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Sample records for polarized electron-ion collider

  1. Polarized Parton Distributions at an Electron-Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Richard D.; Guffanti, Alberto; Nocera, Emanuele R.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We study the potential impact of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering data from a future electron-ion collider (EIC) on longitudinally polarized parton distribution (PDFs). We perform a PDF determination using the NNPDF methodology, based on sets of deep-inelastic EIC pseudodata, for different realistic choices of the electron and proton beam energies. We compare the results to our current polarized PDF set, NNPDFpol1.0, based on a fit to fixed-target inclusive DIS data. We show that the uncertainties on the first moments of the polarized quark singlet and gluon distributions are substantially reduced in comparison to NNPDFpol1.0, but also that more measurements may be needed to ultimately pin down the size of the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin.

  2. Polarized positrons in Jefferson lab electron ion collider (JLEIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fanglei; Grames, Joe; Guo, Jiquan; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong

    2018-05-01

    The Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) is designed to provide collisions of electron and ion beams with high luminosity and high polarization to reach new frontier in exploration of nuclear structure. The luminosity, exceeding 1033 cm-2s-1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass (CM) energy and maximum luminosity above 1034 cm-2s-1, is achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches with proper cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) and electron can be easily preserved, manipulated and maintained by taking advantage of the unique figure-8 shape rings. With a growing physics interest, polarized positron-ion collisions are considered to be carried out in the JLEIC to offer an additional probe to study the substructure of nucleons and nuclei. However, the creation of polarized positrons with sufficient intensity is particularly challenging. We propose a dedicated scheme to generate polarized positrons. Rather than trying to accumulate "hot" positrons after conversion, we will accumulate "cold" electrons before conversion. Charge accumulation additionally provides a novel means to convert high repetition rate (>100 MHz) electron beam from the gun to a low repetition rate (<100 MHz) positron beam for broad applications. In this paper, we will address the scheme, provide preliminary estimated parameters and explain the key areas to reach the desired goal.

  3. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  4. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeyratne, S.; Accardi, A.; Ahmed, S.; Barber, D.; Bisognano, J.; Bogacz, A.; Castilla, A.; Chevtsov, P.; Corneliussen, S.; Deconinck, W.; Degtiarenko, P.; Delayen, J.; Derbenev, Ya.; DeSilva, S.; Douglas, D.; Dudnikov, V.; Ent, R.; Erdelyi, B.; Evtushenko, P.; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Guzey, V.; Horn, T.; Hutton, A.; Hyde, C.; Johnson, R.; Kim, Y.; Klein, F.; Kondratenko, A.; Kondratenko, M.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Lin, F.; Manikonda, S.; Marhauser, F.; McKeown, R.; Morozov, V.; Dadel-Turonski, P.; Nissen, E.; Ostroumov, P.; Pivi, M.; Pilat, F.; Poelker, M.; Prokudin, A.; Rimmer, R.; Satogata, T.; Sayed, H.; Spata, M.; Sullivan, M.; Tennant, C.; Terzic, B.; Tiefenback, M.; Wang, H.; Wang, S.; Weiss, C.; Yunn, B.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  5. Progress on the design of the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider at JLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F.; Bogacz, A.; Brindza, P.; Camsonne, A.; Daly, E.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Douglas, D.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Grames, J.; Guo, J.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Jordan, K.; Kimber, A.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Michalski, T.; Morozov, V. S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; /Jefferson Lab /Argonne /DESY /Moscow , Inst. Phys. Tech., Dolgoprydny /Dubna, JINR /Northern Illinois U. /Old Doominion U. /Novosibirsk, GOO Zaryad /SLAC /Texas A-M

    2015-07-14

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab is designed to provide high luminosity and high polarization needed to reach new frontiers in the exploration of nuclear structure. The luminosity, exceeding 1033 cm-2s-1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass (CM) energy and maximum luminosity above 1034 cm-2s-1, is achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches made possible by high-energy electron cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) can be easily preserved and manipulated due to the unique figure-8 shape of the collider rings. A fully consistent set of parameters have been developed considering the balance of machine performance, required technical development and cost. This paper reports recent progress on the MEIC accelerator design including electron and ion complexes, integrated interaction region design, figure-8-ring-based electron and ion polarization schemes, RF/SRF systems and ERL-based high-energy electron cooling. Luminosity performance is also presented for the MEIC baseline design.

  6. GPDs at an electron ion collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility for a precise determination of Generalized Parton Distribution (GPDs) functions at an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) has been explored. The high luminosity of the machine, together with the large resolution and rapidity acceptance of the new dedicated detector, will open opportunity for high precision measurements of GPDs. We report on the study of GPDs from deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). We also point out that such measurements at a proposed EIC provide insight to both, the transverse distribution of sea quarks and gluons as well as the proton spin decomposition.

  7. GPDs at an electron ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazio, Salvatore [Brookhaven National Laboratory, 11973 Upton NY (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The feasibility for a precise determination of Generalized Parton Distribution (GPDs) functions at an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) has been explored. The high luminosity of the machine, together with the large resolution and rapidity acceptance of the new dedicated detector, will open opportunity for high precision measurements of GPDs. We report on the study of GPDs from deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). We also point out that such measurements at a proposed EIC provide insight to both, the transverse distribution of sea quarks and gluons as well as the proton spin decomposition.

  8. Probing sea quarks and gluons: the electron-ion collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, T.

    2014-01-01

    A future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would be the world's first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world's first e-A collider, and would seek the QCD foundation of nucleons and nuclei in terms of the sea quarks and gluons, matching to these valence quark studies. The EIC will provide a versatile range of kinematics and beam polarization, as well as beam species, to allow for mapping the spin and spatial structure of the quark sea and gluons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. (authors)

  9. Crabbing system for an electron-ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    As high energy and nuclear physicists continue to push further the boundaries of knowledge using colliders, there is an imperative need, not only to increase the colliding beams' energies, but also to improve the accuracy of the experiments, and to collect a large quantity of events with good statistical sensitivity. To achieve the latter, it is necessary to collect more data by increasing the rate at which these processes are being produced and detected in the machine. This rate of events depends directly on the machine's luminosity. The luminosity itself is proportional to the frequency at which the beams are being delivered, the number of particles in each beam, and inversely proportional to the cross-sectional size of the colliding beams. There are several approaches that can be considered to increase the events statistics in a collider other than increasing the luminosity, such as running the experiments for a longer time. However, this also elevates the operation expenses, while increasing the frequency at which the beams are delivered implies strong physical changes along the accelerator and the detectors. Therefore, it is preferred to increase the beam intensities and reduce the beams cross-sectional areas to achieve these higher luminosities. In the case where the goal is to push the limits, sometimes even beyond the machines design parameters, one must develop a detailed High Luminosity Scheme. Any high luminosity scheme on a modern collider considers|in one of their versions|the use of crab cavities to correct the geometrical reduction of the luminosity due to the beams crossing angle. In this dissertation, we present the design and testing of a proof-of-principle compact superconducting crab cavity, at 750 MHz, for the future electron-ion collider, currently under design at Jefferson Lab. In addition to the design and validation of the cavity prototype, we present the analysis of the first order beam dynamics and the integration of the

  10. TMDs and GPDs at a future Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ent, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    In the U.S., an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) of energy √(s) = 20-100 GeV is under design, with two options studied at Brookhaven National Lab and Jefferson Laboratory. The recent 2015 US Nuclear Science Long-Range Planning effort included a future EIC as a recommendation for future construction. The EIC will be unique in colliding polarised electrons off polarised protons and light nuclei, providing the spin degrees of freedom essential to pursue its physics program driven by spin structure, multi-dimensional tomographic images of protons and nuclei, and discovery of the role of collective effects of gluons in nuclei. The foreseen luminosity of the EIC, coupled with its energy variability and reach, will allow unprecedented three-dimensional imaging of the gluon and sea quark distributions, via both TMDs and GPDs, and to explore correlations amongst them. Its hermetic detection capability of correlated fragments promises to similarly allow for precise tomographic images of the quark-gluon landscape in nuclei, transcending from light few-body nuclei to the heaviest nuclei, and could uncover how the TMD and GPD landscape changes when gluons display an anticipated collective behavior at the higher energies. (orig.)

  11. Nuclear structure functions at a future electron-ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenauer, E. C.; Fazio, S.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Paukkunen, H.; Zurita, P.

    2017-12-01

    The quantitative knowledge of heavy nuclei's partonic structure is currently limited to rather large values of momentum fraction x —robust experimental constraints below x ˜10-2 at low resolution scale Q2 are particularly scarce. This is in sharp contrast to the free proton's structure which has been probed in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) measurements down to x ˜10-5 at perturbative resolution scales. The construction of an electron-ion collider (EIC) with a possibility to operate with a wide variety of nuclei, will allow one to explore the low-x region in much greater detail. In the present paper we simulate the extraction of the nuclear structure functions from measurements of inclusive and charm reduced cross sections at an EIC. The potential constraints are studied by analyzing simulated data directly in a next-to-leading order global fit of nuclear Parton Distribution Functions based on the recent EPPS16 analysis. A special emphasis is placed on studying the impact an EIC would have on extracting the nuclear gluon parton distribution function, the partonic component most prone to nonlinear effects at low Q2. In comparison to the current knowledge, we find that the gluon parton distribution function can be measured at an EIC with significantly reduced uncertainties.

  12. THE ELECTRON ION COLLIDER. A HIGH LUMINOSITY PROBE OF THE PARTONIC SUBSTRUCTURE OF NUCLEONS AND NUCLEI.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDITED BY M.S. DAVIS

    2002-02-01

    By the end of this decade, the advancement of current and planned research into the fundamental structure of matter will require a new facility, the Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The EIC will collide high-energy beams of polarized electrons from polarized protons and neutrons, and unpolarized beams of electrons off atomic nuclei with unprecedented intensity. Research at the EIC will lead to a detailed understanding of the structure of the proton, neutron, and atomic nuclei as described by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), the accepted theory of the strong interaction. The EIC will establish quantitative answers to important questions by delivering dramatically increased precision over existing and planned experiments and by providing completely new experimental capabilities. Indeed, the EIC will probe QCD in a manner not possible previously. This document presents the scientific case for the design, construction and operation of the EIC. While realization of the EIC requires a significant advance in the development of efficient means of producing powerful beams of energetic electrons, an important consideration for choosing the site of the EIC is the planned upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The upgrade planned for RHIC will fully meet the requirements for the ion beam for the EIC, providing a distinct advantage in terms of cost, schedule and the final operation.

  13. Pre-Town Meeting on spin physics at an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, Elke-Caroline; Bland, Leslie; Huang, Jin; Tarasov, Andrey [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Balitsky, Ian; Radyushkin, Anatoly [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA (United States); Burkardt, Matthias [New Mexico State University, Department of Physics, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Burkert, Volker; Chen, Jian-Ping; Kubarovsky, Valery; Melnitchouk, Wally; Qiu, Jian-Wei; Richards, David [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Deshpande, Abhay [Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, SUNY, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gamberg, Leonard [Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Grosse Perdekamp, Matthias [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Hyde, Charles [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Ji, Xiangdong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, INPAC, Department of Physics, and Shanghai Key Lab for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Shanghai (China); Peking University, Center for High-Energy Physics, Beijing (China); University of Maryland, Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Jiang, Xiaodong; Liu, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kang, Zhong-Bo [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Mani L. Bhaumik Institute for Theoretical Physics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lajoie, John [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Liu, Keh-Fei [University of Kentucky, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Center for Computational Sciences, Lexington, KY (United States); Liuti, Simonetta [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mulders, Piet [VU University Amsterdam, Nikhef and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Prokudin, Alexei [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Sichtermann, Ernst; Yuan, Feng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratmann, Marco; Vogelsang, Werner [Tuebingen University, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    A polarized ep/eA collider (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC), with polarized proton and light-ion beams and unpolarized heavy-ion beams with a variable center-of-mass energy √(s) ∝ 20 to ∝ 100 GeV (upgradable to ∝ 150 GeV) and a luminosity up to ∝ 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, and thereby lead to new qualitative and quantitative information on the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei. During this meeting at Jefferson Lab we addressed recent theoretical and experimental developments in the spin and the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, and their correlations). This mini-review contains a short update on progress in these areas since the EIC White paper (A. Accardi et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 52, 268 (2016)). (orig.)

  14. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  15. Concept for an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) detector built around the BaBar solenoid

    OpenAIRE

    PHENIX Collaboration; Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alfred, M.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.

    2014-01-01

    The PHENIX collaboration presents here a concept for a detector at a future Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The EIC detector proposed here, referred to as ePHENIX, will have excellent performance for a broad range of exciting EIC physics measurements, providing powerful investigations not currently available that will dramatically advance our understanding of how quantum chromodynamics binds the proton and forms nuclear matter.

  16. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.

    2004-01-01

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting rf structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a dc-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%

  17. High-energy high-luminosity electron-ion collider eRHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hammons, L.; Hao, Y.; Webb, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference. The replacement cost of the RHIC facility is about two billion US dollars, and the eRHIC will fully take advantage and utilize this investment. We plan adding a polarized 5-30 GeV electron beam to collide with variety of species in the existing RHIC accelerator complex, from polarized protons with a top energy of 325 GeV, to heavy fully-striped ions with energies up to 130 GeV/u. Brookhaven's innovative design, is based on one of the RHIC's hadron rings and a multi-pass energy-recovery linac (ERL). Using the ERL as the electron accelerator assures high luminosity in the 10 33 -10 34 cm -2 sec -1 range, and for the natural staging of eRHIC, with the ERL located inside the RHIC tunnel. The eRHIC will provide electron-hadron collisions in up to three interaction regions. We detail the eRHIC's performance in Section 2. Since first paper on eRHIC paper in 2000, its design underwent several iterations. Initially, the main eRHIC option (the so-called ring-ring, RR, design) was based on an electron ring, with the linac-ring (LR) option as a backup. In 2004, we published the detailed 'eRHIC 0th Order Design Report' including a cost-estimate for the RR design. After detailed studies, we found that an LR eRHIC has about a 10-fold higher luminosity than the RR. Since 2007, the LR, with its natural staging strategy and full transparency for polarized electrons, became the main choice for eRHIC. In 2009, we completed technical studies of the design and dynamics for MeRHIC with 3-pass 4 GeV ERL. We learned much from this evaluation, completed a bottom-up cost estimate for this $350M machine, but then shelved the design. In the same year, we turned again to considering the cost-effective, all-in-tunnel six-pass ERL for our design of the high-luminosity eRHIC. In it

  18. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to √s=500 GeV

  19. Feedback scheme for kink instability in ERL based electron ion collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Y.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2011-01-01

    Kink instability presents one of the limiting factors from achieving higher luminosity in ERL based electron ion collider (EIC). However, we can take advantage of the flexibility of the linac and design a feedback system to cure the instability. This scheme raises the threshold of kink instability dramatically and provides opportunity for higher luminosity. We studied the effectiveness of this system and its dependence on the amplitude and phase of the feedback. In this paper we present results of theses studies of this scheme and describe its theoretical and practical limitations. The main advantage of an energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron ion collider (EIC) over a ring-ring type counterpart is the higher achievable luminosity. In ERL-based version, one electron beam collides with the opposing ion beam only once so that the beam-beam parameter can largely exceed the usual limitation in an electron collider ring, while the beam-beam parameter for the ion beam remains small values. The resulting luminosity may be enhanced by one order of magnitude. The beam dynamics related challenges also arise as the luminosity boost in ERL based EIC due to the significant beam-beam effect on the electron beam. The effects on the electron beam include the additional large beam-beam tune shift and nonlinear emittance growth, which are discussed. The ion beam may develop a head-tail type instability, referred as 'kink instability', through the interaction with the electron beam. In this paper, we discuss the feasibility of an active feedback system to mitigate the kink instability, by taking advantage of the flexibility of ERL. Throughout the paper, we will discuss the collision between proton and electron beam. Any other ion species can be scaled by its charge Z and ion mass A.

  20. Testing of multigap Resistive Plate Chambers for Electron Ion Collider Detector Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Hannah; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Despite decades of research on the subject, some details of the spin structure of the nucleon continues to be unknown. To improve our knowledge of the nucleon spin structure, the construction of a new collider is needed. This is one of the primary goals of the proposed Electron Ion Collider (EIC). Planned EIC spectrometers will require good particle identification. This can be provided by time of flight (TOF) detectors with excellent timing resolutions of 10 ps. A potential TOF detector that could meet this requirement is a glass multigap resistive plate chamber (mRPC). These mRPCs can provide excellent timing resolution at a low cost. The current glass mRPC prototypes have a total of twenty 0.1 mm thick gas gaps. In order to test the feasibility of this design, a cosmic test stand was assembled. This stand used the coincidence of scintillators as a trigger, and contains fast electronics. The construction, the method of testing, and the test results of the mRPCs will be presented.

  1. Electron-Ion Collider: The next QCD frontier. Understanding the glue that binds us all

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardi, A. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Albacete, J.L. [Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, IPNO, Orsay (France); Anselmino, M. [Torino University (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Armesto, N. [University of Santiago de Campostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Aschenauer, E.C.; Burton, T.; Fazio, S.; Hao, Y.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Lee, J.H.; Lee, Y.; Litvinenko, V.; Ludlam, T.W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Qiu, J.W.; Roser, T.; Toll, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Ullrich, T.; Venugopalan, R.; Vigdor, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Bacchetta, A. [University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Boer, D. [University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brooks, W.K.; Hakobyan, H.; Kopeliovich, B. [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile); Chang, N.B.; Huang, M. [Shandong University, Shandong (China); Deng, W.T. [Frankfurt University, FIAS, Frankfurt (Germany); Shandong University, Shandong (China); Deshpande, A.; Kumar, K. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Diehl, M. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dumitru, A.; Jalilian-Marian, J. [Baruch College, CUNY, New York, NY (United States); Dupre, R.; Sabatie, F. [Centre de Saclay, CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ent, R.; Guzey, V.; Hutton, A.; Lin, F.L.; McKeown, R.; Morozov, V.S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Prokudin, A.; Weiss, C.; Zhang, Y.H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Gao, H. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hasch, D. [INFN, LNF, Frascati (Italy); Holt, R. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Horn, T. [The Catholic University of America, N.E. Washington, DC (United States); Hyde, C. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Klein, S.; Sichtermann, E.; Yuan, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kovchegov, Y. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Kumericki, K. [University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Lappi, T.; Paukkunen, H. [University of Jyvaskyla, Jyvaskyla (Finland); Levin, E.M. [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile); Marquet, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Meziani, Z.E.; Metz, A. [Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Milner, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Mueller, A.H. [Columbia University, New York, NY (US); Mueller, B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (US); Duke University, Durham, NC (US); Mueller, D. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (DE); Qian, X. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (US); Ramsey-Musolf, M. [University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA (US); Sassot, R. [University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (AR); Schnell, G. [University of Basque Country, Bilbao (ES); Schweitzer, P. [University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (US); Stratmann, M.; Vogelsang, W. [University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (DE); Strikman, M. [Pennsylvania State University, Philadelphia, PA (US); Sullivan, M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (US); Taneja, S. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (CA); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (US); Xiao, B.W. [Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei (CN); Zheng, L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (US); Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei (CN)

    2016-09-15

    This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics over the past decades and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on ''Gluons and quark sea at high energies'' at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them. It has been benefited profoundly from inputs by the users' communities of BNL and JLab. This White Paper offers the promise to propel the QCD science program in the US, established with the CEBAF accelerator at JLab and the RHIC collider at BNL, to the next QCD frontier. (orig.)

  2. Polarization Effects at a Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-01-01

    For Muon Colliders, Polarization will be a useful tool if high polarization is achievable with little luminosity loss. Formulation and effects of beam polarization and luminosity including polarization effects in Higgs resonance studies are discussed for improving precision measurements and Higgs resonance ''discovery'' capability e.g. at the First Muon Collider (FMC)

  3. Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier - Understanding the glue that binds us all

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, A.; Anselmino, M.; Armesto, N.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Bacchetta, A.; Boer, D.; Brooks, W.K.; Burton, T.; Chang, N.B.; Deng, W.T.; Deshpande, A.; Diehl, M.; Dumitru, A.; Dupré, R.; Ent, R.; Fazio, S.; Gao, H.; Guzey, V.; Hakobyan, H.; Hao, Y.; Hasch, D.; Holt, R.; Horn, T.; Huang, M.; Hutton, A.; Hyde, C.; Jalilian-Marian, J.; Klein, S.; Kopeliovich, B.; Kovchegov, Y.; Kumar, K.; Kumerički, K.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Lappi, T.; Lee, J.H.; Lee, Y.; Levin, E.M.; Lin, F.L.; Litvinenko, V.; Ludlam, T.W.; Marquet, C.; Meziani, Z.E.; McKeown, R.; Metz, A.; Milner, R.; Morozov, V.S.; Mueller, A.H.; Müller, B.; Müller, Dieter; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Paukkunen, H.; Prokudin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Qian, X.; Qiu, J.W.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.; Roser, T.; Sabatié, F.; Sassot, R.; Schnell, G.; Schweitzer, P.; Sichtermann, E.; Stratmann, M.; Strikman, M.; Sullivan, M.; Taneja, S.; Toll, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Ullrich, T.; Venugopalan, R.; Vigdor, S.; Vogelsang, W.; Weiss, C.; Xiao, B.W.; Yuan, F.; Zhang, Y.H.; Zheng, L.

    2016-01-01

    This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on "Gluons and quark sea at high energies" at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them, and it benefited from inputs from the users' communities of BNL and JLab. This White Paper offers the promise to prope...

  4. Transverse Momentum Dependent Parton Distribution/Fragmentation Functions at an Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.; Avakian, H.; Boer, D.; Bradamante, F.; Burkardt, M.; Chen, J.P.; Cisbani, E.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Dutta, D.; Gamberg, L.; Gao, H.; Hasch, D.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Kang, Z.; Keppel, C.; Laskaris, G.; Liang, Z.-T.; Liu, M.X.; Makins, N.; Mckeown, R.D.; Metz, A.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Musch, B.; Peng, J.-C.; Prokudin, A.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qiu, J.W.; Rossi, P.; Schweitzer, P.; Soffer, J.; Sulkosky, V.; Wang, Y.; Xiao, B.; Ye, Q.; Ye, Q.-J.; Yuan, F.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, W.; Zhou, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a summary of a recent workshop held at Duke University on Partonic Transverse Momentum in Hadrons: Quark Spin-Orbit Correlations and Quark-Gluon Interactions. The transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, and multi-parton correlation functions, were discussed extensively at the Duke workshop. In this paper, we summarize first the theoretical issues concerning the study of partonic structure of hadrons at a future electron-ion collider (EIC) with emphasis on the TMDs. We then present simulation results on experimental studies of TMDs through measurements of single spin asymmetries (SSA) from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) processes with an EIC, and discuss the requirement of the detector for SIDIS measurements. The dynamics of parton correlations in the nucleon is further explored via a study of SSA in D ((bar D)) production at large transverse momenta with the aim of accessing the unexplored tri-gluon correlation functions. The workshop participants identified the SSA measurements in SIDIS as a golden program to study TMDs in both the sea and valence quark regions and to study the role of gluons, with the Sivers asymmetry measurements as examples. Such measurements will lead to major advancement in our understanding of TMDs in the valence quark region, and more importantly also allow for the investigation of TMDs in the sea quark region along with a study of their evolution.

  5. High-performance DIRC detector for the future Electron Ion Collider experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicy, G.; Allison, L.; Cao, T.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Hartlove, T.; Horn, T.; Hyde, C.; Ilieva, Y.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Peters, K.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Stevens, J.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.

    2018-04-01

    Excellent particle identification (PID) is an essential requirement for a future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) detector. Identification of the hadrons in the final state is critical to study how different quark flavors contribute to nucleon properties. A detector based on the Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) principle, with a radial size of only a few cm, is a perfect solution for those requirements. The R&D process performed by the EIC PID consortium (eRD14) is focused on designing a high-performance DIRC that would extend the momentum coverage well beyond the state-of-the-art, allowing 3 standard deviations or more separation of π/K up to 6 GeV/c, e/π up to 1.8 GeV/c, and p/K up to 10 GeV/c. A key component to reach such a performance is a special 3-layer compound lens. This article describes the status of the High-Performance DIRC R&D for the EIC detector, with a focus on the detailed Monte Carlo simulation results and performance tests of the 3-layer lens.

  6. Polarized electron sources for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S.D.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1992-07-01

    Linear colliders require high peak current beams with low duty factors. Several methods to produce polarized e - beams for accelerators have been developed. The SLC, the first linear collider, utilizes a photocathode gun with a GaAs cathode. Although photocathode sources are probably the only practical alternative for the next generation of linear colliders, several problems remain to be solved, including high voltage breakdown which poisons the cathode, charge limitations that are associated with the condition of the semiconductor cathode, and a relatively low polarization of ≤5O%. Methods to solve or at least greatly reduce the impact of each of these problems are at hand

  7. Effects of Crab Cavities' Multipole Content in an Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satogata, Todd J.; Morozov, Vasiliy; Delayen, Jean R.; Castillo, Alejandro

    2015-09-01

    The impact on the beam dynamics of the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Colider (MEIC) due to the multipole content of the 750 MHz crab cavity was studied using thin multipole elements for 6D phase space particle tracking in ELEGANT. Target values of the sextupole component for the cavity's field expansion were used to perform preliminary studies on the proton beam stability when compared to the case of pure dipole content of the rf kicks. Finally, important effects on the beam sizes due to non-linear components of the crab cavities' fields were identified, and some criteria for their future study were proposed.

  8. Effects of Crab Cavities' Multipole Content in an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satogata, Todd J. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Castillo, Alejandro [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The impact on the beam dynamics of the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Colider (MEIC) due to the multipole content of the 750 MHz crab cavity was studied using thin multipole elements for 6D phase space particle tracking in ELEGANT. Target values of the sextupole component for the cavity’s field expansion were used to perform preliminary studies on the proton beam stability when compared to the case of pure dipole content of the rf kicks. Finally, important effects on the beam sizes due to non-linear components of the crab cavities’ fields were identified, and some criteria for their future study were proposed.

  9. RHIC spin: The first polarized proton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1994-01-01

    The very successful program of QCD and electroweak tests at the high energy hadron colliders have shown that the perturbative QCD has progressed towards becoming a ''precision'' theory. At the same time, it has been shown that with the help of Siberian Snakes it is feasible to accelerate polarized protons to high enough energies where the proven methods of collider physics can be used to probe the spin content of the proton but also where fundamental tests of the spin effects in the standard model are possible. With Siberian Snakes the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will be the first collider to allow for 250 GeV on 250 GeV polarized proton collisions

  10. A novel spectrometer for studying exotic nuclei with the electron/ion collider ELISe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, G.P.A.; Adachi, T.; Harakeh, M.N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Woertche, H.J.; Simon, H.; Koop, I.A.; Couder, M.; Fujiwara, M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel concept of an electron spectrometer developed for the ELISe facility is presented. This spectrometer will be constructed as a part of the international Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung. The spectrometer is designed to analyze electron scattering at the ion-electron interaction region of the NESR and EAR colliding storage rings with a high resolution and a large solid angle. A pre-deflector with a zero-field central channel along the path of the intersecting beam allows the measurement of scattered electrons without interfering with the circulating beams. Ion-optical and magnet design calculations are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and achievement of realistic design specifications.

  11. The Proton Spin, Semi-Inclusive processes, and measurements at a future Electron Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhay, Deshpande

    2018-01-12

    We discuss spin physics, Guido’s contribution to it, and what we still have to learn. We set out in particular a programme for incorporating constraints from semi-inclusive data into global fits of polarized PDFs, and discuss the need for the EIC to increase the precision and kinematic coverage of current measurements.

  12. A Harmonic Kicker Scheme for the Circulator Cooler Ring in the Proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissen, Edward W.; Hutton, Andrew M.; Kimber, Andrew J.

    2013-06-01

    The current electron cooler design for the proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab utilizes a circulator ring for reuse of the cooling electron bunch up to 100 times to cool the ion beams. This cooler requires a fast kicker system for injecting and extracting individual bunches in the circulator ring. Such a kicker must work at a high repetition rate, up to 7.5 to 75 MHz depending on the number of turns in the recirculator ring. It also must have a very short rise and fall time (of order of 1 ns) such that it will kick an individual bunch without disturbing the others in the ring. Both requirements are orders of magnitude beyond the present state-of-the-art as well as the goals of other on-going kicker R&D programs such as that for the ILC damping rings. In this paper we report a scheme of creating this fast, high repetition rate kicker by combining RF waveforms at multiple frequencies to create a kicker waveform that will, for example, kick every eleventh bunch while leaving the other ten unperturbed. We also present a possible implementation of this scheme as well as discuss its limitations.

  13. Harmonic Kicker RF Cavity for the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider EM Simulation, Modification, and Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Sarah; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-09-01

    An important step in the conceptual design for the future Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) is the development of supporting technologies for the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) Electron Cooling Facility. The Harmonic Radiofrequency (RF) kicker cavity is one such device that is responsible for switching electron bunches in and out of the Circulator Cooling Ring (CCR) from and to the ERL, which is a critical part of the ion cooling process. Last year, a half scale prototype of the JLEIC harmonic RF kicker model was designed with resonant frequencies to support the summation of 5 odd harmonics (95.26 MHz, 285.78 MHz, 476.30 MHz, 666.82 MHz, and 857.35 MHz); however, the asymmetry of the kicker cavity gives rise to multipole components of the electric field at the electron-beam axis of the cavity. Previous attempts to symmetrize the electric field of this asymmetrical RF cavity have been unsuccessful. The aim of this study is to modify the existing prototype for a uniform electric field across the beam pathway so that the electron bunches will experience nearly zero beam current loading. In addition to this, we have driven the unmodified cavity with the harmonic sum and used the wire stretching method for an analysis of the multipole electric field components.

  14. Polarized muon beams for muon collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skrinsky, A.N. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1996-11-01

    An option for the production of intense and highly polarized muon beams, suitable for a high-luminosity muon collider, is described briefly. It is based on a multi-channel pion-collection system, narrow-band pion-to-muon decay channels, proper muon spin gymnastics, and ionization cooling to combine all of the muon beams into a single bunch of ultimately low emittance. (orig.).

  15. R&D of a high-performance DIRC detector for a future electron-ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Staceu L. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-08-01

    An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is proposed as the next big scientific facility to be built in the United States, costing over $1 billion in design and construction. Each detector concept for the electron/ion beam interaction point is integrated into a large solenoidal magnet. The necessity for excellent hadronic particle identification (pion/kaon/proton) in the barrel region of the solenoid has pushed research and development (R&D) towards a new, high-performance Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) detector design. The passage of a high energy charged particle through a fused silica bar of the DIRC generates optical Cherenkov radiation. A large fraction of this light propagates by total internal reflection to the end of the bar, where the photon trajectories expand in a large volume before reaching a highly segmented photo-detector array. The spatial and temporal distribution of the Cherenkov light at the photo-detector array allows one to reconstruct the angle of emission of the light relative to the incident charged particle track. In order to reach the desired performance of 3sigma pi/K separation at 6 GeV/c particle momentum a new 3-layer spherical lens focusing optic with a lanthanum crown glass central layer was designed to have a nearly at focal plane. In order to validate the EIC DIRC simulation package, a synergistic test beam campaign was carried out in 2015 at the CERN PS with the PANDA Barrel DIRC group using a prototype DIRC detector. Along with the analysis of the CERN test beam data, measurements of the focal plane of the 3-layer lens were performed using a custom-built laser setup at Old Dominion University. Radiation hardness of the lanthanum crown glass was tested using a 160 keV X-ray source and a monochromator at the Catholic University of America. Results of these test-bench experiments and the analysis of the 2015 CERN test beam data are presented here.

  16. R&D of a High-Performance DIRC Detector for a Future Electron-Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stacey Lee

    An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is proposed as the next big scientific facility to be built in the United States, costing over $1 billion in design and construction. Each detector concept for the electron/ion beam interaction point is integrated into a large solenoidal magnet. The necessity for excellent hadronic particle identification (pion/kaon/proton) in the barrel region of the solenoid has pushed research and development (R&D) towards a new, high-performance Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) detector design. The passage of a high energy charged particle through a fused silica bar of the DIRC generates optical Cherenkov radiation. A large fraction of this light propagates by total internal reflection to the end of the bar, where the photon trajectories expand in a large volume before reaching a highly segmented photo-detector array. The spatial and temporal distribution of the Cherenkov light at the photo-detector array allows one to reconstruct the angle of emission of the light relative to the incident charged particle track. In order to reach the desired performance of 3sigma pi/K separation at 6 GeV/c particle momentum a new 3-layer spherical lens focusing optic with a lanthanum crown glass central layer was designed to have a nearly flat focal plane. In order to validate the EIC DIRC simulation package, a synergistic test beam campaign was carried out in 2015 at the CERN PS with the PANDA Barrel DIRC group using a prototype DIRC detector. Along with the analysis of the CERN test beam data, measurements of the focal plane of the 3-layer lens were performed using a custom-built laser setup at Old Dominion University. Radiation hardness of the lanthanum crown glass was tested using a 160 keV X-ray source and a monochromator at the Catholic University of America. Results of these test-bench experiments and the analysis of the 2015 CERN test beam data are presented here.

  17. Polarized electronic sources for future e+/e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.K.; Clendenin, J.E.

    1997-05-01

    Polarized electron beams will play a crucial role in maximizing the physics potential for future e + /e - linear colliders. We will review the SLC polarized electron source (PES), present a design for a conventional PES for the Next Linear Collider (NLC), and discuss the physics issues of a polarized RF gun

  18. Acceleration of polarized protons and deuterons in the ion collider ring of JLEIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratenko, A. M.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Filatov, Yu N.; Derbenev, Ya S.; Lin, F.; Morozov, V. S.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-07-01

    The figure-8-shaped ion collider ring of Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) is transparent to the spin. It allows one to preserve proton and deuteron polarizations using weak stabilizing solenoids when accelerating the beam up to 100 GeV/c. When the stabilizing solenoids are introduced into the collider’s lattice, the particle spins precess about a spin field, which consists of the field induced by the stabilizing solenoids and the zero-integer spin resonance strength. During acceleration of the beam, the induced spin field is maintained constant while the resonance strength experiences significant changes in the regions of “interference peaks”. The beam polarization depends on the field ramp rate of the arc magnets. Its component along the spin field is preserved if acceleration is adiabatic. We present the results of our theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of the spin dynamics during acceleration of protons and deuterons in the JLEIC ion collider ring. We demonstrate high stability of the deuteron polarization in figure-8 accelerators. We analyze a change in the beam polarization when crossing the transition energy.

  19. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  20. EPIC - an electron-polarized ion collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    As discussed earlier in this workshop, we have been studying at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) for some time the potential of a facility-the Light Ion Spin Synchrotron (LISS)- focusing on reactions induced by polarized nucleons at ∼ 1 to 20 GeV. The technology would extrapolate from what we have learned using our existing Cooler ring using internal polarized targets. Indeed, these techniques are most viable at higher energies where the loss of the stored beam is due to the nuclear reactions which are of interest and not that of multiple Coulomb scattering which dominate in our present energy range. However, while the internal targets are not exactly fixed, they certainly do not contribute to the available energy in the center of momentum frame. Consequently, the energy and momentum which can be effective explored are 6 GeV and 3 GeV/c respectively, about the same range that we expect to explore using electromagnetic probes using the enhanced Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory electron beam. Looking at the structure of hadrons, as we currently understand it, one can divide it into four size scales. The LISS facility would permit studies of the manifestation of the nucleon substructure but generally would not get to scales where one would only have incoherent interactions at the partonic level. Following in a path already trodden by our European colleagues, we have recently started to look at the possibility of adding an electronic collider option to our plans. This would significantly increase the kinematic range, with 25 GeV protons and 4 GeV electrons (one gets over 20 GeV in the center of mass-equivalent to about 200 GeV on a fixed proton target). The accessible range provides coverage up to Q 2 = 20 GeV/ c 2 and down to x ∼ 10 -2 (here x = Q 2 /2Mv, the usual Bjorken scaling variable). As the energy of both beams would be variable, one can cover the whole range between HERMES and CERN/FNAL muon beams. Examples of the range of

  1. Numerical calculation of ion polarization in the NICA collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2016-02-01

    The NICA Collider with two solenoid Siberian snakes is “transparent” to the spin. The collider transparent to the spin provides a unique capability to control any polarization direction of protons and deuterons using additional weak solenoids without affecting orbital parameters of the beam. The spin tune induced by the control solenoids must significantly exceed the strength of the zero-integer spin resonance, which contains a coherent part associated with errors in the collider's magnetic structure and an incoherent part associated with the beam emittances. We present calculations of the coherent part of the resonance strength in the NICA collider for proton and deuteron beams.

  2. Numerical calculation of ion polarization in the NICA collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A D; Butenko, A V; Kekelidze, V D; Mikhaylov, V A; Filatov, Yu N; Kondratenko, M A; Kondratenko, A M

    2016-01-01

    The NICA Collider with two solenoid Siberian snakes is “transparent” to the spin. The collider transparent to the spin provides a unique capability to control any polarization direction of protons and deuterons using additional weak solenoids without affecting orbital parameters of the beam. The spin tune induced by the control solenoids must significantly exceed the strength of the zero-integer spin resonance, which contains a coherent part associated with errors in the collider's magnetic structure and an incoherent part associated with the beam emittances. We present calculations of the coherent part of the resonance strength in the NICA collider for proton and deuteron beams. (paper)

  3. Polarized positrons and electrons at the linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke, J.; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Dreiner, H.K.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, J.

    2008-01-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization

  4. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-08-18

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g.

    ).

