers upon increasing the distance between the AuNPs and the aluminum substrates, and between the luminescent nanocrystals and the AuNP films. These results suggest that plasmonic interactions between the emitter nanocrystals, the localized surface plasmons (LSP) of the AuNPs, and the substrate are responsible for the OSL enhancement and quenching. In this sense, the substrate dictates whether LSP relaxation occurs by radiative or non-radiative transisitions, leading to enhanced or quenched OSL, respectively. Therefore, besides showing that AuNP films can enhance and/or tune the sensitivity of luminescent radiation detectors, and demonstrating OSL as a new technique to investigate mechanisms of plasmon-enhanced luminescence, these results bring insights on how substrates strongly modify the optical properties of AuNP films. (paper)

  5. The mensuration of delayed luminescence on ginseng

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Fenghua; Bai, Hua; Tang, Guoqing

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, the delayed luminescence of ginseng produced from two different areas was determined with the self built bioluminescence detecting system. And the attenuation curve of bioluminescence of the experimental samples were studied, before and after the samples extracted by 58% alcohol. We primarily gave out the parameters describing emitting characteristic. Using the method of optic induced bioluminescence, we also determined the weak luminescence emitting from the ginseng tuber, and find the intensity and decay time having obvious difference from skin and core, with these data we can distinguish the producing area and feature of the ginseng. In the experiment, the light-induce luminescence of the sample was menstruated, which has been infused by water and 58% alcohol; the difference between two kinds of samples which were infused and not infused has been delivered. In order to investigate the effect of excitation-light spectrum component to delayed luminescence of ginseng, a light filter witch allow a wavelength scope of 225nm~420nm pass through was installed between the light source and sample, keeping other work condition unchanged, the bioluminescence was also determined. For investigating the effect of extracting to emitting, the absorption spectrum of above samples ware studied, and the time-sequence of absorption spectrum was obtained. Based on the data obtained from our experiment, we analyzed the radiation mechanism of ginseng slice and tuber.

  6. Combustion synthesis and preliminary luminescence studies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The polycrystalline sample of LiBaPO4 : Tb3+ (LBPT) was successfully synthesized by solution combustion synthesis and studied for its luminescence characteristics. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve of LBPT material consists of two peaks at 204.54 and 251.21°C. The optimum concentration was 0.005 mol to ...

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic, electrochemical and luminescence studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hydrazino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole (LH2) as co-ligand were synthesised and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV/Vis, 1H NMR spectra and FAB-mass data. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of the complexes were also ...

  8. Studies of positron induced luminescence from polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Lewis, T.A.; Tolk, N.H.

    1994-01-01

    Light emission from polymers (anthracene dissolved in polystryrene) induced by low-energy positrons and electrons has been studied. Results indicate a clear difference between optical emissions under positron and electron bombardment. The positron-induced luminescence spectrum is believed to be generated by both collisional and annihilation processes

  9. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successful...

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and luminescence property ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 12. Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and luminescence property of a three dimensional Sm(III) coordination polymer with 2,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. Kranthi Kumar Gangu Anima S Dadhich Saratchandra Babu Mukkamala. Volume 127 Issue 12 ...

  11. Understanding the influence of nanoenvironment on luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The role of the rare-earth ion concentration, crystal size and crystal phase on the up- and downconversion emission of rare-earth ions in oxide nanocrystals and their underlying mechanisms are discussed. It is also found that the luminescence lifetime of the excited state rare-earth ions is sensitive to the particle crystalline ...

  12. Understanding the influence of nanoenvironment on luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Understanding the influence of nanoenvironment on luminescence of rare-earth ions. PUSHPAL GHOSH and AMITAVA PATRA∗. Sol-Gel Division, Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032,. India. *Corresponding author. E-mail: apatra@cgcri.res.in. Abstract. This paper presents an overview ...

  13. Biosynthesis of myristic acid in luminescent bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    In vivo pulse-label studies have demonstrated that luminescent bacteria can provide myritic acid (14:0) required for the synthesis of the luciferase substrate myristyl aldehyde. Luminescent wild type Vibrio harveyi incubated with [ 14 C] acetate in a nutrient-depleted medium accumulated substantial tree [ 14 C]fatty acid (up to 20% of the total lipid label). Radio-gas chromatography revealed that > 75% of the labeled fatty acid is 14:0. No free fatty acid was detected in wild type cells labeled prior to the development of bioluminescence in the exponential growth phase, or in a dark mutant of V. harveyi (mutant M17) that requires exogenous 14:0 for light emission. The preferential accumulation of 14:0 was not observed when wild type cells were labeled with [ 14 C]acetate in regular growth medium. Moreover, all V. harveyi strains exhibited similar fatty acid mass compositions regardless of the state of bioluminescence. Since earlier work has shown that a luminescence-related acyltransferase (defective in the M17 mutant) can catalyze the deacylation of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein in vitro, the present results are consistent with a model in which this enzyme diverts 14:0 to the luminescence system during fatty acid biosynthesis. Under normal conditions, the supply of 14:0 by this pathway is tightly regulated such that bioluminescence development does not significantly alter the total fatty acid composition

  14. Multistate Luminescent Solar Concentrator "Smart" Windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sol, Jeroen A.H.P.; Timmermans, Gilles H.; Breugel, van Abraham J.; Schenning, Albertus P.H.J.; Debije, Michael G.

    2018-01-01

    A supertwist liquid crystalline luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) "smart" window is fabricated which can be switched electrically between three states: one designed for increased light absorption and electrical generation (the "dark" state), one for transparency (the "light" state), and one for

  15. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of young sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni Tindahl; Murray, Andrew S.

    2009-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of young (... of OSL dating, outlines the problems specific to the dating of young material, and then uses recent applications to young sediments to illustrate the greatly increased scope and potential of the method in geomorphology and the geology of recent deposits. The overall reliability of this new generation...

  16. Synthesis, crystal structure, theoretical study and luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    performed on complex 1 to rationalize its experimental absorption spectra. Complex 1 exhibits luminescence in EtOH ... potential applications in biological systems like, devel- opment of structural and functional models for ... to react with [WOnS4−n] (n = 0-2).11,12 These reactions result in the formation of a large number of ...

  17. Combustion synthesis and preliminary luminescence studies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bustion synthesis and studied for its luminescence characteristics. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve of. LBPT material consists of two peaks at 204.54 and 251.21◦C. The optimum concentration was 0.005 mol to obtain the higher TL intensity compared to commercial TLD-100 phosphor. The peak shape method was ...

  18. Combustion synthesis and preliminary luminescence studies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    6, October 2015, pp. 1527–1531. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Combustion synthesis and preliminary luminescence studies of. LiBaPO4 : Tb. 3+ phosphor. C B PALAN1,∗, N S BAJAJ1, ... MS received 28 April 2015; accepted 8 June 2015. Abstract. ... In CW-OSL mode its sensitivity for beta expo- sure was found to be ...

  19. luminescence in coloured alkali halide crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    irradiated alkali halide crystals are similar to the luminescence excited by high energy radiation. Ueta et al [11] ... emission, a correlation between the deformation bleaching and mechanoluminescence of coloured alkali ..... [32] V P Zakrevskii, T S Orlova and A V Shuldiner, J. Solid State 37, 675 (1995). [33] C D Clark and ...

  20. Identifying and selecting edible luminescent probes as sensors of food quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G. Corradini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Foods contain a plethora of aromatic molecules—natural colors, synthetic dyes, flavors, vitamins, antioxidants, etc.—that are luminescent, exhibiting prompt fluorescence or delayed phosphorescence. Although food autofluorescence has been used to detect specific contaminants (e.g., aflatoxins or to authenticate specific foods (olive oil, much of the potential of using the optical luminescence of intrinsic molecules for sensing properties of foods is unrealized. We summarize here work characterizing the photophysical properties of some edible, and potentially GRAS (generally-recognized-as-safe, chromophores and especially their sensitivity to, and thus potential for sensing, various physical—viscosity, mobility/rigidity—or chemical—polarity, pH—properties of food known to reflect or be indicative of food quality, stability, and safety. A thorough-going characterization of and robust protocols for interpretation of the luminescent signals from edible chromophores can expand the repertoire of analytical techniques available to monitor quality, and even safety, of the food supply at various stages of production, distribution and storage or even at point of sale.

  1. Precessing deuteron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the acceleration in the Nuclotron of deuterons polarized in the horizontal plane is considered. This horizontal polarization is named precessing polarization. The effects of the main magnetic field and synchrotron oscillations are included. The precessing polarization is supposed to be used in studying the polarization parameters of the elastic dp back-scattering and other experiments

  2. Polare maskuliniteter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Anne Hauan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper my aim is to read and understand the journal of Gerrit de Veer from the last journey of William Barents to the Arctic Regions in 1596 and the journal of captain Junge on his hunting trip from Tromsø to Svalbard in 1834.It is nearly 240 years between this to voyages. The first journal is known as the earliest report from the arctic era. Gerrit de Veer adds instructive copper engravings to his text and give us insight in the crews meeting with this new land. Captain Junges journal is found together with his dead crew in a house in a fjord nearby Ny-Ålesund and has no drawings, but word. Both of these journals may be read as sources of the knowledge and understanding of the polar region. They might also unveil the ideas of how to deal with and survive under the challenges that is given. In addition one can ask if the sources can tell us more about how men describe their challenges. Can the way they expressed themselves in the journals give us an understanding of masculinity? And not least help us to create good questions of the change in the ideas of masculinities which is said to follow the change in understanding of the wilderness.

  3. Tunneling-recombination luminescence between Ag0 and Ag2+ in KCl:AgCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delbecq, C.J.; Dexter, D.L.; Yuster, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    Appropriate treatment of a KCl:AgCl crystal results in the trapping of electrons as silver atoms, Ag 0 , and positive holes as AgCl 4 2- , Ag 2+ , centers. Optical excitation of Ag 0 in such a crystal at T 0 and Ag 2+ pairs, similar to the Ag 0 -Cl 2 - tunneling-recombination studies we previously reported. We have shown that Ag 2+ centers are involved in the emission process by preferentially orienting the anisotropic Ag 2+ at 6 K by excitation with polarized light and observing that the afterglow is polarized. Upon warming to 50 K, where the preferentially oriented Ag 2+ can change orientation, a strong reversal in the degree of polarization occurs which finally decays to zero. The characteristics of this luminescence can be understood if we assume: (i) a tunneling-recombination mechanism in which the orientation of the electric vector of the emitted radiation depends on the position of the Ag 0 relative to the Ag 2+ and (ii) the tunneling is anisotropic and depends on the location of the Ag 0 relative to the anisotropic Ag 2+ . The latter assumption is based on the tetragonal (d-like) symmetry of the Ag 2+ complex. Good quantitative agreement between theory and experiment has been obtained on the decay kinetics, the degree of polarization, and the polarization reversal

  4. Synthesis and characterization of luminescent tricationic salts of mesitylene and stilbazolium moieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Tae Soo; McCurdy, William L.; Tanthmanatham, Ontida; Kim, Tae K.; Han, Haesook; Bhowmik, Pradip K.; Heinrich, Benoît; Donnio, Bertrand

    2012-07-01

    A series of luminescent tricationic salts having mesitylene and stilbazolium moieties with various organic counterions were synthesized by using quaternization and metathesis reactions. Their chemical structures were characterized by 1H, 19F and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Their crystalline and amorphous properties were examined by differential scanning calorimetry, polarized optical microscopy, and variable-temperature X-ray diffraction studies. Their thermal stabilities were determined by thermogravimetric analyses, which were in the broad temperature ranges of 239-317 °C in nitrogen. Their optical properties were studied by UV-Vis and photoluminescent spectroscopy. The light-emission properties were dependent on the polarity of organic solvents (positive solvatochromism) but independent on the chemical structures of organic counterions. They emitted blue light in various organic solvents in a broad range of wavelengths of 470-497 nm, but emitted green light in a narrow range of wavelengths of 506-515 nm in their solid states.

  5. Luminescent Langmuir-Blodgett film of a new amphiphilic Eu3+ β-diketonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Luciano F.; Oliveira, Kleber T. de; Neri, Claudio R.; Sousa Filho, Paulo C. de; Bianco, Marcos J. dal; Ramos, Ana P.; Zaniquelli, Maria E.D.; Serra, Osvaldo A.

    2008-01-01

    This work reports on the synthesis and characterization of the ligand 3-hexadecylpentane-2,4-dione (Hhdacac) and its Eu 3+ complexes Eu(hdacac) 6 .2H 2 O, Eu(hdacac) 6 .phen and Eu(hdacac) 6 .tta, where phen and tta denote 1,10-phenanthroline and thenoyltrifluoroacetone, respectively. These new compounds present long carbon chains and their expected miscibility into non-polar ambients is confirmed by the emission spectra of Eu(hdacac) 6 .tta in hexane. Moreover, the amphiphilic properties of Eu(hdacac) 6 complexes allow the obtainment of thin luminescent films by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. In both cases (solids and films), the typical antenna effect of β-diketonates is observed. The alluring characteristics of these compounds raise great interest in many fields of Materials Science, like photo- and electro-luminescent materials (mainly thin 'organic' films), metal catalysts or probes in non-polar solutions, and Langmuir-Blodgett films of several compositions. For the characterization of these products, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H NMR), thermogravimetric analysis, elementary analyses (C, H), scanning electron microscopy (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), absorption (UV-vis/FT-IR) and photoluminescence spectroscopies were used

  6. Time-related luminescence spectroscopic investigation of electron trapping and recombination in infrared stimulated luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Newman, D.; Viney, I.

    2004-11-01

    Infrared stimulated luminescence (ISL) occurred in CaS:Eu,Sm due to formation of luminescent centres Eu2+ and electron trapping centres Sm3+. The electron trapping centres Sm3+ became occupied (forming Sm2+ by trapping excited electrons) in photoluminescence (PL) excitation (PLX) process causing simultaneous ionization of luminescent centres Eu2+ (leaving Eu3+ by losing an electron or capturing a hole). In this paper, the electron trapping in PLX and the recombination in ISL were examined by the time-related PL and ISL spectra of CaS:Eu,Sm. The spectroscopic evidence confirmed that the ISL in CaS:Eu,Sm was produced due to recombination of de-trapped electrons and previously ionized luminescent centres (Eu3+). It was believed that the electron trapping occurred concurrently as occurrence of the PL of Eu2+ in PLX process. However, the recombination of de-trapped electrons and previously ionized luminescent centres took about 10 μs or even more to occur after infrared irradiation.

  7. A CPL NA SOCIEDADE DO CONHECIMENTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrisia Ciancio

    2009-07-01

    online tem sido pensada pela Comunidade dos Países de Língua Portuguesa (CPLP, que registra preocupação com sua entrada na sociedade do conhecimento nas atas das reuniões de chefes de Estado, e seus desdobramentos, ocorridas a cada dois anos. No entanto, faltam projetos concretos a esta proposta. O enquadramento teórico da pesquisa que se apresenta está no terreno flutuante da Lusofonia, que em sua descontinuidade territorial e fragmentação se projeta em alternativas “tecnoculturais”. As missões colonizadoras pontilharam um trajeto invisível. Esfera que, de algum modo, persiste e pode ser restaurada na criação de comunidades virtuais com uso de novas tecnologias para refazer este percurso, agora em concepção inversa, que privilegia o mosaico cultural dos povos. Um círculo virtual que pede por ser também virtuoso. O objetivo é delimitar bases para uma proposta prática de criação de novos canais de interação. Para alcançar tais constatações, a metodologia empregada foi uma análise documental que verifica os debates ao redor da comunicação ao longo de dez anos (1996 a 2006 na CPLP.

  8. CPL : A Core Language for Cloud Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bračevac, Oliver; Erdweg, S.T.; Salvaneschi, Guido; Mezini, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Running distributed applications in the cloud involves deployment. That is, distribution and configuration of application services and middleware infrastructure. The considerable complexity of these tasks resulted in the emergence of declarative JSON-based domain-specific deployment languages to

  9. Anti-Stokes shift luminescent materials for bio-applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xingjun; Su, Qianqian; Feng, Wei; Li, Fuyou

    2017-02-20

    Anti-Stokes shift luminescence is a special optical process, which converts long-wavelength excitation to short-wavelength emission. This unique ability is especially helpful for bio-applications, because the longer-wavelength light source, usually referring to near infrared light, has a larger penetration depth offering a longer working distance for in vivo applications. The anti-Stokes shift luminescence signal can also be distinguished from the auto-fluorescence of biological tissues, thus reducing background interference during bioimaging. Herein, we summarize recent advances in anti-Stokes shift luminescent materials, including lanthanide and triplet-triplet-annihilation-based upconversion nanomaterials, and newly improved hot-band absorption-based luminescent materials. We focus on the synthetic strategies, optical optimization and biological applications as well as present comparative discussions on the luminescence mechanisms and characteristics of these three types of luminescent materials.

  10. Recent progress in biomedical applications of persistent luminescence nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Ma, Qinqin; Wang, Yingqian; Shen, Haijing; Yuan, Quan

    2017-05-18

    Persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) are an emerging group of promising luminescent materials that can remain luminescent after the excitation ceases. In the past decade, PLNPs with intriguing optical properties have been developed and their applications in biomedicine have been widely studied. Due to the ultra-long decay time of persistent luminescence, autofluorescence interference in biosensing and bioimaging can be efficiently eliminated. Moreover, PLNPs can remain luminescent for hours, making them valuable in bio-tracing. Also, persistent luminescence imaging can guide cancer therapy with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and superior sensitivity. Briefly, PLNPs are demonstrated to be a newly-emerging class of functional materials with unprecedented advantages in biomedicine. In this review, we summarized recent advances in the preparation of PLNPs and the applications of PLNPs in biosensing, bioimaging and cancer therapy.

  11. Luminescence imaging: a powerful characterization tool for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trupke, T.; Weber, J. W.

    2010-08-01

    Luminescence imaging techniques are increasingly used in photovoltaics (PV) related research and development and in the production of solar cells and modules. Intense research in this area has revealed a variety of material and device parameters that can be measured, generally with very short measurement times and high spatial resolution. While the focus of luminescence imaging R&D has so far been on traditional wafer based silicon solar cells, the principles of luminescence imaging, and its inherent benefits apply generally to other solar cell concepts and can therefore be expected to accelerate progress also with the further development and realization of advanced, so-called third generation solar cell approaches. This paper reviews some fundamental aspects of luminescence, specifically the relation between the luminescence intensity and both the minority carrier lifetime and the diode voltage. Some resulting specific luminescence imaging applications for silicon solar cells will be discussed.

  12. New luminescence measurement facilities in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapp, Torben; Jain, Mayank; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives a review of recent developments in luminescence measurement facilities on the Risø TL/OSL reader including radio-luminescence (RL), exo-electron and violet stimulation attachments, and a method for characterising and if necessary correcting for beta irradiation source non......), this facility has been used to measure natural doses in feldspar using the decaying NIR RL signal.Secondly, we present a method for mapping radiation field of the built-in 90Sr/90Y β-source and estimating grain-location specific dose-rates. This is important for the accuracy of single grain results, when...... radiation field is spatially non-uniform across the sample area. We document the effect of this correction method and further investigate on the effect of lifting the source to achieve a better dose-rate uniformity.Finally we summarise two recently-developed novel facilities to help investigate (i) the time...

  13. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Luminescence of YAB:Er single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foeldvari, I.; Beregi, E.; Watterich, A. [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, HAS, Konkoly-Thege u. 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Solarz, P.; Dominiak-Dzik, G.; Ryba-Romanowski, W. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, PAS, Okolna 2, 50422 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    Luminescence spectra of YAB:Er crystals were studied in the ultraviolet-visible region and in the 10-300 K temperature range. The dominant Er{sup 3+}-emission belonged to the {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} {yields} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition (18000-18500 cm{sup -1}). Its Stark components were assigned and found to be consistent with those derived from the absorption spectra. The lifetime of the luminescence was determined as a function of temperature and Er-concentration, and the decay kinetics was analyzed. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Anomalous enhancement of nanodiamond luminescence upon heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomich, A. A.; Kudryavtsev, O. S.; Dolenko, T. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Fisenko, A. V.; Konov, V. I.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristic photoluminescence (PL) of nanodiamonds (ND) of different origin (detonation, HPHT, extracted from meteorite) was studied in situ at high temperatures in the range 20-450 °C. Luminescence was excited using 473 nm laser and recorded in the range 500-800 nm. In contrast to decrease of point defect PL in bulk diamond with temperature, we found that the ND luminescence related to ND surface defects increases almost an order of magnitude upon heating to 200-250 °C. The observed effect reveals that water adsorbed on ND surfaces efficiently quenches PL; water desorption on heating leads to dramatic increase of the radiative de-excitation.

  16. Blue luminescence in ZnO single crystals, nanopowders, ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LGrigorjeva; Millers, D; Pankratov, V; Kalinko, A; Grabis, J; Monty, C

    2007-01-01

    The luminescence spectra and luminescence decay processes were studied in a ZnO single crystal, nanopowders and ceramic at liquid helium and room temperature under VUV synchrotron radiation as well as under pulsed laser excitation. The exciton-exciton and exciton-multiphonon processes were compared in different ZnO nanopowders (commercial powder, powders obtained by vaporization-condensation technique) and ceramic. The possibility of luminescence decay time modification by Al 3+ doping was shown

  17. Intrinsic luminescence of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzov, V.I.; Grabovskis, V.Y.; Tolstoi, M.N.; Vitol, I.K.

    1986-09-01

    This study obtains additional information on L centers and their role in electron excitation and intrinsic luminescence of a whole series. (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) of alkali silicate glasses. The authors compare the features of the interaction with radiation of specimens of glass and crystal of a similar chemical composition, since silicates of alkali metals can be obtained in both the glassy and crystalline states.

  18. Spectral converters and luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scudo, Petra F.; Abbondanza, Luigi; Fusco, Roberto; Caccianotti, Luciano [Eni S.p.A, Research Center for Non-Conventional Energies - Istituto ENI Donegani, Via G.Fauser 4, 28100 Novara (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we present a comprehensive theoretical description of molecular spectral converters in the specific context of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). The theoretical model is an extension to a three-level system interacting with a solar radiation bath of the standard quantum theory of atomic radiative processes. We derive the equilibrium equations of the conversion process and provide specific examples of application of this principle to the development of solar concentration devices. (author)

  19. Luminescent materials incorporating pyrazine or quinoxaline moieties

    OpenAIRE

    Achelle, Sylvain; Baudequin, Christine; Plé, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Though the past few decades, the development of new luminescent materials has received a lot of attention due to their applications as fluorescent sensors, in biological microscopy and in optoelectronic devices. Most of these applications are relied on intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). Presence of electron withdrawing N-heterocycles such as pyrazine and quinoxaline rings appeared therefore particularly interesting to be used as electron-attracting part in π-conjuga...

  20. Biosensing with Luminescent Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Sapsford, Kim E.; Pons, Thomas; Medintz, Igor L.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2006-01-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are a recently developed class of nanomaterial whose unique photophysical properties are helping to create a new generation of robust fluorescent biosensors. QD properties of interest for biosensing include high quantum yields, broad absorption spectra coupled to narrow size-tunable photoluminescent emissions and exceptional resistance to both photobleaching and chemical degradation. In this review, we examine the progress in adapti...

  1. Luminescence dating applied to medieval architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Bouvier, Armel; Pinto, Grégory; Guibert, Pierre; Nicolas-Méry, David; Baylé, Maylis

    2014-01-01

    Avranches’ keep remains constitute a witness of Anglo-Norman knowledge on castle building. Their similarity with other buildings such as Ivry-la-Bataille castle or London Tower required determining the place of Avranches keep in this group: pioneer or imitation? Therefore, samples of brick for luminescence dating were taken from the remaining little tower. Results indicate a chronology later than assumed: second part of the 12th century and first part of 13th century. These dates tend to prov...

  2. Broadband luminescence in liquid-solid transition

    CERN Document Server

    Achilov, M F; Trunilina, O V

    2002-01-01

    Broadband luminescence (BBL) intensity behavior in liquid-solid transition in polyethyleneglycol-600 has been established. Oscillation of BBL intensity observed in liquid-polycrystal transition are not found to observed in liquid-amorphous solid transition. It is shown that application of the theory of electron state tails to interpretation of BBL spectral properties in liquids demands restriction. BBL spectroscopy may be applied for optimization of preparation of polymers with determined properties. (author)

  3. Recombination luminescence in lead tungstate scintillating crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pazzi, G.P.; Fabeni, P.; Susini, C.; Nikl, Martin; Boháček, Pavel; Mihóková, Eva; Vedda, A.; Martini, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Usuki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 38, - (2004), s. 381-384 ISSN 1350-4487 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0753 Grant - others:NATO(XX) SfP 973510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : lead tungstate * BaMo-doping * radioluminescence * luminescence time decay * thermoluminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.664, year: 2004

  4. Luminescent Metal Nanoclusters for Potential Chemosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthaiah Shellaiah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies of metal nanocluster (M-NCs-based sensors for specific analyte detection have achieved significant progress in recent decades. Ultra-small-size (<2 nm M-NCs consist of several to a few hundred metal atoms and exhibit extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Similar to organic molecules, M-NCs display absorption and emission properties via electronic transitions between energy levels upon interaction with light. As such, researchers tend to apply M-NCs in diverse fields, such as in chemosensors, biological imaging, catalysis, and environmental and electronic devices. Chemo- and bio-sensory uses have been extensively explored with luminescent NCs of Au, Ag, Cu, and Pt as potential sensory materials. Luminescent bi-metallic NCs, such as Au-Ag, Au-Cu, Au-Pd, and Au-Pt have also been used as probes in chemosensory investigations. Both metallic and bi-metallic NCs have been utilized to detect various analytes, such as metal ions, anions, biomolecules, proteins, acidity or alkalinity of a solution (pH, and nucleic acids, at diverse detection ranges and limits. In this review, we have summarized the chemosensory applications of luminescent M-NCs and bi-metallic NCs.

  5. Kinetics of infrared stimulated luminescence from feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, M.; Sohbati, R.; Guralnik, B.; Murray, A.S.; Kook, M.; Lapp, T.; Prasad, A.K.; Thomsen, K.J.; Buylaert, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    We extend the localised transition model based on randomly varying recombination distances (Jain et al., 2012) to include Arrhenius analysis and truncated nearest neighbour distributions. The model makes important predictions regarding a) the physical understanding of the linear intercepts in the Arrhenius analysis for localised recombination systems and b) the relationship between charge depletion and shape of the luminescence decay curves; these predictions are successfully tested by experimental investigations. We demonstrate that this model successfully describes the kinetic behaviour, both thermal and optical, of the infrared stimulated luminescence signal from feldspar. Based on the application of this model, it is concluded that different infra-red stimulated luminescence emissions (UV, blue, yellow and far-red) follow the same kinetics, and, therefore, involve participation of the same electron (dosimetric) trap. The differences in thermal stabilities of the different emissions results from differences in number densities of the recombination sites. The results have implications for understanding the mechanism of the far-red emission, and the spatial distributions of recombination sites in feldspar. - Highlights: • Arrhenius analysis of IRSL based on localized transition model (Jain et al., 2012). • Kinetics of IRSL for the different emission bands. • A new analytical description for IRSL. • Demonstrating that feldspar IRSL is consistent with the predictions of the LTM.

  6. Ion beam induced luminescence of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, R

    2001-01-01

    luminescence dead zone at the domain walls. Neodymium-yttrium-aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) was examined and the spectra measured as a function of temperature to show the evolution of intensity of the narrow line emission from the Nd rare earth. Shifts and changes in the intrinsic UV band in the YAG material were also apparent. Thin films of alumina grown on silica on a silicon substrate, along with some that contained copper nanoclusters were also examined. TRIM software was used to model the rate of excitation within the different layers of the material for the various implant energies and to identify the source of the luminescence profile observed in each case. Evidence of thin film interference fringes was apparent in the spectra by fringe patterns modulated onto the luminescence signal as a function of wavelength and film thickness. Analysis of an alkali feldspar material using IBL, and combined with work done using RL and CL experiments, showed a shift towards lower wavelengths of the main red/IR band with ...

  7. Irradiation induced luminescence from ceramic oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, K.J.; Cooper, R. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Full text: Point defects created in solids by irradiation produce a range of interesting properties. Such processes are important in, thermoluminescent dosimetry and artefact dating; the development of F-centre lasers, and particularly with the use of ceramic metal oxides as a first-wall insulator in nuclear fusion reactors. Point defect formation is an initial process which can ultimately lead to dielectric breakdown in insulators. Luminescence in the near UV may be used to monitor the formation of point defects by elastic collision processes resulting from electron irradiation. Pulse radiolysis studies using the controlled energy electrons from a Febetron 706 have enabled thresholds to be determined for atomic displacement necessary to produce F type centres. In general, the energy required to displace an oxygen anion in ceramic oxide lattices is of the order of 50 eV and this process requires collisions with high energy electrons of 0.3 MeV or greater. The time-dependent spectroscopy and decay kinetics of luminescence over the time range nanoseconds to milliseconds and at temperatures from ambient to 10K, reveals distinctive features which are interpreted as indicating a multitrap model for recombination luminescence. A model comprising bimolecular electron-hole recombination, in conjunction with unimolecular electron-detrapping will be presented

  8. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  9. Luminescence of water or ice as a new detection method for magnetic monopoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollmann Anna Obertacke

    2017-01-01

    We present analysis techniques to use luminescence in neutrino telescopes and discuss experimental setups to measure the light yield of luminescence for the particular conditions in neutrino detectors.

  10. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live......In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  11. Luminescence properties of some food dye-stuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astanov, S.Kh.; Muminova, Z.A.; Urunov, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    The luminescence properties of the natural food dye-stuffs and vitamins in temperature range of 300-5.2 K are studied. On the basis of experimental data on quantum yields of the fluorescence, trans-cis-isomerization and luminescence of the molecular oxygen the main ways of the inactivation of electronic excitations in researching compounds have been defined. (author)

  12. Hormonal control of luminescence from lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) photophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Julien M; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2009-11-01

    The velvet belly lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) emits a blue luminescence from thousands of tiny photophores. In this work, we performed a pharmacological study to determine the physiological control of luminescence from these luminous organs. Isolated photophore-filled skin patches produced light under melatonin (MT) and prolactin (PRL) stimulation in a dose-dependent manner but did not react to classical neurotransmitters. The alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) had an inhibitory effect on hormonal-induced luminescence. Because luzindole and 4P-PDOT inhibited MT-induced luminescence, the action of this hormone is likely to be mediated through binding to the MT2 receptor subtype, which probably decreases the intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP (cAMP) because forskolin (a cAMP donor) strongly inhibits the light response to MT. However, PRL seems to achieve its effects via janus kinase 2 (JAK2) after binding to its receptor because a specific JAK2 inhibitor inhibits PRL-induced luminescence. The two stimulating hormones showed different kinetics as well as a seasonal variation of light intensity, which was higher in summer (April) than in winter (December and February). All of these results strongly suggest that, contrary to self-luminescent bony fishes, which harbour a nervous control mechanism of their photophore luminescence, the light emission is under hormonal control in the cartilaginous E. spinax. This clearly highlights the diversity of fish luminescence and confirms its multiple independent apparitions during the course of evolution.

  13. Tuning luminescence intensity of RHO6G dye using silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    in the presence of different amounts of citrate stabilized silver nanoparticles of size, ∼10 nm. Enhancement as well as quenching of luminescence intensity has been observed and it was found that luminescence intensity can be tuned by adding various amounts of silver nanoparticles to the RHO6G dye dispersion.

  14. Thermoluminescence as a Research Tool to Investigate Luminescence Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Adrie J J

    2017-11-26

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) is known as a technique used in radiation dosimetry and dating. However, since the luminescence is very sensitive to the defects in a solid, it can also be used in material research. In this review, it is shown how TSL can be used as a research tool to investigate luminescent characteristics and underlying luminescent mechanisms. First, some basic characteristics and a theoretical background of the phenomenon are given. Next, methods and difficulties in extracting trapping parameters are addressed. Then, the instrumentation needed to measure the luminescence, both as a function of temperature and wavelength, is described. Finally, a series of very diverse examples is given to illustrate how TSL has been used in the determination of energy levels of defects, in the research of persistent luminescence phosphors, and in phenomena like band gap engineering, tunnelling, photosynthesis, and thermal quenching. It is concluded that in the field of luminescence spectroscopy, thermally stimulated luminescence has proven to be an experimental technique with unique properties to study defects in solids.

  15. Performance of Harshaw 6600 thermo-luminescence dosimeter (TLD)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance of Harshaw 6600 thermo-luminescence dosimeter (TLD) system for personal monitoring. ... Fading of 19 % of thermo-luminescence (TL) readout was observed in 90 days when TLD chips were stored at room temperature (~ 27º C). The TL sensitivities of chips in three holder types were close to that for Cs-137 ...

  16. Luminescent studies of impurity doped SrS phosphors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    lated luminescence imaging (Gaslot et al 1982). Recently,. ZnS phosphors prepared by Davies et al (2001) for cathode ray tube showed potential luminescence properties .... (1949) in neutron irradiated LiF. In LiF, a single broad line (linewidth, ~ 100 gauss) with a g-factor of 2⋅008 was observed. A similar centre has been ...

  17. Bright stable luminescent yeast using bacterial luciferase as a sensor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szittner, R; Jansen, G.; Thomas, DY; Meighen, E

    2003-01-01

    24h while luminescence of yeast with decanal decayed to less than 0.01% of that with Z-9-tetradecenal after 2min. Moreover, yeast survived in 0.5% (v/v) Z-9-tetradecenal while 0.005% (v/v) decanal was lethal. Luminescence of yeast (+luxAB) was also stimulated 100-fold by transformation with the

  18. Luminescence performance of Eu -doped lead-free zinc phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These glasses were characterized by several spectroscopic techniques at room temperature. All the glasses showed relatively broad fluorescence excitation and luminescence spectra. Luminescence spectra of these glasses exhibit characteristic emission of Eu3+ ion with an intense and most prominent red emission (614 ...

  19. Tuning luminescence intensity of RHO6G dye using silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. The photoluminescence (PL) from rhodamine (RHO6G) dye dispersed in ethanol has been studied in the presence of different amounts of citrate stabilized silver nanoparticles of size, ∼10 nm. Enhancement as well as quenching of luminescence intensity has been observed and it was found that luminescence ...

  20. Method for altering the luminescence of a semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, J.C.; Dimos, D.B.

    1999-01-12

    A method is described for altering the luminescence of a light emitting semiconductor (LES) device. In particular, a method is described whereby a silicon LES device can be selectively irradiated with a radiation source effective for altering the intensity of luminescence of the irradiated region. 4 figs.

  1. Doped luminescent materials and particle discrimination using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, F. Patrick; Allendorf, Mark D; Feng, Patrick L

    2014-10-07

    Doped luminescent materials are provided for converting excited triplet states to radiative hybrid states. The doped materials may be used to conduct pulse shape discrimination (PSD) using luminescence generated by harvested excited triplet states. The doped materials may also be used to detect particles using spectral shape discrimination (SSD).

  2. Thermoluminescence as a Research Tool to Investigate Luminescence Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) is known as a technique used in radiation dosimetry and dating. However, since the luminescence is very sensitive to the defects in a solid, it can also be used in material research. In this review, it is shown how TSL can be used as a research tool to investigate luminescent characteristics and underlying luminescent mechanisms. First, some basic characteristics and a theoretical background of the phenomenon are given. Next, methods and difficulties in extracting trapping parameters are addressed. Then, the instrumentation needed to measure the luminescence, both as a function of temperature and wavelength, is described. Finally, a series of very diverse examples is given to illustrate how TSL has been used in the determination of energy levels of defects, in the research of persistent luminescence phosphors, and in phenomena like band gap engineering, tunnelling, photosynthesis, and thermal quenching. It is concluded that in the field of luminescence spectroscopy, thermally stimulated luminescence has proven to be an experimental technique with unique properties to study defects in solids. PMID:29186873

  3. Thermoluminescence as a Research Tool to Investigate Luminescence Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) is known as a technique used in radiation dosimetry and dating. However, since the luminescence is very sensitive to the defects in a solid, it can also be used in material research. In this review, it is shown how TSL can be used as a research tool to

  4. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Il An, Gwang; Park, Se-Il; Oh, Jungmin; Kim, Hong Joo; Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung; Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young; Lee, Jaetae; Welch, Michael J; Yoo, Jeongsoo

    2011-04-01

    Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [(32)P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Radionuclides emitting high energy β(+)/β(-) particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [(32)P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Many radionuclides with high energetic β(+) or β(-) particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Preparation and characterization of rare earth luminescent compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinistoe, L.

    1984-01-01

    The luminescence of rare earths and its industrial applications are briefly discussed. The synthesis of activated rare earth oxysulfides and oxyhalides is described. Following analytical techniques for the characterization of the phosphors are discussed: thermal analysis, spark source mass spectrometry, fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and luminescence lifetime measurements. (Author) [pt

  6. Thermoluminescence as a Research Tool to Investigate Luminescence Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrie J. J. Bos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL is known as a technique used in radiation dosimetry and dating. However, since the luminescence is very sensitive to the defects in a solid, it can also be used in material research. In this review, it is shown how TSL can be used as a research tool to investigate luminescent characteristics and underlying luminescent mechanisms. First, some basic characteristics and a theoretical background of the phenomenon are given. Next, methods and difficulties in extracting trapping parameters are addressed. Then, the instrumentation needed to measure the luminescence, both as a function of temperature and wavelength, is described. Finally, a series of very diverse examples is given to illustrate how TSL has been used in the determination of energy levels of defects, in the research of persistent luminescence phosphors, and in phenomena like band gap engineering, tunnelling, photosynthesis, and thermal quenching. It is concluded that in the field of luminescence spectroscopy, thermally stimulated luminescence has proven to be an experimental technique with unique properties to study defects in solids.

  7. Photostimulated luminescence properties of Eu2+ -doped barium aluminate phosphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Quanlong; Qiu, Guangyu; Xu, Xuhui; Qiu, Jianbei; Yu, Xue

    2015-03-01

    An intense green photostimulated luminescence in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor was prepared. The thermoluminescence results indicate that there are at least three types of traps (T1 , T2 , T3 ) with different trap depths in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor according to the bands located at 327, 361 and 555 K, respectively, which are closely associated with the phosphor's long persistent luminescence and photostimulated luminescence properties. In addition, as a novel optical read-out form, a photostimulated persistent luminescence signal can be repeatedly obtained in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor. This shows that re-trapping of the electron released from a deep trap plays an important role in photostimulated persistent luminescence. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Quantum Dot Luminescent Concentrator Cavity Exhibiting 30-fold Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronstein, Noah D.; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Lu; O’Brien, Erin; Powers, Alexander S.; Ferry, Vivian E. [Department; Alivisatos, A. Paul [Materials; Nuzzo, Ralph G.

    2015-08-21

    Luminescent solar concentrators doped with CdSe/CdS quantum dots provide a potentially low-cost and high-performance alternative to costly high-band-gap III–V semiconductor materials to serve as a top junction in multijunction photovoltaic devices for efficient utilization of blue photons. In this study, a photonic mirror was coupled with such a luminescent waveguide to form an optical cavity where emitted luminescence was trapped omnidirectionally. By mitigating escape cone and scattering losses, 82% of luminesced photons travel the length of the waveguide, creating a concentration ratio of 30.3 for blue photons in a waveguide with a geometric gain of 61. Further, we study the photon transport inside the luminescent waveguide, showing unimpeded photon collection across the entire length of the waveguide.

  9. Visible luminescence of dysprosium ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarska, Joanna; Żur, Lidia; Pisarski, Wojciech A

    2011-08-15

    Visible luminescence of Dy(3+) ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses was examined. Luminescence spectra show two intense bands at 480 nm and 573 nm due to (4)F(9/2)→(6)H(15/2) (blue) and (4)F(9/2)→(6)H(13/2) (yellow) transitions of Dy(3+). Luminescence decays from (4)F(9/2) state and yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratios (Y/B) were analysed with PbX(2) (X=F, Cl) content. An introduction of PbX(2) to the borate glass results in the increasing of (4)F(9/2) lifetime and the decreasing of yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratio, which is due to reduction of covalency between Dy(3+) and O(2-)/X(-) ions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. On the relationship between luminescence excitation spectra and feldspar mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1996-01-01

    Feldspar minerals can be used as naturally occurring radiation dosemeters, with dose assessment commonly using luminescence techniques. Since many feldspars contain radioactive K-40, knowledge of the mineralogy of the luminescent samples being measured is of high importance. Most feldspars contain...... more than trace amounts of highly luminescent Fe3+ impurities, and this article examines the relationship between features of the luminescence excitation spectrum of this ion with sample mineralogy. It is demonstrated that there is a near linear correspondence between the plagioclase feldspar...... groups. The results are compared with properties of the excitation spectra dose-dependent optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in order to compare the chemical environment of the OSL donor defect, and the isolated Fe3+ centres....

  11. Magnetic-luminescent spherical particles synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Norma L; Hirata, Gustavo A; Flores, Dora L

    2015-01-01

    The combination of magnetic and luminescent properties in a single particle system, opens-up a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. In this work, we performed the synthesis of magnetic-luminescent Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ @Fe 2 O 3 particles by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis performed in a tubular furnace. In order to achieve the composite formation, commercial superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were coated with a luminescent Eu 3+ -doped Gd 2 O 3 shell in a low-cost one-step process. The spray pyrolysis method yields deagglomerated spherical shape magneto/luminescent particles. The photoluminescence spectra under UV excitation (λ Exc = 265 nm) of the magnetic Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ @Fe 2 O 3 compound showed the characteristic red emission of Eu 3+ (λ Em = 612 nm). This magneto/luminescent system will find applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. (paper)

  12. Thermal luminescence spectroscopy chemical imaging sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Arthur H; Buican, Tudor N; Roese, Erik S; Sutter, James; Samuels, Alan C

    2012-10-01

    The authors present a pseudo-active chemical imaging sensor model embodying irradiative transient heating, temperature nonequilibrium thermal luminescence spectroscopy, differential hyperspectral imaging, and artificial neural network technologies integrated together. We elaborate on various optimizations, simulations, and animations of the integrated sensor design and apply it to the terrestrial chemical contamination problem, where the interstitial contaminant compounds of detection interest (analytes) comprise liquid chemical warfare agents, their various derivative condensed phase compounds, and other material of a life-threatening nature. The sensor must measure and process a dynamic pattern of absorptive-emissive middle infrared molecular signature spectra of subject analytes to perform its chemical imaging and standoff detection functions successfully.

  13. Luminescent properties of praseodymium in some fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, A.S.; Rodnyj, P.A.; Mikhrin, S.B.; Magunov, I.R.

    2005-01-01

    Influence of diverse factors on efficiency of the Pr 3+ cascade emission in BaF 2 : Pr and SrAlF 5 : Pr. The effect of the environment of the luminescence center on the mutual position of the lowest 5d and the 4f level 1 S 0 of Pr 3+ ion is considered. PrF 3 clustering in BaF 2 is observed at a high praseodymium concentration. The promising potential of magnesium as a charge compensator for praseodymium in SrAlF 5 is demonstrated [ru

  14. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Ram Srimath Kandada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  15. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2016-09-01

    Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  16. Laser-induced luminescence in hybrid nanofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifutyarov, R. R.; Khomyakov, A. V.; Akkuzina, A. A.; Avetisov, R. I.; Petrova, O. B.; Avetisov, I. Kh.; Kravchenko, S. V.

    2015-07-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) boron (Bq3) was synthesized by a high-temperature exchange reaction. Bq3 powders containing various polymorphous modifications were synthesized, and their photoluminescent characteristics were analyzed. Films of Alq3/B2O3/Al hybrid materials (HMs) were deposited on glass substrates by vacuum thermal evaporation. It is shown that local heating by a diode laser (785 nm) with an intensity of 150 W/cm2 for one second causes irreversible transformation in the HM film structure. The chromaticity coordinates of the photoluminescence of laser-irradiated regions considerably differ from those of the initial HM film luminescence.

  17. Optically Stimulated Luminescence Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    McKeever, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The book discusses advanced modern applications of optically stimulated luminescence including the appropriate fundamentals of the process. It features major chapters on the use of OSL in space radiation dosimetry, medical physics, personnel dosimetry, security, solid-state physics and other related applications. In each case, the underlying theory is discussed on an as-needed basis for a complete understanding of the phenomena, but with an emphasis of the practical applications of the technique. After an introductory chapter, Chapters 2 to 6 cover basic theory and practical aspects, personal

  18. Luminescence at the end of the tunnelling - Investigating charge transfer mechanisms and luminescence dating methods for feldspar minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis comprises analyses of mineral physics with an application in geology and archeology. The thesis contributes to the development of feldspar luminescence dating methods in order to extend the applicable age range of feldspar luminescence dating in the Quaternary (last 2.6 Ma). The research

  19. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  20. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  1. Comparison of ZrO2:Y nanocrystals and macroscopic single crystal luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, K; Millers, D; Grigorjeva, L; Fidelus, J D; Lojkowski, W

    2007-01-01

    The luminescence spectra of a tetragonally structured ZrO 2 :Y single crystal and nanocrystals were compared. It was found that the number of luminescence centers contributed to the spectra. The excitation of luminescence within the band gap region led to different luminescence spectra for the single crystal and nanocrystal samples, whereas recombinative luminescence spectra were the same for both samples. The origin of this difference is that in the nanocrystals, even under excitation within the band gap, charge carriers were created. Zirconium- oxygen complexes distorted by intrinsic defects were proposed to be the luminescence centres responsible for the wide luminescence band observed

  2. SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC AND LUMINESCENCE DETERMINATION OF ABIRATERONE ACETATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Leonenko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The methods of the spectrophotometric (SP and fluorimetric (FL determination of a new anticancer drug, abiraterone acetate (AA have been proposed. SP method is based on measurement of light absorbance of ethanol solution of AA at a wavelength 253 nm. The calibration graph (CG is linear in the concentration range 1.0–30.0 AA μg/ml, the limit of detection (LOD is 0.35 μg/ml.Two versions of FL determination of AA: on its native luminescence (λex=253 nm; λlum=350  nm and on quenching sensitized luminescence of the terbium(III complex by abiraterone acetate have been developed. CG in the case of native fluorescence is linear in the range of 0.05–7.0 μg/ml, Stern-Folmer calibration curve is linear in the interval of concentrations of AA 0.5– 70 μg/ml. LOD of both fluorescent methods is 0.017 μg/ml.

  3. Luminescence optically stimulated: theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera M, T.; Azorin N, J.

    2002-01-01

    The thermally stimulated luminescence (Tl) has occupied an important place in the Solid state physics (FES) by the flexibility of the phenomena, mainly for its applications in the fields of Radiation Physics (FR) and Medical Physics (MF). The reason of this phenomena lies in the fact of the electrons release by the action of heat. Under that same reason, it can be used the action of another stimulant agent for releasing the trapped electrons in the metastable states (EM), this agent is the light which has the same effect that the heat, giving as result the production of light photons at using light in the visible spectra, of different wavelength that the excitation light. This phenomena is called Luminescence optically stimulated (LOE). The LOE has a great impact in the Solid State Physics (FES), dating and now in the use of the phenomena as a dosimetric method, alternate to the Tl, for its use in the ionizing and non-ionizing radiations fields. (Author)

  4. Hexagonal hafnium zirconium phosphate luminescent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenot, C.F.; Mathers, J.E.; Shaffer, F.N.

    1981-01-01

    A new compound with the chemical formula, (Hfsub(1-x)Zr)sub(3-y) Asub(4y)(POsub(4))sub(4), where x is in the range 0-1, A is at least one alkali metal from the group lithium, sodium, or potassium, and y is in the range 0.4-2.0. The material is luminescent and can be used in X-ray intensifying screens and other intensifying devices with conventional silver halide emulsion X-ray film. It exhibits luminescence both in the self-activated state, in which case it emits in the ultraviolet part of the spectrum, and in the presence of activators, when it emits in the visible region upon excitation by X-rays, ultraviolet, etc. When used with conventional X-ray film, its band emission overlaps, to at least some extent, the absorption edge of the X-ray film base, resulting in good image resolution without substantial crossover. Optimum speed and persistence values are obtained for x of about 0.005-0.5. The compound exhibits about 60 nm bandwidth emission, peaking at about 350 nm, with controlled persistence upon X-ray excitation. The method of preparing the compound is described. (DN)

  5. Luminescent films for chemo- and biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weijiang; Zhou, Wenjuan; Lu, Jun; Lu, Chao

    2015-10-07

    Luminescent films have received great interest for chemo-/bio-sensing applications due to their distinct advantages over solution-based probes, such as good stability and portability, tunable shape and size, non-invasion, real-time detection, extensive suitability in gas/vapor sensing, and recycling. On the other hand, they can achieve selective and sensitive detection of chemical/biological species using special luminophores with a recognition moiety or the assembly of common luminophores and functional materials. Nowadays, the extensively used assembly techniques include drop-casting/spin-coating, Langmuir-Blodgett (LB), self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), layer-by-layer (LBL), and electrospinning. Therefore, this review summarizes the recent advances in luminescent films with these assembly techniques and their applications in chemo-/bio-sensing. We mainly focused on the discussion of the relationship between the sensing properties of the films and their architecture. Furthermore, we discussed some critical challenges existing in this field and possible solutions that have been or are being developed to overcome these challenges.

  6. Decreasing luminescence lifetime of evaporating phosphorescent droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, D. D.; Dam, N. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van de Water, W.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence has been used extensively to study spray dynamics. It is important to understand the influence of droplet evaporation in the interpretation of such measurements, as it increases luminescence quenching. By suspending a single evaporating n-heptane droplet in an acoustic levitator, the properties of lanthanide-complex europium-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-trioctylphosphine oxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) phosphorescence are determined through high-speed imaging. A decrease was found in the measured phosphorescence decay coefficient (780 → 200 μs) with decreasing droplet volumes (10-9 → 10-11 m3) corresponding to increasing concentrations (10-4 → 10-2 M). This decrease continues up to the point of shell-formation at supersaturated concentrations. The diminished luminescence is shown not to be attributable to triplet-triplet annihilation, quenching between excited triplet-state molecules. Instead, the pure exponential decays found in the measurements show that a non-phosphorescent quencher, such as free TTA/TOPO, can be attributable to this decay. The concentration dependence of the phosphorescence lifetime can therefore be used as a diagnostic of evaporation in sprays.

  7. Effect of oxygen concentration on singlet oxygen luminescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Longchao; Lin, Lisheng; Li, Yirong; Lin, Huiyun; Qiu, Zhihai [MOE Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Gu, Ying [Department of Laser Medicine, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Li, Buhong, E-mail: bhli@fjnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Singlet oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) is a major phototoxic component in photodynamic therapy (PDT) and its generation is dependent on the availability of tissue oxygen. To examine the effect of oxygen concentration on {sup 1}O{sub 2} detection, two hydrophilic photosensitizer (PS), rose bengal (RB) and meso-metra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMPyP) were used as model PS. Irradiation was carried out using 523 nm under hypoxic (2%, 13%), normoxic (21%) and hyperoxic (65%) conditions. The spectral and spatial resolved {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence was measured by near-infrared (NIR) photomultiplier tube (PMT) and camera, respectively. Upon the irradiation, the emission signal mainly consisted of background scattering light, PS fluorescence and phosphorescence, and {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence. The PS phosphorescence was evidently dependent on the oxygen concentration and PS type, which resulted in the change of emission profile of {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence. This change was further demonstrated on {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence image. The present study suggests that the low oxygen concentration could affect {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence detection. - Highlights: • Both spectral and spatial resolved {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence measurements were performed. • Effect of oxygen concentration on {sup 1}O{sub 2} generation was quantitatively evaluated. • Low oxygen concentration could affect {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence detection.

  8. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  9. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241 Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  10. Increasing lanthanide luminescence by use of the RETEL effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leif, Robert C; Vallarino, Lidia M; Becker, Margie C; Yang, Sean

    2006-08-01

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes produce emissions with the narrowest-known width at half maximum; however, their significant use in cytometry required an increase in luminescence intensity. The companion review, Leif et al., Cytometry 2006;69A:767-778, described a new technique for the enhancement of lanthanide luminescence, the Resonance Energy Transfer Enhanced Luminescence (RETEL) effect, which increases luminescence and is compatible with standard slide microscopy. The luminescence of the europium ion macrocyclic complex, EuMac, was increased by employing the RETEL effect. After adding the nonluminescent gadolinium ion complex of the thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (TTFA) ligand or the sodium salt of TTFA in ethanol solution, the EuMac-labeled sample was allowed to dry. Both a conventional arc lamp and a time-gated UV LED served as light sources for microscopic imaging. The emission intensity was measured with a CCD camera. Multiple time-gated images were summed with special software to permit analysis and effective presentation of the final image. With the RETEL effect, the luminescence of the EuMac-streptavidin conjugate increased at least six-fold upon drying. Nuclei of apoptotic cells were stained with DAPI and tailed with 5BrdUrd to which a EuMac-anti-5BrdU conjugate was subsequently attached. Time-gated images showed the long-lived EuMac luminescence but did not show the short-lived DAPI fluorescence. Imaging of DNA-synthesizing cells with an arc lamp showed that both S phase and apoptotic cells were labeled, and that their labeling patterns were different. The images of the luminescent EuMac and fluorescent DAPI were combined to produce a color image on a white background. This combination of simple chemistry, instrumentation, and presentation should make possible the inexpensive use of the lanthanide macrocycles, Quantum Dyes, as molecular diagnostics for cytological and histopathological microscopic imaging. (c) 2006 International Society for Analytical

  11. Chemisorptive luminescence on γ-irradiated magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breakspere, R.J.; Read, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    The intensity of a chemisorptive luminescence produced on MgO by oxygen at room temperature is increased by prior γ-irradiation of the MgO, under vacuum, before adsorption. This enhancement of the luminescence increases with radiation dose up to 1.9 x 10 6 rad and is attributed to the interaction between the F + sub (s) centres produced by the radiation and oxygen molecules arriving at the surface from the gas phase. In this work, the spectrum of the emitted luminescence could not be measured. (author)

  12. Oxide/polymer nanocomposites as new luminescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollath, D.; Szabó, D. V.; Schlabach, S.

    2004-06-01

    It is demonstrated that nanocomposites, consisting of an electrically insulating oxide core and PMMA coating exhibit strong luminescence. This luminescence is connected to the interface, where PMMA is bond via a carboxylate bonding to the surface. In this case, luminescence is originated at the carbonyl group of the coating polymer. With decreasing particle size, this emission shows a blue shift, following a law inversely the ones found for quantum confinement systems. For semi-conducting oxides, such as ZnO, this interface related emission is found additionally to quantum confinement phenomena.

  13. Luminescence properties of porcelain ceramics relevant to restrospective radiation dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Markey, B.G.; Poolton, N.R.J.

    1996-01-01

    When applied to porcelain products, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is a potentially viable method for use in dose reconstruction following contamination from nuclear accidents. However, dose sensitivities are highly variable, depending on what type of porcelain is being measured. This ap......When applied to porcelain products, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is a potentially viable method for use in dose reconstruction following contamination from nuclear accidents. However, dose sensitivities are highly variable, depending on what type of porcelain is being measured...... to have the highest sensitivities to radiation dose. Moreover, the presence of these phases is easily identifiable by characteristic signatures in the luminescence emission spectra....