  5. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-01-01

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. (bar P)), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g. ).

  6. Development of a Bunched Beam Electron Cooler based on ERL and Circulator Ring Technology for the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hannon, Fay E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, Andrew M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Roblin, Yves R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of designing an electron ion collider with unprecedented luminosity at a 45 GeV center-of-mass energy. This luminosity relies on ion cooling in both the booster and the storage ring of the accelerator complex. The cooling in the booster will use a conventional DC cooler similar to the one at COSY. The high-energy storage ring, operating at a momentum of up to 100 GeV/nucleon, requires novel use of bunched-beam cooling. There are two designs for such a cooler. The first uses a conventional Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) with a magnetized beam while the second uses a circulating ring to enhance both peak and average currents experienced by the ion beam. This presentation will describe the design of both the Circulator Cooling Ring (CCR) design and that of the backup option using the stand-alone ERL operated at lower charge but higher repetition rate than the ERL injector required by the CCR-based design.

  7. Development of polarized e+ beams for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Endo, A.

    1995-01-01

    We have so far been carrying out systematic investigations to create polarized e + on the basis of two new methods. One method is to use β + decay of radioactive nuclei with short life-time produced with a proton cyclotron and the other method is to use e + e - pair creation from polarized γ beams made through backward Compton scattering of laser lights. Here we describe technical details on productions of polarized e + and measurements of the polarization. The experiments of producing polarized e + will soon start. Although the e + intensity is not sufficiently high, we will acquire lots of know-how for further development of polarized e + sources with high quality which will possibly be applied to future linear colliders. (author)

  8. Colliding-beams polarized ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trainor, T.A.; Douglas, J.G.; Badt, D.; Christiensen, C.; Herron, A.; Leach, D.; Olsen, J.; Osborne, J.L.; Zeps, V.

    1985-01-01

    This ion source was to be purchased from ANAC, Inc., a New Zealand-based supplier of beam optics hardware and atomic beam polarized ion sources in December 1982. Shortly before scheduled delivery ANAC went into receivership. During 1983 little work was done on the project as various steps were taken by us, first to get the ion source completed at ANAC, and then, failing that, to obtain the existing parts. In early 1984 we began work to finish the ion source in Seattle. The project is nearly complete, and this article presents progress to date. 2 refs

  9. Polarized parton distributions at an electron–ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Richard D. [Tait Institute, University of Edinburgh, JCMB, KB, Mayfield Rd, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Forte, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Guffanti, Alberto [The Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center, The Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Nocera, Emanuele R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ridolfi, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Genova and INFN, Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Rojo, Juan [PH Department, TH Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-20

    We study the potential impact of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering data from a future electron–ion collider (EIC) on longitudinally polarized parton distributions (PDFs). We perform a PDF determination using the NNPDF methodology, based on sets of deep-inelastic EIC pseudodata, for different realistic choices of the electron and proton beam energies. We compare the results to our current polarized PDF set, NNPDFpol1.0, based on a fit to fixed-target inclusive DIS data. We show that the uncertainties on the first moments of the polarized quark singlet and gluon distributions are substantially reduced in comparison to NNPDFpol1.0, but also that more measurements may be needed to ultimately pin down the size of the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin.

  10. Polarized parton distributions at an electron–ion collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Forte, Stefano; Guffanti, Alberto; Nocera, Emanuele R.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We study the potential impact of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering data from a future electron–ion collider (EIC) on longitudinally polarized parton distributions (PDFs). We perform a PDF determination using the NNPDF methodology, based on sets of deep-inelastic EIC pseudodata, for different realistic choices of the electron and proton beam energies. We compare the results to our current polarized PDF set, NNPDFpol1.0, based on a fit to fixed-target inclusive DIS data. We show that the uncertainties on the first moments of the polarized quark singlet and gluon distributions are substantially reduced in comparison to NNPDFpol1.0, but also that more measurements may be needed to ultimately pin down the size of the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin

  11. Polarized positron sources for the future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaikovska, I.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis introduces the polarized positron source as one of the key element of the future Linear Collider (LC). In this context, the different schemes of the polarized positron source are described highlighting the main issues in this technology. In particular, the main focus is on the Compton based positron source adopted by the CLIC as a preferred option for the future positron source upgrade. In this case, the circularly polarized high energy gamma rays resulting from Compton scattering are directed to a production target where an electromagnetic cascade gives rise to the production of positrons by e + -e - pair conversion. To increase the efficiency of the gamma ray production stage, a multiple collision point line integrated in energy recovery linac is proposed. The simulations of the positron production, capture and primary acceleration allow to estimate the positron production efficiency and provide a simple parametrization of the Compton based polarized positron source in the view of the future LC requirements. The storage ring based Compton source option, so-called Compton ring, is also described. The main constraint of this scheme is given by the beam dynamics resulting in the large energy spread and increased bunch length affecting the gamma ray production rate. An original theoretical contribution is shown to calculate the energy spread induced by Compton scattering. Moreover, an experiment to test the gamma ray production by Compton scattering using a state-of-art laser system developed at LAL has been conducted in the framework of the 'Mighty Laser' project at the ATF, KEK. The experimental layout as well as the main results obtained are discussed in details. The studies carried out in this thesis show that the polarized positron source based on Compton scattering is a promising candidate for the future LC polarized positron source. (author)

  12. The Role of polarized positrons and electrons in revealing fundamental interactions at the linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke, J.; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, Tyler McMillan; Dreiner, H.K.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottmann, K.; Fraas, H.; Franco-Sollova, F.; Franke, F.; Freitas, A.; Goodson, J.; Gray, J.; Han, A.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hesselbach, S.; Hirose, T.; Hohenwarter-Sodek, K.; Juste, A.; Kalinowski, J.; Kernreiter, T.; Kittel, O.; Kraml, S.; Langenfeld, U.; Majerotto, W.; Martinez, A.; Martyn, H.U.; Mikhailichenko, A.; Milstene, C.; Menges, W.; Meyners, N.; Monig, K.; Moffeit, K.; Moretti, S.; Nachtmann, O.; Nagel, F.; Nakanishi, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Nowak, H.; Omori, T.; Osland, P.; Pankov, A.A.; Paver, N.; Pitthan, R.; Poschl, R.; Porod, W.; Proulx, J.; Richardson, P.; Riemann, S.; Rindani, S.D.; Rizzo, T.G.; Schalicke, A.; Schuler, P.; Schwanenberger, C.; Scott, D.; Sheppard, J.; Singh, R.K.; Sopczak, A.; Spiesberger, H.; Stahl, A.; Steiner, H.; Wagner, A.; Weber, A.M.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G.W.; Woods, M.; Zerwas, P.; Zhang, J.; Zomer, F.

    2008-01-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  13. The Role of polarized positrons and electrons in revealing fundamental interactions at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  14. Revealing Fundamental Interactions: the Role of Polarized Positrons and Electrons at the Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-06

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  15. Revealing Fundamental Interactions: the Role of Polarized Positrons and Electrons at the Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; CERN, Durham U. IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke, J.; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.

    2005-01-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization

  16. Possibilities of polarized protons in Sp anti p S and other high energy hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The requirements for collisions with polarized protons in hadron colliders above 200 GeV are listed and briefly discussed. Particular attention is given to the use of the ''Siberan snake'' to eliminate depolarizing resonances, which occur when the spin precession frequency equals a frequency contained in the spectrum of the field seen by the beam. The Siberian snake is a device which makes the spin precession frequency essentially constant by using spin rotators, which precess the spin by 180 0 about either the longitudinal or transverse horizontal axis. It is concluded that operation with polarized protons should be possible at all the high energy hadron colliders

  17. Polarization effects in the reaction of charm baryon production on colliding electron-positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekalo, M.P.; Korzh, A.P.; Barannik, V.P.

    1980-01-01

    To calculate energy and angular distributions of various decay products of charm baAyons, which are prodUced in reactions on colliding e + e - beams, it is necessary to know the differential cross sections of the e + e - → C+anti C process which correspond to different polarized states of produced C and anti C (C - charm baryon). These differential cross sections are calculated for a single-photon mechanism with respect to the contribution of the anapole and electric dipole form factors of C-baryon. Polarizations of colliding electron-positron beams are taken into account in a full volume

  18. Electron-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    This discussion concentrates on basic physics aspects of inelastic processes of excitation, ionization, and recombination that occur during electron-ion collisions. Except for cases of illustration along isoelectronic sequences, only multicharged (at least +2) ions will be specifically discussed with some emphasis of unique physics aspects associated with ionic charge. The material presented will be discussed from a primarily experimental viewpoint with most attention to electron-ion interacting beams experiments

  19. Polarized e-e+ physics in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1980-11-01

    Electroweak interactions at high energies are expected to be dominated by spin-dependent forces. Recent advances in the production of polarized electron beams in linear machines provide the opportunity for studying these spin-dependent effects. Polarized e - e + annihilation at the Z 0 pole can provide precise measurements of neutral current parameters and the best experimental challenge to the standard model of electroweak interactions

  20. An L-Band Polarized Electron PWT Photoinjector for the International Linear Collider (ILC)

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, David; Chen Ping; Lundquist, Martin; Luo, Yan; Smirnov, Alexei Yu

    2005-01-01

    A multi-cell, standing-wave, L-band, p-mode, plane-wave-transformer (PWT) photoinjector with an integrated photocathode in a novel linac structure is proposed by DULY Research Inc. as a polarized electron source. The PWT photoinjector is capable of operation in ultra high vacuum and moderate field gradient. Expected performance of an L-band polarized electron PWT injector operating under the parameters for the International Linear Collider is presented. The projected normalized transverse rms emittance is an order of magnitude lower than that produced with a polarized electron dc gun followed by subharmonic bunchers.

  1. Polar Coding for the Large Hadron Collider: Challenges in Code Concatenation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2238544; Podzorny, Tomasz; Uythoven, Jan

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we present a concatenated repetition-polar coding scheme that is aimed at applications requiring highly unbalanced unequal bit-error protection, such as the Beam Interlock System of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Even though this concatenation scheme is simple, it reveals significant challenges that may be encountered when designing a concatenated scheme that uses a polar code as an inner code, such as error correlation and unusual decision log-likelihood ratio distributions. We explain and analyze these challenges and we propose two ways to overcome them.

  2. Investigation of beam self-polarization in the future e^{+}e^{-} circular collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gianfelice-Wendt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of resonant depolarization has been suggested for precise beam energy measurements (better than 100 keV in the e^{+}e^{-} Future Circular Collider (FCC-e^{+}e^{-} for Z and WW physics at 45 and 80 GeV beam energy respectively. Longitudinal beam polarization would benefit the Z peak physics program; however it is not essential and therefore it will be not investigated here. In this paper the possibility of self-polarized leptons is considered. Preliminary results of simulations in presence of quadrupole misalignments and beam position monitors (BPMs errors for a simplified FCC-e^{+}e^{-} ring are presented.

  3. Investigation of beam self-polarization in the future e+e- circular collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.

    2016-10-01

    The use of resonant depolarization has been suggested for precise beam energy measurements (better than 100 keV) in the e+e- Future Circular Collider (FCC-e+e-) for Z and W W physics at 45 and 80 GeV beam energy respectively. Longitudinal beam polarization would benefit the Z peak physics program; however it is not essential and therefore it will be not investigated here. In this paper the possibility of self-polarized leptons is considered. Preliminary results of simulations in presence of quadrupole misalignments and beam position monitors (BPMs) errors for a simplified FCC-e+e- ring are presented.

  4. Bhabha vs. Moeller scattering as a contact-interaction analyzer at a polarized linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Pankov, A A

    2002-01-01

    We discuss electron-electron contact-interaction searches in the processes e sup + e sup -->e sup + e sup - and e sup - e sup -->e sup - e sup - at planned Linear Colliders run in the e sup + e sup - and e sup - e sup - modes with both beams longitudinally polarized. Our analysis is based on the measurement, for the two processes, of polarized differential cross sections, and allows to simultaneously take into account the general set of electron contact interaction couplings as independent, non-zero, parameters thus avoiding the simplifying choice of a model. We evaluate the corresponding model-independent constraints on the contact coupling constants, emphasizing the role of the available beam polarization and the complementarity, as far as the chirality of the constants is concerned, of the two processes in giving the best constraints. We also make a comparison with the potential of e sup + e sup --> mu supmu sup - at the same energy and initial beams polarization.

  5. Bhabha vs. Moeller scattering as a contact-interaction analyzer at a polarized linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, A.; Paver, N.

    2002-10-01

    We discuss electron-electron contact-interaction searches in the processes e + e - →e + e - and e - e - →e - e - at planned Linear Colliders run in the e + e - and e - e - modes with both beams longitudinally polarized. Our analysis is based on the measurement, for the two processes, of polarized differential cross sections, and allows to simultaneously take into account the general set of electron contact interaction couplings as independent, non-zero, parameters thus avoiding the simplifying choice of a model. We evaluate the corresponding model-independent constraints on the contact coupling constants, emphasizing the role of the available beam polarization and the complementarity, as far as the chirality of the constants is concerned, of the two processes in giving the best constraints. We also make a comparison with the potential of e + e - →μ μ- at the same energy and initial beams polarization. (author)

  6. Proposed method to produce a highly polarized e+ beam for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okugi, Toshiyuki; Chiba, Masami; Kurihara, Yoshimasa

    1996-01-01

    We propose a method to produce a spin-polarized e + beam using e + e - pair-creation by circularly polarized photons. Assuming Compton scattering of an unpolarized e - beam and circularly polarized laser light, scattered γ-rays at the high end of the energy spectrum are also circularly polarized. If those γ-rays are utilized to create e ± pairs on a thin target, the spin-polarization is preserved for e + 's at the high end of their energy spectrum. By using the injector linac of Accelerator Test Facility at KEK and a commercially available Nd:YAG pulse laser, we can expect about 10 5 polarized e + 's per second with a degree of polarization of 80% and a kinetic energy of 35-80 MeV. The apparatus for creation and measurement of polarized e + 's is being constructed. We present new idea for possible application of our method to future linear colliders by utilizing a high-power CO 2 laser. (author)

  7. Realization of beam polarization at the linear collider and its application to EW processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Sollova, F.

    2006-07-15

    The use of beam polarization at the future ILC e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will benefit the physics program significantly. This thesis explores three aspects of beam polarization: the application of beam polarization to the study of electroweak processes, the precise measurement of the beam polarization, and finally, the production of polarized positrons at a test beam experiment. In the first part of the thesis the importance of beam polarization at the future ILC is exhibited: the benefits of employing transverse beam polarization (in both beams) for the measurement of triple gauge boson couplings (TGCs) in the W-pair production process are studied. The sensitivity to anomalous TGC values is compared for the cases of transverse and longitudinal beam polarization at a center of mass energy of 500 GeV. Due to the suppressed contribution of the t-channel {nu} exchange, the sensitivity is higher for longitudinal polarization. For some physics analyses the usual polarimetry techniques do not provide the required accuracy for the measurement of the beam polarization (around 0.25% with Compton polarimetry). The second part of the thesis deals with a complementary method to measure the beam polarization employing physics data acquired with two polarization modes. The process of single-W production is chosen due to its high cross section. The expected precision for 500 fb{sup -1} and W{yields}{mu}{nu} decays only, is {delta}P{sub e{sup -}}/P{sub e{sup -}}=0.26% and {delta}P{sub e{sup +}}/P{sub e{sup +}}=0.33%, which can be further improved by employing additional W-decay channels. The first results of an attempt to produce polarized positrons at the E-166 experiment are shown in the last part of the thesis. The E-166 experiment, located at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC's LINAC employs a helical undulator to induce the emission of circularly polarized gamma rays by the beam electrons. These gamma rays are converted into longitudinally polarized electron

  8. Spin physics with polarized electrons at the SLC [Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1990-11-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. A gallium arsenide-based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 40 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positions. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moeller and Compton scattering will be used. Spin physics with longitudinally polarized electrons uses the measurement of the left-right asymmetry to provide tests of the Standard Model. The uncertainty in the measurement is precise enough to be sensitive to the effects of particles which can not be produced directly in the machines we have today. 5 refs

  9. Unique heavy lepton signature at e+e- linear collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Osland, P.; Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V.

    2013-03-01

    We explore the effects of neutrino and electron mixing with exotic heavy leptons in the process e + e - →W + W - within E 6 models. We examine the possibility of uniquely distinguishing and identifying such effects of heavy neutral lepton exchange from Z-Z' mixing within the same class of models and also from analogous ones due to competitor models with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings (AGC) that can lead to very similar experimental signatures at the e + e - International Linear Collider (ILC) for √(s)=350, 500 GeV and 1 TeV. Such clear identification of the model is possible by using a certain double polarization asymmetry. The availability of both beams being polarized plays a crucial role in identifying such exotic-lepton admixture. In addition, the sensitivity of the ILC for probing exotic-lepton admixture is substantially enhanced when the polarization of the produced W ± bosons is considered.

  10. The high peak current polarized electron source of the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.; Alley, R.; Aoyagi, H.; Clendenin, J.; Frisch, J.; Garden, C.; Hoyt, E.; Kirby, R.; Klaisner, L.; Kulikov, A.; Mulhollan, G.; Prescott, C.; Saez, P.; Tang, H.; Turner, J.; Woods, M.; Yeremian, D.; Zolotorev, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider injector requires two 2 ns pulses of 4.5-5.5 x 10 10 electrons, separated by 61 ns at 120 Hz, from its source. Since 1992, these currents have been provided by a polarized electron source based on GaAs photocathodes. A beam polarization of 76±4% has been measured at the end of the 50 GeV linac. At low photocathode quantum efficiencies, and for excitation near threshold, the maximum current delivered by the source is constrained, not by the space charge limit of the gun, but by a ''charge limit'' of the photocathode. The charge limited current is proportional to the photocathode quantum efficiency, but the proportionality varies for different photocathode types. Experience with high polarization strained GaAs photocathodes on a test beamline and on the SLC is presented. (orig.)

  11. Investigation of beam self-polarization in the future e+e− circular collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075800

    2016-10-24

    The use of resonant depolarization has been suggested for precise beam energy measurements (better than 100 keV) in the eþe− Future Circular Collider (FCC-eþe−) for Z and WW physics at 45 and 80 GeV beam energy respectively. Longitudinal beam polarization would benefit the Z peak physics program; however it is not essential and therefore it will be not investigated here. In this paper the possibility of selfpolarized leptons is considered. Preliminary results of simulations in presence of quadrupole misalignments and beam position monitors (BPMs) errors for a simplified FCC-eþe− ring are presented.

  12. Intense γ-ray generation for a polarized positron beam in a linear collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyahara

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available γ-ray generation by Compton backscattering in an optical lens series with periodic focal points is considered to produce a polarized positron beam for a linear collider. The lens series is composed of 20 unit cells with a length of 210 mm. Each lens has a hole to pass an electron beam with an energy of 5.8 GeV and the generated γ rays. It is shown by diffraction analysis that laser beam loss in the series is very small, and the beam size is periodically reduced to 26 μm. Electron beam size is reduced to 34 μm in a superconducting solenoid with a field of 15 T. To get a required γ-ray yield of 7×10^{15} γ/s, only one circularly polarized CO_{2} laser source with a power of 24 kW is needed.

  13. Distinguishing new physics scenarios at a linear collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V.; Paver, N.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous nonstandard dynamics dominated by very high mass exchanges are described at current and future accelerator energies by appropriate contactlike effective interactions among the standard model particles. Correspondingly, they can manifest themselves only through deviations of the cross sections from the standard model predictions. If one such deviation were observed, it would be important to definitely identify, to a given confidence level, the actual source among the various possible nonstandard interactions that, in principle, can explain it. Here we estimate the identification reach on different new physics effective interactions, obtainable from angular distributions of lepton pair production processes at the planned electron-positron International Linear Collider with polarized beams. For each nonstandard model, such an identification reach defines the range in the relevant heavy mass scale parameter where it can be unambiguously distinguished from the other nonstandard models as the source of corrections to the standard model cross sections, in case these are observed. The effective interactions for which we estimate the expected identification reach are the interactions based on gravity in large extra dimensions, in TeV -1 extra dimensions and the compositeness-inspired four-fermion contact interactions. The availability of both beams polarized at the International Linear Collider turns out, in many cases, to dramatically enhance the identification sensitivity

  14. Revealing the large extra dimension effective interaction at an e+e- collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, A. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.; Paver, N.

    2007-01-01

    Several types of new physics scenarios are represented by contactlike effective interactions. An example is the exchange of nonstandard quanta of very large mass scales, beyond the kinematical limit for direct production set by the available collider energy. This kind of interactions can be revealed only through deviations of observables from the standard model predictions. If such deviations were observed, the relevant source should be identified among the possible models that could explain them. Here, we assess the expected 'identification reach' on the ADD model of gravity in large compactified extra dimensions, against the compositeness-inspired four-fermion contact interaction. As basic observables we take the differential cross sections for fermion-pair production at a 0.5-1 TeV electron-positron linear collider with both beams longitudinally polarized. For the four-fermion contact interaction, we assume a general linear combination of the individual models with definite chiralities, with arbitrary coupling constants. In this sense, the estimated identification reach on the ADD model can be considered as 'model independent'. In the analysis, we give estimates also for the expected ''discovery reaches'' on the various scenarios. We emphasize the substantial role of beams polarization in enhancing the sensitivity to the contactlike interactions under consideration

  15. Impact of polarized e- and e+ beams at a future linear collider and a Z-factory. Pt. I. Fundamentals in polarization and electroweak precision physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid

    2010-12-01

    The main goal of new physics searches at a future Linear Collider is the precise determination of the underlying new physics model. The physics potential of the ILC as well as the multi-TeV option collider CLIC have to be optimized with regard to expected results from the LHC. The exploitation of spin effects plays a crucial role in this regard. After a short status report of the Linear Collider design and physics requirements, this article explains fundamentals in polarization and provides an overview of the impact of these spin effects in electroweak precision physics. (orig.)

  16. Spin transport at the international linear collider and its impact on the measurement of polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Moritz

    2013-12-15

    At the planned International Linear Collider (ILC), the longitudinal beam polarization needs to be determined with an unprecedented precision. For that purpose, the beam delivery systems (BDS) are equipped with two laser Compton polarimeters each, which are foreseen to achieve a systematic uncertainty of {<=} 0.25 %. The polarimeters are located 1.6 km upstream and 150 m downstream of the e{sup +}e{sup -} interaction point (IP). The average luminosity-weighted longitudinal polarization P{sup lumi}{sub z}, which is the decisive quantity for the experiments, has to be determined from these measurements with the best possible precision. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the spin transport in the BDS is mandatory to estimate how precise the longitudinal polarization at the IP is known from the polarimeter measurements. The envisaged precision for the propagation of the measurement value is {<=} 0.1 %. This thesis scrutinizes the spin transport in view of the achievable precision. A detailed beamline simulation for the BDS has been developed, including the simulation of the beam-beam collisions at the IP. The following factors which might limit the achievable precision is investigated: a variation of the beam parameters, the beam alignment precision at the polarimeters and the IP, the bunch rotation at the IP, the detector magnets, the beam-beam collisions, the emission of synchrotron radiation and misalignments of the beamline elements. In absence of collisions, a precision of 0.085% on the propagation of the measured longitudinal polarization has been found achievable. This result however depends mainly on the presumed precisions for the parallel alignment of the beam at the polarimeters and for the alignment of polarization vector. In presence of collisions, the measurement at the downstream polarimeter depends strongly on the intensity of the collision and the size of the polarimeter laser spot. Therefore, a more detailed study of the laser-bunch interaction is

  17. Unique heavy lepton signature at e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with polarized beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Osland, P. [Univ. Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics and Technology; Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V. [Technical Univ. Gomel (Belarus). Abdus Salam ICTP Affliated Centre

    2013-03-15

    We explore the effects of neutrino and electron mixing with exotic heavy leptons in the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} within E{sub 6} models. We examine the possibility of uniquely distinguishing and identifying such effects of heavy neutral lepton exchange from Z-Z' mixing within the same class of models and also from analogous ones due to competitor models with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings (AGC) that can lead to very similar experimental signatures at the e{sup +}e{sup -} International Linear Collider (ILC) for {radical}(s)=350, 500 GeV and 1 TeV. Such clear identification of the model is possible by using a certain double polarization asymmetry. The availability of both beams being polarized plays a crucial role in identifying such exotic-lepton admixture. In addition, the sensitivity of the ILC for probing exotic-lepton admixture is substantially enhanced when the polarization of the produced W{sup {+-}} bosons is considered.

  18. Development of polarized beam conversion system for the linear collider complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viilleval'd, G.S.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.A.; Karasyuk, V.N.; Sil'vestrov, G.I.; Chernyakin, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    Results of development of the polarized beam conversion system for the 150 GeV linear collider aiming at the linear collider operation with a high repetition rate (approximately 10 Hz), are presented. It is shown, that the conversion can be realized by means of ondulator radiation. Structurally, the spiral ondulator is two identical solenoids, inserted in each other in such a way, that their winding turns are alternating in the direction along the axis and they are supplied by countercurrents. The main parameters of the ondulator are as follows : winding pitch -0.7 cm, the ondulator length 150 m. For generation a field of the intensity 5 kOe it has been suggested that solenoids should be supplied by sinusoidal pulse current of duration approximately 200 μs. It is shown, that the introduction of iron into solenoid increases the efficiency by a factor of 2.1 and 2.7 in the ondulator with iron only in interloop gaps and with the addition of iron locking magnetic counterflow

  19. Exploring the top-Higgs FCNC couplings at polarized linear colliders with top spin observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melić, Blaženka; Patra, Monalisa [Institut Ruđer Bošković, Theoretical Physics Division,Bijenička 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2017-01-11

    We study the nature of flavor changing neutral couplings of the top quark with the Higgs boson and the up/charm quark in the tt̄ production at linear colliders. There are previous bounds on such tqH couplings at both, linear and hadronic colliders, with the assumption that the top couples equally to the left and the right handed fermions. In this paper we examine chirality of the tqH coupling and construct different observables which will be sensitive to it. The kinematics of the emitted q from t→qH in tt̄ production is discussed and it was found that the polar angle distribution of q is sensitive to the chiral nature of tqH couplings. The observables in the context of top-antitop spin correlations, which are sensitive to new physics in the top decay are considered using different spin-quantization bases. It was found that in particular the off-diagonal basis can be useful to distinguish among the chiral tqH couplings. The sensitivity of the unpolarized ILC in probing the couplings at the 3σ level at √s = 500 GeV and L = 500 fb{sup −1} is also studied, resulting in predicted BR(t→qH)<1.19×10{sup −3}. This limit is further improved to BR(t→qH)<8.84×10{sup −4} with the inclusion of initial beam polarization of left handed electrons and right handed positrons.

  20. Distinguishing new physics scenarios at a linear collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, A.A.; Paver, N.; Tsytrinov, A.V.

    2005-12-01

    Numerous non-standard dynamics are described by contact-like effective interactions that can manifest themselves only through deviations of the cross sections from the Standard Model predictions. If one such deviation were observed, it should be important to definitely identify, to a given confidence level, the actual source among the possible non-standard interactions that in principle can explain it. We here estimate the 'identification' reach on different New Physics effective interactions obtainable from angular distributions of lepton pair production processes at the planned International Linear Collider with polarized beams. The models for which we discuss the range in the relevant high mass scales where they can be 'identified' as sources of corrections from the Standard Model predictions, are the interactions based on gravity in large and in TeV -1 extra dimensions and the compositeness-inspired four-fermion contact interactions. The availability of both beams polarized in many cases plays an essential role in enhancing the identification sensitivity. (author)

  1. Polarization preservation and control in a figure-8 ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Kondratenko, A. M. [GOO Zaryad, Russkaya st., 41, Novosibirsk, 630058; Kondratenko, M. A. [GOO Zaryad, Russkaya st., 41, Novosibirsk, 630058; Filatov, Yuri [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); GOO Zaryad, Russkaya st., 41, Novosibirsk, 630058

    2016-02-01

    We present a complete scheme for managing the polarization of ion beams in Jefferson Lab's proposed Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC). It provides preservation of the ion polarization during all stages of beam acceleration and polarization control in the collider's experimental straights. We discuss characteristic features of the spin motion in accelerators with Siberian snakes and in accelerators of figure-8 shape. We propose 3D spin rotators for polarization control in the MEIC ion collider ring. We provide polarization calculations in the collider with the 3D rotator for deuteron and proton beams. The main polarization control features of the figure-8 design are summarized.

  2. Polarization and spin effects in production and decay of charginos and neutralinos at a muon collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahlen, F. von der

    2006-06-14

    In this thesis we have analyzed the polarization effects of the beams and the charginos and neutralinos produced in {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} annihilation around the center of mass energies of the Higgs boson resonances H and A. we have analyzed the effect of the energy spread and of the error from the non-resonant channels, including an irreducible standard model background contribution. For small tan {beta} the process yields large cross sections of up to a pb. For the production of two different charginos we have shown that the H-A interference can be analyzed using asymmetries of the charge conjugated processes. For the chargino pair production with subsequent two-body decays of both charginos we have defined energy distribution and angular asymmetries in the final particles, in order to analyze the spin-spin correlations of the charginos. For the neutralino pair production in {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} annihilation we study similar processes as for chargino production. Line shape measurements of neutralino pair production allow to precisely determine the ratio of H-neutralino and A-neutralino couplings. For neutralino pair production with subsequent two-body decays of both neutralinos we analyze similar observables as in chargino production. The main difference consists in the intrinsic relative CP quantum number of the neutralino pair, which depends on the chosen scenario. We have thus shown that the interaction of the Higgs bosons to the gaugino-higgsino sector can be probed at a muon collider in chargino and neutralino pair production, both analyzing the production line-shape around the resonances as well as studying the chargino and neutralino polarizations via their decays. (orig.)

  3. Angular distributions as a probe of anomalous ZZH and γZH interactions at a linear collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rindani, Saurabh D.; Sharma, Pankaj

    2009-01-01

    We examine the contribution of general Z*ZH and γ*ZH three-point interactions arising from new physics to the Higgs production process e + e - →HZ. From Lorentz covariance, each of these vertices may be written in terms of three (complex) form factors, whose real and imaginary parts together make six independent couplings. We take into account possible longitudinal or transverse beam polarization likely to be available at a linear collider. We show how partial cross sections and angular asymmetries in suitable combinations with appropriate beam polarizations can be used to disentangle various couplings from one another. A striking result is that using transverse polarization, one of the γZH couplings, not otherwise accessible, can be determined independently of all other couplings. Transverse polarization also helps in the independent determination of a combination of two other couplings, in contrast to a combination of four accessible with unpolarized or longitudinally polarized beams. We also obtain the sensitivity of the various observables in constraining the new-physics interactions at a linear collider operating at a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV with longitudinal or transverse polarization.

  4. CERN: TeV Electron-Positron Linear Collider Studies; More polarization in LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-09-15

    The world's highest energy electronpositron collider - CERN's LEP, with a circumference of 27 kilometres - will also be the last such machine to be built as a storage ring. With interest growing in electronpositron physics at energies beyond those attainable at LEP, the next generation of electron-positron colliders must be linear if prohibitive synchrotron radiation power losses are to be avoided. Very high energy linear colliders present many technical challenges but mastery of SLC at Stanford, the world's first electron-positron linear collider, is encouraging. The physics issues of a linear collider have been examined by the international community in ICFA workshops in Saariselka, Finland (September 1991) and most recently in Hawaii (April 1993). The emerging consensus is for a collider with an initial collision energy around 500 GeV, and which can be upgraded to over 1 TeV. A range of very different collider designs are being studied at Laboratories in Europe, the US, Japan and Russia. Following the report of the 1987 CERN Long Range Planning Committee chaired by Carlo Rubbia, studies for a 2 TeV linear collider have progressed at CERN alongside work towards the Laboratory's initial objective - the LHC high energy proton-proton collider in the LEP tunnel.

  5. CERN: TeV Electron-Positron Linear Collider Studies; More polarization in LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The world's highest energy electronpositron collider - CERN's LEP, with a circumference of 27 kilometres - will also be the last such machine to be built as a storage ring. With interest growing in electronpositron physics at energies beyond those attainable at LEP, the next generation of electron-positron colliders must be linear if prohibitive synchrotron radiation power losses are to be avoided. Very high energy linear colliders present many technical challenges but mastery of SLC at Stanford, the world's first electron-positron linear collider, is encouraging. The physics issues of a linear collider have been examined by the international community in ICFA workshops in Saariselka, Finland (September 1991) and most recently in Hawaii (April 1993). The emerging consensus is for a collider with an initial collision energy around 500 GeV, and which can be upgraded to over 1 TeV. A range of very different collider designs are being studied at Laboratories in Europe, the US, Japan and Russia. Following the report of the 1987 CERN Long Range Planning Committee chaired by Carlo Rubbia, studies for a 2 TeV linear collider have progressed at CERN alongside work towards the Laboratory's initial objective - the LHC high energy proton-proton collider in the LEP tunnel

  6. Relativistic electromagnetic waves in an electron-ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Kennel, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    High power laser beams can drive plasma particles to relativistic energies. An accurate description of strong waves requires the inclusion of ion dynamics in the analysis. The equations governing the propagation of relativistic electromagnetic waves in a cold electron-ion plasma can be reduced to two equations expressing conservation of energy-momentum of the system. The two conservation constants are functions of the plasma stream velocity, the wave velocity, the wave amplitude, and the electron-ion mass ratio. The dynamic parameter, expressing electron-ion momentum conversation in the laboratory frame, can be regarded as an adjustable quantity, a suitable choice of which will yield self-consistent solutions when other plasma parameters were specified. Circularly polarized electromagnetic waves and electrostatic plasma waves are used as illustrations.

  7. Spectroscopy of heavy few-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokler, P.H.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper we ask first, why is it interesting to investigate heavy-few electron ions. Then the various accelerator-based methods to produce heavy few-electron ions are discussed. In the main part an overview on available heavy few-electron ion data and current experiments is given. The summary will end up with future aspects in this field. (orig.)

  8. Impact of polarized e- and e+ beams at a future Linear Collider and a Z-factory Part II - Physics beyond the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moortgat-Pick, G

    2011-01-01

    Polarization of both beams at a future Linear Collider would be ideal for facing both expected and unforeseen challenges in searches for new physics: fixing the chirality of the couplings and enabling the higher precision for the polarization measurement itself as well as for polarization-dependent observables, it provides a powerful tool for studying new physics at the future Linear Collider, such as discovering new particles, analyzing signals model-independently and resolving precisely the underlying model. Techniques and engineering designs for a polarized-positron source are well advanced. Potential constraints concerning luminosity, commissioning and operating issues appear to be under control. This article mainly treats with the impact of polarized beams on physics beyond the Standard Model, whereas the fundamentals in polarization as well as the gain in electroweak precision physics are summarized in the corresponding part I.

  9. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Beam-Beam Effects in the Proposed Electron-Ion Colider at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzic, Balsa; Zhang, Yuhong

    2010-01-01

    One key limiting factor to a collider luminosity is beam-beam interactions which usually can cause serious emittance growth of colliding beams and fast reduction of luminosity. Such nonlinear collective beam effect can be a very serious design challenge when the machine parameters are pushed into a new regime. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect for a medium energy ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF.

  11. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  12. Ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  13. Colliding and merging galaxies. II. S0 galaxies with polar rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweizer, F.; Whitmore, B.D.; Rubin, V.C.

    1983-01-01

    We first present a detailed optical study of A0136-0801, a 16 1/2 -mag ''spindle'' galaxy girdled by a ring of gas, dust, and young stars. The spindle is a normal S0 disk seen nearly edge-on, as shown by its photometric profile and fast rotation (v/sub rot//sigma/sub v/ = 2.2); a prolate structure seems to be ruled out. The surrounding ring runs over the poles of this S0 disk and serves as a probe of the vertical potential. The ring motions suggest that a massive halo extends far beyond the S0 disk (out to 3R 25 ) and that this halo is more nearly spherical than flat. We then list 22 related galaxies and derive that a few percent of all field S0's possess near-polar rings or disks. We suggest that these structures are due to a second event, most likely the transfer of mass from a companion galaxy during a close encounter and occasionally also the merger of a companion. Although accretion occurs presumably at random angles, polar rings are favored statistically because of their slow differential precession and consequent longevity. Alternate evolutionary schemes are also discussed. Finally, we suggest that M82 may be forming a polar ring from former M81 material, and predict that the ''tilted bulge'' of UGC 7576 is an S0 disk seen nearly edge-on

  14. Inclusive spin-momentum analysis and new physics at a polarized electron-positron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananthanarayan, B. [Indian Institute of Science, Centre for High Energy Physics, Bangalore (India); Rindani, Saurabh D. [Physical Research Laboratory, Theoretical Physics Division, Ahmedabad (India)

    2018-02-15

    We consider the momentum distribution and the polarization of an inclusive heavy fermion in a process assumed to arise from standard-model (SM) s-channel exchange of a virtual γ or Z with a further contribution from physics beyond the standard model involving s-channel exchanges. The interference of the new-physics amplitude with the SM γ or Z exchange amplitude is expressed entirely in terms of the space-time signature of such new physics. Transverse as well as longitudinal polarizations of the electron and positron beams are taken into account. Similarly, we consider the cases of the polarization of the observed final-state fermion along longitudinal and two transverse spin-quantization axes, which are required for a full reconstruction of the spin dependence of the process. We show how these model-independent distributions can be used to deduce some general properties of the nature of the interaction and some of their properties in prior work which made use of spin-momentum correlations. (orig.)

  15. Polarization effects in W+- and Z0-bosons production with γe-colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval'chuk, V.A.; Stoletnij, I.V.

    1984-01-01

    The helicity amplitudes and differential cross sections of the processes γe → Ze and γe → Wνsub(e) are obtained as well as the density matrix for the vector boson produced, the anomalous magnetic moment of the W boson being arbitrary. It is shown that if √S approximately 100 - 140 GeV, the Z boson yield exceeds that of W bosons even at a small angle between the photon and the produced vector boson momenta. The right-handed polarized photons are found to provide larger cross sections for the above processes as compared with the left-handed ones, but the latter are more suitable for measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of the W boson

  16. B meson physics with polarized electron beams at linear colliders running at the Z0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, W.B.

    1988-12-01

    The expected large cross section for e + e - → Z 0 and subsequent decay to b/bar b/ quarks makes the Z 0 an attractive placeto pursue B meson physics. The cross section for b-quark production at the Z 0 is compared to resonance production at the Υ/sub 4s/ and Υ/sub 5s/. In addition the big electroweak asymmetries, thought to exist in Z 0 decays to b/bar b/ quarks with polarized electron beams, provide an outstanding handle for observation of such effects as B 0 - /bar B/ 0 mixing. In this paper, the feasibility of such measurements is investigated and, with relatively small samples of Z 0 's (a few hundred thousand), both B/sub d/ and B/sub s/ meson mixing are shown to be measurable. The subject of CP violation in neutral B mesons is discussed last, but presently such measurements seem to be out of reach. 7 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Probing Anomalous WW γ and WWZ Couplings with Polarized Electron Beam at the LHeC and FCC-Ep Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Turk Cakir, I; Tasci, A T; Cakir, O

    2016-01-01

    We study the anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings by calculating total cross sections of two processes at the LHeC with electron beam energy Ee=140 GeV and the proton beam energy Ep=7 TeV, and at the FCC-ep collider with the polarized electron beam energy Ee=80 GeV and the proton beam energy Ep=50 TeV. At the LHeC with electron beam polarization, we obtain the results for the difference of upper and lower bounds as (0.975, 0.118) and (0.285, 0.009) for the anomalous (∆κγ, λγ) and (∆κz, λz) couplings, respectively. As for FCC-ep collider, these bounds are obtained as (1.101, 0.065) and (0.320, 0.002) at an integrated luminosity of Lint=100 fb-1.

  18. Measurement of the positron polarization at an helical undulator based positron source for the international linear collider ILC. The E-166 experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Laihem

    2008-06-05

    A helical undulator based polarized positron source is forseen at a future International Linear Collider (ILC). The E-166 experiment has tested this scheme using a one meter long, short-period, pulsed helical undulator installed in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. A low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam passing through this undulator generated circularly polarized photons with energies up to about 8 MeV. The generated photons of several MeV with circular polarization are then converted in a relatively thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at 5 different energies of the positrons. In addition electron polarization has been determined for one energy point. For a comparison of the measured asymmetries with the expectations detailed simulations were necessary. This required upgrading GEANT4 to include the dominant polarization dependent interactions of electrons, positrons and photons in matter. The measured polarization of the positrons agrees with the expectations and is for the energy point with the highest polarization at 6MeV about 80%. (orig.)

  19. Opportunities for Polarized He-3 in RHIC and EIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer E.; Deshpande, A.; Fischer, W.; Derbenev, S.; Milner, R.; Roser, T.; Zelenski, A.

    2011-10-01

    The workshop on opportunities for polarized He-3 in RHIC and EIC was targeted at finding practical ways of implementing and using polarized He-3 beams. Polarized He-3 beams will provide the unique opportunity for first measurements, i.e, to a full quark flavor separation measuring single spin asymmetries for p{sup +}, p{sup -} and p{sup 0} in hadron-hadron collisions. In electron ion collisions the combination of data recorded with polarized electron proton/He-3 beams allows to determine the quark flavor separated helicity and transverse momentum distributions. The workshop had sessions on polarized He-3 sources, the physics of colliding polarized He-3 beams, polarimetry, and beam acceleration in the AGS Booster, AGS, RHIC, and ELIC. The material presented at the workshop will allow making plans for the implementation of polarized He-3 beams in RHIC.

  20. Indirect processes in electron-ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, C.; Griffin, D.C.; Pindzola, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1983-10-01

    A summary is given of an informal workshop held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on June 22-23, 1983, in which the current status of theoretical calculations of indirect processes in electron-ion scattering was reviewed. Processes of particular interest in astrophysical and fusion plasmas were emphasized. Topics discussed include atomic structure effects, electron-impact ionization, and dielectronic recombination

  1. Indirect processes in electron-ion scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottcher, C.; Griffin, D.C.; Pindzola, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1983-10-01

    A summary is given of an informal workshop held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on June 22-23, 1983, in which the current status of theoretical calculations of indirect processes in electron-ion scattering was reviewed. Processes of particular interest in astrophysical and fusion plasmas were emphasized. Topics discussed include atomic structure effects, electron-impact ionization, and dielectronic recombination.

  2. The structural design and the electron optics of a hybrid electron-ion gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bas, E.B.; Gisler, E.; Stucki, F.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a new kind of a particle gun called the hybrid gun. It is able to deliver a finely focused electron or ion beam simply by reversing the polarity of the acceleration voltage. The detailed design features of the gun are given and the electron-ion optical properties are discussed. (author)

  3. Separation of electron ion ring components (computational simulation and experimental results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, V.S.; Dolbilov, G.V.; Kazarinov, N.Yu.; Mironov, V.I.; Novikov, V.G.; Perel'shtejn, Eh.A.; Sarantsev, V.P.; Shevtsov, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    The problems of the available polarization value of electron-ion rings in the regime of acceleration and separation of its components at the final stage of acceleration are studied. The results of computational simulation by use of the macroparticle method and experiments on the ring acceleration and separation are given. The comparison of calculation results with experiment is presented

  4. Comment on "Polarized window for left-right symmetry and a right-handed neutrino at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2016-06-01

    Reference [1 S. Mondal and S. K. Rai, Phys. Rev. D 93, 011702 (2016).] recently argued that the projected Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) presents a unique opportunity to discover a left-right symmetry since the LHeC has availability for polarized electrons. In particular, the authors apply some basic pT cuts on the jets and claim that the on-shell production of right-handed neutrinos at the LHeC, which violates lepton number in two units, has practically no standard model background and, therefore, that the right-handed nature of WR interactions that are intrinsic to left-right symmetric models can be confirmed by using colliding beams consisting of an 80% polarized electron and a 7 TeV proton. In this Comment, we show that their findings, as presented, have vastly underestimated the SM background which prevents a Left-Right symmetry signal from being seen at the LHeC.

  5. Electron-ion-x-ray spectrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.H.; Deslattes, R.D.; MacDonald, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a spectrometer system developed for electron, ion, and x-ray spectroscopy of gas-phase atoms and molecules following inner-shell excitation by tunable synchrotron radiation. The spectrometer has been used on beamline X-24A at the National Synchrotron Light Source for excitation-dependent studies of Ar L-shell and K-shell photoexcitation and vacancy decay processes. The instrumentation and experimental methods are discussed, and examples are given of electron spectra and coincidence spectra between electrons and fluorescent x-rays

  6. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  7. Colliding nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, Roger; Remaud, Bernard; Suraud, E.; Durand, Dominique; Tamain, Bernard; Gobbi, A.; Cugnon, J.; Drapier, Olivier; Govaerts, Jan; Prieels, Rene

    1995-09-01

    This 14. international school Joliot-Curie of nuclear physic deals with nuclei in collision at high energy. Nine lectures are included in the proceedings of this summer school: 1 - From statistical mechanics outside equilibrium to transport equations (Balian, R.); 2 - Modeling of heavy ions reactions (Remaud, B.); 3 - Kinetic equations in heavy ions physics (Suraud, E.); 4 - Colliding nuclei near the Fermi energy (Durand, D.; Tamain, B.); 5 - From the Fermi to the relativistic energy domain: which observable? For which physics? (Gobbi, A.); 6 - Collisions at relativistic and ultra relativistic energies, Theoretical aspects (Cugnon, J.); 7 - Quark-gluon plasma: experimental signatures (Drapier, O.); 8 - Electroweak interaction: a window on physics beyond the standard model (Govaerts, J.); 9 - Symmetry tests in β nuclear process: polarization techniques (Prieels, R.)

  8. Electron - ion recombination processes - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Yukap

    1997-01-01

    Extensive theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out for the past 20 years on electron - ion recombination processes, as they are applied to the analysis of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. We review the basic understanding gained through these efforts, with emphasis on some of the more recent progress made in recombination theory as the recombining system is affected by time-dependent electric fields and plasma particles at low temperature. Together with collisional ionization and excitation processes, recombination is important in determining ionization balance and excited-state population in non-equilibrium plasmas. The radiation emitted by plasmas is usually the principal medium with which to study the plasma condition, as it is produced mainly during the recombination and decay of excited states of ions inside the plasma. This is especially true when the plasma under study is not readily accessible by direct probes, as in astrophysical plasmas. Moreover, external probes may sometimes cause undesirable disturbances of the plasma. Electron-ion recombination proceeds in several different modes. The direct modes include three-body recombination (TBR) and one-step radiative recombination (RR), all to the ground- and singly-excited states of the target ions. By contrast, the indirect resonant mode is a two-step dielectronic recombination (DR), which proceeds first with the formation of doubly-excited states by radiationless excitation/capture. The resonant states thus formed may relax by autoionization and/or radiative cascades. For more exotic modes of recombination, we consider off-shell dielectronic recombination (radiative DR = RDR), in which an electron capture is accompanied by simultaneous radiative emission and excitation of the target ion. Some discussion on attachment of electrons to neutral atoms, resulting in the formation of negative ions, is also given. When resonance states involve one or more electrons in high Rydberg states

  9. Progress on a cryogenically cooled RF gun polarized electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliller, R.P., III; Edwards, H.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    RF guns have proven useful in multiple accelerator applications. An RF gun capable of producing polarized electrons is an attractive electron source for the ILC or an electron-ion collider. Producing such a gun has proven elusive. The NEA GaAs photocathode needed for polarized electron production is damaged by the vacuum environment in an RF gun. Electron and ion back bombardment can also damage the cathode. These problems must be mitigated before producing an RF gun polarized electron source. In this paper we report continuing efforts to improve the vacuum environment in a normal conducting RF gun by cooling it with liquid nitrogen after a high temperature vacuum bake out. We also report on a design of a cathode preparation chamber to produce bulk GaAs photocathodes for testing in such a gun. Future directions are also discussed.

  10. The Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emma, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is the first and only high-energy e + e - linear collider in the world. Its most remarkable features are high intensity, submicron sized, polarized (e - ) beams at a single interaction point. The main challenges posed by these unique characteristics include machine-wide emittance preservation, consistent high intensity operation, polarized electron production and transport, and the achievement of a high degree of beam stability on all time scales. In addition to serving as an important machine for the study of Z 0 boson production and decay using polarized beams, the SLC is also an indispensable source of hands-on experience for future linear colliders. Each new year of operation has been highlighted with a marked improvement in performance. The most significant improvements for the 1994-95 run include new low impedance vacuum chambers for the damping rings, an upgrade to the optics and diagnostics of the final focus systems, and a higher degree of polarization from the electron source. As a result, the average luminosity has nearly doubled over the previous year with peaks approaching 10 30 cm -2 s -1 and an 80% electron polarization at the interaction point. These developments as well as the remaining identifiable performance limitations will be discussed

  11. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity micro + micro - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed

  12. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, David

    1995-01-01

    The increasing interest in the possibility of positive-negative muon colliders was reflected in the second workshop on the Physics Potential and Development of Muon Colliders, held in Sausalito, California, from 16-19 November, with some 60 attendees. It began with an overview of the particle physics goals, detector constraints, the muon collider and mu cooling, and source issues. The major issue confronting muon development is the possible luminosity achievable. Two collider energies were considered: 200 + 200 GeV and 2 + 2 TeV. The major particle physics goals are the detection of the higgs boson(s) for the lower energy collider, together with WW scattering and supersymmetric particle discovery. At the first such workshop, held in Napa, California, in 1992, it was estimated that a luminosity of some 10 30 and 3 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 for the low and high energy collider might be achieved (papers from this meeting were published in the October issue of NIM). This was considered a somewhat conservative estimate at the time. At the Sausalito workshop the goal was to see if a luminosity of 10 32 to 10 34 for the two colliders might be achievable and usable by a detector. There were five working groups - physics, 200 + 200 GeV collider, 2 + 2 TeV collider, detector design and backgrounds, and muon cooling and production methods. Considerable progress was made in all these areas at the workshop.

  13. Future directions in electron--ion collision physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, K.J.; Griffin, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Summary of session on synergistic co-ordination of theory and experiment; synergism between experiment and theory in atomic physics; comparison of theory and experiment for electron-ion excitation and ionization; summary of session on new theoretical and computational methods; new theoretical and computational methods-r-matrix calculations; the coulomb three-body problem: a progress report; summary of session on needs and applications for electron-ion collisional data; electron-ion collisions in the plasma edge; needs and applications of theoretical data for electron impact excitation; summary of session on relativistic effects, indirect effects, resonance, etc; direct and resonant processes in electron-ion collisions; relativistic calculations of electron impact ionization and dielectronic recombination cross section for highly charged ions; electron-ion recombination in the close-coupling approximation; modified resonance amplitudes with strongly correlated channels; a density-matrix approach to the broadening of spectral lines by autoionization, radiative transitions and electron-ion collisions; towards a time-dependent description of electron-atom/ion collisions two electron systems; and comments on inclusion of the generalized bright interaction in electron impact excitation of highly charged ions

  14. Weakly nonlinear electromagnetic waves in an electron-ion positron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzato, F.B.; Schneider, R.S.; Dillenburg, D.

    1987-01-01

    The modulation of a high-frequency electromagnetic wave which is circulary polarized and propagates in a plasma made up of electrons, ions and positrons is investigated. The coefficient of the cubic nonlinear term in the Schroedinger equation may change sign as the relative particle concentrations vary, and consequently a marginal state of modulation instability may exist. To described the system in the neighbourhood of this state an appropriate equation is derived. Particular stationary solutions of this equation are envelope solitary waves, envelope Kinks and envelope hole solitary waves. The dependence of the amplitude of the solutions on the propagation velocity and the particle concentrations is discussed. (author) [pt

  15. Photon-photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R ampersand D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy

  16. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phinney, N.

    1992-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has begun a new era of operation with the SLD detector. During 1991 there was a first engineering run for the SLD in parallel with machine improvements to increase luminosity and reliability. For the 1992 run, a polarized electron source was added and more than 10,000 Zs with an average of 23% polarization have been logged by the SLD. This paper discusses the performance of the SLC in 1991 and 1992 and the technical advances that have produced higher luminosity. Emphasis will be placed on issues relevant to future linear colliders such as producing and maintaining high current, low emittance beams and focusing the beams to the micron scale for collisions. (Author) tab., 2 figs., 18 refs

  17. ''Atomic'' Bremsstrahlung or polarizational radiation in collision of many-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Solov'yov, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    In this work the so-called ''Atomic'' bremsstrahlung (AB) or polarizational radiation, created in collisions of atoms or ions, is discussed. This kind of radiation arises due to the polarization of the electron shell of colliding particles. It is created by the structured projectiles and targets if the constituents are electrically charged. 6 refs, 2 figs

  18. Colliding druthers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Johnson, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    Recommendations are made to maximize the usefulness of the colliding beam facility of the Main Ring and Energy Doubler at the Fermilab accelerator. The advantages of the transposed crossing geometry over the kissing geometry are pointed out

  19. Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Zeppenfeld, D.

    1999-01-01

    These lectures are intended as a pedagogical introduction to physics at $e^+e^-$ and hadron colliders. A selection of processes is used to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of the different machines. The discussion includes $W$ pair production and chargino searches at $e^+e^-$ colliders, Drell-Yan events and the top quark search at the Tevatron, and Higgs searches at the LHC.

  20. Electron-ion recombination rates for merged-beams experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Energy dependence of the electron-ion recombination rates are studied for different recombination processes (radiative recombination, three-body recombination, dissociative recombination) for Maxwellian relative velocity distribution of arbitrary asymmetry. The results are discussed in context of the electron-ion merged beams experiments in cooling ion storage rings. The question of indication of a possible contribution of the three-body recombination to the measured recombination rates versus relative energy is particularly addressed. Its influence on the electron beam temperature derived from the energy dependence of recombination rate is discussed

  1. Constant-gap spectrometer design for the electron/ion collider ELISe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, T.; Harakeh, M.N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Wörtche, H.J.; Berg, G.P.A.; Simon, H.; Koop, I.A.; Couder, M.; Fujiwara, M.

    2011-01-01

    For the study of electron-scattering off radioactive nuclei, the ELISe spectrometer will be constructed as a part of the Facility of Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. A conceptional design of a spectrometer with a “clam-shell” gap was presented before. Here, we will present an improved design with a pre-deflector with a constant gap. Such a pre-deflector is not only simpler to construct but also provides larger angle acceptances in the forward-angle range compared to those with the “clam-shell” design.

  2. Modular focusing ring imaging Cherenkov detector for electron-ion collider experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C. P.; Alfred, M.; Allison, L.; Awadi, M.; Azmoun, B.; Barbosa, F.; Barion, L.; Bennett, J.; Brooks, W.; Butler, C.; Cao, T.; Chiu, M.; Cisbani, E.; Contalbrigo, M.; Datta, A.; Del Dotto, A.; Demarteau, M.; Durham, J. M.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Elder, T.; Fields, D.; Furletova, Y.; Gleason, C.; Grosse-Perdekamp, M.; Harris, J.; Haseler, T. O. S.; He, X.; van Hecke, H.; Horn, T.; Hruschka, A.; Huang, J.; Hyde, C.; Ilieva, Y.; Kalicy, G.; Kimball, M.; Kistenev, E.; Kulinich, Y.; Liu, M.; Majka, R.; McKisson, J.; Mendez, R.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Peters, K.; Rao, T.; Pisani, R.; Qiang, Y.; Rescia, S.; Rossi, P.; Sarajlic, O.; Sarsour, M.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; da Silva, C. L.; Smirnov, N.; Stien, H. D.; Stevens, J.; Sukhanov, A.; Syed, S.; Tate, A. C.; Toh, J.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R. S.; Tsang, T.; Turisini, M.; Wagner, R.; Wang, J.; Woody, C.; Xi, W.; Xie, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zihlmann, B.; Zorn, C.

    2017-11-01

    A powerful new electron-ioncollider (EIC) has been recommended in the 2015 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Science for probing the partonic structure inside nucleons and nuclei with unprecedented precision and versatility [1]. EIC detectors are currently under development [2], all of which require hadron identification over a broad kinematic range. A prototype ring imaging Cherenkov detector has been developed for hadron identification in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 10 GeV/c. The key feature of this new detector is a compact and modular design, achieved by using aerogel as radiator and a Fresnel lens for ring focusing. In this paper, the results from a beam test of a prototype device at Fermilab are reported.

  3. Structure of liquid alkali metals as electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, D.K.; Senatore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1980-08-01

    The static structure factor of liquid alkali metals near freezing, and its dependence on temperature and pressure, are evaluated in an electron-ion plasma model from an accurate theoretical determination of the structure factor of the one-component classical plasma and electron-screening theory. Very good agreement is obtained with the available experimental data. (author)

  4. Structure and electron-ion correlation in liquid Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, Shuta [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yokota, Yukinobu [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kawakita, Yukinobu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takeda, Shin' ichi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: takeda@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2006-11-15

    For liquid Mg at 700 deg. C, structure factors were obtained from both neutron and X-ray diffraction measurements. The bond angle and coordination number distributions were derived from the reverse Monte Carlo analysis. By a combination of both structure factors, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor were deduced.

  5. Spectroscopic and electron-ion collision data for plasma impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faenov, A.; Marchand, R.; Tawara, H.; Vainshtein, L.; Wiese, W.

    1992-01-01

    This Working Group Report briefly reviews and summarizes the available spectroscopic and electron-ion collision data for plasma impurities. Included are lithium, neon, and argon, which, although they are not plasma impurities per se, are introduced into the plasma through the application of diagnostic techniques. 32 refs, 2 tabs

  6. Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, J.

    2001-01-01

    After several years of study e''+ e''- linear colliders in the TeV range have emerged as the major and optimal high-energy physics projects for the post-LHC era. These notes summarize the present status form the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC era. These notes summarize the present status, from the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC is expected to provide first discoveries in the new energy domain, whereas an e''+ e''- linear collider in the 500 GeV-1 TeV will be able to complement it to an unprecedented level of precision in any possible areas: Higgs, signals beyond the SM and electroweak measurements. It is evident that the Linear Collider program will constitute a major step in the understanding of the nature of the new physics beyond the Standard Model. (Author) 22 refs

  7. Collider workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of initial results after the start of operations at CERN's SPS proton-antiproton collider and the prospects for high energy hadron collisions at Fermilab (Tevatron) and Brookhaven (ISABELLE) provided a timely impetus for the recent Topical Workshop on Forward Collider Physics', held at Madison, Wisconsin, from 10-12 December. It became the second such workshop to be held, the first having been in 1979 at the College de France, Paris. The 100 or so participants had the chance to hear preliminary results from the UA1, UA4 and UA5 experiments at the CERN SPS collider, together with other new data, including that from proton-antiproton runs at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

  8. Asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Colestock, P.; Goderre, G.; Johnson, D.; Martin, P.; Holt, J.; Kaplan, D.

    1993-01-01

    The study of CP violation in beauty decay is one of the key challenges facing high energy physics. Much work has not yielded a definitive answer how this study might best be performed. However, one clear conclusion is that new accelerator facilities are needed. Proposals include experiments at asymmetric electron-positron colliders and in fixed-target and collider modes at LHC and SSC. Fixed-target and collider experiments at existing accelerators, while they might succeed in a first observation of the effect, will not be adequate to study it thoroughly. Giomataris has emphasized the potential of a new approach to the study of beauty CP violation: the asymmetric proton collider. Such a collider might be realized by the construction of a small storage ring intersecting an existing or soon-to-exist large synchrotron, or by arranging collisions between a large synchrotron and its injector. An experiment at such a collider can combine the advantages of fixed-target-like spectrometer geometry, facilitating triggering, particle identification and the instrumentation of a large acceptance, while the increased √s can provide a factor > 100 increase in beauty-production cross section compared to Tevatron or HERA fixed-target. Beams crossing at a non-zero angle can provide a small interaction region, permitting a first-level decay-vertex trigger to be implemented. To achieve large √s with a large Lorentz boost and high luminosity, the most favorable venue is the high-energy booster (HEB) at the SSC Laboratory, though the CERN SPS and Fermilab Tevatron are also worth considering

  9. Future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    The high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, pp), of lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders are considered. Technical arguments for increased energy in each type of machine are presented. Their relative size, and the implications of size on cost are discussed

  10. Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  11. Wavelength dependent photoelectron circular dichroism of limonene studied by femtosecond multiphoton laser ionization and electron-ion coincidence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee Fanood, Mohammad M.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Powis, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Enantiomers of the monoterpene limonene have been investigated by (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron circular dichroism employing tuneable, circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses. Electron imaging detection provides 3D momentum measurement while electron-ion coincidence detection can be used to mass-tag individual electrons. Additional filtering, by accepting only parent ion tagged electrons, can be then used to provide discrimination against higher energy dissociative ionization mechanisms where more than three photons are absorbed to better delineate the two photon resonant, one photon ionization pathway. The promotion of different vibrational levels and, tentatively, different electronic ion core configurations in the intermediate Rydberg states can be achieved with different laser excitation wavelengths (420 nm, 412 nm, and 392 nm), in turn producing different state distributions in the resulting cations. Strong chiral asymmetries in the lab frame photoelectron angular distributions are quantified, and a comparison made with a single photon (synchrotron radiation) measurement at an equivalent photon energy.

  12. Colliding muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Is a muon-muon collider really practical? That is the question being asked by Bob Palmer. Well known in particle physics, Palmer, with Nick Samios and Ralph Shutt, recently won the American Physical Society's Panofsky Prize for their 1964 discovery of the omega minus. As well as contributing to other major experiments, both at CERN and in the US, he has contributed ideas to stochastic cooling and novel acceleration schemes

  13. Using polarized positrons to probe physics beyond the standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furletova, Yulia; Mantry, Sonny

    2018-05-01

    A high intensity polarized positron beam, as part of the JLAB 12 GeV program and the proposed electron-ion collider (EIC), can provide a unique opportunity for testing the Standard Model (SM) and probing for new physics. The combination of high luminosity with polarized electrons and positrons incident on protons and deuterons can isolate important effects and distinguish between possible new physics scenarios in a manner that will complement current experimental efforts. A comparison of cross sections between polarized electron and positron beams will allow for an extraction of the poorly known weak neutral current coupling combination 2C3u - C3d and would complement the proposed plan for a precision extraction of the combination 2C2u - Cd at the EIC. Precision measurements of these neutral weak couplings would constrain new physics scenarios including Leptoquarks, R-parity violating supersymmetry, and electron and quark compositeness. The dependence of the charged current cross section on the longitudinal polarization of the positron beam will provide an independent probe to test the chiral structure of the electroweak interactions. A polarized positron can probe charged lepton flavor violation (CLFV) through a search for e+ → τ+ transitions in a manner that is independent and complementary to the proposed e- → τ- search at the EIC. A positron beam incident on an electron in a stationary nuclear target will also allow for a dark-photon (A') search via the annihilation process e+ + e- → A' + γ.

  14. Luminosity geometric reduction factor from colliding bunches with different lengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-09-29

    In the interaction point of the future electron-Ion collider eRHIC, the electron beam bunches are at least one order of magnitude shorter than the proton beam bunches. With the introduction of a crossing angle, the actual number of collisions resulting from the bunch collision gets reduced. Here we derive the expression for the luminosity geometric reduction factor when the bunches of the two incoming beams are not equal.

  15. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, Vasiliy; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Harwood, Leigh; Hutton, Andrew; Lin, Fanglei; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Yunhai; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H.; Wienands, Uli; Gerity, James; Mann, Thomas; McIntyre, Peter; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-09-01

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated super-conducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  16. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, V. S.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Lin, F.; Pilat, F.; Zhang, Y.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, M.; Wang, M-H; Wienands, U.; Gerity, J.; Mann, T.; McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N. J.; Satttarov, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated superconducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  17. Structure and electron-ion correlation of liquid germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: kawakita@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Mikazuki-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohshima, K. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Yokota, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)

    2005-08-15

    Structure factor of liquid germanium (Ge) has a shoulder at {theta} = 3.2 A{sup -1} in the high-momentum-transfer region of the first peak. To investigate the origin of such a non-simplicity in the structure, high energy X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed using 113.26 keV incident X-ray, at BL04B2 beamline of SPring-8. By a combination of the obtained structure factor with the reported neutron diffraction data, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor have been deduced. The peak position of the charge distribution is located at about 1 A, rather smaller r value than the half value of nearest neighbor distance ({approx}2.7 A), which suggests that valence electrons of liquid Ge play a role of screening electrons around a metallic ion rather than covalently bonding electrons.

  18. New method of ionization energy calculation for two-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, D.K.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for calculation of the ionization energy of two-electron ions is proposed. The method is based on the calculation of the energy of second electron interaction with the field of an one-electron ion the potential of which is well known

  19. A Spin-Light Polarimeter for Multi-GeV Longitudinally Polarized Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal [Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS (United States); Dutta, Dipangkar [Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS (United States) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The physics program at the upgraded Jefferson Lab (JLab) and the physics program envisioned for the proposed electron-ion collider (EIC) include large efforts to search for interactions beyond the Standard Model (SM) using parity violation in electroweak interactions. These experiments require precision electron polarimetry with an uncertainty of < 0.5 %. The spin dependent Synchrotron radiation, called "spin-light," can be used to monitor the electron beam polarization. In this article we develop a conceptual design for a "spin-light" polarimeter that can be used at a high intensity, multi-GeV electron accelerator. We have also built a Geant4 based simulation for a prototype device and report some of the results from these simulations.

  20. Device for monitoring electron-ion ring parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyutyunnikov, S.I.; Shalyapin, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    The invention is classified as the method of collective ion acceleration. The device for electron-ion ring parameters monitoring is described. The invention is aimed at increasing functional possibilities of the device at the expense of the enchance in the number of the ring controlled parameters. The device comprises three similar plane mirrors installed over accelerating tube circumference and a mirror manufactured in the form of prism and located in the tube centre, as well as the system of synchrotron radiation recording and processing. Two plane mirrors are installed at an angle of 45 deg to the vertical axis. The angle of the third plane mirror 3 α and that of prismatic mirror 2 α to the vertical axis depend on geometric parameters of the ring and accelerating tube and they are determined by the expression α=arc sin R K /2(R T -L), where R K - ring radius, R T - accelerating tube radius, L - the height of segment, formed by the mirror and inner surface of the accelerating tube. The device suggested permits to determine longitudinal dimensions of the ring, its velocity and the number of electrons and ions in the ring

  1. Measuring the electron-ion ring parameters by bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkin, V.D.; Mozelev, A.A.; Sarantsev, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A system is described for measuring the number of electrons and ions in the electron-ion rings of a collective heavy ion accelerator. The system operation is based on detecting gamma quanta of bremsstrahlung following the ring electron interaction with the nuclei of neutral atoms and ions at different stages of filling the ring with ions. The radiation detector is a scintillation block - a photomultiplier operating for counting with NaI(Tl) crystal sized 30x30 mm and ensuring the detection efficiency close to unity. The system apparatus is made in the CAMAC standard and rems on-line with the TRA/i miniature computer. The block-diagrams of the system and algorithm of data processing are presented. A conclusion is drawn that the results of measuring the ring parameters with the use of the diagnostics system described are in good agreement within the range of measuring errors with those obtained by means of the diagnostics system employing synchrotron radiation and induction sensors

  2. The Antiproton-Ion-Collider at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, R.; Fabbietti, L.; Faestemann, T.; Homolka, J.; Kienle, P.; Ring, P.; Suzuki, K.; Bosch, F.; Franzke, B.; Kozhuharov, Ch.; Litvinov, Y.; Nolden, F.; Cargnelli, M.; Fuhrmann, H.; Hirtl, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Hayano, R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2006-01-01

    An antiproton-ion collider (AIC) has been proposed for the FAIR Project at Darmstadt to independently determine rms radii for protons and neutrons in stable and short lived nuclei by means of antiproton annihilation at medium energies. The AIC makes use of the ELISe electron ion collider complex to store, cool and collide antiprotons of 30 MeV energy with short lived radioactive ions in the NESR. The exotic nuclei are produced by projectile fragmentation or projectile fission and separated in the Super FRS. By detecting the loss of stored ions using the Schottky method the total absorption cross-section for antiprotons on the stored ions with mass A will be measured. Cross sections for the absorption on protons and neutrons, respectively, will be measured by the detection of residual nuclei with A-1 either by the Schottky method or by detecting them in recoil detectors after the first dipole stage of the NESR following the interaction zone. The absorption cross sections are in first order directly proportional to the mean square radii

  3. The antiproton ion collider at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbietti, L.; Faestermann, T.; Homolka, J.; Kienle, P.; Kruecken, R.; Ring, P.; Suziki, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Frankze, B.; Kozhuharov, C.; Nolden, F.; Cargnelli, M.; Fuhrmann, H.; Hirtl, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Hayano, R.S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Lenske, H.; Litvinov, Y.; Shatunov, Y.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Vostrikov, V.A.; Wycech, S.

    2005-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to determine the charge and the matter radii instable and short lived nuclei using an pBar-A collider. The experiment makes use of the appropriately modified electron-ion collider Elise, to collide 30 MeV anti-protons with 740 AMeV ions. The anti-protons are first collected in the CR ring with 3 GeV energy and then cooled in the RESR ring to 30 MeV. The heavy ions produced in the SFRS are precooled in the CR ring, cooled in the RESR ring to 740 AMeV and fed to the NESR ring. The total pBar-nucleon annihilation cross-section is measured detecting the loss of stored ions and the pBar-n, pBar-p cross-sections detecting the A - 1 (Z - 1 or N - 1) nuclei left over after the annihilation, using the Schottcky method. Theoretical predictions show that the annihilation cross-section is proportional to the mean squared radius. (author)

  4. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of how to shield the detector and reduce the background are addressed in the Detector Chapter. Polarization of the muons allows many very interesting measurements which are discussed in the Physics Chapter. Unlike the electron collider in which the electron beam is highly polarized and the positron beam unpolarized, both muon beams may be partially polarized. It is necessary to select forward moving muons from the pion's decay and thus reduce the available number of muons and hence the luminosity. The necessary machine technology needed to achieve such a collider is discussed in the Option Chapter; at the moment it is not part of our point design, although such capability would almost certainly be incorporated into an actual device.

  5. Physics at Future Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.

    1999-01-01

    After a brief review of the Big Issues in particle physics, we discuss the contributions to resolving that could be made by various planned and proposed future colliders. These include future runs of LEP and the Fermilab Tevatron collider, B factories, RHIC, the LHC, a linear electron-positron collider, an electron-proton collider in the LEP/LHC tunnel, a muon collider and a future larger hadron collider (FLHC). The Higgs boson and supersymmetry are used as benchmarks for assessing their capabilities. The LHC has great capacities for precision measurements as well as exploration, but also shortcomings where the complementary strengths of a linear electron-positron collider would be invaluable. It is not too soon to study seriously possible subsequent colliders.

  6. Photoionization and electron-ion recombination of Cr I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2009-01-01

    Using the unified method, the inverse processes of photoionization and electron-ion recombination are studied in detail for neutral chromium, (CrI+hν↔CrII+e), for the ground and excited states. The unified method based on close-coupling approximation and R-matrix method (i) subsumes both the radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR) for the total rate and (ii) provides self-consistent sets of photoionization cross sections σ PI and recombination rates α RC . The present results show in total photoionization of the ground and excited states an enhancement in the background at the first excited threshold, 3d 4 4s 5 D state of the core. One prominent phot-excitation-of-core (PEC) resonance due to one dipole allowed transition ( 6 S- 6 P o ) in the core is found in the photoionization cross sections of most of the valence electron excited states. Structures in the total and partial photoionization, for ionization into various excited core states and ground state only, respectively, are demonstrated. Results are presented for the septet and quintet states with n≤10 and l≤9 of Cr I. These states couple to the core ground state 6 S and contribute to the recombination rates. State-specific recombination rates are also presented for these states and their features are illustrated. The total recombination rate shows two DR peaks, one at a relatively low temperature, at 630 K, and the other around 40,000 K. This can explain existence of neutral Cr in interstellar medium. Calculations were carried out in LS coupling using a close-coupling wave function expansion of 40 core states. The results illustrate the features in the radiative processes of Cr I and provide photoionization cross sections and recombination rates with good approximation for this astrophysically important ion.

  7. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Adzic, P; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Allanach, B; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Bruning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Caldwell, A; Cetinkaya, V; Chekelian, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; Roeck, A.De; d'Enterria, D; DiNezza, P; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klees, R; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kraemer, M; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Milhano, J G; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinolfi, L; Rizvi, E; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schaefer, M; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; South, D; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Kate, H.Ten; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Thompson, P; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Ullrich, T; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F; CERN. Geneva. LHeC Department

    2012-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and electron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100) fb$^{-1}$. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  8. Berkeley mini-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1984-06-01

    The Berkeley Mini-Collider, a heavy-ion collider being planned to provide uranium-uranium collisions at T/sub cm/ less than or equal to 4 GeV/nucleon, is described. The central physics to be studied at these energies and our early ideas for a collider detector are presented

  9. Linear colliders - prospects 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1985-06-01

    We discuss the scaling laws of linear colliders and their consequences for accelerator design. We then report on the SLAC Linear Collider project and comment on experience gained on that project and its application to future colliders. 9 refs., 2 figs

  10. Very high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1986-03-01

    The luminosity and energy requirements are considered for both proton colliders and electron-positron colliders. Some of the basic design equations for high energy linear electron colliders are summarized, as well as design constraints. A few examples are given of parameters for very high energy machines. 4 refs., 6 figs

  11. Electron-ion correlation effects in ion-atom single ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colavecchia, F.D.; Garibotti, C.R. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Gasaneo, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2000-06-28

    We study the effect of electron-ion correlation in single ionization processes of atoms by ion impact. We present a distorted wave model where the final state is represented by a correlated function solution of a non-separable three-body continuum Hamiltonian, that includes electron-ion correlation as coupling terms of the wave equation. A comparison of the electronic differential cross sections computed with this model with other theories and experimental data reveals that the influence of the electron-ion correlation is more significant for low energy emitted electrons. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  12. The future e+e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    At present, the highest energy e + e - colliders are the SLC and LEP. In this paper their future improvement programs for increasing luminosity and/or energy, and the use of longitudinally polarized beams at the interaction point (IP) are discussed. An e + e - collider in the SSC tunnel does not seem to be an attractive option, on both technical and economical grounds, and with LEP, circular colliders have reached the sensible limit of size and cost. Linear colliders which have, in principle, no high energy limit, must overcome a new set of technical problems having to do with beam power limitations, emittance control, superstrong focusing at the IP, strong bunch-bunch interactions at the IP and related backgrounds

  13. SLC and SLD: Experimental experience with a linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breidenbach, M.

    1993-08-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is the prototype e + e - linear collider. This talk will consist of an introduction to SLC, a description of the strategy for luminosity, a description of the systems for the transport and measurement of the polarized electrons, and a description of the present performance of the SLC and planned upgrades. The detector, SLD, and the status of the polarization asymmetry measurement A LR will be described

  14. PIC simulation of the electron-ion collision effects on suprathermal electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yanqing; Han Shensheng

    2000-01-01

    The generation and transportation of suprathermal electrons are important to both traditional ICF scheme and 'Fast Ignition' scheme. The author discusses the effects of electron-ion collision on the generation and transportation of the suprathermal electrons by parametric instability. It indicates that the weak electron-ion term in the PIC simulation results in the enhancement of the collisional absorption and increase of the hot electron temperature and reduction in the maximum electrostatic field amplitude while wave breaking. Therefore the energy and distribution of the suprathermal electrons are changed. They are distributed more close to the phase velocity of the electrostatic wave than the case without electron-ion collision term. The electron-ion collision enhances the self-consistent field and impedes the suprathermal electron transportation. These factors also reduce the suprathermal electron energy. In addition, the authors discuss the effect of initial condition on PIC simulation to ensure that the results are correct

  15. Liquid alkali metals and alkali-based alloys as electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1981-06-01

    The article reviews the theory of thermodynamic and structural properties of liquid alkali metals and alkali-based alloys, within the framework of linear screening theory for the electron-ion interactions. (author)

  16. Polarimetry at a Future Linear Collider - How Precise?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, Michael B

    2000-01-01

    At a future linear collider, a polarized electron beam will play an important role in interpreting new physics signals. Backgrounds to a new physics reaction can be reduced by choice of the electron polarization state. The origin of a new physics reaction can be clarified by measuring its polarization-dependence. This paper examines some options for polarimetry with an emphasis on physics issues that motivate how precise the polarization determination needs to be. In addition to Compton polarimetry, the possibility of using Standard Model asymmetries, such as the asymmetry in forward W-pairs, is considered as a possible polarimeter. Both e + e - and e + e - collider modes are considered

  17. Future Circular Collider Study FCC-he Baseline Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Bruning, Oliver; Klein, Max; Pellegrini, Dario; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Initial considerations are presented on the FCC-he, the electron-hadron collider con guration within the Future Circular Collider study. This note considers arguments for the choice of the electron beam energy based on physics, ep scattering kinematics and cost. The default con guration for the electron accelerator, as for the LHeC, is chosen to be a multi-turn energy recovery linac external to the proton beam tunnel. The main accelerator parameters of the FCC-he are discussed, assuming the concurrent operation of ep with the 100TeV cms energy pp collider. These are compared with the LHeC design concept, for increased performance as for a Higgs facility using the HL-LHC, and also the high energy HE-LHC ep collider configuration. Initial estimates are also provided for the luminosity performance of electron-ion colliders for the 60 GeV electron ERL when combined with the LHC, the HE-LHC and the FCC ion beams.