  14. Splitting of the luminescent excited state of the uranyl ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, C.D.; Sharma, P.; Tanner, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The luminescence spectra of some uranyl compounds has been studied. It has been proposed that the splitting of the luminescent excited state of the uranyl ion is due to a descent in symmetry experienced by the uranyl ion when it is placed in a crystal field. In recent years there has been developed a highly successful model of the electronic structure of the uranyl ion. In this paper the authors use this model to interpret the luminescence spectra of a variety of uranyl compounds

  15. Determination of uranium by luminescent method (tablet variant)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, A.N.; Yufa, B.Ya.

    1985-01-01

    A new tablet variant of luminescent determination of uranium in rocks is developed. The analytical process includes the following operations: sample decomposition, uranium separation from luminescence quencher impurities, preparation of luminescent sample (tablet), photometry of the tablet. The method has two variants developed: the first one is characterized by a more hard decomposition, sample mass being 0.2 g; the second variant has a better detection limit (5x10 -6 %), the sample mass being 0.2-1 g. Procedures of the sample preparation for both variants of analysis are described

  16. Luminescence and the light emitting diode the basics and technology of leds and the luminescence properties of the materials

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, E W; Pamplin, BR

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence and the Light Emitting Diode: The Basics and Technology of LEDS and the Luminescence Properties of the Materials focuses on the basic physics and technology of light emitting diodes (LEDS) and pn junction lasers as well as their luminescence properties. Optical processes in semiconductors and the useful devices which can be made are discussed. Comprised of 10 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to the crystal structure and growth, as well as the optical and electrical properties of LED materials. The detailed fabrication of the LED is then considered, along with the lu

  17. Luminescence of uranium in some phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yu; Zhang Rui

    1992-07-01

    The solid fluorescence spectral properties of uranium in phosphates systems have been observed. The NaH 2 PO 4 : U system has been found to be an efficient green phosphor. The luminescence mechanism of the phosphor has been discussed. The crystal structure of NaH 2 PO 4 : U system under different conditions was also studied. Over a wide range of ignition temperatures (200 ∼ 600 C degree), the system with mass ratio of U/NaH 2 PO 4 below 10 -3 transforms into NaPO 3 : U crystal, which emits strong fluorescence. The system is non-crystalline with decreasing fluorescence intensity when the ignition temperature is higher than 650 C degree. The NaPO 3 crystal lattice has distorted as the mass ratio of U/NaH 2 PO 4 of the system greater than 10 -2

  18. Luminescent solar concentrators utilizing stimulated emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W; Schmidt, Timothy W; Argyros, Alexander

    2016-03-21

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are an emerging technology that aims primarily to reduce the cost of solar energy, with great potential for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, realizing LSCs with commercially viable efficiency is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. Here, we introduce an approach to reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire area of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption to allow net gain in the system, and directed towards a small PV cell. A mathematical model, taking into account thermodynamic considerations, of such a system is presented which identifies key parameters and allows evaluation in terms of net effective output power.

  19. Luminescence of the octahedral uranate group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hair, J.Th.W. de

    1976-01-01

    The luminescence characteristics of the octahedral uranate group are described. Bands in the excitation spectra are assigned to charge transfer transitions from ligand m.o.'s to the 5f state of the hexavalent uranium ion. The emission is a parity-forbidden electric dipole transition 5f→tsub(1u) which is vibronically allowed by coupling with the ungerade vibrational modes of the UO 6- 6 octahedron. This is confirmed by the dependence of the decay time on temperature. Attention is paid to the difference between the vibrational patterns in the emission of the UO 6- 6 and the UO 2+ 2 groups. From measurements as a function of the uranium concentration it is deduced that energy transfer between uranate groups mutually proceeds over some 25 A. This explains why the vibrational pattern in the emission spectra depends on the uranium concentration. (Auth.)

  20. Biosensing with Luminescent Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Mattoussi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs are a recentlydeveloped class of nanomaterial whose unique photophysical properties are helping tocreate a new generation of robust fluorescent biosensors. QD properties of interest forbiosensing include high quantum yields, broad absorption spectra coupled to narrow sizetunablephotoluminescent emissions and exceptional resistance to both photobleaching andchemical degradation. In this review, we examine the progress in adapting QDs for severalpredominantly in vitro biosensing applications including use in immunoassays, asgeneralized probes, in nucleic acid detection and fluorescence resonance energy transfer(FRET - based sensing. We also describe several important considerations when workingwith QDs mainly centered on the choice of material(s and appropriate strategies forattaching biomolecules to the QDs.

  1. Video luminescent barometry - The induction period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uibel, Rory H.; Khalil, Gamal; Gouterman, Martin; Gallery, Jean; Callis, James B.

    1993-01-01

    Video monitoring of oxygen quenching of the photoluminescence of platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) in silicone polymer resin may be used to measure pressure distribution over an airfoil. A continuous increase of the luminescence intensity of PtOEP on exposure to the exciting light is known as the induction effect. The effect of several factors on PtOEP photoluminescence and the induction effect was investigated. The experimental apparatus is described and results are presented. It was observed that the relative induction amplitude and induction time increase at higher oxygen pressure and with thicker films. These observations may be explained if the singlet oxygen produced by oxygen quenching is consumed by the polymer and is therefore unavailable for further quenching. Researchers using this method for measuring pressure distribution on airfoil surfaces should be aware of the induction effect and its implications.

  2. Mechanically Induced Multicolor Change of Luminescent Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhijian; Teng, Mingjun; Xu, Zejun; Jia, Xinru

    2015-06-22

    Mechanofluorochromic or piezochromic fluorescence chemistry involves the switching and tuning of the luminescent properties of solid-state materials induced by exogenous forces, such as grinding, shearing, compression, tension, and so forth. Up until now, most reported mechanochromic systems, including liquid crystals, organic molecules, organometallic compounds, polymers, and dye-doped polymers, have displayed reversible two-color changes, which arise from either supramolecular or chemical structure transformations. However, fluorescent materials that undergo mechanically induced multicolor changes remain rare; this Minireview is focused on such materials. Topics are categorized according to the different applied forces that are required to induce the multicolor change, including mechanical control of either the supramolecular structures or the chemical structures, and mechanical control of both the supramolecular structures and chemical structures. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Sono-luminescence and nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seife, Ch.; Hilgenfeldt, S.; Lohse, D.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents multi-bubble and single-bubble luminescence. Since long scientists have known that ultra-sound waves could trigger the formation of bubbles in water (phenomenon called cavitation) but in 1930, for the first time experiments showed that these bubbles could emit light in particular conditions. In 1989 F. Gaitan succeeded in trapping a single bubble by using stationary ultra-sound waves, this bubble was exploding 20.000 times per second according to the frequency of the wave while emitting a series of flashes of light. Some scientists thought that the gas inside the bubble could reach very high values of temperature and pressure, and proposed the possibility of nuclear fusion to explain the excess of neutrons that has been evidenced in a cavitation experiment with deuterated acetone. The last part of this article describes the controversy triggered by the article describing this experiment, that was published by 'Science' in march 2002. (A.C.)

  4. Violet stimulated luminescence: geo- or thermochronometer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankjærgaard, C.; Guralnik, B.; Porat, N.; Heimann, A.; Jain, M.; Wallinga, J.

    2015-01-01

    The method of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is widely used, but generally limited to the past ∼0.1 million years (Ma) due to early saturation of the desired signal. Violet stimulated luminescence (VSL) of quartz has previously been shown as a promising alternative, with a dose saturation level ∼20 times higher compared to that of OSL, excellent thermal stability on the 10 11 year time scale, and agreement between VSL and OSL ages up to ∼0.3 Ma. Here we explore the usability of the VSL signal to date older quartz samples from palaeosols, whose ages are bracketed by K–Ar ages and palaeomagnetic data of the interbedded basalts, emplaced between 1.6 and 0.7 Ma. VSL ages from three palaeosols largely underestimate the independent ages of their overlying basalts. This can be explained either by a low-temperature thermal anomaly resetting the VSL signal in nature, and/or by an insufficient measurement protocol, unable to correctly translate the natural signal into the equivalent laboratory dose. - Highlights: • We investigate the potential of VSL to date quartz from early Quaternary palaeosols (1.6 - 0.7 Ma old). • The VSL signals show good reproducibility, dose response, thermal stability, and dose recovery. • VSL ages from three palaeosols underestimate the independent K-Ar ages by 50% or more. • It is possible that the VSL ages are correct, but have been reset by thermal anomalies. • Further investigation of the natural VSL signal is needed to confirm these underestimating ages.

  5. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  6. Examination of the picture properties of luminescence memory foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewert, U.; Heine, S.; Nockemann, C.; Stade, J.; Tillack, G.R.; Wessel, H.; Zscherpel, U.; Mattis, A.

    1995-01-01

    Luminescence memory foils are a new medium for radiography without films. They are known by the name of image plates or digital memory foils. The suitability of such systems for industrial radiography is examined. (orig.) [de

  7. Thermo-optical properties of optically stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1995-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence processes in feldspars are subject to competing thermal enhancement and quenching processes: this article describes the thermal enhancement effects for orthoclase, albite and plagioclase feldspars. It is demonstrated that certain lattice vibrational modes can...

  8. Luminescent Lariat Aza-Crown Ether Carboxylic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard König

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lariat ethers are interesting recognition motifs in supramolecular chemistry. The synthesis of a luminescent lariat aza-crown ether with a carboxyl group appended by azide-alkyne (Huisgen cycloaddition is presented.

  9. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  10. Polarization in Sagittarius A*

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the current state of polarization observations of Sagittarius A*, the compact radio source and supermassive black hole candidate in the Galactic Center. These observations are providing new tools for understanding accretion disks, jets and their environments. Linear polarization observations have shown that Sgr A* is unpolarized at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. However, recent single-dish observations indicate that Sgr A* may have strong linear polarization at frequencies higher...

  11. Raman scattering and luminescence of high-Tc superconducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremenko, V.V.; Gnezdilov, V.P.; Fomin, V.I.; Fugol', I.Ya.; Samovarov, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Raman and luminescence spectra of high-T c superconducting oxides are summarized, mainly YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-σ and partly La 2-x Ba x CuO 4-σ . In raman spectra we succeeded to distinguish electron scattering to define the energy gap Δ in the superconducting state. The luminescence spectra are due to the emission of oxygen and interaction with conduction electrons. 70 refs.; 13 figs

  12. Dimensions of luminescent oxidized and porous silicon structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppler, S.; Friedman, S. L.; Marcus, M. A.; Adler, D. L.; Xie, Y.-H.; Ross, F. M.; Harris, T. D.; Brown, W. L.; Chabal, Y. J.; Brus, L. E.; Citrin, P. H.

    1994-04-01

    X-ray absorption measurements from H-passivated porous Si and from oxidized Si nanocrystals, combined with electron microscopy, ir absorption, α recoil, and luminescence emission data, provide a consistent structural picture of the species responsible for the visible luminescence observed in these samples. The mass-weighted average structures in por-Si are particles, not wires, with dimensions significantly smaller than previously reported or proposed.

  13. Optical and luminescent properties of the lead and barium molybdates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spassky, D.A. E-mail: dima@opts.phys.msu.ru; Ivanov, S.N.; Kolobanov, V.N.; Mikhailin, V.V.; Zemskov, V.N.; Zadneprovski, B.I.; Potkin, L.I

    2004-12-01

    Time-resolved luminescence as well as excitation and reflectivity spectra of the oriented lead and barium molybdate single crystals were studied using synchrotron radiation. Features in reflectivity spectra in the fundamental absorption region were analyzed. The contribution of electronic states of lead cation to the formation of the bandgap in PbMoO{sub 4} is supposed. The role of lead states in the intrinsic luminescence of PbMoO{sub 4} is discussed.

  14. Luminescent metal nanoclusters: controlled synthesis and functional applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hong-Tao; Sakka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent metal nanoclusters that consist of only several, to tens of, metal atoms and which possess sizes comparable to the Fermi wavelength of electrons have recently attracted significant attention. This new class of luminescent materials not only provides the missing link between atomic and nanoparticle behaviors in metals but also they present abundant novel information for the development of new applicable material systems to meet urgent needs in many areas (such as ultrasensitive sen...

  15. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, James, Jr.; Dabney, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Instrument measures polarization characteristics of Earth at three wavelengths. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor (ALPS) measures optical polarization characteristics of land surface. Designed to be flown at altitudes of approximately 300 m to minimize any polarizing or depolarizing effects of intervening atmosphere and to look along nadir to minimize any effects depending on look angle. Data from measurements used in conjunction with data from ground surveys and aircraft-mounted video recorders to refine mathematical models used in interpretation of higher-altitude polarimetric measurements of reflected sunlight.

  16. Polarization at SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs

  17. Defect-related luminescent materials: synthesis, emission properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cuimiao; Lin, Jun

    2012-12-07

    Luminescent materials have found a wide variety of applications, including information displays, lighting, X-ray intensification and scintillation, and so on. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to exploring novel luminescent materials so far. In the past decade, defect-related luminescent materials have inspired intensive research efforts in their own right. This kind of luminescent material can be basically classified into silica-based materials, phosphate systems, metal oxides, BCNO phosphors, and carbon-based materials. These materials combine several favourable attributes of traditional commercially available phosphors, which are stable, efficient, and less toxic, being free of the burdens of intrinsic toxicity or elemental scarcity and the need for stringent, intricate, tedious, costly, or inefficient preparation steps. Defect-related luminescent materials can be produced inexpensively and on a large scale by many approaches, such as sol-gel process, hydro(solvo)thermal reaction, hydrolysis methods, and electrochemical methods. This review article highlights the recent advances in the chemical synthesis and luminescent properties of the defect-related materials, together with their control and tuning, and emission mechanisms (solid state physics). We also speculate on their future and discuss potential developments for their applications in lighting and biomedical fields.

  18. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes.

  19. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP 4 . A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  20. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  1. Our Polar Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  2. Terahertz polarization imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Valk, N.C.J.; Van der Marel, W.A.M.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the polarization state of a terahertz pulse by using a modified electrooptic sampling setup. To illustrate the power of this method, we show two examples in which the knowledge of the polarization of the terahertz pulse is essential for interpreting the results:

  3. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  4. Polar Science Is Cool!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  5. Precision Polarization of Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elise; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Couture, Aaron; Crawford, Christopher; Chupp, Tim; Danagoulian, Areg; Estes, Mary; Hona, Binita; Jones, Gordon; Klein, Andi; Penttila, Seppo; Sharma, Monisha; Wilburn, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Determining polarization of a cold neutron beam to high precision is required for the next generation neutron decay correlation experiments at the SNS, such as the proposed abBA and PANDA experiments. Precision polarimetry measurements were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goal of determining the beam polarization to the level of 10-3 or better. The cold neutrons from FP12 were polarized using optically polarized ^3He gas as a spin filter, which has a highly spin-dependent absorption cross section. A second ^ 3He spin filter was used to analyze the neutron polarization after passing through a resonant RF spin rotator. A discussion of the experiment and results will be given.

  6. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements. PMID:29503479

  7. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements.

  8. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-17

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  9. Skin Friction Measurements Using Luminescent Oil Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husen, Nicholas M.

    As aircraft are designed to a greater extent on computers, the need for accurate and fast CFD algorithms has never been greater. The development of CFD algorithms requires experimental data against which CFD output can be validated and from which insight about flow physics can be acquired. Skin friction, in particular, is an important quantity to predict with CFD, and experimental skin friction data sets aid not only with the validation of the CFD predictions, but also in tuning the CFD models to predict specific flow fields. However, a practical experimental technique for collecting spatially and temporally resolved skin friction data on complex models does not yet exist. This dissertation develops and demonstrates a new luminescent oil film skin friction meter which can produce spatially-resolved quantitative steady and unsteady skin friction data on models with complex curvature. The skin friction acting on the surface of a thin film of oil can be approximated by the expression tauw =mu ouh/h, where mu o is the dynamic viscosity of the oil, uh is the velocity of the surface of the oil film, and h is the thickness of the oil film. The new skin friction meter determines skin friction by measuring h and uh. The oil film thickness h is determined by ratioing the intensity of the fluorescent emissions from the oil film with the intensity of the incident light which is scattered from the surface of the model. When properly calibrated, that ratio provides an absolute oil film thickness value. This oil film thickness meter is therefore referred as the Ratioed-Image Film-Thickness (RIFT) Meter. The oil film velocity uh is determined by monitoring the evolution of tagged molecules within the oil film: Photochromic molecules are dissolved into the fluorescent oil and a pattern is written into the oil film using an ultraviolet laser. The evolution of the pattern is recorded, and standard cross-correlation techniques are applied to the resulting sequence of images. This

  10. LUMINESCENCE DIAGNOSTICS OF TUMORS WITH UPCONVERSION NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Rocheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To improve quality of surgery in oncology, it is necessary to completely remove the tumor, including its metastases, to minimize injury to normal tissues and to reduce duration of an intervention. Modern methods of detection based on radiological computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can identify a tumor after its volume has become big enough, i.e. it contains more than 10 billion cells. Therefore, an improvement of sensitivity and resolution ability of diagnostic tools to identify early stages of malignant neoplasms seems of utmost importance. Aim: To demonstrate the potential of a new class of anti-Stokes luminescence nanoparticles for deep optical imaging with high contrast of malignant tumors. Materials and methods: Upconversion nanoparticles with narrow dispersion and a  size of 70 to 80  nm, with a  core/shell structure of NaYF4:Yb3+:Tm3+/NaYF4 were used in the study. The nanoparticles have an intensive band of anti-Stokes photoluminescence at a wavelength of 800  nm under irradiation with a  wavelength of 975  nm (both wavelengths are within the transparency window for biological tissues. The conversion coefficient of the excitation radiation into the anti-Stokes luminescence was 9%. To increase the time during which nanoparticles can circulate in blood flow of small animals, the nanoparticles were covered by a  biocompatible amphiphilic polymer shell. As a  tumor model we used Lewis epidermoid carcinoma transfected to mice. Results: We were able to obtain stable water colloids of nanoparticles covered with amphiphilic polymer that could preserve their initial size at least for one month. The use of upconversion nanoparticles with a  hydrophilic shell made of intermittent maleic anhydride and octadecene co-polymer with subsequent coating with diglycidyl polyethylene glycol ether allowed for reduction of non-specific reaction of nanoparticles with plasma proteins. In its turn, it resulted in an

  11. Identification of Lanthanide(III) Luminophores in Magnetic Circularly Polarized Luminescence Using Raman Optical Activity Instrumentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wu, Tao; Kapitán, J.; Andrushchenko, Valery; Bouř, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 9 (2017), s. 5043-5049 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ16-08764Y; GA ČR GA15-09072S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05935S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : rare earth ions * photophysical properties * europium(III) complexes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 6.320, year: 2016

  12. Solvent polarity and oxygen sensitivity, rather than viscosity, determine lifetimes of biaryl-sensitised terbium luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Edward R H; Williams, J A Gareth; Parker, David

    2017-12-14

    In a macrocyclic terbium complex incorporating a biaryl sensitiser, the observed variation of emission lifetime is shown to be determined by the solubility of oxygen in the solvent system and the relative energy of the chromophore excited state, rather than any dependence on solvent viscosity.

  13. Na-rich feldspar as a luminescence dosimeter in infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew; Jain, Mayank

    2013-01-01

    for measurement. This latter problem does not apply to Na-rich feldspar because of the absence of internal radioactivity.The potential application of Na-rich feldspar as a luminescence dosimeter for the IRSL dating of rock surfaces is investigated using a variety of sediment samples from different geological......, there is no detectable correlation between fading rates and the measured De values. The residual doses measured from the laboratory-bleached samples and a modern analogue suggest that the IR50 signals in both blue and yellow emissions bleach to the same degree, as do the corresponding pIRIR290 signals...

  14. Control of luminescence from pygmy shark (Squaliolus aliae) photophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Julien M; Ho, Hsuan-Ching; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2012-05-15

    The smalleye pygmy shark (Squaliolus aliae) is a dwarf pelagic shark from the Dalatiidae family that harbours thousands of tiny photophores. In this work, we studied the organisation and physiological control of these photogenic organs. Results show that they are mainly situated on the ventral side of the shark, forming a homogeneous ventral photogenic area that appears well suited for counterillumination, a well-known camouflage technique of pelagic organisms. Isolated ventral skin patches containing photophores did not respond to classical neurotransmitters and nitric oxide but produced light after melatonin (MT) application. Prolactin and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone inhibited this hormonally induced luminescence as well as the spontaneous luminescence from the photogenic tissue. The action of MT seems to be mediated by binding to the MT(2) receptor subtype, as the MT(2) receptor agonist 4P-PDOT inhibited the luminescence induced by this hormone. Binding to this receptor probably decreases the intracellular cAMP concentration because forskolin inhibited spontaneous and MT-induced luminescence. In addition, a GABA inhibitory tonus seems to be present in the photogenic tissue as well, as GABA inhibited MT-induced luminescence and the application of bicuculline provoked luminescence from S. aliae photophores. Similarly to what has been found in Etmopteridae, the other luminous shark family, the main target of the luminescence control appears to be the melanophores covering the photocytes. Results suggest that bioluminescence first appeared in Dalatiidae when they adopted a pelagic style at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary, and was modified by Etmopteridae when they started to colonize deep-water niches and rely on this light for intraspecific behaviours.

  15. Dating Last Interglacial Coastal Systems Using New Feldspar Luminescence Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, M.

    2017-12-01

    The recent explosion in new luminescence dating technologies offers new opportunities to explore Quaternary marine coastal facies and landforms. However, tectonic and climatic processes controlling the development of Pleistocene coastal lithosomes are commonly obscured by their poorly constrained geological age. Luminescence dating of feldspar probes one order of magnitude deeper into geological time than radiocarbon and more than 5 times the current age range of quartz optically-stimulated luminescence, routinely used in luminescence dating. However, feldspar luminescence stimulated by infrared photons (eg IRSL) is hampered by anomalous fading. Successful correction methods developed by us over the last 15 years did produce sound chronologies but the fading-corrected ages carried large uncertainties. New approaches initiated by other laboratories, mainly in Europe, have isolated high temperature post-IRSL luminescence as this signal seems to be only slightly affected by fading. However, the gain in stability seems to be lessened due to bleachibility issues, generating age overestimations. We developed a novel protocol known as post-isothermal IRSL dating (Pit-IR) that focuses on a dual system of luminescence signals, probing low (50C) and medium (225C) temperature IRSL signals following isothermal treatments of various intensities. These protocols have been tested on Last interglacial coastal sediments in strikingly different GIA contexts along the Atlantic coastal areas of SE USA as well as from Morocco, Brazil and LIG sites in the Mediterranean basin. A systematic analysis of these results would suggest that a) falling-stages sequences are more commonly preserved as the OSL/IRSL ages are preferentially dating from the end of the MIS5e high stand and b) MIS5a marine sediments may be detectable away from areas generally thought to be affected by peripheral bulge collapse.

  16. Polarization at the SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z/sup 0/ mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Luminescence characteristics of caffeine and theophylline1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, M. M.; De Lima, C. G.; Winefordner, J. D.

    The luminescence properties of solutions of caffeine and theophylline in methanol are observed. The effects of the solvent pH, the presence of a heavy atom and the matrix or substrate on the fluorescence and phosphorescence properties of the compounds are evaluated. Caffeine and theophylline fluorescence can be observed at room temperature from dilute methanolic solutions and strong phosphorescence is observed at low temperature when the matrix is in a polycrystalline state. Acidic and basic media cause spectral changes and reduce the intensity of the low temperature phosphorescence. Iodide is a good heavy-atom enhancer of both the low temperature and room temperature phosphorescence of caffeine and theophylline. The intensity of the phosphorescence at room temperature and when spotted on filter paper depends on the type of filter paper and the pH of the spotting solution and/or the pH of the wet surface at the moment of spotting. Theophylline is more sensitive than caffeine to the microenvironment. Under the appropriate experimental conditions, both low temperature and room temperature phosphorescence could be used as analytical tools for the determination of caffeine and theophylline.

  18. Luminescent silica nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arap, W; Pasqualini, R; Montalti, M; Petrizza, L; Prodi, L; Rampazzo, E; Zaccheroni, N; Marchiò, S

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging techniques are becoming essential for preclinical investigations, necessitating the development of suitable tools for in vivo measurements. Nanotechnology entered this field to help overcome many of the current technical limitations, and luminescent nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most promising materials proposed for future diagnostic implementation. NPs also constitute a versatile platform that can allow facile multi-functionalization to perform multimodal imaging or theranostics (simultaneous diagnosis and therapy). In this contribution we have mainly focused on dye doped silica or silica-based NPs conjugated with targeting moieties to enable imaging of specific cancer cells. We also cite and briefly discuss a few non-targeted systems for completeness. We summarize common synthetic approaches to these materials, and then survey the most recent imaging applications of silica-based nanoparticles in cancer. The field of theranostics is particularly important and stimulating, so, even though it is not the central topic of this paper, we have included some significant examples. We conclude with a short section on NP-based systems already in clinical trials and examples of specific applications in childhood tumors. This review aims to describe and discuss, through focused examples, the great potential of these materials in the medical field, with the aim to encourage further research to implement applications, which today are still rare.

  19. Luminescent probes and sensors for temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-dong; Wolfbeis, Otto S; Meier, Robert J

    2013-10-07

    Temperature (T) is probably the most fundamental parameter in all kinds of science. Respective sensors are widely used in daily life. Besides conventional thermometers, optical sensors are considered to be attractive alternatives for sensing and on-line monitoring of T. This Review article focuses on all kinds of luminescent probes and sensors for measurement of T, and summarizes the recent progress in their design and application formats. The introduction covers the importance of optical probes for T, the origin of their T-dependent spectra, and the various detection modes. This is followed by a survey on (a) molecular probes, (b) nanomaterials, and (c) bulk materials for sensing T. This section will be completed by a discussion of (d) polymeric matrices for immobilizing T-sensitive probes and (e) an overview of the various application formats of T-sensors. The review ends with a discussion on the prospects, challenges, and new directions in the design of optical T-sensitive probes and sensors.

  20. Luminescent Solar Concentrators in the Algal Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellier, Katie; Corrado, Carley; Carter, Sue; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    Today's industry for renewable energy sources and highly efficient energy management systems is rapidly increasing. Development of increased efficiency Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) has brought about new applications for commercial interests, including greenhouses for agricultural crops. This project is taking first steps to explore the potential of LSCs to enhance production and reduce costs for algae and cyanobacteria used in biofuels and nutraceuticals. This pilot phase uses LSC filtered light for algal growth trials in greenhouses and laboratory experiments, creating specific wavelength combinations to determine effects of discrete solar light regimes on algal growth and the reduction of heating and water loss in the system. Enhancing the optimal spectra for specific algae will not only increase production, but has the potential to lessen contamination of large scale production due to competition from other algae and bacteria. Providing LSC filtered light will reduce evaporation and heating in regions with limited water supply, while the increased energy output from photovoltaic cells will reduce costs of heating and mixing cultures, thus creating a more efficient and cost effective production system.

  1. Luminescent sulfides of monovalent and trivalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention discloses a family of luminescent materials or phosphors having a rhombohedral crystal structure and consisting essentially of a mixed host sulfide of at least one monovalent host cation and at least one trivalent host cation, and containing, for each mole of phosphor, 0.0005 to 0.05 mole of at least one activating cation. The monovalent host cations may be Na, K or Rb and Cs. The trivalent host cations may be Gd, La, Lu, Sc and Y. The activating cations may be one or more of trivalent As, Bi, Ce, Dy, Er, Pr, Sb, Sm, Tb and Tm; divalent Lu, Mn, Pb and Sn; and monovalent Ag, Cu and Tl. The novel phosphors may be used in devices to convert electron-beam, ultraviolet or x-ray energy to light in the visible spectrum. Such energy conversion can be employed for example in fluoroscopic screens, and in viewing screens of cathode-ray tubes and other electron tubes

  2. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications.

  3. The luminescence of barium titanium phosphate, BaTi(PO4)2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasse, G.; Dirksen, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    The luminescence of BaTi(PO4)2 is described. The yellow emission is due to titanate octahedra. This compound is one of the exceptional cases where the octahedral titanate luminescence can be described by a simple model.

  4. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  5. Polarized scintillator targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2000-05-01

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as "live" polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  6. Polarized scintillator targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B. van den E-mail: vandenbrandt@psi.ch; Bunyatova, E.I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S

    2000-05-21

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as 'live' polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  7. Heidelberg polarized alkali source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.; Steffens, E.; Jaensch, H.; Philipps Universitaet, Marburg, Germany)

    1984-01-01

    A new atomic beam type polarized alkali ion source has been installed at Heidelberg. In order to improve the beam polarization considerably optical pumping is applied in combination with an adiabatic medium field transition which results in beams in single hyperfine sublevels. The m state population is determined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Highly polarized beams (P/sub s/ > 0.9, s = z, zz) with intensities of 30 to 130 μA can be extracted for Li + and Na + , respectively

  8. Polarization measurement in the COMPASS polarized target

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, K; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Doshita, N; Gautheron, F; Görtz, S; Hasegawa, T; Horikawa, N; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kisselev, Yu V; Koivuniemi, J H; Le Goff, J M; Magnon, A; Meyer, W; Reicherz, G; Matsuda, T

    2004-01-01

    Continuous wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to determine the target polarization in the COMPASS experiment. The system is made of the so-called Liverpool Q-meters, Yale-cards, and VME modules for data taking and system controlling. In 2001 the NMR coils were embedded in the target material, while in 2002 and 2003 the coils were mounted on the outer surface of the target cells to increase the packing factor of the material. Though the error of the measurement became larger with the outer coils than with the inner coils, we have performed stable measurements throughout the COMPASS run time for 3 years. The maximum polarization was +57% and -53% as the average in the target cells.

  9. Study of the luminescence properties of a natural amazonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correcher, V.; Garcia-Guinea, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most gemstones, being natural materials (silicates, carbonates, phosphates, etc.), exhibit luminescence emission. This property could be potentially employed for personal dosimetry in the case of radiation accident or radiological terrorism where conventional monitoring has not been established. We, herein, report on the thermoluminescence (TL), radioluminescence (RL) and infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) response of a well-characterised natural amazonite (KAlSi 3 O 8 ) that, due to its bright blue-green colour when polished, is used as a gemstone. The luminescence emission wavelengths, intensities and thermal kinetics of the amazonite luminescence curves reveal that the ultraviolet band measured on amazonite aliquots is similar to other common K-rich feldspars. On this basis, one can conclude (i) association between twinning and the UV-blue TL emission can be related to structural defects located in the twin-domain boundaries where ionic alkali-self-diffusion, irreversible water losses and irreversible dehydroxylation processes can be involved. (ii) Amazonite exhibits a complex structure with several planar defects (twinning and exsolution interphases which can hold hydroxyl groups, water molecules, etc.) and point defects (impurities, Na, Pb, Mn, etc.) that can act as luminescence centres, and in fact, green and red emissions are respectively associated with the presence of Mn and Fe impurities. Finally, (iv) the thermal stability tests performed on the TL emission of the amazonite confirm a continuum in the trap distribution, i.e. progressive changes in the glow curve shape, intensity and temperature position of the maximum peak.

  10. User guide for luminescence sampling in archaeological and geological contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michelle S.; Gray, Harrison J.; Johnson, Jack A.; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Feathers, James K.; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence dating provides a direct age estimate of the time of last exposure of quartz or feldspar minerals to light or heat and has been successfully applied to deposits, rock surfaces, and fired materials in a number of archaeological and geological settings. Sampling strategies are diverse and can be customized depending on local circumstances, although all sediment samples need to include a light-safe sample and material for dose-rate determination. The accuracy and precision of luminescence dating results are directly related to the type and quality of the material sampled and sample collection methods in the field. Selection of target material for dating should include considerations of adequacy of resetting of the luminescence signal (optical and thermal bleaching), the ability to characterize the radioactive environment surrounding the sample (dose rate), and the lack of evidence for post-depositional mixing (bioturbation in soils and sediment). Sample strategies for collection of samples from sedimentary settings and fired materials are discussed. This paper should be used as a guide for luminescence sampling and is meant to provide essential background information on how to properly collect samples and on the types of materials suitable for luminescence dating.

  11. On the relationship between luminescence excitation spectra and feldspar mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Boetter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1996-01-01

    Feldspar minerals can be used as naturally occurring radiation dosemeters, with dose assessment commonly using luminescence techniques. Since many feldspars contain radioactive 40 K, knowledge of the mineralogy of the luminescent samples being measured is of high importance. Most feldspars contain more than trace amounts of highly luminescent Fe 3+ impurities, and this article examines the relationship between features of the luminescence excitation spectrum of this ion with sample mineralogy. It is demonstrated that there is a near linear correspondence between the plagioclase feldspar composition and the separation of the 4 T 2 (D) and 4 A 1 4 E(G) Fe 3+ ion levels, and this could be used to identify plagioclase feldspar composition. In the samples tested, certain features of the spectra also allowed a distinction to be made between the alkali (K-Na) and plagioclase (Na-Ca) feldspar groups. The results are compared with properties of the excitation spectra dose-dependent optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in order to compare the chemical environment of the OSL donor defect, and the isolated Fe 3+ centres. (Author)

  12. Luminescence properties of tetravalent uranium in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirishima, A.; Kimura, T.; Nagaishi, R.; Tochiyama, O.

    2004-01-01

    The luminescence spectra of U 4+ in aqueous solutions were observed in the UV-VIS region at ambient and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The excitation spectrum indicates that the luminescence is arising from the deexcitation of a 5f electron at the 1 S 0 level and no other emissions of U 4+ in aqueous solutions were detected for other f-f transitions. All the luminescence peaks were assigned to the transitions from 1 S 0 to lower 5f levels. To estimate the luminescence lifetime, luminescence decay curves were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. At room temperature, the decay curve indicated that the lifetime was shorter than 20 ns. On the other hand, the frozen sample of U 4+ in aqueous solution at liquid nitrogen temperature showed the same emission spectrum as at room temperature and its lifetime was 149 ns in H 2 O system and 198 ns in D 2 O system. The longer lifetime at liquid nitrogen temperature made it possible to measure the spectrum of U 4+ at the concentration as low as 10 -6 M. The difference in the anion species (ClO 4 - , Cl - , SO 4 2- ) affected the structure of the emission spectrum to some extent. (orig.)

  13. Elevated-temperature luminescence measurements to improve spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluska, Mariusz; Czerwinski, Andrzej

    2018-01-01

    Various branches of applied physics use luminescence based methods to investigate light-emitting specimens with high spatial resolution. A key problem is that luminescence signals lack all the advantages of high locality (i.e. of high spatial resolution) when structures with strong built-in electric field are measured. Such fields exist intentionally in most photonic structures, and occur unintentionally in many other materials. In this case, as a result of beam-induced current generation and its outflow, information that indicates irregularities, nonuniformities and inhomogeneities, such as defects, is lost. We show that to avoid nonlocality and enable truly local luminescence measurements, an elevated measurement temperature as high as 350 K (or even higher) is, perhaps surprisingly, advantageous. This is in contrast to a widely used approach, where cryogenic temperatures, or at least room temperature, are recommended. The elevated temperature of a specimen, together with the current outflow being limited by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, is shown to improve the spatial resolution of luminescence measurements greatly. All conclusions drawn using the example of cathodoluminescence are useful for other luminescence techniques.

  14. Mechanoresponsive Luminescent Molecular Assemblies: An Emerging Class of Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Yamane, Shogo; Mitani, Masato; Weder, Christoph; Kato, Takashi

    2016-02-10

    The possibility to change the molecular assembled structures of organic and organometallic materials through mechanical stimulation is emerging as a general and powerful concept for the design of functional materials. In particular, the photophysical properties such as photoluminescence color, quantum yield, and emission lifetime of organic and organometallic fluorophores can significantly depend on the molecular packing, enabling the development of molecular materials with mechanoresponsive luminescence characteristics. Indeed, an increasing number of studies have shown in recent years that mechanical force can be utilized to change the molecular arrangement, and thereby the optical response, of luminescent molecular assemblies of π-conjugated organic or organometallic molecules. Here, the development of such mechanoresponsive luminescent (MRL) molecular assemblies consisting of organic or organometallic molecules is reviewed and emerging trends in this research field are summarized. After a brief introduction of mechanoresponsive luminescence observed in molecular assemblies, the concept of "luminescent molecular domino" is introduced, before molecular materials that show turn-on/off of photoluminescence in response to mechanical stimulation are reviewed. Mechanically stimulated multicolor changes and water-soluble MRL materials are also highlighted and approaches that combine the concept of MRL molecular assemblies with other materials types are presented in the last part of this progress report. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Luminescent Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals Containing Copper: Synthesis, Photophysics, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Kathryn E; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Kilburn, Troy B; Marchioro, Arianna; Nelson, Heidi D; Whitham, Patrick J; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-09-28

    Copper-doped semiconductors are classic phosphor materials that have been used in a variety of applications for many decades. Colloidal copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals have recently attracted a great deal of interest because they combine the solution processability and spectral tunability of colloidal nanocrystals with the unique photoluminescence properties of copper-doped semiconductor phosphors. Although ternary and quaternary semiconductors containing copper, such as CuInS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have been studied primarily in the context of their photovoltaic applications, when synthesized as colloidal nanocrystals, these materials have photoluminescence properties that are remarkably similar to those of copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals. This review focuses on the luminescent properties of colloidal copper-doped, copper-based, and related copper-containing semiconductor nanocrystals. Fundamental investigations into the luminescence of copper-containing colloidal nanocrystals are reviewed in the context of the well-established luminescence mechanisms of bulk copper-doped semiconductors and copper(I) molecular coordination complexes. The use of colloidal copper-containing nanocrystals in applications that take advantage of their luminescent properties, such as bioimaging, solid-state lighting, and luminescent solar concentrators, is also discussed.

  16. Study of the luminescence properties of a natural amazonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V., E-mail: v.correcher@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Most gemstones, being natural materials (silicates, carbonates, phosphates, etc.), exhibit luminescence emission. This property could be potentially employed for personal dosimetry in the case of radiation accident or radiological terrorism where conventional monitoring has not been established. We, herein, report on the thermoluminescence (TL), radioluminescence (RL) and infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) response of a well-characterised natural amazonite (KAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) that, due to its bright blue-green colour when polished, is used as a gemstone. The luminescence emission wavelengths, intensities and thermal kinetics of the amazonite luminescence curves reveal that the ultraviolet band measured on amazonite aliquots is similar to other common K-rich feldspars. On this basis, one can conclude (i) association between twinning and the UV-blue TL emission can be related to structural defects located in the twin-domain boundaries where ionic alkali-self-diffusion, irreversible water losses and irreversible dehydroxylation processes can be involved. (ii) Amazonite exhibits a complex structure with several planar defects (twinning and exsolution interphases which can hold hydroxyl groups, water molecules, etc.) and point defects (impurities, Na, Pb, Mn, etc.) that can act as luminescence centres, and in fact, green and red emissions are respectively associated with the presence of Mn and Fe impurities. Finally, (iv) the thermal stability tests performed on the TL emission of the amazonite confirm a continuum in the trap distribution, i.e. progressive changes in the glow curve shape, intensity and temperature position of the maximum peak.

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF LUMINESCENT CENTRES IN GLASS WITH COPPER AND CHLORINE IONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Babkina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Research results of luminescent and excitation spectra of potassium-alumina-borate glass with copper and chlorine ions luminescence are submitted. It is shown, that before the heat treatment glass luminescence is connected with molecular clusters Cun (n < 10. The broadband luminescence in the visible spectral region, appearing after the heat treatment, is due to the appearance of (CuCln and (Cu2On molecular clusters in glass matrix.

  18. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  19. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function......%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has been implemented in a 1D...

  20. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  1. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) from feldspar samples is of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since it provides information on the luminescence mechanism in these materials. In this paper we present new analytical equations which can be used to analyze TR-IR...

  2. Modelling of optically stimulated luminescence of zircon : assessment of the suitability for dating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkin, A.A.; Vainshtein, D.I.; Hartog, H.W. den

    2006-01-01

    The mineral zircon, ZrSiO4, is a candidate material for optical dating because it exhibits luminescence after exposure to natural radioactivity. The kinetic model of zircon thermally stimulated luminescence proposed before has been modified and used to investigate optically Stimulated luminescence

  3. Water-Triggered Luminescent "Nano-bombs" Based on Supra-(Carbon Nanodots)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, Q.; Qu, S.; Jing, P.; Ji, W.; Li, D.; Cao, J.; Zhang, H.; Liu, L.; Zhao, J.; Shen, D.

    2015-01-01

    Novel luminescent "nano-bombs" based on a self-assembled system of carbon-nanodots, termed supra-CDs, are developed. The luminescence of these luminescent "nano-bombs" depends strongly on water contact; they show weak emission in toluene and decompose in contact with water, resulting in strong

  4. ENERGY-TRANSFER PROCESSES INVOLVING DIFFERENT LUMINESCENCE-CENTERS IN BAF2CE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSER, R; DORENBOS, P; VANEIJK, CWE; MEIJERINK, A; BLASSE, G; DENHARTOG, HW

    1993-01-01

    The luminescence of cerium-doped barium fluoride crystals has been investigated as a function of wavelength and time. For excitation uv light, x-rays and gamma rays were used. The well known cross luminescence (CL) near 200 nm and self-trapped exciton luminescence (STE) near 300 nm, which are due to

  5. Switching and tuning organic solid state luminescence via a supramolecular approach

    OpenAIRE

    DRAPER, SYLVIA MARY; VARGHESE, SREEJA

    2009-01-01

    PUBLISHED Unusual intermolecular interactions of organic luminescent acid, 2-cyano-3(4-(diphenylamino)phenyl)acrylic acid (CDPA), with amines lead to the formation of supramolecular luminescence systems with switchable and tunable solid-state luminescence This material is based upon works supported by EU FP6 [MKTD-CT-2004-014472] and Science Foundation Ireland [05PICAI819

  6. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Horimoto, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Sukegawa, Kouta; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasma can be anisotropic in laser-produced plasmas. We have developed a new technique to evaluate the polarization degree of the emission lines in the extreme vacuum ultra violet wavelength region. The polarization of the emission lines and the continuums from the lithium-like nitrogen and from helium- and hydrogen-like carbon in recombining plasma is evaluated. Particle simulation in the velocity space gives the time scale for relaxation of anisotropic EVDFs. (author)

  7. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  8. Hsp Polarization Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, Robert

    1991-07-01

    This proposal defines the procedure for determining the instrumental polarization of the polarimetric IDT (IDT#1, POL) on the HSP. 1 of 2 unpolarized standard stars wil be observed using various filter-polarizer combinations. These observations will permit the instrumental polarization to be calibrated. The instrumental polarization must be determined to a high precision in order to vectoriallly remove it from HSP polarization observations to determine the actual astronomical polarization. Final run of proposal will look at one of 2 possible stars previously observed to get another look at the throughput. Revision History: Mark H. Slovak 8/30/88 Translated to V2 proposal instructions (RPSS V6.2) S. Laurent 1/20/89 Updated: Sally Laurent 2/24/89, 3/20/89, 4/13/89, 5/12/89 Modified: P. Stanley 1/15/90 - change to use CTA selected targets only; Fixes for aberration problem - SALM 7/30/90; Based on SV/HSP 1386. New submission changed targets and revised scheduling strategy. Revised: 26 Aug 92 J. Dolan, L. Walter, P. Reppert want to re-run the proposal (3985) one last time to bring down errors.

  9. Luminescence properties of isomeric and tautomeric lanthanide pyridinedicarboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntus, L.N.; Zolin, V.F.; Babushkina, T.A.; Kutuza, I.B.

    2004-01-01

    The luminescence and PMR spectra of europium salts of six isomers of 2,3-, 2,4-, 2,5-, 2,6-, 3,4-, and 3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acids (PDA) had been studied. The distribution of the effective charge in the nearest surroundings of the Eu 3+ ion in these salts was evaluated from Stark splittings of electronic transitions. The values of relative integral intensities of electronic transitions 5 D 0 - 7 F J (J=0-4) in the luminescence spectra were reported. Compounds investigated were divided into three subgroups taking into account the details of the structure of the ligands and details of the luminescence spectra. The ligand coordination manners as well as the strength of interaction between lanthanide ion and ligands were confirmed by data of the PMR and IR spectroscopy

  10. Fiber-coupled Luminescence Dosimetry in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik

    2011-01-01

    . Some crystalline phosphors, such as carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) have the ability to store charge produced in the crystal during irradiation. The stored charge may later be released by fiber-guided laser light under emission of so-called optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The OSL signal......Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry is an emerging technology with several potentially attractive features of relevance for uses in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology: direct water equivalence (i.e. no significant perturbation of the radiation field in a water phantom or a patient), sub......-mm detector size, high dynamic range (below a mGy to several Gy), microsecond time resolution, and absence of electrical wires or other electronics in the dosimeter probe head. Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry systems typically consist of one or more small samples of phosphor, e.g. a mg of plastic...

  11. Bistable luminescence of trivalent rare-earth ions in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, Jose Garcia; Ramirez O, Maria de la; Rodenas, Airan; Jaque, Daniel; Bausa, Luisa; Bettinelli, Marco; Speghini, Adolfo; Cavalli, Enrico; Ivleva, Lioudmila

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we have examined three new bistable systems based on the luminescence of three different crystals activated with trivalent rare earth ions. We have focussed our attention on Yb 3+ ions activators, for which the most relevant results are obtained. The first crystal, Sr 0.6 Ba 0.4 Nb 2 O 6 , is a ferroelectric material with a relatively low phase transition temperature (∼370 K), which provides bistability in the luminescence of Yb 3+ ions due to the thermal hysteresis associated with phase transition. The second crystal, LiNbO 3 , provides an intrinsic bistability in the luminescence of Yb 3+ ions, which is driven by changes in the excitation intensity. In the third crystal, NdPO 4 , a new mechanism of excitation intensity driven bistability is obtained when activated with Yb 3+ ions, due to a interplay between the Nd 3+ ↔Yb 3+ energy transfer and back transfer processes

  12. Optical and luminescence properties of zinc oxide (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodnyi, P. A.; Khodyuk, I. V.

    2011-11-01

    We generalize and systematize basic experimental data on optical and luminescence properties of ZnO single crystals, thin films, powders, ceramics, and nanocrystals. We consider and study mechanisms by which two main emission bands occur, a short-wavelength band near the fundamental absorption edge and a broad long-wavelength band, the maximum of which usually lies in the green spectral range. We determine a relationship between the two luminescence bands and study in detail the possibility of controlling the characteristics of ZnO by varying the maximum position of the short-wavelength band. We show that the optical and luminescence characteristics of ZnO largely depend on the choice of the corresponding impurity and the parameters of the synthesis and subsequent treatment of the sample. Prospects for using zinc oxide as a scintillator material are discussed. Additionally, we consider experimental results that are of principal interest for practice.

  13. Luminescent microbanding in speleothems: High-resolution chronology and paleoclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shopov, Y. Y.; Ford, D. C.; Schwarcz, H. P.

    1994-05-01

    When illuminated by ultraviolet light, many calcite speleothems (stalagmites, stalactites, flowstones) display luminescence caused by the presence of organic (humic) substances occluded in the calcite. The amplitude of luminescence varies in a banded pattern parallel to growth layering. Through 14C and thermal ionization mass spectrometry uranium-series dating, we show that cyclical oscillations in the luminescence have periodicities ranging from a few days to ≥105 yr. A well-defined annual cycle is present in many vadose-zone speleothems and can be used to define the chronology of short-term events. This cycle is probably a response to hydrological events in the recharge to the cave. Longer term oscillations are inferred to be controlled by climate, through its effect on organic activity in the overlying soil.

  14. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials from fundamentals to bioapplications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xueyuan; Tu, Datao

    2014-01-01

    Lanthanide-Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials reviews the latest advances in the development of lanthanide-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles for potential bioapplications. This book covers the chemical and physical fundamentals of these nanoparticles, such as the controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in-vitro biodetection of tumor biomarkers. This book is intended for those readers who are interested in systematically understanding the materials design strategy, optical behavior of lanthanide ions, and practical bioapplications of lanthanide nanoparticles. It primarily focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers in chemistry, physics and biological aspects of luminescent nanomaterials. All chapters were written by scientists active in this field and for a broad audience, providing both beginners and advanced researchers with comprehensive information on the ...

  15. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry with gypsum wallboard (drywall).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jeroen W; Burdette, Kevin E; Inrig, Elizabeth L; Dewitt, Regina; Mistry, Rajesh; Rink, W Jack; Boreham, Douglas R

    2010-09-01

    Gypsum wallboard (drywall) represents an attractive target for retrospective dosimetry by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the event of a radiological accident or malicious use of nuclear material. In this study, wallboard is shown to display a radiation-induced luminescence signal (RIS) as well as a natural background signal (NS), which is comparable in intensity to the RIS. Excitation and emission spectra show that maximum luminescence intensity is obtained for stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes (470 nm) and for detection in the ultraviolet region (290-370 nm). It is necessary to decrease the optical stimulation power dramatically in order to adequately separate the RIS from the interfering background signal. The necessary protocols are developed for accurately measuring the absorbed dose as low as 500 mGy and demonstrate that the RIS decays logarithmically with storage time, with complete erasure expected within 1-4 d.

  16. Luminescent properties of Al2O3: Tb powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esparza G, A.E.; Garcia, M.; Falcony, C.; Azorin N, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this work the photo luminescent and cathode luminescent characteristics of aluminium oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) powders impurified with terbium (Tb) were studied for their use in dosimetry. The optical, structural, morphological characteristics of the powders as function of variation in the impurity concentration and the annealing temperature will be presented. As regards the optical properties of powders (photoluminescence and cathode luminescence) it was observed a characteristic emission associated with radiative transitions between electron energy levels of terbium, the spectra associated with this emission consists of several peaks associated with such transitions. In the structural and morphological characterization (X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy) it was appreciated that in accordance the annealing temperature of powders is augmented it is evident the apparition of certain crystalline phases. The results show that this is a promissory material for radiation dosimetry. (Author)

  17. Luminescent metal nanoclusters: controlled synthesis and functional applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Tao Sun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent metal nanoclusters that consist of only several, to tens of, metal atoms and which possess sizes comparable to the Fermi wavelength of electrons have recently attracted significant attention. This new class of luminescent materials not only provides the missing link between atomic and nanoparticle behaviors in metals but also they present abundant novel information for the development of new applicable material systems to meet urgent needs in many areas (such as ultrasensitive sensors for heavy metals, bioimaging, as well as information technology mainly because of their attractive characteristics, including ultra-small size, good dispersibility, excellent biocompatibility and photostability. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the controlled synthesis and application of luminescent metal nanoclusters, with a particular emphasis on Pt, Mo, Bi and alloy clusters. We also speculate on their future and discuss potential developments for their use in sensors, bioimaging and energy harvesting and conversion.

  18. Luminescent metal nanoclusters: controlled synthesis and functional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Tao; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    Luminescent metal nanoclusters that consist of only several, to tens of, metal atoms and which possess sizes comparable to the Fermi wavelength of electrons have recently attracted significant attention. This new class of luminescent materials not only provides the missing link between atomic and nanoparticle behaviors in metals but also they present abundant novel information for the development of new applicable material systems to meet urgent needs in many areas (such as ultrasensitive sensors for heavy metals, bioimaging, as well as information technology) mainly because of their attractive characteristics, including ultra-small size, good dispersibility, excellent biocompatibility and photostability. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the controlled synthesis and application of luminescent metal nanoclusters, with a particular emphasis on Pt, Mo, Bi and alloy clusters. We also speculate on their future and discuss potential developments for their use in sensors, bioimaging and energy harvesting and conversion.

  19. Luminescence and photosensitivity of PbI2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosad, S.S.; Novosad, I.S.; Matviishin, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    One studied effect of temperature treatment and storage conditions on spectra features of PbI 2 crystals grown by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method from salt additionally purified by directed crystallization. Spectra of X-ray luminescence, photoluminescence and thermostimulated luminescence were investigated within 85-295 K temperature range under stationary X-ray excitation and emission of N 2 -laser. One studied photoelectret properties of those crystals under 85 K. Luminescence of PbI 2 crystals with maximum within 595 nm region observed following their thermal annealing under 475-495 K temperature and typical for near-the-surface section of specimens may be caused by oxygen-containing centres [ru

  20. Aqueous EuII-containing complex with bright yellow luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuda-Wedagedara, Akhila N. W.; Wang, Chengcheng; Martin, Philip D.; Allen, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    EuII-containing materials have unique luminescence, redox, and magnetic properties that have potential applications in optoelectronics, sensors, and imaging. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of EuII-containing aza-222 cryptate that displays yellow luminescence and a quantum yield of 26% in aqueous media. The crystal structure reveals a staggered hulahoop geometry. Both solid-state and solution-phase data are presented that indicate that the high quantum yield is a result of the absence of OH oscillators in the inner sphere of the complex. We expect that EuII-containing aza-222 cryptate is a step toward EuII-containing luminescent materials that can be used in a variety of applications including biological imaging. PMID:25853298

  1. Mapping thermal exposure by luminescence thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.Q.; Sanderson, D.C.W. [Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1994-04-01

    It has been shown in previous studies that residual geological thermoluminescence (TL) signals can be used to assess fire damage and thermal exposure, both of which are of some interest in archaeological contexts. Detailed studies of the removal of TL from pure alkali feldspars have shown systematic relations between measured glow curve parameters and the temperatures and durations of isothermal annealing. However, in most archaeological cases, the temperature-time profile is variable and unknown. To examine the relationship between TL characteristics and thermal history under more realistic conditions, a model hearthstone was constructed containing a three-dimensional matrix of 64 thermocouples and the spatial variations in temperature monitored during the course of two experimental fires. Cores were removed from the stone at 18 locations where direct thermocouple correlations could be made, and at a further two locations, to interpolate the radial temperature distribution. Each core was sectioned and samples extracted for TL and PSL analysis, thus providing a representative set of samples which had been exposed to different maximum temperatures and a dynamic thermal exposure. TL measurements were made from room temperature to 700{sup o}C using a UV-filtered reader, and PSL measurements were made using a high sensitivity infrared pulsed diode array. The TL results, parametrized in terms of the position of the residual geological signal, are compared with thermocouple data integrated with respect to time over the course of the known thermal exposure, taking account of the empirical form of the complementary temperature-time relationships deduced from studies of pure minerals. This provides a means of quantifying thermal exposure for a generalized thermal event, which can be directly related to measured luminescence indicators. (Author).