  18. Strong WW scattering at photon linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    We investigate the possibility of observing strong interactions of longitudinally polarized weak vector bosons in the process γγ → ZZ at a photon linear collider. We make use of polarization of the photon beams and cuts on the decay products of the Z bosons to enhance the signal relative to the background of transversely polarized ZZ pairs. We find that the background overwhelms the signal unless there are strong resonant effects, as for instance from a technicolor analogue of the hadronic f 2 (1270) meson

  19. ERL-BASED LEPTON-HADRON COLLIDERS: eRHIC AND LHeC

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Two hadron-ERL colliders are being proposed. The Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) plans to collide the high-energy protons and heavy ions in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN with 60-GeV polarized electrons or positrons. The baseline scheme for this facility adds to the LHC a separate recirculating superconducting (SC) lepton linac with energy recovery, delivering a lepton current of 6.4mA. The electron-hadron collider project eRHIC aims to collide polarized (and unpolarized) electrons with a current of 50 (220) mA and energies in the range 5–30 GeV with a variety of hadron beams— heavy ions as well as polarized light ions— stored in the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL. The eRHIC electron beam will be generated in an energy recovery linac (ERL) installed inside the RHIC tunnel.

  20. The development of colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    During the period of the 50's and the 60's colliders were developed. Prior to that time there were no colliders, and by 1965 a number of small devices had worked, good understanding had been achieved, and one could speculate, as Gersh Budker did, that in a few years 20% of high energy physics would come from colliders. His estimate was an under-estimate, for now essentially all of high energy physics comes from colliders. The author presents a brief review of that history: sketching the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological advances which made it all possible

  1. Flow shear stabilization of hybrid electron-ion drift mode in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, L.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a model of sheared flow stabilization on hybrid electron-ion drift mode is proposed. At first, in the presence of dissipative trapped electrons, there exists an intrinsic oscillation mode in tokamak plasmas, namely hybrid dissipative trapped electron-ion temperature gradient mode (hereafter, called as hybrid electron-ion drift mode). This conclusion is in agreement with the observations in the simulated tokamak experiment on the CLM. Then, it is found that the coupling between the sheared flows and dissipative trapped electrons is proposed as the stabilization mechanism of both toroidal sheared flow and poloidal sheared flow on the hybrid electron-ion drift mode, that is, similar to the stabilizing effect of poloidal sheared flow on edge plasmas in tokamaks, in the presence of both dissipative trapped electrons and toroidal sheared flow, large toroidal sheared flow is always a strong stabilizing effect on the hybrid electron-ion drift mode in internal transport barrier location, too. This result is consistent with the experimental observations in JT-60U. (author)

  2. Flow shear stabilization of hybrid electron-ion drift mode in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, L.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a model of sheared flow stabilization on hybrid electron-ion drift mode is proposed. At first, in the presence of dissipative trapped electrons, there exists an intrinsic oscillation mode in tokamak plasmas, namely hybrid dissipative trapped electron-ion temperature gradient mode (hereafter, called as hybrid electron-ion drift mode). This conclusion is in agreement with the observations in the simulated tokamak experiment on the CLM. Then, it is found that the coupling between the sheared flows and dissipative trapped electrons is proposed as the stabilization mechanism of both toroidal sheared flow and poloidal sheared flow on the hybrid electron-ion drift mode, that is, similar to the stabilizing effect of poloidal sheared flow on edge plasmas in tokamaks, in the presence of both dissipative trapped electrons and toroidal sheared flow, large toroidal sheared flow is always a strong stabilizing effect on the hybrid electron-ion drift mode in internal transport barrier location, too. This result is consistent with the experimental observations in JT-60U. (author)

  3. Tevatron Collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.J.

    1990-02-01

    The physics of hadron colliders is briefly reviewed. Issues for further study are presented. Particular attention is given to the physics opportunities for a high luminosity (≥ 100 pb -1 /experiment/run) Upgrade of the Tevatron Collider. 25 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Stanford's linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, B.

    1985-01-01

    The peak of the construction phase of the Stanford Linear Collider, SLC, to achieve 50 GeV electron-positron collisions has now been passed. The work remains on schedule to attempt colliding beams, initially at comparatively low luminosity, early in 1987. (orig./HSI).

  5. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1985-01-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The author discusses the status of the machine and the detectors and give an overview of the physics which can be done at this new facility. He also gives some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built

  6. Acceleration of polarized particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buon, J.

    1992-05-01

    The spin kinetics of polarized beams in circular accelerators is reviewed in the case of spin-1/2 particles (electrons and protons) with emphasis on the depolarization phenomena. The acceleration of polarized proton beams in synchrotrons is described together with the cures applied to reduce depolarization, including the use of 'Siberian Snakes'. The in-situ polarization of electrons in storage rings due to synchrotron radiation is studied as well as depolarization in presence of ring imperfections. The applications of electron polarization to accurately calibrate the rings in energy and to use polarized beams in colliding-beam experiments are reviewed. (author) 76 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  7. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  8. Fine structures of atomic excited states: precision atomic spectroscopy and electron-ion collision process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiang; Cheng Cheng; Li Jiaming

    2011-01-01

    Scientific research fields for future energies such as inertial confinement fusion researches and astrophysics studies especially with satellite observatories advance into stages of precision physics. The relevant atomic data are not only enormous but also of accuracy according to requirements, especially for both energy levels and the collision data. The fine structure of high excited states of atoms and ions can be measured by precision spectroscopy. Such precision measurements can provide not only knowledge about detailed dynamics of electron-ion interactions but also a bench mark examination of the accuracy of electron-ion collision data, especially incorporating theoretical computations. We illustrate that by using theoretical calculation methods which can treat the bound states and the adjacent continua on equal footing. The precision spectroscopic measurements of excited fine structures can be served as stringent tests of electron-ion collision data. (authors)

  9. Towards future circular colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  10. SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.; Bell, R.A.; Brown, K.L.

    1980-06-01

    The SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER is designed to achieve an energy of 100 GeV in the electron-positron center-of-mass system by accelerating intense bunches of particles in the SLAC linac and transporting the electron and positron bunches in a special magnet system to a point where they are focused to a radius of about 2 microns and made to collide head on. The rationale for this new type of colliding beam system is discussed, the project is described, some of the novel accelerator physics issues involved are discussed, and some of the critical technical components are described

  11. Gluons and the quark sea at high energies: distributions, polarization, tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, D.; Venugopalan, R.; Diehl, M.; Milner, R.; Vogelsang, W.; et al.

    2011-09-30

    This report is based on a ten-week program on Gluons and the quark sea at high-energies, which took place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle in Fall 2010. The principal aim of the program was to develop and sharpen the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), a facility that will be able to collide electrons and positrons with polarized protons and with light to heavy nuclei at high energies, offering unprecedented possibilities for in-depth studies of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). This report is organized around the following four major themes: (i) the spin and flavor structure of the proton, (ii) three dimensional structure of nucleons and nuclei in momentum and configuration space, (iii) QCD matter in nuclei, and (iv) Electroweak physics and the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Beginning with an executive summary, the report contains tables of key measurements, chapter overviews for each of the major scientific themes, and detailed individual contributions on various aspects of the scientific opportunities presented by an EIC.

  12. Gluons and the quark sea at high energies: distributions, polarization, tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Boer, D; Milner, Richard; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner; Kaplan, David; Montgomery, Hugh; Vigdor, Steven; Accardi, A.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Burkardt, M.; Ent, R.; Guzey, V.; Hasch, D.; Kumar, K.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Li, Ying-chuan; Marciano, W.; Marquet, C.; Sabatie, F.; Stratmann, M.; Yuan, F.; Sassot, R.; Zurita, P.; Cherednikov, I.O.; Goncalves, V.P.; Sandapen, R.; Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Gao, J.-H.; Liang, Z.-T.; Passek-Kumericki, K.; Kumericki, K.; Lappi, T.; Wallon, S.; Pire, B.; Geraud, R.; Moutarde, H.; Gelis, F.; Soyez, G.; Meskauskas, M.; Mueller, Dieter; Stefanis, N.G.; Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U.; Diehl, M.; Bartels, J.; Pirner, H.J.; Hagler, P.; Jager, B.; Spiesberger, H.; Lautenschlager, T.; Schafer, A.; Ringer, F.; Vogelsang, W.; Kroll, P.; Alekhin, S.; Blumlein, J; Moch, S.-O.; Pisano, C.; Rojo, J.; Bacchetta, A.; Pasquini, B.; Radici, M.; Ciofi degli Atti, C.; Mezzetti, C.B.; Kaptari, L.P.; Anselmino, M.; Tanaka, K.; Koike, Y.; Kumano, S.; Motyka, L.; Golec-Biernat, K.; Stasto, A.M.; Golec-Biernat, K.; Szymanowski, L.; Cherednikov, I.O.; Kaptari, L.P.; Radyushkin, A.; Alekhin, S.; Kondratenko, A.; Horowitz, W.A.; Schnell, G.; Chevtsov, P.; Mulders, P.J.; Rogers, T.C.; Boer, D.; Forshaw, J.R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Chirilli, G.A.; Muller, D.; Wang, X.-N.; Yuan, F.; Qian, X.; Brodsky, S.J.; Schweitzer, P.; Horn, T.; Tuchin, K.; Dupre, R.; Erdelyi, B.; Manikonda, S.; Ostrumov, P.N.; Abeyratne, S.; Erdelyi, B.; Vossen, A.; Riordan, S.; Tsentalovich, E.; Goldstein, G.R.; Pozdeyev, E.; Huang, M.; Aidala, C.; Dumitru, A.; Dominguez, F.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Deshpande, A.; Faroughy, C.; Hammons, L.; Hao, Y.; Johnson, E.C.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Taneja, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Webb, S.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.M.; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Hao, Y.; He, P.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Zelenski, A.; Beuf, G.; Burton, T.; Debbe, R.; Fazio, S.; Marciano, W.J.; Qiu, J.-W.; Toll, T.; Ullrich, T.; Deshpande, A.; Dumitru, A.; Kang, Z.-B.; Stasto, A.M.; Yuan, F.; Kovchegov, Y.V.; Majumder, A; Metz, A.; Zhou, J.; Gamberg, L.; Stasto, A.M.; Strikman, M.; Xiao, B.-W.; Guzzi, M.; Nadolsky, P.; Olness, F.; BC, H.; Liuti, S.; Ahmed, S.; Bogacz, A.; Derbenev, Ya.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Marhauser, F.; Morozov, V.; Pilat, F.; Rimmer, R.; Satogata, T.; Sullivan, M.; Spata, M.; Terzic, B.; Wang, H.; Yunn, B.; Zhang, Y.; Avakian, H.; Musch, B.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Prokudin, A.; Radyushkin, A.; Weiss, C.; Krafft, G.; Radyushkin, A.; Sayed, H.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Cloet, I.C.; Miller, G.; Gonderinger, M.

    2011-01-01

    This report is based on a ten-week program on "Gluons and the quark sea at high-energies", which took place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Seattle in Fall 2010. The principal aim of the program was to develop and sharpen the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), a facility that will be able to collide electrons and positrons with polarized protons and with light to heavy nuclei at high energies, offering unprecedented possibilities for in-depth studies of quantum chromodynamics. This report is organized around four major themes: i) the spin and flavor structure of the proton, ii) three-dimensional structure of nucleons and nuclei in momentum and configuration space, iii) QCD matter in nuclei, and iv) Electroweak physics and the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Beginning with an executive summary, the report contains tables of key measurements, chapter overviews for each of the major scientific themes, and detailed individual contributions on various aspects of the scientific op...

  13. The SLAC polarized electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.; Frisch, J.

    1995-06-01

    The SLAC polarized electron source employs a photocathode DC high voltage gun with a loadlock and a YAG pumped Ti:sapphire laser system for colliding beam experiments or a flash lamp pumped Ti:sapphire laser for fixed target experiments. It uses a thin, strained GaAs(100) photocathode, and is capable of producing a pulsed beam with a polarization of ≥80% and a peak current exceeding 10 A. Its operating efficiency has reached 99%. The physics and technology of producing high polarization electron beams from a GaAs photocathode will be reviewed. The prospects of realizing a polarized electron source for future linear colliders will also be discussed

  14. Linear collider: a preview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  15. Muon collider progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  16. FERMILAB: Preparing to collide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Against the background of stringent Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) regulations mandated by the US Department of Energy for all national Labs, Fermilab prepared to mount the next major Tevatron proton-antiproton collider run

  17. Linear collider: a preview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

  18. Polarized particles in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Kondratenko, A.M.; Serednyakov, S.I.; Skrinskij, A.N.; Tumajkin, G.M.; Shatunov, Yu.M.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments with polarized beams on the VEPP-2M and SPEAK storage rings are described. Possible methods of producing polarized particle beams in storage rings as well as method of polarization monitoring are counted. Considered are the processes of radiation polarization of electrons and positrons. It is shown, that to preserve radiation polarization the introduction of regions with a strong sign-variable magnetic field is recommended. Methods of polarization measurement are counted. It is suggested for high energies to use dependence of synchrotron radiation power on transverse polarization of electrons and positrons. Examples of using polarizability of colliding beams in storage rings are presented

  19. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-01-15

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the Collider delivered its goods at a total energy of 1600 GeV, significantly boosting the world record for laboratory collisions.

  20. Superconducting linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) for particle accelerators have been demonstrated by successful operation of systems in the TRISTAN and LEP electron-positron collider rings respectively at the Japanese KEK Laboratory and at CERN. If performance continues to improve and costs can be lowered, this would open an attractive option for a high luminosity TeV (1000 GeV) linear collider

  1. FERMILAB: Collider detectors -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Last month's edition (April, page 12) included a status report on data collection and preliminary physics results from the 'newcomer' DO detector at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This time the spotlight falls in the Veteran' CDF detector, in action since 1985 and meanwhile significantly upgraded. Meanwhile the Tevatron collider continues to improve, with record collision rates

  2. Proceedings of the workshop on the PS-spin collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yoshiharu

    1993-05-01

    This volume is a record of the PS-Spin Collider Workshop which was held at KEK, Jan. 31-Feb.1, 1992. As a future project of the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron (KEK-PS), the hadron collider (PS-Collider), has been under discussion. Originally, the PSC was designed for heavy ion beam collisions with the energy range of 5-7 GeV/u. If polarized protons are accelerated in PSC, 19 x 19 GeV collisions are possible. This workshop was proposed to bring together interested experimentalists and accelerator physicists to discuss the case that could be made for polarization physics and the technical feasibility at the PS Spin Collider. More than 30 physicists participated in the workshop and very interesting and useful discussions took place. (author)

  3. Effects of electron-ion temperature equilibration on inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Barry; Hu, S X

    2011-07-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation essentially affects both the laser absorption in coronal plasmas and the hot-spot formation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It has recently been reexamined for plasma conditions closely relevant to ICF implosions using either classical molecular-dynamics simulations or analytical methods. To explore the electron-ion temperature equilibration effects on ICF implosion performance, we have examined two Coulomb logarithm models by implementing them into our hydrocodes, and we have carried out hydrosimulations for ICF implosions. Compared to the Lee-More model that is currently used in our standard hydrocodes, the two models predict substantial differences in laser absorption, coronal temperatures, and neutron yields for ICF implosions at the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al. Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Such effects on the triple-picket direct-drive design at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have also been explored. Based on the validity of the two models, we have proposed a combined model of the electron-ion temperature-relaxation rate for the overall ICF plasma conditions. The hydrosimulations using the combined model for OMEGA implosions have shown ∼6% more laser absorption, ∼6%-15% higher coronal temperatures, and ∼10% more neutron yield, when compared to the Lee-More model prediction. It is also noticed that the gain for the NIF direct-drive design can be varied by ∼10% among the different electron-ion temperature-relaxation models.

  4. Experimental determination of the electron-avalanche and the electron-ion recombination coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernst, G.J.; Boer, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    The electron-ion recombination coefficient γ and the avalanche coefficient δ = (α − a) · vd, where α and a are the ionizat ion and attachment coefficients respectively and vd the drift velocity of the electrons, have been experimentally determined in a self-sustained CO2-laser system (1:1:3 mixture)

  5. A new apparatus for electron-ion multiple coincidence momentum imaging spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Y.; Kato, M.; Pruemper, G.; Liu, X.-J.; Lischke, T.; Ueda, K.; Tamenori, Y.; Oura, M.; Yamaoka, H.; Suzuki, I.H.; Saito, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new experimental apparatus for the electron-ion multiple coincidence momentum imaging spectroscopy in order to obtain the angular distributions of vibration-resolved photoelectrons from molecules fixed in space. The apparatus consists of a four-stage molecular supersonic jet and a spectrometer analyzing three-dimensional momenta of fragment ions and electrons in coincidence

  6. Are we ready to test QED in two-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermolaev, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The great improvement on the accuracy of the measured transition intervals in two-electron ions achieved recently is discussed with reference to reports of Berry (ANL) and Silver (Oxford) on the precision determination of the 2s 3 S 1 - 2p 3 P/sub J/, J = 0, and 2, intervals in the ions with intermediate Z

  7. Exclusive processes in electron-ion collisions in the dipole formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaroto, E. R.; Navarra, F. S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, F. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Campus Diadema, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel, 275, Jd. Eldorado, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, V. P. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, 96010-900 Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    We compare the predictions of two saturation models for production of vector mesons and of photons in electron-ion collisions. The models considered are the b-CGC and the rcBK. The calculations were made in the kinematical range of the LHeC and of the future eRHIC.

  8. Towards Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN presently provides proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics programme will extend through the second half of the 2030’s. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ∼100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton c...

  9. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detector, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The int...

  10. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The in...

  11. Towards a Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.

    2011-01-01

    A multi TeV Muon Collider is required for the full coverage of Terascale physics. The physics potential for a Muon Collider at ∼3 TeV and integrated luminosity of 1 ab -1 is outstanding. Particularly strong cases can be made if the new physics is SUSY or new strong dynamics. Furthermore, a staged Muon Collider can provide a Neutrino Factory to fully disentangle neutrino physics. If a narrow s-channel resonance state exists in the multi-TeV region, the physics program at a Muon Collider could begin with less than 10 31 cm -2 s -1 luminosity. Detailed studies of the physics case for a 1.5-4 TeV Muon Collider are just beginning. The goals of such studies are to: (1) identify benchmark physics processes; (2) study the physics dependence on beam parameters; (3) estimate detector backgrounds; and (4) compare the physics potential of a Muon Collider with those of the ILC, CLIC and upgrades to the LHC.

  12. Photon collider at TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-01-01

    High energy photon colliders (γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e + e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3)L e + e - . Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e + e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e + e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is ''an optical storage ring (optical trap)'' with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems

  13. On the electron-ion temperature ratio established by collisionless shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jacco; Broersen, Sjors; Bykov, Andrei; Gabici, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Astrophysical shocks are often collisionless shocks, in which the changes in plasma flow and temperatures across the shock are established not through Coulomb interactions, but through electric and magnetic fields. An open question about collisionless shocks is whether electrons and ions each establish their own post-shock temperature (non-equilibration of temperatures), or whether they quickly equilibrate in the shock region. Here we provide a simple, thermodynamic, relation for the minimum electron-ion temperature ratios that should be expected as a function of Mach number. The basic assumption is that the enthalpy-flux of the electrons is conserved separately, but that all particle species should undergo the same density jump across the shock, in order for the plasma to remain charge neutral. The only form of additional electron heating that we allow for is adiabatic heating, caused by the compression of the electron gas. These assumptions result in an analytic treatment of expected electron-ion temperature ratio that agrees with observations of collisionless shocks: at low sonic Mach numbers, Ms ≲ 2, the electron-ion temperature ratio is close to unity, whereas for Mach numbers above Ms ≈ 60 the electron-ion temperature ratio asymptotically approaches a temperature ratio of Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩. In the intermediate Mach number range the electron-ion temperature ratio scales as Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2. In addition, we calculate the electron-ion temperature ratios under the assumption of adiabatic heating of the electrons only, which results in a higher electron-ion temperature ratio, but preserves the Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2 scaling. We also show that for magnetised shocks the electron-ion temperature ratio approaches the asymptotic value Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩ for lower magnetosonic Mach numbers (Mms), mainly because for a strongly magnetised shock the sonic Mach number is larger than the magnetosonic Mach number (Mms ≤ Ms). The predicted scaling of the electron-ion

  14. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  15. Polarization at SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs

  16. The development of colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Don Kerst, Gersh Budker, and Bruno Touschek were the individuals, and the motivating force, which brought about the development of colliders, while the laboratories at which it happened were Stanford, MURA, the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, Orsay, Frascati, CERN, and Novosibirsk. These laboratories supported, during many years, this rather speculative activity. Of course, many hundreds of physicists contributed to the development of colliders but the men who started it, set it in the right direction, and forcefully made it happen, were Don, Gersh, and Bruno. Don was instrumental in the development of proton-proton colliders, while Bruno and Gersh spearheaded the development of electron-positron colliders. In this brief review of the history, I will sketch the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological developments which made possible the development of colliders. It may look as if the emphasis is on theoretical concepts, but that is really not the case, for in this field -- the physics of beams -- the theory and experiment go hand in hand; theoretical understanding and advances are almost always motivated by the need to explain experimental results or the desire to construct better experimental devices

  17. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  18. Superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider is to be a 20 TeV per beam proton-proton accelerator and collider. Physically the SCC will be 52 miles in circumference and slightly oval in shape. The use of superconducting magnets instead of conventional cuts the circumference from 180 miles to the 52 miles. The operating cost of the SCC per year is estimated to be about $200-250 million. A detailed cost estimate of the project is roughly $3 billion in 1986 dollars. For the big collider ring, the technical cost are dominated by the magnet system. That is why one must focus on the cost and design of the magnets. Presently, the process of site selection is underway. The major R and D efforts concern superconducting dipoles. The magnets use niobium-titanium as a conductor stabilized in a copper matrix. 10 figures

  19. Gluons and the quark sea at high energies : distributions, polarization, tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, D.; Diehl, M.; Milner, R.; Venugopalan, R.; Vogelsang, W.; Accardi, A.; Aschenauer, E.; Burkardt, M.; Ent, R.; Guzey, V.; Hasch, D.; Kumar, K.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Li, Y.; Marciano, W. J.; Marquet, C.; Sabatie, F.; Stratmann, M.; Yuan, F.; Abeyratne, S.; Ahmed, S.; Aidala, C.; Alekhin, S.; Anselmino, M.; Avakian, H.; Bacchetta, A.; Bartels, J.; H., BC; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Beuf, G.; Blumlein, J.; Blaskiewicz, M .; Bogacz, A.; Brodsky, S. J.; Burton, T.; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Cherednikov, I. O.; Chevtsov, P.; Chirilli, G. A.; Atti, C. Ciofi degli; Cloet, I. C.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Debbe, R.; Derbenev, Ya; Deshpande, A.; Dominguez, F.; Dumitru, A.; Dupre, R.; Erdelyi, B.; Faroughy, C.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Forshaw, J. R.; Geraud, R.; Gallmeister, K.; Gamberg, L.; Gao, J. -H.; Gassner, D.; Gelis, F.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Goldstein, G.; Golec-Biernat, K.; Goncalves, V. P.; Gonderinger, M.; Guzzi, M.; Hagler, P.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Hao, Y.; He, P.; Horn, T.; Horowitz, W. A.; Huang, M.; Hutton, A.; Jager, B.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E. C.; Kang, Z. -B.; Kaptari, L. P.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Koike, Y.; Kondratenko, A.; Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Kovchegov, Y. V.; Krafft, G.; Kroll, P.; Kumano, S.; Kumericki, K.; Lappi, T.; Lautenschlager, T.; Li, R.; Liang, Z. -T.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Liuti, S.; Luo, Y.; Muller, D.; Mahler, G.; Majumder, A.; Manikonda, S.; Marhauser, F.; McIntyre, G.; Meskauskas, M.; Meng, W.; Metz, A.; Mezzetti, C. B.; Miller, G. A.; Minty, M.; Moch, S. -O.; Morozov, V.; Mosel, U.; Motyka, L.; Moutarde, H.; Mulders, P. J.; Musch, B.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nadolsky, P.; Olness, F.; Ostrumov, P. N.; Parker, B.; Pasquini, B.; Passek-Kumericki, K.; Pikin, A.; Pilat, F.; Pire, B.; Pirner, H.; Pisano, C.; Pozdeyev, E.; Prokudin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Qian, X.; Qiu, J. -W.; Radici, M.; Radyushkin, A.; Rao, T.; Rimmer, R.; Ringer, F.; Riordan, S.; Rogers, T.; Rojo, J.; Roser, T.; Sandapen, R.; Sassot, R.; Satogata, T.; Sayed, H.; Schafer, A.; Schnell, G.; Schweitzer, P.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Soyez, G.; Spata, M.; Spiesberger, H.; Stasto, A. M.; Stefanis, N. G.; Strikman, M.; Sullivan, M.; Szymanowski, L.; Tanaka, K.; Taneja, S.; Tepikian, S.; Terzic, B.; Than, Y.; Toll, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsentalovich, E.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuchin, K.; Tuozzolo, J.; Ullrich, T.; Vossen, A.; Wallon, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, X. -N.; Webb, S.; Weiss, C.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B. -W.; Xu, W.; Yunn, B.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, J.; Zurita, P.

    2011-01-01

    This report is based on a ten-week program on "Gluons and the quark sea at high-energies", which took place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Seattle in Fall 2010. The principal aim of the program was to develop and sharpen the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), a facility that

  20. Collide@CERN Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Kieffer, Robert; Blas Temino, Diego; Bertolucci, Sergio; Mr. Decelière, Rudy; Mr. Hänni, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to “Collide@CERN Geneva Music”. Come to the public lecture about collisions between music and particle physics by the third winners of Collide@CERN Geneva, Vincent Hänni & Rudy Decelière, and their scientific inspiration partners, Diego Blas and Robert Kieffer. The event marks the beginning of their residency at CERN, and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 16 October 2014 at 19.00. Doors will open at 18.30.

  1. The Colliding Beams Sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Sequencer (CBS) is a computer program used to operate the pbar-p Collider by synchronizing the applications programs and simulating the activities of the accelerator operators during filling and storage. The Sequencer acts as a meta-program, running otherwise stand alone applications programs, to do the set-up, beam transfers, acceleration, low beta turn on, and diagnostics for the transfers and storage. The Sequencer and its operational performance will be described along with its special features which include a periodic scheduler and command logger. 14 refs., 3 figs

  2. Superphysics at UNK collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kereselidze, A.R.; Liparteliani, A.G.; Sokolov, A.A.; Volkov, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical incompleteness of standard model and the way of going beyond frames on the basis of supersymmetry are considered. The most important directions of experimental researches at the colliders of a new generation are given. Theoretical estimates of masses of supersymmetrical particles in the framework of N=1 supergravity obtained from compactification of the popular E 8 xE 8 superstring theories are presented. The experimental search for supersymmetrical particles at the UNK pp-collider (√s=6 TeV) is performed

  3. Hadron collider luminosity limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1992-01-01

    The three colliders operated to date have taught us a great deal about the behaviour of both bunched and debunched beams in storage rings. The main luminosity limitations are now well enough understood that most of them can be stronglu attenuated or eliminated by approriate design precautions. Experience with the beam-beam interaction in both the SPS and the Tevatron allow us to predict the performance of the new generation of colliders with some degree of confidence. One of the main challenges that the accelerator physicist faces is the problem of the dynamic aperture limitations due to the lower field quality expected, imposed by economic and other constraints.

  4. DESY: HERA polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The new HERA electron-proton collider at DESY in Hamburg achieved the first luminosity for electron-proton collisions on 19 October last year. Only one month later, on 20 November, HERA passed another important milestone with the observation of transverse electron polarization

  5. DESY: HERA polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-03-15

    The new HERA electron-proton collider at DESY in Hamburg achieved the first luminosity for electron-proton collisions on 19 October last year. Only one month later, on 20 November, HERA passed another important milestone with the observation of transverse electron polarization.

  6. Challenges for highest energy circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, M; Wenninger, J; Zimmermann, F

    2014-01-01

    A new tunnel of 80–100 km circumference could host a 100 TeV centre-of-mass energy-frontier proton collider (FCC-hh/VHE-LHC), with a circular lepton collider (FCCee/TLEP) as potential intermediate step, and a leptonhadron collider (FCC-he) as additional option. FCC-ee, operating at four different energies for precision physics of the Z, W, and Higgs boson and the top quark, represents a significant push in terms of technology and design parameters. Pertinent R&D efforts include the RF system, topup injection scheme, optics design for arcs and final focus, effects of beamstrahlung, beam polarization, energy calibration, and power consumption. FCC-hh faces other challenges, such as high-field magnet design, machine protection and effective handling of large synchrotron radiation power in a superconducting machine. All these issues are being addressed by a global FCC collaboration. A parallel design study in China prepares for a similar, but smaller collider, called CepC/SppC.

  7. Effects of external field on elastic electron-ion collision in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Sang-Chul; Jung, Young-Dae

    2008-01-01

    The field effects on elastic electron-ion collision are investigated in a plasma with the presence of the external field. The eikonal method and effective interaction potential including the far-field term caused by the external field is employed to obtain the eikonal phase shift and eikonal cross section as functions of the field strength, external frequency, impact parameter, collision energy, thermal energy and Debye length. The result shows that the effect of the external field on the eikonal cross section is given by the second-order eikonal phase. In addition, the external field effects suppress the eikonal cross section as well as eikonal phase for the elastic electron-ion collision. The eikonal phase and cross section are found to be increased with an increase of the frequency of the external field. It is also shown that the eikonal cross section increases with an increase of the thermal energy and Debye length.

  8. Electron-ion collision rates in atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, M; Hilse, P; Schlanges, M; Bornath, Th; Krainov, V P

    2010-01-01

    In atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses, plasmas with high density and high temperature are created. The heating is mainly caused by inverse bremsstrahlung, i.e. determined by electron-ion collisions. In the description of the scattering of electrons on noble gas ions in such plasmas, it is important to account for the inner structure of the ions and the screening by the surrounding plasma medium which can be accomplished by using suitable model potentials. In the wide parameter range met in experiments, the Born approximation is not applicable. Instead, the electron-ion collision frequency is calculated on the basis of classical momentum transport cross sections. Results are presented for xenon, krypton and argon ions in different charge states. A comparison of these results to those for the scattering on Coulomb particles with the same charge shows an enhancement of the collision frequency. The Born approximation, however, leads to an overestimation.

  9. Physics at the SLC [SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1990-11-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) was constructed in the years 1983--1987 for two principal reasons: to develop the accelerator physics and technology that are necessary for the construction of future linear electron-positron colliders; and to produce electron-positron collisions at the Z 0 pole and to study the physics of the weak neutral current. To date, the SLC program has been quite successful at achieving the first goal. The machine has produced and collided high energy electron and positron beams of three-micron transverse size. The problems of operating an open geometry detector in an environment that is more akin to those found in fixed-target experiments than in storage rings have largely been solved. As a physics producing venture, the SLC has been less successful than was originally hoped but more successful than is commonly believed. Some of the results that have been produced by the Mark II experiment with a very modest data sample are competitive with those that have been produced with much larger samples by the four LEP collaborations. At the current, time, SLAC is engaged in an ambitious program to upgrade the SLC luminosity and to exploit one of its unique features, a spin polarized electron beam. These lectures are therefore organized into three sections: a brief description of the SLC; a review of the physics results that have been achieved with the Mark II detector; a description of the SLC's future: the realization and use of a polarized electron beam

  10. Effect of electron-ion treatment on fermentative activity of food yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, I.N.; Ostapenkov, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Investigation into effect of electron-ion treatment (EIT) on fermentative activity (FA) of Sacch cerevisial type yeasts of 12 breed was conducted. It is shown that even within the limits of one and the same type different treatment regimes are meded. This is obviously connected with physiologic peculiarities of different yeast breeds. Therefore an individual optimal treatment regime should be determined in each particular case during EIT of different breeds

  11. A cold cathode of a gas-discharge electron-ion gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A cold cathode of a gas-discharge electron-ion gun is constructed in order to continuously replace the eroded material by feeding a wire or a set of coaxial cylinders in the spot where the ions hit the cathode. In this way, the form of the cathode and the electric-field configuration is preserved which guarantees the conservation of a sharp narrow electron beam profile

  12. Characteristics of electron-ion whistlers and their application to ionospheric probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.N.; Tiwari, S.; Tolpadi, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    In this communication the effect of ion temperature on the propagation of electron-ion whistlers in the ionosphere is investigated. A general expression including the effect of ion temperature is derived for the group travel time for the electron-ion whistler as it travels from the base of the ionosphere to the satellite. A study of the dependence of the group travel time for the proton whislters. Further, from the expression for the group travel time including the effect of the ion temperature in conjunction with the generalized dispersion relation a relation for the cyclotron damping rate (both temporal and spatial) has been obtained. A detailed study if the cyclotron damping rate with travel time and ion temperature leads to the conclusion that the observed amplitude cutoff characteristics for the proton whistler can be explained on the basis of the mechanism of cyclotron damping. It is also shown that the knowledge of the group travel time of an electron-ion whistler can be used to estimate the ion temperature at the satellite

  13. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  14. QCD and collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stirling, William James

    1991-12-01

    1. Some basic theory. 2. Two important applications: - e+ e- annihilation (LEPSLS) ; deep inelastic scattering (HERA). 3. Other applications..., large Pt jets, W and Z, heavy quark production..., (pp- colliders). In this lecture: some basic theory. 1. QCD as a non abelian gauge field theory. 2. Asymptotic freedom. 3. Beyond leading order - renormalisation schemes. 4. MS.

  15. Superconducting Super Collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, M.L.

    1986-04-01

    The scientific need for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is outlined, along with the history of the development of the SSC concept. A brief technical description is given of each of the main points of the SSC conceptual design. The construction cost and construction schedule are discussed, followed by issues associated with the realization of the SSC. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  16. High luminosity particle colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p anti p), lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed

  17. Diffraction at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons with ''soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy

  18. LINEAR COLLIDERS: 1992 workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settles, Ron; Coignet, Guy

    1992-01-01

    As work on designs for future electron-positron linear colliders pushes ahead at major Laboratories throughout the world in a major international collaboration framework, the LC92 workshop held in Garmisch Partenkirchen this summer, attended by 200 machine and particle physicists, provided a timely focus

  19. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    't Hooft, Gerardus; Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Collier, Paul; Stapnes, Steinar; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Stachel, Johanna; Lederman, Leon Max

    2007-01-01

    Several articles about the LHC: The Making of the standard model; high-energy colliders and the rise of the standard model; How the LHC came to be; Building a behemoth; Detector challenges at the LHC; Beyond the standard model with the LHC; The quest for the quark-gluon plasma; The God particle et al. (42 pages

  20. Review of linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Seishi

    1992-01-01

    The status of R and D of future e + e - linear colliders proposed by the institutions throughout the world is described including the JLC, NLC, VLEPP, CLIC, DESY/THD and TESLA projects. The parameters and RF sources are discussed. (G.P.) 36 refs.; 1 tab

  1. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  2. High energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p anti p), lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed

  3. Hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs

  4. B factory with hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockyer, N.S.

    1990-01-01

    The opportunities to study B physics in a hadron collider are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the technological developments necessary for these experiments. The R and D program of the Bottom Collider Detector group is reviewed. (author)

  5. 6th International Conference on the Physics Opportunities at an ElecTron-Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sabatié, F; POETIC6

    2015-01-01

    POETIC6, the 6th edition of the International Conference on the "Physics Opportunities at an ElecTron-Ion Collider", will take place at Ecole Polytechnique in Palaiseau, France from Monday, September 7th to Friday, September 11th 2015, a few weeks before the National Science Advisory Committee recommends a new Long Range Plan to the United States' DOE and NSF. In the midst of this much-anticipated report, and following earlier workshops at Stellenbosch, Bloomington, Valparaiso, Jyvaskyla and Yale, it is timely for the POETIC series to become an international conference. The primary goal will remain to continue the advancement of the field of electron-ion collider physics. While the central theme of the conference will be the physics of a future electron-ion collider, the workshop will also cover strongly-related physics in the CEBAF, RHIC, and LHC experimental programs. The conference will aim primarily at developments on the theory/phenomenology side, but the latest accelerator and experimental developments ...