  2. Luminescence characterization of a sodium rich feldspar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V.; Sanchez M, L. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia G, J. [MNCN-CSIC, c/ J. Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Rivera, T. [CICATA-IPN, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports on the radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of a sodium rich feldspar ((Na,K)[AlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}]) with a mean molecular composition of orthoclase (Or) and albite (Ab) of Or{sub 1}Ab{sub 99}. Despite the complexity of the luminescence signals of the sample, it is possible to determine six different emission bands at about 300, 380, 420, 460, 550 and 680 nm. The 300 nm emission can be associated to structural defects related to the recombination process in which the Na{sup +} ion diffusion-limited is involved. The UV-blue emission band at (i) 380 nm is characteristic of mineral phases containing SiO{sub 4} tetrahedral and could be related to intrinsic defects in the lattice, (ii) the 420 nm band could be associated to the presence of Cu (II) ions placed next to the hole traps or the recombination on a centre formed from a hole-oxygen atom adjacent to two Al atoms (Al-O-Al) and (iii) the 460 nm waveband could be due to the presence of Ti{sup 4+}. The green and red emissions are respectively associated to the presence of Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The ratio between the relative intensities, peaked at 290 (the more intense waveband) and 550 nm is about 10:1 in both TL and RL; this fact indicates that the efficiency of recombination centres does no changes regardless on the type of the process. (Author)

  3. Latest developments in silica fibre luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D. A.; Abdul S, S. F.; Jafari, S. M.; Alanazi, A. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Amouzad M, G. [University of Malaya, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Lightwave Research Group, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Addul R, H. A.; Mizanur R, A. K. M.; Zubair, H. T.; Begum, M.; Yusoff, Z.; Omar, N. Y. M. [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, 2010 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Maah, M. J. [University of Malaya, Department of Chemistry, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Collin, S. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 OLW Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mat-Sharif, K. A.; Muhd-Yassin, S. Z.; Zulkifli, M. I., E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.uk [Telekom Malaysia Research and Development Sdn Bhd., 63000 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Using tailor made sub-mm diameter doped-silica fibres, we are carrying out luminescence dosimetry studies for a range of situations, including thermoluminescence (Tl)investigations on a liquid alpha source formed of {sup 223}RaCl (the basis of the Bayer Health care product Xofigo), the Tl response to a 62 MeV proton source and Tl response to irradiation from an {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. In regard to the former, in accord with the intrinsic high linear energy transfer (Let) and short path length (<100 um) of the α-particles in calcified tissue, the product is in part intended as a bone-seeking radionuclide for treatment of metastatic cancer, offering high specificity and efficacy. The Tl yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibres has been investigated including for photonic crystal fibre un collapsed, flat fibres and single mode fibres, these systems offering many advantages over conventional passive dosimetry types. In particular, one can mention comparable and even superior sensitivity, an effective atomic number Z{sub eff} of the silica dosimetric material close to that of bone, and the glassy nature of the fibres offering the additional advantage of being able to place such dosimeters directly into liquid environments. Finally we review the use of our tailor made fibres for on-line radioluminescence measurements of radiotherapy beams. The outcome from these various lines of research is expected to inform development of doped fiber radiation dosimeters of versatile utility, ranging from clinical applications through to industrial studies and environmental evaluations. (Author)

  4. Ion irradiation effect of alumina and its luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Shunya; Naramoto, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; My, N.T.

    1997-03-01

    The luminescence spectra of single crystalline alpha-alumina and ruby which has 0.02% of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a impurity, induced by 200 keV He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} irradiation were measured at room temperature as a function of irradiation dose. The analysis of the measured spectra showed the existence of three main luminescence features in the wavelength region of 250 to 350 nm, namely anionic color centers, F-center at 411 nm and F{sup +}-center at 330 nm and a band observed around 315 nm. As alpha-alumina was irradiated with He{sup +}, F-center and F{sup +}-center luminescence grew and decayed, but the behaviors of those were different from each other. It seems that a concentration quenching occurred on the F-center luminescence in the dose range above 1x10{sup 14} He/cm{sup 2}. Furthermore, F-center luminescence was strongly suppressed in ruby, compared with that in alumina. On the other hand, the luminescence band around 315 nm appeared only in the early stage of irradiation and did not show its growth part. The dose dependent behavior was similar to that of Cr{sup 3+} emission at 695 nm (R-line) in ruby in both cases of He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} irradiation. Based on the experimental results mentioned above, the processes of defect formation and excitation in alumina in the early stage of ion irradiation will be discussed. (author)

  5. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  6. The luminescent concentrator: a bright idea for spectrum conversion?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slooff, L.H.; Kinderman, R.; Burgers, A.R.; Van Roosmalen, J.A.M. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Buechtemann, A. [Fraunhofer Institut for Applied Polymer Research, Golm (Germany); Chatten, J.; Farrel, D.; Barnham, K.W.J. [Physics Department, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-01

    Luminescent concentrator plates with different dyes were combined with multicrystalline silicon solar cells at one side of the plate. Spectral response and IV measurements were performed. The results show an external quantum efficiency of 25 % for an optical concentration factor of 10, giving an effective concentration factor of 2.5 at the absorption maximum. The electrical current of the silicon cell is increased by a factor 1.5 with respect to the bare cell under normal incidence. The influence of dye concentration, mirrored surfaces and plate dimensions on the performance of the luminescent concentrator is addressed.

  7. Luminescent Lanthanide MOFs: A Unique Platform for Chemical Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shu-Na; Wang, Guangbo; Poelman, Dirk; Voort, Pascal Van Der

    2018-04-07

    In recent years, lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (LnMOFs) have developed to be an interesting subclass of MOFs. The combination of the characteristic luminescent properties of Ln ions with the intriguing topological structures of MOFs opens up promising possibilities for the design of LnMOF-based chemical sensors. In this review, we present the most recent developments of LnMOFs as chemical sensors by briefly introducing the general luminescence features of LnMOFs, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the applications of LnMOF sensors for cations, anions, small molecules, nitroaromatic explosives, gases, vapors, pH, and temperature, as well as biomolecules.

  8. Luminescence dating of ancient pottery of Pithoria, Ranchi, Jharkhand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartia, R.K.; Nabadwip Singh, S.; Bhengra, D.

    2006-01-01

    Luminescence dating of an ancient pottery obtained from excavation of Megalithic site of Pithoria, (Ranchi district, Jharkhand) has been performed using both Thermoluminescence (TL) and Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The work represents first of its kind in terms of materials of Jharkhand. Our preliminary OSL age estimated is 1700 ± 300 years. The date probably corresponds to the early settlement of the famous Munda tribe of Chhota Nagpur, Central India. It is hoped that the work will be the first step for reconstruction of the early history of the Mundas, a typical representative of the great Kol race (aborigines of India). (author)

  9. Luminescent chemical sensing, biosensing, and screening using upconverting nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achatz, Daniela E; Ali, Reham; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2011-01-01

    Upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) display the unique property of converting near-infrared light (with wavelengths of typically 800-1,000 nm) into visible luminescence. Following a short introduction into the mechanisms leading to the effect, the main classes of materials used are discussed. We then review the state of the art of using UCNPs: (1) to label biomolecules such as antibodies and (synthetic) oligomers for use in affinity assay and flow assays; (2) to act as nanolamps whose emission intensity is modulated by chemical indicators, thus leading to a novel kind of chemical sensors; and (3), to act as donors in luminescence resonance energy transfer in chemical sensors and biosensors.

  10. Kinetics of luminescence decay in electron-irradiated sapphire crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, Kevin J.; Cooper, Ronald [Department of Chemistry, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Boas, John F. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia)

    1997-07-28

    The kinetics of luminescence decay in electron-irradiated sapphire ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) single crystals have been investigated using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. The data, observed over timescales from tens of nanoseconds to tens of milliseconds, characteristically feature a rapid decay of intensity punctuated by discrete plateau regions. Simple theoretical models, invoking such theories as first- or second-order mechanisms, rate laws or power-law dependences, are unable to explain these features. A theoretical model comprising bimolecular electron - hole recombination, together with unimolecular electron detrapping from two discrete traps, qualitatively accounts for these features. (author)

  11. Solid state luminescent light filters for neodymium lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenik, V. N.; Koptev, V. G.; Razvina, T. M.; Rzhevskiy, M. B.; Stavrov, A. A.; Starostina, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    The spectral luminescent properties of a number of optical filters made of doped quartz glasses are compared; their influence on the lasing characteristics of a YAG:Nd sup 3+ laser are investigated. The studies employed KlZh5 glass, as well as quartz glass made of synthetic amorphous and crystalline silicon dioxide and containing Sm sup 2+. Luminescence kinetics were investigated by using an Sl-70 oscillograph. It is found that the use of quartz glasses doped with Sm sup 2+ ions and KlZh5 glass for light figures can increase the optical pumping efficiency of pulsed lasers in certain cases.

  12. High-resolution light microscopy using luminescent nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Roy, Indrajit; Yong, Ken-Tye; Pudavar, Haridas E; Prasad, Paras N

    2010-01-01

    This review presents recent progress in the development of the luminescent nanoparticles for confocal and multiphoton microscopy. Four classes of nanomaterials are discussed: (1) silica-based nanoparticles doped with fluorescent molecules, (2) gold nanoparticles, (3) semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots/rods), and (4) nanophosphors. Special considerations are given to recently developed imaging nanoprobes, such as (1) organically modified silica (ORMOSIL) nanoparticles doped with two-photon absorbing fluorophores, which exhibit aggregation-enhanced fluorescence (AEF), and (2) nanophosphors (ceramic nanoparticles containing luminescent lanthanoid ions). Advantages and disadvantages of every class of nanomaterials and their specific applications are briefly discussed.

  13. Development of a battery-operated portable synchronous luminescence spectrofluorometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarie, J.P.; Vo-Dinh, T.; Miller, G.; Ericson, M.N.; Maddox, S.R.; Watts, W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6101 (United States)); Eastwood, D.; Lidberg, R.; Dominguez, M. (Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company, Las Vegas, Nevada 89119 (United States))

    1993-09-01

    A battery-operated portable synchronous luminescence spectrofluorometer was developed for on-site analysis of groundwater or hazardous waste sites. The instrument is capable of either emission, excitation, or synchronous fluorescence measurements. The instrument is suited for trace analysis of important pollutants such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons, creosotes, and polychlorinated biphenyls in complex mixtures. The ability to perform synchronous luminescence measurements on these samples can reduce the complexity of fluorescence spectra and help in rapid field site characterization. A description of the instrumental components is given and an evaluation of the instrument using anthracene and several oil samples is provided to illustrate the usefulness of the instrument.

  14. The evolution of tensor polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Lee, S.Y.; Ratner, L.

    1993-01-01

    By using the equation of motion for the vector polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization is derived. The evolution equation for the tensor polarization is studied in the presence of an isolate spin resonance and in the presence of a spin rotor, or snake

  15. Luminescence of uranyl ion complexed with 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid as ligand in acetonitrile medium. Observation of co-luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maji, Siuli; Kumar, Satendra; Sankaran, Kannan [Indira Ghandi Centre for Atomic Research, Tamil Nadu (India). Materials Chemistry Div.

    2017-10-01

    Luminescence from UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} (uranyl ion) complexed with 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid (PDA) has been studied using acetonitrile (MeCN) as solvent between pH 1.0 and 6.0. The enhancement in luminescence intensity because of sensitization by PDA in the non-aqueous environment provided by the MeCN is found to be one order better than in aqueous medium. The luminescence is further enhanced by about four times following the addition of Y{sup 3+}; a process known as co-luminescence. This is the first study on co-luminescence of uranyl ion in its PDA complex. Lifetime studies indicate the presence of two species having different micro-environments. Formations of both intra and inter molecular complexes are believed to be responsible for enhancement due to co-luminescence.

  16. Device and method for luminescence enhancement by resonant energy transfer from an absorptive thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akselrod, Gleb M.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Bulovic, Vladimir; Tischler, Jonathan R.; Tisdale, William A.; Walker, Brian J.

    2017-12-12

    Disclosed are a device and a method for the design and fabrication of the device for enhancing the brightness of luminescent molecules, nanostructures, and thin films. The device includes a mirror, a dielectric medium or spacer, an absorptive layer, and a luminescent layer. The absorptive layer is a continuous thin film of a strongly absorbing organic or inorganic material. The luminescent layer may be a continuous luminescent thin film or an arrangement of isolated luminescent species, e.g., organic or metal-organic dye molecules, semiconductor quantum dots, or other semiconductor nanostructures, supported on top of the absorptive layer.

  17. Polarized Electrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1997-12-31

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously.initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented.

  18. Polarized electrons at Jefferson laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously. Initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented

  19. Silane-Induced N-Polarity in Wires Probed by a Synchrotron Nanobeam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Damien; Messanvi, Agnes; Eymery, Joël; Martínez-Criado, Gema

    2017-02-08

    Noncentrosymmetric one-dimensional structures are key driving forces behind advanced nanodevices. Owing to the critical role of silane injection in creating nanosized architectures, it has become a challenge to investigate the induced local lattice polarity in single GaN wires. Thus, if axial and radial structures are well-grown by a silane-mediated approach, an ideal model to study their polar orientations is formed. By combining synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and X-ray excited optical luminescence, we show here experimental evidence of the role of silane to promote the N-polarity, light emission, and elemental incorporation within single wires. In addition, our experiment demonstrates the ability to spatially examine carrier diffusion phenomena without electrical contacts, opening new avenues for further studies with simultaneous optical and elemental sensitivity at the nanoscale.

  20. Polar low monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobylev, Leonid; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta; Mitnik, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale atmospheric low pressure weather systems, developing poleward of the main baroclinic zone and associated with high surface wind speeds. Small size and short lifetime, sparse in-situ observations in the regions of their development complicate polar low study. Our knowledge of polar lows and mesocyclones has come almost entirely during the period of satellite remote sensing since, by virtue of their small horizontal scale, it was rarely possible to analyse these lows on conventional weather charts using only the data from the synoptic observing network. However, the effects of intense polar lows have been felt by coastal communities and seafarers since the earliest times. These weather systems are thought to be responsible for the loss of many small vessels over the centuries, although the nature of the storms was not understood and their arrival could not be predicted. The actuality of the polar low research is stipulated by their high destructive power: they are a threat to such businesses as oil and gas exploration, fisheries and shipping. They could worsen because of global warming: a shrinking of sea ice around the North Pole, which thawed to its record minimum in the summer of 2007, is likely to give rise to more powerful storms that form only over open water and can cause hurricane-strength winds. Therefore, study of polar lows, their timely detection, tracking and forecasting represents a challenge for today meteorology. Satellite passive microwave data, starting from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite, remain invaluable source of regularly available remotely sensed data to study polar lows. The sounding in this spectral range has several advantages in comparison with observations in visible and infrared ranges and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data: independence on day time and clouds, regularity and high temporal resolution in Polar Regions. Satellite

  1. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  2. The Bochum Polarized Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reicherz, G.; Goertz, S.; Harmsen, J.; Heckmann, J.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Bochum 'Polarized Target' group develops the target material 6 LiD for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. Several different materials like alcohols, alcanes and ammonia are under investigation. Solid State Targets are polarized in magnetic fields higher than B=2.5T and at temperatures below T=1K. For the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization process, paramagnetic centers are induced chemically or by irradiation with ionizing beams. The radical density is a critical factor for optimization of polarization and relaxation times at adequate magnetic fields and temperatures. In a high sensitive EPR--apparatus, an evaporator and a dilution cryostat with a continuous wave NMR--system, the materials are investigated and optimized. To improve the polarization measurement, the Liverpool NMR-box is modified by exchanging the fixed capacitor for a varicap diode which not only makes the tuning very easy but also provides a continuously tuned circuit. The dependence of the signal area upon the circuit current is measured and it is shown that it follows a linear function

  3. In-line Fiber Polarizer

    OpenAIRE

    Perumalsamy, Priya

    1998-01-01

    Polarizers and polarization devices are important components in fiber optic communication and sensor systems. There is a growing need for efficient low loss components that are compatible with optical fibers. An all fiber in-line polarizer is a more desirable alternative that could be placed at appropriate intervals along communication links. An in-line fiber polarizer was fabricated and tested. The in-line fiber polarizer operates by coupling optical energy propagatin...

  4. Time-resolved luminescence from quartz: An overview of contemporary developments and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chithambo, M. L.; Ankjærgaard, C.; Pagonis, V.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved optical stimulation of luminescence has become established as a key method for measurement of optically stimulated luminescence from quartz, feldspar and α-Al2O3:C, all materials of interest in dosimetry. The aim of time-resolved optical stimulation is to separate in time the stimulation and emission of luminescence. The luminescence is stimulated from a sample using a brief light pulse and the emission monitored during stimulation in the presence of scattered stimulating light or after pulsing, over photomultiplier noise only. Although the use of the method in retrospective dosimetry has been somewhat limited, the technique has been successfully applied to study mechanisms in the processes leading up to luminescence emission. The main means for this has been the temperature dependence of the luminescence intensity as well as the luminescence lifetimes determined from time-resolved luminescence spectra. In this paper we review some key developments in theory and applications to quartz including methods of evaluating lifetimes, techniques of evaluating kinetic parameters using both the dependence of luminescence intensity and lifetime on measurement temperature, and of lifetimes on annealing temperature. We then provide an overview of some notable applications such as separation of quartz signals from a quartz-feldspar admixture and the utility of the dynamic throughput, a measure of luminescence measured as a function of the pulse width. The paper concludes with some suggestions of areas where further exploration would advance understanding of dynamics of luminescence in quartz and help address some outstanding problems in its application.

  5. Ytterbium-porphyrins as a new class of the luminescent labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsvirko, M [Institute of Chemistry and Environmental Protection, Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 Armii Krajowej Av., Czestochowa (Poland); Korovin, Yu [A.V.Bogatsky Physico-Chemical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 86 Lustdorfskaya doroga, 65080 Odessa, Ukraine (Ukraine); Rusakova, N [A.V.Bogatsky Physico-Chemical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 86 Lustdorfskaya doroga, 65080 Odessa, Ukraine (Ukraine)

    2007-08-15

    New complexes of ytterbium with asymmetric porphyrins containing substituents in {beta}-positions and hydrophobic meso-(monophenyl-p-oxypropyl)triphenylporphyrin (OPP) were obtained and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis absorption and luminescence spectroscopy. Electronic absorption, luminescence and luminescence excitation spectra of these complexes were studied at 295 K in DMF solutions and in the water-lecithin medium. The 4f-luminescence of ytterbium-porphyrins in the near infrared (IR) spectral region ({lambda}{sub max} = 980 nm) is observed under excitation in Soret band (400-430 nm). The effect of substituent in porphyrin macroring on the 4f-luminescent properties was also investigated. The conjugates of these compounds with protein molecules - bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated as well. These compounds are interesting at the initial stage of diagnostics of tumor tissues as IR-luminescent probes due to their spectral-luminescent characteristics and some biochemical properties.

  6. Political Competition and Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    This paper considers political competition and the consequences of political polarization when parties are better informed about how the economy functions than voters are. Specifically, parties know the cost producing a public good, voters do not. An incumbent's choice of policy acts like a signa...... for costs before an upcoming election. It is shown that the more polarized the political parties the more distorted the incumbent's policy choice.......This paper considers political competition and the consequences of political polarization when parties are better informed about how the economy functions than voters are. Specifically, parties know the cost producing a public good, voters do not. An incumbent's choice of policy acts like a signal...

  7. Physics of polarized targets

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    For developing, building and operating solid polarized targets we need to understand several fields of physics that have seen sub stantial advances during the last 50 years. W e shall briefly review a selection of those that are important today. These are: 1) quantum statistical methods to describe saturation and relaxation in magnetic resonance; 2) equal spin temperature model for dy namic nuclear polarization; 3 ) weak saturation during NMR polarization measurement; 4 ) refrigeration using the quantum fluid properties of helium isotopes. These, combined with superconducting magnet technologies, permit today to reach nearly complete pola rization of almost any nuclear spins. Targets can be operated in frozen spin mode in rather low and inhomogeneous field of any orientation, and in DNP mode in beams of high intensity. Beyond such experiments of nuclear and particle physics, applications a re also emerging in macromolecular chemistry and in magnetic resonance imaging. This talk is a tribute to Michel Borghini...

  8. No More Polarization, Please!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mia Reinholt

    The organizational science literature on motivation has for long been polarized into two main positions; the organizational economic position focusing on extrinsic motivation and the organizational behavior position emphasizing intrinsic motivation. With the rise of the knowledge economy...... and the increasing levels of complexities it entails, such polarization is not fruitful in the attempt to explain motivation of organizational members. This paper claims that a more nuanced perspective on motivation, acknowledging the co-existence of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, the possible interaction...... between the two as well as different types of motivations filling in the gap between the two polar types, is urgently needed in the organizational science literature. By drawing on the research on intrinsic and extrinsic motivation conducted in social psychology and combining this with contributions from...

  9. Polarized source upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, T.B.; Rummel, R.L.; Carter, E.P.; Westerfeldt, C.R.; Lovette, A.W.; Edwards, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    The decision was made this past year to move the Lamb-shift polarized ion source which was first installed in the laboratory in 1970. The motivation was the need to improve the flexibility of spin-axis orientation by installing the ion source with a new Wien-filter spin precessor which is capable of rotating physically about the beam axis. The move of the polarized source was accomplished in approximately two months, with the accelerator being turned off for experiments during approximately four weeks of this time. The occasion of the move provided the opportunity to rewire completely the entire polarized ion source frame and to rebuild approximately half of the electronic chassis on the source. The result is an ion source which is now logically wired and carefully documented. Beams obtained from the source are much more stable than those previously available

  10. A lunar polar expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Tomas

    1992-09-01

    Advanced exploration and development in harsh environments require mastery of basic human survival skill. Expeditions into the lethal climates of Earth's polar regions offer useful lessons for tommorrow's lunar pioneers. In Arctic and Antarctic exploration, 'wintering over' was a crucial milestone. The ability to establish a supply base and survive months of polar cold and darkness made extensive travel and exploration possible. Because of the possibility of near-constant solar illumination, the lunar polar regions, unlike Earth's may offer the most hospitable site for habitation. The World Space Foundation is examining a scenario for establishing a five-person expeditionary team on the lunar north pole for one year. This paper is a status report on a point design addressing site selection, transportation, power, and life support requirements.

  11. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P; Lewis, Jason S; Grimm, Jan

    2010-07-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies. In vitro phantom studies were used to validate the visible light emission observed from a range of radionuclides including the positron emitters (18)F, (64)Cu, (89)Zr, and (124)I; beta-emitter (131)I; and alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac for potential use in CLI. The novel radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (89)Zr-desferrioxamine B [DFO]-J591 for immuno-PET of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression was used to coregister and correlate the CLI signal observed with the immuno-PET images and biodistribution studies. Phantom studies confirmed that Cerenkov radiation can be observed from a range of positron-, beta-, and alpha-emitting radionuclides using standard optical imaging devices. The change in light emission intensity versus time was concordant with radionuclide decay and was also found to correlate linearly with both the activity concentration and the measured PET signal (percentage injected dose per gram). In vivo studies conducted in male severe combined immune deficient mice bearing PSMA-positive, subcutaneous LNCaP tumors demonstrated that tumor-specific uptake of (89)Zr-DFO-J591 could be visualized by both immuno-PET and CLI. Optical and immuno-PET signal intensities were found to increase over time from 24 to 96 h, and biodistribution studies were found to correlate well with both imaging modalities. These studies represent the first, to our knowledge, quantitative assessment of CLI for measuring radiotracer uptake in vivo. Many radionuclides common to both nuclear

  12. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  13. Dark Polar Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  14. Imaging with Polarized Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their zero charge, neutrons are able to pass through thick layers of matter (typically several centimeters while being sensitive to magnetic fields due to their intrinsic magnetic moment. Therefore, in addition to the conventional attenuation contrast image, the magnetic field inside and around a sample can be visualized by detecting changes of polarization in a transmitted beam. The method is based on the spatially resolved measurement of the cumulative precession angles of a collimated, polarized, monochromatic neutron beam that traverses a magnetic field or sample.

  15. The polar mesosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Ray; Murphy, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The mesosphere region, which lies at the edge of space, contains the coldest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, with summer temperatures as low as minus 130 °C. In this extreme environment ice aerosol layers have appeared since the dawn of industrialization—whose existence may arguably be linked to human influence—on yet another layer of the Earth's fragile atmosphere. Ground-based and space-based experiments conducted in the Arctic and Antarctic during the International Polar Year (IPY) aim to address limitations in our knowledge and to advance our understanding of thermal and dynamical processes at play in the polar mesosphere

  16. Internal polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, E.R.; Coulter, K.; Gilman, R.; Holt, R.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Napolitano, J.; Potterveld, D.H.; Young, L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Mishnev, S.I.; Nikolenko, D.M.; Popov, S.G.; Rachek, I.A.; Temnykh, A.B.; Toporkov, D.K.; Tsentalovich, E.P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B. (AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (USSR). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1989-01-01

    Internal polarized targets offer a number of advantages over external targets. After a brief review of the basic motivation and principles behind internal polarized targets, the technical aspects of the atomic storage cell will be discussed in particular. Sources of depolarization and the means by which their effects can be ameliorated will be described, especially depolarization by the intense magnetic fields arising from the circulating particle beam. The experience of the Argonne Novosibirsk collaboration with the use of a storage cell in a 2 GeV electron storage ring will be the focus of this technical discussion. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  17. AGS polarized H- source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kponou, A.; Alessi, J.G.; Sluyters, T.

    1985-01-01

    The AGS polarized H - source is now operational. During a month-long experimental physics run in July 1984, pulses equivalent to 15 μA x 300 μs (approx. 3 x 10 10 protons) were injected into the RFQ preaccelerator. Beam polarization, measured at 200 MeV, was approx. 75%. After the run, a program to increase the H - yield of the source was begun and significant progress has been made. The H - current is now frequently 20 to 30 μA. A description of the source and some details of our operating experience are given. We also briefly describe the improvement program

  18. Red luminescence from ZnO : Cr nanophosphors under visible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Red luminescence from ZnO : Cr. 3+ nanophosphors under visible excitation. N PUSHPA1, M K KOKILA1,*, B M NAGABHUSHANA2, H NAGABHUSHANA3 and. A JAGANNATHA REDDY. 4. 1Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560 056, India. 2Department of Chemistry, M.S. Ramaiah Institute of ...

  19. Red luminescence from ZnO : Cr nanophosphors under visible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    perature factors, which can give rise to better quality nanoparticles of desired size and shape. Although there are several reports on chromium-doped. ZnO12–14 and other nanoparticles,16,20 the luminescence study of chromium-doped ZnO nanomaterials is very rare. In light of this, present work reports on lumines-.

  20. The effects of Tb 3+ doping concentration on luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reported that the particle size, shape, crystallinity, etc., sig- nificantly affect the luminescence properties of Tb3+ ion.16. In 2014, the authors present ab initio theoretical study of the 4f8 and 4f75d manifolds of Tb3+-doped BaF2 cubic sites, gives the calculated electronic structure and spectro- scopic parameters.12 On the ...

  1. The effects of Tb 3 doping concentration on luminescence properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper is aimed at explaining the effects of Tb3+ concentration on structure and luminescence properties and clarifying the concentration quenching mechanism of Tb3+. The lattice of BaF2 decreases with the increase of Tb3+ ions concentration. The emission spectrum of BaF2:Tb3+ consists of blue emission band and ...

  2. Development of scintillation and luminescent detectors at BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Research and development work carried out at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, in the field of radiation detectors for various applications, particularly in the area of scintillation and luminescent detectors is reviewed. The review is presented in the form of 7 articles. (author). figs

  3. Luminescence and decay of excitons in lead tungstate crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laguta, V. V.; Nikl, Martin; Zazubovich, S.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 42, - (2007), s. 515-520 ISSN 1350-4487 Grant - others:Estonian Science Foundation(EE) 6548 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : luminescence * excitons defects, * lead tungstate Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.054, year: 2007

  4. Luminescence from potassium feldspars stimulated by infrared and green light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments are reported which investigate stimulated luminescence from potassium feldspar. The aim is to provide a basic phenomenological description of the response of the material to stimulation by heat, infrared radiation (875 DELTA 80 nm) and a green light wavelength band from 5 15...