  6. Electron-electron luminosity in the Next Linear Collider -- a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.; Thompson, K.A.; Helm, R.H.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss some operational aspects of electron-electron collisions at the Next Linear Collider (NLC) and estimate the luminosity attainable in such a machine. They also consider the use of two future technologies which could simplify the operation and improve the luminosity in an e - e - collider: polarized rf guns and plasma lenses

  7. High luminosity μ+ μ- collider: Report of a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.; Tollestrup, A.; Sessler, A.

    1996-12-01

    Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV (c-of-m) high luminosity μ + μ - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are analyzed. Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. We briefly mention the luminosity requirements of hadrons and lepton machines and their high-energy-physics advantages and disadvantages in reference to their effective center of mass energy. Finally, we present an R ampersand D plan to determine whether such machines are practical

  8. Laser optics for a γ-γ collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klem, D.E.; Seppala, L.

    1996-06-01

    The constraints on an optical system to convert the electron beams to γ-ray beams for a γ-γ collider are considered. We show that the range of possible designs is limited by the requirement of near head-on collisions and present a design which achieves two passes of the laser pulse with arbitrary control of the polarization. For certain polarization combinations, four passes appear possible. 16 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Large Hadron Collider manual

    CERN Document Server

    Lavender, Gemma

    2018-01-01

    What is the universe made of? How did it start? This Manual tells the story of how physicists are seeking answers to these questions using the world’s largest particle smasher – the Large Hadron Collider – at the CERN laboratory on the Franco-Swiss border. Beginning with the first tentative steps taken to build the machine, the digestible text, supported by color photographs of the hardware involved, along with annotated schematic diagrams of the physics experiments, covers the particle accelerator’s greatest discoveries – from both the perspective of the writer and the scientists who work there. The Large Hadron Collider Manual is a full, comprehensive guide to the most famous, record-breaking physics experiment in the world, which continues to capture the public imagination as it provides new insight into the fundamental laws of nature.

  10. The International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    List Benno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The International Linear Collider (ILC is a proposed e+e− linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 200–500 GeV, based on superconducting RF cavities. The ILC would be an ideal machine for precision studies of a light Higgs boson and the top quark, and would have a discovery potential for new particles that is complementary to that of LHC. The clean experimental conditions would allow the operation of detectors with extremely good performance; two such detectors, ILD and SiD, are currently being designed. Both make use of novel concepts for tracking and calorimetry. The Japanese High Energy Physics community has recently recommended to build the ILC in Japan.

  11. The International Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Benno

    2014-04-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed e+e- linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 200-500 GeV, based on superconducting RF cavities. The ILC would be an ideal machine for precision studies of a light Higgs boson and the top quark, and would have a discovery potential for new particles that is complementary to that of LHC. The clean experimental conditions would allow the operation of detectors with extremely good performance; two such detectors, ILD and SiD, are currently being designed. Both make use of novel concepts for tracking and calorimetry. The Japanese High Energy Physics community has recently recommended to build the ILC in Japan.

  12. Linear Colliders TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the TESLA (TeV Superconducting Linear Accelerator) collaboration (at present 19 institutions from seven countries) is to establish the technology for a high energy electron-positron linear collider using superconducting radiofrequency cavities to accelerate its beams. Another basic goal is to demonstrate that such a collider can meet its performance goals in a cost effective manner. For this the TESLA collaboration is preparing a 500 MeV superconducting linear test accelerator at the DESY Laboratory in Hamburg. This TTF (TESLA Test Facility) consists of four cryomodules, each approximately 12 m long and containing eight 9-cell solid niobium cavities operating at a frequency of 1.3 GHz

  13. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  14. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Juettner Fernandes, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    What really happened during the Big Bang? Why did matter form? Why do particles have mass? To answer these questions, scientists and engineers have worked together to build the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. Includes glossary, websites, and bibliography for further reading. Perfect for STEM connections. Aligns to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts. Teachers' Notes available online.

  15. QCD for Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Skands, Peter

    2011-01-01

    These lectures are directed at a level suitable for graduate students in experimental and theoretical High Energy Physics. They are intended to give an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) as it is used in collider physics applications. The aim is to bring the reader to a level where informed decisions can be made concerning different approaches and their uncertainties. The material is divided into four main areas: 1) fundamentals, 2) perturbative QCD, ...

  16. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  17. QCD evolution of (un)polarized gluon TMDPDFs and the Higgs q T -distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, Miguel G.; Kasemets, Tomas; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2015-07-01

    We provide the proper definition of all the leading-twist (un)polarized gluon transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDPDFs), by considering the Higgs boson transverse momentum distribution in hadron-hadron collisions and deriving the factorization theorem in terms of them. We show that the evolution of all the (un)polarized gluon TMDPDFs is driven by a universal evolution kernel, which can be resummed up to next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic accuracy. Considering the proper definition of gluon TMDPDFs, we perform an explicit next-to-leading-order calculation of the unpolarized ( f {1/ g }), linearly polarized ( h {1/⊥ g }) and helicity ( g {1/L g }) gluon TMDPDFs, and show that, as expected, they are free from rapidity divergences. As a byproduct, we obtain the Wilson coefficients of the refactorization of these TMDPDFs at large transverse momentum. In particular, the coefficient of g {1/L g }, which has never been calculated before, constitutes a new and necessary ingredient for a reliable phenomenological extraction of this quantity, for instance at RHIC or the future AFTER@LHC or Electron-Ion Collider. The coefficients of f {1/ g } and h {1/⊥ g } have never been calculated in the present formalism, although they could be obtained by carefully collecting and recasting previous results in the new TMD formalism. We apply these results to analyze the contribution of linearly polarized gluons at different scales, relevant, for instance, for the inclusive production of the Higgs boson and the C-even pseudoscalar bottomonium state η b . Applying our resummation scheme we finally provide predictions for the Higgs boson q T -distribution at the LHC.

  18. Polarized protons and parity violating asymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueman, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential for utilizing parity violating effects, associated with polarized protons, to study the standard model, proton structure, and new physics at the SPS Collider is summarized. 24 references

  19. An alternative longitudinal polarization scheme for tristan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Yokoya, Kaoru.

    1981-07-01

    For electron storage rings general conditions are derived to get a high level longitudinal polarization and a possible design of the experimental insertion for TRISTAN e-p collider is presented. (author)

  20. Theoretical progress in studying the characteristic x-ray emission from heavy few-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surzhykov, Andrey; Stohlker, Thomas; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kabachnik, Nikolai M

    2009-01-01

    Recent theoretical progress in the study of the x-ray characteristic emission from highly-charged, few-electron ions is reviewed. These investigations show that the bound-state radiative transitions in high-Z ions provide a unique tool for better understanding the interplay between the structural and dynamical properties of heavy ions. In order to illustrate such an interplay, detailed calculations are presented for the K α1 decay of the helium-like uranium ions U 90+ following radiative electron capture, Coulomb excitation and dielectronic recombination processes.

  1. Ion-acoustic envelope modes in a degenerate relativistic electron-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKerr, M.; Kourakis, I. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Haas, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    A self-consistent relativistic two-fluid model is proposed for one-dimensional electron-ion plasma dynamics. A multiple scales perturbation technique is employed, leading to an evolution equation for the wave envelope, in the form of a nonlinear Schrödinger type equation (NLSE). The inclusion of relativistic effects is shown to introduce density-dependent factors, not present in the non-relativistic case—in the conditions for modulational instability. The role of relativistic effects on the linear dispersion laws and on envelope soliton solutions of the NLSE is discussed.

  2. Electron, ion and atomic beams interaction with solid high-molecular dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milyavskij, V V; Skvortsov, V A [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). High Energy Density Research Center

    1997-12-31

    A mathematical model was constructed and numerical investigation performed of the interaction between intense electron, ion and atomic beams and solid high-molecular dielectrics under various boundary conditions. The model is based on equations of the mechanics of continuum, electrodynamics and kinetics, describing the accumulation and relaxation of space charge and shock-wave processes, as well as the evolution of electric field in the sample. A semi-empirical procedure is proposed for the calculation of energy deposition by electron beam in a target in the presence of a non-uniform electric field. (author). 4 figs., 2 refs.

  3. Measuring the sea quark polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makdisi, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Spin is a fundamental degree of freedom and measuring the spin structure functions of the nucleon should be a basic endeavor for hadron physics. Polarization experiments have been the domain of fixed target experiments. Over the years large transverse asymmetries have been observed where the prevailing QCD theories predicted little or no asymmetries, and conversely the latest deep inelastic scattering experiments of polarized leptons from polarized targets point to the possibility that little of the nucleon spin is carried by the valence quarks. The possibility of colliding high luminosity polarized proton beams in the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a great opportunity to extend these studies and systematically probe the spin dependent parton distributions specially to those reactions that are inaccessible to current experiments. This presentation focuses on the measurement of sea quark and possibly the strange quark polarization utilizing the approved RHIC detectors

  4. 2 x 2 TeV mu(superscript +) mu (superscript) collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Noble, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    The scenarios for high-luminosity 2 x 2 TeV and 250 x 250 GeV μ + μ - colliders are presented. Having a high physics potential, such a machine has specific physics and technical advantages and disadvantages when compared with an e + e - collider. Parameters for the candidate designs and the basic components - proton source, pion production and decay channel, cooling, acceleration and collider storage ring - are considered. Attention is paid to the areas mostly affecting the collider performance: targetry, energy spread, superconducting magnet survival, detector backgrounds, polarization, environmental issues. 13 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Searching for dark matter at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, Francois [IN2P3/CNRS et Universite Paris-Sud 11 Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Arcadi, Giorgio; Mambrini, Yann [Universite Paris-Sud, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Orsay (France)

    2015-04-01

    Dark Matter (DM) detection prospects at future e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders are reviewed under the assumption that DM particles are fermions of the Majorana or Dirac type. Although the discussion is quite general, one will keep in mind the recently proposed candidate based on an excess of energetic photons observed in the center of our Galaxy with the Fermi-LAT satellite. In the first part we will assume that DM interactions are mediated by vector bosons, Z or Z'. In the case of Z-boson Direct Detection limits force only axial couplings with the DM. This solution can be naturally accommodated by Majorana DM but is disfavored by the GC excess. Viable scenarios can be instead found in the case of Z' mediator. These scenarios can be tested at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders through ISR events, e{sup +}e{sup -} → XX + γ. A sensitive background reduction can be achieved by using highly polarized beams. In the second part scalar particles, in particular Higgs particles, have been considered as mediators. The case of the SM Higgs mediator is excluded by limits on the invisible branching ratio of the Higgs. On the contrary particularly interesting is the case in which the DM interactions are mediated by the pseudoscalar state A in two Higgs-doublet model scenarios. In this last case the main collider signature is e{sup +}e{sup -} → HA, H → hh, A → XX. (orig.)

  6. Searching for dark matter at colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, Francois; Arcadi, Giorgio; Mambrini, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter (DM) detection prospects at future e + e - colliders are reviewed under the assumption that DM particles are fermions of the Majorana or Dirac type. Although the discussion is quite general, one will keep in mind the recently proposed candidate based on an excess of energetic photons observed in the center of our Galaxy with the Fermi-LAT satellite. In the first part we will assume that DM interactions are mediated by vector bosons, Z or Z'. In the case of Z-boson Direct Detection limits force only axial couplings with the DM. This solution can be naturally accommodated by Majorana DM but is disfavored by the GC excess. Viable scenarios can be instead found in the case of Z' mediator. These scenarios can be tested at e + e - colliders through ISR events, e + e - → XX + γ. A sensitive background reduction can be achieved by using highly polarized beams. In the second part scalar particles, in particular Higgs particles, have been considered as mediators. The case of the SM Higgs mediator is excluded by limits on the invisible branching ratio of the Higgs. On the contrary particularly interesting is the case in which the DM interactions are mediated by the pseudoscalar state A in two Higgs-doublet model scenarios. In this last case the main collider signature is e + e - → HA, H → hh, A → XX. (orig.)

  7. Spin Transparency Mode in the NICA Collider with Solenoid Siberian Snakes for Proton and Deuteron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2017-12-01

    Two solenoid Siberian Snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in spin transparency mode of the NICA collider. The snake solenoids with a total field integral of 2×50 T·m are placed into the straight sections of the NICA collider. It allows one to control polarization of protons and deuterons up to 13.5 GeV/c and 4 GeV/c respectively. The snakes introduce a strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Snakes are presented.

  8. Generalized Lenard-Balescu calculations of electron-ion temperature relaxation in beryllium plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhen-Guo; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Da-Fang; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping

    2015-09-01

    The problem of electron-ion temperature relaxation in beryllium plasma at various densities (0.185-18.5g/cm^{3}) and temperatures [(1.0-8)×10^{3} eV] is investigated by using the generalized Lenard-Balescu theory. We consider the correlation effects between electrons and ions via classical and quantum static local field corrections. The numerical results show that the electron-ion pair distribution function at the origin approaches the maximum when the electron-electron coupling parameter equals unity. The classical result of the Coulomb logarithm is in agreement with the quantum result in both the weak (Γ_{ee}1) electron-electron coupling ranges, whereas it deviates from the quantum result at intermediate values of the coupling parameter (10^{-2}Coulomb logarithm will decrease and the corresponding relaxation rate ν_{ie} will increase. In addition, a simple fitting law ν_{ie}/ν_{ie}^{(0)}=a(ρ_{Be}/ρ_{0})^{b} is determined, where ν_{ie}^{(0)} is the relaxation rate corresponding to the normal metal density of Be and ρ_{0}, a, and b are the fitting parameters related to the temperature and the degree of ionization 〈Z〉 of the system. Our results are expected to be useful for future inertial confinement fusion experiments involving Be plasma.

  9. Hadron-hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility

  10. The super collider revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.; Pato, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors suggest a revised version of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) that employs the planned SSC first stage machine as an injector of 0.5 TeV protons into a power laser accelerator. The recently developed Non-linear Amplification of Inverse Bremsstrahlung Acceleration (NAIBA) concept dictates the scenario of the next stage of acceleration. Post Star Wars lasers, available at several laboratories, can be used for the purpose. The 40 TeV CM energy, a target of the SSC, can be obtained with a new machine which can be 20 times smaller than the planned SSC

  11. Heavy leptons at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnemus, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The recent advent of high energy hadron colliders capable of producing weak bosons has opened new vistas for particle physics research, including the search for a possible fourth generation heavy charged lepton, which is the primary topic of the thesis. Signals for identifying a new heavy lepton have been calculated and compared to Standard Model backgrounds. Results are presented for signals at the CERN collider, the Fermilab collider, and the proposed Superconducting Supercollider

  12. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e + -e - collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2γ at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines

  13. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  14. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  15. Majorana Higgses at colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Collider signals of heavy Majorana neutrino mass origin are studied in the minimal Left-Right symmetric model, where their mass is generated spontaneously together with the breaking of lepton number. The right-handed triplet Higgs boson Δ, responsible for such breaking, can be copiously produced at the LHC through the Higgs portal in the gluon fusion and less so in gauge mediated channels. At Δ masses below the opening of the V V decay channel, the two observable modes are pair-production of heavy neutrinos via the triplet gluon fusion gg → Δ → NN and pair production of triplets from the Higgs h → ΔΔ → 4 N decay. The latter features tri- and quad same-sign lepton final states that break lepton number by four units and have no significant background. In both cases up to four displaced vertices may be present and their displacement may serve as a discriminating variable. The backgrounds at the LHC, including the jet fake rate, are estimated and the resulting sensitivity to the Left-Right breaking scale extends well beyond 10 TeV. In addition, sub-dominant radiative modes are surveyed: the γγ, Zγ and lepton flavour violating ones. Finally, prospects for Δ signals at future e + e - colliders are presented.

  16. New family of exact solutions for colliding plane gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurtsever, U.

    1988-01-01

    We construct an infinite-parameter family of exact solutions to the vacuum Einstein field equations describing colliding gravitational plane waves with parallel polarizations. The interaction regions of the solutions in this family are locally isometric to the interiors of those static axisymmetric (Weyl) black-hole solutions which admit both a nonsingular horizon, and an analytic extension of the exterior metric to the interior of the horizon. As a member of this family of solutions we also obtain, for the first time, a colliding plane-wave solution where both of the two incoming plane waves are purely anastigmatic, i.e., where both incoming waves have equal focal lengths

  17. Vanilla Technicolor at Linear Colliders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Frandsen, Mads; Jarvinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the reach of Linear Colliders (LC)s for models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We show that LCs can efficiently test the compositeness scale, identified with the mass of the new spin-one resonances, till the maximum energy in the center-of-mass of the colliding leptons. In ...

  18. Future prospects for electron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Toge, N

    2001-01-01

    An overview on the future prospects for electron colliders is presented. In the first part of this paper we will walk through the status of current development of next-generation electron linear colliders of sub-TeV to TeV energy range. Then we will visit recent results from technological developments which aim at longer term future for higher energy accelerators.

  19. Linear colliders for photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The enthusiasm of the first international workshop on photonphoton colliders and associated physics, held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 28 March - 1 April, could have set a ball rolling. According to proponents of this physics, the particle physics one can study with a high energy linear collider is special and complements that of a hadron supercollider

  20. The photon collider at TESLA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badelek, B.; Bloechinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkman, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chýla, Jiří; Ciftci, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 30 (2004), s. 5097-5186 ISSN 0217-751X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : photon collider * linear collider * gamma-gamma * photon-photon * photon electron * Compton scattering Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.054, year: 2004

  1. Overview of colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, J.C.; Month, M.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of the colliding beam facilities in existence today. The major high energy physics facilities around the world are described, and a view is presented of the beam collisions in which the instruments used to make the beams collide and those used to detect the products of particle interactions in the beam overlap region are described

  2. Soviet Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchetkov, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the high energy physics program in the USSR during 1960s-1970s culminated with a decision to build the Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK) to carry out fixed target and colliding beam experiments. The UNK was to have three rings. One ring was to be built with conventional magnets to accelerate protons up to the energy of 600 GeV. The other two rings were to be made from superconducting magnets, each ring was supposed to accelerate protons up to the energy of 3 TeV. The accelerating rings were to be placed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of 21 km. As a 3 x 3 TeV collider, the UNK would make proton-proton collisions with a luminosity of 4 x 1034 cm-1s-1. Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino was a project leading institution and a site of the UNK. Accelerator and detector research and development studies were commenced in the second half of 1970s. State Committee for Utilization of Atomic Energy of the USSR approved the project in 1980, and the construction of the UNK started in 1983. Political turmoil in the Soviet Union during late 1980s and early 1990s resulted in disintegration of the USSR and subsequent collapse of the Russian economy. As a result of drastic reduction of funding for the UNK, in 1993 the project was restructured to be a 600 GeV fixed target accelerator only. While the ring tunnel and proton injection line were completed by 1995, and 70% of all magnets and associated accelerator equipment were fabricated, lack of Russian federal funding for high energy physics halted the project at the end of 1990s.

  3. Towards the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    The broad physics potential of e+e- linear colliders was recognized by the high energy physics community right after the end of LEP in 2000. In 2007, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) now under construction at CERN will obtain its first collisions. The LHC, colliding protons with protons at 14 TeV, will discover a standard model Higgs boson over the full potential mass range, and should be sensitive to new physics into the several TeV range. The program for the Linear Collider (LC) will be set in the context of the discoveries made at the LHC. All the proposals for a Linear Collider will extend the discoveries and provide a wealth of measurements that are essential for giving deeper understanding of their meaning, and pointing the way to further evolution of particle physics in the future. For the mexican groups is the right time to join such an effort

  4. CERN balances linear collider studies

    CERN Multimedia

    ILC Newsline

    2011-01-01

    The forces behind the two most mature proposals for a next-generation collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study, have been steadily coming together, with scientists from both communities sharing ideas and information across the technology divide. In a support of cooperation between the two, CERN in Switzerland, where most CLIC research takes place, recently converted the project-specific position of CLIC Study Leader to the concept-based Linear Collider Study Leader.   The scientist who now holds this position, Steinar Stapnes, is charged with making the linear collider a viable option for CERN’s future, one that could include either CLIC or the ILC. The transition to more involve the ILC must be gradual, he said, and the redefinition of his post is a good start. Though not very much involved with superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, where ILC researchers have made significant advances, CERN participates in many aspect...

  5. Study of device of electron-ion treatment of mother baking yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostapenkov, A.M.; Merinov, N.S.; Nazarov, V.N.; Balan, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Devices for electron- ion treatment of mother baking yeasts are considered and classified by the way of aerions removal from the ionization zone: the first ones - by means of the electric field, the other - by air directed flux. Devices of the first type require high voltage - 20-60 kV. Electrodynamic ion generator has been applied as a device of the second type; considered is its construction, principal of operation, given are diagrams of ion flux dependence. The methods of process calculations in the generator and experimental results are presented. The main advantage of the generator of the second type is operation at low (3-5 kV) voltages. It is shown, that the yeast growth module can achieve 36% at essential increase of biomass when using these yeasts as sowing. The device can be used for biostimulation and antisepting of food raw materials

  6. High mass-resolution electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core-excited organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokushima, T; Senba, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiraya, A

    2001-01-01

    Total electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core excited organic molecules have been carried out with high mass resolution by using multimode (reflectron/linear) time-of-flight mass analyzer. From the ion correlation spectra of core excited CH sub 3 OH and CD sub 3 OH, the reaction pathway to form H sub 3 sup + (D sub 3 sup +) is identified as the elimination of three H (D) atoms from the methyl group, not as the inter-group (-CH sub 3 and -OH) interactions. In a PEPIPICO spectrum of acetylacetone (CH sub 3 COCH sub 2 COCH sub 3) measured by using a reflectron TOF, correlations between ions up to mass number 70 with one-mass resolution was recorded.

  7. Laser-induced electron--ion recombination used to study enhanced spontaneous recombination during electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, U.; Wolf, A.; Schuess ler, T.; Habs, D.; Schwalm, D.; Uwira, O.; Linkemann, J.; Mueller, A.

    1997-01-01

    Spontaneous recombination of highly charged ions with free electrons in merged velocity matched electron and ion beams has been observed in earlier experiments to occur at rates significantly higher than predicted by theoretical estimates. To study this enhanced spontaneous recombination, laser induced recombination spectra were measured both in velocity matched beams and in beams with well defined relative velocities, corresponding to relative electron-ion detuning energies ranging from 1 meV up to 6.5 meV where the spontaneous recombination enhancement was found to be strongly reduced. Based on a comparison with simplified calculations, the development of the recombination spectra for decreasing detuning energies indicates additional contributions at matched velocities which could be related to the energy distribution of electrons causing the spontaneous recombination rate enhancement

  8. Experimental efforts at NIST towards one-electron ions in circular Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Joseph N; Guise, Nicholas D; Brewer, Samuel M

    2011-01-01

    Experimental effort is underway at NIST to enable tests of theory with one-electron ions synthesized in circular Rydberg states from captured bare nuclei. Problematic effects that limit the accuracy of predicted energy levels for low-lying states are vanishingly small for high-angular-momentum (high-L) states; in particular, the nuclear size correction for high-L states is completely negligible for any foreseeable improvement of measurement precision. As an initial step towards realizing such states, highly charged ions are extracted from the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT) and steered through the electrodes of a Penning trap. The goal is to capture bare nuclei in the Penning trap for experiments to make one-electron atoms in circular Rydberg states with dipole (E1) transitions in the optical domain accessible to a frequency comb.

  9. Hyperpolarizabilities of one and two electron ions under strongly coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Subhrangsu; Mandal, Puspajit; Kumar Mukherjee, Prasanta; Fricke, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    Systematic investigations on the hyperpolarizabilities of hydrogen and helium like ions up to nuclear charge Z = 7 under strongly coupled plasma environment have been performed. Variation perturbation theory has been adopted to evaluate such properties for the one and two electron systems. For the two electron systems coupled Hartree-Fock theory, which takes care of partial electron correlation effects, has been utilised. Ion sphere model of the strongly coupled plasma, valid for ionic systems only, has been adopted for estimating the effect of plasma environment on the hyperpolarizability. The calculated free ion hyperpolarizability for all the systems is in good agreement with the existing data. Under confinement hyperpolarizabilities of one and two electron ions show interesting trend with respect to plasma coupling strength.

  10. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  11. Probing colliding Calcium plasmas with emission and VUV absorption imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, K.D.; Hirsch, J.S.; Kennedy, E.T.; Costello, T.; Poletto, L.; Nicolosi, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Laser produced plasmas are formed when a short pulse and high power laser is focused onto a surface. Applications range from VUV/X-ray sources for lithography, microscopy and radiography to X-ray lasers, thin film deposition, analytical spectroscopy and electron/ion beam generation (and even acceleration). A battery of particle and optical techniques are now used to diagnose laser plasmas. One highly successful technique is gated-CCD (Charged Coupled Device) imaging of plasma plumes. It provides critical data on the early (creation) and late (expansion) phases of plasma plumes. However, this technique is limited to detecting only the excited (emitting) species in the plume. Recently, we developed a vacuum-UV (VUV) photoabsorption imaging facility called VPIF which enables one can track the evolution of dark plume matter or non-emitting plasma species residing in ground and metastable states. Although much is known about the dynamics of single laser plasma plumes expanding freely, little is known about the overlap between colliding plasma plumes. We are currently performing combined conventional gated CCD imaging and spectroscopy with VUV absorption imaging to map the evolution of the overlap volume of two colliding and interpenetrating plasma plumes. We are specifically tracking ground state singly ionized calcium in the plasmas by tuning into the inner shell 3p to 3d transition at 33.2 eV while the excited state species are tracked using transitions in the UV -NIR spectral range. The experiment may be cast as a model system for atmospheric and/or astrophysical colliding systems, e.g., when tracer elements are injected into supersonic winds at high altitude or when supernovae eject plasma into the solar wind

  12. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The μ + μ - collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged

  13. Ab initio study of electron-ion structure factors in binary liquids with different types of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevets, Ivan; Bryk, Taras

    2014-01-01

    Electron-ion structure factors, calculated in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, are reported for several binary liquids with different kinds of chemical bonding: metallic liquid alloy Bi–Pb, molten salt RbF, and liquid water. We derive analytical expressions for the long-wavelength asymptotes of the partial electron-ion structure factors of binary systems and show that the analytical results are in good agreement with the ab initio simulation data. The long-wavelength behaviour of the total charge structure factors for the three binary liquids is discussed

  14. Muon-muon and other high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The first section looks at the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron, of lepton and photon-photon colliders for comparison. The second section discusses the physics considerations for the muon collider. The third section covers muon collider components. The fourth section is about the intersection region and detectors. In the fifth section, the authors discuss modifications to enhance the muon polarization's operating parameters with very small momentum spreads, operations at energies other than the maximum for which the machine is designed, and designs of machines for different maximum energies. The final section discusses a Research and Development plan aimed at the operation of a 0.5 TeV demonstration machine by the year 2010, and of the 4 TeV machine by the year 2020

  15. Probing electroweak symmetry breaking at multi-TeV colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Low energy theorems are derived for scattering of longitudinally polarized W and Z's, providing the basis for an estimate of the observable signal if electroweak symmetry breaking is due to new physics at the TeV scale. A pp collider with L, √s = 40 TeV, 10 33 cm. -2 s -1 is just sufficient to observe the signal while pp colliders with 40, 10 32 or 20, 10 33 are not. A collider that is sensitive to the TeV-scale signal provides valuable information about symmetry breaking whether the masses of the associated new particles are below, within, or above the 1-2 TeV region. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  17. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED PROTONS AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUANG, H.

    2002-01-01

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) ended its second year of operation in January 2002 with five weeks of polarized proton collisions. Polarized protons were successfully injected in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV. The machine performance and accomplishments during the polarized proton run will be reviewed. The plans for the next polarized proton run will be outlined

  18. Optimizing the degree of polarization in PETRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, H.D.; Kewisch, J.; Lewin, H.C.; Mais, H.; Rossmanith, R.; Schmidt, R.; Barber, D.P.

    1982-05-01

    A method is described for compensating the depolarizing effects caused by vertical orbit distortions. The technique has been successfully applied during measurements of beam polarization at PETRA and reproducible polarizations of 70 to 80% have been obtained both in single beam and colliding beam operation. (orig.)

  19. Topics in Collider Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petriello, Frank J

    2003-08-27

    It is an exciting time for high energy physics. Several experiments are currently exploring uncharted terrain; the next generation of colliders will begin operation in the coming decade. These experiments will together help us understand some of the most puzzling issues in particle physics: the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and the generation of flavor physics. It is clear that the primary goal of theoretical particle physics in the near future is to support and guide this experimental program. These tasks can be accomplished in two ways: by developing experimental signatures for new models which address outstanding problems, and by improving Standard Model predictions for precision observables. We present here several results which advance both of these goals. We begin with a study of non-commutative field theories. It has been suggested that TeV-scale non-commutativity could explain the origin of CP violation in the SM. We identify several distinct signatures of non-commutativity in high energy processes. We also demonstrate the one-loop quantum consistency of a simple spontaneously broken non-commutative U(1) theory; this result is an important preface to any attempt to embed the SM within a non-commutative framework. We then investigate the phenomenology of extra-dimensional theories, which have been suggested recently as solutions to the hierarchy problem of particle physics. We first examine the implications of allowing SM fields to propagate in the full five-dimensional spacetime of the Randall-Sundrum model, which solves the hierarchy problem via an exponential ''warping'' of the Planck scale induced by a five-dimensional anti de-Sitter geometry. In an alternative extra-dimensional theory, in which all SM fields are permitted to propagate in flat extra dimensions, we show that properties of the Higgs boson are significantly modified. Finally, we discuss the next-to-next-to leading order QCD corrections to the dilepton

  20. Hadron collider physics 2005. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanelli, M.; Clark, A.; Wu, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Hadron Collider Physics Symposia (HCP) are a new series of conferences that follow the merger of the Hadron Collider Conferences with the LHC Symposia series, with the goal of maximizing the shared experience of the Tevatron and LHC communities. This book gathers the proceedings of the first symposium, HCP2005, and reviews the state of the art in the key physics directions of experimental hadron collider research: - QCD physics - precision electroweak physics - c-, b-, and t-quark physics - physics beyond the Standard Model - heavy ion physics The present volume will serve as a reference for everyone working in the field of accelerator-based high-energy physics. (orig.)

  1. The standard model and colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-03-01

    Some topics in the standard model of strong and electroweak interactions are discussed, as well as how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders which will become operational in the next few years. The radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed briefly, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which are relevant to hadron colliders are then discussed. Some of the problems which the standard model does not solve are discussed, and the energy ranges accessible to the new colliders are indicated

  2. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, U.; Parsons, J.; Albrow, M.; Denisov, D.; Han, T.; Kotwal, A.; Olness, F.; Qian, J.; Belyaev, S.; Bosman, M.; Brooijmans, G.; Gaines, I.; Godfrey, S.; Hansen, J.B.; Hauser, J.; Heintz, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Kao, C.; Landsberg, G.; Maltoni, F.; Oleari, C.; Pagliarone, C.; Paige, F.; Plehn, T.; Rainwater, D.; Reina, L.; Rizzo, T.; Su, S.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Vataga, E.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  3. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  4. When Black Holes Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  5. The RHIC polarized H{sup −} ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenski, A., E-mail: zelenski@bnl.gov; Atoian, G.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Steski, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    A novel polarization technique had been successfully implemented for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) polarized H{sup −} ion source upgrade to higher intensity and polarization. In this technique, a proton beam inside the high magnetic field solenoid is produced by ionization of the atomic hydrogen beam (from external source) in the He-gaseous ionizer cell. Further proton polarization is produced in the process of polarized electron capture from the optically pumped Rb vapor. The use of high-brightness primary beam and large cross sections of charge-exchange cross sections resulted in production of high intensity H{sup −} ion beam of 85% polarization. The source very reliably delivered polarized beam in the RHIC Run-2013 and Run-2015. High beam current, brightness, and polarization resulted in 75% polarization at 23 GeV out of Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and 60%-65% beam polarization at 100-250 GeV colliding beams in RHIC.

  6. A Prototype Combination TPC Cherenkov Detector with GEM Readout for Tracking and Particle Identification and its Potential Use at an Electron Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woody Craig

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A prototype detector is being developed which combines the functions of a Time Projection Chamber for charged particle tracking and a Cherenkov detector for particle identification. The TPC consists of a 10×10×10 cm3 drift volume where the charge is drifted to a 10×10 cm2 triple GEM detector. The charge is measured on a readout plane consisting of 2×10 mm2 chevron pads which provide a spatial resolution ∼ 100 μm per point in the chevron direction along with dE/dx information. The Cherenkov portion of the detector consists of a second 10×10 cm2 triple GEM with a photosensitive CsI photocathode on the top layer. This detector measures Cherenkov light produced in the drift gas of the TPC by high velocity particles which are above threshold. CF4 or CF4 mixtures will be used as the drift gas which are highly transparent to UV light and can provide excellent efficiency for detecting Cherenkov photons. The drift gas is also used as the operating gas for both GEM detectors. The prototype detector has been constructed and is currently being tested in the lab with sources and cosmic rays, and additional tests are planned in the future to study the detector in a test beam.

  7. A Prototype Combination TPC Cherenkov Detector with GEM Readout for Tracking and Particle Identification and its Potential Use at an Electron Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Craig; Azmoun, Babak; Majka, Richard; Phipps, Michael; Purschke, Martin; Smirnov, Nikolai

    2018-02-01

    A prototype detector is being developed which combines the functions of a Time Projection Chamber for charged particle tracking and a Cherenkov detector for particle identification. The TPC consists of a 10×10×10 cm3 drift volume where the charge is drifted to a 10×10 cm2 triple GEM detector. The charge is measured on a readout plane consisting of 2×10 mm2 chevron pads which provide a spatial resolution ˜ 100 μm per point in the chevron direction along with dE/dx information. The Cherenkov portion of the detector consists of a second 10×10 cm2 triple GEM with a photosensitive CsI photocathode on the top layer. This detector measures Cherenkov light produced in the drift gas of the TPC by high velocity particles which are above threshold. CF4 or CF4 mixtures will be used as the drift gas which are highly transparent to UV light and can provide excellent efficiency for detecting Cherenkov photons. The drift gas is also used as the operating gas for both GEM detectors. The prototype detector has been constructed and is currently being tested in the lab with sources and cosmic rays, and additional tests are planned in the future to study the detector in a test beam.

  8. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  9. Collider Physics an Experimental Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvezio Pagliarone, Carmine

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews shortly a small part of the contents of a set of lectures, presented at the XIV International School of Particles and Fields in Morelia, state of Michoacan, Mexico, during November 2010. The main goal of those lectures was to introduce students to some of the basic ideas and tools required for experimental and phenomenological analysis of collider data. In particular, after an introduction to the scientific motivations, that drives the construction of powerful accelerator complexes, and the need of reaching high center of mass energies and luminosities, some basic concept about collider particle detectors will be discussed. A status about the present running colliders and collider experiments as well as future plans and research and development is also given.

  10. Prospects for Future Collider Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-10-20

    One item on the agenda of future colliders is certain to be the Higgs boson. What is it trying to tell us? The primary objective of any future collider must surely be to identify physics beyond the Standard Model, and supersymmetry is one of the most studied options. it Is supersymmetry waiting for us and, if so, can LHC Run 2 find it? The big surprise from the initial 13-TeV LHC data has been the appearance of a possible signal for a new boson X with a mass ~750 GeV. What are the prospects for future colliders if the X(750) exists? One of the most intriguing possibilities in electroweak physics would be the discovery of non-perturbative phenomena. What are the prospects for observing sphalerons at the LHC or a future collider?

  11. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  12. CLIC: developing a linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a CERN project to provide high-energy electron-positron collisions. Instead of conventional radio-frequency klystrons, CLIC will use a low-energy, high-intensity primary beam to produce acceleration.

  13. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  14. The rise of colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1992-06-01

    It is a particular pleasure for me to have this opportunity to review for you the rise of colliding beams as the standard technology for high-energy-physics accelerators. My own career in science has been intimately tied up in the transition from the old fixed-target technique to colliding-beam work. I have led a kind of double life both as a machine builder and as an experimenter, taking part in building and using the first of the colliding-beam machines, the Princeton-Stanford Electron-Electron Collider, and building the most recent advance in the technology, the Stanford Linear Collider. The beginning was in 1958, and in the 34 years since there has been a succession of both electron and proton colliders that have increased the available center-of-mass energy for hard collisions by more than a factor of 1000. For the historians here, I regret to say that very little of this story can be found in the conventional literature. Standard operating procedure for the accelerator physics community has been publication in conference proceedings, which can be obtained with some difficulty, but even more of the critical papers are in internal laboratory reports that were circulated informally and that may not even have been preserved. In this presentation I shall review what happened based on my personal experiences and what literature is available. I can speak from considerable experience on the electron colliders, for that is the topic in which I was most intimately involved. On proton colliders my perspective is more than of an observer than of a participant, but I have dug into the literature and have been close to many of the participants

  15. Light Higgs production at the Compton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jikia, G.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the production of a light Higgs boson with a mass of 120 GeV in photon-photon collisions at a Compton collider. The event generator for the backgrounds to a Higgs signal due to b-barb and c-barc heavy quark pair production in polarized γγ collisions is based on a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD calculation. For J z = 0 the large double-logarithmic corrections up to four loops are also included. It is shown that the two-photon width of the Higgs boson can be measured with high statistical accuracy of about 2% for integrated γγ luminosity in the hard part of the spectrum of 40 fb -1 . As a result the total Higgs boson width can be calculated in a model independent way to an accuracy of about 14%

  16. Light Higgs production at a photon collider

    CERN Document Server

    Söldner-Rembold, S

    2001-01-01

    We present a preliminary study of the production of a light Higgs boson with a mass between 120 and 160 GeV in photon-photon collisions at a Compton collider. The event generator for the backgrounds to a Higgs signal due to b-barb and c-barc heavy quark pair production in polarized gamma gamma collisions is based on a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD calculation. For J sub z =0 the large double-logarithmic corrections up to four loops are also included. It is shown that the two-photon width of the Higgs boson can be measured with high statistical accuracy of about 2-10% for integrated gamma gamma luminosity in the hard part of the spectrum of 43 fb sup - sup 1. From this result the total Higgs boson width can be derived in a model independent way.

  17. Model independent Z' constraints at future e+e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leike, A.

    1993-11-01

    Model independent constraints on the mass of extra neutral gauge bosons and their couplings to charged leptons are given for LEP II and a 500 GeV e + e - collider. Analytical exclusion limits are derived in the Born approximation. The Z' limits obtained with radiative corrections are always worse than those calculated at the Born level. Polarized beams are only useful for degrees of polarization essentially larger than 50%. Known discovery limits on extra Z bosons predicted by popular Z' models are reproduced as special cases. The Z' constraints are compared to those predicted by four fermion contact interactions. (orig.)

  18. Accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1990-10-01

    Polarization hadron experiments at high energies continue to generate surprises. Many questions remain unanswered or unanswerable within the frame work of QCD. These include such basic questions as to why at high energies the polarization analyzing power in pp elastic scattering remains high, why hyperons are produced with high polarizations etc. It is, therefore, interesting to investigate the possibilities of accelerating and storing polarized beams in high energy colliders. On the technical side the recent understanding and confirmation of the actions of partial and multiple Siberian snakes made it possible to contemplate accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams to multi-TeV energies. In this paper, we will examine the equipment, the operation and the procedure required to obtain colliding beams of polarized protons at TeV energies

  19. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  20. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10 35 cm -2 s -1 . The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design

  1. The first ep collider run and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desy, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    After successful machine commissioning in 1991, the new electron-proton collider HERA was ready to start the experimental program in spring last year. Data taking at the ZEUS and H1 experiments began on June 26. The energy of the colliding beams was E e =26.7 GeV and E p = 820 GeV, in accord with the design. The peak luminosity obtained so far was 2.2x10 29 cm -2 s -1 . Until the end of the experimental run in November 1992 an integrated luminosity of 33 nb -1 was delivered to the experiments. Future plans concerning ep operation focus on increasing the number of colliding bunches in order to approach the design goal for the luminosity of 1.5x10 31 cm -2 s -1 . In the electron ring, up to 60% transverse spin polarization have been achieved. It is planned to install a polarized gas target experiment (Hermes, approved as the 3rd HERA experiment) which will require an electron beam with about 50% longitudinal polarization. The machine modifications required for HERMES are scheduled for the 93/94 winter shut down. Furthermore, the possibilities of installing a fixed target experiment for b-quark physics in the proton ring are being studied

  2. POLARIZED BEAMS: 1 - Longitudinal electron spin polarization at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1994-09-15

    Wednesday 4 May marked a turning point in the art of the manipulation of spins in electron storage rings: longitudinal electron spin polarization (with the spins oriented along the electrons' direction of motion) was established in the electron ring of HERA, the electronproton collider at DESY in Hamburg. A polarization level of about 55% was obtained and polarizations of over 60% were reproducibly obtained in the following days. The beam energy was 27.52 GeV, corresponding to half integer spin tune of 62.5.

  3. Status report of a high luminosity muon collider and future research and development plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.; Sessler, A.

    1996-11-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV (c-of-m) high luminosity μ + μ - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are analyzed. Finally, we present an R ampersand D plan to determine whether such machines are practical, and, if they are, lead to the construction of a 0.5 TeV demonstration by 2010, and to a 4 TeV collider by the year 2020

  4. When Moons Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufu, Raluca; Aharonson, Oded

    2017-10-01

    Impacts between two orbiting satellites is a natural consequence of Moon formation. Mergers between moonlets are especially important for the newly proposed multiple-impact hypothesis as these moonlets formed from different debris disks merge together to form the final Moon. However, this process is relevant also for the canonical giant impact, as previous work shows that multiple moonlets are formed from the same debris disk.The dynamics of impacts between two orbiting bodies is substantially different from previously heavily studied planetary-sized impacts. Firstly, the impact velocities are smaller and limited to, thus heating is limited. Secondly, both fragments have similar mass therefore, they would contribute similarly and substantially to the final satellite. Thirdly, this process can be more erosive than planetary impacts as the velocity of ejected material required to reach the mutual Hill sphere is smaller than the escape velocity, altering the merger efficiency. Previous simulations show that moonlets inherit different isotopic signatures from their primordial debris disk, depending on the parameters of the collision with the planet. We therefore, evaluate the degree of mixing in moonlet-moonlet collisions in the presence of a planetary gravitational field, using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Preliminary results show that the initial thermal state of the colliding moonlets has only a minor influence on the amount of mixing, compared to the effects of velocity and impact angle over their likely ranges. For equal mass bodies in accretionary collisions, impact angular momentum enhances mixing. In the hit-and-run regime, only small amounts of material are transferred between the bodies therefore mixing is limited. Overall, these impacts can impart enough energy to melt ~15-30% of the mantle extending the magma ocean phase of the final Moon.

  5. Electron-Ion Intensity Dropouts in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events during Solar Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lun C.

    2017-09-01

    Since the field-line mixing model of Giacalone et al. suggests that ion dropouts cannot happen in the “gradual” solar energetic particle (SEP) event because of the large size of the particle source region in the event, the observational evidence of ion dropouts in the gradual SEP event should challenge the model. We have searched for the presence of ion dropouts in the gradual SEP event during solar cycle 23. From 10 SEP events the synchronized occurrence of ion and electron dropouts is identified in 12 periods. Our main observational facts, including the mean width of electron-ion dropout periods being consistent with the solar wind correlation scale, during the dropout period the dominance of the slab turbulence component and the enhanced turbulence power parallel to the mean magnetic field, and the ion gyroradius dependence of the edge steepness in dropout periods, are all in support of the solar wind turbulence origin of dropout events. Also, our observation indicates that a wide longitude distribution of SEP events could be due to the increase of slab turbulence fraction with the increased longitude distance from the flare-associated active region.

  6. Fluid aspects of electron streaming instability in electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jao, C.-S.; Hau, L.-N.

    2014-01-01

    Electrons streaming in a background electron and ion plasma may lead to the formation of electrostatic solitary wave (ESW) and hole structure which have been observed in various space plasma environments. Past studies on the formation of ESW are mostly based on the particle simulations due to the necessity of incorporating particle's trapping effects. In this study, the fluid aspects and thermodynamics of streaming instabilities in electron-ion plasmas including bi-streaming and bump-on-tail instabilities are addressed based on the comparison between fluid theory and the results from particle-in-cell simulations. The energy closure adopted in the fluid model is the polytropic law of d(pρ −γ )/dt=0 with γ being a free parameter. Two unstable modes are identified for the bump-on-tail instability and the growth rates as well as the dispersion relation of the streaming instabilities derived from the linear theory are found to be in good agreement with the particle simulations for both bi-streaming and bump-on-tail instabilities. At the nonlinear saturation, 70% of the electrons are trapped inside the potential well for the drift velocity being 20 times of the thermal velocity and the pρ −γ value is significantly increased. Effects of ion to electron mass ratio on the linear fluid theory and nonlinear simulations are also examined

  7. Polarized electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Polarized electron sources for high energy accelerators took a significant step forward with the introduction of a new laser-driven photocathode source for the SLC in 1992. With an electron beam polarization of >80% and with ∼99% uptime during continuous operation, this source is a key factor in the success of the current SLC high-energy physics program. The SLC source performance is used to illustrate both the capabilities and the limitations of solid-state sources. The beam requirements for future colliders are similar to that of the SLC with the addition in most cases of multiple-bunch operation. A design for the next generation accelerator source that can improve the operational characteristics and at least minimize some of the inherent limitations of present sources is presented. Finally, the possibilities for producing highly polarized electron beams for high-duty-factor accelerators are discussed

  8. Polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    The book on 'polarized neutrons' is intended to inform researchers in condensed matter physics and chemistry of the diversity of scientific problems that can be investigated using polarized neutron beams. The contents include chapters on:- neutron polarizers and instrumentation, polarized neutron scattering, neutron polarization analysis experiments and precessing neutron polarization. (U.K.)

  9. New electron-ion-plasma equipment for modification of materials and products surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', N.N.

    2013-01-01

    Electron-ion-plasma treatment of materials and products, including surface clearing and activation, formation surface layers with changed chemical and phase structure, increased hardness and corrosion resistance; deposition of various functional coatings, has received a wide distribution in a science and industry. Widespread methods of ion-plasma modification of material and product surfaces are ion etching and activation, ion-plasma nitriding, arc or magnetron deposition of functional coatings, including nanostructured. The combination of above methods of surface modification allows essentially to improve exploitation properties of treated products and to optimize the characteristics of modified surfaces for concrete final requirements. For the purpose of a combination of various methods of ion-plasma treatment in a single work cycle at Institute of High Current Electronics of SB RAS (IHCE SB RAS) specialized technological equipment 'DUET', 'TRIO' and 'QUADRO' and 'KVINTA' have been developed. This equipment allow generating uniform low-temperature gas plasma at pressures of (0.1-1) Pa with concentration of (10 9 -10 11 ) cm -3 in volume of (0.1-1) m 3 . In the installations consistent realization of several various operations of materials and products treatment in a single work cycle is possible. The operations are preliminary heating and degassing, ion clearing, etching and activation of materials and products surface by plasma of arc discharges; chemicothermal treatment (nitriding) for formation of diffusion layer on a surface of treated sample using plasma of nonself-sustained low-pressure arc discharge; deposition of single- or multilayered superhard (≥40 GPa) nanocrystalline coatings on the basis of pure metals or their compounds (nitrides, carbides, carbonitrides) by the arc plasma-assisted method. For realization of the modes all installations are equipped by original sources of gas and metal plasma. Besides, in

  10. Unified first principles description from warm dense matter to ideal ionized gas plasma: electron-ion collisions induced friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiayu; Hou, Yong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-06-18

    Electron-ion interactions are central to numerous phenomena in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime and at higher temperature. The electron-ion collisions induced friction at high temperature is introduced in the procedure of ab initio molecular dynamics using the Langevin equation based on density functional theory. In this framework, as a test for Fe and H up to 1000 eV, the equation of state and the transition of electronic structures of the materials with very wide density and temperature can be described, which covers a full range of WDM up to high energy density physics. A unified first principles description from condensed matter to ideal ionized gas plasma is constructed.

  11. Quantum screening effects on the electron-ion occurrence scattering time advance in strongly coupled semiclassical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Mi-Young; Jung, Young-Dae

    2003-01-01

    Quantum screening effects on the occurrence scattering time advance for elastic electron-ion collisions in strongly coupled semiclassical plasmas are investigated using the second-order eikonal analysis. The electron-ion interaction in strongly coupled semiclassical plasmas is obtained by the pseudopotential model taking into account the plasma screening and quantum effects. It is found that the quantum-mechanical effects significantly reduce the occurrence scattering time advance. It is also found that the occurrence scattering time advance increases with increasing Debye length. It is quite interesting to note that the domain of the maximum occurrence time advance is localized for the forward scattering case. The region of the scaled thermal de Broglie wave length (λ-bar) for the maximum occurrence time advance is found to be 0.4≤λ-bar≤1.4

  12. Photoionization and electron-ion recombination of Fe XVII for high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2012-01-01

    Earlier studies on electron-ion recombination of Fe XVII, e+FeXVIII→FeXVII, concentrated on low temperature region. However, due to its higher abundance, recombination in the high temperature region is of great importance. Total and level-specific recombination cross sections and rates of Fe XVII are presented from the detailed study in the high temperature. The calculations were carried out using the unified method which incorporates both the radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR) including the interference effects. The method also yields self-consistent set of recombination rates and photoionization cross sections. Unified method is implemented through relativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) method and close coupling (CC) approximation. For the details of the high energy and high temperature features a CC wave function expansion consisting of 60 levels from n=2 and 3 complexes of the core Fe XVIII was considered. Earlier study included core excitations to n=2 levels only. It is found that the resonances due to core excitations to n=3 levels are much more extensive and stronger than those to n=2 levels and increase the recombination considerably in the high temperature region. While earlier study of 3-level calculations agree very well with the experimentally derived low temperature recombination, the high temperature rate shows a broad peak at about 5×10 6 K, near the maximum abundance of the ion, due to dominance of DR via PEC (photo-excitation-of-core) resonances of n=3 levels. Level-specific recombination rate coefficients, which include both the RR and DR, are presented for 454 levels (n≤10, l≤9, 0 ≤J≤8 with even and odd parities) of Fe XVII. This is the first large-scale BPRM calculations for recombination of a complex atomic system beyond He- and Li-like ions. The results are expected to be accurate with 10-20% uncertainty and provide accurate modelings of ultraviolet to X-ray spectra.

  13. Coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulation of hydrogen molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillo, Giovanni; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2018-03-01

    We performed simulations for solid molecular hydrogen at high pressures (250 GPa ≤ P ≤ 500 GPa) along two isotherms at T = 200 K (phase III) and at T = 414 K (phase IV). At T = 200 K, we considered likely candidates for phase III, the C2c and Cmca12 structures, while at T = 414 K in phase IV, we studied the Pc48 structure. We employed both Coupled Electron-Ion Monte Carlo (CEIMC) and Path Integral Molecular Dynamics (PIMD). The latter is based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the van der Waals approximation (vdW-DF). The comparison between the two methods allows us to address the question of the accuracy of the exchange-correlation approximation of DFT for thermal and quantum protons without recurring to perturbation theories. In general, we find that atomic and molecular fluctuations in PIMD are larger than in CEIMC which suggests that the potential energy surface from vdW-DF is less structured than the one from quantum Monte Carlo. We find qualitatively different behaviors for systems prepared in the C2c structure for increasing pressure. Within PIMD, the C2c structure is dynamically partially stable for P ≤ 250 GPa only: it retains the symmetry of the molecular centers but not the molecular orientation; at intermediate pressures, it develops layered structures like Pbcn or Ibam and transforms to the metallic Cmca-4 structure at P ≥ 450 GPa. Instead, within CEIMC, the C2c structure is found to be dynamically stable at least up to 450 GPa; at increasing pressure, the molecular bond length increases and the nuclear correlation decreases. For the other two structures, the two methods are in qualitative agreement although quantitative differences remain. We discuss various structural properties and the electrical conductivity. We find that these structures become conducting around 350 GPa but the metallic Drude-like behavior is reached only at around 500 GPa, consistent with recent experimental claims.

  14. Siting the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.; Rooney, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering established the Super Collider Site Evaluation Committee to evaluate the suitability of proposed sites for the Superconducting Super Collider. Thirty-six proposals were examined by the committee. Using the set of criteria announced by DOE in its Invitation for Site Proposals, the committee identified eight sites that merited inclusion on a ''best qualified list.'' The list represents the best collective judgment of 21 individuals, carefully chosen for their expertise and impartiality, after a detailed assessment of the proposals using 19 technical subcriteria and DOE's life cycle cost estimates. The sites, in alphabetical order, are: Arizona/Maricopa; Colorado; Illinois; Michigan/Stockbridge; New York/Rochester; North Carolina; Tennessee; and Texas/Dallas-Fort Worth. The evaluation of these sites and the Superconducting Super Collider are discussed in this book

  15. Muon collider interaction region design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Alexahin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Design of a muon collider interaction region (IR presents a number of challenges arising from low β^{*}<1  cm, correspondingly large beta-function values and beam sizes at IR magnets, as well as the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. As a consequence, the designs of the IR optics, magnets and machine-detector interface are strongly interlaced and iterative. A consistent solution for the 1.5 TeV center-of-mass muon collider IR is presented. It can provide an average luminosity of 10^{34}  cm^{-2} s^{-1} with an adequate protection of magnet and detector components.

  16. Relativistic, QED and nuclear effects in highly charged ions revealed by resonant electron-ion recombination in storage rings

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of few-electron ions has evolved into a sensitive spectroscopic tool for highly charged ions. This is due to technological advances in electron-beam preparation and ion-beam cooling techniques at heavy-ion storage rings. Recent experiments prove unambiguously that DR collision spectroscopy has become sensitive to 2nd order QED and to nuclear effects. This review discusses the most recent developments in high-resolution spectroscopy of low-energy DR resonances, ...

  17. Recent results from hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Dark spectroscopy at lepton colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2018-03-01

    Rich and complex dark sectors are abundant in particle physics theories. Here, we propose performing spectroscopy of the mass structure of dark sectors via mono-photon searches at lepton colliders. The energy of the mono-photon tracks the invariant mass of the invisible system it recoils against, which enables studying the resonance structure of the dark sector. We demonstrate this idea with several well-motivated models of dark sectors. Such spectroscopy measurements could potentially be performed at Belle II, BES-III and future low-energy lepton colliders.

  19. Physics beyond Colliders Kickoff Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kickoff workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  20. Workshop on Physics Beyond Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kick-off workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  1. Emittance control in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Before completing a realistic design of a next-generation linear collider, the authors must first learn the lessons taught by the first generation, the SLC. Given that, they must make designs fault tolerant by including correction and compensation in the basic design. They must also try to eliminate these faults by improved alignment and stability of components. When these two efforts cross, they have a realistic design. The techniques of generation and control of emittance reviewed here provide a foundation for a design which can obtain the necessary luminosity in a next-generation linear collider

  2. Status of the SLC: Developments in Linear Collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejcik, P.

    1994-11-01

    This paper reviews the performance of the SLAC Linear Collider, both from the perspective of a machine delivering high luminosity polarized beams for physics, and as a test for future linear colliders. The development of the SLC taken place over a number of years and the steady improvements have been documented in previous review papers. As a review paper, the list references also serves as a bibliography, pointing to the work of the many people contributing to the upgrades and commissioning of the various SLC systems. The major upgrades for this present run have been an improved final focus optics, new low impedance vacuum chambers for the damping rings and improved polarization from the electron source. The performance of the SLC is driven to some extent by its unique 3-beam operation in which the linac accelerates both the electron and positron bunches for collision, as well as the electron bunch to produce the positrons. The special attention required to maintain stable operation in the face of the interactions caused by beam loading from the bunches will (fortunately exclamation point) not be an issue in future linear colliders. They will deal instead with the problems associated with handling long bunch trains

  3. An Antiproton Ion Collider (AIC) for Measuring Neutron and Proton Distributions in Stable and Radioactive Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienle, Paul

    2005-01-01

    An antiproton-ion collider is proposed to independently determine mean square radii for protons and neutrons in stable and short lived nuclei by means of antiproton absorption at medium energies. The experiment makes use of the electron ion collider complex (ELISE) of the GSI FAIR project with appropriate modifications of the electron ring to store, cool and collide antiprotons of 30 MeV energy with 740A MeV energy ions.The total absorption cross-section of antiprotons by the stored ions will be measured by detecting their loss by means of the Schottky noise spectroscopy method. Cross sections for the absorption on protons and neutrons, respectively, will be studied by detection of residual nuclei with A-1 either by the Schottky method or by analysing them in recoil detectors after the first dipole stage of the NESR following the interaction zone. With a measurement of the A-1 fragment momentum distribution, one can test the momentum wave functions of the annihilated neutron and proton, respectively. Furthermore by changing the incident ion energy the tails of neutron and proton distribution can be measured.The absorption cross section is at asymptotic energies in leading order proportional to the mean square radius of the nucleus. Predicted cross sections and luminosities show that the method is applicable to nuclei with production rates of about 105 s-1 or lower, depending on the lifetime of the ions in the NESR, and for half-lives down to 1 second

  4. Optimization Of Chromaticity Compensation And Dynamic Aperture In MEIC Collider Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Fanglei; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Beard, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The conceptual design of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab relies on an ultra-small beta-star to achieve high luminosities of up to 10 34 cm -2 s -1 . A low-beta insertion for interaction regions unavoidably induces large chromatic effects that demand a proper compensation. The present approach of chromatic compensation in the MEIC collider rings is based on a local correction scheme using two symmetric chromatic compensation blocks that includes families of sextupoles, and are placed in a beam extension area on both sides of a collision point. It can simultaneously compensate the first order chromaticity and chromatic beam smear at the IP without inducing significant second order aberrations. In this paper, we investigate both the momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture in the MEIC ion collider ring by considering the aberration effects up to the third order, such as amplitude dependent tune shift. We also explore the compensation of the third order effects by introducing families of octupoles in the extended beam area.

  5. Measuring the contribution of low Bjorken-x gluons to the proton spin with polarized proton-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Scott Justin

    collide like and unlike sign helicity protons separately. It also requires understanding the ratio of the collision rates of these two portions of the beam exquisitely well. This is a long standing problem and, until recently, had threatened to severely restrict the ability of PHENIX to utilize the large data sets that have been acquired in the last two years to improve the constraints on DeltaG. We will conclude this thesis with a comprehensive overview of the relative luminosity systematic uncertainty and present a new framework within which this uncertainty can be determined. The measurement of the gluon contribution to the proton spin at the PHENIX experiment is a multi- faceted problem which requires a multi-faceted solution. This thesis describes several aspects of the solution as the single- and di-hadron measurements from MPC data are likely to provide the best constraints to Delta G at low-x for the next decade. Eventually, an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) will be designed and commissioned that will further extend the kinematic reach of the polarized DIS experiments that motivated the spin program at RHIC. In the meantime, the goal of PHENIX in general, and the MPC in particular, is to glean as much information about the gluon polarization as possible before the EIC era arrives. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. New neutral current effects at e+e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    Four fermion contact interaction effects in the processes e + e - → μ + μ - , b-barb and c-barc at the e + e - linear colliders with √ s = 0.5 TeV and longitudinally polarized initial beams have been studied. Presented analysis has been performed by means of new integrated observables expressed in terms of the forward (σ F ) and backward (σ B ) polarized cross sections such that they give information on individual helicity cross sections. The helicity cross sections allow to perform a general model-independent analysis of four-fermion contact interactions and obtain the corresponding constraints on their parameters. It is also shows that the sensitivity of the new polarized observables to contact interactions is quite larger than that of the conventional observables (σ, A FB , A LR , A LR,FB ) [ru

  7. Collider Scaling and Cost Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with collider cost and scaling. The main points of the discussion are the following ones: 1) scaling laws and cost estimation: accelerating gradient requirements, total stored RF energy considerations, peak power consideration, average power consumption; 2) cost optimization; 3) Bremsstrahlung considerations; 4) Focusing optics: conventional, laser focusing or super disruption. 13 refs

  8. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    11KEK, Tsukuba, Japan. 12Cornell University ... This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth ... In view of the requirements of the hour and the available skills and interests, it was decided to .... The actual computation, which is long and somewhat tedious, is currently under way and is ...

  9. Collider physics: A theorist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, S.D.

    1986-06-01

    Recent experimental results from the CERN anti p p Collider are reviewed from a theorist's perspective. The conclusion is that the standard model is impressively verified and nothing else seems to be present. Some other relevant phenomenological and theoretical issues are also reviewed

  10. Feedback Systems for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an integral part of the design. Feedback requirements for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at high bandwidth and fast response. To correct for the motion of individual bunches within a train, both feedforward and feedback systems are planned. SLC experience has shown that feedback systems are an invaluable operational tool for decoupling systems, allowing precision tuning, and providing pulse-to-pulse diagnostics. Feedback systems for the NLC will incorporate the key SLC features and the benefits of advancing technologies

  11. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S

    2008-02-15

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W{sup {+-}}/Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  12. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch, S.

    2008-02-01

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W ± /Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  13. The SPS panti p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareyte, J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this lecture is to give a general idea of how the collider works. The fact that one of the beams is composed of scarce precious antiprotons imposes strong constraints on the operation of such a machine. Solutions to these specific problems will be described. (orig./HSI)

  14. Fast Timing for Collider Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in fast timing particle detectors have opened up new possibilities to design collider detectors that fully reconstruct and separate event vertices and individual particles in the time domain. The applications of these techniques are considered for the physics at HL-LHC.

  15. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including ...

  16. Electroweak results from hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarteau, Marcel

    1997-01-01

    A review of recent electroweak results from hadron colliders is given. Properties of the W ± and Z 0 gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities are presented. The emphasis is placed on the measurement of the mass of the W boson and the measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings

  17. Design flaw could delay collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "A magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) failed during a key test at the European particle physics laboratory CERN last week. Physicists and engineers will have to repair the damaged magnet and retrofit others to correct the underlynig design flaw, which could delay the start-up of the mammouth subterranean machine." (1,5 page)

  18. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC, ILC and the CERN management.

  19. CERN's Large Hadron Collider project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Tom A.

    1997-03-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. After an outline of the physics motivation, we describe the LHC machine, interaction rates, experimental challenges, and some important physics channels to be studied. Finally we discuss the four experiments planned at the LHC: ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHC-B.

  20. CERN's Large Hadron Collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearnley, Tom A.

    1997-01-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. After an outline of the physics motivation, we describe the LHC machine, interaction rates, experimental challenges, and some important physics channels to be studied. Finally we discuss the four experiments planned at the LHC: ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHC-B

  1. Linear collider systems and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the systems and sub-systems involved in so-called ''conventional'' e + e - linear colliders and to study how their design affects the overall cost of these machines. There are presently a total of at least six 500 GeV c. of m. linear collider projects under study in the world. Aside from TESLA (superconducting linac at 1.3 GHz) and CLIC (two-beam accelerator with main linac at 30GHz), the other four proposed e + e - linear colliders can be considered ''conventional'' in that their main linacs use the proven technique of driving room temperature accelerator sections with pulsed klystrons and modulators. The centrally distinguishing feature between these projects is their main linac rf frequency: 3 GHz for the DESY machine, 11.424 GHz for the SLAC and JLC machines, and 14 GHz for the VLEPP machine. The other systems, namely the electron and positron sources, preaccelerators, compressors, damping rings and final foci, are fairly similar from project to project. Probably more than 80% of the cost of these linear colliders will be incurred in the two main linacs facing each other and it is therefore in their design and construction that major savings or extra costs may be found

  2. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking

  3. Summary of the Linear Collider Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The focus of the Linear Collider Working Group was on a next generation linear collider. Topics discussed are: parameters; damping rings; bunch compression and pre-acceleration; linac; final focus; and multibunch effects. 8 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  4. Lasers and future high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-02-01

    Future high energy colliders, directions for particle physics and relationship to new technology such as lasers are discussed. Experimental approaches to explore New Physics with emphasis on the utility of high energy colliders are also discussed

  5. Physics at hadron colliders: Experimental view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    The physics of the hadron-hadron collider experiment is considered from an experimental point of view. The problems encountered in determination of how well the standard model describes collider results are discussed. 53 refs., 58 figs

  6. Strings and superstrings. Electron linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandrini, V.; Bambade, P.; Binetruy, P.; Kounnas, C.; Le Duff, J.; Schwimmer, A.

    1989-01-01

    Basic string theory; strings in interaction; construction of strings and superstrings in arbitrary space-time dimensions; compactification and phenomenology; linear e+e- colliders; and the Stanford linear collider were discussed [fr

  7. Tau physics at p bar p colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konigsberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments

  8. NOVOSIBIRSK/STANFORD: colliding linac beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Plans to use colliding beams from linear accelerators are being considered at Novosibirsk and Stanford. The VLEPP scheme proposed for Novosibirsk and the Stanford single pass collider scheme are described. (W.D.L.).

  9. World lays groundwork for future linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2010-01-01

    "New physics from the Large Hadron Collider can best be explored with a large lepton collider; realizing one will require mobilizing accelerator and particle physicists, funding agencies, and politicians" (3 pages)

  10. Gluons and the Quark Sea at High Energies: Distributions, Polarization, Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, Daniel; /Groningen U.; Diehl, Markus; /DESY; Milner, Richard; /MIT; Venugopalan, Raju; /Brookhaven; Vogelsang, Werner; /Tubingen U.; Kaplan, David; /Washington U., Seattle; Montgomery, Hugh; /Jefferson Lab; Vigdor, Steven; /Brookhaven; Accardi, A.; /Jefferson Lab; Aschenauer, E.C.; /Brookhaven; Burkardt, M.; /New Mexico State U.; Ent, R.; /Jefferson Lab; Guzey, V.; /Jefferson Lab; Hasch, D.; /Frascati; Kumar, K.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst; Lamont, M.A.C.; /Brookhaven; Li, Ying-chuan; /Brookhaven; Marciano, W.; /Brookhaven; Marquet, C.; /CERN; Sabatie, F.; /IRFU, SPhN, Saclay; Stratmann, M.; /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /Buenos Aires U. /Antwerp U. /Pelotas U. /Moncton U. /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /CCTVal, Valparaiso /Hefei, CUST /Shandong U., Weihai /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb /Zagreb U., Phys. Dept. /Jyvaskyla U. /Orsay, LPT /Paris U., VI-VII /Ecole Polytechnique, CPHT /IRFU, SPhN, Saclay /Saclay, SPhT /Ruhr U., Bochum /Giessen U. /DESY /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Heidelberg U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Regensburg U. /Tubingen U. /Wuppertal U. /DESY /Cagliari U. /INFN, Cagliari /Frascati /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Pavia /Pavia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2012-06-07

    This report on the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is the result of a ten-week program at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle (from September 13-November 19, 2010), motivated by the need to develop a strong case for the continued study of the QCD description of hadron structure in the coming decades. Hadron structure in the valence quark region will be studied extensively with the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV science program, the subject of an INT program the previous year. The focus of the INT program was on understanding the role of gluons and sea quarks, the important dynamical degrees of freedom describing hadron structure at high energies. Experimentally, the most direct and precise way to access the dynamical structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies is with a high luminosity lepton probe in collider mode. An EIC with optimized detectors offers enormous potential as the next generation accelerator to address many of the most important, open questions about the fundamental structure of matter. The goal of the INT program, as captured in the writeups in this report, was to articulate these questions and to identify golden experiments that have the greatest potential to provide definitive answers to these questions. At resolution scales where quarks and gluons become manifest as degrees of freedom, the structure of the nucleon and of nuclei is intimately connected with unique features of QCD dynamics, such as confinement and the self-coupling of gluons. Information on hadron sub-structure in DIS is obtained in the form of 'snapshots' by the 'lepton microscope' of the dynamical many-body hadron system, over different momentum resolutions and energy scales. These femtoscopic snapshots, at the simplest level, provide distribution functions which are extracted over the largest accessible kinematic range to assemble fundamental dynamical insight into hadron and nuclear sub-structure. For the proton, the EIC would be

  11. Multi-TeV muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuffer, D.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that muons may be used in a future generation of high-energy high-luminosity μ + μ - and μ - p colliders is presented. The problem of collecting and cooling high-intensity muon bunches is discussed and ionization cooling is described. High-energy collider scenarios are outlined; muon colliders may become superior to electron colliders in the multi-TeV energy range

  12. Effect of μe universality violation in muon pair production on colliding electron-positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guliev, N.A.; Dzhafarov, I.G.; Mekhtiev, B.I.

    1981-01-01

    The muonic pair production in colliding electron-positron beams is treated assuming the electron and muon weak interaction constants to be different. General formulae for the differential and total cross sections applicable at arbitrary energies of the colliding beams are obtained taking simultaneously into account arbitrary polarizations of the incident particles and longitudinal polarization of the muon (μ - ). It is shown that study of some polarization characteristics of a given reaction allows to distinguish possible weak interaction μe universality breaking effects. The revealing effects are analysed in the framework of unified gauge SU(2)xU(1) models, of weak and electromagnetic interactions [ru

  13. The Strength of Chaos: Accurate Simulation of Resonant Electron Scattering by Many-Electron Ions and Atoms in the Presence of Quantum Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-20

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0012 The Strength of Chaos : accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many-electron ions and atoms in the presence...of quantum chaos Igor Bray CURTIN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Final Report 01/20/2017 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF...SUBTITLE The Strength of Chaos : accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many- electron ions and atoms in the presence of quantum chaos

  14. Performance of the SLC polarized electron source with high polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Alley, R.K.; Aoyagi, H.

    1993-04-01

    For the 1992 operating cycle of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), the polarized electron source (PES) during its maiden run successfully met the pulse intensity and overall efficiency requirements of the SLC. However, the polarization of the bulk GaAs cathode was low (∼27%) and the pulse-to-pulse stability was marginal. We have shown that adequate charge for the SLC can be extracted from a strained layer cathode having P e ∼80% even though the quantum efficiency (QE) is - beam stability. The performance of the PES during the 1993 SLC operating cycle with these and other improvements is discussed

  15. Run scenarios for the linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Battaglia et al. email = crathbun@fnal.gov

    2002-01-01

    We have examined how a Linear Collider program of 1000 fb -1 could be constructed in the case that a very rich program of new physics is accessible at √s ≤ 500 GeV. We have examined possible run plans that would allow the measurement of the parameters of a 120 GeV Higgs boson, the top quark, and could give information on the sparticle masses in SUSY scenarios in which many states are accessible. We find that the construction of the run plan (the specific energies for collider operation, the mix of initial state electron polarization states, and the use of special e - e - runs) will depend quite sensitively on the specifics of the supersymmetry model, as the decay channels open to particular sparticles vary drastically and discontinuously as the underlying SUSY model parameters are varied. We have explored this dependence somewhat by considering two rather closely related SUSY model points. We have called for operation at a high energy to study kinematic end points, followed by runs in the vicinity of several two body production thresholds once their location is determined by the end point studies. For our benchmarks, the end point runs are capable of disentangling most sparticle states through the use of specific final states and beam polarizations. The estimated sparticle mass precisions, combined from end point and scan data, are given in Table VIII and the corresponding estimates for the mSUGRA parameters are in Table IX. The precision for the Higgs boson mass, width, cross-sections, branching ratios and couplings are given in Table X. The errors on the top quark mass and width are expected to be dominated by the systematic limits imposed by QCD non-perturbative effects. The run plan devotes at least two thirds of the accumulated luminosity near the maximum LC energy, so that the program would be sensitive to unexpected new phenomena at high mass scales. We conclude that with a 1 ab -1 program, expected to take the first 6-7 years of LC operation, one can do

  16. Conventional power sources for colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 μsec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 μsec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 μsec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths

  17. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  18. Perspectives on large linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1987-11-01

    Three main items in the design of large linear colliders are presented. The first is the interrelation of energy and luminosity requirements. These two items impose severe constraints on the accelerator builder who must design a machine to meet the needs of experimentl high energy physics rather than designing a machine for its own sake. An introduction is also given for linear collider design, concentrating on what goes on at the collision point, for still another constraint comes here from the beam-beam interaction which further restricts the choices available to the accelerator builder. The author also gives his impressions of the state of the technology available for building these kinds of machines within the next decade. The paper concludes with a brief recommendation for how we can all get on with the work faster, and hope to realize these machines sooner by working together. 10 refs., 9 figs

  19. Polarization at LEP. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, G.; Altarelli, G.; Blondel, A.; Coignet, G.; Keil, E.; Plane, D.E.; Treille, D.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains a collection of papers covering the most important part of studies carried out by five study groups in view of a programme of experiments with polarized beams at LEP, the Large Electron-Positron collider under construction at CERN. The emphasis is on precision measurements at the Z peak. Such measurements are shown to be of considerable theoretical interest as well as very clean from the point of view of theoretical and experimental uncertainties. The measurement of the beam polarization can certainly be performed with sufficient accuracy, thanks to the availability of both e + and e - beam polarization. The normalization of the data taken with different beam helicities poses certain constraints that are described. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the possibility of providing longitudinally polarized beams in the LEP machine: The design of new wigglers and spin rotators, the study of correction procedures and results of numerical simulations are presented. (orig.)

  20. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-05-13

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch.