  5. Luminescence Imaging Strategies for Drone-Based PV Array Inspection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benatto, Gisele Alves dos Reis; Riedel, Nicholas; Mantel, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop outdoor defect detection imaging and understand fully its challenges and limitations. The imaging is based on luminescence strategies that will be used for fast and accurate UAV-based inspection system for PV power plants. We studied electroluminescence (EL...

  6. Guest driven structural transformation studies of a luminescent metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ; crystal to crystal transformation; luminescence. ... On air drying the MOF loses free DCM molecules and changed its structure in a crystal to crystal manner to produce compound 1 [{Zn(L)2(OTf)2}.XG](1). This guest-induced breathing of the ...

  7. High-quantum efficiency, long-lived luminescing refractory oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Gonzalez, R.; Summers, G.P.

    A crystal having a high-quantum efficiency and a long period of luminescence is formed of MgO or CaO and possessing a concentration ratio of H/sup -/ ions to F centers in the range of about 0.05 to about 10.

  8. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v and 1.95% (v/v respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v. Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR, while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent.

  9. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe F. Smet

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs. The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  10. Application of Quantum Dot nanocrystal in Luminescent solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoda, Shokoufeh; Khalaji Assadi, Morteza; Ahmadi Kandjani, Sohrab; Kayiem, Hussain H. Al; Hussain Bhat, Aamir

    2018-03-01

    The basic design of luminescent solar concentrator is a transparent plate doped with an appropriate luminescent material (organic dyes, quantum dots), which is able to absorb sunlight (direct and diffuse), and then guides photons produced by photoluminescence to its narrow edges where they are converted by photovoltaic cells. Unfortunately, LSCs have suffered from numerous efficiency losses. Therefore, new luminescent species and novel approaches are needed for its practical application. This paper deals with investigation of nonhazardous, environmental friendly luminescent species include CuInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs. The CuInS2/ZnS QDs possess advantages of Stocks shift as large as more than 130 nm and high photoluminescence quantum yield of 80%. The paper presents the effect of large stock shift CuInS2/ZnS QDs on reducing the reabsorption losses in LSC by using experimental investigation. The LSC sheets were fabricated by dispersing CuInS2/ZnS QDs particles in a polymethylmethacrylate waveguide. A series of LSCs (dimension 4.0 cm × 3.0 cm × 0.3cm) with different CuInS2/ZnS QDs particles concentration (0.015 and 0.03 wt.%) were fabricated and their optical properties (absorptions/emissions) were characterized. The results show that the CuInS2/ZnS QDs-LSC provides a promising way for the reduction of reabsorption losses in LSCs.

  11. Time-resolved luminescence from feldspars: New insight into fading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Denby, P.M.; Murray, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared optically stimulated luminescence (IR-OSL) signals of K- and Na-feldspar samples extracted from sediments were measured in UV, blue and red detection windows, using a fast photon counter and pulsed IR stimulation (lambda = 875 nm). We observe that the relative contribution ...

  12. Tm2+ luminescent materials for solar radiation conversion devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Kolk, E.

    2015-01-01

    A solar radiation conversion device is described that comprises a luminescent Tm 2+ inorganic material for converting solar radiation of at least part of the UV and/or visible and/or infra red solar spectrum into infrared solar radiation, preferably said infrared solar radiation having a wavelength

  13. Blue and green luminescence of reduced graphene oxide quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Henych, Jiří; Lang, Kamil; Kormunda, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 63, november (2013), s. 537-546 ISSN 0008-6223 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : different solvents * graphene oxides * green luminescence * intensive cavitations * N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 6.160, year: 2013

  14. Dosimetry based on thermally and optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agersnap Larsen, Niels

    1999-01-01

    Thermally Stimulated Luminescence (TL) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) properties of quartz and α-Al 2 O 3 have been investigated. Anneling-induced OSL and TL sensitivity changes in quartz has been investigated by experiments and modelling. This study does not support a pre-dose effect to account for the observed annealing-induced sensitivity change. The experimental data indicates a more simple mechanism that involves alteration of the concentration of the defect centers. Results from modelling of removal or creation of defect centers comparing well with experimentally obtained data. Thermal quenching of luminescence for the main emission center, the F-center, in α-Al 2 O 3 :C has been investigated by analysing TL curves obtained at different heating rates. The thermal quenching dependence of luminescence is found to follow the classical Mott-Seitz expression. Basic investigations of OSL properties of αAl 2 O 3 :C, including: the thermal depth of the OSL traps, the temperature dependence of OSL, and the OSL stimulation spectra. Simultaneous measurements of TL and thermally stimulated conductivity (TSC) are presented for γ-irradiated αAl 2 O 3 :C. Activation energy analysis of the data reveals a superposition of several first-order TL and TSC peaks caused by release of charge carriers from a distribution of trapping states. Furthermore a description of an experimental method developed to determine the sign of the thermally released charge carriers has been presented. (au)

  15. Simulation of optically-stimulated luminescence of zircon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkin, A A; Vainshtein, D.I.; Hartog, H.W. den

    2007-01-01

    Mineral zircon, ZrSiO4, belongs to a class of materials that can be used as a chronological tool in geology and archaeology for measurements of the natural radiation dose and the sample age by optical methods. The model of optically stimulated luminescence developed earlier is used to investigate

  16. Polyphenol oxidase-based luminescent enzyme hydrogel: an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... Polyphenol oxidase-based luminescent enzyme hydrogel: an efficient redox active immobilized scaffold. BISWAJIT DEY1,∗. , SUPRABHAT MUKHERJEE2, NILADRI MUKHERJEE2,. RANJAN KUMAR MONDAL1, BISWARUP SATPATI3 and SANTI PRASAD SINHA BABU2. 1Department of Chemistry ...

  17. Luminescence Imaging Strategies for Drone-Based PV Array Inspection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benatto, Gisele Alves dos Reis; Riedel, Nicholas; Mantel, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop outdoor defect detection imaging and understand fully its challenges and limitations. The imaging is based on luminescence strategies that will be used for fast and accurate UAV-based inspection system for PV power plants. We studied electroluminescence (EL) ac...

  18. Synthesis and luminescent properties of novel Cu (II), Zn (II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    compared with the ligand, which decrease energy loss and are apt to emit fluorescence. In the solid state, as shown in figure 4, the ligand. 1 emits very weak luminescence, which can be assigned to π–π* transition. 19,20. However, the poly- meric complexes 2, 3 emit intensive blue/green light, implying the energy transfer ...

  19. Luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz as a result of annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Agersnap Larsen, N.; Mejdahl, V.

    1995-01-01

    Retrospective dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz extracted from (for example) bricks needs to account for strong OSL sensitivity changes that are known to occur depending on the previous thermal treatment of the sample. Non-heated quartz exhibits OSL orders of magni...

  20. Luminescence and energy transfer in hexavalent uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krol, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    The author investigates the luminescence of uranate groups in uranates and examines the possible role of excitation energy transfer between the uranate groups in these compounds. Some uranyl compounds were investigated in order to compare the energy transfer in these compounds with that in the uranates. (G.T.H.)

  1. Leaf Roof - Designing Luminescent Solar Concentrating PV Roof Tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.; Doudart de la Gree, G.; Papadopoulos, A..; Rosemann, A.; Debije, M.G.; Cox, M.; Krumer, Zachar

    2016-01-01

    The Leaf Roof project on the design features of PV roof tiles using Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) technology [1] has resulted in a functional prototype. The results are presented in the context of industrial product design with a focus on the aesthetic aspects of LSCs [2]. This paper outlines

  2. Luminescence and energy transfer processes in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliet, J.P.M. van.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis some studies are presented of the luminescence and energy transfer in compounds containing Eu 3+ , Pr 3+ and Gd 3+ ions. Ch. 2 deals with the energy migration in the system Gd 1 - xEu x(IO 3) 3. In ch 3 the luminescence properties of the Pr 3+ ion in the system La 1 - xPr xMgAl 1 10 1 9 are reported. Ch. 4 discusses the luminescence properties of alkali europium double tungstates and molybdates AEuW 20 8 and AEuMo 20 * (A + = alkali metal atom). The luminiscence and energy migration characteristics of the isostructural system LiGd 1 - xEu xF 4 and Gd 1 - xEu xNbO 4 are reported in ch. 5. In ch. 6 the mechanism of energy migration in (La,Gd)AlO 3 and (Gd,Eu)AlO 3 is discussed. Ch. 7 deals with the system Na 5(Gd,Eu) (WO 4) 4. In ch. 8 the luminescence and energy transfer properties of two europium tellurite anti-glass phases are reported. The two phases are Eu 1 . 7 9TeO x, which has a pseudotetragonal structure, and Eu 1 . 0 6TeO x, which has a monoclinic, ordered structure. (author). 201 refs.; 39 figs.; 8 tabs

  3. Progress in chemical luminescence-based biosensors: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Aldo; Mirasoli, Mara; Michelini, Elisa; Di Fusco, Massimo; Zangheri, Martina; Cevenini, Luca; Roda, Barbara; Simoni, Patrizia

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors are a very active research field. They have the potential to lead to low-cost, rapid, sensitive, reproducible, and miniaturized bioanalytical devices, which exploit the high binding avidity and selectivity of biospecific binding molecules together with highly sensitive detection principles. Of the optical biosensors, those based on chemical luminescence detection (including chemiluminescence, bioluminescence, electrogenerated chemiluminescence, and thermochemiluminescence) are particularly attractive, due to their high-to-signal ratio and the simplicity of the required measurement equipment. Several biosensors based on chemical luminescence have been described for quantitative, and in some cases multiplex, analysis of organic molecules (such as hormones, drugs, pollutants), proteins, and nucleic acids. These exploit a variety of miniaturized analytical formats, such as microfluidics, microarrays, paper-based analytical devices, and whole-cell biosensors. Nevertheless, despite the high analytical performances described in the literature, the field of chemical luminescence biosensors has yet to demonstrate commercial success. This review presents the main recent advances in the field and discusses the approaches, challenges, and open issues, with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing chemical luminescence biosensors and improving their commercial exploitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of bi-functional magneto-luminescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wise method for the preparation of multifunctional magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposites with Fe3O4 na- nospheres as the core and Eu3+ doped sodium lutetium fluoride (NaLuF4:Eu3+) as the shell. Luminescence effi- ciency of Eu3+ doped NaLaF4 nanoparticles present at the surface and super-paramagnetic behavior of ...

  5. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstey, Mitchell R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Fruetel, Julia A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hayden, Carl C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Buckley, Heather L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Arnold, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves "Click" chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  6. On the interpretation of luminescence of lead halide crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babin, V.; Krasnikov, A.; Nikl, Martin; Stolovits, A.; Zazubovich, S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 229, č. 3 (2002), s. 1295-1304 ISSN 0370-1972 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : luminescence * lead halide * exciton Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.930, year: 2002

  7. Luminescence of dimer lead centers in aluminium perovskites and garnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babin, V.; Bichevin, V.; Gorbenko, V.; Makhov, A.; Mihóková, Eva; Nikl, Martin; Vedda, A.; Zazubovich, S.; Zorenko, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 246, č. 6 (2009), s. 1318-1326 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0893 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : aluminum garnets and perovskites * Pb 2+ contamination * luminescence * liquid phase epitaxy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.150, year: 2009

  8. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, Philippe F.; Moreels, Iwan; Hens, Zeger; Poelman, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials) to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs). The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  9. Intrinsic luminescence of YAlO.sub.3./sub. perovskites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zorenko, Y.; Voloshinovskii, A.; Gorbenko, V.; Zorenko, T.; Nikl, Martin; Nejezchleb, K.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2007), s. 963-967 ISSN 1862-6351 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2471 Grant - others:INTAS(XE) 04-78-7083 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : intrinsic emission * perovskites * luminescence * exciton Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  10. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon [Pinole, CA; Schlamp, Michael C [Plainsboro, NJ; Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  11. Characterization of UV written waveguides with luminescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Harpøth, Anders; Rosbirk, Tue

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence microscopy is used to measure the refractive index profile and molecular defect distribution of UV written waveguides with a spatial resolution of ~0.4 mm and high signal-to-noise ratio. The measurements reveal comlex waveguide formation dynamics with significant topological changes...

  12. Synthesis and luminescent properties of novel Cu (II), Zn (II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Synthesis and luminescent properties of novel Cu (II), Zn (II) polymeric complexes based on 1,10-phenanthroline and biphenyl groups. YAN HE, CHAOFAN ZHONG*, YU ZHOU and HAILIANG ZHANG. Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education,. College of Chemistry ...

  13. Synthesis, structure and luminescence properties of phosphates A1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 1. Synthesis, structure and luminescence properties of phosphates A 1 − 3 x Eu x Zr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 (A—alkali metal). ANTON KANUNOV BENOIT GLORIEUX ALBINA ORLOVA ELENA BOROVIKOVA GALINA ZAVEDEEVA. Volume 40 Issue 1 February 2017 pp 7- ...

  14. Synthesis and characterization of bi-functional magneto-luminescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 128; Issue 7. Synthesis and characterization of bi-functional magneto-luminescent Fe₃O₄ @ SiO₂ @ NaLuF₄ :Eu³⁺ hybrid core / shell nanospheres. JIGMET LADOL HEENA KHAJURIA HAQ NAWAZ SHEIKH YUGAL KHAJURIA. Regular Article Volume 128 Issue ...

  15. Luminescence of nanocrystalline ZnSe:Mn2+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, J.F.; Wuister, S.F.; Kelly, J.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2000-01-01

    The luminescence properties of nanocrystalline ZnSe:Mn^(2+) prepared via an inorganic chemical synthesis are described. Photoluminescence spectra show distinct ZnSe and Mn^(2+) related emissions, both of which are excited via the ZnSe host lattice. The Mn^(2+) emission wavelength and the

  16. Doping the dots: doped quantum dots for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, synthesis methods for luminescent organically capped colloidal ZnSe QDs of different sizes, ranging from 4.0 to 7.5 nm are reported. These QDs are analyzed using TEM, absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence measurements and temperature dependent photoluminescence decay

  17. Thermal dependence of luminescence lifetimes and radioluminescence in quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, V., E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [McDaniel College, Physics Department, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Chithambo, M.L. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, PO BOX 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Chen, R. [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Chruścińska, A. [Institute of Physics, Nicholas Copernicus University, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Fasoli, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Li, S.H. [Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Martini, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Ramseyer, K. [Institut für Geologie, Baltzerstrasse 1-3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    During time-resolved optical stimulation experiments (TR-OSL), one uses short light pulses to separate the stimulation and emission of luminescence in time. Experimental TR-OSL results show that the luminescence lifetime in quartz of sedimentary origin is independent of annealing temperature below 500 °C, but decreases monotonically thereafter. These results have been interpreted previously empirically on the basis of the existence of two separate luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L} in quartz, each with its own distinct luminescence lifetime. Additional experimental evidence also supports the presence of a non-luminescent hole reservoir R, which plays a critical role in the predose effect in this material. This paper extends a recently published analytical model for thermal quenching in quartz, to include the two luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L}, as well as the hole reservoir R. The new extended model involves localized electronic transitions between energy states within the two luminescence centers, and is described by a system of differential equations based on the Mott–Seitz mechanism of thermal quenching. It is shown that by using simplifying physical assumptions, one can obtain analytical solutions for the intensity of the light during a TR-OSL experiment carried out with previously annealed samples. These analytical expressions are found to be in good agreement with the numerical solutions of the equations. The results from the model are shown to be in quantitative agreement with published experimental data for commercially available quartz samples. Specifically the model describes the variation of the luminescence lifetimes with (a) annealing temperatures between room temperature and 900 °C, and (b) with stimulation temperatures between 20 and 200 °C. This paper also reports new radioluminescence (RL) measurements carried out using the same commercially available quartz samples. Gaussian deconvolution of the RL emission spectra was

  18. The physics of polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    This course is intended to give a description of the basic physical concepts which underlie the study and the interpretation of polarization phenomena. Apart from a brief historical introduction (Sect. 1), the course is organized in three parts. A first part (Sects. 2 - 6) covers the most relevant facts about the polarization phenomena that are typically encountered in laboratory applications and in everyday life. In Sect. 2, the modern description of polarization in terms of the Stokes parameters is recalled, whereas Sect. 3 is devoted to introduce the basic tools of laboratory polarimetry, such as the Jones calculus and the Mueller matrices. The polarization phenomena which are met in the reflection and refraction of a beam of radiation at the separation surface between two dielectrics, or between a dielectric and a metal, are recalled in Sect. 4. Finally, Sect. 5 gives an introduction to the phenomena of dichroism and of anomalous dispersion and Sect. 6 summarizes the polarization phenomena that are commonly encountered in everyday life. The second part of this course (Sects. 7-14) deals with the description, within the formalism of classical physics, of the spectro-polarimetric properties of the radiation emitted by accelerated charges. Such properties are derived by taking as starting point the Liénard and Wiechert equations that are recalled and discussed in Sect. 7 both in the general case and in the non-relativistic approximation. The results are developed to find the percentage polarization, the radiation diagram, the cross-section and the spectral characteristics of the radiation emitted in different phenomena particularly relevant from the astrophysical point of view. The emission of a linear antenna is derived in Sect. 8. The other Sections are devoted to Thomson scattering (Sect. 9), Rayleigh scattering (Sect. 10), Mie scattering (Sect. 11), bremsstrahlung radiation (Sect. 12), cyclotron radiation (Sect. 13), and synchrotron radiation (Sect. 14

  19. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  20. Enantioselective Light Harvesting with Perylenediimide Guests on Self-Assembled Chiral Naphthalenediimide Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethy, Ramarani; Kumar, Jatish; Métivier, Rémi; Louis, Marine; Nakatani, Keitaro; Mecheri, Nila Mohan Thazhe; Subhakumari, Akhila; Thomas, K George; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Nakashima, Takuya

    2017-11-20

    Self-assembling molecular systems often display amplified chirality compared to the monomeric state, which makes the molecular recognition more sensitive to chiral analytes. Herein, we report the almost absolute enantioselective recognition of a chiral perylenediimide (PDI) molecule by chiral supramolecular nanofibers of a bichromophoric naphthalenediimide (NDI) derivative. The chiral recognition was evaluated through the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the NDI-based host nanofibers to the guest PDI molecules. The excitation energy was successfully transferred to the guest molecule through efficient energy migration along the host nanofiber, thus demonstrating the light-harvesting capability of these hybrid systems. Furthermore, circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) was enantioselectively sensitized by the guest molecule as the wavelength band and sign of the CPL signal were switched in response to the chiral guest molecule. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The sensitized luminescence of manganese-activated calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J.H.; Evans, L.W.; Ginther, R.J.; Murata, K.J.

    1947-01-01

    Synthetic manganese-activated calcites are shown to be practically inert to ultraviolet excitation in the range 2000-3500A, while they are luminescent under cathode-ray excitation. The incorporation of small amounts of an auxiliary impurity along with the manganese produces the strong response to ultraviolet radiation hitherto ascribed to CaCO3:Mn itself. Three such impurities have been studied: lead, thallium, and cerium. The first two induce excitation in the neighborhood of the mercury resonance line, while the cerium introduces a response principally to longer wave ultraviolet. The strong response to 2537A excitation shown by some natural calcites is likewise found to be due to the presence of lead along with the manganese, rather than to the manganese alone. The data do not warrant ascribing the longer wave-length ultraviolet-excited luminescence of all natural calcites to the action of an auxiliary impurity. The essential identity of the cathode-ray excited luminescence spectra of CaCO 3:Mn, CaCO3: (Pb+Mn), CaCO3:(Tl+Mn), and CaCO3:(Ce+Mn) with the 2537A-excited spectra of the latter three is evidence that the luminescent center in all cases is the manganese ion or the MnO6 group. It is shown that a "cascade" mechanism for the action of the auxiliary impurities, lead, thallium, and cerium, is incorrect; and that the phenomenon must be considered as a case of sensitized luminescence. Owing to the nature of cathode-ray excitation, the manganese activator can be excited by this agent even in the absence of a second impurity. For optical excitation, however, an absorption band for the ultraviolet must be established by building into the CaCO3:Mn a second impurity or "sensitizer.".

  2. Lobbying and political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Ursprung, Heinrich W.

    2002-01-01

    Standard spatial models of political competition give rise to equilibria in which the competing political parties or candidates converge to a common position. In this paper I show how political polarization can be generated in models that focus on the nexus between pre-election interest group lobbying and electoral competition.

  3. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  4. Polarization of Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.

    1957-01-01

    The numerical results for the polarization of Bremsstrahlung are presented. The multiple scattering of electrons in the target is taken into account. The angular-and photon energy dependences are seen on the curves for an incident 25 MeV electron energy. (Author) [fr

  5. DESY: HERA polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The new HERA electron-proton collider at DESY in Hamburg achieved the first luminosity for electron-proton collisions on 19 October last year. Only one month later, on 20 November, HERA passed another important milestone with the observation of transverse electron polarization

  6. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  7. Graphics of polar figure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this work, is that starting from a data file coming from a spectra that has been softened, and of the one that have been generated its coordinates to project it in stereographic form, to create the corresponding polar figure making use of the Cyber computer of the ININ by means of the GRAPHOS package. This work only requires a Beta, Fi and Intensity (I) enter data file. It starts of the existence of a softened spectra of which have been generated already with these data, making use of some language that in this case was FORTRAN for the Cyber computer, a program is generated supported in the Graphos package that allows starting of a reading of the Beta, Fi, I file, to generate the points in a stereographic projection and that it culminates with the graph of the corresponding polar figure. The program will request the pertinent information that is wanted to capture in the polar figure just as: date, name of the enter file, indexes of the polar figure, number of levels, radio of the stereographic projection (cms.), crystalline system to which belongs the sample, name the neuter graph file by create and to add the own general data. (Author)

  8. Down-conversion luminescence and its temperature-sensing properties from Er3+-doped sodium bismuth titanate ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Zheng, Shanshan; Zhou, Hong; Pan, Anlian; Wu, Guangheng; Liu, Jun-ming

    2015-11-01

    Here, we demonstrate outstanding temperature-sensing properties from Na0.5Bi0.49Er0.01TiO3 (NBT:Er) thin films. The perovskite phase for them is stable in the temperature range from 80 to 440 K. Interestingly, the Er doping enhances the ferroelectric polarization and introduces local dipolar, which are positive for temperature sensing. Pumped by a 488-nm laser, the NBT:Er thin films show strong green luminescence with two bands around 525 and 548 nm. The intensity ratio I 525/ I 548 can be used for temperature sensing, and the maximum sensitivity is about 2.3 × 10-3 K-1, higher than that from Er-doped silicon oxide. These suggest NBT:Er thin film is a promising candidate for temperature sensor.

  9. Characteristics of volume polarization holography with linear polarization light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Jinliang; Wu, An'an; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jue; Lin, Xiao; Tan, Xiaodi; Shimura, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Volume polarization holographic recording in phenanthrenequinone-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PQ-PMMA) photopolymer with linear polarized light is obtained. The characteristics of the volume polarization hologram are experimentally investigated. It is found that beyond the paraxial approximation the polarization states of the holographic reconstruction light are generally different from the signal light. Based on vector wave theoretical analyses and material properties, the special exposure condition for correctly holographic reconstruction is obtained and experimentally demonstrated.

  10. Influence of Nano sized Silicon Oxide on the Luminescent Properties of Zn O Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvalagin, V.; Grodziuk, G.; Kurmach, M.; Granchak, V.; Sarapulova, O.; Sherstiuk, V.

    2016-01-01

    For practical use of nano sized zinc oxide as the phosphor its luminescence quantum yields should be maximized. The aim of this work was to enhance luminescent properties of Zn O nanoparticles and obtain high-luminescent Zn O/SiO 2 composites using simpler approaches to colloidal synthesis. The luminescence intensity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was increased about 3 times by addition of silica nano crystals to the source solutions during the synthesis of Zn O nanoparticles. Then the quantum yield of luminescence of the obtained Zn O/SiO 2 composites is more than 30%. Such an impact of silica is suggested to be caused by the distribution of Zn O nano crystals on the surface of silica, which reduces the probability of separation of photo generated charges between the zinc oxide nanoparticles of different sizes, and as a consequence, there is a significant increase of the luminescence intensity of Zn O nanoparticles. This way of increasing nano-Zn O luminescence intensity facilitates its use in a variety of devices, including optical ultraviolet and visible screens, luminescent markers, antibacterial coatings, luminescent solar concentrators, luminescent inks for security printing, and food packaging with abilities of informing consumers about the quality and safety of the packaged product.

  11. Influence of Nanosized Silicon Oxide on the Luminescent Properties of ZnO Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Shvalagin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For practical use of nanosized zinc oxide as the phosphor its luminescence quantum yields should be maximized. The aim of this work was to enhance luminescent properties of ZnO nanoparticles and obtain high-luminescent ZnO/SiO2 composites using simpler approaches to colloidal synthesis. The luminescence intensity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was increased about 3 times by addition of silica nanocrystals to the source solutions during the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles. Then the quantum yield of luminescence of the obtained ZnO/SiO2 composites is more than 30%. Such an impact of silica is suggested to be caused by the distribution of ZnO nanocrystals on the surface of silica, which reduces the probability of separation of photogenerated charges between the zinc oxide nanoparticles of different sizes, and as a consequence, there is a significant increase of the luminescence intensity of ZnO nanoparticles. This way of increasing nano-ZnO luminescence intensity facilitates its use in a variety of devices, including optical ultraviolet and visible screens, luminescent markers, antibacterial coatings, luminescent solar concentrators, luminescent inks for security printing, and food packaging with abilities of informing consumers about the quality and safety of the packaged product.

  12. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and polarized antiproton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the π degree production at high p perpendicular and in the Λ (Σ degree), π ± , π degree production at large x F , and Δσ L (pp, bar pp) measurements. 18 refs

  13. NUCLEON POLARIZATION IN 3-BODY MODELS OF POLARIZED LI-6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHELLINGERHOUT, NW; KOK, LP; COON, SA; ADAM, RM

    1993-01-01

    Just as He-3 --> can be approximately characterized as a polarized neutron target, polarized Li-6D has been advocated as a good isoscalar nuclear target for the extraction of the polarized gluon content of the nucleon. The original argument rests upon a presumed ''alpha + deuteron'' picture of Li-6,

  14. Geomagnetic polarity transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ronald T.; McFadden, Phillip L.

    1999-05-01

    The top of Earth's liquid outer core is nearly 2900 km beneath Earth's surface, so we will never be able to observe it directly. This hot, dense, molten iron-rich body is continuously in motion and is the source of Earth's magnetic field. One of the most dynamic manifestations at Earth's surface of this fluid body is, perhaps, a reversal of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately, the most recent polarity transition occurred at about 780 ka, so we have never observed a transition directly. It seems that a polarity transition spans many human lifetimes, so no human will ever witness the phenomenon in its entirety. Thus we are left with the tantalizing prospect that paleomagnetic records of polarity transitions may betray some of the secrets of the deep Earth. Certainly, if there are systematics in the reversal process and they can be documented, then this will reveal substantial information about the nature of the lowermost mantle and of the outer core. Despite their slowness on a human timescale, polarity transitions occur almost instantaneously on a geological timescale. This rapidity, together with limitations in the paleomagnetic recording process, prohibits a comprehensive description of any reversal transition both now and into the foreseeable future, which limits the questions that may at this stage be sensibly asked. The natural model for the geomagnetic field is a set of spherical harmonic components, and we are not able to obtain a reliable model for even the first few harmonic terms during a transition. Nevertheless, it is possible, in principle, to make statements about the harmonic character of a geomagnetic polarity transition without having a rigorous spherical harmonic description of one. For example, harmonic descriptions of recent geomagnetic polarity transitions that are purely zonal can be ruled out (a zonal harmonic does not change along a line of latitude). Gleaning information about transitions has proven to be difficult, but it does seem

  15. Superior Valley Polarization and Coherence of 2 s Excitons in Monolayer WSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Yu; Goldstein, Thomas; Tong, Jiayue; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Yan, Jun

    2018-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of 2 s exciton radiative emission from monolayer tungsten diselenide, enabled by hexagonal boron nitride protected high-quality samples. The 2 s luminescence is highly robust and persists up to 150 K, offering a new quantum entity for manipulating the valley degree of freedom. Remarkably, the 2 s exciton displays superior valley polarization and coherence than 1 s under similar experimental conditions. This observation provides evidence that the Coulomb-exchange-interaction-driven valley-depolarization process, the Maialle-Silva-Sham mechanism, plays an important role in valley excitons of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides.

  16. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e+e- collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point

  17. Analytical polarization calculations beyond SLIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison is made between the theories of Bell and Leinaas and of Derbenev and Kondratenko for the spin polarization in electron storage rings. A calculation of polarization in HERA using the program SMILE of Mane is presented

  18. On Determinants of Political Polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Grechyna, Daryna

    2015-01-01

    Political polarization has been shown to significantly influence a country's economic performance. However, little is known about the drivers of political polarization. In this article, we aim to identify the main determinants of political polarization using Bayesian Model Averaging to overcome the problem of model uncertainty. We find that the level of trust within a country and the degree of income inequality are the most robust determinants of political polarization.

  19. Cherenkov luminescence measurements with digital silicon photomultipliers: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciarrocchi, Esther; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); INFN, section of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Cherry, Simon R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Lehnert, Adrienne; Hunter, William C. J.; McDougald, Wendy; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Kinahan, Paul E. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-11-16

    A feasibility study was done to assess the capability of digital silicon photomultipliers to measure the Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source. Cherenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is possible with a charge coupled device (CCD) based technology, but a stand-alone technique for quantitative activity measurements based on Cherenkov luminescence has not yet been developed. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are photon counting devices with a fast impulse response and can potentially be used to quantify β-emitting radiotracer distributions by CLI. In this study, a Philips digital photon counting (PDPC) silicon photomultiplier detector was evaluated for measuring Cherenkov luminescence. The PDPC detector is a matrix of avalanche photodiodes, which were read one at a time in a dark count map (DCM) measurement mode (much like a CCD). This reduces the device active area but allows the information from a single avalanche photodiode to be preserved, which is not possible with analog SiPMs. An algorithm to reject the noisiest photodiodes and to correct the measured count rate for the dark current was developed. The results show that, in DCM mode and at (10–13) °C, the PDPC has a dynamic response to different levels of Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source and transmitted through an opaque medium. This suggests the potential for this approach to provide quantitative activity measurements. Interestingly, the potential use of the PDPC in DCM mode for direct imaging of Cherenkov luminescence, as a opposed to a scalar measurement device, was also apparent. We showed that a PDPC tile in DCM mode is able to detect and image a β source through its Cherenkov radiation emission. The detector’s dynamic response to different levels of radiation suggests its potential quantitative capabilities, and the DCM mode allows imaging with a better spatial resolution than the conventional event-triggered mode. Finally, the same acquisition procedure and data processing could

  20. Efficient red luminescence from organic-soluble Au25 clusters by ligand structure modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Ammu; Varghese, Elizabeth; Choudhury, Susobhan; Pal, Samir Kumar; Pradeep, T.

    2015-08-01

    An efficient method to enhance visible luminescence in a visibly non-luminescent organic-soluble 4-(tert butyl)benzyl mercaptan (SBB)-stabilized Au25 cluster has been developed. This method relies mainly on enhancing the surface charge density on the cluster by creating an additional shell of thiolate on the cluster surface, which enhances visible luminescence. The viability of this method has been demonstrated by imparting red luminescence to various ligand-protected quantum clusters (QCs), observable to the naked eye. The bright red luminescent material derived from Au25SBB18 clusters was characterized using UV-vis and luminescence spectroscopy, TEM, SEM/EDS, XPS, TG, ESI and MALDI mass spectrometry, which collectively proposed an uncommon molecular formula of Au29SBB24S, suggested to be due to different stapler motifs protecting the Au25 core. The critical role of temperature on the emergence of luminescence in QCs has been studied. The restoration of the surface ligand shell on the Au25 cluster and subsequent physicochemical modification to the cluster were probed by various mass spectral and spectroscopic techniques. Our results provide fundamental insights into the ligand characteristics determining luminescence in QCs.An efficient method to enhance visible luminescence in a visibly non-luminescent organic-soluble 4-(tert butyl)benzyl mercaptan (SBB)-stabilized Au25 cluster has been developed. This method relies mainly on enhancing the surface charge density on the cluster by creating an additional shell of thiolate on the cluster surface, which enhances visible luminescence. The viability of this method has been demonstrated by imparting red luminescence to various ligand-protected quantum clusters (QCs), observable to the naked eye. The bright red luminescent material derived from Au25SBB18 clusters was characterized using UV-vis and luminescence spectroscopy, TEM, SEM/EDS, XPS, TG, ESI and MALDI mass spectrometry, which collectively proposed an uncommon

  1. Polarized electrogowdy spacetimes censored

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nungesser, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.nungesser@aei.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2010-05-01

    A sketch of the proof of strong cosmic censorship is presented for a class of solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations, those with polarized Gowdy symmetry. A key element of the argument is the observation that by means of a suitable choice of variables the central equations in this problem can be written in a form where they are identical to the central equations for general (i.e. non-polarized) vacuum Gowdy spacetimes. Using this it is seen that the results of Ringstroem on strong cosmic censorship in the vacuum case have implications for the Einstein-Maxwell case. Working out the geometrical meaning of these analytical results leads to the main conclusion.

  2. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); et al.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  3. Polarization induced doped transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  4. Polar bears, Ursus maritimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D.; Stirling, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Polar bears are the largest of the eight species of bears found worldwide and are covered in a pigment-free fur giving them the appearance of being white. They are the most carnivorous of bear species consuming a high-fat diet, primarily of ice-associated seals and other marine mammals. They range throughout the circumpolar Arctic to the southernmost extent of seasonal pack ice.

  5. Polarized advanced fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The d- 3 He reaction has the same spin dependence as the d-t reaction. It produces no neutrons, so that if the d-d reactivity could be reduced, it would lead to a neutron-lean reactor. The current understanding of the possible suppression of the d-d reactivity by spin polarization is discussed. The question as to whether a suppression is possible is still unresolved. Other advanced fuel reactions are briefly discussed. 11 refs

  6. On polarization in biomembranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zecchi, Karis Amata

    close to physiological conditions, making these effects biologically relevant. In this work, we consider the case of asymmetric membranes which can display spontaneous polarization in the absence of a field. Close to the phase transition, we find that the membrane displays piezoelectric, flexoelectric...... on different geometries point in the direction of a flexoelectric mechanism behind current rectification in lipid bilayers. Finally, we suggest that our updated equivalent circuit should be included in the interpretation of elctrophysiological data....

  7. Multifrequency Behaviour of Polars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Reinsch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataclysmic variables emit over a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper I will review observations of polars in relevant passbands obtained during the last decade and will discuss their diagnostical potential to access the physics of the main components within the binary systems. This will include a discussion of intrinsic source variability and the quest for simultaneous multi-frequency observations.

  8. Towards the rare earth functionalization of nano-clays with luminescent reporters for biophotonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaup, Gina; Felbeck, Tom; Staniford, Mark; Kynast, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Completely water dispersible nanoclays can be equipped with optical functions for eventual uses in biophotonics. For this purpose, 3-mercaptopropylmethyldimethoxysilane is grafted as a linker to the rims of strongly anisotropic clay disks for the subsequent covalent attachement of a rare earth β-diketonate, co-coordinated with epoxy-functional phenanthroline (“Eu(ttfa)_3epoxiphen”). Silane grafting yields of approximately 80% with respect to available rim-SiOH groups can be obtained as demonstrated by reliable determination of the grafted mercapto-groups with 5,5′-dithiol-bis-(2nitrobenzoic acid) (“Ellman's reagent”). The final linkage of Eu(ttfa)_3epoxiphen to the rim mercapto-groups competes with mere polar adsorption on the laponite faces; however, the rim linkage can be confirmed via the complex's excitation and emission spectra and X-ray diffraction of the solids obtained, and corresponding absorption spectra. - Highlights: • Nanoclay disks are modified at their rim with mercaptopropyl silane in high grafting rates. • A reliable analytical method for the determination of graftings rates was developed. • Subsequent linkage to a Eu epoxiphenanthroline complex affords moderate luminescence.

  9. Nanocomposites Based on Luminescent Colloidal Nanocrystals and Polymeric Ionic Liquids towards Optoelectronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Panniello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric ionic liquids (PILs are an interesting class of polyelectrolytes, merging peculiar physical-chemical features of ionic liquids with the flexibility, mechanical stability and processability typical of polymers. The combination of PILs with colloidal semiconducting nanocrystals leads to novel nanocomposite materials with high potential for batteries and solar cells. We report the synthesis and properties of a hybrid nanocomposite made of colloidal luminescent CdSe nanocrystals incorporated in a novel ex situ synthesized imidazolium-based PIL, namely, either a poly(N-vinyl-3-butylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate or a homologous PIL functionalized with a thiol end-group exhibiting a chemical affinity with the nanocrystal surface. A capping exchange procedure has been implemented for replacing the pristine organic capping molecules of the colloidal CdSe nanocrystals with inorganic chalcogenide ions, aiming to disperse the nano-objects in the PILs, by using a common polar solvent. The as-prepared nanocomposites have been studied by TEM investigation, UV-Vis, steady-state and time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy for elucidating the effects of the PIL functionalization on the morphological and optical properties of the nanocomposites.

  10. Trackable Metallodrugs Combining Luminescent Re(I) and Bioactive Au(I) Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo, Andrés; Fernández-Moreira, Vanesa; Marzo, Isabel; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2017-12-18

    Hetero-bimetallic and -trimetallic complexes were synthesized by the combination of different metallic fragments, a luminescent Re(I) species, and a bioactive Au(I) derivative. A ditopic P,N-donor ligand (L) was used as linker between both metals, affording six new bipyridine (bipy) Re(I)/Au(I) hetero-metallic complexes of the type fac-[Re(bipy)(CO) 3 (LAuCl)] + (4-6) and [(fac-[Re(bipy)(CO) 3 (L)]) 2 Au] 3+ (7-9) after a thorough synthetic procedure. Their emission is associated with a triplet metal-to-ligand charge transfer (Re(dπ) → bipy(π*)) transition and red-shifted in polar solvents with lifetimes in the range of nanoseconds and quantum yield values up to 12.5%. Cytotoxicity values in A549 cells of hetero-trimetallic species are almost twice that for the hetero-bimetallic (ca. 37 vs 69 μM, respectively), being the L-Au fragment the source of the antiproliferative activity. Species 7 and 8 showed similar behavior by fluorescence microscopy, with a nonuniform cytoplasmatic distribution, a clear accumulation in single spots at the edge of the inner cell membrane as well as in areas within the nucleus. Preliminary studies suggest the DNA as one of the targets and passive diffusion as the entrance pathway.

  11. Polar Business Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Caisse

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polar business design aims to enable entrepreneurs, managers, consultants, researchers, and business students to better tackle model-based analysis, creation, and transformation of businesses, ventures, and, more generically, collective endeavors of any size and purpose. It is based on a systems-thinking approach that builds on a few interrelated core concepts to create holistic visual frameworks. These core concepts act as poles linked by meaningful dyads, flows, and faces arranged in geometric shapes. The article presents two such polar frameworks as key findings in an ongoing analytic autoethnography: the three-pole Value−Activity−Stakeholder (VAS triquetra and the four-pole Offer−Creation−Character−Stakeholder (OCCS tetrahedron. The VAS triquetra is a more aggregated model of collective endeavors. The OCCS tetrahedron makes a trade-off between a steeper learning curve and deeper, richer representation potential. This article discusses how to use these two frameworks as well as their limits, and explores the potential that polar business design offers for future research.

  12. Luminescence characteristics of dental ceramics for retrospective dosimetry: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Correcher, V.; Delgado, A.; Goksu, Y.; Huebner, S

    2002-07-01

    Ceramic materials that are widely employed in dental prosthetics and repairs exhibit luminescent properties. Because of their use in the body, these materials are potentially of interest in situations where retrospective dosimetry for individuals is required but where monitoring was not planned. The luminescent properties of dental ceramics obtained in Germany, Spain and the UK were examined. Linear dose-response characteristics were obtained in the range <100 mGy to 10 Gy using thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence and infrared-stimulated luminescence measurement techniques. Measurements of time-resolved luminescence were also performed to examine the nature of the luminescence recombination under visible (470 nm) and IR (855 nm) stimulation. The results obtained by TL and optically stimulated techniques suggest that there may be deeper traps than previously observed in certain types of dental ceramic. Such traps may be less susceptible to optical and athermal fading than was reported in earlier studies. (author)

  13. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nano-bioprobes for the detection of tumor markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Ping; Tu, Datao; Zhou, Shanyong; Huang, Mingdong; Chen, Xueyuan

    2015-02-01

    Sensitive and specific biodetection of tumor markers is essential for early-stage cancer diagnosis and therapy, and will ultimately increase the patient survival rate. As a new generation of luminescent bioprobes, lanthanide (Ln3+)-doped inorganic luminescent nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest for a variety of biomedical applications due to their superior physicochemical properties. In this feature article, we provide a brief overview of the most recent advances in the development of Ln3+-doped luminescent nano-bioprobes and their promising applications for in vitro detection of tumor markers with an emphasis on the establishment of state-of-the-art assay techniques, such as heterogeneous time-resolved (TR) luminescent bioassay, dissolution-enhanced luminescent bioassay, upconversion (UC) luminescent bioassay, homogeneous TR Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and UC-FRET bioassays. Some future prospects and efforts towards this emerging field are also envisioned.

  14. Core-Shell Structure in Doped Inorganic Nanoparticles: Approaches for Optimizing Luminescence Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dini Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Doped inorganic luminescent nanoparticles (NPs have been widely used in both research and application fields due to their distinctive properties. However, there is an urgent demand to improve their luminescence efficiency, which is greatly reduced by surface effects. In this paper, we review recent advances in optimizing luminescence properties of doped NPs based on core-shell structure, which are basically classified into two categories: one is by use of surface coating with nonmetal materials to weaken the influence of surface effect and the other is with metal shell via metal enhanced luminescence. Different materials used to coat NPs are surveyed, and their advantages and disadvantages are both commented on. Moreover, problems in current core-shell structured luminescent NPs are pointed out and strategies furthering the optimization of luminescence properties are suggested.

  15. Modelling the luminescence of iridium cyclometalated complexes encapsulated in cucurbituril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrawashdeh, Lubna R; Cronin, Michael P; Day, Anthony I; Wallace, Lynne; Woodward, Clifford E

    2018-01-15

    Iridium(iii) cyclometalated complexes in aqueous solution often display relatively weak luminescence. It has been shown in previous work that this emission can be significantly enhanced (by up to two orders of magnitude) by encapsulation in cucurbit[10]uril (Q[10]). Luminescence lifetime measurements suggest a dynamic self-quenching mechanism is active, possibly due to displacement of an excited guest complex via collision with an unbound complex. We devise a model for the association of a group of iridium(iii) cyclometalated complexes with Q[10]. The model parameters are then fitted to steady-state emission titration curves. The excellent agreement of experimental data with the model provides valuable mechanistic information relating to the way this class of metal complexes interact and associate with the Q[10] host.

  16. Characterization of UV fluorophores for application to luminescent solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellier, Kaitlin; Carter, Sue

    The implementation of solar as an alternative energy source faces many challenges, including the competition for space with agriculture and the environmental impacts of solar farms in deserts. As a solution to these problems, the Carter Lab has developed Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) panels for applications to greenhouses. These panels utilize a luminescent dye compatible with the spectrum used in photosynthesis for the plants below and front-facing PV cells, achieving power enhancement of greater than 20% compared with the cells alone. To increase this enhancement, additional portions of the unused spectrum must be harvested. In this talk, we will discuss the characterization of UV absorbing fluorophores, including spectra, quantum yield, and the enhancement of light output and power generation. We will also address the combination of these UV dyes with the original LSC dye in low and high concentration, and the FRET efficiency and potential applications associated with high concentration films.

  17. Organic scintillators with long luminescent lifetimes for radiotherapy dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Lindvold, Lars René; Andersen, Claus Erik

    2011-01-01

    for radiotherapy treatments deliver pulsed beams, the stem signal can be suppressed using dosimeter materials with luminescent lifetimes much longer than that of the stem signal. However, producing organic scintillators with long luminescent lifetimes has proven difficult in practice. We report on the results...... component on the order of 20 μs was estimated for the custom-made organic scintillator, while the commercial scintillator exhibited a fast component of approximately 5 ns lifetime (7 ns as stated by the manufacturer) and an approximate 10 μs lifetime slow component. Although these lifetimes are not long...... enough for practical applications in radiotherapy dosimetry, this study supports that the stem signal can be greatly reduced by applying a temporal gating....

  18. Characterization of dehydration-induced luminescence of kaolinite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, N.; Coyne, L.; Lawless, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    The dehydration-induced luminescence of a colloidal kaolinite is investigated experimentally, with particular attention given to the effect of various treatments on the luminescence characteristics. It is found that the total photon count of the emitted light is linearly related to the film thickness up to a thickness of 30 microns; mechanical stress in the form of grinding increases the photon output and produces extensive changes in the emission kinetics. A direct check of the emission wavelength dependence (by using color filters) indicates that roughly 75 percent of the emission occurs in the wavelength range below 410 nm. It is also found that incorporation of fluorescent molecules into the kaolinite paste increases the photon output and may indicate the transfer of ultraviolet photons to the fluorescent probe.

  19. The use of luminescence for dating young volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christoph; Schaarschmidt, Maria; Kolb, Thomas; Richter, Daniel; Tchouankoue, Jean Pierre; Zöller, Ludwig

    2017-04-01

    Reliable chronologies of volcanic eruptions are vital for hazard analysis, but dating of Holocene and Late Pleistocene volcanism poses a major challenge. Established techniques such as 40Ar/39Ar are often problematic due to the long half-life of 40K or the absence of datable materials. In this context, luminescence dating methods are an alternative since they are applicable to Earth's most common minerals and to a range of different datable events. Luminescence signal resetting during volcanic activity can be caused by heat (lava, contact to lava), light (disintegration of ejecta) or (temperature-assisted) pressure in the course of phreatomagmatic explosions. While volcanogenic minerals assembling basalt or other volcanic rocks are less suitable for luminescence dating due to so-called anomalous fading, the signal of volcanogenically heated or fragmented country rock actually relates to the time of eruption as well and further provides reproducible results. This contribution aims to illustrate the potential of this latter approach by presenting two case studies. The first refers to two Late Pleistocene scoria cones in the Westeifel Volcanic Field (WEVF), Germany, of which the Wartgesberg locality was dated by 40Ar/39Ar and 14C, while the closeby Facher Höhe is chronologically poorly constrained (Mertz et al. 2015; pers comm. Luise Eichhorn, 2016). The former locality allows testing the accuracy of various luminescence techniques (thermoluminescence, TL, optically stimulated luminescence, OSL, infrared stimulated luminescence, IRSL) applied to quartz and feldspar against independent age control. The other study site is the monogenetic Lake Nyos Maar as part of the Cameroon Volcanic Line, having killed 1,700 people in 1986 following the release of large amounts of CO2. Previous dating efforts of the last explosive activity are inconsistent and yielded age estimates ranging from 400 a (14C) to >350 ka (K-Ar) (Aka et al. 2008). Our results demonstrate that multiple

  20. Synthesis of biocompatible multicolor luminescent carbon dots for bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvvada, Nagaprasad; Prashanth Kumar, B. N.; Konar, Suraj; Kalita, Himani; Mandal, Mahitosh; Pathak, Amita

    2012-08-01

    Water-soluble carbon dots (C-dots) were prepared through microwave-assisted pyrolysis of an aqueous solution of dextrin in the presence of sulfuric acid. The C-dots produced showed multicolor luminescence in the entire visible range, without adding any surface-passivating agent. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed the graphitic nature of the carbon and the presence of hydrophilic groups on the surface, respectively. The formation of uniformly distributed C-dots and their luminescent properties were, respectively, revealed from transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The biocompatible nature of C-dots was confirmed by a cytotoxicity assay on MDA-MB-468 cells and their cellular uptake was assessed through a localization study.

  1. Synthesis of biocompatible multicolor luminescent carbon dots for bioimaging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaprasad Puvvada, B N Prashanth Kumar, Suraj Konar, Himani Kalita, Mahitosh Mandal and Amita Pathak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble carbon dots (C-dots were prepared through microwave-assisted pyrolysis of an aqueous solution of dextrin in the presence of sulfuric acid. The C-dots produced showed multicolor luminescence in the entire visible range, without adding any surface-passivating agent. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed the graphitic nature of the carbon and the presence of hydrophilic groups on the surface, respectively. The formation of uniformly distributed C-dots and their luminescent properties were, respectively, revealed from transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The biocompatible nature of C-dots was confirmed by a cytotoxicity assay on MDA-MB-468 cells and their cellular uptake was assessed through a localization study.

  2. Lanthanide Coordination Polymer Nanosheet Aggregates: Solvothermal Synthesis and Downconversion Luminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Rui Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A lanthanide coordination polymers (CPs nanostructure (1 has been synthesized via a facile template-free solvothermal strategy using DMF as solvent and 2-methyl benzoic acid (2-MeBAH as ligands. The products are characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, elemental analyses (EA, and downward luminescence. Product 1 built from Tb3+ and 2-MeBAH has one-dimensional structure which is connected by trinuclear second building units (SBUs. Downward luminescence shows that sample 1 exhibits characteristic transitions of the Tb3+ ion at 489, 544, 583, and 621 nm, and the strongest peak is at 544 nm ascribed to the transition of D45→F57 of Tb3+.

  3. Luminescence study of praseodymium complexes with selected phosphonate ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlicki, G.; Lis, S.

    2011-08-01

    Spectroscopic properties of Pr(III) complexes with diethyl(phthalimidomethyl)phosphonate (DPIP) and diethyl(2-oxo-2phenylethyl)phosphonate (DEPP) ligands were studied using absorption and luminescence spectroscopy. Absorption spectra of praseodymium nitrate hexahydrate complexes with phosphonate ligands in acetonitrile solutions were measured and used to calculate oscillator strength values. Luminescence (excitation and emission) spectra of the Pr(III) complexes with DPIP and DEPP were measured in CH 3CN, DMSO, methanol and toluene solutions. The sensitized emission of Pr(III), observed from different excited states ( 3P 0 or 1D 2), resulted from the intramolecular energy transfer from the ligands to the emissive levels of Pr(III). The Pr(III) complexes with studied ligands were synthesized and their compositions, as Pr(DEPP) 2(NO 3) 3 and Pr(DPIP) 3(NO 3) 3, were confirmed by elemental analyses. Using IR and 31P NMR spectroscopy coordination mode of the ligands were described.

  4. Supramolecular luminescence from oligofluorenol-based supramolecular polymer semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Wei; Wang, Long; Xie, Ling-Hai; Lin, Jin-Yi; Huang, Wei

    2013-11-13

    Supramolecular luminescence stems from non-covalent exciton behaviors of active π-segments in supramolecular entities or aggregates via intermolecular forces. Herein, a π-conjugated oligofluorenol, containing self-complementary double hydrogen bonds, was synthesized using Suzuki coupling as a supramolecular semiconductor. Terfluorenol-based random supramolecular polymers were confirmed via concentration-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The photoluminescent spectra of the TFOH-1 solution exhibit a green emission band (g-band) at approximately ~520 nm with reversible features, as confirmed through titration experiments. Supramolecular luminescence of TFOH-1 thin films serves as robust evidence for the aggregates of g-band. Our results suggest that the presence of polyfluorene ketone defects is a sufficient condition, rather than a sufficient-necessary condition for the g-band. Supramolecular electroluminescence will push organic devices into the fields of supramolecular optoelectronics, spintronics, and mechatronics.

  5. Identifying irradiated flour by photo-stimulated luminescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros Anita Ahmad Ramli; Muhammad Samudi Yasir; Zainon Othman; Wan Saffiey Wan Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: The photo-stimulated luminescence technique is recommended by European Committee for standardization for the detection food irradiation (EN 13751:2009). This study shows on luminescence technique to identify gamma irradiated five types of flour (corn flour, tapioca flour, wheat flour, glutinos rice flour and rice flour) at three difference dose levels in the range 0.2 - 1 kGy. The signal level is compare with two thresholds (700 and 5000). The majority of irradiated samples produce a strong signal above the upper threshold (5000 counts/ 60 s). All the control samples gave negative screening result while the signals below the lower threshold (700 counts/ 60s) suggest that the sample has not been irradiated. A few samples show the signal levels between the two thresholds (intermediate signals) suggest that further investigation. Reported procedure was also tested over 60 days, confirming the applicability and feasibility of proposed methods. (author)

  6. Control of spontaneous emission rate in luminescent resonant diamond particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelev, R.; Zalogina, A.; Kudryashov, S.; Ivanova, A.; Levchenko, A.; Makarov, S.; Zuev, D.; Shadrivov, I.

    2018-01-01

    We study the properties of luminescent diamond particles of different sizes (up to ~1.5 μm) containing multiple NV-centers. We theoretically predict that the average liftetime in such particles is decreased by several times as compared to optically small subwavelength nanodiamonds. In our experiments, samples were obtained by milling the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited diamond film, and characterized by Raman spectroscopy and dark- field spectroscopy methods. Time-resolved luminescence measurements of the excited state of NV-centers showed that their average lifetime varies from 10 to 17 ns in different samples. By comparing this data to the values of the lifetime of the NV-centers in optically small nanodiamonds, known from literature, we confirm a severalfold decrease of the lifetime in resonant particles.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of La-Doped Luminescent Multilayer Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianlei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have successfully designed ordered luminescent multilayer films based on La-doped nonmagnetic or magnetic inorganic nanostructure with electronic microenvironment (EM. The inorganic nanosheets with opposite charge can assemble EM between the interlayers. At the same time, their elements on nanosheets of layer double hydroxides (LDHs are facile to be replaced so that we can introduce transition metal or lanthanide elements. Besides, ferromagnetic effect (FE can be formed in this microenvironment due to introducing transition metal on LDHs nanosheets. As a result, we confirm that EM, FE, and doping La element in the LDHs can affect the vibration of backbone of chromophores and then prolong the luminescent lifetime, which suggests a new pathway for developing the novel light-emitting thin films.

  8. Persistent luminescence in nitride and oxynitride phosphors: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, Philippe F.; Botterman, Jonas; Van den Eeckhout, Koen; Korthout, Katleen; Poelman, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    The research field of persistent luminescence has experienced a strong growth in the past two decades, with a steady development of new materials and applications. Here we give an overview of the recent progress in a specific class of host materials, namely oxynitride and nitride persistent phosphors. These are interesting hosts to explore because of their unique characteristics, such as chemical stability and tunability of the emission over the entire visible range upon doping with divalent europium. To yield persistent luminescence however, co-dopants have to be added or the synthesis conditions have to be adjusted. Specific materials, such as Ca2Si5N8:Eu,Tm and BaSi2O2N2:Eu, are highlighted and their properties are put into the context of emerging applications such as in vivo imaging and pressure sensing via mechanoluminescence. Finally, directions for future research are given.

  9. Naturally Efficient Emitters: Luminescent Organometallic Complexes Derived from Natural Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hua; Young, David J.

    2013-08-01

    Naturally occurring molecules offer intricate structures and functionality that are the basis of modern medicinal chemistry, but are under-represented in materials science. Herein, we review recent literature describing the use of abundant and relatively inexpensive, natural products for the synthesis of ligands for luminescent organometallic complexes used for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and related technologies. These ligands are prepared from the renewable starting materials caffeine, camphor, pinene and cinchonine and, with the exception of caffeine, impart performance improvements to the emissive metal complexes and resulting OLED devices, with emission wavelengths that span the visible spectrum from blue to red. The advantages of these biologically-derived molecules include improved solution processibility and phase homogeneity, brighter luminescence, higher quantum efficiencies and lower turn-on voltages. While nature has evolved these carbon-skeletons for specific purposes, they also offer some intriguing benefits in materials science and technology.

  10. Luminescence response of synthetic opal under femtosecond laser pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasnetsov, M.V.; Bazhenov, V.Yu.; Dmitruk, I.N.; Kudryavtseva, A.D.; Tcherniega, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic opal is an artificial photonic metamaterial composed from spherical globules of amorphous silica (SiO 2 ) about 300 nm in diameter. We report, for the first time to our knowledge, the origin of a narrow luminescence spectral peak (4 nm HWHM) and optical second and third harmonic generation in synthetic opal samples under femtosecond laser excitation (800 nm) at liquid-nitrogen temperature. Stimulated-emission effects are discussed related to the possibility of nanocavity lasing at the condition of the first Mie resonance in a dielectric sphere. - Highlights: • Second harmonic generation in a synthetic opal (amorphous material composed from spherical SiO 2 globules) was observed. • Narrow luminescence peak which we assign to a Mie resonance in a globule was detected at liquid-nitrogen temperature

  11. UV-Activated Luminescence/Colourimetric O2 Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mills

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An oxygen indicator is described, comprising nanoparticles of titania dispersed in hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC polymer film containing a sacrificial electron donor, glycerol, and the redox indicator, indigo-tetrasulfonate (ITS. The indicator is blue- coloured in the absence of UV light, however upon exposure to UV light it not only loses its colour but also luminesces, unless and until it is exposed to oxygen, whereupon its original colour is restored. The initial photobleaching spectral (absorbance and luminescence response characteristics in air and in vacuum are described and discussed in terms of a simple reaction scheme involving UV activation of the titania photocatalyst particles, which are used to reduce the redox dye, ITS, to its leuco form, whilst simultaneously oxidising the glycerol to glyceraldehye. The response characteristics of the activated, that is, UV photobleached, form of the indicator to oxygen are also reported and the possible uses of such an indicator to measure ambient O2 levels are discussed.

  12. Cerenkov Luminescence Tomography for In Vivo Radiopharmaceutical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI is a cost-effective molecular imaging tool for biomedical applications of radiotracers. The introduction of Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT relative to planar CLI can be compared to the development of X-ray CT based on radiography. With CLT, quantitative and localized analysis of a radiopharmaceutical distribution becomes feasible. In this contribution, a feasibility study of in vivo radiopharmaceutical imaging in heterogeneous medium is presented. Coupled with a multimodal in vivo imaging system, this CLT reconstruction method allows precise anatomical registration of the positron probe in heterogeneous tissues and facilitates the more widespread application of radiotracers. Source distribution inside the small animal is obtained from CLT reconstruction. The experimental results demonstrated that CLT can be employed as an available in vivo tomographic imaging of charged particle emitters in a heterogeneous medium.

  13. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Luminescent Properties of Oxazine 170 Perchlorate Doped PMMA Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Miluski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents fabrication and luminescent properties of poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA fiber doped by Oxazine 170 perchlorate. The bright fluorescence of polymeric fiber (at molar fluorescent organic dye concentration 4.3 × 10−5 was characterized in terms of spectrum and signal attenuation vs. the fiber length. The significant changes in fluorescence spectrum (λmax red shift average slope 4.6 nm/cm and Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM increasing slope 6.7 nm/cm have been noticed for the length of the fiber (0.02–0.08 m which corresponds to a high overlapping region of absorption and emission spectra of used dye. The red shift of λmax (c.a. 80 nm was presented in fabricated polymeric fiber at distance 0.85 m. The obtained characteristics can be used for luminescent properties optimization of fluorescent organic-dye-doped PMMA fiber.

  15. New luminescent mycenoid fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) from São Paulo State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardin, Dennis E; Perry, Brian A; Stevani, Cassius V

    Four species of mycenoid fungi are reported as luminescent (or putatively luminescent) on the basis of specimens collected from São Paulo State, Brazil. Two of them represent new species (Mycena oculisnymphae, Resinomycena petarensis), and two represent new reports of luminescence in previously described species (M. deformis, M. globulispora). Comprehensive descriptions, illustrations, photographs, and comparisons with phenetically similar species are provided. Sequences of nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions were generated for barcoding purposes and for comparisons with similar species.

  16. Experimental results on combined ultraviolet-proton excitation of moon rock luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    The experimental results reported indicate that a small synergistic effect may exist between near-UV radiation and solar-wind-energy protons in solar radiation that could slightly enhance luminescence generation on the moon's surface. The magnitude of the effect, however, is far too small to account for the apparent orders-of-magnitude discrepancy between reported telescope measurements of lunar luminescence and the limitation of lunar luminescence intensity based on lab studies of moon rocks.

  17. Design and optimization of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Levchuk, Ievgen

    2017-01-01

    Luminescent colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have attracted prominent attention for the last three decades since their size-dependent optical properties were discovered. Numerous applications in fields of light conversion such as light-emitting diodes (LED), photovoltaics, medicine, lasers and TV displays were developed. Despite the strong and rapid expansion of this field in the scope of material quality reflected by narrow size distribution and photoluminescence quantum yield, simplific...

  18. Modeling of the luminescent concentrators by ray-tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgers, A.R.; Van Roosmalen, J.A.M.; Slooff, L.H.; Kinderman, R. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2005-06-01

    We have made luminescent concentrator devices by gluing multi-crystalline silicon solar cells to polymer plates containing fluorescent dyes. The devices have been characterised by optical reflection- and transmission measurements and with external quantum efficiency measurements. We have applied different mirror configurations to the devices to improve the external quantum efficiency. The measurements have been modelled with a ray-tracing simulation. The simulation allows us to analyse loss mechanisms in the device.

  19. Sexithiophenes as efficient luminescence quenchers of quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Mason

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sexithiophenes 1a and 1b, in which a 4-(dimethylaminophenyl unit is incorporated as an end-capping group, were synthesised and characterised by cyclic voltammetry, absorption spectroscopy and UV–vis spectroelectrochemistry. Additionally, their ability to function as effective luminescence quenchers for quantum dot emission was studied by photoluminescence spectroscopy and compared with the performance of alkyl end-capped sexithiophenes 2a and 2b.

  20. Mathematical aspects of ground state tunneling models in luminescence materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, Vasilis, E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [Physics Department, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Kitis, George [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-12-15

    Luminescence signals from a variety of natural materials have been known to decrease with storage time at room temperature due to quantum tunneling, a phenomenon known as anomalous fading. This paper is a study of several mathematical aspects of two previously published luminescence models which describe tunneling phenomena from the ground state of a donor–acceptor system. It is shown that both models are described by the same type of integral equation, and two new analytical equations are presented. The first new analytical equation describes the effect of anomalous fading on the dose response curves (DRCs) of naturally irradiated samples. The DRCs in the model were previously expressed in the form of integral equations requiring numerical integration, while the new analytical equation can be used immediately as a tool for analyzing experimental data. The second analytical equation presented in this paper describes the anomalous fading rate (g-Value per decade) as a function of the charge density in the model. This new analytical expression for the g-Value is tested using experimental anomalous fading data for several apatite crystals which exhibit high rate of anomalous fading. The two new analytical results can be useful tools for analyzing anomalous fading data from luminescence materials. In addition to the two new analytical equations, an explanation is provided for the numerical value of a constant previously introduced in the models. - Highlights: • Comparative study of two luminescence models for feldspars. • Two new analytical equations for dose response curves and anomalous fading rate. • The numerical value z=1.8 of previously introduced constant in models explained.

  1. Maximizing and stabilizing luminescence from halide perovskites with potassium passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi-Jalebi, Mojtaba; Andaji-Garmaroudi, Zahra; Cacovich, Stefania; Stavrakas, Camille; Philippe, Bertrand; Richter, Johannes M.; Alsari, Mejd; Booker, Edward P.; Hutter, Eline M.; Pearson, Andrew J.; Lilliu, Samuele; Savenije, Tom J.; Rensmo, Håkan; Divitini, Giorgio; Ducati, Caterina; Friend, Richard H.; Stranks, Samuel D.

    2018-03-01

    Metal halide perovskites are of great interest for various high-performance optoelectronic applications. The ability to tune the perovskite bandgap continuously by modifying the chemical composition opens up applications for perovskites as coloured emitters, in building-integrated photovoltaics, and as components of tandem photovoltaics to increase the power conversion efficiency. Nevertheless, performance is limited by non-radiative losses, with luminescence yields in state-of-the-art perovskite solar cells still far from 100 per cent under standard solar illumination conditions. Furthermore, in mixed halide perovskite systems designed for continuous bandgap tunability (bandgaps of approximately 1.7 to 1.9 electronvolts), photoinduced ion segregation leads to bandgap instabilities. Here we demonstrate substantial mitigation of both non-radiative losses and photoinduced ion migration in perovskite films and interfaces by decorating the surfaces and grain boundaries with passivating potassium halide layers. We demonstrate external photoluminescence quantum yields of 66 per cent, which translate to internal yields that exceed 95 per cent. The high luminescence yields are achieved while maintaining high mobilities of more than 40 square centimetres per volt per second, providing the elusive combination of both high luminescence and excellent charge transport. When interfaced with electrodes in a solar cell device stack, the external luminescence yield—a quantity that must be maximized to obtain high efficiency—remains as high as 15 per cent, indicating very clean interfaces. We also demonstrate the inhibition of transient photoinduced ion-migration processes across a wide range of mixed halide perovskite bandgaps in materials that exhibit bandgap instabilities when unpassivated. We validate these results in fully operating solar cells. Our work represents an important advance in the construction of tunable metal halide perovskite films and interfaces that can

  2. Size independent blue luminescence in nitrogen passivated silicon nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasog, Mita; Veinot, Jonathan G.C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    The photoluminescent properties of allylamine terminated silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) are investigated. Chloride surface terminated Si-NCs of different sizes react with allylamine yielding NCs that exhibit size independent blue luminescent NCs. NCs were characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Reaction scheme summarizing surface modification approach used for the present study. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Photostimulated luminescence, fast method of detection of irradiated foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzik, G.P.; Stachowicz, W.

    2005-01-01

    The principle of pulsed photostimulated luminescence (PPSL) method, description of instrumentation and methodology of measurements are presented. The pathway of operational procedure and testing of the PPSL instrument in the Laboratory for Detection of Irradiated Food of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology are described. Attention has been paid to the positives of the new method while some limitation of its application have been also discussed. (author)

  4. Luminescence dosimetry: recent developments in theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeever, S.W.S.

    2000-01-01

    Thermally and optically stimulated luminescence have been used in applications in solid state physics, radiation dosimetry and geological dating for several decades. This paper gives a generalized description of these methods in terms of non-equilibrium thermodynamics and in doing so highlights similarities and differences between the methods. Recent advances in both the theory and application of the techniques are highlighted with numerous specific examples. (Author)

  5. Geometry flexibility of copper iodide clusters: variability in luminescence thermochromism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Quentin; Goff, Xavier F Le; Nocton, Gregory; Fargues, Alexandre; Garcia, Alain; Berhault, Aurélie; Kahlal, Samia; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Martineau, Charlotte; Trébosc, Julien; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre; Perruchas, Sandrine

    2015-05-04

    An original copper(I) iodide cluster of novel geometry obtained by using a diphosphine ligand is reported and is formulated [Cu6I6(PPh2(CH2)3PPh2)3] (1). Interestingly, this sort of "eared cubane" cluster based on the [Cu6I6] inorganic core can be viewed as a combination of the two known [Cu4I4] units, namely, the cubane and the open-chair isomeric geometries. The synthesis, structural and photophysical characterisations, as well as theoretical study of this copper iodide along with the derived cubane (3) and open-chair (2) [Cu4I4(PPh3)4] forms, were investigated. A new polymorph of the cubane [Cu4I4(PPh3)4] cluster is indeed presented (3). The structural differences of the clusters were analyzed by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Luminescence properties of the three clusters were studied in detail as a function of the temperature showing reversible luminescence thermochromism for 1 with an intense orange emission at room temperature. This behavior presents different feature compared to the cubane cluster and completely contrasts with the open isomer, which is almost nonemissive at room temperature. Indeed, the thermochromism of 1 differs by a concomitant increase of the two emission bands by lowering the temperature, in contrast to an equilibrium phenomenon for 3. The luminescence properties of 2 are very different by exhibiting only one single band when cooled. To rationalize the different optical properties observed, density functional theory calculations were performed for the three clusters giving straightforward explanation for the different luminescence thermochromism observed, which is attributed to different contributions of the ligands to the molecular orbitals. Comparison of 3 with its [Cu4I4(PPh3)4] cubane polymorphs highlights the sensibility of the emission properties to the cuprophilic interactions.

  6. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) study of synthetic stishovite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, A.; Yamanaka, C.; Ikeya, M.; Ohtaka, O.; Takada, M.; Katsura, T.

    2000-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of synthetic stishovite was investigated for a future dating technique of meteor impact craters. Luminescence around 330 nm was measured on the γ-ray irradiated stishovite under two stimulating light sources of infrared laser (830 nm) and blue light emitting diode set (470 nm). Thermoluminescence (TL) studies before and after the OSL measurements showed the intensities around 100-200 deg. C and 220-350 deg. C to increase and those around 350-450 deg. C to decrease. This indicates that a part of deep-trapped charges excited during the OSL measurements were retrapped by shallower traps. The infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) after the TL measurement up to 450 deg. C could not be detected, while the blue light stimulated luminescence (BLSL) after TL had about one-tenth of the intensity before TL. This indicates that a part of the charges in shallower traps were detrapped thermally and returned to the deeper traps which were related to BLSL. The result implies that some of the BLSL-related traps are quite stable at room temperature and could be used for geological dating. In addition, two paramagnetic centers produced by sudden release of high pressure in synthesis process were found in the unirradiated stishovite by electron spin resonance (ESR). Their g-factors are g parallel =2.00181 and g perpendicular =2.00062 for an axial signal and g=2.00305 for the other isotropic signal. These signals could be used for an evidence of impacts if those signals could be stored in geological time

  7. The Voltage Boost Enabled by Luminescence Extraction in Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapati, Vidya; Steiner, Myles A.; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2016-11-21

    A new physical principle has emerged to produce record voltages and efficiencies in photovoltaic cells, 'luminescence extraction.' This is exemplified by the mantra 'a good solar cell should also be a good LED.' Luminescence extraction is the escape of internal photons out of the front surface of a solar cell. Basic thermodynamics says that the voltage boost should be related to concentration ratio, C, of a resource by ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{C}. In light trapping, (i.e. when the solar cell is textured and has a perfect back mirror) the concentration ratio of photons C={4n2}, so one would expect a voltage boost of ..delta..V=kT ln{4n2} over a solar cell with no texture and zero back reflectivity, where n is the refractive index. Nevertheless, there has been ambiguity over the voltage benefit to be expected from perfect luminescence extraction. Do we gain an open circuit voltage boost of ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{n2}, ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{2n2}, or ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{4n2}? What is responsible for this voltage ambiguity ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{4}=36mVolts? We show that different results come about, depending on whether the photovoltaic cell is optically thin or thick to its internal luminescence. In realistic intermediate cases of optical thickness the voltage boost falls in between; ln{n2}q..delta..V/kT)<;ln{4n2}.

  8. Amplified Luminescence Quenching of Phosphorescent Metal–Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent, Caleb A. [Department of Chemistry,; Liu, Demin [Department of Chemistry,; Meyer, Thomas J. [Department of Chemistry,; Lin, Wenbin [Department of Chemistry,

    2012-02-22

    Amplified luminescence quenching has been demonstrated in metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) composed of Ru(II)-bpy building blocks with long-lived, largely triplet metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excited states. Strong non-covalent interactions between the MOF surface and cationic quencher molecules coupled with rapid energy transfer through the MOF microcrystal facilitates amplified quenching with a 7000-fold enhancement of the Stern–Völmer quenching constant for methylene blue compared to a model complex.

  9. Luminescence properties of piezoelectric single crystals with langasite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Minoru; Takagi, Shinya; Kitaura, Mamoru; Fujita, Masami; Endo, Naoyuki

    2007-01-01

    Luminescence properties of single crystals of langasite (LGS), langataite (LGT), and langanite (LGN) are investigated at 5 K by using synchrotron radiation as an exciting light source. Two emission bands are observed at 420 and 500 nm in LGS, at 410 and 460 nm in LGT, and at 500 and 535 nm in LGN. The origin of these bands is discussed by reference to the electronic structure of LGS

  10. Temperature influence on luminescent coupling efficiency in concentrator MJ SCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvarts, Maxim, E-mail: shvarts@scell.ioffe.ru; Emelyanov, Viktor; Mintairov, Mikhail; Evstropov, Valery; Timoshina, Nailya [Ioffe Institute, 26 Politekhnicheskaya str., St.-Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-28

    In the work, presented are the results of investigation of temperature dependencies of the luminescent coupling effectiveness in lattice-matched (LM) GaInP/GaAs/Ge and metamorphic (MM) GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells. The “ordinary” luminescent coupling effectiveness rise has been observed with temperature decrease for GaAs-Ge, GaInP-GaInAs and GaInAs-Ge pairs of subcells, and its limiting values have been defined. A “reverse” behavior of the luminescent coupling effectiveness for the GaInP-GaAs pair has been found, determined emittance potential drop of wideband GaInP p-n junction. It is shown that the established “unusual” behavior of the LC efficiency may be determined by the presence of thermalized centers of non-radiative recombination of charge carriers for the GaInP subcell in GaInP/GaAs/Ge LM structure. Estimation of characteristic parameters for the nonradiative recombination processes in wideband GaInP p-n junction has been carried out, and values for the energy of the nonradiative center thermalization (E{sub nrad2} =79.42meV) and for the activation energy of nonradiative band-to-band recombination (E{sub A}=33.4meV) have been obtained.

  11. Cerenkov luminescence tomography based on preconditioning orthogonal matching pursuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixiao; Hu, Zhenhua; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie; Yang, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a novel optical imaging method and has been proved to be a potential substitute of the traditional radionuclide imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). This imaging method inherits the high sensitivity of nuclear medicine and low cost of optical molecular imaging. To obtain the depth information of the radioactive isotope, Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) is established and the 3D distribution of the isotope is reconstructed. However, because of the strong absorption and scatter, the reconstruction of the CLT sources is always converted to an ill-posed linear system which is hard to be solved. In this work, the sparse nature of the light source was taken into account and the preconditioning orthogonal matching pursuit (POMP) method was established to effectively reduce the ill-posedness and obtain better reconstruction accuracy. To prove the accuracy and speed of this algorithm, a heterogeneous numerical phantom experiment and an in vivo mouse experiment were conducted. Both the simulation result and the mouse experiment showed that our reconstruction method can provide more accurate reconstruction result compared with the traditional Tikhonov regularization method and the ordinary orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) method. Our reconstruction method will provide technical support for the biological application for Cerenkov luminescence.

  12. Luminescent nanoparticles and their applications in the life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Varun K. A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles have recently emerged as an important group of materials used in numerous disciplines within the life sciences, ranging from basic biophysical research to clinical therapeutics. Luminescent nanoparticles make excellent optical bioprobes significantly extending the capabilities of alternative fluorophores such as organic dyes and genetically engineered fluorescent proteins. Their advantages include excellent photostability, tunable and narrow spectra, controllable size, resilience to environmental conditions such as pH and temperature, combined with a large surface for anchoring targeting biomolecules. Some types of nanoparticles provide enhanced detection contrast due to their long emission lifetime and/or luminescence wavelength blue-shift (anti-Stokes) due to energy upconversion. This topical review focuses on four key types of luminescent nanoparticles whose emission is governed by different photophysics. We discuss the origin and characteristics of optical absorption and emission in these nanoparticles and give a brief account of synthesis and surface modification procedures. We also introduce some of their applications with opportunities for further development, which could be appreciated by the physics-trained readership.

  13. Luminescent lanthanide reporters: new concepts for use in bioanalytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuojola, Johanna; Soukka, Tero

    2014-01-23

    Lanthanides represent the chemical elements from lanthanum to lutetium. They intrinsically exhibit some very exciting photophysical properties, which can be further enhanced by incorporating the lanthanide ion into organic or inorganic sensitizing structures. A very popular approach is to conjugate the lanthanide ion to an organic chromophore structure forming lanthanide chelates. Another approach, which has quickly gained interest, is to incorporate the lanthanide ions into nanoparticle structures, thus attaining improved specific activity and a large surface area for biomolecule immobilization. Lanthanide-based reporters, when properly shielded from the quenching effects of water, usually express strong luminescence emission, multiple narrow emission lines covering a wide wavelength range, and exceptionally long excited state lifetimes enabling time-gated luminescence detection. Because of these properties, lanthanide-based reporters have found widespread applications in various fields of life. This review focuses on the field of bioanalytical applications. Luminescent lanthanide reporters and assay formats utilizing these reporters pave the way for increasingly sensitive, simple, and easily automated bioanalytical applications.

  14. Synthesis and Features of Luminescent Bromo- and Iodohectorite Nanoclay Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Silva Santos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The smectites represent a versatile class of clay minerals with broad usage in industrial applications, e.g., cosmetics, drug delivery, bioimaging, etc. Synthetic hectorite Na0.7(Mg5.5Li0.3[Si8O20](OH4 is a distinct material from this class due to its low-cost production method that allows to design its structure to match better the applications. In the current work, we have synthesized for the first time ever nanoclay materials based on the hectorite structure but with the hydroxyl groups (OH− replaced by Br− or I−, yielding bromohectorite (Br-Hec and iodohectorite (I-Hec. It was aimed that these materials would be used as phosphors. Thus, OH− replacement was done to avoid luminescence quenching by multiphonon de-excitation. The crystal structure is similar to nanocrystalline fluorohectorite, having the d001 spacing of 14.30 Å and 3 nm crystallite size along the 00l direction. The synthetic materials studied here show strong potential to act as host lattices for optically active species, possessing mesoporous structure with high specific surface area (385 and 363 m2 g−1 for Br-Hec and I-Hec, respectively and good thermal stability up to 800 °C. Both materials also present strong blue-green emission under UV radiation and short persistent luminescence (ca. 5 s. The luminescence features are attributed to Ti3+/TiIV impurities acting as the emitting center in these materials.

  15. Visible luminescence in polyaniline/(gold nanoparticle) composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Renata F. S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais (Brazil); Andrade, Cesar A. S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Bioquimica (Brazil); Santos, Clecio G. dos [Instituto de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (Brazil); Melo, Celso P. de, E-mail: celso@df.ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    We describe the use of solution chemistry methods to prepare polyaniline/(gold nanoparticles)-PANI/AuNPs-composites as colloidal particles that exhibit an intense green fluorescence after excitation in the ultraviolet region. Measurements of the relative fluorescence quantum yield indicate that the intensity of the observed luminescence of these nanocomposites is a few orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding fluorescence of either the isolated polymer or the pure AuNPs. Hence, cooperative effects between the conducting polymer chains and the metallic particles must dominate the emission behavior of these materials. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the existence of metal nanoparticle aggregates with sizes in the 2-3 nm range dispersed in the polymer matrix. By implementing an experimental planning, we have been able to change the preparation parameters so as to vary in a controlled manner the intensity and the profile of the luminescence spectrum as well as the size and aggregation characteristics of the colloidal particles. We also show that when the pH of the medium is varied, the dielectric properties (such as the degree of conductivity) of the PANI/AuNPs colloidal solutions and the intensity of their luminescence change in a consistent manner. Due to the polycation nature of the doped PANI chains, we suggest that these composites may find interesting applications as fluorescent markers of biologic molecules.

  16. Luminescent lanthanide reporters: new concepts for use in bioanalytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuojola, Johanna; Soukka, Tero

    2014-01-01

    Lanthanides represent the chemical elements from lanthanum to lutetium. They intrinsically exhibit some very exciting photophysical properties, which can be further enhanced by incorporating the lanthanide ion into organic or inorganic sensitizing structures. A very popular approach is to conjugate the lanthanide ion to an organic chromophore structure forming lanthanide chelates. Another approach, which has quickly gained interest, is to incorporate the lanthanide ions into nanoparticle structures, thus attaining improved specific activity and a large surface area for biomolecule immobilization. Lanthanide-based reporters, when properly shielded from the quenching effects of water, usually express strong luminescence emission, multiple narrow emission lines covering a wide wavelength range, and exceptionally long excited state lifetimes enabling time-gated luminescence detection. Because of these properties, lanthanide-based reporters have found widespread applications in various fields of life. This review focuses on the field of bioanalytical applications. Luminescent lanthanide reporters and assay formats utilizing these reporters pave the way for increasingly sensitive, simple, and easily automated bioanalytical applications. (topical review)

  17. Delayed luminescence in a multiparameter approach to evaluation and reduction of radiobiological risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Rosaria; Cammarata, Francesco Paolo; Minafra, Luigi; Marchese, Valentina; Russo, Giorgio; Manti, Lorenzo; Musumeci, Francesco; Scordino, Agata

    2017-07-01

    In the framework of the research project ETHICS "Pre-clinical experimental and theoretical studies to improve treatment and protection by charged particles" funded by the National Nuclear Physics Institute, Italy, we studied the phenomenon called delayed luminescence emitted by non-tumorigenic breast epithelial MCF10A cell line after proton irradiation at different doses (0.5, 2, 6, 9 Gy). The aim is to found possible correlations between delayed luminescence and in vitro damaging induced by ion irradiation. The first results of this research show that the delayed luminescence kinetics is proton dose dependent. An interesting correlation between delayed luminescence and clonogenic potential was observed.

  18. OLED lighting devices having multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Antoniadis, Homer

    2010-11-16

    An apparatus such as a light source has a multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer disposed over a transparent layer of the light source and on the exterior of said light source. The multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer includes a plurality of light extraction elements and a plurality of luminescence conversion elements. The light extraction elements diffuses the light from the light source while luminescence conversion elements absorbs a first spectrum of light from said light source and emits a second spectrum of light.

  19. Hormesis response of marine and freshwater luminescent bacteria to metal exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAILI SHEN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The stimulatory effect of low concentrations of toxic chemicals on organismal metabolism, referred to as hormesis, has been found to be common in the widely used luminescence bioassay. This paper aims to study the hormesis phenomenon in both marine and freshwater luminescent bacteria, named Photobacterium phosphorem and Vibrio qinghaiensis. The effects of Cu (II, Zn (II, Cd (II and Cr (VI on luminescence of these two bacteria were studied for 0 to 75 minutes exposure by establishing dose- and time-response curves. A clear hormesis phenomenon was observed in all four testing metals at low concentrations under the condition of luminescence assays.

  20. Temperature and Pressure Sensors Based on Spin-Allowed Broadband Luminescence of Doped Orthorhombic Perovskite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I. (Inventor); Chambers, Matthew D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring pressure or temperature based on luminescence are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on spin-allowed broadband luminescence of sensors with orthorhombic perovskite structures of rare earth aluminates doped with chromium or similar transition metals, such as chromium-doped gadolinium aluminate. Luminescence from these sensors can be measured to determine at least one of temperature or pressure, based on either the intense luminescence of these sensors, even at high temperatures, or low temperature techniques discussed herein.