  1. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch

  2. New collider scheme at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, H.G.

    1984-07-01

    This paper presents current ideas from Berkeley concerning a possible new facility for studying the phase transition from hadronic matter to quark matter. The physics ideas have evolved over a period of more than five years, the VENUS concept for a 25 GeV/nucleon colliding beam facility having been presented in 1979. The concept for the Minicollider has been, like that of VENUS, the work of Hermann Grunder and Christoph Leemann

  3. Perspectives on large Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1987-01-01

    The accelerator community now generally agrees that the Linear Collider is the most cost-effective technology for reaching much higher energies in the center-of-mass than can be attained in the largest of the e + e - storage rings, LEP. Indeed, even as the first linear collider, the SLC at SLAC, is getting ready to begin operations groups, at SLAC, Novosibirsk, CERN and KEK are doing R and D and conceptual design studies on a next generation machine in the 1 TeV energy region. In this perspectives talk I do not want to restrict my comments to any particular design, and so I will talk about a high-energy machine as the NLC, which is shorthand for the Next Linear Collider, and taken to mean a machine with a center-of-mass energy someplace in the 0.5 to 2 TeV energy range with sufficient luminosity to carry out a meaningful experimental program. I want to discuss three main items with you. The first is the interrelation of energy and luminosity requirements. These two items impose severe constraints on the accelerator builder. Next, I will give an introduction to linear collider design, concentrating on what goes on at the collision point, for still another constraint comes here from the beam-beam interaction which further restricts the choices available to the accelerator builder.Then, I want to give my impressions of the state of the technology available for building these kinds of machines within the next decade

  4. Stanford Linear Collider magnet positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wand, B.T.

    1991-08-01

    For the installation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) the positioning and alignment of the beam line components was performed in several individual steps. In the following the general procedures for each step are outlined. The calculation of ideal coordinates for the magnets in the entire SLC will be discussed in detail. Special emphasis was given to the mathematical algorithms and geometry used in the programs to calculate these ideal positions. 35 refs., 21 figs

  5. Physics goals of future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    These lectures describe some of the physics goals that future colliders are designed to achieve. Emphasis is on the SSC, but its capabilities are compared to those of other machines, and set in a context of what will be measured before the SSC is ready. Physics associated with the Higgs sector is examined most thoroughly, with a survey of the opportunities to find evidence of extended gauge theories

  6. Electron-Ion Dynamics with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Towards Predictive Solar Cell Modeling: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitra, Neepa [Hunter College City University of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-07-14

    This project investigates the accuracy of currently-used functionals in time-dependent density functional theory, which is today routinely used to predict and design materials and computationally model processes in solar energy conversion. The rigorously-based electron-ion dynamics method developed here sheds light on traditional methods and overcomes challenges those methods have. The fundamental research undertaken here is important for building reliable and practical methods for materials discovery. The ultimate goal is to use these tools for the computational design of new materials for solar cell devices of high efficiency.

  7. FUTURE CIRCULAR COLLIDER LOGISTICS STUDY

    CERN Document Server

    Beißert, Ulrike; Kuhlmann, Gerd; Nettsträter, Andreas; Prasse, Christian; Wohlfahrt, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva is the largest and most powerful collider in the world. CERN and its research and experimental infrastructure is not only a focus for the science community but is also very much in the public eye. With the Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study, CERN has begun to examine the feasibility of a new underground accelerator ring with a length of approximately 100 kilometres. Logistics is of great importance for the construction, assembly and operation of the FCC. During the planning, construction and assembly of the LHC, logistics proved to be one of the key factors. As the FCC is even larger than the LHC, logistics will also become more and more significant. This report therefore shows new concepts, methods and analytics for logistics, supply chain and transport concepts as part of the FCC study. This report deals with three different logistics aspects for the planning and construction phase of FCC: 1. A discussion of d...

  8. Particle production at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geich-Gimbel, C.

    1987-11-01

    Key features of the SPS panti p Collider and the detectors of the UA-experiments involved are dealt with in chapter 2, which includes and accord to the ramping mode of the Collider, which allowed to raise the c.m. energy to 900 GeV in the UA5/2 experiment. The following chapters concentrate on physics results. Starting with a discussion of cross sections and diffraction dissociation in chapter 3 we then continue with a presentation of basic features of particle production such as rapidity and multiplicity distributions in chapter 4. There one of the unexpected findings at Collider energies, the breakdown of the so-called KNO-scaling, and new regularities potentially governing multiplicity distributions, are discussed. The findings about correlations among the final state particles, which may tell about the underlying dynamics of multi-particle production and be relevant to models thereof, are described in due detail in chapter 5. Transverse spectra and their trends with energy are shown in chapter 6. Results on identified particles are collected in a separate chapter in order to stress that this piece of information was an important outcome of the UA5 experiment. (orig./HSI)

  9. RHIC FY15 pp Run RHIC and AGS polarization analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adams, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-20

    The polarization information is important for the spin physics program in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). There are discrepancies between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements. First, the face value of AGS polarization is higher than RHIC ones in general. Second, the measured polarization profile (described by the profile ratio R) is stronger in AGS than in RHIC. This note analyzes the polarization data from FY15 pp run period. The results show that the differences between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements are reasonable, but the R value difference is puzzling. The difference between blue and yellow ring is worth of spin simulation to explain.

  10. KEK/NAGOYA/SLAC: Highly polarized electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In the push by the Japanese KEK Laboratory, in collaboration with university groups and overseas laboratories, to develop new techniques for the future Japan electronpositron collider (JLC), a recent achievement is a significant increase in the efficient yield of highly polarized electrons

  11. TESLA-N electron scattering with polarized targets at TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotokov, V.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of polarized eN scattering can be realized at the TESLA linear collider facility at DESY with luminosities that are about two orders of magnitude higher than those expected for other experiments at comparable energies. A large variety of polarized parton distribution and fragmentation functions can be determined with unprecedented accuracy, many of them for the first time

  12. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  13. Semiconductors Under Ion Radiation: Ultrafast Electron-Ion Dynamics in Perfect Crystals and the Effect of Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Wei; Schleife, André

    Stability and safety issues have been challenging difficulties for materials and devices under radiation such as solar panels in outer space. On the other hand, radiation can be utilized to modify materials and increase their performance via focused-ion beam patterning at nano-scale. In order to grasp the underlying processes, further understanding of the radiation-material and radiation-defect interactions is required and inevitably involves the electron-ion dynamics that was traditionally hard to capture. By applying Ehrenfest dynamics based on time-dependent density functional theory, we have been able to perform real-time simulation of electron-ion dynamics in MgO and InP/GaP. By simulating a high-energy proton penetrating the material, the energy gain of electronic system can be interpreted as electronic stopping power and the result is compared to existing data. We also study electronic stopping in the vicinity of defects: for both oxygen vacancy in MgO and interface of InP/GaP superlattice, electronic stopping shows strong dependence on the velocity of the proton. To study the energy transfer from electronic system to lattice, simulations of about 100 femto-seconds are performed and we analyze the difference between Ehrenfest and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

  14. Polarized γ source based on Compton backscattering in a laser cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yakimenko

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel gamma source suitable for generating a polarized positron beam for the next generation of electron-positron colliders, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC, and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC. This 30-MeV polarized gamma source is based on Compton scattering inside a picosecond CO_{2} laser cavity generated from electron bunches produced by a 4-GeV linac. We identified and experimentally verified the optimum conditions for obtaining at least one gamma photon per electron. After multiplication at several consecutive interaction points, the circularly polarized gamma rays are stopped on a target, thereby creating copious numbers of polarized positrons. We address the practicality of having an intracavity Compton-polarized positron source as the injector for these new colliders.

  15. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  16. SuperB: Next-Generation e+e− B-factory Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Novokhatski, A; Chao, A; Nosochkov, Y; Seeman, J T; Sullivan, M K; Wienands, J T; Wittmer, W; Baylac, M A; Bourrion, O; Monseu, N; Vescovi, C; Bettoni, S; Biagini, M E; Boni, R; Boscolo, M; Demma, T; Drago, A; Esposito, M; Guiducci, S; Preger, M A; Raimondi, P; Tomassini, S; Zobov, M; Bogomyagkov, A V; Nikitin, S A; Piminov, P A; Shatilov, D N; Sinyatkin, S V; Vobly, P; Bolzon, B; Brunetti, L; Jeremie, A; A. Chancé; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Musenich, R; Liuzzo, S M; Paoloni, E; Okunev, I N; Poirier, F; Rimbault, C; Variola, A

    2011-01-01

    The SuperB international team continues to optimize the design of an electron-positron collider, which will allow the enhanced study of the origins of flavor physics. The project combines the best features of a linear collider (high single-collision luminosity) and a storage-ring collider (high repetition rate), bringing together all accelerator physics aspects to make a very high luminosity of 1036 cm-2 s-1. This asymmetric-energy collider with a polarized electron beam will produce hundreds of millions of B-mesons at the Y(4S) resonance. The present design is based on extremely low emittance beams colliding at a large Piwinski angle to allow very low ßy* without the need for ultra short bunches. Use of crab-waist sextupoles will enhance the luminosity, suppressing dangerous resonances and allowing for a higher beam-beam parameter. The project has flexible beam parameters, improved dynamic aperture, and spin-rotators in the Low Energy Ring for longitudinal polarization of the electron beam at the Interactio...

  17. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-01-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies

  18. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  19. Beam dynamics in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1990-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss some basic beam dynamics issues related to obtaining and preserving the luminosity of a next generation linear collider. The beams are extracted from a damping ring and compressed in length by the first bunch compressor. They are then accelerated in a preaccelerator linac up to an energy appropriate for injection into a high gradient linac. In many designs this pre-acceleration is followed by another bunch compression to reach a short bunch. After acceleration in the linac, the bunches are finally focused transversely to a small spot. 27 refs., 1 fig

  20. The proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this lecture is the CERN Proton-Antiproton (panti p) Collider, in which John Adams was intimately involved at the design, development, and construction stages. Its history is traced from the original proposal in 1966, to the first panti p collisions in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in 1981, and to the present time with drastically improved performance. This project led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson in 1983 and produced one of the most exciting and productive physics periods in CERN's history. (orig.)

  1. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  2. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel M. [IIT, Chicago

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  3. Kinematics and resolution at future ep colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Klein, M.

    1992-01-01

    Limitations due to resolution and kinematics are discussed of the (Q 2 , x) range accessible with electron-proton colliders after HERA. For the time after HERA one may think of two electron-proton colliders: an asymmetric energy machine and a rather symmetric one. Both colliders are compared here in order to study the influence of the different E l /E p ratios on the accessible kinematic range which is restricted due to angular coverage, finite detector resolution and calibration uncertainties

  4. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  5. Estimates of Fermilab Tevatron collider performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, G.

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a model which has been used to estimate the average luminosity performance of the Tevatron collider. In the model, the average luminosity is related quantitatively to various performance parameters of the Fermilab Tevatron collider complex. The model is useful in allowing estimates to be developed for the improvements in average collider luminosity to be expected from changes in the fundamental performance parameters as a result of upgrades to various parts of the accelerator complex

  6. Particle physics experiments at high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, John

    2011-01-01

    Written by one of the detector developers for the International Linear Collider, this is the first textbook for graduate students dedicated to the complexities and the simplicities of high energy collider detectors. It is intended as a specialized reference for a standard course in particle physics, and as a principal text for a special topics course focused on large collider experiments. Equally useful as a general guide for physicists designing big detectors. (orig.)

  7. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds

  8. FUTURE LEPTON COLLIDERS AND LASER ACCELERATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Future high energy colliders along with their physics potential, and relationship to new laser technology are discussed. Experimental approaches and requirements for New Physics exploration are also described

  9. SLAC-Linac-Collider (SLC) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-02-01

    The proposed SLAC Linear Collider Project (SLC) and its features are described in this paper. In times of ever increasing costs for energy the electron storage ring principle is about to reach its practical limit. A new class of colliding beam beam facilities, the Linear Colliders, are getting more and more attractive and affordable at very high center-of-mass energies. The SLC is designed to be a poineer of this new class of colliding beam facilities and at the same time will serve as a valuable tool to explore the high energy physics at the level of 100 GeV in the center-of-mass system

  10. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  11. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  12. Stochastic cooling in muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10 30 cm -2 s -1 as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to ∼10 3 for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW

  13. Twistor Spinoffs for Collider Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Lance

    2006-01-01

    In the coming decade, the search for the Higgs boson, and for new particles representing physics beyond the Standard Model, will be carried out by colliding protons at the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. A collision of two protons, each of which is made out of quarks and gluons, is inherently messy. Feynman likened it to smashing two Swiss watches together to figure out how they work. In recent decades, we have learned better how the Swiss watches work, using the theory of quark-gluon interactions, quantum chromodynamics. Armed with this knowledge, we can better predict the results of collisions at the Tevatron and the LHC, to see whether the Standard Model holds up or fails, or whether new particles are in the data. But a major bottleneck is simply in adding up Feynman diagrams, for which the rules are well known, yet there can be thousands of extremely complicated diagrams. In fact, the sum of all diagrams is often much simpler than the typical one, suggesting hidden symmetries and better ways to compute. In the past two years, spinoffs from a new theory, 'twistor string theory', have led to very efficient alternatives to Feynman diagrams for making such predictions, as I will explain.

  14. The muon collider (Sandro's snake)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a feasibility study for the design of a muon collider. Recognized the fact that the particle lifetime increases linearly with the energy, we have adopted a scheme where steps of cooling and acceleration are entwined. We have indeed found convenient to accelerate the beam as fast as possible to increase its chances of survival, and necessary to dilute the action of cooling throughout the entire accelerating process to make it more effective and affordable. All acceleration and cooling steps are executed in a single pass essentially along a curvilinear and open path. We do not believe it is possible to handle the beam otherwise in circular and closed rings, as it has been proposed in the past. The example shown in this paper describes a muon collider at the energy of 250 GeV per beam and a luminosity of 4 x 10 28 cm -2 s -1 . We have adopted an extrapolation of the stochastic cooling method for the reduction of the beam emittance

  15. Flavorful leptoquarks at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Gudrun; Loose, Dennis; Nišandžić, Ivan

    2018-04-01

    B -physics data and flavor symmetries suggest that leptoquarks can have masses as low as a few O (TeV ) , predominantly decay to third generation quarks, and highlight p p →b μ μ signatures from single production and p p →b b μ μ from pair production. Abandoning flavor symmetries could allow for inverted quark hierarchies and cause sizable p p →j μ μ and j j μ μ cross sections, induced by second generation couplings. Final states with leptons other than muons including lepton flavor violation (LFV) ones can also arise. The corresponding couplings can also be probed by precision studies of the B →(Xs,K*,ϕ )e e distribution and LFV searches in B -decays. We demonstrate sensitivity in single leptoquark production for the large hadron collider (LHC) and extrapolate to the high luminosity LHC. Exploration of the bulk of the parameter space requires a hadron collider beyond the reach of the LHC, with b -identification capabilities.

  16. The Collider dipole magnet program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, R.W.; Bailey, R.; Bever, D.; Bogart, L.; Gigg, G.; Packer, M.; Page, L.; Stranberg, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider will consist of more large superconducting magnets than have been built to date. Over 12,000 superconducting magnets are required and more than 8,000 will be Collider dipoles. The dipole magnet program is on the critical path of the project and requires the optimized utilization of the Nation's resources - National Laboratories, Universities and Industry. General Dynamics and Westinghouse Electric Corporation have been chosen as the Leader and Follower companies for the design of producible magnets and the manufacturing of the SSC dipoles. Industry has the necessary experience, skills and facilities required to produce reliable and cost effective dipole magnets. At peak production, 10 CDMs per day, very large quantities (nearly 130 metric tonnes/day) of materials will have to be procured from companies nationwide and fabricated into defect-free magnets. A key element of the SSCL's strategy to produce the most efficient CDM program is to employ the Leader-Follower approach, with the Leader transferring technology from the laboratories to the Leader's facility, fully integrating the Follower in the producibility and tooling/factory design efforts, and assisting the Follower in magnet qualification tests. General Dynamics is ready to help build America's most powerful research tool. Management is in place, the facilities are ready for activation and resources are available for immediate assignment

  17. Orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Siberian snakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A D; Butenko, A V; Kekelidze, V D; Mikhaylov, V A; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yu N; Kondratenko, A M

    2016-01-01

    Two solenoid Siberian snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in the “spin transparency” mode of the NICA collider. The field integrals of the solenoid snakes for protons and deuterons at maximum momentum of 13.5 GeV/c are equal to 2×50 T·m and 2×160 T·m respectively. The snakes introduce strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in NICA collider with solenoid snakes are presented. (paper)

  18. Computing and data handling requirements for SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] and LHC [Large Hadron Collider] experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.

    1990-05-01

    A number of issues for computing and data handling in the online in environment at future high-luminosity, high-energy colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are outlined. Requirements for trigger processing, data acquisition, and online processing are discussed. Some aspects of possible solutions are sketched. 6 refs., 3 figs

  19. An energy resolved electron-ion coincidence study near the S 2p thresholds of the SF6 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivimaeki, A; Ruiz, J Alvarez; Erman, P; Hatherly, P; Garcia, E Melero; Rachlew, E; Rius i Riu, J; Stankiewicz, M

    2003-01-01

    The fragmentation dynamics of the SF 6 molecule following the excitations of S 2p electrons into unoccupied molecular orbitals has been studied using the energy-resolved electron-ion coincidence technique. Fragmentation patterns were found to depend on the particular excitation and on the electronic state of the molecular ion. The spectator resonant Auger decay at the 2p → 6a 1g resonance induces changes in the ion distributions as compared to direct photoionization. Furthermore, coincidence spectra related to the same Auger structure display different ion abundances at the 2t 2g and 4e g shape resonances. Differences were also found in the Auger decay spectra. These findings give further support for the previously suggested many-electron character of the 4e g shape resonance

  20. Electronic transport coefficients in plasmas using an effective energy-dependent electron-ion collision-frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, G.; Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Decoster, A.; Videau, L.

    2017-10-01

    We present a model to calculate the electrical and thermal electronic conductivities in plasmas using the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach coupled with the Kramers approximation. The divergence in photon energy at low values is eliminated using a regularization scheme with an effective energy-dependent electron-ion collision-frequency. Doing so, we interpolate smoothly between the Drude-like and the Spitzer-like regularizations. The model still satisfies the well-known sum rule over the electrical conductivity. Such kind of approximation is also naturally extended to the average-atom model. A particular attention is paid to the Lorenz number. Its nondegenerate and degenerate limits are given and the transition towards the Drude-like limit is proved in the Kramers approximation.

  1. Neutron beam effects on spin-exchange-polarized 3He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M; Babcock, E; Andersen, K H; Barrón-Palos, L; Becker, M; Boag, S; Chen, W C; Chupp, T E; Danagoulian, A; Gentile, T R; Klein, A; Penttila, S; Petoukhov, A; Soldner, T; Tardiff, E R; Walker, T G; Wilburn, W S

    2008-08-22

    We have observed depolarization effects when high intensity cold neutron beams are incident on alkali-metal spin-exchange-polarized 3He cells used as neutron spin filters. This was first observed as a reduction of the maximum attainable 3He polarization and was attributed to a decrease of alkali-metal polarization, which led us to directly measure alkali-metal polarization and spin relaxation over a range of neutron fluxes at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Institute Laue-Langevin. The data reveal a new alkali-metal spin-relaxation mechanism that approximately scales as sqrt[phi_{n}], where phi_{n} is the neutron capture-flux density incident on the cell. This is consistent with an effect proportional to the concentration of electron-ion pairs but is much larger than expected from earlier work.

  2. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN: Report on the Physics and Design Concepts for Machine and Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J.L.; Akay, A.N.; Aksakal, H.; Albacete, J.L.; Alekhin, S.; Allport, P.; Andreev, V.; Appleby, R.B.; Arikan, E.; Armesto, N.; Azuelos, G.; Bai, M.; Barber, D.; Bartels, J.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Belyaev, A.S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Bernard, N.; Bertolucci, S.; Bettoni, S.; Biswal, S.; Blumlein, J.; Bottcher, H.; Bogacz, A.; Bracco, C.; Brandt, G.; Braun, H.; Brodsky, S.; Buning, O.; Bulyak, E.; Buniatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Cakir, I.T.; Cakir, O.; Calaga, R.; Cetinkaya, V.; Ciapala, E.; Ciftci, R.; Ciftci, A.K.; Cole, B.A.; Collins, J.C.; Dadoun, O.; Dainton, J.; De Roeck, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Dudarev, A.; Eide, A.; Enberg, R.; Eroglu, E.; Eskola, K.J.; Favart, L.; Fitterer, M.; Forte, S.; Gaddi, A.; Gambino, P.; Garcia Morales, H.; Gehrmann, T.; Gladkikh, P.; Glasman, C.; Godbole, R.; Goddard, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Guffanti, A.; Guzey, V.; Gwenlan, C.; Han, T.; Hao, Y.; Haug, F.; Herr, W.; Herve, A.; Holzer, B.J.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jeanneret, B.; Jimenez, J.M.; Jowett, J.M.; Jung, H.; Karadeniz, H.; Kayran, D.; Kilic, A.; Kimura, K.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kluge, T.; Kocak, F.; Korostelev, M.; Kosmicki, A.; Kostka, P.; Kowalski, H.; Kramer, G.; Kuchler, D.; Kuze, M.; Lappi, T.; Laycock, P.; Levichev, E.; Levonian, S.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Lombardi, A.; Maeda, J.; Marquet, C.; Mellado, B.; Mess, K.H.; Milanese, A.; Moch, S.; Morozov, I.I.; Muttoni, Y.; Myers, S.; Nandi, S.; Nergiz, Z.; Newman, P.R.; Omori, T.; Osborne, J.; Paoloni, E.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pascaud, C.; Paukkunen, H.; Perez, E.; Pieloni, T.; Pilicer, E.; Pire, B.; Placakyte, R.; Polini, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pupkov, Y.; Radescu, V.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Rinol, L.; Rohini, R.; Rojo, J.; Russenschuck, S.; Sahin, M.; Salgado, C.A.; Sampei, K.; Sassot, R.; Sauvan, E.; Schneekloth, U.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schulte, D.; Senol, A.; Seryi, A.; Sievers, P.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Smith, W.; Spiesberger, H.; Stasto, A.M.; Strikman, M.; Sullivan, M.; Sultansoy, S.; Sun, Y.P.; Surrow, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Taels, P.; Tapan, I.; Tasci, T.; Tassi, E.; Ten Kate, H.; Terron, J.; Thiesen, H.; Thompson, L.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomas Garcia, R.; Tommasini, D.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuckmantel, J.; Turkoz, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tywoniuk, K.; Unel, G.; Urakawa, J.; VanMechelen, P.; Variola, A.; Veness, R.; Vivoli, A.; Vobly, P.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Wallon, S.; Watt, G.; Weiss, C.; Wiedemann, U.A.; Wienands, U.; Willeke, F.; Xiao, B.W.; Yakimenko, V.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Zhang, Z.; Zimmermann, F.; Zlebcik, R.; Zomer, F.

    2012-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new collider for particle and nuclear physics, the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), in which a newly built electron beam of 60 GeV, up to possibly 140 GeV, energy collides with the intense hadron beams of the LHC. Compared to HERA, the kinematic range covered is extended by a factor of twenty in the negative four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$, while with the design luminosity of $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ the LHeC is projected to exceed the integrated HERA luminosity by two orders of magnitude. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering measurements. These are designed to investigate a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The physics programme also includes electron-deuteron and electron-ion scattering in a $(Q^2, 1/x)$ ran...

  3. The Smallest Drops of the Hottest Matter? New Investigations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (493rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickles, Anne [BNL Physics Department

    2014-03-19

    Pool sharks at the billiards hall know that sometimes you aim to rocket the cue ball for a head-on collision, and other times, a mere glance will do. Physicists need to know more than a thing or two about collision geometry too, as they sift through data from the billions of ions that smash together at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Determining whether ions crash head-on or just glance is crucial for the physicists analyzing data to study quark-gluon plasma—the ultra-hot, "perfect" liquid of quarks and gluons that existed more than 13 billion years ago, before the first protons and neutrons formed. For these physicists, collision geometry data provides insights about quark-gluon plasma's extremely low viscosity and other unusual properties, which are essential for understanding more about the "strong force" that holds together the nucleus, protons, and neutrons of every atom in the universe. Dr. Sickles explains how physicists use data collected at house-sized detectors like PHENIX and STAR to determine what happens before, during, and after individual particle collisions among billions at RHIC. She also explains how the ability to collide different "species" of nuclei at RHIC—including protons and gold ions today and possibly more with a proposed future electron-ion collider upgrade (eRHIC)—enables physicists to probe deeper into the mysteries of quark-gluon plasma and the strong force.

  4. Higgs and SUSY searches at future colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... searches at future colliders, particularly comparing and contrasting the capabilities of LHC and next linear collider (NLC), including the aspects of Higgs searches in supersymmetric theories. I will also discuss how the search and study of sparticles other than the Higgs can be used to give information about the parameters ...

  5. Physicist pins hopes on particle collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Physicist pins hopes on particle collider By Deseret Morning News Published: Monday, Dec. 31, 27 12:4 a.m. MST FONT Scott Thomas, a 187 State University graduate, is working at the frontiers of science. The theoretical physicist is crafting ways to extract fundamental secrets that seem certain to be uncovered by the Large Hadron Collider.

  6. Technical challenge of future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himel, T.

    1986-05-01

    The next generation of high energy e + e - colliders is likely to be built with colliding linear accelerators. A lot of research and development is needed before such a machine can be practically built. Some of the problems and recent progress made toward their solution are described here. Quantum corrections to beamstrahlung, the production of low emittance beams and strong focusing techniques are covered

  7. Anomalous VVH interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We examine, in a model independent way, the sensitivity of a linear collider to the couplings of a light Higgs boson to a pair of gauge bosons, including the possibility of. CP violation. We construct several observables that probe the various possible anomalous couplings. For an intermediate mass Higgs, a collider ...

  8. Last magnet in place for colossal collider

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "Workers have installed the last magnet for the world's mew highest-energy particle smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The installation marks an important milestone; however, researchers still may not get the collider completed in time to start it up in November as planned." (1 page)

  9. Anomalous VVH interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We examine, in a model independent way, the sensitivity of a linear collider to the couplings of a light Higgs boson to a pair of gauge bosons, including the possibility of CP violation. We construct several observables that probe the various possible anomalous couplings. For an intermediate mass Higgs, a collider operating ...

  10. Possible limits of plasma linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, F.

    2017-07-01

    Plasma linear colliders have been proposed as next or next-next generation energy-frontier machines for high-energy physics. I investigate possible fundamental limits on energy and luminosity of such type of colliders, considering acceleration, multiple scattering off plasma ions, intrabeam scattering, bremsstrahlung, and betatron radiation. The question of energy efficiency is also addressed.

  11. Summary of exotic collider concepts group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    1995-01-01

    We present a summary of the discussions in the Exotic Collider Concepts Group. Most of the discussions were centered around the status and open problems for muon-muon and gamma-gamma colliders. In addition the group discussed some general problems and new results of accelerator physics. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  12. Reggeon calculus at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, C.; Varias, A.; Yepes, P.

    1983-01-01

    The phenomenology of the perturbative reggeon calculus at collider energies is studied. It is found that the graphs which were neglected at ISR energies are still negligeable at √s=540 GeV. The perturbative series for the total cross section still converges reasonably fast. The values of the different parameters which describe rightly the data up to ISR energies give rise to a total cross section of around 60 mb at √s=540 GeV. For these values, the corresponding low mass and high mass eikonal series converges much more slowly. The non perturbative reggeon calculus gives rise to a total cross section less than 60 mb. (orig.)

  13. Experimental Approaches at Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaros, John A

    2002-01-01

    Precision measurements have played a vital role in our understanding of elementary particle physics. Experiments performed using e + e - collisions have contributed an essential part. Recently, the precision measurements at LEP and SLC have probed the standard model at the quantum level and severely constrained the mass of the Higgs boson [1]. Coupled with the limits on the Higgs mass from direct searches [2], this enables the mass to be constrained to be in the range 115-205 GeV. Developments in accelerator R and D have matured to the point where one could contemplate construction of a linear collider with initial energy in the 500 GeV range and a credible upgrade path to ∼ 1 TeV. Now is therefore the correct time to critically evaluate the case for such a facility

  14. Collide@CERN - public lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to a public lecture by Gilles Jobin, first winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva Dance and Performance Artist-in-residence Prize, and his CERN inspiration partner, Joao Pequenao. They will present their work in dance and science at the Globe of Science and Innovation on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6.30 p.m.).   
                                                  Programme 19:00 Opening address by - Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, - Ariane Koek...

  15. Dark matter wants Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Asano, M.; Fujii, K.; Takubo, Y.; Honda, T.; Saito, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Humdi, R.S.; Ito, H.; Kanemura, S; Nabeshima, T.; Okada, N.; Suehara, T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main purposes of physics at the International Linear Collider (ILC) is to study the property of dark matter such as its mass, spin, quantum numbers, and interactions with particles of the standard model. We discuss how the property can or cannot be investigated at the ILC using two typical cases of dark matter scenario: 1) most of new particles predicted in physics beyond the standard model are heavy and only dark matter is accessible at the ILC, and 2) not only dark matter but also other new particles are accessible at the ILC. We find that, as can be easily imagined, dark matter can be detected without any difficulties in the latter case. In the former case, it is still possible to detect dark matter when the mass of dark matter is less than a half mass of the Higgs boson.

  16. Collide@CERN: sharing inspiration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Late last year, Julius von Bismarck was appointed to be CERN's first "artist in residence" after winning the Collide@CERN Digital Arts award. He’ll be spending two months at CERN starting this March but, to get a flavour of what’s in store, he visited the Organization last week for a crash course in its inspiring activities.   Julius von Bismarck, taking a closer look... When we arrive to interview German artist Julius von Bismarck, he’s being given a presentation about antiprotons’ ability to kill cancer cells. The whiteboard in the room contains graphs and equations that might easily send a non-scientist running, yet as Julius puts it, “if I weren’t interested, I’d be asleep”. Given his numerous questions, he must have been fascinated. “This ‘introduction’ week has been exhilarating,” says Julius. “I’ve been able to interact ...

  17. Multibunch operation in the Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.A.; Finley, D.A.; Bharadwaj, V.

    1993-05-01

    The Tevatron Collider at Fermilab is the world's highest energy hadron collider, colliding protons with antiprotons at a center of mass energy of 1800 GeV. At present six proton bunches collide with six antiproton bunches to generate luminosities of up to 9 x 10 30 cm -2 s -1 . It is estimated that to reach luminosities significantly greater than 10 31 cm -2 s -1 while minimizing the number of interactions per crossing, the number of bunches will have to be increased. Thirty-six bunch operation looks like the most promising plan. This paper looks at the strategies for increasing the number of particle bunches, the new hardware that needs to be designed and changes to the operating mode in filling the Tevatron. An interactive program which simulates the filling of the Tevatron collider is also presented. The time scale for multibunch operation and progress towards running greater than six bunches is given in this paper

  18. Superconducting magnets for a muon collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The existence of a muon collider will be dependent on the use of superconducting magnets. Superconducting magnets for the μ - μ + collider will be found in the following locations: the π - π + capture system, the muon phase rotation system, the muon cooling system, the recirculating acceleration system, the collider ring, and the collider detector system. This report describes superconducting magnets for each of these sections except the detector. In addition to superconducting magnets, superconducting RF cavities will be found in the recirculating accelerator sections and the collider ring. The use of superconducting magnets is dictated by the need for high magnetic fields in order to reduce the length of various machine components. The performance of all of the superconducting magnets will be affected the energy deposited from muon decay products. (orig.)

  19. The International Linear Collider Progress Report 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yamamoto, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) set up the Global Design Effort (GDE) for the design of the International Linear Collider (ILC) in 2005. Drawing on the resources of over 300 national laboratories, universities and institutes worldwide, the GDE produced a Reference Design Report in 2007, followed by a more detailed Technical Design Report (TDR) in 2013. Following this report, the GDE was disbanded. A compact core team, the Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC), replaced it. This is still under the auspices of ICFA and is directly overseen by the Linear Collider Board, which reports to ICFA. The LCC is charged with continuing the design effort on a much-reduced scale until the Project is approved for construction. An additional mandate of the LCC was to bring together all linear collider work, including the CERN-based Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) under one structure in order to exploit synergies between the two studies.

  20. Final Focus Systems in Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, Tor

    1998-01-01

    In colliding beam facilities, the ''final focus system'' must demagnify the beams to attain the very small spot sizes required at the interaction points. The first final focus system with local chromatic correction was developed for the Stanford Linear Collider where very large demagnifications were desired. This same conceptual design has been adopted by all the future linear collider designs as well as the SuperConducting Supercollider, the Stanford and KEK B-Factories, and the proposed Muon Collider. In this paper, the over-all layout, physics constraints, and optimization techniques relevant to the design of final focus systems for high-energy electron-positron linear colliders are reviewed. Finally, advanced concepts to avoid some of the limitations of these systems are discussed

  1. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Ivanov, M. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J.; Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S.; Farget, F.; Schmitt, C.; Audouin, L.; Khan, E.; Tassan-Got, L.; Aumann, T.; Beller, P.; Boretzky, K.; Dolinskii, A.; Egelhof, P.; Emling, H.; Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kester, O.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nolden, F.; Schmidt, K. -H.; Scheidenberger, Ch.; Simon, H.; Steck, M.; Weick, H.; Enders, J.; Pietralla, N.; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Zilges, A.; Distler, M. O.; Merkel, H.; Mueller, U.; Junghans, A. R.; Lenske, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Suda, T.; Kato, S.; Adachi, T.; Hamieh, S.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Woertche, H.; Berg, G. P. A.; Koop, I. A.; Logatchov, P. V.; Otboev, A. V.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Shatilov, D. N.; Shatunov, P. Y.; Shatunov, Y. M.; Shiyankov, S. V.; Shvartz, D. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Chulkov, L. V.; Danilin, B. V.; Korsheninnikov, A. A.; Kuzmin, E. A.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Volkov, V. A.; Grishkin, Y.; Lisin, V. P.; Mushkarenkov, A. N.; Nedorezov, V.; Polonski, A. L.; Rudnev, N. V.; Turinge, A. A.; Artukh, A.; Avdeichikov, V.; Ershov, S. N.; Fomichev, A.; Golovkov, M.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Grigorenko, L.; Klygin, S.; Krupko, S.; Meshkov, I. N.; Rodin, A.; Sereda, Y.; Seleznev, I.; Sidorchuk, S.; Syresin, E.; Stepantsov, S.; Ter-Akopian, G.; Teterev, Y.; Vorontsov, A. N.; Kamerdzhiev, S. P.; Litvinova, E. V.; Karataglidis, S.; Alvarez Rodriguez, R.; Borge, M. J. G.; Ramirez, C. Fernandez; Garrido, E.; Sarriguren, P.; Vignote, J. R.; Fraile Prieto, L. M.; Lopez Herraiz, J.; Moya de Guerra, E.; Udias-Moinelo, J.; Amaro Soriano, J. E.; Rojo, A. M. Lallena; Caballero, J. A.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Zhukov, M.; Golubev, P.; Rudolph, D.; Hencken, K.; Jourdan, J.; Krusche, B.; Rauscher, T.; Kiselev, D.; Trautmann, D.; Al-Khalili, J.; Catford, W.; Johnson, R.; Stevenson, P. D.; Barton, C.; Jenkins, D.; Lemmon, R.; Chartier, M.; Cullen, D.; Bertulani, C. A.; Heinz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the

  2. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, A.N.; Gaidarov, M.K. [INRNE-BAS Sofia (Bulgaria); Ivanov, M.V. [Grupo de Physica Nuclear, Complutense University of Madrid (Spain); Kadrev, D.N. [INRNE-BAS Sofia (Bulgaria); Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires Bordeaux-Gradingnan (CENBG) (France); Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S. [CEA Saclay (France); Farget, F.; Schmitt, C. [GANIL Caen (France)

    2011-05-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the structure of exotic nuclei. The conceptual design and the scientific challenges of ELISe are presented.

  3. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.N.; Gaidarov, M.K.; Ivanov, M.V.; Kadrev, D.N.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J.; Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S.; Farget, F.; Schmitt, C.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the structure of exotic nuclei. The conceptual design and the scientific challenges of ELISe are presented.

  4. The large hadron collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiani, L.

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge of the fundamental constituents of matter has greatly advanced, over the last decades. The standard theory of fundamental interactions presents us with a theoretically sound picture, which describes with great accuracy known physical phenomena on most diverse energy and distance scales. These range from 10 -16 cm, inside the nucleons, up to large-scale astrophysical bodies, including the early Universe at some nanosecond after the Big-Bang and temperatures of the order of 10 2 GeV. The picture is not yet completed, however, as we lack the observation of the Higgs boson, predicted in the 100-500 GeV range - a particle associated with the generation of particle masses and with the quantum fluctuations in the primordial Universe. In addition, the standard theory is expected to undergo a change of regime in the 10 3 GeV region, with the appearance of new families of particles, most likely associated with the onset of a new symmetry (supersymmetry). In 1994, the CERN Council approved the construction of the large hadron collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider of a new design to be installed in the existing LEP tunnel, with an energy of 7 TeV per beam and extremely large luminosity, of ∝10 34 cm -2 s -1 . Construction was started in 1996, with the additional support of the US, Japan, Russia, Canada and other European countries, making the LHC a really global project, the first one in particle physics. After a short review of the physics scenario, I report on the present status of the LHC construction. Special attention is given to technological problems such as the realization of the super-conducting dipoles, following an extensive R and D program with European industries. The construction of the large LHC detectors has required a vast R and D program by a large international community, to overcome the problems posed by the complexity of the collisions and by the large luminosity of the machine. (orig.)

  5. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  6. The principles and construction of linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1986-09-01

    The problems posed to the designers and builders of high-energy linear colliders are discussed. Scaling laws of linear colliders are considered. The problem of attainment of small interaction areas is addressed. The physics of damping rings, which are designed to condense beam bunches in phase space, is discussed. The effect of wake fields on a particle bunch in a linac, particularly the conventional disk-loaded microwave linac structures, are discussed, as well as ways of dealing with those effects. Finally, the SLAC Linear Collider is described. 18 refs., 17 figs

  7. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  8. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Kozanecki, W. (DAPNIA-SPP, CEN-Saclay (France))

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  9. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1989-01-01

    The conceptual design of a collider capable of accelerating and colliding heavy ions and to be constructed in the existing 3.8 km tunnel at Brookhaven has been developed. The collider has been designed to provide collisions of gold ions at six intersection points with a luminosity of about 2 x 10 26 cm -2 sec -1 at an energy per nucleon of 100 GeV in each beam. Collisions with different ion species, including protons, will be possible. The salient design features and the reasons for major design choices of the proposed machine are discussed in this paper. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Standard model Higgs physics at colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this report we briefly review the experimental status and prospects to verify the Higgs mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. The focus is on the most relevant aspects of the phenomenology of the Standard Model Higgs boson at current (Tevatron) and future (Large Hadron Collider, LHC and International Linear Collider, ILC) particle colliders. We review the Standard Model searches: searches at the Tevatron, the program planned at the LHC and prospects at the ILC. Emphasis is put on what follows after a candidate discovery at the LHC: the various measurements which are necessary to precisely determine what the properties of this Higgs candidate are. (author)

  11. Vector mesons in reactions with colliding electron-positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekalo, M.P.; Gakh, G.I.

    1980-01-01

    Polarization phenomena in the processes of vector meson production in reactions with colliding electron-positron beams e + e - → V+X, where V is a vector meson, X is a nondetected set of particles are investigated. For the one-photon mechanism of the process, where V and X are hadrons, the mutually unambiguous correspondence between the structural functions is found. The dependence of the e + e - → VX differential cross section upon the electron and positron polarizations is calculated using the virtual photon density matrix in the helicity basis. This formalism permits to take explicitly into account the P-invariance consequences for the angular distribution of the V-meson decay products. For the processes e + e - → πA 1 , and e + e - → rho + rho - the structural functions are calculated in terms of the corresponding electromagnetic form factors. It is noted that six functions out ten real structural functions describing the e + e - → VX reaction can be determined by means of investigation of the angular distribution of the V-meson decay products which is produced in collisions of unpolarized leptons. To study the collision of polarized leptons one more structural function can be determined. The formation of the X system with definite values of parity and spin is characterized by seven structural functions, five of which can be found while studying the angular distribution of the V-meson decay products produced in e + e - collisions with unpolarized (polarized) particles. If the spin of the X state is 1, in experiments with polarized beams all structural functions can be determined while investigating the angular distribution of the V-meson decay products

  12. Prospects of measuring general Higgs couplings at e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, K. [KEK, Ibaraki (Japan). Theory Group; Ishihara, S. [KEK, Ibaraki (Japan). Theory Group; Department of Physics, Hyogo University of Education, 941-1 Shimokume, Yashiro, Kato, Hyogo 673-1494 (Japan); Kamoshita, J. [Department of Physics, Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Otsuka, Bunkyo, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Kniehl, B.A. [II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    We examine how accurately the general HZV couplings, with V=Z{gamma}, may be determined by studying e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}Hf anti f processes at future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders. By using the optimal-observable method, which makes use of all available experimental information, we find out which combinations of the various HZV coupling terms may be constrained most efficiently with high luminosity. We also assess the benefits of measuring the tau-lepton helicities, identifying the bottom-hadron charges, polarizing the electron beam and running at two different collider energies. The HZZ couplings are generally found to be well constrained, even without these options, while the HZ{gamma} couplings are not. The constraints on the latter may be significantly improved by beam polarization. (orig.)

  13. Positron sources for electron-positron colliders application to the ILC and CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    The increased demanding qualities for positron sources dedicated to e+e- colliders pushed on investigations oriented on new kinds of e+ sources. The different kinds of positron sources polarized and no polarized are considered. Their main features (intensity, emittance) are described and analysed. Comparison between the different sources is worked out. The characteristics of the positron beam available in the collision point are greatly depending on the capture device and on the positron accelerator. Different kinds of capture systems are considered and their qualities, compared. Intense positron sources which are necessary for the colliders require intense incident beams (electrons or photons). The large number of pairs created in the targets leads to important energy deposition and so, thermal heating, which associated to temperature gradients provoke mechanical stresses often destructive. Moreover, the important Coulomb collisions, can affect the atomic structure in crystal targets and the radiation resist...

  14. String Resonances at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Dai, De-Chang; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lust, Dieter; Stojkovic, Dejan; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] We consider extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes. Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale M_s is in the TeV range and that the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the upcoming HL-LHC run (3000 fb^{-1}) with \\sqrt{s} = 14 TeV, and at potential future pp colliders, HE-LHC and VLHC, operating at \\sqrt{s} = 33 and 100 TeV, respectively. In such D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets and \\gamma + jet are completely independent of the details of compactification, and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first (n=1) and second (n=2) resonant poles to determine the discovery potential for Regge excitations of the quark, the gluon, and the color singlet living on the QCD stack. We show that for string scales as large as 7.1 TeV (6.1 TeV), lowest massive Regge exc...

  15. Emittance control in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1991-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the generation and control of the emittance in a next-generation linear collider. The beams are extracted from a damping ring and compressed in length by the first bunch compressor. They are then accelerated in a preaccelerator linac up to an energy appropriate for injection into a high gradient linac. In many designs this pre-acceleration is followed by another bunch compression to reach a short bunch. After acceleration in the linac, the bunches are finally focused transversely to a small spot. The proposed vertical beam sizes at the interaction point are the order of a few nanometers while the horizontal sizes are about a factor of 100 larger. This cross-sectional area is about a factor of 10 4 smaller than the SLC. However, the main question is: what are the tolerances to achieve such a small size, and how do they compare to present techniques for alignment and stability? These tolerances are very design dependent. Alignment tolerances in the linac can vary from 1 μm to 100 μm depending upon the basic approach. In this paper we discuss techniques of emittance generation and control which move alignment tolerances to the 100 μm range

  16. Test accelerator for linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, S.; Akai, K.; Akemoto, M.; Araki, S.; Hayano, H.; Hugo, T.; Ishihara, N.; Kawamoto, T.; Kimura, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Kubo, T.; Kurokawa, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Mizuno, H.; Odagiri, J.; Otake, Y.; Sakai, H.; Shidara, T.; Shintake, T.; Suetake, M.; Takashima, T.; Takata, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Urakawa, J.; Yamamoto, N.; Yokoya, K.; Yoshida, M.; Yoshioka, M.; Yamaoka, Y.

    1989-01-01

    KEK has proposed to build Test Accelerator Facility (TAF) capable of producing a 2.5 GeV electron beam for the purpose of stimulating R ampersand D for linear collider in TeV region. The TAF consists of a 1.5 GeV S-band linear accelerator, 1.5 GeV damping ring and 1.0 GeV X-band linear accelerator. The TAF project will be carried forward in three phases. Through Phase-I and Phase-II, the S-band and X-band linacs will be constructed, and in Phase-III, the damping ring will be completed. The construction of TAF Phase-I has started, and the 0.2 GeV S-band injector linac has been almost completed. The Phase-I linac is composed of a 240 keV electron gun, subharmonic bunchers, prebunchers and traveling buncher followed by high-gradient accelerating structures. The SLAC 5045 klystrons are driven at 450 kV in order to obtain the rf-power of 100 MW in a 1 μs pulse duration. The rf-power from a pair of klystrons are combined into an accelerating structure. The accelerating gradient up to 100 MeV/m will be obtained in a 0.6 m long structure. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Neutron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firk, F.W.K.

    1976-01-01

    Some recent experiments involving polarized neutrons are discussed; they demonstrate how polarization studies provide information on fundamental aspects of nuclear structure that cannot be obtained from more traditional neutron studies. Until recently, neutron polarization studies tended to be limited either to very low energies or to restricted regions at higher energies, determined by the kinematics of favorable (p, vector n) and (d, vector n) reactions. With the advent of high intensity pulsed electron and proton accelerators and of beams of vector polarized deuterons, this is no longer the case. One has entered an era in which neutron polarization experiments are now being carried out, in a routine way, throughout the entire range from thermal energies to tens-of-MeV. The significance of neutron polarization studies is illustrated in discussions of a wide variety of experiments that include the measurement of T-invariance in the β-decay of polarized neutrons, a search for the effects of meson exchange currents in the photo-disintegration of the deuteron, the determination of quantum numbers of states in the fission of aligned 235 U and 237 Np induced by polarized neutrons, and the double- and triple-scattering of fast neutrons by light nuclei

  18. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  19. Final Report for the UNIVERSITY-BASED DETECTOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR THE INTERNATIONAL LINEAR COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E [Univ. of Oregon

    2013-04-22

    The U.S Linear Collider Detector R&D program, supported by the DOE and NSF umbrella grants to the University of Oregon, made significant advances on many critical aspects of the ILC detector program. Progress advanced on vertex detector sensor development, silicon and TPC tracking, calorimetry on candidate technologies, and muon detection, as well as on beamline measurements of luminosity, energy, and polarization.

  20. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    The final focus system of a linear collider must perform two primary functions, it must focus the two opposing beams so that their transverse dimensions at the interaction point are small enough to yield acceptable luminosity, and it must steer the beams together to maintain collisions. In addition, the final focus system must transport the outgoing beams to a location where they can be recycled or safely dumped. Elementary optical considerations for linear collider final focus systems are discussed, followed by chromatic aberrations. The design of the final focus system of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is described. Tuning and diagnostics and steering to collision are discussed. Most of the examples illustrating the concepts covered are drawn from the SLC, but the principles and conclusions are said to be generally applicable to other linear collider designs as well. 26 refs., 17 figs

  1. WHIZARD 2.2 for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilian, W.; Ohl, T.

    2014-03-01

    We review the current status of the WHIZARD event generator. We discuss, in particular, recent improvements and features that are relevant for simulating the physics program at a future Linear Collider.

  2. Parameters of the SLAC Next Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, T.; Adolphsen, C.; Burke, D.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the authors present the parameters and layout of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC is the SLAC design of a future linear collider using X-band RF technology in the main linacs. The collider would have an initial center-of-mass energy of 0.5 TeV which would be upgraded to 1 TeV and then 1.5 TeV in two stages. The design luminosity is > 5 x 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 at 0.5 TeV and > 10 34 cm -2 sec -1 at 1.0 and 1.5 TeV. They briefly describe the components of the collider and the proposed energy upgrade scenario

  3. New Stanford collider starts at Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    On 11 April the new SLC Stanford Linear Collider created its first Z particle, inaugurating high energy physics research at this novel machine based on the two-mile linac at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre, SLAC. (orig./HSI).

  4. Topcolor and the First Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.T.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a class of models of electroweak symmetry breaking that involve strong dynamics and top quark condensation. A new scheme based upon a seesaw mechanism appears particularly promising. Various implications for the first-stage muon collider are discussed

  5. Magnet R and D for future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbi, Gian Luca

    2001-01-01

    High-energy colliders complementing and expanding the physics reach of LHC are presently under study in the United States, Europe and Japan. The magnet system is a major cost driver for hadron colliders at the energy frontier, and critical to the successful operation of muon colliders. Under most scenarios, magnet design as well as vacuum and cryogenic systems are complicated by high radiation loads. Magnet R and D programs are underway worldwide to take advantage of new developments in superconducting materials, achieve higher efficiency and simplify fabrication while preserving accelerator-class field quality. A review of recent progress in magnet technology for future colliders is presented, with emphasis on the most innovative design concepts and fabrication techniques

  6. Timeline for Particle Collider in doubt

    CERN Multimedia

    Klapper, Bradley S

    2007-01-01

    "Officials at CERN said the possible delays in getting the particle collider back online are the result of the magnet failure and cooling processes that have been slower than expected for the 17-mile tunnel." (1,5 page)

  7. The collider calamity, publ. by Scientific American

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "For decades, the big guns of American science have been the U.S. Department of Energy's particle collider, which investigate the nature of matter by accelerating subatomic particles and smashing them together." (1 page)

  8. Decoupling schemes for the SSC Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Y.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Meinke, R.; Peterson, J.; Pilat, F.; Stampke, S.; Syphers, M.; Talman, R.

    1993-05-01

    A decoupling system is designed for the SSC Collider. This system can accommodate three decoupling schemes by using 44 skew quadrupoles in the different configurations. Several decoupling schemes are studied and compared in this paper

  9. Test facilities for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    During the past several years there has been a tremendous amount of progress on Linear Collider technology world wide. This research has led to the construction of the test facilities described in this report. Some of the facilities will be complete as early as the end of 1996, while others will be finishing up around the end 1997. Even now there are extensive tests ongoing for the enabling technologies for all of the test facilities. At the same time the Linear Collider designs are quite mature now and the SLC is providing the key experience base that can only come from a working collider. All this taken together indicates that the technology and accelerator physics will be ready for a future Linear Collider project to begin in the last half of the 1990s

  10. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-01-01

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e + e - collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two

  11. Linear accelerators for TeV colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1985-05-01

    This paper summarizes four tutorial lectures on linear electron accelerators: Electron Linacs for TeV Colliders, Emittance and Damping Rings, Wake Fields: Basic Concepts, and Wake Field Effects in Linacs

  12. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e + - e - colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II)

  13. Il Collisore LHC (Large Hadron Collider)

    CERN Multimedia

    Brianti, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    In 2007, in a new Collider in the tunnel of 27km, collisions will be made between very powerful beams of protons and ions. The energies will be very high to try to catch the most tiny particle (1 page)

  14. Topcolor and the First Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, C.T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)][Chicago Univ., IL (United States)

    1998-04-01

    We describe a class of models of electroweak symmetry breaking that involve strong dynamics and top quark condensation. A new scheme based upon a seesaw mechanism appears particularly promising. Various implications for the first-stage muon collider are discussed.

  15. Working group report: Collider and B physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The activities of the working group including some of the seminars are summarized. The written ... The search for supersymmetry at future colliders also received a lot of attention. It is believed that ..... Then the kinematic regions can be divided.

  16. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (4/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  17. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  18. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (2/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  19. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (3/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  20. Facts about real antimatter collide with fiction

    CERN Multimedia

    Siegfried, Tom

    2004-01-01

    When science collides with fiction, sometimes a best seller emerges from the debris. Take Dan Brown's Angels & Demons, for instance, a murder mystery based on science at CERN, the European nuclear research laboratory outside Geneva

  1. Super High Energy Colliding Beam Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    This lecture presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evolution of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 kilometer tunnel of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachie in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particle.

  2. Investigation of effective impact parameters in electron-ion temperature relaxation via Particle-Particle Coulombic molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yinjian

    2017-09-01

    Aiming at a high simulation accuracy, a Particle-Particle (PP) Coulombic molecular dynamics model is implemented to study the electron-ion temperature relaxation. In this model, the Coulomb's law is directly applied in a bounded system with two cutoffs at both short and long length scales. By increasing the range between the two cutoffs, it is found that the relaxation rate deviates from the BPS theory and approaches the LS theory and the GMS theory. Also, the effective minimum and maximum impact parameters (bmin* and bmax*) are obtained. For the simulated plasma condition, bmin* is about 6.352 times smaller than the Landau length (bC), and bmax* is about 2 times larger than the Debye length (λD), where bC and λD are used in the LS theory. Surprisingly, the effective relaxation time obtained from the PP model is very close to the LS theory and the GMS theory, even though the effective Coulomb logarithm is two times greater than the one used in the LS theory. Besides, this work shows that the PP model (commonly known as computationally expensive) is becoming practicable via GPU parallel computing techniques.

  3. Validity of the independent-processes approximation for resonance structures in electron-ion scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badnell, N.R.; Pindzola, M.S.; Griffin, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The total inelastic cross section for electron-ion scattering may be found in the independent-processes approximation by adding the resonant cross section to the nonresonant background cross section. We study the validity of this approximation for electron excitation of multiply charged ions. The resonant-excitation cross section is calculated independently using distorted waves for various Li-like and Na-like ions using (N+1)-electron atomic-structure methods previously developed for the calculation of dielectronic-recombination cross sections. To check the effects of interference between the two scattering processes, we also carry out detailed close-coupling calculations for the same atomic ions using the R-matrix method. For low ionization stages, interference effects manifest themselves sometimes as strong window features in the close-coupling cross section, which are not present in the independent-processes cross section. For higher ionization stages, however, the resonance features found in the independent-processes approximation are found to be in good agreement with the close-coupling results

  4. A compact CMA spectrometer with axially integrated hybrid electron-ion gun for ISS, AES and sputter depth profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisler, E.; Bas, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Until now, the combined application of electrons and ions in surface analysis required two separate sources for electrons and ions with different incidence angles. The newly developed hybrid electron-ion gun, however, allows bombardment of the same sample area both with noble gas ions and with electrons coming from the same direction. By integrating such a hybrid gun axially in a cylindrical mirror energy analyser (CMA) a sensitive compact single flange spectrometer obtains for ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and sputtering all within normal beam incidence. This concept makes accurate beam centering very easy. Additionally, the bombardment from the same direction both for sputtering and for surface analysis brings advantages in depth profiling. The scattering angle for ISS has a constant value of about 138 0 . The hybrid gun delivers typically an electron beam current of -20μA at 3keV for AES, and an ion beam current of +40 nA and +1.2μA at 2 keV for ISS and sputtering respectively. The switching time between ISS, AES, and sputtering mode is about 0.1 s. So this system is best suited for automatically controlled depth profile analysis. The design and operation of this new system will be described and some applications will be discussed. (author)

  5. Structure of very heavy few-electron ions - new results from the heavy ion storage ring, ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokler, P.H.; Stoehlker, T.; Kozhuharov, C.; Moshammer, R.; Rymuza, P.; Bosch, F.; Kandler, T.

    1993-08-01

    The heavy ion synchrotron/storage ring facility at GSI, SIS/ESR, provides intense beams of cooled, highly-charged ions up to naked uranium (U 92+ ). By electron capture during ion-atom collisions in the gas target of the ESR or by recombination at ion-electron encounters in the ''electron cooler'' excited states are populated. The detailed structure of very heavy one-, two- and three-electron ions is studied. The different mechanisms leading to the excited states are described, as well as the new experimental tools now available for a detailed spectroscopy of these interesting systems. Special emphasis is given to X-ray transitions to the groundstates in H- and He-like systems. For the heaviest species the groundstate Lambshift can now be probed on an accuracy level of better than 10% using solid-state X-ray detectors. Applying dispersive X-ray analyzing techniques, this accuracy will certainly be improved in future. However, utilizing the dielectronic resonances for a spectroscopy, the structure in Li-like heavy ions can already be probed now on the sub eV level. (orig.)

  6. Initial value problem for colliding gravitational plane waves. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, I.; Ernst, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a homogeneous Hilbert problem (HHP) approach to the initial value problem (IVP) for colliding gravitational plane waves with noncollinear polarization that began in two earlier papers [I. Hauser and F. J. Ernst, J. Math. Phys. 30, 872 (1989) and 30, 2322 (1989)] is continued. After formulating the HHP, the description of how one can apply it to generate a new family of solutions of the colliding wave problem that generalizes a three-parameter family constructed by Ernst, Garcia, and Hauser [J. Math. Phys. 29, 681 (1988)] using a double-Harrison transformation is given. Then the proof that the solution of the new HHP indeed solves the IVP that is posed is presented. A matrix Fredholm equation of the second kind that is equivalent to the HHP is also deduced. This will be used in a sequel to complete the proof of existence of solutions of the HHP and the proof that certain assumed differentiability hypotheses are in fact valid

  7. Brilliant positron sources for CLIC and other collider projects

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Dadoun, Olivier; Kamitani, Takuya; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Variola, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider), as future linear collider, requires an intense positron source. A brief history is given up to the present baseline configuration which assumes unpolarized beams. A conventional scheme, with a single tungsten target as source of e-e+ pairs, has been studied several years ago. But, in order to reduce the beam energy deposition on the e+ target converter, a double-target system has been studied and proposed as baseline for CLIC. With this ‘‘hybrid target’’, the positron production scheme is based on the channeling process. A 5 GeV electron beam impinges on a thin crystal tungsten target aligned along its axis, enhancing the photon production by channeling radiation. A large number of photons are sent to a thick amorphous tungsten target, generating large number of e-e+ pairs, while the charged particles are bent away, reducing the deposited energy and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). The targets parameters are optimized for the positron production. Polarize...

  8. W,Z0 production at the pp collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.; Gordon, H.A.; Killian, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    We have examined some experimental questions relating to the production of W's and Z 0 's at a pp collider. To be specific we have considered a Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) with center of energy √s = 800 GeV and luminosity L = 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 (the standard BNL Isabelle (ISA) operating conditions). Most experiments should accumulate 10 sec of beam and therefore will have an integrated luminosity L = 10 40 cm -2 . This corresponds to the production of millions of conventional charged W's per interaction region and gives the potential for high statistics studies of the properties of W's and for experiments searching for higher mass objects. Our focus has been on testing predictions of the standard model. We have concentrated on W production since it is likely the standard Z 0 will be observed in the near future. In most cases the W is detected via its semileptonic decay W → l + nu. The specific topics considered are: W +- production: pp → W +- + X, W +- → e +- + nu, pp → W +- + γ + X, polarization effects in W +- production, and very high luminosity experiments

  9. The promise of the large collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In 2007, the most powerful particle accelerator ever built, CERN's new Large hadron Collider, will probe the secrets of matter in the energy states prevailing in the moments after the Big Bang. By colliding particles together when they are moving at close to the speed of ight, physicists hope to find out about matter in its earliest forms, using the energy produced by the collisions." (2 pages)

  10. Photon Linear Collider Gamma-Gamma Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronberg, J.

    2012-01-01

    High energy photon - photon collisions can be achieved by adding high average power short-pulse lasers to the Linear Collider, enabling an expanded physics program for the facility. The technology required to realize a photon linear collider continues to mature. Compton back-scattering technology is being developed around the world for low energy light source applications and high average power lasers are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion.

  11. Physics goals of the next linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Marciano, W.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Gunion, J. F. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)] [and others; NLC ZDR Design Group; NLC Physics Working Group

    1996-05-01

    We present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center of mass energy 500 GeV-1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. 132 refs., 54 figs., 14 tabs.

  12. Physics goals of the next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlman, S.; Marciano, W.J.; Gunion, J. F.

    1996-05-01

    We present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center of mass energy 500 GeV-1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. 132 refs., 54 figs., 14 tabs

  13. Excited quark production at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    1987-06-01

    Composite models generally predict the existence of excited quark and lepton states. We consider the production and experimental signatures of excited quarks Q* of spin and isospin 1/2 at hadron colliders and estimate the background for those channels which are most promising for Q* identification. Multi-TeV pp-colliders will give access to such particles with masses up to several TeV

  14. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the Collider delivered its goods at a total energy of 1600 GeV, significantly boosting the world record for laboratory collisions

  15. Physics possibilities of lepton and hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peccei, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    After a brief introduction to lepton and hadron colliders presently being planned, I give some examples of the nice standard physics which is expected to be seen in them. The bulk of the discussion, however, is centered on signals for new physics. Higgs searches at the new colliders are discussed, as well as signatures and prospects for detecting effects of supersymmetry, compositeness and dynamical symmetry breakdown. (orig.)

  16. Considerations on Energy Frontier Colliders after LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2016-11-15

    Since 1960’s, particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics, 29 total have been built and operated, 7 are in operation now. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The future of the world-wide HEP community critically depends on the feasibility of possible post-LHC colliders. The concept of the feasibility is complex and includes at least three factors: feasibility of energy, feasibility of luminosity and feasibility of cost. Here we overview all current options for post-LHC colliders from such perspective (ILC, CLIC, Muon Collider, plasma colliders, CEPC, FCC, HE-LHC) and discuss major challenges and accelerator R&D required to demonstrate feasibility of an energy frontier accelerator facility following the LHC. We conclude by taking a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and discussion on the perspectives for the far future of the accelerator-based particle physics. This paper largely follows previous study [1] and the presenta ion given at the ICHEP’2016 conference in Chicago [2].

  17. Physics at high luminosity muon colliders and a facility overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Physics potentials at future colliders including high luminosity μ + μ - colliders are discussed. Luminosity requirement, estimates for Muon collider energies of interest (0.1 TeV to 100 TeV) are calculated. Schematics and an overview of Muon Collider facility concept are also included

  18. Measurement of electron beam polarization at the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, H.

    1987-03-01

    The polarimeters needed to monitor and measure electron beam polarization at the Stanford Linear Collider are discussed. Two types of polarimeters, are to be used. The first is based on the spin dependent elastic scattering of photons from high energy electrons. The second utilizes the spin dependence of elastic electron-electron scattering. The plans of the SLC polarization group to measure and monitor electron beam polarization are discussed. A brief discussion of the physics and the demands it imposes on beam polarization measurements is presented. The Compton polarimeter and the essential characteristics of two Moeller polarimeters are presented

  19. Ionic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    Ferroelectricity occurs in many different kinds of materials. Many of the technologically important solids, which are ferroelectric, can be classified as ionic. Any microscopic theory of ferroelectricity must contain a description of local polarization forces. We have collaborated in the development of a theory of ionic polarization which is quite successful. Its basic assumption is that the polarization is derived from the properties of the individual ions. We have applied this theory successfully to diverse subjects as linear and nonlinear optical response, phonon dispersion, and piezoelectricity. We have developed numerical methods using the local Density approximation to calculate the multipole polarizabilities of ions when subject to various fields. We have also developed methods of calculating the nonlinear hyperpolarizability, and showed that it can be used to explain light scattering experiments. This paper elaborates on this polarization theory

  20. Polarization experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halzen, F.

    1977-02-01

    In a theoretical review of polarization experiments two important points are emphasized: (a) their versatility and their relevance to a large variety of aspects of hadron physics (tests of basic symmetries; a probe of strong interaction dynamics; a tool for hadron spectroscopy); (b) the wealth of experimental data on polarization parameters in pp and np scattering in the Regge language and in the diffraction language. (author)

  1. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute, to design an energy frontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new 80-100 km tunnel with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV, an order of magnitude beyond the LHC's, as a long-term goal. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90-350 GeV high-luminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines will be assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics by the end of 2018. The presentation will summarize the status of machine designs and parameters and discuss the essential technical components to be developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets with a field of 16 T for the hadron collider and high-power, high-efficiency RF systems for the lepton collider. In addition the unprecedented beam power presents special challenges for the hadron collider for all aspects of beam handling and machine protection. First conclusions of geological investigations and implementation studies will be presented. The status of the FCC collaboration and the further planning for the study will be outlined.

  2. High luminosity polarized proton collisions at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides the unique opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at a center-of-mass energy of up to 500 GeV and luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . Such high luminosity and high energy polarized proton collisions will open up the possibility of studying spin effects in hard processes. However, the acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. After successful operation of RHIC with gold beams polarized protons from the AGS have been successfully injected into RHIC and accelerated using a full Siberian snakes built from four superconducting helical dipoles. A new high energy proton polarimeter was also successfully commissioned. Operation with two snakes per RHIC ring is planned for next year

  3. Polarization measurement for internal polarized gaseous targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhenyu; Ye Yunxiu; Lv Haijiang; Mao Yajun

    2004-01-01

    The authors present an introduction to internal polarized gaseous targets, polarization method, polarization measurement method and procedure. To get the total nuclear polarization of hydrogen atoms (including the polarization of the recombined hydrogen molecules) in the target cell, authors have measured the parameters relating to atomic polarization and polarized hydrogen atoms and molecules. The total polarization of the target during our measurement is P T =0.853 ± 0.036. (authors)

  4. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadron colliders and three {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

  5. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KING, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e + e - and hadron colliders and three μ + μ - colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory

  6. Prospects for colliders and collider physics to the 1 PeV energy scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bruce J.

    2000-08-01

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing our progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC—one each of e+e- and hadron colliders and three μ+μ- colliders — and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R&D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

  7. STANFORD: Highly polarized SLC electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Using specialized photocathodes made with 'strained' gallium arsenide, physicists at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) have generated electron beams with polarizations in excess of 60 percent a year ahead of schedule. Together with recent luminosity increases, this breakthrough will have a major impact on the physics output of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Beam polarization was almost tripled using photocathodes in which a gallium arsenide layer was grown epitaxially over a substrate of gallium arsenide phosphide. The mismatch between these two layers deforms the crystal structure and removes a degeneracy in the valence band structure, permitting selective optical pumping of one unique spin state. Whereas conventional gallium arsenide photocathodes are limited to 50 percent polarization because of this degeneracy (and realistic cathodes fall substantially below this theoretical limit), such strained crystal lattices have the potential to yield polarizations close to 100 percent. Polarization enhancement with strained lattices was first demonstrated in 1991 by a SLAC/Wisconsin/ Berkeley group (May 1991, page 6) with a 71 percent polarization in a laboratory experiment. More recently this group has achieved polarization in excess of 90 percent, reported last November at the Nagoya Spin Symposium. (In a complementary development, a Japanese KEK/ Nagoya/KEK obtains polarized beams using a 'superlattice' - May 1991, page 4.) The 1993 SLC run, the strained gallium arsenide photocathode technique's debut in an operating particle accelerator, has proved to be a resounding, unqualified success - as have physics experiments on the Z particles produced by the highly polarized beam. A conservative approach was called for, due to concerns about possible charge saturation effects. A relatively thick (0.3 micron) gallium arsenide layer was used for the photocathode in the SLC polarized electron source. With a titanium

  8. "Electron/Ion Sponge"-Like V-Based Polyoxometalate: Toward High-Performance Cathode for Rechargeable Sodium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jilei; Chen, Zhen; Chen, Shi; Zhang, Bowei; Wang, Jin; Wang, Huanhuan; Tian, Bingbing; Chen, Minghua; Fan, Xiaofeng; Huang, Yizhong; Sum, Tze Chien; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2017-07-25

    One key challenge facing room temperature Na-ion batteries lies in identifying earth-abundant, environmentally friendly and safe materials that can provide efficient Na + storage sites in Na-ion batteries. Herein, we report such a material, polyoxometalate Na 2 H 8 [MnV 13 O 38 ] (NMV), with entirely different composition and structure from those cathode compounds reported before. Ex-situ XPS and FTIR analyses reveal that NMV cathode behaves like an "electron/Na-ion sponge", with 11 electrons/Na + acceptability per mole, which has a decisive contribution to the high capacity. The extraordinary structural features, evidenced by X-ray crystallographic analysis, of Na 2 H 8 [MnV 13 O 38 ] with a flexible 2D lamellar network and 1D open channels provide diverse Na ion migration pathways, yielding good rate capability. First-principle calculations demonstrate that a super-reduced state, [MnV 13 O 38 ] 20- , is formed with slightly expanded size (ca. 7.5%) upon Na + insertion compared to the original [MnV 13 O 38 ] 9- . This "ion sponge" feature ensures the good cycling stability. Consequently, benefiting from the combinations of "electron/ion sponge" with diverse Na + diffusion channels, when revealed as the cathode materials for Na-ion batteries, Na 2 H 8 [MnV 13 O 38 ]/G exhibits a high specific capacity (ca. 190 mA h/g at 0.1 C), associates with a good rate capability (130 mA h/g at 1 C), and a good capacity retention (81% at 0.2 C). Our results promote better understanding of the storage mechanism in polyoxometalate host, enrich the existing rechargeable SIBs cathode chemistry, and enlighten an exciting direction for exploring promising cathode materials for Na-ion batteries.

  9. Progress on $e^{+}e^{-}$ linear colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Siemann, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Physics issues. The physics program will be reviewed for e+e- linear colliders in the TeV energy range. At these prospective facilities central issues of particle physics can be addressed, the problem of mass, unification and structure of space-time. In this context the two lectures will focus on analyses of the Higgs mechanism, supersymmetry and extra space dimensions. Moreover, high-precision studies of the top-quark and the gauge boson sector will be discussed. Combined with LHC results, a comprehensive picture can be developed of physics at the electroweak scale and beyond. Designs and technologies (R. Siemann - 29, 30, 31 May) The physics and technologies of high energy linear colliders will be reviewed. Fundamental concepts of linear colliders will be introduced. They will be discussed in: the context of the Stanford Linear Collider where many ideas changed and new ones were developed in response to operational experience. the requirements for future linear colliders. The different approaches for reac...

  10. CLIC e+e- Linear Collider Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, Dominik; Linssen, Lucie; Schulte, Daniel; Simon, Frank; Stapnes, Steinar; Toge, Nobukazu; Weerts, Harry; Wells, James

    2012-01-01

    This document provides input from the CLIC e+e- linear collider studies to the update process of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. It is submitted on behalf of the CLIC/CTF3 collaboration and the CLIC physics and detector study. It describes the exploration of fundamental questions in particle physics at the energy frontier with a future TeV-scale e+e- linear collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) two-beam acceleration technique. A high-luminosity high-energy e+e- collider allows for the exploration of Standard Model physics, such as precise measurements of the Higgs, top and gauge sectors, as well as for a multitude of searches for New Physics, either through direct discovery or indirectly, via high-precision observables. Given the current state of knowledge, following the observation of a \\sim125 GeV Higgs-like particle at the LHC, and pending further LHC results at 8 TeV and 14 TeV, a linear e+e- collider built and operated in centre-of-mass energy stages from a few-hundred GeV up t...

  11. Status of the SLAC Linear Collider Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiening, R.

    1983-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider Project has two principal goals. The first is to serve as a prototype for a future very high energy linear electron-positron collider. The second is to quickly, at low cost, achieve sufficient luminosity at 100 GeV center-of-mass energy to explore the physics of the Z 0 . The first goal is important to the future of electron-positron physics because the rapid increase of synchrotron radiation with energy causes the cost of circular storage ring colliders to whereas the cost of linear colliders increases only in proportion to the center-of-mass energy. The second is important because the existance at SLAC of a linear accelerator which can be converted at low cost to collider operation makes possible a unique opportunity to quickly achieve 100 GeV center-of-mass collisions. At the design luminosity of 6.0 x 10 30 many thousands of Z 0 decays should be observed in each day of operation

  12. High Intensity Polarized Electron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelker, Benard; Adderley, Philip; Brittian, Joshua; Clark, J.; Grames, Joseph; Hansknecht, John; McCarter, James; Stutzman, Marcy; Suleiman, Riad; Surles-law, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    During the 1990s, at numerous facilities world wide, extensive RandD devoted to constructing reliable GaAs photoguns helped ensure successful accelerator-based nuclear and high-energy physics programs using spin polarized electron beams. Today, polarized electron source technology is considered mature, with most GaAs photoguns meeting accelerator and experiment beam specifications in a relatively trouble-free manner. Proposals for new collider facilities however, require electron beams with parameters beyond today's state-of-the-art and serve to renew interest in conducting polarized electron source RandD. And at CEBAF/Jefferson Lab, there is an immediate pressing need to prepare for new experiments that require considerably more beam current than before. One experiment in particular?Q-weak, a parity violation experiment that will look for physics beyond the Standard Model?requires 180 uA average current at polarization >80% for a duration of one year, with run-averaged helicity correlate

  13. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Shvets, G

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation.

  14. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.-M. Rax

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation

  15. Sources of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, L.

    1983-01-01

    Various sources of polarized neutrons are reviewed. Monoenergetic source produced with unpolarized or polarized beams, white sources of polarized neutrons, production by transmissions through polarized hydrogen targets and polarized thermal neutronsare discussed, with appropriate applications included. (U.K.)

  16. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersema, K.; Covino, S.; Toma, K.; van der Horst, A.J.; Varela, K.; Min, M.; Greiner, J.; Starling, R.L.C.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Campana, S.; Curran, P.A.; Fan, Y.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Gorosabel, J.; Gomboc, A.; Götz, D.; Hjorth, J.; Jin, Z.P.; Kobayashi, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Mundell, C.; O’Brien, P.T.; Pian, E.; Rowlinson, A.; Russell, D.M.; Salvaterra, R.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S.D.; Elliott, J.; Fariña, C.; Hartoog, O.E.; Karjalainen, R.; Klose, S.; Knust, F.; Levan, A.J.; Schady, P.; Sudilovsky, V.; Willingale, R.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the

  17. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiersema, K.; Covino, S.; Toma, K.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of th...

  18. Multiplicities and minijets at Tevatron Collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcevic, I.

    1989-01-01

    We show that in the parton branching model, the probability distribution does not obey KNO scaling. As energy increases, gluon contribution to multiplicities increases, resulting in the widening of the probability distribution, in agreement with experimental data. We predict that the widening of the distribution will stop at Tevatron Collider energies due to the dominant role of gluons at these energies. We also find that the gluon contribution to the 'minijet' cross section increases with energy and becomes dominant at the Tevatron Collider. We calculate QCD minijet cross sections for a variety of structure functions, QCD scales and p T min . We compare our theoretical results with the experimental data and find that some of the structure functions and choices of scale are preferred by the experimental data. We give theoretical predictions for the minijet cross section at the Tevatron Collider, indicating the possibility of distinguishing between different sets of structure functions and choices of scale. (orig.)

  19. SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOIDS FOR THE MUON COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN,M.A.; EYSSA,Y.; KENNY,S.; MILLER,J.R.; PRESTEMON,S.; WEGGEL,R.J.

    2000-06-12

    The muon collider is a new idea for lepton colliders. The ultimate energy of an electron ring is limited by synchrotron radiation. Muons, which have a rest mass that is 200 times that of an electron can be stored at much higher energies before synchrotron radiation limits ring performance. The problem with muons is their short life time (2.1 {micro}s at rest). In order to operate a muon storage ring large numbers of muon must be collected, cooled and accelerated before they decay to an electron and two neutrinos. As the authors see it now, high field superconducting solenoids are an integral part of a muon collider muon production and cooling systems. This report describes the design parameters for superconducting and hybrid solenoids that are used for pion production and collection, RF phase rotations of the pions as they decay into muons and the muon cooling (reduction of the muon emittance) before acceleration.

  20. The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollestrup, A.V.

    1994-11-01

    The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade