WorldWideScience

Sample records for polarized directional reflectance

  1. Direct visualization of polarization reversal of organic ferroelectric memory transistor by using charge modulated reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Takako; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2017-11-01

    By using the charge modulated reflectance (CMR) imaging technique, charge distribution in the pentacene organic field-effect transistor (OFET) with a ferroelectric gate insulator [P(VDF-TrFE)] was investigated in terms of polarization reversal of the P(VDF-TrFE) layer. We studied the polarization reversal process and the carrier spreading process in the OFET channel. The I-V measurement showed a hysteresis behavior caused by the spontaneous polarization of P(VDF-TrFE), but the hysteresis I-V curve changes depending on the applied drain bias, possibly due to the gradual shift of the polarization reversal position in the OFET channel. CMR imaging visualized the gradual shift of the polarization reversal position and showed that the electrostatic field formed by the polarization of P(VDF-TrFE) contributes to hole and electron injection into the pentacene layer and the carrier distribution is significantly dependent on the direction of the polarization. The polarization reversal position in the channel region is governed by the electrostatic potential, and it happens where the potential reaches the coercive voltage of P(VDF-TrFE). The transmission line model developed on the basis of the Maxwell-Wagner effect element analysis well accounts for this polarization reversal process in the OFET channel.

  2. Light-directing omnidirectional circularly polarized reflection from liquid-crystal droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing; Li, Yannian; Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Zola, Rafael S; Yang, Deng-Ke; Bunning, Timothy J; Weitz, David A; Li, Quan

    2015-02-09

    Constructing and tuning self-organized three-dimensional (3D) superstructures with tailored functionality is crucial in the nanofabrication of smart molecular devices. Herein we fabricate a self-organized, phototunable 3D photonic superstructure from monodisperse droplets of one-dimensional cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) containing a photosensitive chiral molecular switch with high helical twisting power. The droplets are obtained by a glass capillary microfluidic technique by dispersing into PVA solution that facilitates planar anchoring of the liquid-crystal molecules at the droplet surface, as confirmed by the observation of normal incidence selective circular polarized reflection in all directions from the core of individual droplet. Photoirradiation of the droplets furnishes dynamic reflection colors without thermal relaxation, whose wavelength can be tuned reversibly by variation of the irradiation time. The results provided clear evidence on the phototunable reflection in all directions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Direct observation of hopping induced spin polarization current in oxygen deficient Co-doped ZnO by Andreev reflection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kung-Shang; Huang, Tzu-Yu; Dwivedi, G.D. [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Lu-Kuei; Lee, Shang-Fan [Taiwan Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Sun, Shih-Jye [Department of Applied Physics, National Kaohsiung University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chou, Hsiung, E-mail: hchou@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Co-doped ZnO thin-films were grown with varying V{sub O} concentartion. • PCAR measurements were done to study the SPC. • High spin polarization was observed above a certain V{sub O} concentartion. • High V{sub O} samples provide a high density of completed percolation path. • This complete percolation path gives rise to high SPC. - Abstract: Oxygen vacancy induced ferromagnetic coupling in diluted magnetic oxide (DMO) semiconductors have been reported in several studies, but technologically more crucial spin-polarized current (SPC) is still under-developed in DMOs. Few studies have claimed that VRH mechanism can originate the SPC, but, how VRH mechanism associated with percolation path, is not clearly understood. We used Point-contact Andreev reflection (PCAR) technique to probe the SPC in Co-doped ZnO (CZO) films. Since the high resistance samples cause broadening in conductance(G)-voltage(V) curves, which may result in an unreliable evaluation of spin polarization, we include two extra parameters, (i) effective temperature and (ii) spreading resistance, for the simulation to avoid the uncertainty in extracting spin polarization. The effective G-V curves and higher spin polarization can be obtained above a certain oxygen vacancy concentration. The number of completed and fragmentary percolation paths is proportional to the concentration of oxygen vacancies. For low oxygen vacancy samples, the Pb-tip has a higher probability of covering fragmentary percolation paths than the complete ones, due to its small contact size. The completed paths may remain independent of one another and get polarized in different directions, resulting in lower spin-polarization value. High oxygen vacancy samples provide a high density of completed path, most of them link to one another by crossing over, and gives rise to high spin-polarization value.

  4. Direct measurement of the static and transient magneto-optical permittivity of cobalt across the entire M -edge in reflection geometry by use of polarization scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusin, Dmitriy; Tengdin, Phoebe M.; Gopalakrishnan, Maithreyi; Gentry, Christian; Blonsky, Adam; Gerrity, Michael; Legut, Dominik; Shaw, Justin M.; Nembach, Hans T.; Silva, T. J.; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    2018-01-01

    The microscopic state of a magnetic material is characterized by its resonant magneto-optical response through the off-diagonal dielectric tensor component ɛx y. However, the measurement of the full complex ɛx y in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region covering the M absorption edges of 3 d ferromagnets is challenging due to the need for either a careful polarization analysis, which is complicated by a lack of efficient polarization analyzers, or scanning the angle of incidence in fine steps. Here, we propose and demonstrate a technique to extract the complex resonant permittivity ɛx y simply by scanning the polarization angle of linearly polarized high harmonics to measure the magneto-optical asymmetry in reflection geometry. Because this technique is more practical and faster to experimentally implement than previous approaches, we can directly measure the full time evolution of ɛx y(t ) during laser-induced demagnetization across the entire M2 ,3 absorption edge of cobalt with femtosecond time resolution. We find that for polycrystalline Co films on an insulating substrate, the changes in ɛx y are uniform throughout the spectrum, to within our experimental precision. This result suggests that, in the regime of strong demagnetization, the ultrafast demagnetization response is primarily dominated by magnon generation. We estimate the contribution of exchange-splitting reduction to the ultrafast demagnetization process to be no more than 25%.

  5. Layered magnets: polarized neutron reflection studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabel, H.; Schreyer, A. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentalphysik/Festkoerperphysik, Bochum (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Neutron reflectivity measurements from extended surfaces, thin films and superlattices provide information on the chemical profile parallel to the film normal, including film thicknesses, average composition and interfacial roughness parameters. Reflectivity measurements with polarized neutrons are particularly powerful for analyzing the magnetic density profiles in thin films and superlattices in addition to chemical profiles. The basic theory of polarized neutron reflectivity is provided, followed by some examples and more recent applications concerning polarized neutron reflectivity studies from exchange coupled Fe/Cr superlattices. (author) 5 figs., 13 refs.

  6. Geomagnetic excursions reflect an aborted polarity state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Plenier, Guillaume; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2008-10-01

    Geomagnetic excursions represent short episodes of a few thousand years at most during which the field considerably exceeds its normal range of variability during a polarity state. Paleomagnetic records have now been obtained with extremely high temporal resolution which have improved our knowledge of these short events. We have compiled the most detailed records of excursions that had occurred during the Brunhes and Matuyama chrons. We show that virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) of at least one record of each event are able to reach the opposite polarity. In the next step, we have computed different simulations of excursions during which the dipole progressively vanishes before growing back without reversing. This scenario produces very few reversed directions which are only visible at some latitudes. We infer that it is impossible to reach the ratio of reversed to intermediate VGPs present in the paleomagnetic records if the excursions were not associated with a short period of reversed dipole field. Therefore, excursions should be regarded as two successive reversals bracketing an aborted polarity interval. We propose that the same underlying mechanisms prevail in both situations (excursions or reversals) and that below a certain strength the field reaches an unstable position which preludes either the achievement of a reversal or its return to the former polarity.

  7. Grazing incidence polarized neutron scattering in reflection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    During the year 1980, polarized neutron scattering technique came into being as an ana- lytic tool to measure the ... The discovery of antiferromagnetic coupling was critical to the discovery of GMR, pro- viding as it did ..... Here we consider the incident wave vector ki making an angle αi in the x–z plane while the scattered ...

  8. Do cephalopods communicate using polarized light reflections from their skin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Shashar, Nadav; Hanlon, Roger T

    2009-07-01

    Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopus) are probably best known for their ability to change color and pattern for camouflage and communication. This is made possible by their complex skin, which contains pigmented chromatophore organs and structural light reflectors (iridophores and leucophores). Iridophores create colorful and linearly polarized reflective patterns. Equally interesting, the photoreceptors of cephalopod eyes are arranged in a way to give these animals the ability to detect the linear polarization of incoming light. The capacity to detect polarized light may have a variety of functions, such as prey detection, navigation, orientation and contrast enhancement. Because the skin of cephalopods can produce polarized reflective patterns, it has been postulated that cephalopods could communicate intraspecifically through this visual system. The term 'hidden' or 'private' communication channel has been given to this concept because many cephalopod predators may not be able to see their polarized reflective patterns. We review the evidence for polarization vision as well as polarization signaling in some cephalopod species and provide examples that tend to support the notion--currently unproven--that some cephalopods communicate using polarized light signals.

  9. [Analysis of influencing factors of snow hyperspectral polarized reflections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhong-Qiu; Zhao, Yun-Sheng; Yan, Guo-Qian; Ning, Yan-Ling; Zhong, Gui-Xin

    2010-02-01

    Due to the need of snow monitoring and the impact of the global change on the snow, on the basis of the traditional research on snow, starting from the perspective of multi-angle polarized reflectance, we analyzed the influencing factors of snow from the incidence zenith angles, the detection zenith angles, the detection azimuth angles, polarized angles, the density of snow, the degree of pollution, and the background of the undersurface. It was found that these factors affected the spectral reflectance values of the snow, and the effect of some factors on the polarization hyperspectral reflectance observation is more evident than in the vertical observation. Among these influencing factors, the pollution of snow leads to an obvious change in the snow reflectance spectrum curve, while other factors have little effect on the shape of the snow reflectance spectrum curve and mainly impact the reflection ratio of the snow. Snow reflectance polarization information has not only important theoretical significance, but also wide application prospect, and provides new ideas and methods for the quantitative research on snow using the remote sensing technology.

  10. Light polarization management via reflection from arrays of sub-wavelength metallic twisted bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, M.; Haberko, J.; Zinkiewicz, Ł.; Wasylczyk, P.

    2017-12-01

    With constant progress of nano- and microfabrication technologies, photolithography in particular, a number of sub-wavelength metallic structures have been demonstrated that can be used to manipulate light polarization. Numerical simulations of light propagation hint that helical twisted bands can have interesting polarization properties. We use three-dimensional two-photon photolithography (direct laser writing) to fabricate a few-micrometer-thick arrays of twisted bands and coat them uniformly with metal. We demonstrate that circular polarization can be generated from linear polarization upon reflection from such structures over a broad range of frequencies in the mid infrared.

  11. A C/X Dual-band Wide-angle Reflective Polarization Rotation Metasurface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a C/X dual-band wide-angle re¬flective polarization rotation metasurface (PRMS with high rotation efficiency is proposed and realized. Aiming to miniaturize the size of the unit cell, a metallic flower-like shape ring is selected to extend the current path and the 45 degree slanting stitch along diagonal direction is used to form the asymmetric structure. The simulated results show that the proposed PRMS achieves polarization rotation at 4.61 GHz and 8.67 GHz with high efficiency, at which the linear polarization incident wave is converted into its orthogonal polarization after reflection. Furthermore, the high polarization rotation efficiency of the proposed PRMS is maintained under an oblique incident direction from 0° to 60°. To verify the simulated results, the proposed PRMS is fabricated and measured. The measured results are in good accordance with the simulated ones.

  12. Polarization-controlled luminaires utilizing multiple Fresnel reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Caulfield, H. John; Alvarez, Roberto

    2003-11-01

    A novel luminaire utilizes repeated Fresnel reflections by angled surfaces to transform a small collimated input beam into a controlled output pattern with a high degree of polarization, either linear or radial. Applications to backlighting, front-lighting, optical communications and automotive lighting will be discussed.

  13. Polarization-Directed Surface Plasmon Polariton Launching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2017-01-05

    The relative intensities of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) simultaneously launched from opposing edges of a symmetric trench structure etched into a silver thin film may be controllably varied by tuning the linear polarization of the driving field. This is demonstrated through transient multiphoton photoemission electron microscopy measurements performed using a pair of spatially separated phase-locked femtosecond pulses. Our measurements are rationalized using finite-difference time domain simulations, which reveal that the coupling efficiency into the PSP modes is inversely proportional to the magnitude of the localized surface plasmon fields excited at the trench edges. Additional experiments on single step edges also show asymmetric PSP launching with respect to polarization, analogous to the trench results. Our combined experimental and computational results allude to the interplay between localized and propagating surface plasmon modes in the trench; strong coupling to the localized modes at the edges correlates to weak coupling to the PSP modes. Simultaneous excitation of the electric fields localized at both edges of the trench results in complex interactions between the right- and left-side PSP modes with Fabry-Perot and cylindrical modes. This results in a trench width-dependent PSP intensity ratio using otherwise identical driving fields. A systematic exploration of polarization directed PSP launching from a series of trench structures reveals an optimal PSP contrast ratio of 4.2 using a 500 nm-wide trench.

  14. Polar-Direct-Drive Experiments on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Bonino, M.J.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk

    2006-01-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD), a promising ignition path for the NIF while the beams are in the indirect-drive configuration, is currently being investigated on the OMEGA laser system by using 40 beams in six rings repointed to more uniformly illuminate the target. The OMEGA experiments are being performed with standard, ''warm'' targets with and without the use of an equatorial ''Saturn-like'' toroidally shaped CH ring. Target implosion symmetry is diagnosed with framed x-ray backlighting using additional OMEGA beams and by time-integrated x-ray imaging of the stagnating core

  15. [The research of the relationship between snow properties and the bidirectional polarized reflectance from snow surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhong-Qiu; Wu, Zheng-Fang; Zhao, Yun-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    In the context of remote sensing, the reflectance of snow is a key factor for accurate inversion for snow properties, such as snow grain size, albedo, because of it is influenced by the change of snow properties. The polarized reflectance is a general phenomenon during the reflected progress in natural incident light In this paper, based on the correct measurements for the multiple-angle reflected property of snow field in visible and near infrared wavelength (from 350 to 2,500 nm), the influence of snow grain size and wet snow on the bidirectional polarized property of snow was measured and analyzed. Combining the results measured in the field and previous conclusions confirms that the relation between polarization and snow grain size is obvious in infrared wavelength (at about 1,500 nm), which means the degree of polarization increasing with an increase of snow grain size in the forward scattering direction, it is because the strong absorption of ice near 1,500 nm leads to the single scattering light contributes to the reflection information obtained by the sensor; in other word, the larger grain size, the more absorption accompanying the larger polarization in forward scattering direction; we can illustrate that the change from dry snow to wet snow also influences the polarization property of snow, because of the water on the surface of snow particle adheres the adjacent particles, that means the wet snow grain size is larger than the dry snow grain size. Therefore, combining the multiple-angle polarization with reflectance will provide solid method and theoretical basis for inversion of snow properties.

  16. Robust reflective ghost imaging against different partially polarized thermal light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Guo; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rui-Xue; Zhang, De-Jian; Liu, Hong-Chao; Li, Zong-Guo; Xiong, Jun

    2018-03-01

    We theoretically study the influence of degree of polarization (DOP) of thermal light on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the reflective ghost imaging (RGI), which is a novel and indirect imaging modality. An expression for the CNR of RGI with partially polarized thermal light is carefully derived, which suggests a weak dependence of CNR on the DOP, especially when the ratio of the object size to the speckle size of thermal light has a large value. Different from conventional imaging approaches, our work reveals that RGI is much more robust against the DOP of the light source, which thereby has advantages in practical applications, such as remote sensing.

  17. Directional reflectance factor distributions of a cotton row crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, D. S.; Newcomb, W. W.; Schutt, J. B.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Jackson, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The directional reflectance factor distribution spanning the entire exitance hemisphere was measured for a cotton row crop (Gossypium barbadense L.) with 39 percent ground cover. Spectral directional radiances were taken in NOAA satellite 7 AVHRR bands 1 and 2 using a three-band radiometer with restricted 12 deg full angle field of view at half peak power points. Polar co-ordinate system plots of directional reflectance factor distributions and three-dimensional computer graphic plots of scattered flux were used to study the dynamics of the directional reflectance factor distribution as a function of spectral band, geometric structure of the scene, solar zenith and azimuth angles, and optical properties of the leaves and soil. The factor distribution of the incomplete row crops was highly polymodal relative to that for complete vegetation canopies. Besides the enhanced reflectance for the antisolar point, a reflectance minimum was observed towards the forwardscatter direction in the principle plane of the sun. Knowledge of the mechanics of the observed dynamics of the data may be used to provide rigorous validation for two- or three-dimensional radiative transfer models, and is important in interpreting aircraft and satellite data where the solar angle varies widely.

  18. Generation of neutron standing waves at total reflection of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Nikitenko, Yu.V.; Kozhevnikov, S.V.; Radu, F.; Kruijs, R.; Rekveldt, M.Th.

    1999-01-01

    The regime of neutron standing waves at reflection of polarized thermal neutrons from the structure glass/Cu (1000 A Angstrom)/Ti (2000 A Angstrom)/Co (60 A Angstrom)/Ti (300 A Angstrom) in a magnetic field directed at an angle to the sample plane is realized. The intensity of neutrons with a particular spin projection on the external magnetic field direction appears to be a periodic function of the neutron wavelength and the glancing angle of the reflected beam. It is shown that the neutron standing wave regime can be a very sensitive method for the determination of changes in the spatial position of magnetic noncollinear layers. (author)

  19. Polarity inversion of aluminum nitride by direct wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yusuke; Katayama, Ryuji; Akiyama, Toru; Ito, Tomonori; Miyake, Hideto

    2018-03-01

    A novel fabrication process based on direct bonding technologies is proposed and demonstrated to achieve polarity inversion in AlN. High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy observation clearly showed an atomically flat bonding interface and an abrupt transition from Al polarity (+c) to N polarity (‑c) through a single monolayer. This ideal polarity inversion of III–nitride materials is expected to provide new insight into heteropolar device applications.

  20. Polarized neutron reflectivity and scattering studies of magnetic heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, H.; Theis-Bröhl, K.

    2003-02-01

    The current interest in the magnetism of ultrathin films and multilayers is driven by their manifold applications in the magneto-and spin-electronic areas, for instance as magnetic field sensors or as information storage devices. In this regard, there is a large interest in exploring spin structures and spin disorder at the interface of magnetic heterostructures, to investigate magnetic domains in thin films and superlattices, and to understand remagnetization processes of various laterally shaped magnetic nanostructures. Traditionally neutron scattering has played a dominant role in the determination of spin structures, phase transitions and magnetic excitations in bulk materials. Today, its potential for the investigation of thin magnetic films has to be redefined. Polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR) at small wavevectors can provide precise information on the magnetic field distribution parallel to the film plane and on layer resolved magnetization vectors. In addition, PNR is not only sensitive to structural interface roughness but also to the magnetic roughness. Furthermore, magnetic hysteresis measurements from polarized small angle Bragg reflections allows us to filter out correlation effects during magnetization reversals of magnetic stripes and islands. An overview is provided on most recent PNR investigations of magnetic heterostructures.

  1. Polarized neutron reflectivity and scattering studies of magnetic heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabel, H; Theis-Broehl, K

    2003-01-01

    The current interest in the magnetism of ultrathin films and multilayers is driven by their manifold applications in the magneto-and spin-electronic areas, for instance as magnetic field sensors or as information storage devices. In this regard, there is a large interest in exploring spin structures and spin disorder at the interface of magnetic heterostructures, to investigate magnetic domains in thin films and superlattices, and to understand remagnetization processes of various laterally shaped magnetic nanostructures. Traditionally neutron scattering has played a dominant role in the determination of spin structures, phase transitions and magnetic excitations in bulk materials. Today, its potential for the investigation of thin magnetic films has to be redefined. Polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR) at small wavevectors can provide precise information on the magnetic field distribution parallel to the film plane and on layer resolved magnetization vectors. In addition, PNR is not only sensitive to structural interface roughness but also to the magnetic roughness. Furthermore, magnetic hysteresis measurements from polarized small angle Bragg reflections allows us to filter out correlation effects during magnetization reversals of magnetic stripes and islands. An overview is provided on most recent PNR investigations of magnetic heterostructures

  2. Using remote sensing to detect the polarized sunglint reflected from oil slicks beyond the critical angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingcheng; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Yongxue; Mao, Zhihua; Qian, Weixian; Wang, Mengqiu; Zhang, Minwei; Xu, Jiang; Sun, Shaojie; Du, Peijun

    2017-08-01

    The critical angle at which the brightness of oil slicks and oil-free seawater is reversed occurs under sunglint and is often shown as an area of uncertainty due to different roughness and surface Fresnel reflection parameters. Consequently, differentiating oil slicks from the seawater in these areas using optical sensors is a challenge. Polarized optical remote sensing techniques provide complementary information for intensity imagery with different physical properties and, thus, possess the ability to resolve this difficult problem. In the polarized reflectance model, the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) of sunglint depends on accurately knowing the Stokes parameter for the reflected light, and varies with the refractive index of the surface layer and viewing angles. For the polarized detection of oil slicks, the highest sensitivity of the DOLP to the refractive index is located within the specular reflection direction where the sum of the solar and sensor zenith angles is 82.6°. The modeled results clearly indicate that the DOLP of oil slicks is weaker in comparison with oil-free seawater under sunglint. Using measurements from the space-borne Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar (PARASOL) over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, we illustrate that the PARASOL-derived DOLP difference between the oil spill and seawater is obvious and is in accordance with the modeled results. These preliminary results suggest that the potential of multiangle measurement and feasibility of deriving refractive index of ocean surface from space-borne sensors need further researches.

  3. Asymmetric bistable reflection and polarization switching in a magnetic nonlinear multilayer structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuz, Vladimir R.; Novitsky, Denis V.; Prosvirnin, Sergey L.

    2014-01-01

    , while light reflected from the other side has its polarization unchanged. Using the nonlinear transfer matrix calculations in the frequency domain, it is demonstrated that defect resonances in the nonlinear reflection spectra undergo bending, resulting in polarization bistability of reflected light....... This bistability is shown to result in abrupt switching between linear polarization of the output reflected light when the input intensity is varied. This switching is confirmed in finite-difference time-domain simulations, and its hysteresis character is established....

  4. The Effect of Incident Light Polarization on Vegetation Bidirectional Reflectance Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Thome, Kurt; Ranson, Kurtis J.; King, Michael D.; Butler, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The Laboratory-based Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) polarization study of vegetation is presented in this paper. The BRF was measured using a short-arc Xenon lamp/monochromator assembly producing an incoherent, tunable light source with a well-defined spectral bandpass at visible and near-infrared wavelengths of interest at 470 nm and 870 nm and coherent light source at 1.656 microns. All vegetation samples were measured using P and S linearly polarized incident light over a range of incident and scatter angles. By comparing these results, we quantitatively examine how the BRF of the samples depends on the polarization of the incident light. The differences are significant, depend strongly on the incident and scatter angles, and can be as high as 120% at 67 deg incident and 470nm. The global nature of Earth's processes requires consistent long-term calibration of all instruments involved in data retrieval. The BRF defines the reflection characteristics of Earth surface. It provides the reflectance of a target in a specific direction as a function of illumination and viewing geometry. The BRF is a function of wavelength and reflects the structural and optical properties of the surface. Various space and airborne radiometric and imaging remote sensing instruments are used in the remote sensing characterization of vegetation canopies and soils, oceans, or especially large pollution sources. The satellite data is validated through comparison with airborne, ground-based and laboratory-based data in an effort to fully understand the vegetation canopy reflectance, The Sun's light is assumed to be unpolarized at the top of the atmosphere; however it becomes polarized to some degree due to atmospheric effects by the time it reaches the vegetation canopy. Although there are numerous atmospheric correction models, laboratory data is needed for model verification and improvement.

  5. Direct Probes of Linearly Polarized Gluons inside Unpolarized Hadrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, D.; Brodsky, S. J.; Mulders, P.J.G.; Pisano, C.

    2011-01-01

    We show that linearly polarized gluons inside unpolarized hadrons can be directly probed in jet or heavy quark pair production in electron-hadron collisions. We discuss the simplest cos2 asymmetries and estimate their maximal value, concluding that measurements of the unknown linearly polarized

  6. Direct seawater desalination by ion concentration polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Jae; Ko, Sung Hee; Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Han, Jongyoon

    2010-04-01

    A shortage of fresh water is one of the acute challenges facing the world today. An energy-efficient approach to converting sea water into fresh water could be of substantial benefit, but current desalination methods require high power consumption and operating costs or large-scale infrastructures, which make them difficult to implement in resource-limited settings or in disaster scenarios. Here, we report a process for converting sea water (salinity ~500 mM or ~30,000 mg l-1) to fresh water (salinity water is divided into desalted and concentrated streams by ion concentration polarization, a phenomenon that occurs when an ion current is passed through ion-selective membranes. During operation, both salts and larger particles (cells, viruses and microorganisms) are pushed away from the membrane (a nanochannel or nanoporous membrane), which significantly reduces the possibility of membrane fouling and salt accumulation, thus avoiding two problems that plague other membrane filtration methods. To implement this approach, a simple microfluidic device was fabricated and shown to be capable of continuous desalination of sea water (~99% salt rejection at 50% recovery rate) at a power consumption of less than 3.5 Wh l-1, which is comparable to current state-of-the-art systems. Rather than competing with larger desalination plants, the method could be used to make small- or medium-scale systems, with the possibility of battery-powered operation.

  7. Broadband infrared reflective surfaces using doped and stacked polar dielectric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janipour, Mohsen; Sendur, Kursat

    2018-02-01

    Polar dielectrics, such as SiC, are excellent candidates for operation in extreme environments due to their excellent mechanical and thermal properties. In addition, they can achieve good IR reflection in the Reststrahlen band. However, these materials have relatively narrow spectral bandwidth for reflection, especially considering that the broadband illumination sources in extreme environments. In this study, we investigated the broadband reflection properties of polar dielectrics by engineering the Reststrahlen band through doping and stacked layers. Our results indicate that by doping polar dielectrics, spectral reflection bandwidth can be significantly broadened. In addition, we demonstrate that by stacking different polar dielectric layers, the reflection spectrum of different materials can be overlapped, and thereby, significantly broader spectrum is obtained.

  8. Direct Probing of Polarization Charge at Nanoscale Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Owoong [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering; Seol, Daehee [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering; Lee, Dongkyu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Han, Hee [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (South Korea); Lindfors-Vrejoiu, Ionela [Univ. of Cologne (Germany). Physics Inst.; Lee, Woo [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (South Korea); Jesse, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Lee, Ho Nyung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Alexe, Marin [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kim, Yunseok [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering

    2017-11-14

    Ferroelectric materials possess spontaneous polarization that can be used for multiple applications. Owing to a long-term development of reducing the sizes of devices, the preparation of ferroelectric materials and devices is entering the nanometer-scale regime. In order to evaluate the ferroelectricity, there is a need to investigate the polarization charge at the nanoscale. Nonetheless, it is generally accepted that the detection of polarization charges using a conventional conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) without a top electrode is not feasible because the nanometer-scale radius of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip yields a very low signal-to-noise ratio. But, the detection is unrelated to the radius of an AFM tip and, in fact, a matter of the switched area. In this work, the direct probing of the polarization charge at the nanoscale is demonstrated using the positive-up-negative-down method based on the conventional CAFM approach without additional corrections or circuits to reduce the parasitic capacitance. The polarization charge densities of 73.7 and 119.0 µC cm-2 are successfully probed in ferroelectric nanocapacitors and thin films, respectively. The results we obtained show the feasibility of the evaluation of polarization charge at the nanoscale and provide a new guideline for evaluating the ferroelectricity at the nanoscale.

  9. Optically ambidextrous circularly polarized reflection from the chiral cuticle of the scarab beetle Chrysina resplendens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Ewan D; McDonald, Luke T; Vukusic, Pete

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of structural colour mechanisms in biological systems has given rise to many interesting optical effects in animals and plants. The instance of the scarab beetle Chrysina resplendens is particularly distinctive. Its exoskeleton has a bright, golden appearance and reflects both right-handed and left-handed circularly polarized light concurrently. The chiral nanostructure responsible for these properties is a helicoid, in which birefringent dielectric planes are assembled with an incremental rotation. This study correlates details of the beetle's circularly polarized reflectance spectra directly with physical aspects of its structural morphology. Electron micrography is used to identify and measure the physical dimensions of the key constituent components. These include a chiral multilayer configuration comprising two chirped, left-handed helicoids that are separated by a birefringent retarder. A scattering matrix technique is used to simulate the system's optical behaviour in which the roles of each component of the morphological substructure are elucidated by calculation of the fields throughout its depth. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Comparison of PARASOL Observations with Polarized Reflectances Simulated Using Different Ice Habit Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Benjamin H.; Yang, Ping; Baum, Bryan A.; Riedi, Jerome; Labonnote, Laurent C.; Thieuleux, Francois; Platnick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Insufficient knowledge of the habit distribution and the degree of surface roughness of ice crystals within ice clouds is a source of uncertainty in the forward light scattering and radiative transfer simulations required in downstream applications involving these clouds. The widely used MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5 ice microphysical model assumes a mixture of various ice crystal shapes with smooth-facets except aggregates of columns for which a moderately rough condition is assumed. When compared with PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) polarized reflection data, simulations of polarized reflectance using smooth particles show a poor fit to the measurements, whereas very rough-faceted particles provide an improved fit to the polarized reflectance. In this study a new microphysical model based on a mixture of 9 different ice crystal habits with severely roughened facets is developed. Simulated polarized reflectance using the new ice habit distribution is calculated using a vector adding-doubling radiative transfer model, and the simulations closely agree with the polarized reflectance observed by PARASOL. The new general habit mixture is also tested using a spherical albedo differences analysis, and surface roughening is found to improve the consistency of multi-angular observations. It is suggested that an ice model incorporating an ensemble of different habits with severely roughened surfaces would potentially be an adequate choice for global ice cloud retrievals.

  11. Degrees of polarization of reflected light eliciting polarotaxis in dragonflies (Odonata), mayflies (Ephemeroptera) and tabanid flies (Tabanidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriska, György; Bernáth, Balázs; Farkas, Róbert; Horváth, Gábor

    2009-12-01

    With few exceptions insects whose larvae develop in freshwater possess positive polarotaxis, i.e., are attracted to sources of horizontally polarized light, because they detect water by means of the horizontal polarization of light reflected from the water surface. These insects can be deceived by artificial surfaces (e.g. oil lakes, asphalt roads, black plastic sheets, dark-coloured cars, black gravestones, dark glass surfaces, solar panels) reflecting highly and horizontally polarized light. Apart from the surface characteristics, the extent of such a 'polarized light pollution' depends on the illumination conditions, direction of view, and the threshold p* of polarization sensitivity of a given aquatic insect species. p* means the minimum degree of linear polarization p of reflected light that can elicit positive polarotaxis from a given insect species. Earlier there were no quantitative data on p* in aquatic insects. The aim of this work is to provide such data. Using imaging polarimetry in the red, green and blue parts of the spectrum, in multiple-choice field experiments we measured the threshold p* of ventral polarization sensitivity in mayflies, dragonflies and tabanid flies, the positive polarotaxis of which has been shown earlier. In the blue (450nm) spectral range, for example, we obtained the following thresholds: dragonflies: Enallagma cyathigerum (0%

  12. Reflecting and Polarizing Properties of Conductive Fabrics in Ultra-High Frequency Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Kiprijanovič

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The system based on ultra-wide band (UWB signals was employed for qualitative estimation of attenuating, reflecting and polarizing properties of conductive fabrics, capable to prevent local static charge accumulation. Pulsed excitation of triangle monopole antenna of 6.5 cm height by rectangular electric pulses induced radiation of UWB signals with spectral density of power having maximum in ultra-high frequency (UHF range. The same antenna was used for the radiated signal receiving. Filters and amplifiers of different passband were employed to divide UHF range into subranges of 0.3-0.55 GHz, 0.55-1 GHz, 1-2 GHz and 2-4 GHz bands. The free space method, when conductive fabric samples of 50x50 cm2 were placed between transmitting and receiving antennas, was used to imitate a practical application. Received wideband signals corresponding to the defined range were detected by unbiased detectors. The fabrics made of two types of warps, containing different threads with conductive yarns, were investigated. It was estimated attenuation and reflective properties of the fabrics when electric field is collinear or perpendicular to thread direction. In the UHF range it was revealed good reflecting properties of the fabrics containing metallic component in the threads. The system has advantages but not without a certain shortcoming. Adapting it for specific tasks should lead to more effective usage, including yet unused properties of the UWB signals.

  13. Study of magnetic thin films by polarized neutron reflectivity. Off-specular diffusion on periodical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, F.

    1998-01-01

    Theoretical (Zeeman energy effects) and experimental (beam polarisation problems) progress have been made in the understanding of polarized neutron reflectivity with polarisation analysis. It has been shown that modelization and numerical simulations makes it possible to avoid to have to systematically measure a full set of reflectivity curves for each field and temperature condition. It has been possible to determine a magnetic profile as a function of the field in a magnetic bilayer system by using only a few points in the reciprocal space. This technique allows to considerable reduce the experiment time. In single nickel layer systems, we have shown that it is possible to induce magnetic rotation inhomogeneities when these systems are subjects to deformation strains. The effect are related to magneto-elastic constants gradients. In trilayer systems, with a ME constant modulation, we have been able to induce large magnetic rotation gradients. A new magneto-optic technique to measure the magnetization direction without rotating the magnetic field has been developed. The field of neutron reflectivity has been extended to off-specular studies. It has been possible to account quantitatively of the off-specular diffusion on 2-D model systems (prepared by optical lithography). This new technique should make it possible in the future to determine magnetic structures with a in-depth as well as lateral resolution. (author)

  14. Polarization contrast in fluorescence scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, A.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Polarization contrast is presented in fluorescence images of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer obtained with a scanning near-field optical microscope operated in reflection. A tapered optical fiber is used both to excite and to collect the fluorescence. The lateral resolution in the reflection

  15. Angular Scattering Reflectance and Polarization Measurements of Candidate Regolith Materials Measured in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Boryta, Mark D.; Hapke, Bruce W.; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Vandervoort, Kurt; Vides, Christina L.

    2016-10-01

    The reflectance and polarization of light reflected from a solar system object indicates the chemical and textural state of the regolith. Remote sensing data are compared to laboratory angular scattering measurements and surface properties are determined.We use a Goniometric Photopolarimeter (GPP) to make angular reflectance and polarization measurements of particulate materials that simulate planetary regoliths. The GPP employs the Helmholtz Reciprocity Principle ( 2, 1) - the incident light is linearly polarized - the intensity of the reflected component is measured. The light encounters fewer optical surfaces improving signal to noise. The lab data are physically equivalent to the astronomical data.Our reflectance and polarization phase curves of highly reflective, fine grained, media simulate the regolith of Jupiter's satellite Europa. Our lab data exhibit polarization phase curves that are very similar to reports by experienced astronomers (4). Our previous reflectance phase curve data of the same materials agree with the same astronomical observers (5). We find these materials exhibit an increase in circular polarization ratio with decreasing phase angle (3). This suggests coherent backscattering (CB) of photons in the regolith (3). Shkuratov et al.(3) report that the polarization properties of these particulate media are also consistent with the CB enhancement process (5). Our results replicate the astronomical data indicating Europa's regolith is fine-grained, high porous with void space exceeding 90%.1. Hapke, B. W. (2012). ISBN 978-0-521-88349-82. Minnaert, M. (1941).Asrophys. J., 93, 403-410.3. Nelson, R. M. et al. (1998). Icarus, 131, 223-230.4. Rosenbush, V. et al. (2015). ISBN 978-1-107-04390-9, pp 340-359.5. Shkuratov, Yu. et al. (2002) Icarus 159, 396-416.

  16. Terahertz reflection spectroscopy of Debye relaxation in polar liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Uffe; Cooke, David; Tanaka, Koichiro

    2009-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation interacts strongly with the intermolecular hydrogen-bond network in aqueous liquids. The dielectric properties of liquid water and aqueous solutions in the THz spectral region are closely linked to the microscopic dynamics of the liquid solution, and hence THz spectroscopy...... for remote detection of some of the properties of bottled liquids. Here we present a review of THz spectroscopy and modeling of water-ethanol mixtures, and establish a link between the dielectric function of water-ethanol mixtures and some of their thermodynamic properties. We then review how the knowledge...... offers an important insight into fundamental intermolecular interactions in polar liquids. At the same time, the strong and characteristic interaction between THz radiation and liquids offers a methodology for the classification of liquids inside containers, and hence the THz region is suitable...

  17. Depth enhancement of multi-layer light field display using polarization dependent internal reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Na-Young; Lim, Hong-Gi; Lee, Sung-Keun; Kim, Yong-Soo; Park, Jae-Hyeung

    2013-12-02

    A technique to enhance the depth range of the multi-layer light field three-dimensional display is proposed. A set of the optical plates are stacked in front of the conventional multi-layer light field display, creating additional internal reflection for one polarization state. By switching between two orthogonal polarization states in synchronization with the displayed three-dimensional images, the depth range of the display can be doubled. The proposed method is verified experimentally, confirming its feasibility.

  18. Color multiplexing using directional holographic gratings and linear polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, L I; Rodriguez, A; Ramirez, G; Guel, S; Nunez, O F, E-mail: roca@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica (IICO) Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (UASLP) (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    We propose a system of multiplexing and de-multiplexing, which uses a holographic diffraction grating to compel modulated light of different colors to be sent through an optical fiber. Diffraction gratings were fabricated specifically to pick the desired direction in which we wanted the light of different wavelengths to impinge the optic fiber, and also to be separated at the output. It was been found that the system preserves the polarization of light, which give us a one more freedom degree, allowing us to process twice the original information amount.

  19. Material and device studies for the development of ultra-violet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) along polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramya

    Over the past few years, significant effort was dedicated to the development of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) for a variety of applications. Such applications include chemical and biological detection, water purification and solid-state lighting. III-Nitride LEDs based on multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown along the conventional [0001] (polar) direction suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), due to the existence of strong electric fields that arise from spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization. Thus, there is strong motivation to develop MQW-based III-nitride LED structures grown along non-polar and semi-polar directions. The goal of this dissertation is to develop UV-LEDs along the [0001] polar and [11 2¯ 0] non-polar directions by the method of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). The polar and non-polar LEDs were grown on the C-plane and R-plane sapphire substrates respectively. This work is a combination of materials science studies related to the nucleation, growth and n- and p-type doping of III-nitride films on these two substrates, as well as device studies related to fabrication and characterization of UV-LEDs. It was observed that the crystallographic orientation of the III-nitride films grown on R-plane sapphire depends strongly on the kinetic conditions of growth of the Aluminum Nitride (AIN) buffer. Specifically, growth of the AIN buffer under group III-rich conditions leads to nitride films having the (11 2¯ 0) non polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface, while growth of the buffer under nitrogen rich conditions leads to nitride films with the (11 2¯ 6) semi-polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface. The electron concentration and mobility for the films grown along the polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions were investigated. P-type doping of Gallium Nitride (GaN) films grown on the nonpolar (11 2¯ 0) plane do not suffer from polarity inversion and thus the material was doped p-type with a hole concentration

  20. POLVSM (Polarized Volume Scattering Meter) instrument: an innovative device to measure the directional and polarized scattering properties of hydrosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chami, Malik; Thirouard, Alexandre; Harmel, Tristan

    2014-10-20

    An innovative instrument dedicated to the multispectral measurements of the directional and polarized scattering properties of the hydrosols, so-called POLVSM, is described. The instrument could be used onboard a ship, as a benchtop instrument, or at laboratory. The originality of the POLVSM concept relies on the use of a double periscopic optical system whose role is (i) to separate the plane containing the light source from the scattering plane containing the sample and the receiver and (ii) to prevent from any specularly reflected light within the sample chamber. As a result, a wide range of scattering angle, namely from 1° to 179°, is covered by the detector. Another originality of the instrument is to measure the Mueller scattering matrix elements, including the degree of polarization. A relevant calibration procedure, which could be of great interest as well for other instruments, is proposed to convert the raw data into physical units. The relative uncertainty in POLVSM data was determined at ± 4.3%. The analysis of measurements of the volume scattering function and degree of polarization performed under controlled conditions for samples dominated either by inorganic hydrosols or phytoplankton monospecific species showed a good consistency with literature, thus confirming the good performance of the POLVSM device. Comparisons of POLVSM data with theoretical calculations showed that Mie theory could reproduce efficiently the measurements of the VSF and degree of polarization for the case of inorganic hydrosols sample, despite the likely non sphericity of these particles as revealed by one of the element of the Mueller matrix. Our results suggested as well that a sophisticated modeling of the heterogeneous internal structure of living cells, or at least, the use of layered sphere models, is needed to correctly predict the directional and polarized effects of phytoplankton on the oceanic radiation. The relevance of performing angularly resolved measurements

  1. Polarization resolved imaging with a reflection near-field optical microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Xiao, Mufei; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using a rigorous microscopic point-dipole description of probe-sample interactions, we study imaging with a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope. Optical content, topographical artifacts, sensitivity window-i.e., the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical...... contrast-and symmetry properties are considered for optical images obtained in constant-distance mode for different polarization configurations. We demonstrate that images obtained in cross-polarized detection mode are free of background and topographical artifacts and that the cross-circular polarization...... configuration is preferable to the cross-linear one, since it ensures more isotropic (in the surface plane) near-field imaging of surface features. The numerical results are supported with experimental near-field images obtained by using a reflection microscope with an uncoated fiber tip....

  2. Highly Directive Reflect Array Antenna Design for Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-14

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0033 Highly Directive Reflect Array Antenna Design for Wireless Power Transfer Siddhartha Prakash Duttagupta INDIAN INSTITUTE...should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of...Directive Reflect Array Antenna Design for Wireless Power Transfer 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4076 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  3. Polar Direct Drive-Ignition at 1 MJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Marshall, F.J.; Betti, R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V.N.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Radha, P.B.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.; McCrory, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    Target designs to achieve direct-drive ignition on the NIF using the x-ray-drive beam configuration are examined. This approach, known as polar direct drive (PDD), achieves the required irradiation uniformity by repointing some of the beams toward the target equator, and by increasing the laser intensity at the equator to compensate for the reduced laser coupling from oblique irradiation. Techniques to increase the equatorial intensity can include using phase plates that produce elliptical spot shapes, increasing the power in beams directed toward the equator, and using a ring offset from the equator to redirect rays toward the target normal. The requirements for beam pointing, power balance, single-beam smoothing, and inner-ice-surface roughness are examined. Designs with an incident laser energy of 1.0 MJ are presented. The simulations use the 2-D hydrocode DRACO with 3-D ray trace to model the laser irradiation and Monte Carlo alpha particle transport to model the thermonuclear burn

  4. Full Polarization Analysis of Resonant Superlattice and Forbidden x-ray Reflections in Magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, S.B.; Bland, S.R.; Detlefs, B.; Beale, T.A.W.; Mazzoli, C.; Joly, Y.; Hatton, P.D.; Lorenzo, J.E.; Brabers, V.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite being one of the oldest known magnetic materials, and the classic mixed valence compound, thought to be charge ordered, the structure of magnetite below the Verwey transition is complex and the presence and role of charge order is still being debated. Here, we present resonant x-ray diffraction data at the iron K-edge on forbidden (0, 0, 2n+1) C and superlattice (0, 0, 2n+1/2)C reflections. Full linear polarization analysis of the incident and scattered light was conducted in order to explore the origins of the reflections. Through simulation of the resonant spectra we have confirmed that a degree of charge ordering takes place, while the anisotropic tensor of susceptibility scattering is responsible for the superlattice reflections below the Verwey transition. We also report the surprising result of the conversion of a significant proportion of the scattered light from linear to nonlinear polarization.

  5. Spectral and spatial properties of polarized light reflections from the arms of squid (Loligo pealeii) and cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Mäthger, Lydia M; Hanlon, Roger T; Cronin, Thomas W

    2007-10-01

    On every arm of cuttlefish and squid there is a stripe of high-reflectance iridophores that reflects highly polarized light. Since cephalopods possess polarization vision, it has been hypothesized that these polarized stripes could serve an intraspecific communication function. We determined how polarization changes when these boneless arms move. By measuring the spectral and polarizing properties of the reflected light from samples at various angles of tilt and rotation, we found that the actual posture of the arm has little or no effect on partial polarization or the e-vector angle of the reflected light. However, when the illumination angle changed, the partial polarization of the reflected light also changed. The spectral reflections of the signals were also affected by the angle of illumination but not by the orientation of the sample. Electron microscope samples showed that these stripes are composed of several groups of multilayer platelets within the iridophores. The surface normal to each group is oriented at a different angle, which produces essentially constant reflection of polarized light over a range of viewing angles. These results demonstrate that cuttlefish and squid could send out reliable polarization signals to a receiver regardless of arm orientation.

  6. Reflectance and Polarization Characteristics of Various Vegetation Types: an Advanced Experimental Approach using the FIGIFIGO Goniospectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, M.; Peltoniemi, J.; Zubko, N.; Pisek, J.

    2016-12-01

    To reduce data acquired by Earth Observation projects and for collecting more accurate knowledge on the Earth, universe, and environment one needs to provide a set of reliable references carefully gathered by measuring various known, well characterized targets. We present an overview of the Finnish Geodetic Institute's field goniospectrometer, FIGIFIGO, and highlight its capabilities for spectropolarimetric measurements of various samples, both under actual field conditions and in the laboratory. The design concept of this custom made instrument has proven to have a number of advantages, such as a well designed, user friendly interface, a high level of automation, and an excellent adaptability to a wide range of weather conditions during field measurements. The instrument communicates via a control computer which has a simple user-friendly interface. It is battery powered and very portable, making it feasible to transport it by plane, car, boat, or sledge. The system includes a sky camera to detect the orientation of the goniometer and a pyranometer to monitor the synchronous illumination conditions. The instrument's mirror can be finely adjusted to apply small spatial corrections to the optical chain. The foreoptics is connected to an ASD FieldSpec Pro FR 350-2500 nm spectroradiometer by an optical fiber. A calcite Glan-Thompson prism is used as a polarizer, covering the full spectral range with better than 1% accuracy.FIGIFIGO has been used to measure the reflectance properties of hundreds of different targets, including various vegetation types. In particular, it has been shown that directional and polarization signals vary largely between different species, and provide information about the leaf surface and orientation. The measurement data are stored in the FGI's Reflectance Library and new specific measurements are made upon request. The potential use of the results from these measurements are diverse; including their use as ground truth references for Earth

  7. Polarization contrast in reflection near-field optical microscopy with uncoated fibre tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using cross-hatched, patterned semiconductor surfaces and round 20-nm-thick gold pads on semiconductor wafers, we investigate the imaging characteristics of a reflection near-field optical microscope with an uncoated fibre tip for different polarization configurations and light wavelengths....... Is is shown that cross-polarized detection allows one to effectively suppress far-field components in the detected signal and to realise imaging of optical contrast on the sub-wavelength scale. The sensitivity window of our microscope, i.e. the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical...

  8. Phototaxis and polarotaxis hand in hand: night dispersal flight of aquatic insects distracted synergistically by light intensity and reflection polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Pál; Horváth, Gábor; Kriska, György; Blahó, Miklós; Csabai, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    Based on an earlier observation in the field, we hypothesized that light intensity and horizontally polarized reflected light may strongly influence the flight behaviour of night-active aquatic insects. We assumed that phototaxis and polarotaxis together have a more harmful effect on the dispersal flight of these insects than they would have separately. We tested this hypothesis in a multiple-choice field experiment using horizontal test surfaces laid on the ground. We offered simultaneously the following visual stimuli for aerial aquatic insects: (1) lamplit matte black canvas inducing phototaxis alone, (2) unlit shiny black plastic sheet eliciting polarotaxis alone, (3) lamplit shiny black plastic sheet inducing simultaneously phototaxis and polarotaxis, and (4) unlit matte black canvas as a visually unattractive control. The unlit matte black canvas trapped only a negligible number (13) of water insects. The sum (16,432) of the total numbers of water beetles and bugs captured on the lamplit matte black canvas (7,922) and the unlit shiny black plastic sheet (8,510) was much smaller than the total catch (29,682) caught on the lamplit shiny black plastic sheet. This provides experimental evidence for the synergistic interaction of phototaxis (elicited by the unpolarized direct lamplight) and polarotaxis (induced by the strongly and horizontally polarized plastic-reflected light) in the investigated aquatic insects. Thus, horizontally polarizing artificial lamplit surfaces can function as an effective ecological trap due to this synergism of optical cues, especially in the urban environment.

  9. Wideband and High-Efficiency Reflective Polarization Conversion Metasurface Based on Anisotropic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi; Guo, Chenjiang; Yuan, Pengliang; Ren, Yu-Hui; Ding, Jun

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a wideband and high-efficiency reflective polarization conversion metasurface (PCM) based on anisotropic metamaterials. The PCM has a period of sub-wavelength and simple design with a double-meander-line-shaped resonator printed on a metallic copper plate backed dielectric substrate. Owing to strong anisotropic properties and multiple plasmon resonances at neighboring frequencies, the PCM has a simulated fractional bandwidth of 82.3% from 8.40 GHz to 20.15 GHz with a polarization conversion ratio over 0.9. Numerical analysis and experimental validation are carried out to study the polarization conversion characteristics of the PCM. In addition, the mechanisms are analyzed in detail on the basis of multiple plasmon resonances and surface magnetic field distributions, respectively. The measured and simulated results obtained are in good agreement, which validates the effectiveness of the simulations and analysis.

  10. Polarization control of high transmission/reflection switching by all-dielectric metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibanuma, Toshihiko; Maier, Stefan A.; Albella, Pablo

    2018-02-01

    Metasurfaces built of high refractive dielectric nanostructures could play a key role in controlling the electromagnetic wave propagation, due to their low energy losses and their ability to excite not only electric but also magnetic resonances. In this study, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that an array of high-index dielectric nanodimers can perform as tuneable metasurfaces that can be switched from a high transmitter to a high reflector, by just changing the linear polarization of excitation. The incident polarization alters the hybridization mode of the excited electric and magnetic dipoles in the dimer, and this leads to either spectral overlap or separation of the two dipoles. The hybridization of the electric and magnetic modes modifies the effective permittivity and permeability of the tuneable dielectric metasurface, exhibiting the high transmission and reflection that can be easily switched by simply changing the linear polarization.

  11. Remote sensing of aerosols by using polarized, directional and spectral measurements within the A-Train: the PARASOL mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tanré

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Instruments dedicated to aerosol monitoring are recently available and the POLDER (POLarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances instrument on board the PARASOL (Polarization & Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar mission is one of them. By measuring the spectral, angular and polarization properties of the radiance at the top of the atmosphere, in coordination with the other A-Train instruments, PARASOL provides the aerosol optical depths (AOD as well as several optical and microphysical aerosol properties. The instrument, the inversion schemes and the list of aerosol parameters are described. Examples of retrieved aerosol parameters are provided as well as innovative approaches and further inversion techniques.

  12. Reflecting metallic metasurfaces designed with stochastic optimization as waveplates for manipulating light polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberko, Jakub; Wasylczyk, Piotr

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate that a stochastic optimization algorithm with a properly chosen, weighted fitness function, following a global variation of parameters upon each step can be used to effectively design reflective polarizing optical elements. Two sub-wavelength metallic metasurfaces, corresponding to broadband half- and quarter-waveplates are demonstrated with simple structure topology, a uniform metallic coating and with the design suited for the currently available microfabrication techniques, such as ion milling or 3D printing.

  13. Polar Direct Drive Shock Ignition Design on LMJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bel, Edouard; Schurtz, Guy; Ribeyre, Xavier; Lafon, Marion

    2011-10-01

    A low aspect ratio target family is designed in order to demonstrate the potential of ignition conditions of hydrogen isotopes on the LMJ by Shock Ignition without major modification of the facility i.e. for low laser induced damage on optics in the range of laser energy of 400-600 kJ. The shock ignition scheme is divided in two steps: first the compression of the fuel at low velocities and secondly the launch of strong shock allows to ignite the central hot spot. The presented work reports on the use of LMJ indirect drive laser hardware to compress the fuel at low implosion velocity in using a possible polar direct drive irradiation of the target. The ignition condition are produced from the launch of a bipolar strong converging shock by dedicated LMJ beams. A 1D robustness study is also performed with CHIC code for different target sizes and spike power and timing. The figure of merit is the bandwidth of the shock ignition window. We present a solution for a LMJ PDD laser illumination for the target compression and for the spike. We show first 2D CHIC simulations using this new PDD configuration. This strategy for implementation of PDD shock ignition on LMJ participate of a first proof of principle of shock ignition scheme in the frame of HiPER future reactor design.

  14. Influence of the tilting reflection mirror on the temperature and wind velocity retrieved by a polarizing atmospheric Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunmin; Li, Ying

    2012-09-20

    The principles of a polarizing atmospheric Michelson interferometer are outlined. The tilt of its reflection mirror results in deflection of the reflected beam and affects the intensities of the observed inteferogram. This effect is systematically analyzed. Both rectangular and circular apertures are considered. The theoretical expression of the modulation depth and phase of the interferogram are derived. These parameters vary with the inclination angle of the mirror and the distance between the deflection center and the optical axis and significantly influence the retrieved temperature and wind speed. If the wind and temperature errors are required to be less than 3 m/s and 5 K, the deflection angle must be less than 0.5°. The errors are also dependent on the shape of aperture. If the reflection mirror is deflected in one direction, the temperature error is smaller for a circular aperture (1.3 K) than for a rectangular one (2.6 K), but the wind velocity errors are almost the same (less than 3 m/s). If the deflection center and incident light beam are coincident, the temperature errors are 3 × 10(-4) K and 0.45 K for circular and rectangular apertures, respectively. The wind velocity errors are 1.2 × 10(-3) m/s and 0.06 m/s. Both are small. The result would be helpful for theoretical research and development of the static polarization wind imaging interferometer.

  15. Direct tensor rendering using a bidirectional reflectance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Mikio; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2000-02-01

    For the multi variable volumetric tensor field visualization, an efficient direct rendering technique without using geometrical primitive is proposed. The bi- directional reflectance shading model is used to map the anisotropy stress shear tensor components in direct volume rendering. We model the sub-pixel-sized microfacet at tensor sampling points. The nine component of 3D tensor field are mapped onto grid deformation, opacity mapping, color specification, and normal directions of these microfacets. The ray integration is executed though these irregular infinitesimal microfacets distribution. This direct tensor rendering was applied for at-a-glance tensor visualization of earthquake simulation. That realized a view of deformed structure, stress distribution, local shear discontinuity and the shock front, integrated in a single image. The characteristic P- and S-wave modes are distinguished in the rendered earthquake simulations. Compared with the glyph representation of tensor features, the direct tensor rendering gives the general and total image of tensor field even for the low resolution pixel planes, because the sampling object is assumed as infinitesimally small. the computational cost of direct tensor rendering is not so high than that of scalar volume rendering because the modifications are only ins hading calculation but not in the ray integration.

  16. Polarized light for horizontal incidence and reflection by plane-parallel atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenier, J.W.; Stam, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the intensity vector of light reflected by a plane-parallel atmosphere is discontinuous if the directions of incidence and reflection are both horizontal. An exact expression describing the discontinuity is presented. This expression shows that the discontinuity is only due to first

  17. Circularly polarized reflection from the scarab beetle Chalcothea smaragdina: light scattering by a dual photonic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Luke T; Finlayson, Ewan D; Wilts, Bodo D; Vukusic, Pete

    2017-08-06

    Helicoidal architectures comprising various polysaccharides, such as chitin and cellulose, have been reported in biological systems. In some cases, these architectures exhibit stunning optical properties analogous to ordered cholesteric liquid crystal phases. In this work, we characterize the circularly polarized reflectance and optical scattering from the cuticle of the beetle Chalcothea smaragdina (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) using optical experiments, simulations and structural analysis. The selective reflection of left-handed circularly polarized light is attributed to a Bouligand-type helicoidal morphology within the beetle's exocuticle. Using electron microscopy to inform electromagnetic simulations of this anisotropic stratified medium, the inextricable connection between the colour appearance of C. smaragdina and the periodicity of its helicoidal rotation is shown. A close agreement between the model and the measured reflectance spectra is obtained. In addition, the elytral surface of C. smaragdina possesses a blazed diffraction grating-like surface structure, which affects the diffuse appearance of the beetle's reflected colour, and therefore potentially enhances crypsis among the dense foliage of its rainforest habitat.

  18. Invited Article: An active terahertz polarization converter employing vanadium dioxide and a metal wire grating in total internal reflection geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xudong; Chen, Xuequan; Parrott, Edward P. J.; Han, Chunrui; Humbert, Georges; Crunteanu, Aurelian; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2018-05-01

    Active broadband terahertz (THz) polarization manipulation devices are challenging to realize, but also of great demand in broadband terahertz systems. Vanadium dioxide (VO2) shows a promising phase transition for active control of THz waves and provides broadband polarization characteristics when integrated within grating-type structures. We creatively combine a VO2-based grating structure with a total internal reflection (TIR) geometry providing a novel interaction mechanism between the electromagnetic waves and the device, to realize a powerful active broadband THz polarization-controlling device. The device is based on a Si-substrate coated with a VO2 layer and a metal grating structure on top, attached to a prism for generating the TIR condition on the Si-VO2-grating interface. The grating is connected to electrodes for electrically switching the VO2 between its insulating and conducting phases. By properly selecting the incident angle of the THz waves, the grating direction, and the incident polarization state, we first achieved a broadband intensity modulator under a fused silica prism with an average modulation depth of 99.75% in the 0.2-1.1 THz region. Additionally, we realized an active ultra-broadband quarter-wave converter under a Si prism that can be switched between a 45° linear rotator and a quarter wave converter in the 0.8-1.5 THz region. This is the first demonstration of an active quarter-wave converter with ultra-broad bandwidth performance. Our work shows a highly flexible and multifunctional polarization-controlling device for broadband THz applications.

  19. Reflection performance research of grating with polarization independence based on a sandwiched structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Hao; Wang, Bo; Zhu, Wenhua; Yin, Sufang; Chen, Li; Lei, Liang; Zhou, Jinyun

    2018-02-01

    The novel reflective grating was studied under Littrow incidence as one sort of high-efficiency optical element. A covering layer and a dielectric layer are employed in this structure to achieve higher efficiency and wider bandwidth. For the given wavelength of 1550 nm, by using two-beam-interference theory of modal method, duty cycle and period of grating can be calculated, where the physical essence of high efficiency in the first-order is well explained by the modal method. The other grating parameters are optimized by using rigorous coupled-wave analysis. The optimized grating has an appropriate aspect ratio and shows that diffraction efficiencies of TE and TM polarizations in the first-order are greater than 97%. Compared with the reported surface-relief high-efficiency grating, the diffraction efficiencies of the proposed grating for TE and TM polarizations can be greatly improved.

  20. Directional reflectance factor distributions for cover types of Northern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, D. S.; Newcomb, W. W.; Tucker, C. J.; Zonneveld, I. S.; Van Wijngaarden, W.

    1985-01-01

    Directional reflectance factors that spanned the entire exitance hemisphere were collected on the ground throughout the morning period for common cover types in Tunisia, Africa. NOAA 7/8 AVHRR bands 1(0.58-0.68 micron) and 2 (0.7301.1 micron) were used in data collection. The cover types reported were a plowed field, annual grassland, steppe grassland, hard wheat, salt plain, and irrigated wheat. Several of these cover types had geometric structures that are extreme as compared to those reported in the literature. Comparisons were made between the dynamics of the observed reflectance distributions and those reported in the literature. It was found that the dynamics of the measured data could be explained by a combination of soil and vegetation scattering components. The data and analysis further validated physical principles that cause the reflectance distribution dynamics as proposed by field and simulation studies in the literature. Finally, the normalized difference transformation (Band 2 - Band 1)/(Band 1 + Band 2), which is useful in monitoring vegetation cover, generally decreased the variation in signal with changing view angle. However, several exceptions were noted.

  1. Self-assembled iron oxide nanoparticle multilayer: x-ray and polarized neutron reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, D; Benitez, M J; Petracic, O; Badini Confalonieri, G A; Szary, P; Brüssing, F; Theis-Bröhl, K; Devishvili, A; Vorobiev, A; Konovalov, O; Paulus, M; Sternemann, C; Toperverg, B P; Zabel, H

    2012-02-10

    We have investigated the structure and magnetism of self-assembled, 20 nm diameter iron oxide nanoparticles covered by an oleic acid shell for scrutinizing their structural and magnetic correlations. The nanoparticles were spin-coated on an Si substrate as a single monolayer and as a stack of 5 ML forming a multilayer. X-ray scattering (reflectivity and grazing incidence small-angle scattering) confirms high in-plane hexagonal correlation and a good layering property of the nanoparticles. Using polarized neutron reflectivity we have also determined the long range magnetic correlations parallel and perpendicular to the layers in addition to the structural ones. In a field of 5 kOe we determine a magnetization value of about 80% of the saturation value. At remanence the global magnetization is close to zero. However, polarized neutron reflectivity reveals the existence of regions in which magnetic moments of nanoparticles are well aligned, while losing order over longer distances. These findings confirm that in the nanoparticle assembly the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction is rather strong, dominating the collective magnetic properties at room temperature.

  2. All dielectric reflective metasurface for controlling phase and polarization by using silicon nanoblocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsoo; Lee, Young Jin; Hong, Seokhyeun; Moon, Kihwan; Kwon, Soon-Hong

    2017-09-01

    We suggest all dielectric metasurfaces composed of silicon (Si) nanoblock array. We can control the phase and polarization of light reflected the metasurface by changing Mie scattering of each Si block. The Mie scattering is easily adjusted by changing structure parameters of Si block width and height. In single Si nanoblock, the magnetic dipole resonance mode was diminished when decreasing its height. In this study, for making 2-dimensional metasurface, we analyze the scattering cross-section by changing width and height of Si nanoblock with finite-difference time-domain method.

  3. How Can Polarization States of Reflected Light from Snow Surfaces Inform Us on Surface Normals and Ultimately Snow Grain Size Measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A. M.; Flanner, M.; Yang, P.; Yi, B.; Huang, X.; Feldman, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Snow Grain Size and Pollution (SGSP) algorithm is a method applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data to estimate snow grain size from space-borne measurements. Previous studies validate and quantify potential sources of error in this method, but because it assumes flat snow surfaces, however, large scale variations in surface normals can cause biases in its estimates due to its dependence on solar and observation zenith angles. To address these variations, we apply the Monte Carlo method for photon transport using data containing the single scattering properties of different ice crystals to calculate polarization states of reflected monochromatic light at 1500nm from modeled snow surfaces. We evaluate the dependence of these polarization states on solar and observation geometry at 1500nm because multiple scattering is generally a mechanism for depolarization and the ice crystals are relatively absorptive at this wavelength. Using 1500nm thus results in a higher number of reflected photons undergoing fewer scattering events, increasing the likelihood of reflected light having higher degrees of polarization. In evaluating the validity of the model, we find agreement with previous studies pertaining to near-infrared spectral directional hemispherical reflectance (i.e. black-sky albedo) and similarities in measured bidirectional reflectance factors, but few studies exist modeling polarization states of reflected light from snow surfaces. Here, we present novel results pertaining to calculated polarization states and compare dependences on solar and observation geometry for different idealized snow surfaces. If these dependencies are consistent across different ice particle shapes and sizes, then these findings could inform the SGSP algorithm by providing useful relationships between measurable physical quantities and solar and observation geometry to better understand variations in snow surface normals from remote sensing observations.

  4. Direct Observation of Room-Temperature Polar Ordering in Colloidal GeTe Nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polking, Mark J.; Zheng, Haimei; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.; Chan, Emory; Caldwell, Marissa A.; Raoux, Simone; Kisielowski, Christian F.; Ager, Joel W. III; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Alivisatos, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    Ferroelectrics and other materials that exhibit spontaneous polar ordering have demonstrated immense promise for applications ranging from non-volatile memories to microelectromechanical systems. However, experimental evidence of polar ordering and effective synthetic strategies for accessing these materials are lacking for low-dimensional nanomaterials. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of size-controlled nanocrystals of the polar material germanium telluride (GeTe) using colloidal chemistry and provide the first direct evidence of room-temperature polar ordering in nanocrystals less than 5 nm in size using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman studies demonstrate a sizeable polar distortion and a reversible size-dependent polar phase transition in these nanocrystals. The stability of polar ordering in solution-processible nanomaterials suggests an economical avenue to Tbit/in2-density non-volatile memory devices and other applications.

  5. Influence of InAlN Nanospiral Structures on the Behavior of Reflected Light Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hung Kuo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of structural configurations of indium aluminum nitride (InAlN nanospirals, grown by reactive magnetron sputter epitaxy, on the transformation of light polarization are investigated in terms of varying structural chirality, growth temperatures, titanium nitride (TiN seed (buffer layer thickness, nanospiral thickness, and pitch. The handedness of reflected circularly polarized light in the ultraviolet–visible region corresponding to the chirality of nanospirals is demonstrated. A high degree of circular polarization (Pc value of 0.75 is obtained from a sample consisting of 1.2 μm InAlN nanospirals grown at 650 °C. A film-like structure is formed at temperatures lower than 450 °C. At growth temperatures higher than 750 °C, less than 0.1 In-content is incorporated into the InAlN nanospirals. Both cases reveal very low Pc. A red shift of wavelength at Pc peak is found with increasing nanospiral pitch in the range of 200–300 nm. The Pc decreases to 0.37 for two-turn nanospirals with total length of 0.7 μm, attributed to insufficient constructive interference. A branch-like structure appears on the surface when the nanospirals are grown longer than 1.2 μm, which yields a low Pc around 0.5, caused by the excessive scattering of incident light.

  6. Directional emissivity and reflectance: dependence on emergence angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturilli, Alessandro; Helbert, Jörn

    2017-04-01

    Dependence of laboratory measured emissivity spectra from the emergence angle is a subject that still needs a lot of investigations to be fully understood. Most of the previous work is based on reflectance measurements in the VIS-NIR spectral region and on emissivity measurements of flat, solid surfaces (mainly metals), which are not directly applicable to the analysis of remote sensing data. Small bodies in particular (c.f. asteroids Itokawa and 1999JU3, the respective targets of JAXA Hayabusa and Hayabusa 2 missions) have a very irregular surface; hence the spectra from those rough surfaces are difficult to compare with laboratory spectra, where the observing geometry is always close to "nadir". At the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) we have set-up a series of spectral measurements to investigate this problem in the 1 - 16 µm spectral region. We measured the emissivity for two asteroid analog materials (meteorite Millbillillie and a synthetic enstatite) in vacuum and under purged air, at surface temperature of 100°C, for emergence angles of 0°, 5°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 50°, and 60°. Emissivity of a serpentinite slab, already used as calibration target for the MARA instrument on Hayabusa 2 MASCOT lander, and for the Thermal Infrared Imager (TIR) spectrometer on Hayabusa 2 orbiter was measured under the same conditions. Additionally a second basalt slab was measured. Both slabs were not measured at 5° inclination. Complementary reflectance measurements of the four samples were taken. For all the samples measured, we found that for calibrated emissivity, significant variations from values obtained at nadir (0° emergence angle) appear only for emergence angles ≥ 40°. Reflectance measurements confirmed this finding, showing the same trend of variations.

  7. Vitrified chiral-nematic liquid crystalline films for selective reflection and circular polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsis, D.; Chen, P.H.M.; Mastrangelo, J.C.; Chen, S.H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Blanton, T.N. [Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Nematic and left-handed chiral-nematic liquid crystals comprising methoxybiphenylbenzoate and (S)-(-)-1-phenylethylamine pendants to a cyclohexane core were synthesized and characterized. Although pristine samples were found to be polycrystalline, thermal quenching following heating to and annealing at elevated temperatures permitted the molecular orders characteristic of liquid crystalline mesomorphism to be frozen in the glassy state. Left at room temperature for 6 months, the vitrified liquid crystalline films showed no evidence of recrystallization. An orientational order parameter of 0.65 was determined with linear dichroism of a vitrified nematic film doped with Exalite 428 at a mole fraction of 0.0025. Birefringence dispersion of a blank vitrified nematic film was determined using a phase-difference method complemented by Abbe refractometry. A series of vitrified chiral-nematic films were prepared to demonstrate selective reflection and circular polarization with a spectral region tunable from blue to the infrared region by varying the chemical composition. The experimentally measured circular polarization spectra were found to agree with the Good-Karali theory in which all four system parameters were determined a priori: optical birefringence, average refractive index, selective reflection wavelength, and film thickness.

  8. Polarization-interleave-multiplexed discrete multi-tone modulation with direct detection utilizing MIMO equalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xian; Zhong, Kangping; Gao, Yuliang; Sui, Qi; Dong, Zhenghua; Yuan, Jinhui; Wang, Liang; Long, Keping; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Lu, Chao

    2015-04-06

    Discrete multi-tone (DMT) modulation is an attractive modulation format for short-reach applications to achieve the best use of available channel bandwidth and signal noise ratio (SNR). In order to realize polarization-multiplexed DMT modulation with direct detection, we derive an analytical transmission model for dual polarizations with intensity modulation and direct diction (IM-DD) in this paper. Based on the model, we propose a novel polarization-interleave-multiplexed DMT modulation with direct diction (PIM-DMT-DD) transmission system, where the polarization de-multiplexing can be achieved by using a simple multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) equalizer and the transmission performance is optimized over two distinct received polarization states to eliminate the singularity issue of MIMO demultiplexing algorithms. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed PIM-DMT-DD system are investigated via theoretical analyses and simulation studies.

  9. Direct injection of spin-polarized carriers across YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7- ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 5-6. Direct injection of spin-polarized ... from the CMR layer is 38 mA. This clearly shows that spin-polarized quasiparticles injected from the CMR layer into the YBCO layer suppress the critical current of the superconductor via the pair-breaking phenomena.

  10. The polarized neutron reflectivity and X-ray reflectivity studies of the magnetic profiles of epitaxial Ni80Fe20/Ru multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, H.-C.; Peir, J.-J.; Lee, C.-H.; Lin, M.-Z.; Wu, P.-T.; Huang, J.C.A.; Tun Zin

    2005-01-01

    The depth profiles of the epitaxial Ni 80 Fe 20 (1 1 1)/Ru(0 0 0 1) multilayers were studied by polarized neutron reflectivity and X-ray reflectivity. At the Ru thickness that the anti-ferromagnetic coupling was found, the magnetic moments between two Ni 80 Fe 20 interlayers show a biquadratic coupling effect with a double unit cell at low applied fields. A magnetic dead layer of about 0.3 nm was also found at the interface boundaries. The maximal polarization effect applied to the Ru layer is less than 0.03μ B

  11. Polarization-dependent in-line quasi-Michelson interferometer based on PM-PCF reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yanying; Qiao, Xueguang; Rong, Qiangzhou; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Dingyi; Wang, Ruohui; Sun, Hao; Hu, Manli; Feng, Zhongyao

    2013-05-20

    An in-line fiber quasi-Michelson interferometer (IFQMI) working on reflection is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensing head is fabricated by splicing a section of polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF) with a lead-in single mode fiber (SMF). Some cladding modes are excited into the PM-PCF via the mismatch-core splicing interface between PM-PCF and SMF. Besides, two orthogonal polarized-modes are formed due to the inherent multiholes cladding structure of the PM-PCF. A well-defined interference pattern is obtained as the result of cladding-orthogonal modes interference. The IFQMI with 20 cm long PM-PCF is proposed for strain and torsion measurements. A strain sensitivity of -1.3 pm/με and a torsion sensitivity of -19.17 pm/deg are obtained, respectively. The proposed device with 10 cm long PM-PCF exhibits a considered temperature sensitivity of 9.9 pm/°C. The IFQMI has a compact structure and small size, making it a good candidate for multiparameter measurements.

  12. Polarized photomodulated reflectivity and photoluminescence studies of ordered InGaP2 under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.J.; Chandrasekhar, H.R.; Chandrasekhar, M.; Jones, E.D.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Spontaneous ordering of ternary alloys grown on misoriented substrates has been of recent interest. Ordering induced band gap reduction, and valence band splittings exhibiting novel polarization properties have been investigated by theory and experiment. This paper discusses polarized photomodulated reflectivity (PR) and photoluminescence (PL) studies of MOCVD grown InGaP 2 epilayers lattice-matched to a GaAs substrate. These structures were grown on a (001) face with a niisorientation of two degrees along . The high degree of ordering has enabled us to accurately measure the crystal field splitting and additional structure not reported in the PR spectra. For the electric field E parallel to [110] two features in the PR spectra are seen; for E parallel[110], however, additional features are observed. Comparison with spectra of disordered samples of the same alloy composition has enabled a determination of the band gap reduction due to ordering. Linewidths of the PR peaks are approximately 5--10 meV which has enabled us to study them in detail as a function of hydrostatic pressure at cryogenic temperatures. The pressure dependence is slightly sublinear with the first order term of 8--9 meV/kbar for pressures well below the l-X crossover. Also observed is the indirect level crossing which occurs under pressure at about 40-kbar. A comparison of PR lineshapes at 1-bar is also presented at several commonly used experimental temperatures. Data indicate a substantial change in PR lineshapes, showing that interpretation of reflectivity data for these samples must be handled carefully

  13. Flexible Holographic Fabrication of 3D Photonic Crystal Templates with Polarization Control through a 3D Printed Reflective Optical Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lowell

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have systematically studied the holographic fabrication of three-dimensional (3D structures using a single 3D printed reflective optical element (ROE, taking advantage of the ease of design and 3D printing of the ROE. The reflective surface was setup at non-Brewster angles to reflect both s- and p-polarized beams for the interference. The wide selection of reflective surface materials and interference angles allow control of the ratio of s- and p-polarizations, and intensity ratio of side-beam to central beam for interference lithography. Photonic bandgap simulations have also indicated that both s and p-polarized waves are sometimes needed in the reflected side beams for maximum photonic bandgap size and certain filling fractions of dielectric inside the photonic crystals. The flexibility of single ROE and single exposure based holographic fabrication of 3D structures was demonstrated with reflective surfaces of ROEs at non-Brewster angles, highlighting the capability of the ROE technique of producing umbrella configurations of side beams with arbitrary angles and polarizations and paving the way for the rapid throughput of various photonic crystal templates.

  14. Direct measurement of the dielectric polarization properties of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo, Ana; Dans, Pablo D.; Carrascosa, José L.; Orozco, Modesto; Gomila, Gabriel; Fumagalli, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The electric polarizability of DNA, represented by the dielectric constant, is a key intrinsic property that modulates DNA interaction with effector proteins. Surprisingly, it has so far remained unknown owing to the lack of experimental tools able to access it. Here, we experimentally resolved it by detecting the ultraweak polarization forces of DNA inside single T7 bacteriophages particles using electrostatic force microscopy. In contrast to the common assumption of low-polarizable behavior like proteins (εr ∼ 2–4), we found that the DNA dielectric constant is ∼8, considerably higher than the value of ∼3 found for capsid proteins. State-of-the-art molecular dynamic simulations confirm the experimental findings, which result in sensibly decreased DNA interaction free energy than normally predicted by Poisson–Boltzmann methods. Our findings reveal a property at the basis of DNA structure and functions that is needed for realistic theoretical descriptions, and illustrate the synergetic power of scanning probe microscopy and theoretical computation techniques. PMID:25136104

  15. ROCK1-directed basement membrane positioning coordinates epithelial tissue polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, William P; Gervais, Elise M; Centanni, Samuel W; Gulfo, Kathryn M; Nelson, Deirdre A; Larsen, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    The basement membrane is crucial for epithelial tissue organization and function. However, the mechanisms by which basement membrane is restricted to the basal periphery of epithelial tissues and the basement membrane-mediated signals that regulate coordinated tissue organization are not well defined. Here, we report that Rho kinase (ROCK) controls coordinated tissue organization by restricting basement membrane to the epithelial basal periphery in developing mouse submandibular salivary glands, and that ROCK inhibition results in accumulation of ectopic basement membrane throughout the epithelial compartment. ROCK-regulated restriction of PAR-1b (MARK2) localization in the outer basal epithelial cell layer is required for basement membrane positioning at the tissue periphery. PAR-1b is specifically required for basement membrane deposition, as inhibition of PAR-1b kinase activity prevents basement membrane deposition and disrupts overall tissue organization, and suppression of PAR-1b together with ROCK inhibition prevents interior accumulations of basement membrane. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of wild-type PAR-1b results in ectopic interior basement membrane deposition. Significantly, culture of salivary epithelial cells on exogenous basement membrane rescues epithelial organization in the presence of ROCK1 or PAR-1b inhibition, and this basement membrane-mediated rescue requires functional integrin β1 to maintain epithelial cell-cell adhesions. Taken together, these studies indicate that ROCK1/PAR-1b-dependent regulation of basement membrane placement is required for the coordination of tissue polarity and the elaboration of tissue structure in the developing submandibular salivary gland.

  16. Joint polarization tracking and channel equalization based on radius-directed linear Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Yang, Yanfu; Zhong, Kangping; Liu, Jie; Wu, Xiong; Yao, Yong

    2018-01-01

    We propose a joint polarization tracking and channel equalization scheme based on radius-directed linear Kalman filter (RD-LKF) by introducing the butterfly finite-impulse-response (FIR) filter in our previously proposed RD-LKF method. Along with the fast polarization tracking, it can also simultaneously compensate the inter-symbol interference (ISI) effects including residual chromatic dispersion and polarization mode dispersion. Compared with the conventional radius-directed equalizer (RDE) algorithm, it is demonstrated experimentally that three times faster convergence speed, one order of magnitude better tracking capability, and better BER performance is obtained in polarization division multiplexing 16 quadrature amplitude modulation system. Besides, the influences of the algorithm parameters on the convergence and the tracking performance are investigated by numerical simulation.

  17. Polarization contrast linear spectroscopies for cubic semiconductors under stress: macro- and micro-reflectance difference spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martinez, L.F.; Balderas-Navarro, R.E.; Castro-Garcia, R.; Herrera-Jasso, R.; Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Chavira-Rodriguez, M. [Departamento de Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2011-01-15

    The technique to measure optical anisotropies (OA) in cubic semiconductors is termed either reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS) or reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS). In this paper we report on the application of RDS/RAS to a number of cubic semiconductors. We discuss RD spectra of GaAs, Si, CdTe, GaP, InP and GaSb (001) surfaces, induced by an uniaxial stress applied along [110] crystal directions. We show that all RD spectra can be explained in terms of a phenomenological model based on a perturbative Hamiltonian. We further report on measurements of spatial-resolved RDS measurements of GaAs employing a newly developed micro-RD spectrometer with a spatial resolution of 5 {mu}m. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Increasing detectivity of polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy for the study of ultrathin films deposited on various substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccani, J; Buffeteau, T; Desbat, B; Blaudez, D

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we present a simple way to increase the sensitivity of polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) for the study of ultrathin films deposited on dielectric and semiconductor substrates. The enhancement of the absorption band intensity is obtained by reducing the signal arising from the substrate. This is achieved by adding a polarizer after the sample in order to balance the polarized reflectivities of the sample. As a consequence, the contribution of the film to the PM-IRRAS signal is increased relative to that of the substrate. An enhancement factor of about 10 has been obtained for ultrathin organic films deposited on glass and spread at the air-water interface. This method has also allowed the study of the very thin native oxide layer present on silicon without the need for the reference spectrum of bare silicon.

  19. Variation in the circularly polarized light reflection of Lomaptera (Scarabaeidae) beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, I E; Weir, K; McCall, M W; Parker, A R

    2016-07-01

    An extended spectroscopic study on the left-through-left circularly polarized reflection spectra of a large number of beetles from the Australasian Scrabaeidae:Cetoniinae of the Lomaptera genus was undertaken. We have obtained a five-category spectral classification. The principal spectral features, which even within the genus range from blue to infrared, are related to structural chirality in the beetle shells. The detailed features of each spectral classification are related to different structural perturbations of the helix, including various pitch values and abrupt twist defects. These spectral characteristics and associated shell structures are confirmed on the basis of simple modelling. An important conclusion from our study is that the simple helical structure resulting in a single symmetric Bragg peak is not the dominant spectral type. Rather the reality is a rich tapestry of spectral types. One intriguing specimen is identified via a scanning electron micrograph to consist of a double interstitial helix leading to a particular double-peak spectrum. © 2016 The Authors.

  20. Development of an in situ polarization-dependent total-reflection fluorescence XAFS measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, W J; Tanizawa, Y; Shido, T; Iwasawa, Y; Nomura, M; Asakura, K

    2001-03-01

    An in situ polarization-dependent total-reflection fluorescence X-ray absorption fine structure (PTRF-XAFS) spectroscopy system has been developed, which enables PTRF-XAFS experiments to be performed in three different orientations at various temperatures (273-600 K) and pressures (10(-10) approximately 760 torr). The system consists of a measurement chamber and a preparation chamber. The measurement chamber has a high-precision six-axis goniometer and a multielement solid-state detector. Using a transfer chamber, also operated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions, the sample can be transferred to the measurement chamber from the preparation chamber, which possesses low-energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy facilities, as well as a sputtering gun and an annealing system. The in situ PTRF-EXAFS for Cu species on TiO2 (110) has been measured in three different orientations, revealing anisotropic growth of Cu under the influence of the TiO2 (110) surface.

  1. Spectrally efficient polarization multiplexed direct-detection OFDM system without frequency gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chia-Chien; Zeng, Wei-Siang; Lin, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-25

    We experimentally demonstrate a spectrally efficient direct-detection orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (DD-OFDM) system. In addition to polarization-division multiplexing, removing the frequency gap further improves the spectral efficiency of the OFDM system. The frequency gap between a reference carrier and OFDM subcarriers avoids subcarrier-to-subcarrier beating interference (SSBI) in traditional DD-OFDM systems. Without dynamic polarization control, the resulting interference after square-law direct detection in the proposed gap-less system is polarization-dependent and composed of linear inter-carrier interference (ICI) and nonlinear SSBI. Thus, this work proposes an iterative multiple-input multiple-output detection scheme to remove the mixed polarization-dependent interference. Compared to the previous scheme, which only removes ICI, the proposed scheme can further eliminate SSBI to achieve the improvement of ∼ 7 dB in signal-to-noise ratio. Without the need for polarization control, we successfully utilize 7-GHz bandwidth to transmit a 39.5-Gbps polarization multiplexed OFDM signal over 100 km.

  2. Assessing Zones of Low Radar Reflectivity Across the South Polar Cap of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzig, N. E.; Smith, I. B.; Whitten, J. L.; Campbell, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Shallow Radar (SHARAD) revealed near-surface zones of low radar reflectivity (reflection-free zones, RFZs) in many areas of Planum Australe (Phillips et al., 2011, Science 332). The most poleward, RFZ3, corresponds geographically to geologic unit AA3 (Tanaka et al., 2007, 7th Int'l Mars Conf. abs. 3276) that exhibits sublimation features. Geometric considerations demonstrated that RFZ3 consists of three distinct layers of CO2 ice, preserved from earlier periods of atmospheric collapse (Bierson et al., 2016, GRL 43). However, the nature of other RFZs at lower latitudes remains undetermined, with none of the SHARAD observations examined to date providing definitive geometric constraints on their composition. While CO2-ice composition has not been ruled out, these RFZs differ in important ways from RFZ3. Surface imagery in the vicinity of the outlying RFZs does not generally exhibit sublimation features similar to those seen in AA3, SHARAD reflectivity exhibits a lower contrast with surrounding materials relative to RFZ3, and there are no indications of distinct layering within the outlying RFZs as there are in RFZ3. In addition, climate modeling of atmospheric collapse episodes (Wood et al., 2016, LPSC abs. 3074) suggests that CO2 accumulation is highly concentrated at the highest latitudes. An alternative explanation for the outlying RFZs is that they consist of nearly pure water ice deposited during times when atmospheric dust was nearly absent. Such conditions may occur coeval with eras of CO2 accumulation at the higher latitudes. To test these possibilities, we are working to constrain the composition of the outlying RFZs, using the recently produced 3-D SHARAD data volume that encompasses the entire Martian south polar ice cap (Foss et al., 2017, The Leading Edge, 36). Work is ongoing, but we expect that the geometric corrections and improvements to the overall signal-to-noise ratio provided by the 3-D radar imaging processing may

  3. Growth behavior of GaN film along non-polar [1 1 -2 0] directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Xiaojing; Xu Ke; Wang Jianfeng; Yang Hui; Bian Lifeng; Zhang Jingping; Xu Zijian

    2011-01-01

    We studied the atomic assembly mechanisms of non-polar GaN films by the molecular dynamics method as a function of the N:Ga flux ratio at a fixed adatom energy on non-polar planes. Our study revealed that high quality crystal growth occurred only when off-lattice atoms (which are usually associated with amorphous embryos or defect complexes) formed during deposition were able to move to unoccupied lattice sites by thermally activated diffusion processes, which attests to the experimental difficulties in obtaining smooth surfaces due to dense stacking faults lying in non-polar GaN. Furthermore, surface structures on different planes played an important role. We further suggested favorable conditions for growing high quality GaN films and nano-structures along non-polar directions.

  4. Direct Numerical Simulations of Concentration and Temperature Polarization in Direct Contact Membrane Distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jincheng; Tilton, Nils

    2017-11-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is a method of desalination with boundary layers that are challenging to simulate. MD is a thermal process in which warm feed and cool distilled water flow on opposite sides of a hydrophobic membrane. The temperature difference causes water to evaporate from the feed, travel through the membrane, and condense in the distillate. Two challenges to MD are temperature and concentration polarization. Temperature polarization represents a reduction in the transmembrane temperature difference due to heat transfer through the membrane. Concentration polarization describes the accumulation of solutes near the membrane. These phenomena reduce filtration and lead to membrane fouling. They are difficult to simulate due to the coupling between the velocity, temperature, and concentration fields on the membrane. Unsteady regimes are particularly challenging because noise at the outlets can pollute the near-membrane flow fields. We present the development of a finite-volume method for the simulation of fluid flow, heat, and mass transport in MD systems. Using the method, we perform a parametric study of the polarization boundary layers, and show that the concentration boundary layer shows self-similar behavior that satisfies power laws for the downstream growth. Funded by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.

  5. In Situ Nondestructive Analysis of Kalanchoe pinnata Leaf Surface Structure by Polarization-Modulation Infrared Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Enami, Shinichi; Shimoaka, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2017-12-14

    The outermost surface of the leaves of land plants is covered with a lipid membrane called the cuticle that protects against various stress factors. Probing the molecular-level structure of the intact cuticle is highly desirable for understanding its multifunctional properties. We report the in situ characterization of the surface structure of Kalanchoe pinnata leaves using polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Without sample pretreatment, PM-IRRAS measures the IR spectra of the leaf cuticle of a potted K. pinnata plant. The peak position of the CH 2 -related modes shows that the cuticular waxes on the leaf surface are mainly crystalline, and the alkyl chains are highly packed in an all-trans zigzag conformation. The surface selection rule of PM-IRRAS revealed the average orientation of the cuticular molecules, as indicated by the positive and negative signals of the IR peaks. This unique property of PM-IRRAS revealed that the alkyl chains of the waxes and the main chains of polysaccharides are oriented almost perpendicular to the leaf surface. The nondestructive, background-free, and environmental gas-free nature of PM-IRRAS allows the structure and chemistry of the leaf cuticle to be studied directly in its native environment.

  6. Critical health psychology in New Zealand: Developments, directions and reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Kerry; Lyons, Antonia C; Stephens, Christine

    2018-03-01

    We examine how critical health psychology developed in New Zealand, taking an historical perspective to document important influences. We discuss how academic appointments created a confluence of critical researchers at Massey University, how interest in health psychology arose and expanded, how the critical turn eventuated and how connections, both local and international, were important in building and sustaining these developments. We discuss the evolution of teaching a critical health psychology training programme, describe the research agendas and professional activities of academic staff involved and how this sustains the critical agenda. We close with some reflections on progress and attainment.

  7. Conoscopic polarized interference applied in measuring uniaxial axis direction of electro-optic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Jiang, Hongzhen; Zhang, Lin; Li, Dong; Liu, Xu; Zheng, Fanglan

    2016-10-01

    The crystal can be used to be electro-optic switch because of its electro-optic modulation. Generally the uniaxial axis of electro-optic crystal is perpendicular to the light injection surface. Due to the manufacturing precision, the uniaxial axis direction has a little angle with the normal of the light injection surface, which affects the electro-optic modulation ability. In conoscopic polarized inference, due to birefraction the ordinary ray and extraordinary ray from crystal interferes after the polarizer. The interference pattern of crystal component is circle fringes with dark cross. The center of interference pattern has relation to the uniaxial axis direction. Using digital camera to capture the pattern and the center position of interferogram can be determinate by image processing program. In repeatability experiments the rms of center position is around 1 pixel. To measure the uniaxial axis direction, the normal direction of the crystal component should also be accurately determinate. Michelson interference method is introduced to determinate the normal direction. If rotate the crystal component around the normal direction in conoscopic polarized interference, the track of interferogram center is a circle theoretically. The circle center is related to the normal direction of crystal component, and the radii is related to the angle uniaxial axis, which can be determinate by least square fitting method. Experiment result shows that the measuring precision can achieves several tens of microradians.

  8. Design of Polarization-Independent Coarse Wavelength Splitters Based on Ridge-Waveguide Directional Couplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee-Wei Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the first unique design of a polarization-independent dual-wavelength splitter for wavelengths around 1.3 μm and 1.55 μm that is potentially of great interest to passive optical network (PON applications. The filter design is simple compared with the other architectures and is based on ridge-type lateral directional couplers that can be readily integrated with other planar waveguide devices. Two design examples, based on InP/InGaAsP and Si/SiGe waveguides, are given. This polarization-independent wavelength splitting is achieved by exploiting the polarization dependence of the waveguides to produce coupling lengths that are sensitive to polarization and wavelength. We show that, to split the wavelengths without splitting the polarizations, the coupling lengths must be sufficiently different for TE and TM and for the different wavelengths in order to give the correct required ratios between the TE and TM coupling lengths for the two wavelengths of interest. We also show that the same approach can be applied to the design of a polarization splitter. The crosstalk, optical bandwidth, and fabrication sensitivity for the wavelength filter are evaluated.

  9. GPS scintillation effects associated with polar cap patches and substorm auroral activity: direct comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yaqi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We directly compare the relative GPS scintillation levels associated with regions of enhanced plasma irregularities called auroral arcs, polar cap patches, and auroral blobs that frequently occur in the polar ionosphere. On January 13, 2013 from Ny-Ålesund, several polar cap patches were observed to exit the polar cap into the auroral oval, and were then termed auroral blobs. This gave us an unprecedented opportunity to compare the relative scintillation levels associated with these three phenomena. The blobs were associated with the strongest phase scintillation (σϕ, followed by patches and arcs, with σϕ up to 0.6, 0.5, and 0.1 rad, respectively. Our observations indicate that most patches in the nightside polar cap have produced significant scintillations, but not all of them. Since the blobs are formed after patches merged into auroral regions, in space weather predictions of GPS scintillations, it will be important to enable predictions of patches exiting the polar cap.

  10. Exploration of a Polarized Surface Bidirectional Reflectance Model Using the Ground-Based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Diner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterization of surface reflection is essential for retrieval of aerosols using downward-looking remote sensors. In this paper, observations from the Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI are used to evaluate a surface polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function (PBRDF model. GroundMSPI is an eight-band spectropolarimetric camera mounted on a rotating gimbal to acquire pushbroom imagery of outdoor landscapes. The camera uses a very accurate photoelastic-modulator-based polarimetric imaging technique to acquire Stokes vector measurements in three of the instrument’s bands (470, 660, and 865 nm. A description of the instrument is presented, and observations of selected targets within a scene acquired on 6 January 2010 are analyzed. Data collected during the course of the day as the Sun moved across the sky provided a range of illumination geometries that facilitated evaluation of the surface model, which is comprised of a volumetric reflection term represented by the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete function plus a specular reflection term generated by a randomly oriented array of Fresnel-reflecting microfacets. While the model is fairly successful in predicting the polarized reflection from two grass targets in the scene, it does a poorer job for two manmade targets (a parking lot and a truck roof, possibly due to their greater degree of geometric organization. Several empirical adjustments to the model are explored and lead to improved fits to the data. For all targets, the data support the notion of spectral invariance in the angular shape of the unpolarized and polarized surface reflection. As noted by others, this behavior provides valuable constraints on the aerosol retrieval problem, and highlights the importance of multiangle observations.

  11. Calcium- and BTB domain protein-modulated PINOID kinase directs polar auxin transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robert-Boisivon, Hélène S.

    2008-01-01

    Plant architecture is determined by tightly regulated developmental processes that largely depend on the action of the plant hormone auxin. A major determinant in auxin action, besides its signaling pathway, is its polar cell-to-cell transport (PAT) throughout the plant. The direction on this

  12. Lithological characterization of a contaminated site using Direct current resistivity and time domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurya, Pradip Kumar; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben

    study a large contaminated site in Denmark was investigated using direct current resistivity and time domain induced polarization (DCIP). For this purpose 14 profiles were collected alongside a stream in order to investigate the contamination and delineate the lithological units. 2D inversion using...

  13. Predicting Clear-Sky Reflectance Over Snow/Ice in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Arduini, Robert F.; Hong, Gang; Minnis, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of clouds requires an accurate estimate of the clear-sky radiances for a given scene to detect clouds and aerosols and to retrieve their microphysical properties. Knowing the spatial and angular variability of clear-sky albedo is essential for predicting clear-sky radiance at solar wavelengths. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Project uses the nearinfrared (NIR; 1.24, 1.6 or 2.13 micrometers), visible (VIS; 0.63 micrometers) and vegetation (VEG; 0.86 micrometers) channels available on the Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to help identify clouds and retrieve their properties in both snow-free and snow-covered conditions. Thus, it is critical to have reliable distributions of clear-sky albedo for all of these channels. In CERES Edition 4 (Ed4), the 1.24-micrometer channel is used to retrieve cloud optical depth over snow/ice-covered surfaces. Thus, it is especially critical to accurately predict the 1.24-micrometer clear-sky albedo alpha and reflectance rho for a given location and time. Snow albedo and reflectance patterns are very complex due to surface texture, particle shapes and sizes, melt water, and vegetation protrusions from the snow surface. To minimize those effects, this study focuses on the permanent snow cover of Antarctica where vegetation is absent and melt water is minimal. Clear-sky albedos are determined as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA) from observations over all scenes determined to be cloud-free to produce a normalized directional albedo model (DRM). The DRM is used to develop alpha(SZA=0 degrees) on 10 foot grid for each season. These values provide the basis for predicting r at any location and set of viewing & illumination conditions. This paper examines the accuracy of this approach for two theoretical snow surface reflectance models.

  14. Advance directives or living wills: reflections of general practitioners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Living wills have long been associated with end-of-life care. This study explored the promotion of living wills by general practitioners (GPs) and frail care nursing coordinators who were directly involved in the care of the elderly in Howick, KwaZulu-Natal. The study also explored their views regarding the pro ...

  15. Spectral-directional reflectivity of Tyvek immersed in water

    CERN Document Server

    Filevich, A; Bianchi, H; Rodríguez-Martino, J; Torlasco, G

    1999-01-01

    Spectral-directional relative intensity of the light scattered by a Tyvek sample, immersed in water, has been measured for visible and UV wavelengths. The obtained information is useful to simulate the behavior of light in water Cherenkov detectors, such as those proposed for the observation of high energy cosmic ray air showers. In this work a simple empirical dependence of the scattering pattern on the angle was found, convenient to be used in Monte Carlo simulation programs.

  16. COMPARISONS OF THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD DIRECTIONS OBTAINED FROM THE IBEX RIBBON AND INTERSTELLAR POLARIZATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, Priscilla C.; Andersson, B-G; Berdyugin, Andrei; Piirola, Vilppu; Funsten, Herbert O.; Magalhaes, Antonio M.; McComas, David J.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Slavin, Jonathan D.; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.

    2010-01-01

    Variations in the spatial configuration of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) near the Sun can be constrained by comparing the ISMF direction at the heliosphere found from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft observations of a 'Ribbon' of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), with the ISMF direction derived from optical polarization data for stars within ∼40 pc. Using interstellar polarization observations toward ∼30 nearby stars within ∼90 0 of the heliosphere nose, we find that the best fits to the polarization position angles are obtained for a magnetic pole directed toward ecliptic coordinates of λ, β ∼ 263 0 , 37 0 (or galactic coordinates of l, b ∼ 38 0 , 23 0 ), with uncertainties of ±35 0 based on the broad minimum of the best fits and the range of data quality. This magnetic pole is 33 0 from the magnetic pole that is defined by the center of the arc of the ENA Ribbon. The IBEX ENA ribbon is seen in sight lines that are perpendicular to the ISMF as it drapes over the heliosphere. The similarity of the polarization and Ribbon directions for the local ISMF suggests that the local field is coherent over scale sizes of tens of parsecs. The ISMF vector direction is nearly perpendicular to the flow of local interstellar material (ISM) through the local standard of rest, supporting a possible local ISM origin related to an evolved expanding magnetized shell. The local ISMF direction is found to have a curious geometry with respect to the cosmic microwave background dipole moment.

  17. European water framework directive reflected by the Romanian legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, M.; Ristoiu, D.

    2013-11-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is one of the most ambitious legislative instrument in the field of water policy which has as major aim the achievement of a good status for all surface and ground waters in the European Union (EU) until 2015. For this purpose Member States of EU have to identify major water surfaces within their territory, assign them to river basin districts and establish for the river basin districts the management plans and programmes of measures. The strength but also the most problematic issue of WFD law package is the pollution of water from chemicals which is set out in Article 16 of the WFD 2000/60/EC. As a first step of this strategy, a list of priority substances were adopted (Decision 2455/2001/EC) identifying 33 chemicals or groups of chemicals (mainly organic compounds as pesticides, certain PAHs, BTEX, halogenated solvents, flame retardants, etc.) which are of great concern throughout EU, due to their widespread usage. Romania, as a member state of the EU needs to align its legislative package on water quality protection to those proposed in WFD. Major problems arise from the lack of standard methods for qualitative and quantitative monitoring of these priorities chemical pollutants.

  18. Measurement of the tau lepton polarization in the ALEPH experiment using the tau direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, I.

    1996-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis has been performed within the ALEPH experiment located on the LEP electron-positron collider. It is a part of the precision measurements with the goal of determining the fundamental parameters of the standard model of the electroweak interactions and testing its internal coherence. The measurement of the τ polarization allows a precise determination of the electroweak mixing angle by measuring the coupling constants of the Z 0 boson to the τ and to the electron and a test of the electron-tau universality predicted by the standard model. The τ direction is used for the first time in a polarization measurement in this analysis. The use of the τ direction increases the sensibility of the polarization measurement in the hadronic τ decay channels ρ and a 1 . Both decay modes of the a 1 , a 1 -> 3τ +- and a 1 -> τ +- 2τ 0 , were considered. The τ channel was analyzed as well. Data recorded by the ALEPH detector between 1990 and 1994 were analyzed, corresponding to 136 000 τ + τ - events. The value of the measured τ polarization is A eτ = - 0.1530 ± 0.0047 stat ± 0.0030 syst , yielding the value of the sinus squared of the electroweak mixing angle sin 2 θ W eff = 0.23076 ± 0.00070. It is one of the most precise measurements among those done at LEP. (author). 68 refs., 103 figs., 41 tabs., 1 append

  19. Bi-directional reflectance distribution function of a tungsten block for ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Ogawa, Hiroaki; Sugie, Tatsuo; Kusama, Yoshinori

    2012-02-01

    In order to investigate reflection properties on plasma-facing material in ITER, the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a tungsten block sample has been measured. On the machining surface of the block, one-directional machining lines are engraved. Two laser diodes λ652 nm and λ473 nm were used to simulate H α and H β emissions, respectively. The reflected light is affected by the machining surface. The reflected light traces an arc when the incident light is injected in the parallel direction to the engraved line. On the other hand the reflected light traces a line shape when the incident light is injected in the perpendicular direction to the engraved lines. Ray tracing simulation qualitatively explains the experimental results. (author)

  20. The O2 A-Band in the Fluxes and Polarization of Starlight Reflected by Earth-Like Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Rossi, Loic; Stam, Daphne M.

    2017-06-01

    Earth-like, potentially habitable exoplanets are prime targets in the search for extraterrestrial life. Information about their atmospheres and surfaces can be derived by analyzing the light of the parent star reflected by the planet. We investigate the influence of the surface albedo A s, the optical thickness b cloud, the altitude of water clouds, and the mixing ratio of biosignature O2 on the strength of the O2 A-band (around 760 nm) in the flux and polarization spectra of starlight reflected by Earth-like exoplanets. Our computations for horizontally homogeneous planets show that small mixing ratios (η < 0.4) will yield moderately deep bands in flux and moderate-to-small band strengths in polarization, and that clouds will usually decrease the band depth in flux and the band strength in polarization. However, cloud influence will be strongly dependent on properties such as optical thickness, top altitude, particle phase, coverage fraction, and horizontal distribution. Depending on the surface albedo and cloud properties, different O2 mixing ratios η can give similar absorption-band depths in flux and band strengths in polarization, especially if the clouds have moderate-to-high optical thicknesses. Measuring both the flux and the polarization is essential to reduce the degeneracies, although it will not solve them, especially not for horizontally inhomogeneous planets. Observations at a wide range of phase angles and with a high temporal resolution could help to derive cloud properties and, once those are known, the mixing ratio of O2 or any other absorbing gas.

  1. Investigation of oscillations of piezoelectric actuators with multi-directional polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucinskis, Raimundas; Mazeika, Dalius; Bansevicius, Ramutis

    2018-01-01

    Oscillations of two beam type piezoelectric actuators with non-homogeneous polarization are investigated. 3DOF oscillations of the contact point are excited applying harmonic signal on the electrodes of the actuators. Elliptical motion of the contact point is generated in the three perpendicular planes independently. Investigated actuators can move or rotate slider in three different directions. Superposition of flexural resonant oscillations in two perpendicular directions and longitudinal resonant oscillation of the beam is employed to obtain elliptical motion of the contact point. Performed investigation demonstrates that the piezoelectric actuators with non-homogeneous polarization provide an effective solution for generation a multi-DOF motion of the contact point. Both proposed actuators have specific topology of the electrodes that allows to control contact point trajectory by means of particular excitation regimes. The paper presents results of numerical modeling as well as experimental study obtained in the course of testing of the fabricated prototypes of the actuators.

  2. Assessment of polarization correction impact on the calibration of Terra MODIS reflective solar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aisheng; Angal, Amit; Geng, Xu; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2017-09-01

    The Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), launched in 1999 on Terra and 2002 on Aqua spacecraft respectively, is a scanning radiometer that covers a wavelength range from 0.4 μm to 14.4 μm and scans the Earth over an angular range from -55° to +55°. After a few years in the Terra mission, it became extremely challenging to characterize the changes in the sensor gain and response versus scan angle (RVS) at short wavelengths due to significant degradation and increased polarization sensitivity. To better characterize the system-level degradation, the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) developed an enhanced approach in Collection-6 (C6) L1B algorithm by supplementing the on-board calibration data with the Earth-scene response trends at various scan angles obtained from the pseudo-invariant desert sites. However, the trends at short wavelengths experienced significant impact due to the increased polarization sensitivity, especially at the end of scan. In this study, a polarization correction algorithm developed by MCST is applied to the Terra MODIS RSB response trends obtained from the desert sites. The trends after polarization correction are used to derive the gain and RVS based on the existing MODIS C6 calibration algorithm. Impact of the polarization correction is examined for gain, RVS and their fitting uncertainties over the entire mission. The results of this study provide useful information on how to further improve accuracy and stability of the calibrated L1B product.

  3. Vimentin intermediate filaments template microtubule networks to enhance persistence in cell polarity and directed migration

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Zhuo; Ding, Liya; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Lowery, Jason; Zaritsky, Assaf; Sitterley, Karlyndsay; Mota, Andressa; Costigliola, Nancy; Starker, Colby G.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Tytell, Jessica; Goldman, Robert D.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF) enhances directed cell migration, but the mechanism behind VIF’s effect on motility is not understood. VIF interact with microtubules, whose organization contributes to polarity maintenance in migrating cells. Here we characterize the dynamic coordination of VIF and microtubule networks in wounded monolayers of Retinal Pigment Epithelial cells. By genome editing we fluorescently labelled endogenous vimentin and α-...

  4. Solid polymer films exhibiting handedness-switchable, full-color-tunable selective reflection of circularly polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yuuya; Takagi, Keisuke; Suginome, Michinori

    2014-07-16

    Poly(quinoxaline-2,3-diyl)s bearing (S)-2-methylbutyl, n-butyl, and 8-chlorooctyl groups as side chains were synthesized to fabricate dry solid polymer thin films. These films exhibited selective reflection of right-handed circular polarized light (CPL) in the visible region after annealing in CHCl3 vapor at room temperature. The handedness of reflected CPL was inverted to the left after annealing in 1,2-dichloroethane vapor. It was also found that the color of a particular single film along with the handedness of reflected CPL were fully tuned reversibly, upon exposure of the film to the vapor of various mixtures of chloroform and 1,2-dichloroethane in different ratios.

  5. Extraordinary reflection and transmission with direction dependent wavelength selectivity based on parity-time-symmetric multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Shulin; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a kind of periodical ternary parity-time (PT) -symmetric multilayers to realize nearly 100% reflectance and transmittance simultaneously when light is incident from a certain direction. This extraordinary reflection and transmission is original from unidirectional Bragg reflection of PT-symmetric systems as the symmetry spontaneous breaking happens at PT thresholds. The extra energy involved in reflection and transmission lights is obtained from pumping light to the gain regions of the structure. Moreover, we find that our PT-symmetric structure shows direction dependent wavelength selectivity. When the illumination light is incident from two opposite directions into the multilayer structure, such extraordinary reflection and transmission appear at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, respectively. Such distinguishing properties may provide these structures with attractive applications as beam splitters, laser mirrors, narrow band filters, and multiband PT-symmetric optical devices

  6. Quinuclidinium salt ferroelectric thin-film with duodecuple-rotational polarization-directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu-Meng; Tang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Han-Yue; Zhang, Wan-Ying; Zhang, Yi; Ye, Heng-Yun; Nakamura, Takayoshi; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2017-04-01

    Ferroelectric thin-films are highly desirable for their applications on energy conversion, data storage and so on. Molecular ferroelectrics had been expected to be a better candidate compared to conventional ferroelectric ceramics, due to its simple and low-cost film-processability. However, most molecular ferroelectrics are mono-polar-axial, and the polar axes of the entire thin-film must be well oriented to a specific direction to realize the macroscopic ferroelectricity. To align the polar axes, an orientation-controlled single-crystalline thin-film growth method must be employed, which is complicated, high-cost and is extremely substrate-dependent. In this work, we discover a new molecular ferroelectric of quinuclidinium periodate, which possesses six-fold rotational polar axes. The multi-axes nature allows the thin-film of quinuclidinium periodate to be simply prepared on various substrates including flexible polymer, transparent glasses and amorphous metal plates, without considering the crystallinity and crystal orientation. With those benefits and excellent ferroelectric properties, quinuclidinium periodate shows great potential in applications like wearable devices, flexible materials, bio-machines and so on.

  7. Design of a compact polarization beam splitter based on a deformed photonic crystal directional coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Gang; Zheng Wanhua; Wang Ke; Du Xiaoyu; Xing Mingxin; Chen Lianghui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a compact polarization beam splitter based on a deformed photonic crystal directional coupler is designed and simulated. The transverse-electric (TE) guided mode and transverse-magnetic (TM) guided mode are split due to different guiding mechanisms. The effect of the shape deformation of the air holes on the coupler is studied. It discovered that the coupling strength of the coupled waveguides is strongly enhanced by introducing elliptical airholes, which reduce the device length to less than 18.5μm. A finite-difference time-domain simulation is performed to evaluate the performance of the device, and the extinction ratios for both TE and TM polarized light are higher than 20 dB. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  8. Lateral refraction and reflection of light polarized lenses principle. Coplanar lens systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, L.

    2012-01-01

    Studying the behavior of the linearly polarized light to impact a lens and in the lens itself, resulted in the discovery of a physical principle of optics, not mentioned or used so far. This phenomenon is very useful in practice. Perhaps the manifestation of the phenomenon occurs in the plane perpendicular to the road or optical axis, is due the reason that was not seen before, but it has always been there when polarized light passes through a lens. Known and mastered the principle has been manipulated for better research results, using for the first time a planar lens system, which according to the placement of the lens allows for accurate lags between the light beams ar the exits the system. (Author)

  9. Thermal inertia and radar reflectivity of the Martian north polar ERG: Low-density aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    The north polar layered deposits on Mars appear to be the source of the dark material that comprises the north polar erg. The physical properties and chemical composition of the erg material therefore have important implications for the origin and evolution of the Martian layered deposits. Viking bistatic radar and infrared thermal mapping (IRTM) data indicate that the bulk density of the erg material is lower than that of the average Martian surface. These data are consistent with hypotheses involving formation of filamentary sublimation residue (FSR) particles from erosion of the layered deposits. The color and albedo of the erg and of the layered deposits, and the presence of magnetic material on Mars, suggest that the dark material is composed of low-density aggregates of magnetic dust grains, perhaps similar to FSR particles created in laboratory experiments.

  10. 6C polarization analysis - seismic direction finding in coherent noise, automated event identification, and wavefield separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzbach, C.; Sollberger, D.; Greenhalgh, S.; Van Renterghem, C.; Robertsson, J. O. A.

    2017-12-01

    Polarization analysis of standard three-component (3C) seismic data is an established tool to determine the propagation directions of seismic waves recorded by a single station. A major limitation of seismic direction finding methods using 3C recordings, however, is that a correct propagation-direction determination is only possible if the wave mode is known. Furthermore, 3C polarization analysis techniques break down in the presence of coherent noise (i.e., when more than one event is present in the analysis time window). Recent advances in sensor technology (e.g., fibre-optical, magnetohydrodynamic angular rate sensors, and ring laser gyroscopes) have made it possible to accurately measure all three components of rotational ground motion exhibited by seismic waves, in addition to the conventionally recorded three components of translational motion. Here, we present an extension of the theory of single station 3C polarization analysis to six-component (6C) recordings of collocated translational and rotational ground motions. We demonstrate that the information contained in rotation measurements can help to overcome some of the main limitations of standard 3C seismic direction finding, such as handling multiple arrivals simultaneously. We show that the 6C polarisation of elastic waves measured at the Earth's free surface does not only depend on the seismic wave type and propagation direction, but also on the local P- and S-wave velocities just beneath the recording station. Using an adaptation of the multiple signal classification algorithm (MUSIC), we demonstrate how seismic events can univocally be identified and characterized in terms of their wave type. Furthermore, we show how the local velocities can be inferred from single-station 6C data, in addition to the direction angles (inclination and azimuth) of seismic arrivals. A major benefit of our proposed 6C method is that it also allows the accurate recovery of the wave type, propagation directions, and phase

  11. Longitudinal polarization of direct muons with 1.9 GeV/c transverse momentum produced in NN-collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.V.; Alekseev, A.V.; Bityukov, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    The results of new measurements of direct-muon longitudinal polarization are presented. The experiment has been carried out at the Serpukhov accelerator with 70 GeV protons on a copper target. Muons produced from the internal copper target at 9 deg to the incident beam have been slowed down and focused by a muonguide from magnetized iron which has also selected muon with an identical charge. The coefficient of direct muon polarization etasub(x) is calculated through the polarization of muons from π and K decays and through the number of direct muon fraction in the beam. etasub(x) is found to be -0.41+-0.17. In other words the evidence is found that among direct muons produced with 1.9 GeV/c transverse momentum there is a component with negative polarization. The result agrees poorely with a hypothesis that all direct muons are originated in electromagnetic interactions (eta=0)

  12. Remote sensing of ice crystal asymmetry parameter using multi-directional polarization measurements – Part 1: Methodology and evaluation with simulated measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new remote sensing technique to infer the average asymmetry parameter of ice crystals near cloud top from multi-directional polarization measurements. The method is based on previous findings that (a complex aggregates of hexagonal crystals generally have scattering phase matrices resembling those of their components; and (b scattering phase matrices systematically vary with aspect ratios of crystals and their degree of microscale surface roughness. Ice cloud asymmetry parameters are inferred from multi-directional polarized reflectance measurements by searching for the closest fit in a look-up table of simulated polarized reflectances computed for cloud layers that contain individual, randomly oriented hexagonal columns and plates with varying aspect ratios and roughness values. The asymmetry parameter of the hexagonal particle that leads to the best fit with the measurements is considered the retrieved value. For clouds with optical thickness less than 5, the cloud optical thickness must be retrieved simultaneously with the asymmetry parameter, while for optically thicker clouds the asymmetry parameter retrieval is independent of cloud optical thickness. Evaluation of the technique using simulated measurements based on the optical properties of a number of complex particles and their mixtures shows that the ice crystal asymmetry parameters are generally retrieved to within 5%, or about 0.04 in absolute terms. The retrieval scheme is largely independent of calibration errors, range and sampling density of scattering angles and random noise in the measurements. The approach can be applied to measurements of past, current and future airborne and satellite instruments that measure multi-directional polarized reflectances of ice-topped clouds.

  13. The Performance of Reflecting Multichannel Collimators as a Neutron Beam Filter and Polarizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Passell, L.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.

    1963-01-01

    Summarizes the results obtained to date from a study of the properties of reflecting multi-channel collimators. The measurements have not yet been completed but enough information is available to give an indication of the capabilities of the system.......Summarizes the results obtained to date from a study of the properties of reflecting multi-channel collimators. The measurements have not yet been completed but enough information is available to give an indication of the capabilities of the system....

  14. Effect-Directed Analysis to Explore the Polar Bear Exposome: the Identification of Thyroid Hormone Disrupting Compounds in Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, E.; van Velzen, M.J.M.; Brandsma, S.H.; Lie, E.; Loken, K.; de Boer, J.; Bytingsvik, J.; Jenssen, B.M.; Aars, J.; Hamers, T.; Lamoree, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Compounds with transthyretin (TTR)-binding potency in the blood plasma of polar bear cubs were identified with effect-directed analysis (EDA). This approach contributes to the understanding of the thyroid disrupting exposome of polar bears. The selection of these samples for in-depth EDA was based

  15. The underlying magnetic field direction in Ulysses observations of the southern polar heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, R. J.; Balogh, A.; Smith, E. J.; Murphy, N.; McComas, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Between May 1993 and January 1995, the Ulysses spacecraft has probed the southern polar heliosphere at latitudes greater than 30 deg S, reaching a maximum latitude of 80.2 deg S in September 1994. Using hourly averages of the data obtained by the magnetometer experiment on Ulysses we have studied the underlying direction of the magnetic field threading this region of the heliosphere, away from the influence of the magnetic sector structure which complicates similar analyses in the ecliptic plane. We have constructed histograms of the measured magnetic field direction using the simple Parker spiral model field direction as a reference. We find that throughout this region the meridional angle between the field vector and the Parker model direction has a distribution which is symmetric and has a most probable value consistent with the model. At latitudes below about 60 deg S the azimuthal angle distribution also has a most probable value consistent with the model but this distribution is highly asymmetric with a greater number of observations of field lines less tightly wound than the expected spiral direction. At latitudes greater than 60 deg S the most probable value of the azimuthal angle is found to have become nearly 30 more tightly wound than the expected direction, but due to the asymmetric distribution still with a greater number of observations less tightly wound than expected. We consider possible causes of both the asymmetry in the distributions and the shift in the most probable value at the highest latitudes, one of which may be the presence of large amplitude, long period Alfven waves in the magnetic field originating from the Sun's southern polar coronal hole.

  16. Detecting Canopy Water Status Using Shortwave Infrared Reflectance Data From Polar Orbiting and Geostationary Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fensholt, Rasmus; Huber Gharib, Silvia; Proud, Simon Richard

    2010-01-01

    analyses performed on SEVIRI SIWSI during a dry period within the growing season support these findings. These results suggest that the combined advantage of an improved temporal resolution and a fixed viewing angle potentially makes the SEVIRI sensor an interesting complementary data source to POES data......-based canopy water status detection from geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) data as compared to polar orbiting environmental satellite (POES)-based moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. The EO-based SWIR water stress index...

  17. Measurement of anchoring coefficient of homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystal using a polarizing optical microscope in reflective mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-In Baek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the homeotropic alignment of liquid crystals is widely used in LCD TVs, no easy method exists to measure its anchoring coefficient. In this study, we propose an easy and convenient measurement technique in which a polarizing optical microscope is used in the reflective mode with an objective lens having a low depth of focus. All measurements focus on the reflection of light near the interface between the liquid crystal and alignment layer. The change in the reflected light is measured by applying an electric field. We model the response of the director of the liquid crystal to the electric field and, thus, the change in reflectance. By adjusting the extrapolation length in the calculation, we match the experimental and calculated results and obtain the anchoring coefficient. In our experiment, the extrapolation lengths were 0.31 ± 0.04 μm, 0.32 ± 0.08 μm, and 0.23 ± 0.05 μm for lecithin, AL-64168, and SE-5662, respectively.

  18. Designing symmetric polar direct drive implosions on the Omega laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Cobble, James A.; Murphy, Thomas J.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Bradley, Paul A.; Hakel, Peter; Hsu, Scott C.; Kyrala, George A.; Obrey, Kimberly A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Baumgaertel, Jessica A.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Achieving symmetric capsule implosions with Polar Direct Drive [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004); R. S. Craxton et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056304 (2005); F. J. Marshall et al., J. Phys. IV France 133, 153–157 (2006)] has been explored during recent Defect Induced Mix Experiment campaign on the Omega facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. To minimize the implosion asymmetry due to laser drive, optimized laser cone powers, as well as improved beam pointings, were designed using 3D radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. Experimental back-lit radiographic and self-emission images revealed improved polar symmetry and increased neutron yield which were in good agreement with 2D HYDRA simulations. In particular, by reducing the energy in Omega's 21.4° polar rings by 16.75%, while increasing the energy in the 58.9° equatorial rings by 8.25% in such a way as to keep the overall energy to the target at 16 kJ, the second Legendre mode (P{sub 2}) was reduced by a factor of 2, to less than 4% at bang time. At the same time the neutron yield increased by 62%. The polar symmetry was also improved relative to nominal DIME settings by a more radical repointing of OMEGA's 42.0° and 58.9° degree beams, to compensate for oblique incidence and reduced absorption at the equator, resulting in virtually no P{sub 2} around bang time and 33% more yield.

  19. Designing symmetric polar direct drive implosions on the Omega laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Cobble, James A.; Murphy, Thomas J.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Bradley, Paul A.; Hakel, Peter; Hsu, Scott C.; Kyrala, George A.; Obrey, Kimberly A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Baumgaertel, Jessica A.; Batha, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving symmetric capsule implosions with Polar Direct Drive [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004); R. S. Craxton et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056304 (2005); F. J. Marshall et al., J. Phys. IV France 133, 153–157 (2006)] has been explored during recent Defect Induced Mix Experiment campaign on the Omega facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. To minimize the implosion asymmetry due to laser drive, optimized laser cone powers, as well as improved beam pointings, were designed using 3D radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. Experimental back-lit radiographic and self-emission images revealed improved polar symmetry and increased neutron yield which were in good agreement with 2D HYDRA simulations. In particular, by reducing the energy in Omega's 21.4° polar rings by 16.75%, while increasing the energy in the 58.9° equatorial rings by 8.25% in such a way as to keep the overall energy to the target at 16 kJ, the second Legendre mode (P 2 ) was reduced by a factor of 2, to less than 4% at bang time. At the same time the neutron yield increased by 62%. The polar symmetry was also improved relative to nominal DIME settings by a more radical repointing of OMEGA's 42.0° and 58.9° degree beams, to compensate for oblique incidence and reduced absorption at the equator, resulting in virtually no P 2 around bang time and 33% more yield

  20. Polarization resolved imaging with a reflection near-field optical microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Xiao, Mufei; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using a rigorous microscopic point-dipole description of probe-sample interactions, we study imaging with a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope. Optical content, topographical artifacts, sensitivity window-i.e., the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical c...

  1. Variation of directional reflectance factors with structural changes of a developing alfalfa canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, J. A.; Kimes, D. S.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1982-01-01

    Directional reflectance factors of an alfalfa canopy were determined and related to canopy structure, agronomic variables, and irradiance conditions at four periods during a cutting cycle. Nadir and off-nadir reflectance factors decreased with increasing biomass in Thematic Mapper band 3(0.63-0.69 micrometer) and increased with increasing biomass in band 4(0.76-0.90 micrometer). The sensor view angle had less impact on perceived reflectance as the alfalfa progressed from an erectophile canopy of stems after harvest to a near planophile canopy of leaves at maturity. Studies of directional reflectance are needed for testing and upgrading vegetation canopy models and to aid in the complex interpretation problems presented by aircraft scanners and pointable satellites where illumination and viewing geometries may vary widely. Distinct changes in the patterns of radiance observed by a sensor as structural and biomass changes occur are keys to monitoring the growth and condition of crops.

  2. An evaluation of directional analysis techniques for multidirectional, partially reflected waves .1. numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilic, C; Chadwick, A; Helm-Petersen, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies of advanced directional analysis techniques have mainly centred on incident wave fields. In the study of coastal structures, however, partially reflective wave fields are commonly present. In the near structure field, phase locked methods can be successfully applied. In the far field...... of multidirectional waves with partial reflections. It is shown that the results are influenced by the ratio of distance from the reflector (L) to the length of the time series (S) used in the spectral analysis. Both methods are found to be capable of determining the incident and reflective wave fields when US > 0.......5. The BBM provides, in most cases, more accurate estimates of incident significant wave height, average reflection coefficients and directional spreading....

  3. Estimation of Nitrogen Vertical Distribution by Bi-Directional Canopy Reflectance in Winter Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wenjiang; Yang, Qinying; Pu, Ruiliang; Yang, Shaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Timely measurement of vertical foliage nitrogen distribution is critical for increasing crop yield and reducing environmental impact. In this study, a novel method with partial least square regression (PLSR) and vegetation indices was developed to determine optimal models for extracting vertical foliage nitrogen distribution of winter wheat by using bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) data. The BRDF data were collected from ground-based hyperspectral reflectance measuremen...

  4. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments

  5. Dynamic exposure model analysis of continuous laser direct writing in Polar-coordinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan; Lv, Yingjun; Mao, Wenjie

    2018-01-01

    In order to exactly predict the continuous laser direct writing quality in Polar-coordinate, we take into consideration the effect of the photoresist absorbing beam energy, the Gaussian attribute of the writing beam and the dynamic exposure process, and establish a dynamic exposure model to describe the influence of the tangential velocity of the normal incident facular center and laser power on the line width and sidewall angle. Numerical simulation results indicate that while writing velocity remains unchanged, the line width and sidewall angle are all increased as the laser power increases; while laser power remains unchanged, the line width and sidewall angle are all decreased as the writing velocity increases; at the same time the line profile in the exposure section is asymmetry and the center of the line has tiny excursion toward the Polar-coordinate origin compared with the facular center. Then it is necessary to choose the right writing velocity and laser power to obtain the ideal line profile. The model makes up the shortcomings of traditional models that can only predict line width or estimate the profile of the writing line in the absence of photoresist absorption, and can be considered as an effect analysis method for optimizing the parameters of fabrication technique of laser direct writing.

  6. Biquaternion beamspace with its application to vector-sensor array direction findings and polarization estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Xu, Feng; Jiang, Jing Fei; Zhang, Jian Qiu

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a biquaternion beamspace, constructed by projecting the original data of an electromagnetic vector-sensor array into a subspace of a lower dimension via a quaternion transformation matrix, is first proposed. To estimate the direction and polarization angles of sources, biquaternion beamspace multiple signal classification (BB-MUSIC) estimators are then formulated. The analytical results show that the biquaternion beamspaces offer us some additional degrees of freedom to simultaneously achieve three goals. One is to save the memory spaces for storing the data covariance matrix and reduce the computation efforts of the eigen-decomposition. Another is to decouple the estimations of the sources' polarization parameters from those of their direction angles. The other is to blindly whiten the coherent noise of the six constituent antennas in each vector-sensor. It is also shown that the existing biquaternion multiple signal classification (BQ-MUSIC) estimator is a specific case of our BB-MUSIC ones. The simulation results verify the correctness and effectiveness of the analytical ones.

  7. Quantum secure direct communication against the collective noise with polarization-entangled Bell states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Wang, Jun-Xi; Li, Qing-Yang; Shen, Hong-Zhi; Dong, Hai-Kuan; Xiu, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yuan-Peng; Gao, Ya-Jun

    2015-12-01

    We propose a quantum secure direct communication protocol via a collective noise channel, exploiting polarization-entangled Bell states and the nondemolition parity analysis based on weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities. The participant Bob, who will receive the secret information, sends one of two photons in a polarization-entangled Bell state exploiting the transmission circuit against the collective noise to the participant Alice, who will send the secret information, by the means of photon block transmission. If the first security check employing the nondemolition parity analysis is passed, the task of securely distributing the quantum channel is fulfilled. Encoding secret information on the photons sent from Bob by performing single-photon unitary transformation operations, Alice resends these photons to Bob through the transmission circuit against the collective noise. Exploiting the nondemolition parity analysis to distinguish Bell states, Bob can obtain the secret information from Alice after the second security check is passed, and the resulting Bell states can be applied to other tasks of quantum information processing. Under the condition of the secure quantum channel being confirmed, the photons that are utilized in the role of the security check can be applied to the function of secure direct communication, thus enhancing the efficiency of transmitting secret information and saving a lot of resources.

  8. Mapping geological structures in bedrock via large-scale direct current resistivity and time-domain induced polarization tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Matteo; Olsson, Per-Ivar; Johansson, Sara

    2017-01-01

    An investigation of geological conditions is always a key point for planning infrastructure constructions. Bedrock surface and rock quality must be estimated carefully in the designing process of infrastructures. A large direct-current resistivity and time-domain induced-polarization survey has......, there are northwest-trending Permian dolerite dykes that are less deformed. Four 2D direct-current resistivity and time-domain induced-polarization profiles of about 1-km length have been carefully pre-processed to retrieve time-domain induced polarization responses and inverted to obtain the direct......-current resistivity distribution of the subsoil and the phase of the complex conductivity using a constant-phase angle model. The joint interpretation of electrical resistivity and induced-polarization models leads to a better understanding of complex three-dimensional subsoil geometries. The results have been...

  9. Selective Removal of Demineralization Using Near Infrared Cross Polarization Reflectance and a Carbon Dioxide Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kenneth H; Fried, Daniel

    2012-02-09

    Lasers can ablate/remove tissue in a non-contact mode of operation and a pulsed laser beam does not interfere with the ability to image the tooth surface, therefore lasers are ideally suited for integration with imaging devices for image-guided ablation. Laser energy can be rapidly and efficiently delivered to tooth surfaces using a digitally controlled laser beam scanning system for precise and selective laser ablation with minimal loss of healthy tissues. Under the appropriate irradiation conditions such laser energy can induce beneficial chemical and morphological changes in the walls of the drilled cavity that can increase resistance to further dental decay and produce surfaces with enhanced adhesive properties to restorative materials. Previous studies have shown that images acquired using near-IR transillumination, optical coherence tomography and fluorescence can be used to guide the laser for selective removal of demineralized enamel. Recent studies have shown that NIR reflectance measurements at 1470-nm can be used to obtain images of enamel demineralization with very high contrast. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that image guided ablation of occlusal lesions can be successfully carried out using a NIR reflectance imaging system coupled with a carbon dioxide laser operating at 9.3-μm with high pulse repetition rates.

  10. One-dimensional photonic crystals with highly Bi-substituted iron garnet defect in reflection polar geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailova, T V; Berzhansky, V N; Karavainikov, A V; Shaposhnikov, A N; Prokopov, A R; Lyashko, S D

    2016-01-01

    It is represented the results of modelling of magnetooptical properties in reflection polar geometry of one-dimensional photonic crystal, in which highly Bi-substituted iron garnet defect of composition Bi 1.0 Y 0.5 Gd 1.5 Fe 4.2 A l0.8 O 12 / Bi 2.8 Y 0.2 Fe 5 Oi 2 is located between the dielectric Bragg mirrors (SiO 2 / TiO 2 ) m (were m is number of layer pairs) and buffer SiO 2 and gold top layers of different thicknesses is placed on structure. The modification of spectral line- shapes of microcavity and Tamm plasmon-polariton modes depending on m is found. (paper)

  11. Detection of precancerous lesions in the oral cavity using oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Maria J.; Verma, Nishant; Fradkin, Leonid; Lam, Sylvia; MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine; Markey, Mia K.; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2017-06-01

    We developed a multifiber optical probe for oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) in vivo and evaluated its performance in detection of dysplasia in the oral cavity. The probe design allows the implementation of a number of methods to enable depth resolved spectroscopic measurements including polarization gating, source-detector separation, and differential spectroscopy; this combination was evaluated in carrying out binary classification tasks between four major diagnostic categories: normal, benign, mild dysplasia (MD), and severe dysplasia (SD). Multifiber OPRS showed excellent performance in the discrimination of normal from benign, MD, SD, and MD plus SD yielding sensitivity/specificity values of 100%/93%, 96%/95%, 100%/98%, and 100%/100%, respectively. The classification of benign versus dysplastic lesions was more challenging with sensitivity and specificity values of 80%/93%, 71%/93%, and 74%/80% in discriminating benign from SD, MD, and SD plus MD categories, respectively; this challenge is most likely associated with a strong and highly variable scattering from a keratin layer that was found in these sites. Classification based on multiple fibers was significantly better than that based on any single detection pair for tasks dealing with benign versus dysplastic sites. This result indicates that the multifiber probe can perform better in the detection of dysplasia in keratinized tissues.

  12. New vegetation indices for remote measurement of chlorophylls based on leaf directional reflectance spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccioni, A; Agati, G; Mazzinghi, P

    2001-08-15

    Directional reflectance (R) spectra from 380 to 780 nm for nadir illuminated leaves of four different plants (croton, Codiaeum variegatum; spotted eleagnus, Eleagnus pungens Maculata; Japanese pittosporum, Pittosporum tobira and Benjamin fig, Ficus benjamina Starlight) were acquired at a viewing angle of 30 degrees from the nadir direction. Chlorophyll-a and -b content of leaves covered a range of 1-60 and 0.5-21 microg/cm(2), respectively. In contrast with previous results from hemispherical reflectance measurements, directional reflectance data does not correlate well with chlorophyll concentration. This is mainly due to the external reflectance (R(E)) at the leaf epidermis, caused by the mismatch of the refractive index at the air-epidermis and epidermis-inner layer boundary. The external reflectance can be identified with the blue flat reflectance between 380 and 480 nm. The inner reflectance (R(I)), obtained by subtracting the external reflectance from the measured spectra, was found to be linearly related to the logarithm of the chlorophyll content. Good fitting of the log (Chl) versus R(I)(lambda) curves were obtained for R(I) in the green band (around 550 nm) and close to the inflection point in the red edge (around 700 nm). The coefficient of determination, r(2), of curve fitting improved (up to 0.97) when the normalised inner reflectance NR(I)(lambda)=R(I)(lambda)/R(I)(lambda(0)), with lambda(0)>or=750 nm, was used instead of the absolute reflectance. The best indices for Chl, Chl-a and Chl-b determination were R(I)(542)/R(I)(750), R(I)(706)/R(I)(750) and R(I)(556)/R(I)(750), respectively. However, since the content of Chl-a relative to Chl-b was almost constant for the plants investigated, the two last indices must be further validated on leaves with a high variability in the Chl-a:Chl-b ratio. The error in the determination of chlorophyll content was found to be of the order of 10%. This value was lower than those obtained by applying the vegetation

  13. Directional reflectance and milli-scale feather morphology of the African Emerald Cuckoo, Chrysococcyx cupreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Todd Alan; Bostwick, Kimberly S; Marschner, Steve

    2013-09-06

    Diverse plumages have evolved among birds through complex morphological modifications. We investigate how the interplay of light with surface and subsurface feather morphology determines the direction of light propagation, an understudied aspect of avian visual signalling. We hypothesize that milli-scale modifications of feathers produce anisotropic reflectance, the direction of which may be predicted by the orientation of the milli-scale structure. The subject of this study is the African Emerald Cuckoo, Chrysococcyx cupreus, noted for its shimmering green iridescent appearance. Using a spherical gantry, we measured the change in the directional reflectance across the feather surface and over a hemisphere of incident lighting directions. Using a microCT scanner, we also studied the morphology of the structural branches of the barb. We tracked the changes in the directional reflectance to the orientation of the structural branches as observed in the CT data. We conclude that (i) the far-field signal of the feather consists of multiple specular components, each associated with a different structural branch and (ii) the direction of each specular component is correlated to the orientation of the corresponding structure.

  14. The RPG gene of Medicago truncatula controls Rhizobium-directed polar growth during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Godfroy, Olivier; de Billy, Françoise; Saurat, Olivier; Jauneau, Alain; Gough, Clare

    2008-07-15

    Rhizobia can infect roots of host legume plants and induce new organs called nodules, in which they fix atmospheric nitrogen. Infection generally starts with root hair curling, then proceeds inside newly formed, intracellular tubular structures called infection threads. A successful symbiotic interaction relies on infection threads advancing rapidly at their tips by polar growth through successive cell layers of the root toward developing nodule primordia. To identify a plant component that controls this tip growth process, we characterized a symbiotic mutant of Medicago truncatula, called rpg for rhizobium-directed polar growth. In this mutant, nitrogen-fixing nodules were rarely formed due to abnormally thick and slowly progressing infection threads. Root hair curling was also abnormal, indicating that the RPG gene fulfils an essential function in the process whereby rhizobia manage to dominate the process of induced tip growth for root hair infection. Map-based cloning of RPG revealed a member of a previously unknown plant-specific gene family encoding putative long coiled-coil proteins we have called RRPs (RPG-related proteins) and characterized by an "RRP domain" specific to this family. RPG expression was strongly associated with rhizobial infection, and the RPG protein showed a nuclear localization, indicating that this symbiotic gene constitutes an important component of symbiotic signaling.

  15. Modifying Earth's Insolation with Aerosols: Reflectance and Polarization Properties of Candidate Particulate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R. M.; Boryta, M. D.; Hapke, B. W.; Manatt, K. S.; Shkuratov, Y.; Vandervoort, K.; Vides, C.; Quinones, J.

    2017-12-01

    We report reflectance phase curves of selected materials, including several that, if distributed as particulate aerosols, might regulate solar insolation and hence reduce Earth's surface temperature. (See e.g. Teller et al., 1997). We have identified several materials that have phase functions that are remarkably backscattering at very small phase angles (Nelson et al., 2017). When these materials are of appropriately small particle size and in the form of dispersed discrete random media, they are highly reflective at ultraviolet and visual wavelengths. Particles of less than 0.5 microns in diameter are transparent in the infrared. The most promising of these is the mineral halite (NaCl). NaCl and its sister materials exhibit this property due to their simple cubic crystal structure. In crystalline form they are `corner cube' reflectors similar to those on bicycle reflectors used throughout the world, and in arrays deployed by astronauts on the Moon for precise distance determination. As aerosols distributed in relatively small quantities, NaCl might reduce the solar forcing function by several W/m2, the amount estimated by the IPCC to be the anthropogenic contribution to global warming. Furthermore, NaCl is environmentally benign and, as a particulate aerosol, it would have short residence time in the atmosphere. With great trepidation, we suggest potential use in these areas: Temporary regional application to mitigate short-term, life-threatening conditions in areas where extreme temperature events are expected on timescales of days, and Global application for immediate relief during a near-term transition period to an atmosphere that is generally free of anthropogenic greenhouse gas. We offer this as a temporary relief measure and not a solution, somewhat analogous to the application of morphine in a medical situation. This work partially supported by NASA's Cassini Orbiter Program

  16. Direct injection of spin-polarized carriers across YBa2Cu3O7−δ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In summary, we have shown that the direct injection of spin-polarized carriers from LCMO into YBCO suppresses the critical current of the YBCO layer due to the breaking of the time reversal symmetry of the Cooper pairs. Further, our experiments show that when the ferromagnetic LCMO layer is in direct contact with YBCO, ...

  17. Direct hyperpolarization of micro- and nanodiamonds for bioimaging applications - Considerations on particle size, functionalization and polarization loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Grzegorz; Jähnig, Fabian; Steinhauser, Jonas; Wespi, Patrick; Ernst, Matthias; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Due to the inherently long relaxation time of 13C spins in diamond, the nuclear polarization enhancement obtained with dynamic nuclear polarization can be preserved for a time on the order of about one hour, opening up an opportunity to use diamonds as a new class of long-lived contrast agents. The present communication explores the feasibility of using 13C spins in directly hyperpolarized diamonds for MR imaging including considerations for potential in vivo applications.

  18. Cdc42 is not essential for filopodium formation, directed migration, cell polarization, and mitosis in fibroblastoid cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czuchra, Aleksandra; Wu, Xunwei; Meyer, Hannelore

    2005-01-01

    Cdc42 is a small GTPase involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and cell polarity. To test whether Cdc42 has an essential role in the formation of filopodia or directed cell migration, we generated Cdc42-deficient fibroblastoid cells by conditional gene inactivation. We report here that loss...... of Cdc42 did not affect filopodium or lamellipodium formation and had no significant influence on the speed of directed migration nor on mitosis. Cdc42-deficient cells displayed a more elongated cell shape and had a reduced area. Furthermore, directionality during migration and reorientation of the Golgi...... apparatus into the direction of migration was decreased. However, expression of dominant negative Cdc42 in Cdc42-null cells resulted in strongly reduced directed migration, severely reduced single cell directionality, and complete loss of Golgi polarization and of directionality of protrusion formation...

  19. Evidence for surface water ice in the lunar polar regions using reflectance measurements from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter and temperature measurements from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Lucey, Paul G.; Lemelin, Myriam; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Siegler, Matthew A.; Mazarico, Erwan; Aharonson, Oded; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Hayne, Paul O.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Paige, David A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2017-08-01

    We find that the reflectance of the lunar surface within 5° of latitude of the South Pole increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, near ∼110 K, behavior consistent with the presence of surface water ice. The North polar region does not show this behavior, nor do South polar surfaces at latitudes more than 5° from the pole. This South pole reflectance anomaly persists when analysis is limited to surfaces with slopes less than 10° to eliminate false detection due to the brightening effect of mass wasting, and also when the very bright south polar crater Shackleton is excluded from the analysis. We also find that south polar regions of permanent shadow that have been reported to be generally brighter at 1064 nm do not show anomalous reflectance when their annual maximum surface temperatures are too high to preserve water ice. This distinction is not observed at the North Pole. The reflectance excursion on surfaces with maximum temperatures below 110 K is superimposed on a general trend of increasing reflectance with decreasing maximum temperature that is present throughout the polar regions in the north and south; we attribute this trend to a temperature or illumination-dependent space weathering effect (e.g. Hemingway et al., 2015). We also find a sudden increase in reflectance with decreasing temperature superimposed on the general trend at 200 K and possibly at 300 K. This may indicate the presence of other volatiles such as sulfur or organics. We identified and mapped surfaces with reflectances so high as to be unlikely to be part of an ice-free population. In this south we find a similar distribution found by Hayne et al. (2015) based on UV properties. In the north a cluster of pixels near that pole may represent a limited frost exposure.

  20. Bi-directional Reflectance of Icy Surface Analogs: A Dual Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinones, Juan Manuel; Vides, Christina; Nelson, Robert M.; Boryta, Mark; Mannat, Ken s.

    2018-01-01

    Bi-directional reflectance measurements of analogs for planetary regolith have provided insight into the surface properties of planetary satellites and small bodies. Because Aluminum Oxide (Al2O3) and water ice share a similar hexagonal crystalline structure, the former has been used in laboratory experiments to simulate the regolith of both icy and dusty planetary bodies. By measuring various sizes of well sorted size fractions of Al2O3, the reflectance phase curve and porosity of a planetary regolith can be determined. We have designed an experiment to test the laboratory measurements produced by Nelson et al. (2000). Additionally, we made reflectance measurements for other alkali-halide compounds that could be used for applications beyond astronomy and planetary science.In order to provide an independent check on the Nelson et al. data, we designed an instrument with a different configuration. While both instruments take bidirectional reflectance measurements, our instrument, the Rigid Photometric Goniometer (RPG), is fixed at a phase angle of 5° and detects the scattered light with a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The PMT current is then measured with an electrometer. Following the example of Nelson et al., we measured the bidirectional reflectance of Al2O3 particulate size fractions between 0.1reflectance measurements for NaCl and KCl of sizes from 20reflectance applications beyond astronomy and planetary science. The objective of the experiment was to determine the particle size that provided optimal, or maximum, reflectance for each compound. Our conclusions bring confirmation and clarity to photometric sciences.

  1. TEM studies of GaN layers grown in non-polar direction: Laterally overgrown and pendeo-epitaxial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2008-08-01

    The formation of structural defects in GaN grown in non-polar directions is reviewed based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Stacking faults (SFs) formed on c-planes and also on prismatic planes bounded by partial dislocations, in addition to full dislocations, are major defects in these layers. Since c-planes are arranged perpendicular to the substrate, these defects propagate to the sample surface through the active areas of the devices and become detrimental for device applications. An established method to decrease the defect density is lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) and pendeo-epitaxy. The measured density of SFs in the seed areas is ˜1.3×10 6 cm -1and in the 'wing' areas ˜1.2×10 4 cm -1; a decrease of almost of two orders of magnitude. For overgrown samples, two opposite wings grow in opposite polar directions: [0 0 0 1] (Ga-growth polarity) and [0 0 0 1] (N-growth polarity) confirmed by convergent beam electron diffraction. Ga-polar wings are wider and often have different height than those grown with N-polarity, therefore planarity of these layers and cracking at the meeting front of two wings often occur. It is shown that two-step growth using MOCVD leads to satisfactory layer planarity.

  2. Reflection and self-directed and group learning improve OSCE scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Masami; Imanaka, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    Reflection and self-directed learning have been emphasised as important in the process of learning, and are inevitably applied in medical education. The effectiveness of reflection on learning outcomes and its application in medical education must be investigated. In 2009, 86 fourth-year medical students at Kagoshima University took a course in basic clinical skills that included introductory lectures and small group training sessions. As part of these new educational interventions, the students received a lecture on reflective learning, wrote down their own reflections on skills training during the course, and voluntary participation in self- and group practice was promoted. Two weeks after the course, the students took six stations of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) via the Common Achievement Test. Each station and total score of the OSCE were compared with those from 2006-2008, and with national mean scores of the same station scenario in 2008. Students wrote 966 reflection reports (11.2 reports per student), and actively used rooms and materials for self- and group practice. All station and total scores of the OSCE in 2009 were higher than those in 2008: the total scores of the OSCE, the physical examination (PE) station and suturing skills were significantly improved, but the scores for 'Interview' and 'Head and Neck' PE were not. Our new educational intervention enabled students to experience some reflection on skills training, and facilitated students' experiential learning. We conclude that it was effective at least in the initial phase of basic clinical skills training. The students' reflection on communication skills needs to be improved. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  3. Constraints on direction-dependent cosmic birefringence from Planck polarization data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Dagoberto; Boubel, Paula; Scott, Douglas

    2017-12-01

    Cosmic birefringence is the process that rotates the plane of polarization by an amount, α, as photons propagate through free space. Such an effect arises in parity-violating extensions to the electromagnetic sector, such as the Chern-Simons term common in axion models, quintessence models, or Lorentz-violating extensions to the standard model. Most studies consider the monopole of this rotation, but it is also possible for the effect to have spatial anisotropies. Paying particular attention to large scales, we implement a novel pixel-based method to extract the spherical harmonics for L 30. Our results are consistent with no detection and we set 95 % upper limits on the amplitude of a scale-invariant power spectrum of L(L+1)CL/2π<[2.2 (stat.)±0.7 (syst.)]×10-5=[0.07 (stat.)±0.02 (syst.)] deg2, on par with previous constraints. This implies specific limits on the dipole and quadrupole amplitudes to be √C1/4π lesssim 0.o2 and √C2/4π lesssim 0.o1, at 95 % CL, respectively, improving previous constraints by an order of magnitude. We further constrain a model independent M=0 quadrupole in an arbitrary direction to be α20 = 0.o02 ± 0.o21, with an unconstrained direction. However, we find an excess of dipolar power with an amplitude √3C1/4π = 0.o32±0.o10 (stat.)±0.o08 (syst.)], in the direction (l,b)=(295o,17o)±(22o,17o) (stat.)±(5o,16o) (syst.), larger than 1.4 % of simulations with no birefringence. We attribute part of this signal to the contamination of residual foregrounds not accounted for in our simulations, although this should be further investigated.

  4. Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Embree

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ideally, editorials are written one to two months before publication in the Journal. It was my turn to write this one. I had planned to write the first draft the evening after my clinic on Tuesday, September 11. It didn't get done that night or during the next week. Somehow, the topic that I had originally chosen just didn't seem that important anymore as I, along my friends and colleagues, reflected on the changes that the events of that day were likely to have on our lives.

  5. Difference between the Brewster angle and angle of minimum reflectance for incident unpolarized or circularly polarized light at interfaces between transparent media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, R M A

    2015-06-01

    For reflection at interfaces between transparent optically isotropic media, the difference between the Brewster angle ϕB of zero reflectance for incident p-polarized light and the angle ϕu min of minimum reflectance for incident unpolarized or circularly polarized light is considered as function of the relative refractive n in external and internal reflection. We determine the following. (i) ϕu min reflection (n > 1), the maximum difference (ϕB - ϕu min)max = 75° at n = 2 + √3. (iii) In internal reflection and 0 reflectance R0 at normal incidence is in the range 0 ≤ R0 ≤ 1/3, ϕu min = 0, and ϕB - ϕu min = ϕB. (v) For internal reflection and 0 < n < 2 - √3, ϕu min exhibits an unexpected maximum (= 12.30°) at n = 0.24265. Finally, (vi) for 1/3 ≤ R0 < 1, Ru min at ϕu min is limited to the range 1/3 ≤ Ru min < 1/2.

  6. Mapping geological structures in bedrock via large-scale direct current resistivity and time-domain induced polarization tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Matteo; Olsson, Per-Ivar; Johansson, Sara

    2017-01-01

    An investigation of geological conditions is always a key point for planning infrastructure constructions. Bedrock surface and rock quality must be estimated carefully in the designing process of infrastructures. A large direct-current resistivity and time-domain induced-polarization survey has b...... been performed in Dalby, Lund Municipality, southern Sweden, with the aim of mapping lithological variations in bedrock. The geology at the site is characterised by Precambrian granitic gneisses and amphibolites, which are intensely deformed, fractured, and partly weathered. In addition......-polarization profiles. The direct-current resistivity and time-domain induced-polarization methodology proved to be a suitable technique for extensively mapping weathered zones with poor geotechnical characteristics and tectonic structures, which can lead to severe problems for infrastructure construction and....../or constitute risk zones for aquifer contamination....

  7. DETERMINATION OF THE DEGREE OF GRAVEL AGGREGATE-BITUMENCOVERAGE BY MULTI-DIRECTIONAL REFLECTANCE MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mulsow

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the determination of the percentage area of bitumen on partly covered aggregate. This task is a typical issue in material testing in road construction. The asphalt components bitumen and aggregate are subjected to defined mechanical stress in the presence of water in order to test the affine properties of the components. The degree to which the bitumen separates from the aggregate surface serves as an indicator for the quality of the affinity. Until now, examiners have been judging the coverage degree of samples by visual rating. Several research projects attempted to replace the error-prone subjective assessment by automatic procedures. These procedures analyse the different chromaticities of aggregate and bitumen in RGB images. However, these approaches as a whole are not reliable enough because of the rather specific requirements that are made on the environmental conditions when the picture is taken (illumination, exclusion of extraneous light and also on the lab assistant (manual definition of training areas, management of camera and illumination parameters. Moreover, the analysis is not suitable for all types of rock because of the necessary difference in colour between bitumen and aggregate (e.g. dark rock samples. Contrary to previous approaches, the new multi-directional reflectance measurements use the different surface characteristics of bitumen and aggregate instead of the chromaticities as separation criteria. These differences are made visible by directional lighting with a laser. The diffuse reflection from the aggregate surface and the directional reflection from the optically smoother bitumen produce definitely distinguishable brightnesses in the image. Thus the colour of the material is of no significance. The approach was used in a procedure and assessed. The paper presents the method itself, approaches for the elimination of reflections and first results. Moreover, the measuring principle is compared with

  8. Polarity Specific Suppression Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Joos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external auditory stimulus and affects 10–15% of the Western population. Previous studies have demonstrated the therapeutic effect of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over the left auditory cortex on tinnitus loudness, but the effect of this presumed excitatory stimulation contradicts with the underlying pathophysiological model of tinnitus. Therefore, we included 175 patients with chronic tinnitus to study polarity specific effects of a single tDCS session over the auditory cortex (39 anodal, 136 cathodal. To assess the effect of treatment, we used the numeric rating scale for tinnitus loudness and annoyance. Statistical analysis demonstrated a significant main effect for tinnitus loudness and annoyance, but for tinnitus annoyance anodal stimulation has a significantly more pronounced effect than cathodal stimulation. We hypothesize that the suppressive effect of tDCS on tinnitus loudness may be attributed to a disrupting effect of ongoing neural hyperactivity, independent of the inhibitory or excitatory effects and that the reduction of annoyance may be induced by influencing adjacent or functionally connected brain areas involved in the tinnitus related distress network. Further research is required to explain why only anodal stimulation has a suppressive effect on tinnitus annoyance.

  9. The Directed Cooperative Assembly of Proteorhodopsin Into 2d And 3d Polarized Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, H.; Whited, G.; Nguyen, C.; Stucky, G.D.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-07-12

    Proteorhodopsin is the membrane protein used by marine bacterioplankton as a light-driven proton pump. Here, we describe a rapid cooperative assembly process directed by universal electrostatic interactions that spontaneously organizes proteorhodopsin molecules into ordered arrays with well defined orientation and packing density. We demonstrate the charge density-matching mechanism that selectively controls the assembly process. The interactions among different components in the system are tuned by varying their charge densities to yield different organized transmembrane protein arrays: (i) a bacteriorhodopsin purple membrane-like structure where proteorhodopsin molecules are cooperatively arranged with charged lipids into a 2D hexagonal lattice; (ii) selected liquid-crystalline states in which crystalline lamellae made up of the coassembled proteorhodopsin and charged lipid molecules are coupled three-dimensionally with polarized proteorhodopsin orientation persisting through the macroscopic scale. Understanding this rapid electrostatically driven assembly process sheds light on organizing membrane proteins in general, which is a prerequisite for membrane protein structural and mechanistic studies as well as in vitro applications.

  10. Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation to Enhance Creative Cognition: Interactions between Task, Polarity, and Stimulation Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Weinberger

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Creative cognition is frequently described as involving two primary processes, idea generation and idea selection. A growing body of research has used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to examine the neural mechanisms implicated in each of these processes. This literature has yielded a diverse set of findings that vary depending on the location and type (anodal, cathodal, or both of electrical stimulation employed, as well as the task’s reliance on idea generation or idea selection. As a result, understanding the interactions between stimulation site, polarity and task demands is required to evaluate the potential of tDCS to enhance creative performance. Here, we review tDCS designs that have elicited reliable and dissociable enhancements for creative cognition. Cathodal stimulation over the left inferior frontotemporal cortex has been associated with improvements on tasks that rely primarily on idea generation, whereas anodal tDCS over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and frontopolar cortex has been shown to augment performance on tasks that impose high demands on creative idea selection. These results highlight the functional selectivity of tDCS for different components of creative thinking and confirm the dissociable contributions of left dorsal and inferior lateral frontotemporal cortex for different creativity tasks. We discuss promising avenues for future research that can advance our understanding of the effectiveness of tDCS as a method to enhance creative cognition.

  11. Bare and thin-film-coated substrates with null reflection for p- and s-polarized light at the same angle of incidence: reflectance and ellipsometric parameters as functions of substrate refractive index and film thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, R M A

    2016-10-20

    Intensity reflectances and ellipsometric parameters of a partially clad transparent substrate that suppresses the reflection of incident p- and s-polarized light at the same angle of incidence from uncoated and single-layer-coated areas are determined as functions of normalized film thickness ς and substrate refractive index n2. The common polarizing angle is the Brewster angle of the ambient-substrate interface, and the light beam incident from the ambient (air or vacuum) is refracted in the film at a 45° angle from the normal to the parallel-plane film boundaries. For n2≤2, the differential reflection phase shift Δ=δp-δs≈±90° for all values of ς so that the Brewster angle is also approximately the principal angle of the film-substrate system independent of film thickness. Accurate techniques for monitoring the deposition of such films are also proposed.

  12. Correlation characteristics of signals reflected by the wavy surface of ocean in mirror direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitkovskiy, Y. Y.; Nosov, A. V.; Savelyev, V. V.

    1985-06-01

    An experimental study was carried out to determine the correlation characteristics of pseudonoise signals reflected from a wave-covered surface in the mirror direction. The major measured quantity was the reciprocal correlation coefficient between the transmitted signal and the reflected signal. The transmitter was lowered from a ship on a 150 m cable. The receiver and preamplifier were lowered to the same depth from a buoy which was allowed to drift from the ship to a distance of 100-500 m, the changing distance changing the angle of the beam reflected from the surface of the ocean back down to the hydrophone. The radiator transmitted a pulsed signal with a pseudonoise carrier. The results were interpreted within the framework of ordinary correlation theory by processing several recordings, calculating the sign and ordinary correlation coefficients to determine the variation in sign correlation coefficient as a function of the ordinary correlation coefficient. Graphs of the average variation are presented. It was found that the medium did not distort the signal as it propagated through the water mass (within the limits of experimental accuracy). The correlation coefficient between the transmitted and reflected signals is thus determined entirely by the characteristics of reradiation of the sound by the wavecovered surface.

  13. LO-TO splittings, effective charges and interactions in electro-optic meta-nitroaniline crystal as studied by polarized IR reflection and transmission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, M. M.; Le Calvé, N.; Romain, F.; Pasquier, B.

    1994-10-01

    The polarized IR reflection spectra of the meta-nitroaniline ( m-NA) single crystal along the a, b and c crystallographic axes as well as the b and c polarized transmission spectra have been measured in the 100-400 cm -1 region. The LO-TO splitting values have been calculated from the reflection spectra by fitting them with the four parameter dielectric function. The dipole moment derivatives, relevant to dynamic effective charges, of the vibrations have also been calculated and used to check the applicability of the oriented gas model (OGM) to reflection spectra. The discrepancies from the OGM have been discussed in terms of vibronic couplings, weak hydrogen bondings (HB) and intramolecular charge transfer.

  14. The Effect of Layered Curriculum on Reflective Thinking and on Self-Directed Learning Readiness of Prospective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencel, Ilke Evin; Saracaloglu, A. Seda

    2018-01-01

    Teachers are important role models for pupils. They should be reflective practitioners and self-directed learners. Teacher training process should promote being a reflective thinker and a self-directed learner. Curriculum should be designed in accordance with constructivism. The aim of this research is to investigate effects of layered curriculum…

  15. Demonstration of bi-directional LED visible light communication using TDD traffic with mitigation of reflection interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y F; Yeh, C H; Chow, C W; Liu, Y; Liu, Y L; Tsang, H K

    2012-10-08

    In this work, we experimentally demonstrate a bi-directional transmission link using light emitting diode (LED) visible light communication (VLC) for both downlink and uplink paths. Time-division-duplex (TDD) is proposed and demonstrated to significantly eliminate the reflection interference in VLC. A free space bi-directional transmission of 2 m using simple on-off keying (OOK) modulation with bit error rate (BER) of reflection interference is analyzed, showing the proposed scheme can significantly eliminate the reflection interference.

  16. Hemispherical-directional reflectance factor measurements of snow on the Greenland Ice Sheet during the Radiation, Snow Characteristics and Albedo at Summit (RASCALS) campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, Teemu; Riihelä, Aku; Lahtinen, Panu; Peltoniemi, Jouni I.

    2014-10-01

    During the summer of 2010 a snow measurement campaign was carried out at Greenland Environmental Observatory, on Greenland Ice Sheet. Broadband snow albedo (bihemispherical reflectance), spectral hemispherical conical reflectance factor, temperature, density and other physical parameters were measured. Especially, the Hemispherical Directional Reflectance Factor (HDRF) of 46 snow samples was measured using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer (FIGIFIGO). Additionally, linear polarization (Stokes parameters I, Q, and U), or Muller matrix elements R11, R12, and R13, were measured from some samples. Albedo was also calculated from the HDRF and these values were compared to those from the albedometer. Values were found to be within 3% of each other, which is within the accuracy limits of the instruments. We also compared our results to previous measurements at the Summit (by Bourgeois et al. during 2005 and Carmagnola et al. during 2011) and found our results to be in agreement with their measurements. Compared to previous studies, our measurements have full solar spectrum spectral coverage and linear polarization.

  17. Daily MODIS 500 m Reflectance Anisotropy Direct Broadcast (DB) Products for Monitoring Vegetation Phenology Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Schaaf, Crystal; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Strahler, Alan; Roy, David; Morisette, Jeffrey; Wang, Zhuosen; Nightingale, Joanne; Nickeson, Jaime; Richardson, Andrew D.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Land surface vegetation phenology is an efficient bio-indicator for monitoring ecosystem variation in response to changes in climatic factors. The primary objective of the current article is to examine the utility of the daily MODIS 500 m reflectance anisotropy direct broadcast (DB) product for monitoring the evolution of vegetation phenological trends over selected crop, orchard, and forest regions. Although numerous model-fitted satellite data have been widely used to assess the spatio-temporal distribution of land surface phenological patterns to understand phenological process and phenomena, current efforts to investigate the details of phenological trends, especially for natural phenological variations that occur on short time scales, are less well served by remote sensing challenges and lack of anisotropy correction in satellite data sources. The daily MODIS 500 m reflectance anisotropy product is employed to retrieve daily vegetation indices (VI) of a 1 year period for an almond orchard in California and for a winter wheat field in northeast China, as well as a 2 year period for a deciduous forest region in New Hampshire, USA. Compared with the ground records from these regions, the VI trajectories derived from the cloud-free and atmospherically corrected MODIS Nadir BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) adjusted reflectance (NBAR) capture not only the detailed footprint and principal attributes of the phenological events (such as flowering and blooming) but also the substantial inter-annual variability. This study demonstrates the utility of the daily 500 m MODIS reflectance anisotropy DB product to provide daily VI for monitoring and detecting changes of the natural vegetation phenology as exemplified by study regions comprising winter wheat, almond trees, and deciduous forest.

  18. Atmospheric infrasound propagation modelling using the reflectivity method with a direct formulation of the wind effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Valerie; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Schweitzer, Johannes; Gibbons, Steven J.

    2016-04-01

    We recently advocated using the reflectivity method, also known as the wavenumber integration method or fast-field program, to model atmospheric infrasound propagation at regional distances. The advantage of the reflectivity method is its ability to model the full wavefield, including diffractive effects with head waves and shadow zone arrivals, in a broad frequency range but still at a relatively low computational cost. Attenuation can easily be included, giving the possibility to analyse relative amplitudes and frequency content of the different arrivals. It has clear advantages compared with ray theory in terms of predicting phases considering the particular frequent occurrence of shadow zone arrivals in infrasound observations. Its main limitation, at least in the traditional form of the method, lies in the fact that it can only handle range-independent models. We presented earlier some reflectivity method simulations of an observed accidental explosion in Norway. Wind intensity and direction are non-negligible parameters for infrasound propagation and these are appropriately taken into account in most infrasound ray-tracing codes. On the other hand, in the previous reflectivity simulations wind was taken into account only through the effective sound speed approximation where the horizontal projection of the wind field is added to the adiabatic sound speed profiles. This approximation is appropriate for dominantly horizontal propagation but can give incorrect arrival times and shadow zone locations for waves which have a significant portion of their propagation path at more vertical incidence, like thermospheric arrivals. We present here how we have modified the original reflectivity algorithm in order to take the wind into account in a more correct fashion, and how this improvement influences the synthetics.

  19. Three-Way-Switchable (Right/Left/OFF) Selective Reflection of Circularly Polarized Light on Solid Thin Films of Helical Polymer Blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yuuya; Uno, Makoto; Suginome, Michinori

    2016-06-13

    Two poly(quinoxaline-2,3-diyl) copolymers bearing miscibility-enhancing 8-chlorooctyloxy and (S)-2-methylbutoxy or n-butoxy side chains were synthesized. After annealing in CHCl3 vapor, a polymer-blend film of these copolymers exhibited selective reflection of right-handed circularly polarized light (CPL) in the visible region. The handedness of the CPL reflected was completely inverted upon annealing of the film in THF vapor. Annealing in n-hexane vapor resulted in the phase separation of the polymer blend, which turned the selective reflection off. This three-way-switchable reflection, that is, reflection of right-handed or left-handed CPL, together with an OFF state, could be observed visually through right- and left-handed CPL filters. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Airborne hyperspectral observations of surface and cloud directional reflectivity using a commercial digital camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ehrlich

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Spectral radiance measurements by a digital single-lens reflex camera were used to derive the directional reflectivity of clouds and different surfaces in the Arctic. The camera has been calibrated radiometrically and spectrally to provide accurate radiance measurements with high angular resolution. A comparison with spectral radiance measurements with the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART-Albedometer showed an agreement within the uncertainties of both instruments (6% for both. The directional reflectivity in terms of the hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF was obtained for sea ice, ice-free ocean and clouds. The sea ice, with an albedo of ρ = 0.96 (at 530 nm wavelength, showed an almost isotropic HDRF, while sun glint was observed for the ocean HDRF (ρ = 0.12. For the cloud observations with ρ = 0.62, the cloudbow – a backscatter feature typically for scattering by liquid water droplets – was covered by the camera. For measurements above heterogeneous stratocumulus clouds, the required number of images to obtain a mean HDRF that clearly exhibits the cloudbow has been estimated at about 50 images (10 min flight time. A representation of the HDRF as a function of the scattering angle only reduces the image number to about 10 (2 min flight time.

    The measured cloud and ocean HDRF have been compared to radiative transfer simulations. The ocean HDRF simulated with the observed surface wind speed of 9 m s−1 agreed best with the measurements. For the cloud HDRF, the best agreement was obtained by a broad and weak cloudbow simulated with a cloud droplet effective radius of Reff = 4 μm. This value agrees with the particle sizes derived from in situ measurements and retrieved from the spectral radiance of the SMART-Albedometer.

  1. Origin of the direct and reflected head of the rectus femoris: an anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John M; Harris, Joshua D; Graham, William C; Virk, Sohrab S; Ellis, Thomas J

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to define the footprint of the direct and reflected heads of the rectus femoris and the relation of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) to adjacent neurovascular (lateral circumflex femoral artery and femoral nerve), bony (anterior superior iliac spine [ASIS]), and tendinous structures (iliopsoas). Twelve fresh-frozen cadaveric hip joints from 6 cadavers, average age of 44.5 (±9.9) years, were carefully dissected of skin and fascia to expose the muscular, capsular, and bony structures of the anterior hip and pelvis. Using digital calipers, measurements were taken of the footprint of the rectus femoris on the AIIS, superior-lateral acetabulum and hip capsule, and adjacent anatomic structures. The average dimensions of the footprint of the direct head of the rectus femoris were 13.4 mm (±1.7) × 26.0 mm (±4.1), whereas the dimensions of the reflected head footprint were 47.7 mm (±4.4) × 16.8 mm (±2.2). Important anatomic structures, including the femoral nerve, psoas tendon, and lateral circumflex femoral artery, were noted in proximity to the AIIS. The neurovascular structure closest to the AIIS was the femoral nerve (20.8 ± 3.4 mm). The rectus femoris direct and reflected heads originate over a broad area of the anterolateral pelvis and are in close proximity to critical neurovascular structures, and care must be taken to avoid them during hip arthroscopy. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the proximal rectus femoris is valuable for any surgical exposure of the anterior hip joint, particularly arthroscopic subspine decompression and open femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) surgery. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of in-material losses on terahertz absorption, transmission, and reflection in photonic crystals made of polar dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebryannikov, Andriy E., E-mail: andser@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Nanotechnology Research Center—NANOTAM, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Nojima, S. [Yokohama City University, Department of Nanosystem Science, Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Kanazawa Ku, 22-2 Seto, Yokohama, Kanagawa 2360027 (Japan); Alici, K. B. [TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, Materials Institute, 41470 Gebze, Kocaeli (Turkey); Ozbay, Ekmel [Nanotechnology Research Center—NANOTAM, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-10-07

    The effect of the material absorption factor on terahertz absorption (A), transmittance (T), and reflectance (R) for slabs of PhC that comprise rods made of GaAs, a polar dielectric, is studied. The main goal was to illustrate how critical a choice of the absorption factor for simulations is and to indicate the importance of the possible modification of the absorption ability by using either active or lossy impurities. The spectra of A, T, and R are strongly sensitive to the location of the polaritonic gap with respect to the photonic pass and stop bands connected with periodicity that enables the efficient combination of the effects of material and structural parameters. It will be shown that the spectra can strongly depend on the utilized value of the material absorption factor. In particular, both narrow and wide absorption bands may appear owing to a variation of the material parameters with a frequency in the vicinity of the polaritonic gap. The latter are often achieved at wideband suppression of transmission, so that an ultra-wide stop band can appear as a result of adjustment of the stop bands having different origin. The results obtained at simultaneous variation of the absorption factor and frequency, and angle of incidence and frequency, indicate the possibility of the existence of wide ranges of tolerance, in which the basic features do remain. This allows for mitigating the accuracy requirements for the absorption factor in simulations and promises the efficient absorption of nonmonochromatic waves and beams with a wide angular spectrum. Suppression of narrowband effects in transmission is demonstrated at rather large values of the absorption factor, when they appear due to either the defect modes related to structural defects or dispersion inspired variations of the material parameters in the vicinity of the polaritonic gap. Comparison with auxiliary structures helps one to detect the common features and differences of homogeneous slabs and slabs of a

  3. Estimation of Nitrogen Vertical Distribution by Bi-Directional Canopy Reflectance in Winter Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjiang Huang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Timely measurement of vertical foliage nitrogen distribution is critical for increasing crop yield and reducing environmental impact. In this study, a novel method with partial least square regression (PLSR and vegetation indices was developed to determine optimal models for extracting vertical foliage nitrogen distribution of winter wheat by using bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF data. The BRDF data were collected from ground-based hyperspectral reflectance measurements recorded at the Xiaotangshan Precision Agriculture Experimental Base in 2003, 2004 and 2007. The view zenith angles (1 at nadir, 40° and 50°; (2 at nadir, 30° and 40°; and (3 at nadir, 20° and 30° were selected as optical view angles to estimate foliage nitrogen density (FND at an upper, middle and bottom layer, respectively. For each layer, three optimal PLSR analysis models with FND as a dependent variable and two vegetation indices (nitrogen reflectance index (NRI, normalized pigment chlorophyll index (NPCI or a combination of NRI and NPCI at corresponding angles as explanatory variables were established. The experimental results from an independent model verification demonstrated that the PLSR analysis models with the combination of NRI and NPCI as the explanatory variables were the most accurate in estimating FND for each layer. The coefficients of determination (R2 of this model between upper layer-, middle layer- and bottom layer-derived and laboratory-measured foliage nitrogen density were 0.7335, 0.7336, 0.6746, respectively.

  4. Estimation of nitrogen vertical distribution by bi-directional canopy reflectance in winter wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenjiang; Yang, Qinying; Pu, Ruiliang; Yang, Shaoyuan

    2014-10-28

    Timely measurement of vertical foliage nitrogen distribution is critical for increasing crop yield and reducing environmental impact. In this study, a novel method with partial least square regression (PLSR) and vegetation indices was developed to determine optimal models for extracting vertical foliage nitrogen distribution of winter wheat by using bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) data. The BRDF data were collected from ground-based hyperspectral reflectance measurements recorded at the Xiaotangshan Precision Agriculture Experimental Base in 2003, 2004 and 2007. The view zenith angles (1) at nadir, 40° and 50°; (2) at nadir, 30° and 40°; and (3) at nadir, 20° and 30° were selected as optical view angles to estimate foliage nitrogen density (FND) at an upper, middle and bottom layer, respectively. For each layer, three optimal PLSR analysis models with FND as a dependent variable and two vegetation indices (nitrogen reflectance index (NRI), normalized pigment chlorophyll index (NPCI) or a combination of NRI and NPCI) at corresponding angles as explanatory variables were established. The experimental results from an independent model verification demonstrated that the PLSR analysis models with the combination of NRI and NPCI as the explanatory variables were the most accurate in estimating FND for each layer. The coefficients of determination (R2) of this model between upper layer-, middle layer- and bottom layer-derived and laboratory-measured foliage nitrogen density were 0.7335, 0.7336, 0.6746, respectively.

  5. Directional cell migration establishes the axes of planar polarity in the posterior lateral-line organ of the zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Schier, Hernán; Starr, Catherine J; Kappler, James A; Kollmar, Richard; Hudspeth, A J

    2004-09-01

    The proper orientation of mechanosensory hair cells along the lateral-line organ of a fish or amphibian is essential for the animal's ability to sense directional water movements. Within the sensory epithelium, hair cells are polarized in a stereotyped manner, but the mechanisms that control their alignment relative to the body axes are unknown. We have found, however, that neuromasts can be oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the anteroposterior body axis. By characterizing the strauss mutant zebrafish line and by tracking labeled cells, we have demonstrated that neuromasts of these two orientations originate from, respectively, the first and second primordia. Furthermore, altering the migratory pathway of a primordium reorients a neuromast's axis of planar polarity. We propose that the global orientation of hair cells relative to the body axes is established through an interaction between directional movement by primordial cells and the timing of neuromast maturation.

  6. Arbitrary control of the polarization and intensity profiles of diffraction-attenuation-resistant beams along their propagation direction

    OpenAIRE

    Corato-Zanarella, Mateus; Dorrah, Ahmed H.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Mojahedi, Mo

    2017-01-01

    We report on the theory and experimental generation of a class of diffraction-attenuation-resistant beams with state of polarization (SoP) and intensity that can be controlled on demand along the propagation direction. This is achieved by a suitable superposition of Bessel beams, whose parameters are systematically chosen based on closed-form analytic expressions provided by the Frozen Waves (FWs) method. Using an amplitude-only spatial light modulator, we experimentally demonstrate three sce...

  7. Evaluation of direct analysis in real time for the determination of highly polar pesticides in lettuce and celery using modified Quick Polar Pesticides Extraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Francisco J; Chan, Danny; Dickinson, Michael; Lloyd, Antony S; Adams, Stuart J

    2017-05-05

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) was evaluated for the determination of a number of highly polar pesticides using the Quick Polar Pesticides Extraction (QuPPe) method. DART was hyphenated to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) in order to get the required selectivity that allows the determination of these compounds in complex samples such as lettuce and celery. Experimental parameters such as desorption temperature, scanning speed, and distances between the DART ion source and MS inlet were optimized. Two different mass analyzers (Orbitrap and QTOF) and two accessories for sample introduction (Dip-it ® tips and QuickStrip™ sample cards) were evaluated. An extra clean-up step using primary-secondary amine (PSA) was included in the QuPPe method to improve sensitivity. The main limitation found was in-source fragmentation, nevertheless QuPPe-DART-HRMS proved to be a fast and reliable tool with quantitative capabilities for at least seven compounds: amitrole, cyromazine, propamocarb, melamine, diethanolamine, triethanolamine and 1,2,4-triazole. The limits of detection ranged from 20 to 60μg/kg. Recoveries for fortified samples ranged from 71 to 115%, with relative standard deviations <18%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Directly Detecting MeV-Scale Dark Matter Via Solar Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Haipeng; Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef; Ritz, Adam

    2018-04-01

    If dark matter (DM) particles are lighter than a few MeV /c2 and can scatter off electrons, their interaction within the solar interior results in a considerable hardening of the spectrum of galactic dark matter received on Earth. For a large range of the mass versus cross section parameter space, {me,σe}, the "reflected" component of the DM flux is far more energetic than the end point of the ambient galactic DM energy distribution, making it detectable with existing DM detectors sensitive to an energy deposition of 10 -103 eV . After numerically simulating the small reflected component of the DM flux, we calculate its subsequent signal due to scattering on detector electrons, deriving new constraints on σe in the MeV and sub-MeV range using existing data from the XENON10/100, LUX, PandaX-II, and XENON1T experiments, as well as making projections for future low threshold direct detection experiments.

  9. Direct observation of chiral currents and magnetic reflection in atomic flux lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fangzhao Alex; Meier, Eric J; Gadway, Bryce

    2017-04-01

    The prospect of studying topological matter with the precision and control of atomic physics has driven the development of many techniques for engineering artificial magnetic fields and spin-orbit interactions. Recently, the idea of introducing nontrivial topology through the use of internal (or external) atomic states as effective "synthetic dimensions" has garnered attraction for its versatility and possible immunity from heating. We engineer tunable gauge fields through the local control of tunneling phases in an effective two-dimensional manifold of discrete atomic momentum states. We demonstrate the ability to create homogeneous gauge fields of arbitrary value, directly imaging the site-resolved dynamics of induced chiral currents. Furthermore, we engineer the first inhomogeneous artificial gauge fields for cold atoms, observing the magnetic reflection of atoms incident upon a step-like variation of an artificial vector potential. These results open new possibilities for the study of topological phases and localization phenomena in atomic gases.

  10. Preliminary method for direct quantification of colistin methanesulfonate by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niece, Krista L; Akers, Kevin S

    2015-09-01

    Colistin use has increased in response to the advent of infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms. It is administered parenterally as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS). Various formulations of CMS and labeling conventions can lead to confusion about colistin dosing, and questions remain about the pharmacokinetics of CMS. Since CMS does not have strong UV absorbance, current methods employ a laborious process of chemical conversion to colistin followed by precolumn derivatization to detect formed colistin by high-performance liquid chromatography. Here, we report a method for direct quantification of colistin methanesulfonate by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FTIR). Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Arbitrary Control of Polarization and Intensity Profiles of Diffraction-Attenuation-Resistant Beams along the Propagation Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corato-Zanarella, Mateus; Dorrah, Ahmed H.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Mojahedi, Mo

    2018-02-01

    We report on the theory and experimental generation of a class of diffraction-attenuation-resistant beams with state of polarization (SOP) and intensity that can be controlled on demand along the propagation direction. This control is achieved by a suitable superposition of Bessel beams, whose parameters are systematically chosen based on closed-form analytic expressions provided by the frozen waves method. Using an amplitude-only spatial light modulator, we experimentally demonstrate three scenarios. In the first, the SOP of a horizontally polarized beam evolves to radial polarization and is then changed to vertical polarization, with the beam intensity held constant. In the second, we simultaneously control the SOP and the longitudinal intensity profile, which is chosen such that the beam's central ring can be switched off over predefined space regions, thus generating multiple foci with different SOPs and at different intensity levels along the propagation. Finally, the ability to control the SOP while overcoming attenuation inside lossy fluids is shown experimentally. We envision our proposed method to be of great interest for many applications, such as optical tweezers, atom guiding, material processing, microscopy, and optical communications.

  12. The O{sub 2} A-Band in the Fluxes and Polarization of Starlight Reflected by Earth-Like Exoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauchez, Thomas [Laboratoire d’Optique Atmosphèrique (LOA), UMR 8518, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Rossi, Loic; Stam, Daphne M. [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2017-06-10

    Earth-like, potentially habitable exoplanets are prime targets in the search for extraterrestrial life. Information about their atmospheres and surfaces can be derived by analyzing the light of the parent star reflected by the planet. We investigate the influence of the surface albedo A {sub s}, the optical thickness b {sub cloud}, the altitude of water clouds, and the mixing ratio of biosignature O{sub 2} on the strength of the O{sub 2} A-band (around 760 nm) in the flux and polarization spectra of starlight reflected by Earth-like exoplanets. Our computations for horizontally homogeneous planets show that small mixing ratios ( η < 0.4) will yield moderately deep bands in flux and moderate-to-small band strengths in polarization, and that clouds will usually decrease the band depth in flux and the band strength in polarization. However, cloud influence will be strongly dependent on properties such as optical thickness, top altitude, particle phase, coverage fraction, and horizontal distribution. Depending on the surface albedo and cloud properties, different O{sub 2} mixing ratios η can give similar absorption-band depths in flux and band strengths in polarization, especially if the clouds have moderate-to-high optical thicknesses. Measuring both the flux and the polarization is essential to reduce the degeneracies, although it will not solve them, especially not for horizontally inhomogeneous planets. Observations at a wide range of phase angles and with a high temporal resolution could help to derive cloud properties and, once those are known, the mixing ratio of O{sub 2} or any other absorbing gas.

  13. Template-directed self-assembly of dynamic covalent capsules with polar interiors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Albano; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C; Ballester, Pablo

    2017-11-01

    Chiral polyimine molecular capsules with polar interiors have been prepared through template covalent dynamic self-assembly. An aryl-extended tetraaldehyde calix[4]pyrrole scaffold was condensed with suitable diamines as linkers using templates for efficient self-assembly. The capsular complexes were characterized in solution, gas phase and the solid-state. Unprecedented transfer of asymmetry was observed from a chiral diamine linker to the resulting supramolecular capsular assembly.

  14. Ultra-wideband, Wide Angle and Polarization-insensitive Specular Reflection Reduction by Metasurface based on Parameter-adjustable Meta-Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jianxun; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Hui; Li, Zengrui; (Lamar) Yang, Yaoqing; Che, Yongxing; Qi, Kainan

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an ultra-wideband, wide angle and polarization-insensitive metasurface is designed, fabricated, and characterized for suppressing the specular electromagnetic wave reflection or backward radar cross section (RCS). Square ring structure is chosen as the basic meta-atoms. A new physical mechanism based on size adjustment of the basic meta-atoms is proposed for ultra-wideband manipulation of electromagnetic (EM) waves. Based on hybrid array pattern synthesis (APS) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, the selection and distribution of the basic meta-atoms are optimized simultaneously to obtain the ultra-wideband diffusion scattering patterns. The metasurface can achieve an excellent RCS reduction in an ultra-wide frequency range under x- and y-polarized normal incidences. The new proposed mechanism greatly extends the bandwidth of RCS reduction. The simulation and experiment results show the metasurface can achieve ultra-wideband and polarization-insensitive specular reflection reduction for both normal and wide-angle incidences. The proposed methodology opens up a new route for realizing ultra-wideband diffusion scattering of EM wave, which is important for stealth and other microwave applications in the future.

  15. DIRECT-METHODS FOR INCOMMENSURATE INTERGROWTH COMPOUNDS .2. DETERMINATION OF THE MODULATION USING ONLY MAIN REFLECTIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SHA, BD; FAN, HF; VANSMAALEN, S; LAM, EJW; BEURSKENS, PT

    1994-01-01

    A modified Sayre equation for incommensurate intergrowth compounds is presented. With this equation, both magnitude and phase for structure factors of satellite reflections can be estimated quantitatively through the observed intensities of main reflections, provided their phases are already known.

  16. Synaptic polarity of the command interneurons for Caenorhabditis Elegans directional motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszek Maria Rakowski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The command interneuron circuit for Caenorhabditis Elegans locomotion has been known for a long time [1,2]. However, synaptic polarities of these interneurons, and thus, the circuit functioning is largely unknown. Additionally, nematode command neurons express both glutamate-gated chloride channels and glutamate-gated cation channels, which causes that each synapse, even when belonging to the same neuron, might be either inhibitory or excitatory. We use an experimental behavioral data set: eighteen different neural ablations were performed and times spent in the forward and reverse motions were registered. Therefore one can consider eighteen different command neuron network structures where each one as a whole, controls the behavior of the nematode, and results with one of the eighteen different behavioral patterns. In order to decipher the particular polarities of each neuron we have constructed a theoretical (interneuron network model, in which neural activities are represented by a set of differential equations and searched all possible synaptic polarity combinations in the circuit to find the best match to the timing data [3,4]. Here, we present the extension of this model, where we explicitly incorporate calcium concentration dynamics as the regulatory factor and detailed connectivity diagram based on the transmission type of each synapse. Since the parameter space spanned by the morphological and regulatory factors is huge, we have applied an evolutionary strategy for finding the parameters of the mathematical model, for which the theoretical results and the experimental data fit the best. The overall model output consists of the averaged values: neuron activities, calcium concentration levels, input signal (the upstream neurons activity pattern and of the resolved detailed connectivity diagram. The deciphered list of the types of synapses states that most of the synapses, including strongest connections, e.g. ASH ->

  17. Direct nuclear reactions with polarized protons: an experimental study of Ge and Se

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moonen, W.H.L.

    1986-01-01

    The present investigation, is concerned with excited states of some transitional nuclides, which, through the experimental improvements, became accessible for polarized proton experiments. The aim was to see how nuclei behave when they have a proton and/or neutron number inbetween 28 and 50. Another aim was the completion of the picture of even-even nuclei in general where the research started with the nuclei Fe (Z=26) and Ni (Z=28). Therefore some nuclei were chosen which follow this series: Ge, Z=32, N=38,40,42,44; Se, Z=34, N=42,44,46. (Auth.)

  18. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) for direct analysis of aerosol particle samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontempi, E; Zacco, A; Benedetti, D; Borgese, L; Colombi, P; Stosnach, H; Finzi, G; Apostoli, P; Buttini, P; Depero, L E

    2010-04-14

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have a great impact on the environment and on human health. Routine analysis of the particles usually involves only the mass determination. However, chemical composition and phases provide fundamental information about the particles' origins and can help to prevent health risks. For example, these particles may contain heavy metals such as Pb, Ni and Cd, which can adversely affect human health. In this work, filter samples were collected in Brescia, an industrial town located in Northern Italy. In order to identify the chemical composition and the phases of the atmospheric aerosols, the samples were analysed by means of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry with a laboratory instrument and X-ray microdiffraction at Synchrotron Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington (Cheshire, UK). The results are discussed and correlated to identify possible pollution sources. The novelty of this analytical approach is that filter samples for TXRF were analysed directly and did not require chemical pretreatment to leach elements from the aerosol particulates. The results of this study clearly show that TXRF is a powerful technique for the analysis of atmospheric aerosols on 'as-received' filters, thereby leaving samples intact and unaltered for possible subsequent analyses by other methods. In addition, the low detection limits for many elements (low ng/cm2) indicate that this method may hold promise in various application fields, such as nanotechnology.

  19. The Sandmeier Field Goniometer: A Measurement Tool for Bi-Directional Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mark; Brown, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Recent activities at the Remote Sensing Program at Stennis Space Center have identified the need to properly verify and validate data provided by the remote sensing community. One important variable, which effects remote sensing data is bi-directional reflectance distribution (BRDF). In order to quantify the effects of BRDF on man-made and natural ground targets, the Stennis Verification & Validation (V&V) team commissioned the Systems Engineering Division at NASA Ames Research Center to develop a Field Goniometer for use at the V&V Large Target Range and for various ground truthing missions. The Swiss Field Goniometer (FIGOS) was used as a benchmark instrument to design the new state of the art Sandmeier Field Goniometer (SGF), named after Stefan Sandmeier, developer of FIGOS. After establishing requirements for the SFG, design efforts began in early May 1998. The design of the SFG was completed in September 1998. Manufacturing, construction, and testing was completed in May 1999. The SFG was shipped to NASA SSC and fully operational by June 1999.

  20. Impedance of vapor feed direct methanol fuel cells--polarization dependence of elementary processes at the anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Hiroshi; Ishida, Tomohiro; Teranishi, Nozomu; Arai, Chikao; Yamada, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    Membrane electrode assemblies of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) with different catalyst and ionomer loading were prepared. Anode performance and impedance spectra were measured to clarify the characteristics of vapor feed DMFCs (VF-DMFCs). The impedance spectra were deconvolved into three semi-circles with different time constants, each showing a different dependence on the anodic polarization. The middle-frequency range arc decreased as the anodic polarization increased, indicating that this process represents the oxidation reaction of methanol. The high-frequency range arc showed little dependence on the anodic polarization, but increased with the thickness of the electrode, indicating that this process might be related to proton conduction through the electrode. The low-frequency range arc was observed only when the methanol concentration was low, in contrast to liquid feed DMFCs (LF-DMFCs), for which the removal of the product gas presents a large resistance. A simpler design can therefore be used for a VF-DMFC, giving it an advantage over an LF-DMFC. A decreasing ionomer to catalyst ratio (I/C) caused the interfacial conductivity (σ E ) to increase, but it intensively decreased when I/C was below 0.25. Thus, the connection of the catalysts is important for the anode's performance

  1. Multiple-view spectrally resolved x-ray imaging observations of polar-direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, R. C.; Johns, H. M.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Nagayama, T. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Hsu, S. C.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Hakel, P.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wysocki, F. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight, including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to laser imprinting and zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial-view images show a “double bun” structure that is consistent with synthetic images obtained from post-processing 2D and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment. Polar-view images show a pentagonal, petal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of PDD OMEGA implosions not previously observed. Differences are noted with respect to a PDD experiment performed at National Ignition Facility.

  2. Ror2 Enhances Polarity and Directional Migration of Primordial Germ Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissner, Michael D.; Zhou, Xin; Anderson, Kathryn V.

    2011-01-01

    The trafficking of primordial germ cells (PGCs) across multiple embryonic structures to the nascent gonads ensures the transmission of genetic information to the next generation through the gametes, yet our understanding of the mechanisms underlying PGC migration remains incomplete. Here we identify a role for the receptor tyrosine kinase-like protein Ror2 in PGC development. In a Ror2 mouse mutant we isolated in a genetic screen, PGC migration and survival are dysregulated, resulting in a diminished number of PGCs in the embryonic gonad. A similar phenotype in Wnt5a mutants suggests that Wnt5a acts as a ligand to Ror2 in PGCs, although we do not find evidence that WNT5A functions as a PGC chemoattractant. We show that cultured PGCs undergo polarization, elongation, and reorientation in response to the chemotactic factor SCF (secreted KitL), whereas Ror2 PGCs are deficient in these SCF-induced responses. In the embryo, migratory PGCs exhibit a similar elongated geometry, whereas their counterparts in Ror2 mutants are round. The protein distribution of ROR2 within PGCs is asymmetric, both in vitro and in vivo; however, this asymmetry is lost in Ror2 mutants. Together these results indicate that Ror2 acts autonomously to permit the polarized response of PGCs to KitL. We propose a model by which Wnt5a potentiates PGC chemotaxis toward secreted KitL by redistribution of Ror2 within the cell. PMID:22216013

  3. Ror2 enhances polarity and directional migration of primordial germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana J Laird

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The trafficking of primordial germ cells (PGCs across multiple embryonic structures to the nascent gonads ensures the transmission of genetic information to the next generation through the gametes, yet our understanding of the mechanisms underlying PGC migration remains incomplete. Here we identify a role for the receptor tyrosine kinase-like protein Ror2 in PGC development. In a Ror2 mouse mutant we isolated in a genetic screen, PGC migration and survival are dysregulated, resulting in a diminished number of PGCs in the embryonic gonad. A similar phenotype in Wnt5a mutants suggests that Wnt5a acts as a ligand to Ror2 in PGCs, although we do not find evidence that WNT5A functions as a PGC chemoattractant. We show that cultured PGCs undergo polarization, elongation, and reorientation in response to the chemotactic factor SCF (secreted KitL, whereas Ror2 PGCs are deficient in these SCF-induced responses. In the embryo, migratory PGCs exhibit a similar elongated geometry, whereas their counterparts in Ror2 mutants are round. The protein distribution of ROR2 within PGCs is asymmetric, both in vitro and in vivo; however, this asymmetry is lost in Ror2 mutants. Together these results indicate that Ror2 acts autonomously to permit the polarized response of PGCs to KitL. We propose a model by which Wnt5a potentiates PGC chemotaxis toward secreted KitL by redistribution of Ror2 within the cell.

  4. Direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Christiansen, Anders V.

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... and subsurface temperatures supplemented the DC-IP measurements. A time-lapse DC-IP monitoring system has been acquiring at least six datasets per day on a 42-electrode profile with 0.5. m electrode spacing since July 2013. Remote control of the data acquisition system enables interactive adaptation...

  5. Comprehensive analysis of polar and apolar constituents of butter and margarine by nuclear magnetic resonance, reflecting quality and production processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schripsema, Jan

    2008-04-23

    The separation of butter or margarine into polar (soluble in water) and apolar fractions (soluble in chloroform) and subsequent analysis of these fractions by (1)H NMR permits a comprehensive analysis of its constituents. In the polar fraction the preservatives benzoic and sorbic acid, the organic acids citric, lactic, butyric, acetic, and formic acid, and, furthermore, the carbohydrate lactose were quantified. In the apolar fraction the conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) rumenic acid, diglycerides, and linoleic acid were quantified. Rumenic acid is a characteristic component of ruminant fats and was found in all butter samples. The levels varied between 0.50 and 1.08%. Ten brands of Brazilian butter were investigated as was one brand from Norway. Also, two brands of margarine were investigated for comparison. A large variation in especially polar constituents was found between the butter samples, revealing the presence of preservatives in five brands of butter from Brazil, remarkable because these additives are legally not allowed. Furthermore, the levels of organic acids and lactose permitted conclusions about the production process and quality; for example, the presence of higher levels of free butyric acid indicate lipolysis, leading to a lower quality, and low levels of lactose indicate that after churning the residual milk fluids have been removed by an additional washing step in the production process.

  6. 30-m Land Surface Albedo by Integrating Landsat directional reflectance and MODIS anisotropic information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Y.; Masek, J. G.; Gao, F.; Schaaf, C.; Williams, C. A.; Wang, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Land surface albedo as a key physical variable determining the solar energy absorbed by the land surface, and can affect climate through ecosystem feedback processes. Some studies have highlighted that positive radiative forcing (warming) induced by increased forest cover and decreased albedo in temperate and boreal forest regions could offset the negative forcing expected from carbon sequestration (Betts 2000). However, these studies have not used data at the spatial resolution of human land dynamics (e.g. 30m Landsat resolution). Therefore, there is a need for improved estimates of land surface albedo at high resolution to fully understand the role of land cover change in climate forcing and carbon cycle. Following our initial "concurrent" approach applied to Landsat data acquired during the post-2000 MODIS era (Shuai et al.2011), we have developed a "pre-MODIS era" approach to generate 30-meter albedos using Landsat surface directional reflectance (1970s-2000) and Look-Up-Tables (LUT) of anisotropy information extracted from MODIS BRDF data. We use a NLCD (National Land Cover Dataset)-class-based LUT for non-disturbed land cover. Disturbed forest patches are identified from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) and North American Forest Dynamics (NAFD) datasets. For each category, high quality MODIS BRDF parameters (MCD43A1 product) are retrieved and used to populate the LUT. Each entry in the LUT reflects a unique combination of land cover type, disturbance age and type, season/month, and sensor bands. The initial BRDF LUT generated for the Pacific Northwest of the United States exhibits various BRDF evolution trajectories for disturbed classes, including different recovery trajectories for fire and non-fire disturbance. The albedo-to-nadir-ratio method (Shuai et al., 2011) is applied to the BRDF LUT to calculate spectral albedos, followed by a narrow-to-broadband conversion (Liang 2000) to generate broad-band shortwave albedo. Our preliminary

  7. Optical detection dental disease using polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Fried, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

  8. Methods for quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical and diffuse reflectance measurements using an FTIR and a commercial integrating sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Forland, Brenda M.; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Hanssen, Leonard; Gonzalez, Gerardo

    2018-01-01

    Infrared integrating sphere measurements of solid samples are important in providing reference data for contact, standoff and remote sensing applications. At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) we have developed protocols to measure both the directional-hemispherical ( and diffuse (d) reflectances of powders, liquids, and disks of powders and solid materials using a commercially available, matte gold-coated integrating sphere and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Detailed descriptions of the sphere alignment and its use for making these reflectance measurements are given. Diffuse reflectance values were found to be dependent on the bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) of the sample and the solid angle intercepted by the sphere’s specular exclusion port. To determine how well the sphere and protocols produce quantitative reflectance data, measurements were made of three diffuse and two specular standards prepared by the National institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA), LabSphere Infragold and Spectralon standards, hand-loaded sulfur and talc powder samples, and water. The five NIST standards behaved as expected: the three diffuse standards had a high degree of “diffuseness,” d/ = D > 0.9, whereas the two specular standards had D ≤ 0.03. The average absolute differences between the NIST and PNNL measurements of the NIST standards for both directional-hemispherical and diffuse reflectances are on the order of 0.01 reflectance units. Other quantitative differences between the PNNL-measured and calibration (where available) or literature reflectance values for these standards and materials are given and the possible origins of discrepancies are discussed. Random uncertainties and estimates of systematic uncertainties are presented. Corrections necessary to provide better agreement between the PNNL reflectance values as measured for the NIST standards and the NIST reflectance values for these same standards are also

  9. Simultaneous reflection masking: dependency on direct sound level and hearing-impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Jörg; Mihai, Paul Glad

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous reflection masked thresholds (RMTs) were measured for 3 normal-hearing (NH) and 3 hearing-impaired (HI) subjects as a function of reflection delay. All stimuli were presented diotically and dichotically, using a 200 ms long broadband noise (100-50000 Hz) as input signal. For 55 d...... delays. Hence, in contrast to binaural reflection enhancement, binaural reflection suppression seems to involve mechanisms that are robust to auditory-internal noise-floor and hearing-impairment. Moreover, differences between the RMTs for HI- and NH-listeners were in prin-ciple agreement with differences...

  10. New directions in the theory of spin-polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelman, J.M.V.A.

    1988-01-01

    The three chapters of this thesis dealing with collisions between hydrogen (or deuterium) atoms in their ground state, each treat a different development in the theory of atomic hydrogen or deuterium gas. The decay due to interatomic collisions hindered till now all attempts to reach the low temperature, high-density regime where effects due to degeneracy are expected to show up. In ch. 2 a simple way out is presented for the case of Fermi gases: In spin-polarized Fermi systems at very low temperatures collisions are much effective than in Bose systems. For the Fermi gas, consisting of magnetically confined deuterium atoms, it appears that fast spin-exchange collisions automatically lead to a completely spin-polarized gas for which the spin-relaxation limited lifetime increases dramatically with decreasing temperature. As also the ratio of internal thermalization rate over decay rate increases with decreasing temperature, this gas can be cooled by forced evaporation down to very low temperatures. In ch. 3 it iis shown that the nuclear spin dynamics due to the hyperfine interaction during collisions, strongly limits the improvement in frequency stability attainable by H masers operating at low temperatures. In ch. 4 the phenomenon of spin waves is studied. It is shown that, despite the fact that interactions between two atoms are nuclear-spin independent, the outcome of a scattering event does not depend on the nuclear spins involved due to the particle indistinguishability effects at low collision energies. This effect gives rise to quantum phenomena on a macroscopic scale via the occurrence of spin waves. (author). 185 refs.; 34 figs

  11. A New Intermediate Far-Field Spot Design for Polar Direct Drive at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, D.; Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; McKenty, P. W.

    2015-11-01

    New far-field spot shapes were required and subsequently designed for the intermediate phase plates that will be fielded at the National Ignition Facility for polar-direct-drive laser-coupling experiments. Two-dimensional DRACO simulations using the new far-field spot design, coupled with appropriate ring energies and beam pointing angles, achieve a high neutron yield-over-clean (YOC) ratio with a clean hot-spot radius averaging 50 μm and a convergence ratio (CR) above 17 when performed with a 1300- μm plastic shell target driven by a 700-kJ double-picket pulse. This meets the original design objectives of maintaining a clean hot spot with a CR of 17. The presented far-field spot shapes are based on an ignition polar-direct-drive configuration modeled with the iSNB nonlocal thermal transport model. In addition, the use of Multi-FM during the first two pickets does not hinder performance, but instead slightly improves the neutron yield. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. Polarity-specific cortical effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in primary somatosensory cortex of healthy humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eRehmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a noninvasive stimulation method that has been shown to modulate the excitability of the motor and visual cortices in human subjects in a polarity dependent manner in previous studies. The aim of our study was to investigate whether anodal and cathodal tDCS can also be used to modulate the excitability of the human primary somatosensory cortex (S1. We measured paired-pulse suppression (PPS of somatosensory evoked potentials in 36 right-handed volunteers before and after anodal, cathodal or sham stimulation over the right non-dominant S1. Paired-pulse stimulation of the median nerve was performed at the dominant and non-dominant hand. After anodal tDCS, PPS was reduced in the ipsilateral S1 compared to sham stimulation, indicating an excitatory effect of anodal tDCS. In contrast, PPS in the stimulated left hemisphere was increased after cathodal tDCS, indicating an inhibitory effect of cathodal tDCS. Sham stimulation induced no pre-post differences. Thus, tDCS can be used to modulate the excitability of S1 in polarity-dependent manner, which can be assessed by paired-pulse suppression. An interesting topic for further studies could be the investigation of direct correlations between sensory changes and excitability changes induced by tDCS.

  13. Direct analysis of Al2O3 powders by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschel, Birgit U; Fittschen, Ursula E A; Pepponi, Giancarlo; Jokubonis, Christoph; Streli, Christina; Wobrauschek, Peter; Falkenberg, Gerald; Broekaert, José A C

    2005-08-01

    A direct analysis procedure for the determination of trace impurities of Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ga in Al2O3 ceramic powders by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) is described. The powders were analysed in the form of slurries containing 1-10 mg mL(-1) of powder. The use of the procedure in the case of powders with differing grain size and for different slurry concentrations was investigated. Three different quantification possibilities were compared, namely the use of Al as a matrix component, the use of Fe as a trace element contained in the sample or of Co added in concentrations of 200 microg g(-1) as internal standard. The homogeneity of elemental distributions in sample layers deposited on the TXRF quartz carriers by evaporating 5 microL of the 10 mg mL(-1) slurries was studied by scanning the 4- to 5-mm-diameter spots of two samples by synchrotron radiation TXRF at Hasylab. For powders with differing graininess but mainly finer than about a few 10 microm, no systematic influence of the grain size on the accuracy of the determinations of Ca, V, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn could be observed. The measurement precision, however, seemed to be limited by inhomogeneous distributions of the trace elements in the samples as testified by the synchrotron radiation TXRF scans. Detection limits of the developed TXRF procedure for Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ga were found to be in the 0.3-7 microg g(-1) range and were shown to increase slightly with the grain size of the samples. Quantification using Al (matrix) as internal standard led to systematically higher values out of the accuracy required, whereas the other two approaches in all cases led to reliable results.

  14. Connexin 43-mediated modulation of polarized cell movement and the directional migration of cardiac neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Francis, Richard; Wei, Chih Jen; Linask, Kaari L; Lo, Cecilia W

    2006-09-01

    Connexin 43 knockout (Cx43alpha1KO) mice have conotruncal heart defects that are associated with a reduction in the abundance of cardiac neural crest cells (CNCs) targeted to the heart. In this study, we show CNCs can respond to changing fibronectin matrix density by adjusting their migratory behavior, with directionality increasing and speed decreasing with increasing fibronectin density. However, compared with wild-type CNCs, Cx43alpha1KO CNCs show reduced directionality and speed, while CNCs overexpressing Cx43alpha1 from the CMV43 transgenic mice show increased directionality and speed. Altered integrin signaling was indicated by changes in the distribution of vinculin containing focal contacts, and altered temporal response of Cx43alpha1KO and CMV43 CNCs to beta1 integrin function blocking antibody treatment. High resolution motion analysis showed Cx43alpha1KO CNCs have increased cell protrusive activity accompanied by the loss of polarized cell movement. They exhibited an unusual polygonal arrangement of actin stress fibers that indicated a profound change in cytoskeletal organization. Semaphorin 3A, a chemorepellent known to inhibit integrin activation, was found to inhibit CNC motility, but in the Cx43alpha1KO and CMV43 CNCs, cell processes failed to retract with semaphorin 3A treatment. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses suggested close interactions between Cx43alpha1, vinculin and other actin-binding proteins. However, dye coupling analysis showed no correlation between gap junction communication level and fibronectin plating density. Overall, these findings indicate Cx43alpha1 may have a novel function in mediating crosstalk with cell signaling pathways that regulate polarized cell movement essential for the directional migration of CNCs.

  15. Evidence of a circularly polarized light mode along the optic axis in c-cut NH4H2PO4, induced by circular differential reflection and anomalous birefringence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, Werner; Steininger, Steven; Herreros-Cedres, Javier; Glazer, Anthony Michael

    2010-01-01

    The anomalous birefringence and circular differential reflection of NH 4 H 2 PO 4 (4-bar2m), cut on the optic axis, have been found to cause an additional signal in measurements of the optical rotation employing polarized light technology, with the sample between crossed and slightly modulated linear polarizers (tilting high accuracy universal polarimetry). The azimuthal rotation of the linearly polarized light, up to 100 times larger than expected, is described in terms of a circularly polarized light mode along the optic axis of varying amplitude. Experimental evidence leading to our conclusion is given and a qualitative model for the effect is presented.

  16. Complex reflection coefficients of p- and s-polarized light at the pseudo-Brewster angle of a dielectric-conductor interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, R M A

    2013-10-01

    The complex Fresnel reflection coefficients r(p) and r(s) of p- and s-polarized light and their ratio ρ=r(p)/r(s) at the pseudo-Brewster angle (PBA) φ(pB) of a dielectric-conductor interface are evaluated for all possible values of the complex relative dielectric function ε=|ε|exp(-jθ)=ε(r)-jε(i), ε(i)>0 that share the same φ(pB). Complex-plane trajectories of r(p), r(s), and ρ at the PBA are presented at discrete values of φ(pB) from 5° to 85° in equal steps of 5° as θ is increased from 0° to 180°. It is shown that for φ(pB)>70° (high-reflectance metals in the IR) r(p) at the PBA is essentially pure negative imaginary and the reflection phase shift δ(p)=arg(r(p))≈-90°. In the domain of fractional optical constants (vacuum UV or light incidence from a high-refractive-index immersion medium) 0reflection phase shifts δ(p), δ(s), Δ=δ(p)-δ(s)=arg(ρ) are also determined as functions of φ(pB).

  17. Polar Frontal Zone of the Barents Sea Western Trough Based on the Direct Measurements in 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Morozov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of measurements carried out in summer, 2007 in the north-western part of the Barents Sea are discussed. The ship weather station and the vessel mounted Acoustic Doppler current profiler VMADCP150 are used to carry out measurements in the vessel motion. CTD/LADCP-sensing is performed at the drift stations. The minimum horizontal scale of a temperature front is 0.5 km, whereas the maximum horizontal gradient of water temperature is 4 °C/km. The width of the North Cape Current Northern branch is ~8 km that is three times larger than the Rossby radius of deformation. Position of the temperature front coincides with that of the jet stream core. The characteristics of small-scale vertical structure of water dynamics and density stratification in the polar frontal zone are discussed. The averaged annual variability of temperature and salinity vertical structure in the area of the Spitsbergen Bank and the Hopen Deep are represented. The intra-annual variability of water salinity in the Hopen Deep calculated based on the historical database of hydrological data, revealed the presence of variations with a period of four months. Based on satellite observations, position of the temperature front in the area of research is defined.

  18. Study of dual-polarization OQAM-OFDM PON with direct detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qing-long; Feng, Min; Bai, Cheng-lin; Hu, Wei-sheng

    2016-01-01

    An offset quadrature amplitude modulation orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OQAM-OFDM) passive optical network (PON) architecture with direct detection is brought up to increase the transmission range and improve the system performance. In optical line terminal (OLT), OQAM-OFDM signals at 40 Gbit/s are transmitted as downstream. At each optical network unit (ONU), the optical OQAM-OFDM signal is demodulated with direct detection. The results show that the transmission distance can exceed 20 km with negligible penalty under the experimental conditions.

  19. Study of magnetic thin films by polarized neutron reflectivity. Off-specular diffusion on periodical structures; Etude de couches minces magnetiques par reflectivite de neutrons polarises. Diffusion non speculaire sur des structures periodiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, F

    1998-11-26

    Theoretical (Zeeman energy effects) and experimental (beam polarisation problems) progress have been made in the understanding of polarized neutron reflectivity with polarisation analysis. It has been shown that modelization and numerical simulations makes it possible to avoid to have to systematically measure a full set of reflectivity curves for each field and temperature condition. It has been possible to determine a magnetic profile as a function of the field in a magnetic bilayer system by using only a few points in the reciprocal space. This technique allows to considerable reduce the experiment time. In single nickel layer systems, we have shown that it is possible to induce magnetic rotation inhomogeneities when these systems are subjects to deformation strains. The effect are related to magneto-elastic constants gradients. In trilayer systems, with a ME constant modulation, we have been able to induce large magnetic rotation gradients. A new magneto-optic technique to measure the magnetization direction without rotating the magnetic field has been developed. The field of neutron reflectivity has been extended to off-specular studies. It has been possible to account quantitatively of the off-specular diffusion on 2-D model systems (prepared by optical lithography). This new technique should make it possible in the future to determine magnetic structures with a in-depth as well as lateral resolution. (author)

  20. Direct electric current modifies important cellular aspects and ultrastructure features of Candida albicans yeasts: Influence of doses and polarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Gleyce Moreno; Dos Santos, Eldio Gonçalves; Capella, Francielle Neves Carvalho; Homsani, Fortune; de Pointis Marçal, Carina; Dos Santos Valle, Roberta; de Araújo Abi-Chacra, Érika; Braga-Silva, Lys Adriana; de Oliveira Sales, Marcelo Henrique; da Silva Neto, Inácio Domingos; da Veiga, Venicio Feo; Dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Holandino, Carla

    2017-02-01

    Available treatments against human fungal pathogens present high levels of resistance, motivating the development of new antifungal therapies. In this context, the present work aimed to analyze direct electric current (DC) antifungal action, using an in vitro apparatus equipped with platinum electrodes. Candida albicans yeast cells were submitted to three distinct conditions of DC treatment (anodic flow-AF; electroionic flow-EIF; and cathodic flow-CF), as well as different charges, ranging from 0.03 to 2.40 C. Our results indicated C. albicans presented distinct sensibility depending on the DC intensity and polarity applied. Both the colony-forming unit assay and the cytometry flow with propidium iodide indicated a drastic reduction on cellular viability after AF treatment with 0.15 C, while CF- and EIF-treated cells stayed alive when DC doses were increased up to 2.40 C. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy revealed important ultrastructural alterations in AF-treated yeasts, including cell structure disorganization, ruptures in plasmatic membrane, and cytoplasmic rarefaction. This work emphasizes the importance of physical parameters (polarity and doses) in cellular damage, and brings new evidence for using electrotherapy to treat C. albicans pathology process. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:95-108, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. First direct fluorescence polarization assay for the detection and quantification of spirolides in mussel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otero, Paz; Alfonso, Amparo [Departamento de Farmacologia, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Universitario s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Alfonso, Carmen [CIFGA Laboratorio, Plaza de Santo Domingo, 1, 27001 Lugo (Spain); Araoz, Romulo; Molgo, Jordi [CNRS, Institut de Neurobiologie Alfred Fessard - FRC2118, Laboratoire de Neurobiologie et Developpement UPR3294, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Vieytes, Mercedes R. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Botana, Luis M., E-mail: luis.botana@usc.es [Departamento de Farmacologia, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Universitario s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A direct assay based in the binding of nAChR to spirolide toxins by FP is described. {yields} A direct relationship between FP and 13-desMeC in the range of 10-500 nM is obtained. {yields} FP is dependent on the 13, 19-didesMeC in a higher concentration range than 13-desMeC. {yields} FP assay is a sensitive method to detect and quantify 13-desMeC in mussel samples. - Abstract: In 2009, we achieve the first inhibition FP assay to detect imine cyclic toxins. In the present paper we propose a new FP assay for direct quantify spirolides. This new method has resulted in significant improvement of sensitivity, rapidity and accessibility. In the method design, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata membranes labelled with a derivative of fluorescein was used. Spirolides, 13-desmethyl spirolide C (13-desMeC) and 13,19-didesmethyl spirolide C (13,19-didesMeC) were extracted and purified from cultures of the Alexandrium ostenfeldii dinoflagellate. Data showed the decrease of FP when toxin concentration was increased. Thus, a relationship between the FP units and the spirolides amount present in a sample was obtained. This direct assay is a reproducible, simple and very sensitive method with a detection limit about 25 nM for 13-desMeC and 150 nM for 13,19-didesMeC. The procedure was used to measure spirolides in mussel samples using an extraction and clean up protocol suitable for the FP assay. Results obtained show that this method is able to quantify 13-desMeC in the range of 50-350 {mu}g kg{sup -1} meat. Other liposoluble toxins did not interfere with the assay, proving a specific method. Moreover, the matrix do not affect in the range of toxin concentrations that involving risk of spirolides intoxication.

  2. First direct fluorescence polarization assay for the detection and quantification of spirolides in mussel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, Paz; Alfonso, Amparo; Alfonso, Carmen; Araoz, Romulo; Molgo, Jordi; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A direct assay based in the binding of nAChR to spirolide toxins by FP is described. → A direct relationship between FP and 13-desMeC in the range of 10-500 nM is obtained. → FP is dependent on the 13, 19-didesMeC in a higher concentration range than 13-desMeC. → FP assay is a sensitive method to detect and quantify 13-desMeC in mussel samples. - Abstract: In 2009, we achieve the first inhibition FP assay to detect imine cyclic toxins. In the present paper we propose a new FP assay for direct quantify spirolides. This new method has resulted in significant improvement of sensitivity, rapidity and accessibility. In the method design, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata membranes labelled with a derivative of fluorescein was used. Spirolides, 13-desmethyl spirolide C (13-desMeC) and 13,19-didesmethyl spirolide C (13,19-didesMeC) were extracted and purified from cultures of the Alexandrium ostenfeldii dinoflagellate. Data showed the decrease of FP when toxin concentration was increased. Thus, a relationship between the FP units and the spirolides amount present in a sample was obtained. This direct assay is a reproducible, simple and very sensitive method with a detection limit about 25 nM for 13-desMeC and 150 nM for 13,19-didesMeC. The procedure was used to measure spirolides in mussel samples using an extraction and clean up protocol suitable for the FP assay. Results obtained show that this method is able to quantify 13-desMeC in the range of 50-350 μg kg -1 meat. Other liposoluble toxins did not interfere with the assay, proving a specific method. Moreover, the matrix do not affect in the range of toxin concentrations that involving risk of spirolides intoxication.

  3. The polarization of light in coastal and open oceans: Reflection and transmission by the air-sea interface and application for the retrieval of water optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Robert

    For decades, traditional remote sensing retrieval methods that rely solely on the spectral intensity of the water-leaving light have provided indicators of aquatic ecosystem health. With the increasing demand for new water quality indicators and improved accuracy of existing ones, the limits of traditional remote sensing approaches are becoming apparent. Use of the additional information intrinsic to the polarization state of light is therefore receiving more attention. One of the major challenges inherent in any above-surface determination of the water-leaving radiance, scalar or vector, is the removal of extraneous light which has not interacted with the water body and is therefore not useful for remote sensing of the water itself. Due in-part to the lack of a proven alternative, existing polarimeter installations have thus far assumed that such light was reflected by a flat sea surface, which can lead to large inaccuracies in the water-leaving polarization signal. This dissertation rigorously determines the full Mueller matrices for both surface-reflected skylight and upwardly transmitted light by a wind-driven ocean surface. A Monte Carlo code models the surface in 3D and performs polarized ray-tracing, while a vector radiative transfer (VRT) simulation generates polarized light distributions from which the initial Stokes vector for each ray is inferred. Matrices are computed for the observable range of surface wind speeds, viewing and solar geometries, and atmospheric aerosol loads. Radiometer field-of-view effects are also assessed. Validation of the results is achieved using comprehensive VRT simulations of the atmosphere-ocean system based on several oceanographic research cruises and specially designed polarimeters developed by the City College of New York: one submerged beneath the surface and one mounted on a research vessel. When available, additional comparisons are made at 9 km altitude with the NASA Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). Excellent

  4. Measurements of Branching Fraction, Polarization, and Direct CP-Violating Asymmetry in B{sup +} --> K*{sup 0} {rho}{sup +} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2004-08-19

    The purpose of this analysis is the simultaneous measurement of the branching fraction, the longitudinal-polarization component, and the direct-CP-violating charge asymmetry for the B --> vector-vector decay mode B{sup +} --> K*{sup 0}{rho}{sup +}, which has previously not been seen experimentally. The measurement of the polarization of the penguin decay is of special interest. There is no tree contribution to the decay amplitude and only a very small annihilation process. The polarization of the B{sup +} --> K*{sup 0}{rho}{sup +} decay mode can be compared to that already measured for the similar penguin decay B --> K*{phi}.

  5. Direct current (DC) resistivity and Induced Polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, J.; Fiandaca, G.; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (...... non-intrusively and reliably image freezing patterns and their lateral variation on a 10-100 m scale that is difficult to sample by point measurements.......) measurements at high temporal resolution at a heath tundra site on Disko Island on the west coast of Greenland (69°N). Borehole sediment characteristics and subsurface temperatures supplemented the DC-IP measurements. Data acquired during the freezing period of October 2013 – February 2014 clearly image...... the soil freezing as a strong increase in resistivity. While the freezing horizon generally moves deeper with time, some variations in the freezing depth are observed along the profile. Comparison with depth-specific soil temperature indicates an exponential relationship between resistivity and below-freezing...

  6. A Study of Bi-Directional Reflectance Distribution Functions and Their Effect on Infrared Signature Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    emission is in the IR spectrum. V is ib le Infrared Microwaves Radio waves UVX -Rays Gamma Rays 10-8 10-4 10-2 1µm 103 106 Figure 1.1: The infrared...spectrum is a subset of the electro- magnetic spectrum. Wavelength is in units of microns (µm). Adapted from [4, Figure 1.1]. 1 (a) (b) Figure 1.2: The...properties are independent of the azimuthal incidence angle, φi; most com- mon surface types fit this definition. Two exceptions to this assumption are polar

  7. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  8. The Sociology of Youth: A Reflection on Its Contribution to the Field and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyn, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    This article expands on a piece in the inaugural "Sociology of Youth Newsletter," edited by Steven Threadgold (Wyn 2010). The present article provides an opportunity to engage in a more critical exploration of the issues that youth sociology in Australia contributes to the wider field of sociology and to reflect on challenges that it…

  9. A small mono-polar direct methanol fuel cell stack with passive operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y. H.; Zhao, T. S.; Chen, R.; Xu, C.

    A passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) stack that consists of six unit cells was designed, fabricated, and tested. The stack was tested with different methanol concentrations under ambient conditions. It was found that the stack performance increased when the methanol concentration inside the fuel tank was increased from 2.0 to 6.0 M. The improved performance is primarily due to the increased cell temperature as a result of the exothermic reaction between the permeated methanol and oxygen on the cathode. Moreover, the increased cell temperature enhanced the water evaporation rate on the air-breathing cathode, which significantly reduced water flooding on the cathode and further improved the stack performance. This passive DMFC stack, providing 350 mW at 1.8 V, was successfully applied to power a seagull display kit. The seagull display kit can continuously run for about 4 h on a single charge of 25 cm 3 4.0-M methanol solution.

  10. Portable ultrahigh-vacuum sample storage system for polarization-dependent total-reflection fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoshihide, E-mail: e0827@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Suzuki, Ryo; Beniya, Atsushi; Isomura, Noritake [Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc., Yokomichi 41-1, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Uehara, Hiromitsu; Asakura, Kiyotaka; Takakusagi, Satoru [Catalysis Research Center, Hokkaido University, Kita 21-10, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0021 (Japan); Nimura, Tomoyuki [AVC Co., Ltd., Inada 1450-6, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0061 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    A portable ultrahigh-vacuum sample storage system was designed and built to investigate the detailed geometric structures of mass-selected metal clusters on oxide substrates by polarization-dependent total-reflection fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (PTRF-XAFS). This ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) sample storage system provides the handover of samples between two different sample manipulating systems. The sample storage system is adaptable for public transportation, facilitating experiments using air-sensitive samples in synchrotron radiation or other quantum beam facilities. The samples were transferred by the developed portable UHV transfer system via a public transportation at a distance over 400 km. The performance of the transfer system was demonstrated by a successful PTRF-XAFS study of Pt{sub 4} clusters deposited on a TiO{sub 2}(110) surface.

  11. Directional reflectance factors for monitoring spatial changes in soil surface structure and soil organic matter erosion in agricultural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soils can experience rapid structural degradation in response to land cover changes, resulting in reduced soil productivity, increased erodibility and a loss of soil organic matter (SOM). The breakdown of soil aggregates through slaking and raindrop impact is linked to organic matter turnover, with subsequently eroded material often displaying proportionally more SOM. A reduction in aggregate stability is reflected in a decline in soil surface roughness (SSR), indicating that a soil structural change can be used to highlight soil vulnerability to SOM loss through mineralisation or erosion. Accurate, spatially-continuous measurements of SSR are therefore needed at a variety of spatial and temporal scales to understand the spatial nature of SOM erosion and deposition. Remotely-sensed data can provide a cost-effective means of monitoring changes in soil surface condition over broad spatial extents. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of directional reflectance factors to monitor soil crusting within a controlled laboratory experiment, due to changes in the levels of self-shadowing effects by soil aggregates. However, further research is needed to test this approach in situ, where other soil variables may affect measured reflectance factors and to investigate the use of directional reflectance factors for monitoring soil erosion processes. This experiment assesses the potential of using directional reflectance factors to monitor changes in SSR, aggregate stability and soil organic carbon (SOC) content for two agricultural conditions. Five soil plots representing tilled and seedbed soils were subjected to different durations of natural rainfall, producing a range of different levels of SSR. Directional reflectance factors were measured concomitantly with sampling for soil structural and biochemical tests at each soil plot. Soil samples were taken to measure aggregate stability (wet sieving), SOC (loss on ignition) and soil moisture (gravimetric method). SSM

  12. Direct solar wind proton access into permanently shadowed lunar polar craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Recent analyses of Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer (LPNS) data have suggested that high abundances of hydrogen exist within cold traps at the lunar poles, and it has often been assumed that hydrogen-bearing volatiles sequestered in permanent shadow are topographically shielded from sputtering by solar wind protons. However, recent simulation results are presented showing that textbf{solar wind protons clearly access the floor of an idealized, shadowed lunar crater} through a combination of thermal and ambipolar processes, in effect creating a plasma "mini-wake". These simulations are the first to model the mini-wake environment in two spatial dimensions with a self-consistent lunar surface-plasma interaction. Progress is reported on constraining the nonzero particle fluxes and energies incident on kilometer-scale shadowed topography, such as a small crater embedded within a larger one. The importance of direct solar wind proton bombardment is discussed within the context of understanding the stability and inventory of hydrogen-bearing volatiles in shadow at the lunar poles. textit{The support of the National Lunar Science Institute, the DREAM Institute, LPROPS, and the NASA Postdoctoral Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center administered by ORAU are gratefully acknowledged.}

  13. Direct Solar Wind Proton Access into Permanently Shadowed Lunar Polar Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent analyses of Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer (LPNS) data have suggested that high abundances of hydrogen exist within cold traps at the lunar poles, and it has often been assumed that hydrogen-bearing volatiles sequestered in permanent shadow are topographically shielded from sputtering by solar wind protons. However, recent simulation results are presented showing that solar wind protons clearly access the floor of an idealized, shadowed lunar crater through a combination of thermal and ambipolar processes, in effect creating a plasma "miniwake". These simulations are the first to model the mini-wake environment in two spatial dimensions with a self-consistent lunar surface-plasma interaction. Progress is reported on constraining the nonzero particle fluxes and energies incident on kilometer-scale shadowed topography, such as a small crater embedded within a larger one. The importance of direct solar wind proton bombardment is discussed within the context of understanding the stability and inventory of hydrogen-bearing volatiles in shadow at the lunar poles. The support of the National Lunar Science institute, the DREAM institute, LPROPS, and the NASA Postdoctoral Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center administered by ORAU are gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Polarity-Specific Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Disrupts Auditory Pitch Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko eMatsushita

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is attracting increasing interest because of its potential for therapeutic use. While its effects have been investigated mainly with motor and visual tasks, less is known in the auditory domain. Past tDCS studies with auditory tasks demonstrated various behavioural outcomes, possibly due to differences in stimulation parameters or task measurements used in each study. Further research using well-validated tasks are therefore required for clarification of behavioural effects of tDCS on the auditory system. Here, we took advantage of findings from a prior functional magnetic resonance imaging study, which demonstrated that the right auditory cortex is modulated during fine-grained pitch learning of microtonal melodic patterns. Targeting the right auditory cortex with tDCS using this same task thus allowed us to test the hypothesis that this region is causally involved in pitch learning. Participants in the current study were trained for three days while we measured pitch discrimination thresholds using microtonal melodies on each day using a psychophysical staircase procedure. We administered anodal, cathodal, or sham tDCS to three groups of participants over the right auditory cortex on the second day of training during performance of the task. Both the sham and the cathodal groups showed the expected significant learning effect (decreased pitch threshold over the three days of training; in contrast we observed a blocking effect of anodal tDCS on auditory pitch learning, such that this group showed no significant change in thresholds over the three days. The results support a causal role for the right auditory cortex in pitch discrimination learning.

  15. Transverse electron polarization in the neutron decay - Direct search for scalar and tensor couplings in weak interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodek, Kazimierz

    2012-09-01

    The Standard Model (SM) predictions of T-violation for weak decays of systems built up of u and d quarks are by 7 to 10 orders of magnitude lower than the experimental accuracies attainable at present. It is a general presumption that time reversal phenomena are caused by a tiny admixture of exotic interaction terms. Therefore, weak decays provide a favorable testing ground in a search for such feeble forces. Physics with very slow, polarized neutrons has a great potential in this respect. An experiment seeking for small deviations from the SM in two observables, N and R, that are for the first time addressed experimentally in free neutron decay and that are exclusively sensitive to real and imaginary parts of the same linear combination of the scalar and tensor interaction coupling constants has been completed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland. The analysis of the experimental data has been completed recently leading to, among others, the best direct constraint for the imaginary part of the R-parity violating MSSM contribution. The success of the applied technique results in a new project devoted to the simultaneous measurement of seven correlation coefficients: H, L, N, R, S, U and V. Five of them (H, L, S, U and V) have never before been measured in weak decays. Such a systematic exploration of the transverse electron polarization will generate from the neutron decay alone a complete set of constraints for the real and imaginary parts of the weak scalar and tensor interactions on the level of 5 × 10-4 or better.

  16. New modeling of reflection interference contrast microscopy including polarization and numerical aperture effects: application to nanometric distance measurements and object profile reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoly, O; Huang, Z-H; Valignat, M-P

    2010-02-02

    We have developed a new and improved optical model of reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) to determine with a precision of a few nanometers the absolute thickness h of thin films on a flat surface in immersed conditions. The model takes into account multiple reflections between a planar surface and a multistratified object, finite aperture illumination (INA), and, for the first time, the polarization of light. RICM intensity I is typically oscillating with h. We introduce a new normalization procedure that uses the intensity extrema of the same oscillation order for both experimental and theoretical intensity values and permits us to avoid significant error in the absolute height determination, especially at high INA. We also show how the problem of solution degeneracy can be solved by taking pictures at two different INA values. The model is applied to filled polystyrene beads and giant unilamellar vesicles of radius 10-40 microm sitting on a glass substrate. The RICM profiles I(h) can be fitted for up to two to three oscillation orders, and extrema positions are correct for up to five to seven oscillation orders. The precision of the absolute distance and of the shape of objects near a substrate is about 5 nm in a range from 0 to 500 nm, even under large numerical aperture conditions. The method is especially valuable for dynamic RICM experiments and with living cells where large illumination apertures are required.

  17. Solar power conversion system with directionally- and spectrally-selective properties based on a reflective cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriskina, Svetlana; Kraemer, Daniel; McEnaney, Kenneth; Weinstein, Lee A.; Chen, Gang

    2018-03-13

    Solar power conversion system. The system includes a cavity formed within an enclosure having highly specularly reflecting in the IR spectrum inside walls, the enclosure having an opening to receive solar radiation. An absorber is positioned within the cavity for receiving the solar radiation resulting in heating of the absorber structure. In a preferred embodiment, the system further contains an energy conversion and storage devices thermally-linked to the absorber by heat conduction, convection, far-field or near-field thermal radiation.

  18. Demonstration of 2×ONU 80 Gbps direct detection colorless polarization division multiplexing frequency division multiplexing passive optical network uplink transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhixin; Xu, Yinfan; Wang, Yanyi; Wang, Yuanquan; Chi, Nan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple direct detection passive optical network (PON) uplink transmission scheme based on frequency division multiplexing and polarization division multiplexing. Two optical network units (ONUs) are assigned to two different frequency bands at two different orthogonal polarization directions. At the optical line terminal, both ONU signals can be simultaneously detected by a single photodiode without utilizing any polarization control, polarization selection, or complicated polarization demultiplexing algorithms. As a proof-of-concept, the 2×ONU 80 Gbps 32-ary quadrature amplitude modulation Nyquist single carrier signals are successfully transmitted over 2 km standard single mode fiber or 20 km large effective area fiber with the assistance of frequency domain equalization and decision-directed least-mean-square. The measured bit error rate can be below the 7% pre-forward error correction threshold of 3.8×10-3. Meanwhile, this scheme is compatible with the widely used wavelength-division multiplexed PON, which shows the promising potential and feasibility of this proposal.

  19. Low Group Delay Dispersion Optical Coating for Broad Bandwidth High Reflection at 45° Incidence, P Polarization of Femtosecond Pulses with 900 nm Center Wavelength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Bellum

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe an optical coating design suitable for broad bandwidth high reflection (BBHR at 45° angle of incidence (AOI, P polarization (Ppol of femtosecond (fs laser pulses whose wavelengths range from 800 to 1000 nm. Our design process is guided by quarter-wave HR coating properties. The design must afford low group delay dispersion (GDD for reflected light over the broad, 200 nm bandwidth in order to minimize temporal broadening of the fs pulses due to dispersive alteration of relative phases between their frequency components. The design should also be favorable to high laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT. We base the coating on TiO2/SiO2 layer pairs produced by means of e-beam evaporation with ion-assisted deposition, and use OptiLayer Thin Film Software to explore designs starting with TiO2/SiO2 layers having thicknesses in a reverse chirped arrangement. This approach led to a design with R > 99% from 800 to 1000 nm and GDD < 20 fs2 from 843 to 949 nm (45° AOI, Ppol. The design’s GDD behaves in a smooth way, suitable for GDD compensation techniques, and its electric field intensities show promise for high LIDTs. Reflectivity and GDD measurements for the initial test coating indicate good performance of the BBHR design. Subsequent coating runs with improved process calibration produced two coatings whose HR bands satisfactorily meet the design goals. For the sake of completeness, we summarize our previously reported transmission spectra and LIDT test results with 800 ps, 8 ps and 675 fs pulses for these two coatings, and present a table of the LIDT results we have for all of our TiO2/SiO2 BBHR coatings, showing the trends with test laser pulse duration from the ns to sub-ps regimes.

  20. Spectral and directional reflectance of the fovea in diabetes mellitus: Photoreceptor integrity, macular pigment and lens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zagers, N.P.A.; Pot, M.C.A.; Norren, D. van

    2005-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the integrity of the photoreceptors in the fovea, and to measure the optical density of the macular pigment and the eye lens in patients with diabetes mellitus, and to compare the results with those of a group of healthy subjects. The directional and spectral properties of the

  1. Physiological signal variability in hMT+ reflects performance on a direction discrimination task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Graciela Wutte

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to perceive visual motion is critically dependent on the human motion complex (hMT+ in the dorsal visual stream. Extensive electrophysiological research in the monkey equivalent of this region has demonstrated how neuronal populations code for properties such as speed and direction, and that neurometric functions relate to psychometric functions within the individual monkey. In humans, the physiological correlates of inter-individual perceptual differences are still largely unknown. To address this question, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI while participants viewed translational motion in different directions, and we measured thresholds for direction discrimination of moving stimuli in a separate psychophysics experiment. After determining hMT+ in each participant with a functional localizer, we were able to decode the different directions of visual motion from it using pattern classification (PC. We also characterized the variability of fMRI signal in hMT+ during stimulus and rest periods with a generative model. Relating perceptual performance to physiology, individual direction discrimination thresholds were significantly correlated with the variability measure in hMT+, but not with PC accuracies. Individual differences in PC accuracy were driven by non-physiological noise like head-movement, which makes this method a poor tool to investigate inter-individual differences. In contrast, variability analysis of the fMRI signal was robust to non-physiological noise, and variability characteristics in hMT+ correlated with psychophysical thresholds in the individual participants. Higher levels of fMRI signal variability compared to rest correlated with lower discrimination thresholds. This result is in line with theories on stochastic resonance in the context of neuronal populations, which suggest that endogenous or exogenous noise can increase the sensitivity of neuronal populations to incoming signals.

  2. Spinal cord atrophy in anterior-posterior direction reflects impairment in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, H; Svolgaard, O; Dogonowski, A-M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how atrophy is distributed over the cross section of the upper cervical spinal cord and how this relates to functional impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: We analysed the structural brain MRI scans of 54 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (n=22), primary...... these atrophy measures and clinical impairments as reflected by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Multiple Sclerosis Impairment Scale (MSIS). RESULTS: In patients with MS, CSA and APW but not LRW were reduced compared to healthy controls (P... progressive MS (n=9), secondary progressive MS (n=23) and 23 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We measured the cross-sectional area (CSA), left-right width (LRW) and anterior-posterior width (APW) of the spinal cord at the segmental level C2. We tested for a nonparametric linear relationship between...

  3. Evidence for a spectroscopic direct detection of reflected light from 51 Pegasi b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, J. H. C.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Faria, J. P.; Montalto, M.; Boisse, I.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Melo, C.; Pepe, F.; Sousa, S. G.; Udry, S.; Cunha, D.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The detection of reflected light from an exoplanet is a difficult technical challenge at optical wavelengths. Even though this signal is expected to replicate the stellar signal, not only is it several orders of magnitude fainter, but it is also hidden among the stellar noise. Aims: We apply a variant of the cross-correlation technique to HARPS observations of 51 Peg to detect the reflected signal from planet 51 Peg b. Methods: Our method makes use of the cross-correlation function (CCF) of a binary mask with high-resolution spectra to amplify the minute planetary signal that is present in the spectra by a factor proportional to the number of spectral lines when performing the cross correlation. The resulting cross-correlation functions are then normalized by a stellar template to remove the stellar signal. Carefully selected sections of the resulting normalized CCFs are stacked to increase the planetary signal further. The recovered signal allows probing several of the planetary properties, including its real mass and albedo. Results: We detect evidence for the reflected signal from planet 51 Peg b at a significance of 3σnoise. The detection of the signal permits us to infer a real mass of 0.46+0.06-0.01 MJup (assuming a stellar mass of 1.04 MSun) for the planet and an orbital inclination of 80+10-19 degrees. The analysis of the data also allows us to infer a tentative value for the (radius-dependent) geometric albedo of the planet. The results suggest that 51Peg b may be an inflated hot Jupiter with a high albedo (e.g., an albedo of 0.5 yields a radius of 1.9 ± 0.3 RJup for a signal amplitude of 6.0 ± 0.4 × 10-5). Conclusions: We confirm that the method we perfected can be used to retrieve an exoplanet's reflected signal, even with current observing facilities. The advent of next generation of instruments (e.g. VLT-ESO/ESPRESSO) and observing facilities (e.g. a new generation of ELT telescopes) will yield new opportunities for this type of technique

  4. Directional reflectance of optically dense planetary atmosphere illuminated by solar light: An approximate solution and its verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.; Randrianalisoa, Jaona H.

    2018-03-01

    A new combined approach to calculate the spectral directional reflectance of optically thick cloudy atmosphere illuminated by solar light is suggested. First of all, the approximate method based on the idea of previously developed two-step procedure and a set of 1-D solutions is employed to calculate the local bi-directional reflectance of the cloud layer. After that, the Monte Carlo ray-tracing procedure is used to determine the reflectance of the planet as a whole in the case of a remote sensing from a space vehicle at large distances from the planet. This combined approach appeared to be applicable for planets with opaque cloudy atmosphere. A comparison with the reference Monte Carlo simulation of the complete problem in a wide range of volumetric optical parameters typical of Venus atmosphere in the visible and infrared spectral ranges confirmed very good accuracy of suggested approach. It is recommended to consider the solution obtained as an alternative multi-wavelength method in navigation systems of space vehicles.

  5. Development of a polar direct-drive platform for studying inertial confinement fusion implosion mix on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Mark J.; Bradley, Paul A.; Cobble, James A.; Fincke, James R.; Hakel, Peter; Hsu, Scott C.; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Kyrala, George A.; Magelssen, Glenn R.; Montgomery, David S.; Murphy, Thomas J.; Obrey, Kimberly A.; Shah, Rahul C.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Baumgaertel, Jessica A.; Wysocki, Frederick J.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS F699, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Stephen Craxton, R.; McKenty, Patrick W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fitzsimmons, Paul [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    Experiments were performed to develop a platform for the simultaneous measurement of mix and its effects on fusion burn. Two polar direct drive implosions of all-plastic capsules were conducted for the first time on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To measure implosion trajectory and symmetry, area image backlighting of these capsules was also employed for the first time on NIF, an advance over previous 1-D slit imaging experiments, providing detailed symmetry data of the capsules as they imploded. The implosion trajectory and low-mode asymmetry seen in the resultant radiographs agreed with pre-shot predictions even though the 700 kJ drive energy produced laser beam intensities exceeding laser-plasma instability thresholds. Post-shot simulations indicate that the capsule yield was reduced by a factor of two compared to pre-shot predictions owing to as-shot laser drive asymmetries. The pre-shot predictions of bang time agreed within 200 ps with the experimental results. The second shot incorporated a narrow groove encircling the equator of the capsule. A predicted yield reduction factor of three was not observed.

  6. Development of a polar direct-drive platform for studying inertial confinement fusion implosion mix on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Mark J.; Bradley, Paul A.; Cobble, James A.; Fincke, James R.; Hakel, Peter; Hsu, Scott C.; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Kyrala, George A.; Magelssen, Glenn R.; Montgomery, David S.; Murphy, Thomas J.; Obrey, Kimberly A.; Shah, Rahul C.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Baumgaertel, Jessica A.; Wysocki, Frederick J.; Batha, Steven H.; Stephen Craxton, R.; McKenty, Patrick W.; Fitzsimmons, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were performed to develop a platform for the simultaneous measurement of mix and its effects on fusion burn. Two polar direct drive implosions of all-plastic capsules were conducted for the first time on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To measure implosion trajectory and symmetry, area image backlighting of these capsules was also employed for the first time on NIF, an advance over previous 1-D slit imaging experiments, providing detailed symmetry data of the capsules as they imploded. The implosion trajectory and low-mode asymmetry seen in the resultant radiographs agreed with pre-shot predictions even though the 700 kJ drive energy produced laser beam intensities exceeding laser-plasma instability thresholds. Post-shot simulations indicate that the capsule yield was reduced by a factor of two compared to pre-shot predictions owing to as-shot laser drive asymmetries. The pre-shot predictions of bang time agreed within 200 ps with the experimental results. The second shot incorporated a narrow groove encircling the equator of the capsule. A predicted yield reduction factor of three was not observed

  7. Broadband silicon polarization beam splitter with a high extinction ratio using a triple-bent-waveguide directional coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jun Rong; Ang, Thomas Y L; Sahin, Ezgi; Pawlina, Bryan; Chen, G F R; Tan, D T H; Lim, Soon Thor; Png, Ching Eng

    2017-11-01

    We report on the design and experimental demonstration of a broadband silicon polarization beam splitter (PBS) with a high extinction ratio (ER)≥30  dB. This was achieved using triple-bent-waveguide directional coupling in a single PBS, and cascaded PBS topology. For the single PBS, the bandwidths for an ER≥30  dB are 20 nm for the quasi-TE mode, and 70 nm for the quasi-TM mode when a broadband light source (1520-1610 nm) was employed. The insertion loss (IL) varies from 0.2 to 1 dB for the quasi-TE mode and 0.2-2 dB for the quasi-TM mode. The cascaded PBS improved the bandwidth of the quasi-TE mode for an ER≥30  dB to 90 nm, with a low IL of 0.2-2 dB. To the best of our knowledge, our PBS system is one of the best broadband PBSs with an ER as high as ∼42  dB and a low IL below 1 dB around the central wavelength, and experimentally demonstrated using edge-coupling.

  8. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy investigations of thin silica films deposited on gold. 2. Structural analysis of a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawisza, Izabella; Wittstock, Gunther; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2008-04-15

    In this paper we report on the structural analysis of bilayers of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) using polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM IRRAS). The lipid bilayers were formed on SiO2|Au and Au surfaces using the Langmuir-Blodgett and Langmuir-Schaeffer techniques. As we showed in part 1 (Zawisza, I.; Wittstock, G.; Boukherroub, R.; Szunertis, S. Langmuir 2007, 23, 9303-9309), SiO2 layers of 7 nm thickness, synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on 200 nm thick gold covered glass slides, allow PM IRRAS investigations. Only minor changes in the order and structure of the lipid bilayer are observed when deposited on SiO2|Au and Au surfaces. The choline moiety in the leaflet directed toward the SiO2 surface exists in trans conformation and shows a tilt of 28 degrees with the surface normal of the CN bond. On the silica surface in the second leaflet directed toward air and in two layers deposited on the Au surface, trans and gauche isomers of the choline moiety are present and the tilt of the CN bond increases to 55 degrees with respect to the surface normal. The order and molecular orientation in the DMPC bilayers on SiO2 and Au surfaces are not affected by time. The analysis of the phosphate stretching mode on the Au surface shows slight dehydration of this group and reorientation of the phosphate moiety.

  9. INFLUENCE OF POLARIZATION MODE DISPERSION ON THE EFFECT OF CROSS-PHASE MODULATION IN INTENSITY MODULATION-DIRECT DETECTION WDM TRANSMISSION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Islam

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cross-phase modulation (XPM changes the state-of-polarization (SOP of the channels through nonlinear polarization rotation and induces nonlinear time dependent phase shift for polarization components that leads to amplitude modulation of the propagating waves in a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM system. Due to the presence of birefringence, the angle between the SOP changes randomly and as a result polarization mode dispersion (PMD causes XPM modulation amplitude fluctuation random in the perturbed channel. In this paper we analytically determine the probability density function of the random angle between the SOP of pump and probe, and evaluate the impact of polarization mode dispersion on XPM in terms of bit error rate, channel spacing etc for a two channel intensity modulation-direct detection WDM system at 10 Gb/s. It is found that the XPM induced crosstalk is polarization independent for channel spacing greater than 3 nm or PMD coefficient larger than 2 ps/√km. We also investigate the dependence of SOP variance on PMD coefficient and channel spacing.

  10. OSOAA: A Vector Radiative Transfer Model of Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean System for a Rough Sea Surface Application to the Estimates of the Directional Variations of the Water Leaving Reflectance to Better Process Multi-angular Satellite Sensors Data Over the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chami, Malik; LaFrance, Bruno; Fougnie, Bertrand; Chowdhary, Jacek; Harmel, Tristan; Waquet, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present a radiative transfer model, so-called OSOAA, that is able to predict the radiance and degree of polarization within the coupled atmosphere-ocean system in the presence of a rough sea surface. The OSOAA model solves the radiative transfer equation using the successive orders of scattering method. Comparisons with another operational radiative transfer model showed a satisfactory agreement within 0.8%. The OSOAA model has been designed with a graphical user interface to make it user friendly for the community. The radiance and degree of polarization are provided at any level, from the top of atmosphere to the ocean bottom. An application of the OSOAA model is carried out to quantify the directional variations of the water leaving reflectance and degree of polarization for phytoplankton and mineral-like dominated waters. The difference between the water leaving reflectance at a given geometry and that obtained for the nadir direction could reach 40%, thus questioning the Lambertian assumption of the sea surface that is used by inverse satellite algorithms dedicated to multi-angular sensors. It is shown as well that the directional features of the water leaving reflectance are weakly dependent on wind speed. The quantification of the directional variations of the water leaving reflectance obtained in this study should help to correctly exploit the satellite data that will be acquired by the current or forthcoming multi-angular satellite sensors.

  11. Biologically-directed modeling reflects cytolytic clearance of SIV-infected cells in vivo in macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W David Wick

    Full Text Available The disappointing outcomes of cellular immune-based vaccines against HIV-1 despite strong evidence for the protective role of CD8⁺ T lymphocytes (CTLs has prompted revisiting the mechanisms of cellular immunity. Prior data from experiments examining the kinetics of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV clearance in infected macaques with or without in vivo CD8 depletion were interpreted as refuting the concept that CTLs suppress SIV/HIV by direct killing of infected cells. Here we briefly review the biological evidence for CTL cytolytic activity in viral infections, and utilize biologically-directed modeling to assess the possibility of a killing mechanism for the antiviral effect of CTLs, taking into account the generation, proliferation, and survival of activated CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T lymphocytes, as well as the life cycle of the virus. Our analyses of the published macaque data using these models support a killing mechanism, when one considers T lymphocyte and HIV-1 lifecycles, and factors such as the eclipse period before release of virions by infected cells, an exponential pattern of virion production by infected cells, and a variable lifespan for acutely infected cells. We conclude that for SIV/HIV pathogenesis, CTLs deserve their reputation as being cytolytic.

  12. Timing and order of transmission events is not directly reflected in a pathogen phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Severson, Ethan; Skar, Helena; Bulla, Ingo; Albert, Jan; Leitner, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Pathogen phylogenies are often used to infer spread among hosts. There is, however, not an exact match between the pathogen phylogeny and the host transmission history. Here, we examine in detail the limitations of this relationship. First, all splits in a pathogen phylogeny of more than 1 host occur within hosts, not at the moment of transmission, predating the transmission events as described by the pretransmission interval. Second, the order in which nodes in a phylogeny occur may be reflective of the within-host dynamics rather than epidemiologic relationships. To investigate these phenomena, motivated by within-host diversity patterns, we developed a two-phase coalescent model that includes a transmission bottleneck followed by linear outgrowth to a maximum population size followed by either stabilization or decline of the population. The model predicts that the pretransmission interval shrinks compared with predictions based on constant population size or a simple transmission bottleneck. Because lineages coalesce faster in a small population, the probability of a pathogen phylogeny to resemble the transmission history depends on when after infection a donor transmits to a new host. We also show that the probability of inferring the incorrect order of multiple transmissions from the same host is high. Finally, we compare time of HIV-1 infection informed by genetic distances in phylogenies to independent biomarker data, and show that, indeed, the pretransmission interval biases phylogeny-based estimates of when transmissions occurred. We describe situations where caution is needed not to misinterpret which parts of a phylogeny that may indicate outbreaks and tight transmission clusters. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Spectral dependence of backscattering coefficient of mixed phase clouds over West Africa measured with two-wavelength Raman polarization lidar: Features attributed to ice-crystals corner reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselovskii, I.; Goloub, P.; Podvin, T.; Tanre, D.; Ansmann, A.; Korenskiy, M.; Borovoi, A.; Hu, Q.; Whiteman, D. N.

    2017-11-01

    The existing models predict that corner reflection (CR) of laser radiation by simple ice crystals of perfect shape, such as hexagonal columns or plates, can provide a significant contribution to the ice cloud backscattering. However in real clouds the CR effect may be suppressed due to crystal deformation and surface roughness. In contrast to the extinction coefficient, which is spectrally independent, consideration of diffraction associated with CR results in a spectral dependence of the backscattering coefficient. Thus measuring the spectral dependence of the cloud backscattering coefficient, the contribution of CR can be identified. The paper presents the results of profiling of backscattering coefficient (β) and particle depolarization ratio (δ) of ice and mixed-phase clouds over West Africa by means of a two-wavelength polarization Mie-Raman lidar operated at 355 nm and 532 nm during the SHADOW field campaign. The lidar observations were performed at a slant angle of 43 degree off zenith, thus CR from both randomly oriented crystals and oriented plates could be analyzed. For the most of the observations the cloud backscatter color ratio β355/β532 was close to 1.0, and no spectral features that might indicate the presence of CR of randomly oriented crystals were revealed. Still, in two measurement sessions we observed an increase of backscatter color ratio to a value of nearly 1.3 simultaneously with a decrease of the spectral depolarization ratio δ355/δ532 ratio from 1.0 to 0.8 inside the layers containing precipitating ice crystals. We attribute these changes in optical properties to corner reflections by horizontally oriented ice plates.

  14. Does direct observation of procedural skills reflect trainee's progress in otolaryngology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Z; Hayden, L; Muthuswamy, K; Ziprin, P; Darzi, A; Tolley, N S

    2014-06-01

    UK surgical trainees are required to undertake work-based assessments each year in order to progress in their training. Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) is one of these assessments. We aim to investigate the validity of DOPS in assessing otolaryngology trainees at all levels. A retrospective search of the portfolios of all otolaryngology trainees in North Thames was carried out to identify otolaryngology-specific DOPS. A score (Cs) was calculated for each DOPS based on the percentage of satisfactorily-rated items. The overall performance rating (Ps) was analysed as a separate variable and compared with Cs. The Ps and Cs results were then compared across trainee grades and levels within each grade: Core trainees (CT1-CT2) and specialty trainees (ST3-ST8). Seven hundred and sixty-seven otolaryngology DOPS were completed between August 2008 and September 2013. The tool was found to be reliable and internally consistent. Trainees in ST grade had higher Cs and Ps scores than CT grade (P Otolaryngology DOPS is a useful tool in assessing otolaryngology trainees especially from CT1-ST3 level. DOPS can also differentiate between junior and senior trainees. However, it was not able to demonstrate progress at levels above ST3, most likely due to the simplicity of the procedures which trainees tend to master in the first few years of training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Using the combination refraction-reflection solid to design omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jionghui; Yao, Wenming; Wen, Linqiang

    2015-10-01

    Underwater wireless optical communication is a communication technology which uses laser as an information carrier and transmits data through water. Underwater wireless optical communication has some good features such as broader bandwidth, high transmission rate, better security, anti—interference performance. Therefore, it is promising to be widely used in the civil and military communication domains. It is also suitable for high-speed, short-range communication between underwater mobile vehicles. This paper presents a design approach of omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication, using TRACEPRO simulation tool to help design a combination solid composed of the lens, conical reflector and parabolic reflector, and using the modulated DPSS green laser in the transmitter module to output the laser beam in small divergence angles, after expanded by the combination refraction-reflection solid, the angle turns into a space divergence angle of 2π, achieving the omni-directional light source of hemisphere space, and test in the air and underwater, the result shows that the effect is fine. This paper analyzes the experimental test in the air and water, in order to make further improvement of the uniformity of light distribution, we optimize the reflector surface parameters of combination refraction-reflection solid and test in the air and water. The result shows that omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication optimized could achieve the uniformity of light distribution of underwater space divergence angle of 2π. Omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication designed in this paper has the characteristics of small size and uniformity of light distribution, it is suitable for application between UUVs, AUVs, Swimmer Delivery Vehicles (SDVs) and other underwater vehicle fleet, it realizes point-to-multipoint communications.

  16. Reflections on the Galileoscope Program: Goals, Challenges, Achievements, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Fienberg, R. T.; Arion, D. N.

    2010-01-01

    The value of an inexpensive telescope that could be constructed and used at night became clear in the planning process for the International Year of Astronomy 2009. In fact, it became a national and international priority to develop such a telescope. Thus was born the Galileoscope project, as it later became known. We tested nearly every department store telescope available and finding them wanting in some major aspect, project members developed and tested a series of prototypes of refracting telescope kits. A key to the project is that the telescope is professionally designed and engineered with its design informed by extensive usability testing to ensure that it can be used easily by people of all ages. The eyepiece has excellent eye relief, for example, so that one can observe with glasses. The primary image quality requirement was that the telescope be good enough to see the rings of Saturn, as well as the Galilean satellites of Jupiter, with a field of view large enough to view the entire Pleiades. The Galileoscope is an ideal telescope to reproduce the observations of Galileo, from any place bright city or dark rural site. For the science classroom, we have developed well-tested educational materials on observing with the Galileoscope and teaching optics with it, available in pdf format on the Web site www. galileoscope.org. The educational materials are standards-based and appropriate for high school and beginning-level physics classes. Some of the key project decisions will be described and the future directions of the project will be described. This work was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation Astronomy Division. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  17. Reflections On The Feasibility and Implications of The Eu Water Framework Directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauwens, W.; Goethals, P. L. M.

    The Water Framework Directive (WFD) raises a lot of challenges: the complexity of the text and the diversity of possible solutions to the problems, the timetable for implementation, the incomplete technical and scientific basis, the limitation of human and financial resources,... The paper addresses a number of the key challenges from a technical-scientific, socio-economic and ethical point of view. From a technical-scientific point of view, the major problems are related to the def- inition of the reference conditions and to the simulation tools that will be needed to predict the impact of the River Basin Management Plans. The proper definition of the system of objectives (the reference conditions and the al- lowed deviation from those conditions) throughout the EU has to be considered as one of the key issues of the WFD and remains to be done. Extensive research is actually carried out, both with respect to the conceptual considerations as with respect to the definition of the ecological status. The emphasis that the 5th Research Framework Programme put on the development of integrated simulation models illustrates the need for a further development of such tools. While many models exist for dealing with sub-components of the system (flows, point pollution sources, diffuse pollution, ecosystem models,...) the integration and the adequate model structure and process representation remain major scientific issues. Especially the link between the physico-chemistry and the ecosystem modelling can still be considered to be in its infancy. More research is also needed on the issues of the calibration and the uncertainty of such complex integrated models. It should also be mentioned that the actual - and future - quality monitoring programs in most countries are by far insufficient for the calibration of complex, dynamic quality models. The objective of the WFD is to obtain, in all water bodies in the EU, an ecological quality that is close to the reference or pristine

  18. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure of copper(II) complexes at the air-water interface by a polarized total-reflection X-ray absorption technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Hirohisa; Tanida, Hajime; Watanabe, Iwao; Sagara, Takamasa

    2009-04-01

    Copper(II) complexes spread on an aqueous solution surface were studied by a polarized total-reflection X-ray absorption fine structure (TR-XAFS) technique. The polarized TR-XAFS spectra at the Cu-K edge for copper(II) porphyrins and copper(II) chlorophyllin in a monolayer were measured in situ at the air-water interface. The polarization dependences of X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) involving a 1s-->4p(z) transition allowed us to estimate the molecular orientation and the local coordination structure around the copper(II) atom in the polarization plane selectively. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) region of the polarized TR-XAFS spectra for the metal complexes present at the air-water interface was successfully analyzed for the first time. The relative coordination number for the copper center evaluated from the EXAFS analysis indicated larger values in the vertical polarization than in the horizontal one, in agreement with the standing-up molecular orientation at the air-water interface estimated from the XANES region.

  19. Neural Correlates of Direct and Reflected Self-Appraisals in Adolescents and Adults: When Social Perspective-Taking Informs Self-Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Jennifer H.; Masten, Carrie L.; Borofsky, Larissa A.; Dapretto, Mirella; Fuligni, Andrew J.; Lieberman, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    Classic theories of self-development suggest people define themselves in part through internalized perceptions of other people's beliefs about them, known as reflected self-appraisals. This study uses functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare the neural correlates of direct and reflected self-appraisals in adolescence (N = 12, ages 11-14…

  20. High-directional light source using photon recycling with a retro-reflective Dome incorporated with a textured LED die surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ching-Cherng; Chung, Shuang-Chao; Yang, Shuang-Hao; Yu, Yeh-Wei; Chien, Wei-Ting; Chen, Huang-Kuen; Chen, Shih-Peng

    2013-07-29

    This paper demonstrates a novel retro-reflective dome that enhances the directionality of a light emitting diode (LED) by recycling photons reflected by a textured LED die surface. A simulation model is developed to describe both the photon recycling process within the dome and the role of specific pyramid patterns on the top surface of the LED die. Advanced simulations showed that a perfectly polished surface with 100% reflectivity potentially enhances the directionality of the dome by 340%, 250%, and 240% using reflective domes with 10°, 20°, and 30° light cones, respectively. In the experiment, the directionality of the domes exhibiting surface imperfections is enhanced by approximately 160%, 150%, and 130% using 10°, 20°, and 30° light cones, respectively. By incorporating a textured top surface on the LED die, the proposed dome effectively increases the directionality of the LED light source.

  1. Electrophysiological correlates of refreshing: Event-related potentials associated with directing reflective attention to face, scene, or word representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew R.; McCarthy, Gregory; Muller, Kathleen A.; Brudner, Samuel N.; Johnson, Marcia K.

    2016-01-01

    Refreshing is the component cognitive process of directing reflective attention to one of several active mental representations. Previous studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) suggested that refresh tasks involve a component process of initiating refreshing as well as the top-down modulation of representational regions central to refreshing. However, those studies were limited by fMRI’s low temporal resolution. In the present study, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to examine the timecourse of refreshing on the scale of milliseconds rather than seconds. Event-related potential (ERP) analyses showed that a typical refresh task does have a distinct electrophysiological response as compared to a control condition, and includes at least two main temporal components: an earlier (~400ms) positive peak reminiscent of a P3 response, and a later (~800ms–1400ms) sustained positivity over several sites reminiscent of the late directing attention positivity (LDAP). Overall, the evoked potentials for refreshing representations from three different visual categories (faces, scenes, words) were similar, but multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) showed that some category information was nonetheless present in the EEG signal. When related to previous fMRI studies, these results are consistent with a two-phase model, with the first phase dominated by frontal control signals involved in initiating refreshing and the second by the top-down modulation of posterior perceptual cortical areas that constitutes refreshing a representation. This study also lays the foundation for future studies of the neural correlates of reflective attention at a finer temporal resolution than is possible using fMRI. PMID:25961640

  2. Possible effect of extreme solar energetic particle event of 20 January 2005 on polar stratospheric aerosols: direct observational evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironova, I. A.; Usoskin, I. G.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Petelina, S. V.

    2012-01-01

    Energetic cosmic rays are the main source of ionization of the low-middle atmosphere, leading to associated changes in atmospheric properties. Via the hypothetical influence of ionization on aerosol growth and facilitated formation of clouds, this may be an important indirect link relating solar variability to climate. This effect is highly debated, however, since the proposed theoretical mechanisms still remain illusive and qualitative, and observational evidence is inconclusive and controversial. Therefore, important questions regarding the existence and magnitude of the effect, and particularly the fraction of aerosol particles that can form and grow, are still open. Here we present empirical evidence of the possible effect caused by cosmic rays upon polar stratospheric aerosols, based on a case study of an extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) event of 20 January 2005. Using aerosol data obtained over polar regions from different satellites with optical instruments that were operating during January 2005, such as the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III), and Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS), we found a significant simultaneous change in aerosol properties in both the Southern and Northern Polar regions in temporal association with the SEP event. We speculate that ionization of the atmosphere, which was abnormally high in the lower stratosphere during the extreme SEP event, might have led to formation of new particles and/or growth of preexisting ultrafine particles in the polar stratospheric region. However, a detailed interpretation of the effect is left for subsequent studies. This is the first time high vertical resolution measurements have been used to discuss possible production of stratospheric aerosols under the influence of cosmic ray induced ionization. The observed effect is marginally detectable for the analyzed severe SEP event and can be undetectable for the majority of weak-moderate events. The present

  3. Simultaneous quantification of polar and non-polar volatile organic compounds in water samples by direct aqueous injection-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeppli, Christoph; Berg, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Kipfer, Rolf; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2008-02-15

    A direct aqueous injection-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (DAI-GC/MS) method for trace analysis of 24 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water samples is presented. The method allows for the simultaneous quantification of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylenes (BTEX), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), as well as a variety of chlorinated methanes, ethanes, propane, enthenes and benzenes. Applying a liquid film polyethylene glycol or a porous layer open tubular (PLOT) divinylbenzene GC capillary column to separate the water from the VOCs, volumes of 1-10 microL aqueous sample are directly injected into the GC. No enrichment or pretreatment steps are required and sample volumes as low as 100 microL are sufficient for accurate quantification. Method detection limits determined in natural groundwater samples were between 0.07 and 2.8 microg/L and instrument detection limits of VOCs. DAI-GC/MS offers both good accuracy and precision (relative standard deviations VOC concentration measurements in a polluted aquifer. The wide range of detectable compounds and the lack of labor-intensive sample preparation illustrate that the DAI method is robust and easily applicable for the quantification of important organic groundwater contaminants.

  4. ARTc: Anisotropic reflectivity and transmissivity calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malehmir, Reza; Schmitt, Douglas R.

    2016-08-01

    While seismic anisotropy is known to exist within the Earth's crust and even deeper, isotropic or even highly symmetric elastic anisotropic assumptions for seismic imaging is an over-simplification which may create artifacts in the image, target mis-positioning and hence flawed interpretation. In this paper, we have developed the ARTc algorithm to solve reflectivity, transmissivity as well as velocity and particle polarization in the most general case of elastic anisotropy. This algorithm is able to provide reflectivity solution from the boundary between two anisotropic slabs with arbitrary symmetry and orientation up to triclinic. To achieve this, the algorithm solves full elastic wave equation to find polarization, slowness and amplitude of all six wave-modes generated from the incident plane-wave and welded interface. In the first step to calculate the reflectivity, the algorithm solves properties of the incident wave such as particle polarization and slowness. After calculation of the direction of generated waves, the algorithm solves their respective slowness and particle polarization. With this information, the algorithm then solves a system of equations incorporating the imposed boundary conditions to arrive at the scattered wave amplitudes, and thus reflectivity and transmissivity. Reflectivity results as well as slowness and polarization are then tested in complex computational anisotropic models to ensure their accuracy and reliability. ARTc is coded in MATLAB ® and bundled with an interactive GUI and bash script to run on single or multi-processor computers.

  5. Use of in situ and airborne data to assess satellite-based estimates of directional reflectance and albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Miguel O.

    Accurate representation of the regional characteristics of anisotropic light scattering by land surfaces under a wide range of sky conditions is required (1) for modeling atmospheric shortwave radiative fluxes; (2) for modeling the energy exchange between the earth and atmosphere; and (3) determining the lower boundary conditions for atmospheric radiative transfer models. However, uncertainties due to spatial scale arise when models that describe the albedo and reflectance anisotropy of land surfaces are directly compared against in-situ measurements. This research focuses on comparisons between satellite, airborne, and ground measurements, namely, MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) and Albedo products, airborne angular reflectance measurements, and point tower albedo measurements. A new integrated methodology for establishing the spatial representativeness between tower measurements of surface albedo and MODIS retrievals is developed. This method brings together knowledge of the intrinsic biophysical properties of a given spatial domain and its surrounding landscape to produce a number of geostatistical attributes that describe the overall variability, spatial extent, strength, and temporal structure of surface albedo patterns at separated seasonal periods throughout the year. Local upscaling results over a wide range of forested ecosystems demonstrate the ability of this method to identify landscapes that capture the spatial and seasonal features of surface albedo over large enough footprints to be suitable for use in modeling studies. Airborne measurements from NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer taken over agricultural and natural landscapes in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region during the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) were utilized to compare the spatial characteristics between finer-scale BRDFs and MODIS retrievals in a well-characterized atmospheric regime

  6. Mid-IR Reflectance (DRIFT) Spectral Variations in Basaltic Mineralogy with Direction of Impact at Lonar Crater, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaiah, N.; Chavan, R. S.; Arif, M.

    2012-12-01

    Identification of spectral changes with the direction of impact has important implications for understanding the impact cratering phenomenon occurring on both terrestrial and extraterrestrial planets and also for geology of the crater. Fortuitously, Lonar Impact Crater (India) is the only well-preserved terrestrial simple crater excavated on Deccan basalts and serves as an excellent analogue to craters on Mars and Moon. An ~570 ka old Lonar crater was suggested to be formed by an oblique impact of a chondritic impactor that struck the pre-impact target from the east into a sequence of six basaltic Deccan flows and created a 1.88 km diameter crater with two layers of ejecta blanket. Here we report preliminary laboratory studies of spectral results on fine-grained rock powers (IR (4000-400 cm-1) Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. The basalts were collected from two profiles in the east and south sections of the crater wall and the upper most crater rim, which later subdivided into sector-wise samples to carry out a systematic study of spectral properties of Lonar basalts, together with impact related samples of breccias and impact melts. For the first time, data of the shock metamorphism of Lonar basalt is examined using DRIFT spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of rock powders of relatively unshocked and shocked basalts are obtained to document the mineralogical variations and the distribution of primary (e.g. Plagioclase Feldspar, Pyroxene), and secondary Phyllosilicate minerals (e.g. Illite, Smectite, Montmorillonite, Saponite, Serpentine) with direction of impact. The spectral data between pre-impact unshocked and post-impact shocked basalts are interpreted to reflect the effect of shock pressure and alteration that rock have undergone. On western crater rim sector, typical silicate spectral features in 900-1200 cm-1 which attributed to Si-O stretching, are observed to change slightly in the width and shift in position as a result of

  7. Molecular hydrogen polarization images of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Michael G.; Minchin, N. R.; Hough, J. H.; Aspin, C.; Axon, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    An image of the polarization of the shocked H2 v = 1-0 S(1) line emission in the core of OMC-1 has been obtained. Along the molecular outflow of the source, the line is dichroically polarized by a medium of aligned grains located between the earth and the shock fronts. The polarization pattern traces the magnetic field direction, which is parallel to the outflow axis and to the large-scale field direction determined from far-IR continuum measurements. Close to the IR source IRc2, the likely source of the outflow, the aligned vectors twist, indicating that the magnetic field direction changes. Modeling the line ratios of scattered H2 lines in the reflection nebula, it is concluded that the size distribution of grains there is typical of the small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. By contrast, the scattered continuum radiation from the core region suggests that the grains there are larger than this.

  8. Field spectrometer measurement errors in presence of partially polarized light; evaluation of ground truth measurement accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, Martin P; Dissanska, Maria

    2016-11-28

    Considering that natural light is always partially polarized (reflection, Rayleigh scattering, etc.) and the alteration of the spectral response of spectrometers due to the polarization, some concerns were raised about the accuracy and variability of spectrometer outdoor measurements in field campaigns. We demonstrated by simple experiments that, in some circumstances, spectral measurements can be affected by the polarization. The signal variability due to polarization sensitivity of the spectrometer for the measured sample was about 5-10%. We noted that, measuring surfaces at right angle (a frequently used measurement protocol) minimized the problems due to polarization, producing valid results. On the other hand, measurements acquired with a slant angle are more or less accurate; an important proportion of the signal variability is due to the polarization. Direct sun reflection and reflection from close objects must be avoided.

  9. A New Method for the Estimation of Broadband Apparent Albedo Using Hyperspectral Airborne Hemispherical Directional Reflectance Factor Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier F. Calleja

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The broadband albedo values retrieved from satellite sensors are usually compared directly to ground measurements. Some authors have noted the necessity of high spatial resolution albedo estimates to fill the gap between ground measurements and satellite retrievals. In this respect, hyperspectral airborne data with high spatial resolution is a powerful tool. Here, a new operational method for the calculation of airborne broadband apparent albedo over the spectral range of 350–2500 nm is presented. This new method uses the Hemispherical Directional Reflectance Factor (HDRF as a proxy for the narrowband albedo, assuming a Lambertian approximation. The broadband apparent albedo obtained is compared to that estimated using theapparent albedo equation devised for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. Airborne data were collected using the Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner (AHS. Field data were acquired at three sites: a camelina field, a green grass field, and a vineyard.  The HDRF can be used to approximate the narrowband albedo for all View Zenith Angle (VZA values for flights parallel to the solar principal plane (SPP; for flights orthogonal to the SPP, discrepancies are observed when the VZA approaches −45°. Root Mean Square Error (RMSE values in the range 0.009–0.018 were obtained using the new method, improving upon previous results over the same area (RMSEs of 0.01–0.03. The relative error in the albedo estimation using the new method is 12% for −36.2° < VZA < 40.8° in the case of flights parallel to the SPP and less than 15% for −13° < VZA < 45° and 45% for VZA = −45° for flights orthogonal to the SPP. The good performance of the new method lies in the use of the at-surface solar irradiance and the proposed integration method.

  10. Direct visualization of the reaction transformation and signal amplification in a DNA molecular machine with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eRen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, as a proof of concept, the signal amplification in an artificial DNA molecular machine was directly visualized via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM. The molecular machine brought about obvious morphology change in DNA nanostructures as well as signal amplifications. On one hand, through a triggered and autonomically repeated RCA, a DNA nano-complex featuring a locked circular DNA template (serving as raw feed was converted into a long periodically repeated strand, i.e. the RCA products. Furthermore, this RCA was repeated in three controllable reaction phases, bring about progressive signal amplification. It was testified that the RCA products (presented as long thread-like fluorescent objects can be easily distinguished from the inputted DNA probes (presented as fluorescent dots, thus the transformation in reaction can be visualized. Also, by quantitive counting of the aforementioned fluorescence objects, the progress of the reaction through the phases, along with time, and over the lysozyme concentration can be demonstrated through TIRFM visualization. Overall, it was demonstrated that TIRFM is an efficient approach to quantitively visualize the biochemical processes at single-molecule level.

  11. Reflections on the Journal of Applied Psychology for 2009 to 2014: Infrastructure, operations, innovations, impact, evolution, and desirable directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Steve W J

    2017-03-01

    In this reflection on my experiences as editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology , I consider 6 foci including (a) information on the background, infrastructure, and mechanics of running this top-tier journal; (b) statistics on journal operations across the 7 years of editorial activity (i.e., incoming plus 6 years on the masthead); (c) innovations that my senior editorial team introduced (i.e., transparency via supplemental materials, revival of monographs, initiation of integrative conceptual reviews); (d) impact and influence with respect to articles, authors, and institutions; (e) latent sematic analysis findings to illustrate the evolution and change of journal content over a 33-year comparison period (i.e., it has evolved substantially); and desirable directions for future evolution of the journal (i.e., strengthen our scientific foundation, increase multidisciplinary linkages, focus on multilevel system dynamics as core capabilities, and improve the translation of industrial and organizational science to evidence-based practice and vice versa). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Magnetic anisotropy and magnetoresistance in Co-based multilayers: a polarised neutron reflectivity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effects by carrying out magnetization, magnetoresistance and polarized neutron reflectivity measurements on epitaxial Co/Re multilayers. Polarized neutron reflectivity study with polarization analysis gives a direct way to sense the direction of sublattice magnetization and coupling between magnetic layers. The evolution of magnetic structure as a function of the strength and direction of the applied magnetic field has been studied. The AMR effect observed in magnetoresistance study has been explained in the light of observed magnetic structure. (author)

  13. Readiness for self-directed change in professional behaviours: factorial validation of the Self-Reflection and Insight Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Chris; Stark, Patsy

    2008-11-01

    Self-reflection, the practice of inspecting and evaluating one's own thoughts, feelings and behaviour, and insight, the ability to understand one's own thoughts, feelings and behaviour, are central to the self-regulation of behaviours. The Self-Reflection and Insight Scale (SRIS) measures three factors in the self-regulation cycle: need for reflection; engagement in reflection, and insight. We used structural equation modelling to undertake a confirmatory factor analysis of the SRIS. We re-specified our model to analyse all of the data to explain relationships between the SRIS, medical student characteristics, and responses to issues of teaching and learning in professionalism. The factorial validity of a modified SRIS showed all items loading significantly on their expected factors, with a good fit to the data. Each subscale had good internal reliability (> 0.8). There was a strong relationship between the need for reflection and engagement in reflection (r = 0.77). Insight was related to need for reflection (0.22) and age (0.21), but not to the process of engaging in reflection (0.06). Validation of the SRIS provides researchers with a new instrument with which to measure and investigate the processes of self-reflection and insight in the context of students' self-regulation of their professionalism. Insight is related to the motive or need for reflection, but the process of reflection does not lead to insight. Attending to feelings is an important and integral aspect of self-reflection and insight. Effective strategies are needed to develop students' insight as they reflect on their professionalism.

  14. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  15. Optical phonon features of triclinic montebrasite : dispersion analysis and non-polar Raman modes.

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Rafael M.; Höfer, Sonja; Mayerhöfer, Thomas G.; Popp, Jürgen; Krambrock, Klaus; Lobo, Ricardo P. S. M.; Dias, Anderson; Moreira, Roberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Polarized infrared and Raman spectra of triclinic LiAl(PO4)(OH) [montebrasite] single crystal were recorded for appropriate optical configurations. Dispersion analysis was applied on the infrared reflectivity spectra taken at low incidence angle (11 ) to determine the oscillator parameters and the dipole directions of the polar phonons. In particular, all the 27 polar phonons, predicted by group theory for triclinic P1 structure,were determined. The obtained dielectric tensor para...

  16. Direct transverse load profile determination using the polarization-dependent loss spectral response of a chirped fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, Frédéric; Bette, Sébastien; Kinet, Damien; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The determination of stress profiles created by transverse loads was proved to be important in different domains, such as structural health monitoring and biomechanics, and, more specifically, in the prostheses domain. In this paper, we report an original method to estimate the transverse load profile from the polarization-dependent loss (PDL) spectrum of a chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG). This method makes use of the relationship between the integration of the PDL of a CFBG, and the force profile has the advantage of not requiring any iterative method to estimate the transverse load profile. The relationship linking the integration of the PDL and the force profile is demonstrated using an analytical approximation of the transmission spectrum of CFBGs. The validity of this method for the determination of non-uniform load profiles is then shown using a numerical analysis. An experimental demonstration is finally reported using a 48 mm-long CFBG subject to different step transverse load profiles.

  17. Multistep mass spectrometry methodology for direct characterization of polar lipids in green microalgae using paper spray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oradu, Sheran A; Cooks, R Graham

    2012-12-18

    Paper spray ionization, an ambient ionization method, has been applied for the identification of polar lipids in green microalgae with no sample preparation. A multistep experimental protocol was employed to characterize the lipid species of two microalgae strains, Kyo-Chlorella in tablet form and Nannochloropsis in paste form by mass spectrometry (MS). Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments using collision induced dissociation (CID) were employed for initial characterization of the detected lipid species, which were dominated by polar glycolipids and phospholipids. Product ion scan experiments were performed to determine the lipid head groups and fatty acid composition. Precursor ion scan experiments using fragment ions such as m/z 184, which is characteristic of the phosphocholine headgroup, were then used to confirm the lipid classification. Lipid elemental compositions were determined by exact mass measurements using high resolution mass spectrometry. Finally, the position of unsaturation was determined using reactive paper spray ionization experiments with ozone used as a reagent to cleave double bonds. Ozone was produced in situ using dielectric barrier discharge from a low temperature plasma, and it reacted in ambient air with the spray of ions produced by paper spray ionization. Using the precursor ion scan experiment, the resulting ozone cleavage product ions were used to determine the position of unsaturation for some of these species. By applying this experimental protocol, the molecular formulas and key aspects of the structures of glycerophosphocholines (PCs) such as 9Z-16:1/9Z,12Z-16:2 PC and 6Z,9Z-18:2/6Z,9Z,12Z-18:3PC and monogalactosyldiacylglycerols (MGDGs) such as 18:3/16:3MGDG were identified in the positive ion mode, while glycerophosphoglycerols (PGs) such as 18:3/16:0 PG and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols (SQDGs) such as 18:3/16:0 SQDG were identified in the negative ion mode.

  18. Theoretical predictions for the polarization of the J = 0 - 1 neonlike germanium X-ray laser line in the presence of a directed beam of hot electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inal, M.K.; Dubau, J.; Cornille, M.

    1998-01-01

    The polarization of the neonlike germanium J = 0 - 1 laser line, which would arise from the existence of a directed beam of hot electrons in the amplifying plasma, is theoretically investigated. The relative populations of the magnetic sublevels in the lower J = 1 laser level have been determined by allowing for the processes of direct excitation from the 2p 6 ground level and collisional de-excitation from the upper J = 0 laser level. Elastic collisions leading to transitions between the M J = 0 and M J =1 sublevels within the lower level of the lasing line have also been taken into account. The required elastic and inelastic collision strengths for transitions between magnetic sublevels have been computed in a semi-relativistic distorted-wave approximation, for incident electron energies up to 15 keV. Our calculations predict a rather low degree of polarization for the J = 0 - 1 line, although the elastic collisions are found to play a negligibly small role in the redistribution of magnetic sublevel populations. (author)

  19. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, James, Jr.; Dabney, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Instrument measures polarization characteristics of Earth at three wavelengths. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor (ALPS) measures optical polarization characteristics of land surface. Designed to be flown at altitudes of approximately 300 m to minimize any polarizing or depolarizing effects of intervening atmosphere and to look along nadir to minimize any effects depending on look angle. Data from measurements used in conjunction with data from ground surveys and aircraft-mounted video recorders to refine mathematical models used in interpretation of higher-altitude polarimetric measurements of reflected sunlight.

  20. Comparison of ultraviolet Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) measurements of diffusers used in the calibration of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, J.J.; Park, H.; Barnes, P.Y.; Early, E.A.; Eijk-Olij, C. van; Zoutman, A.E.; Buller-Leeuwen, S. van; Groote Schaarsberg, J.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement and long-term monitoring of global total ozone by ultraviolet albedo measuring satellite instruments require accurate and precise determination of the Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of laboratory-based diffusers used in the pre-launch calibration of those

  1. Reflection of circularly polarized light and the effect of particle distribution on circular dichroism in evaporation induced self-assembled cellulose nanocrystal thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D.; Vukusic, P.; Eichhorn, S. J.

    2017-06-01

    Evaporation induced self-assembled (EISA) thin films of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) have shown great potential for displaying structural colour across the visible spectrum. They are believed primarily to reflect left handed circularly polarised (LCP) light due to their natural tendency to form structures comprising left handed chirality. Accordingly the fabrication of homogenously coloured CNC thin films is challenging. Deposition of solid material towards the edge of a dried droplet, via the coffee-stain effect, is one such difficulty in achieving homogenous colour across CNC films. These effects are most easily observed in films prepared from droplets where observable reflection of visible light is localised around the edge of the dry film. We report here, the observation of both left and right hand circularly polarised (LCP/RCP) light in reflection from distinct separate regions of CNC EISA thin films and we elucidate how these reflections are dependent on the distribution of CNC material within the EISA thin film. Optical models of reflection are presented which are based on structures revealed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of film cross sections. We have also employed spectroscopic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of solid CNC material within a selection of CNC EISA thin films and we have correlated this distribution with polarised light spectra collected from each film. We conclude that film regions from which RCP light was reflected were associated with lower CNC concentrations and thicker film regions.

  2. Reflection of circularly polarized light and the effect of particle distribution on circular dichroism in evaporation induced self-assembled cellulose nanocrystal thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hewson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Evaporation induced self-assembled (EISA thin films of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs have shown great potential for displaying structural colour across the visible spectrum. They are believed primarily to reflect left handed circularly polarised (LCP light due to their natural tendency to form structures comprising left handed chirality. Accordingly the fabrication of homogenously coloured CNC thin films is challenging. Deposition of solid material towards the edge of a dried droplet, via the coffee-stain effect, is one such difficulty in achieving homogenous colour across CNC films. These effects are most easily observed in films prepared from droplets where observable reflection of visible light is localised around the edge of the dry film. We report here, the observation of both left and right hand circularly polarised (LCP/RCP light in reflection from distinct separate regions of CNC EISA thin films and we elucidate how these reflections are dependent on the distribution of CNC material within the EISA thin film. Optical models of reflection are presented which are based on structures revealed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM images of film cross sections. We have also employed spectroscopic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of solid CNC material within a selection of CNC EISA thin films and we have correlated this distribution with polarised light spectra collected from each film. We conclude that film regions from which RCP light was reflected were associated with lower CNC concentrations and thicker film regions.

  3. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) reveals a dissociation between SNARC and MARC effects: Implication for the polarity correspondence account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rosa, Elisa; Bardi, Lara; Umiltà, Carlo; Masina, Fabio; Forgione, Margherita; Mapelli, Daniela

    2017-08-01

    The concept of stimulus response compatibility (SRC) refers to the existence of a privileged association between a specific stimulus feature and a specific response feature. Two examples of SRC are the Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes (SNARC) and the Markedness Association of Response Codes (MARC) effects. According to the polarity correspondence principle, these two SRC effects occur because of a match between the most salient dimensions of stimulus and response. Specifically, the SNARC effect would be caused by a match between right-sided responses and large numbers, while a match between right-sided responses and even numbers would give rise to the MARC effect. The aim of the present study was to test the validity of the polarity correspondence principle in explaining these two SRC effects. To this end, we applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over left and right posterior parietal cortex (PPC), which is thought to be the neural basis of salience processing, during a parity judgement task. Results showed that cathodal tDCS over the PPC significantly reduced the MARC effect but did not affect the SNARC effect, suggesting a dissociation between the two effects. That is, the MARC would rely on a salience processing mechanism, whereas the SNARC would not. Despite this interpretation is in need of further experimental confirmations (i.e., testing different tasks or using different tDCS montages), our results suggest that the polarity correspondence principle can be a plausible explanation only for the MARC effect but not for the SNARC effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Paleomagnetic direction and paleointensity variations during the Matuyama-Brunhes polarity transition from a marine succession in the Chiba composite section of the Boso Peninsula, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Makoto; Suganuma, Yusuke; Haneda, Yuki; Kazaoka, Osamu

    2017-03-01

    The youngest geomagnetic polarity reversal, the Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) boundary, provides an important plane of data for sediments, ice cores, and lavas. The geomagnetic field intensity and directional changes that occurred during the reversal also provide important information for understanding the dynamics of the Earth's outer core, which generates the magnetic field. However, the reversal process is relatively rapid in terms of the geological timescale; therefore, adequate temporal resolution of the geomagnetic field record is essential for addressing these topics. Here, we report a new high-resolution paleomagnetic record from a continuous marine succession in the Chiba composite section of the Kokumoto Formation of the Kazusa Group, Japan, that reveals detailed behaviors of the virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) and relative paleointensity changes during the M-B polarity transition. The resultant relative paleointensity and VGP records show a significant paleointensity minimum near the M-B boundary, which is accompanied by a clear "polarity switch." A newly obtained high-resolution oxygen isotope chronology for the Chiba composite section indicates that the M-B boundary is located in the middle of marine isotope stage (MIS) 19 and yields an age of 771.7 ka for the boundary. This age is consistent with those based on the latest astronomically tuned marine and ice core records and with the recalculated age of 770.9 ± 7.3 ka deduced from the U-Pb zircon age of the Byk-E tephra. To the best of our knowledge, our new paleomagnetic data represent one of the most detailed records on this geomagnetic field reversal that has thus far been obtained from marine sediments and will therefore be key for understanding the dynamics of the geomagnetic dynamo and for calibrating the geological timescale.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Direct evidence of hidden local spin polarization in a centrosymmetric superconductor LaO0.55F0.45BiS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shi-Long; Sumida, Kazuki; Miyamoto, Koji; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Kimura, Akio; Ueda, Yoshifumi; Arita, Masashi; Nagao, Masanori; Watauchi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Isao; Okuda, Taichi

    2017-12-04

    Conventional Rashba spin polarization is caused by the combination of strong spin-orbit interaction and spatial inversion asymmetry. However, Rashba-Dresselhaus-type spin-split states are predicted in the centrosymmetric LaOBiS 2 system by recent theory, which stem from the local inversion asymmetry of active BiS 2 layer. By performing high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we have investigated the electronic band structure and spin texture of superconductor LaO 0.55 F 0.45 BiS 2 . Here we present direct spectroscopic evidence for the local spin polarization of both the valence band and the conduction band. In particular, the coexistence of Rashba-like and Dresselhaus-like spin textures has been observed in the conduction band. The finding is of key importance for fabrication of proposed dual-gated spin-field effect transistor. Moreover, the spin-split band leads to a spin-momentum locking Fermi surface from which superconductivity emerges. Our demonstration not only expands the scope of spintronic materials but also enhances the understanding of spin-orbit interaction-related superconductivity.

  6. Performance Analysis of Polarization Modulated DirectDetection Optical CDMA Systems over Turbulent FSO LinksModeled by the Gamma-Gamma Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a theoretical study to characterize the transmission of optical code division multiple access (CDMA systems deploying polarization shift keying (PolSK over a free space optical (FSO link under the impact of atmospheric turbulence. In our analysis, a novel transceiver architecture for atmospheric OCDMA FSO systems based on polarization modulation with direct detection is proposed and discussed. A detailed analytical model for PolSK-OCDMA systems over a turbulent FSO link is provided. Further, we derive a closed-form bit error ratio (BER and outage probability expressions, taking into account the multiple-access interference (MAI, optical noise and the atmospheric turbulence effect on the FSO link modeled by the Gamma-Gamma distribution. Finally, the results of this study show the most significant parameters that degrade the transmission performance of the PolSK-OCDMA signal over FSO links and indicate that the proposed approach offers improved bit error ratio (BER performances compared to the on-off-keying (OOK modulation scheme in the presence of turbulence.

  7. The interplay of primer-template DNA phosphorylation status and single-stranded DNA binding proteins in directing clamp loaders to the appropriate polarity of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayner, Jaclyn N; Douma, Lauren G; Bloom, Linda B

    2014-01-01

    Sliding clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders to serve the critical role of coordinating various enzymes on DNA. Clamp loaders must quickly and efficiently load clamps at primer/template (p/t) junctions containing a duplex region with a free 3'OH (3'DNA), but it is unclear how clamp loaders target these sites. To measure the Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader specificity toward 3'DNA, fluorescent β and PCNA clamps were used to measure clamp closing triggered by DNA substrates of differing polarity, testing the role of both the 5'phosphate (5'P) and the presence of single-stranded binding proteins (SSBs). SSBs inhibit clamp loading by both clamp loaders on the incorrect polarity of DNA (5'DNA). The 5'P groups contribute selectivity to differing degrees for the two clamp loaders, suggesting variations in the mechanism by which clamp loaders target 3'DNA. Interestingly, the χ subunit of the E. coli clamp loader is not required for SSB to inhibit clamp loading on phosphorylated 5'DNA, showing that χ·SSB interactions are dispensable. These studies highlight a common role for SSBs in directing clamp loaders to 3'DNA, as well as uncover nuances in the mechanisms by which SSBs perform this vital role. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Compensation of negative sequence stator flux of doubly-fed induction generator using polar voltage control-based direct torque control under unbalanced grid voltage condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrinarayan Bansilal Pimple

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a polar voltage control-based direct torque control method to reduce the effects of unbalanced grid voltage on doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG-based wind turbine system. Under unbalanced grid voltage, the stator flux has a negative sequence component which leads to second harmonic pulsation in torque, stator active power, stator reactive power, stator current and rotor current. In the control scheme, the negative sequence rotor voltage vector is controlled to compensate the negative sequence stator flux by negative sequence rotor flux. Simulation study is carried out on a 2 MW DFIG system using MATLAB/SIMULINK. Feasibility of the proposed control strategy is experimentally verified on a 1.5 kW DFIG system.

  9. Selectable spontaneous polarization direction and magnetic anisotropy in BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 epitaxial nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Nico; Muralidharan, Rajaram; Rebled, Jose-Manuel; Estradé, Sonia; Peiró, Francesca; Varela, Manuel; Fontcuberta, Josep; Sánchez, Florencio

    2010-08-24

    We demonstrate that epitaxial strain engineering is an efficient method to manipulate the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties in BiFeO(3)-CoFe(2)O(4) columnar nanocomposites. On one hand, the magnetic anisotropy of CoFe(2)O(4) is totally tunable from parallel to perpendicular controlling the CoFe(2)O(4) strain with proper combinations of substrate and ferroelectric phase. On the other hand, the selection of the used substrate allows the growth of the rhombohedral bulk phase of BiFeO(3) or the metastable nearly tetragonal one, which implies a rotation of the ferroelectric polar axis from [111] to close to the [001] direction. Remarkably, epitaxy is preserved and interfaces are semicoherent even when lattice mismatch is above 10%. The broad range of sustainable mismatch suggests new opportunities to assemble epitaxial nanostructures combining highly dissimilar materials with distinct functionalities.

  10. Study of mixed phase clouds over west Africa: Ice-crystal corner reflection effects observed with a two-wavelength polarization lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselovskii Igor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidar sounding is used for the analysis of possible contribution of the corner reflection (CR effect to the total backscattering in case of ice crystals. Our study is based on observations of mixed phase clouds performed during the SHADOW campaign in Senegal. Mie-Raman lidar allows measurements at 355 nm and 532 nm at 43 dg. off-zenith angle, so the extinction and backscattering Ångström exponents can be evaluated. In some measurements we observed the positive values of backscattering Ångström exponent, which can be attributed to the corner reflection by horizontally oriented ice plates.

  11. Evidence-Based Practice and Teacher Action-Research: A Reflection on the Nature and Direction of "Change"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci-Gray, Laura; Das, Sharmistha; Gray, Donald; Robson, Dean; Spratt, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This study was conceived as an opportunity to reflect on the place of action-research in the contested landscape of educational change in the UK where increasing emphasis has been put on the use of evidence to drive reform. In the context of a government-sponsored project in Scotland, this study looked at the impact of a scholarship initiative…

  12. Direct analysis of sialylated or sulfated glycosphingolipids and other polar and neutral lipids using TLC-MS interfaces[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejung; Zhou, Ying; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Gangliosides and sulfatides (STs) are acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) that have one or more sialic acids or sulfate substituents, in addition to neutral sugars, attached to the C-1 hydroxyl group of the ceramide long chain base. TLC is a widely employed and convenient technique for separation and characterization of GSLs. When TLC is directly coupled to MS, it provides both the molecular mass and structural information without further purification. Here, after development of the TLC plates, the structural analyses of acidic GSLs, including gangliosides and STs, were investigated using the liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA™) and CAMAG TLC-MS interfaces coupled to an ESI QSTAR Pulsar i quadrupole orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer. Coupling TLC with ESI-MS allowed the acquisition of high resolution mass spectra of the acidic GSLs with high sensitivity and mass accuracy, without the loss of sialic acid residues that frequently occurs during low-pressure MALDI MS. These systems were then applied to the analysis of total lipid extracts from bovine brain. This allowed profiling of many different lipid classes, not only gangliosides and STs, but also SMs, neutral GSLs, and phospholipids. PMID:24482490

  13. Direct analysis of sialylated or sulfated glycosphingolipids and other polar and neutral lipids using TLC-MS interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejung; Zhou, Ying; Costello, Catherine E

    2014-04-01

    Gangliosides and sulfatides (STs) are acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) that have one or more sialic acids or sulfate substituents, in addition to neutral sugars, attached to the C-1 hydroxyl group of the ceramide long chain base. TLC is a widely employed and convenient technique for separation and characterization of GSLs. When TLC is directly coupled to MS, it provides both the molecular mass and structural information without further purification. Here, after development of the TLC plates, the structural analyses of acidic GSLs, including gangliosides and STs, were investigated using the liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA™) and CAMAG TLC-MS interfaces coupled to an ESI QSTAR Pulsar i quadrupole orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer. Coupling TLC with ESI-MS allowed the acquisition of high resolution mass spectra of the acidic GSLs with high sensitivity and mass accuracy, without the loss of sialic acid residues that frequently occurs during low-pressure MALDI MS. These systems were then applied to the analysis of total lipid extracts from bovine brain. This allowed profiling of many different lipid classes, not only gangliosides and STs, but also SMs, neutral GSLs, and phospholipids.

  14. Bi-Directional Reflectance Distribution Function: BRDF Effect on Un-mixing, Category Decomposition of the Mixed Pixel (MIXEL) of Remote Sensing Satellite Imagery Data

    OpenAIRE

    Kohei Arai

    2013-01-01

    Method for unmixing, category decomposition of the mixed pixel (MIXEL) of remote sensing satellite imagery data taking into account the effect due to Bi-Directional Reflectance Distribution Function: BRDF is proposed. Although there is not so small BRDF effect on estimation mixing ratios, conventional unmixing methods do not take into account the effect. Through experiments, the effect is clarified. Also the proposed unmixing method with consideration of BRDF effect is validated.

  15. Polarized Electrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1997-12-31

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously.initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented.

  16. Polarized electrons at Jefferson laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously. Initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented

  17. Geometrically distributed one-dimensional photonic crystals for light-reflection in all angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagappan, G; Wu, P

    2009-07-06

    We demonstrate that a series of one-dimensional photonic crystals made of any dielectric materials, with the periods are distributed in a geometrical progression of a common ratio, r light of any spectral range. If an omni-directional reflection is desired for all polarizations and for all incident angles smaller than thetao, then r light reflection.

  18. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-17

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  19. Analyses of Hyperspectral and Directional Data for Agricultural Monitoring Using a Canopy Reflectance Model SLC Progress in the Upper Rhine Valley and Baasdorf Test-Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Heike; Begiebing, Silke; Waldmann, Daniel; Rowotzki, Britta

    2005-06-01

    CHRIS data of the years 2003 and 2004 of two agricultural test-sites in Germany were analyzed with the goal to evaluate the potential of hyperspectral and directional remote sensing data to deliver input information for precision agriculture. Multitemporal observations are available for the Upper Rhine Valley test-site along the German/French border for the year 2003.After geometric correction of the multiangular data set and atmospheric correction, the obtained reflectance spectra were compared to optical radiative transfer simulations with SLC. SLC is an extended version of the canopy reflectance model GeoSAIL.Directional reflectance spectra were extracted and the angular variations compared to the model results. BRDF analyses illustrate the spectral properties of the BRDF for different land uses. As results from the optical modeling, crop parameters like LAI and chlorophyll content are retrieved from the CHRIS data and provided as spatial maps. The directional measurements additionally contain information on the canopy structure that is crop specific, but also changes with phenological development and sometimes even with cultivars. These crop parameters will serve as input parameters for plant production and management models.

  20. Quasi-analytical synthesis of continuous phase correcting structures to increase the directivity of circularly polarized Fabry-Perot resonator antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzal, Muhammad U.; Esselle, Karu P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a quasi-analytical technique to design a continuous, all-dielectric phase correcting structures (PCSs) for circularly polarized Fabry-Perot resonator antennas (FPRAs). The PCS has been realized by varying the thickness of a rotationally symmetric dielectric block placed above the antenna. A global analytical expression is derived for the PCS thickness profile, which is required to achieve nearly uniform phase distribution at the output of the PCS, despite the non-uniform phase distribution at its input. An alternative piecewise technique based on spline interpolation is also explored to design a PCS. It is shown from both far- and near-field results that a PCS tremendously improves the radiation performance of the FPRA. These improvements include an increase in peak directivity from 22 to 120 (from 13.4 dBic to 20.8 dBic) and a decrease of 3 dB beamwidth from 41.5° to 15°. The phase-corrected antenna also has a good directivity bandwidth of 1.3 GHz, which is 11% of the center frequency

  1. Direct and indirect electron precipitation effect on nitric oxide in the polar middle atmosphere, using a full-range energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Johnsen, Christine; Nesse Tyssøy, Hilde; Hendrickx, Koen; Orsolini, Yvan; Kishore Kumar, Grandhi; Ødegaard, Linn-Kristine Glesnes; Sandanger, Marit Irene; Stordal, Frode; Megner, Linda

    2017-08-01

    In April 2010, a coronal mass ejection and a corotating interaction region on the Sun resulted in an energetic electron precipitation event in the Earth's atmosphere. We investigate direct and indirect nitric oxide (NO) response to the electron precipitation. By combining electron fluxes from the Total Energy Detector and the Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites, we obtain a continuous energy spectrum covering 1-750 keV. This corresponds to electrons depositing their energy at atmospheric altitudes 60-120 km. Based on the electron energy deposition, taking into account loss due to photolysis, the accumulated NO number density is estimated. When compared to NO measured at these altitudes by the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment instrument on board the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere satellite, the NO direct effect was detected down to 55 km. The main variability at these altitudes is, however, dominated by the indirect effect, which is downward transported NO. We estimate the source of this descending NO to be in the upper mesosphere at ˜75-90 km.

  2. Directional change during a Miocene R-N geomagnetic polarity reversal recorded by mafic lava flows, Sheep Creek Range, north central Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogue, S. W.; Glen, J. M. G.; Jarboe, N. A.

    2017-09-01

    Recurring transitional field directions during three Miocene geomagnetic reversals provide evidence that lateral inhomogeneity of the lower mantle affects flow in the outer core. We compare new paleomagnetic results from a composite sequence of 15.2 Ma lava flows in north central Nevada (Sheep Creek Range; 40.7°N, 243.2°E), erupted during a polarity reversal, to published data from Steens Mountain (250 km to the northwest in Oregon) and the Newberry Mountains (650 km to the south in California) that document reversals occurring millions of years and many polarity switches earlier. Alternating field demagnetization, followed by thermal demagnetization in half the samples, clearly isolated the primary thermoremanent magnetization of Sheep Creek Range flows. We correlated results from our three sampled sections to produce a composite record that begins with a single virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) at low latitude in the Atlantic, followed by two VGPs situated near latitude 30°N in NE Africa. After jumping to 83°N (one VGP), the pole moves to equatorial South America (one VGP), back to NE Africa (three VGPs), to high southern latitudes (two VGPs), back to equatorial South America (three VGPs), and finally to high northern latitudes (nine VGPs). The repeated visits of the transitional VGP to positions in South America and near NE Africa, as well as the similar behavior recorded at Steens Mountain and the Newberry Mountains, suggest that lower mantle or core-mantle boundary features localize core flow structures, thereby imparting a discernible regional structure on the transitional geomagnetic field that persists for millions of years.

  3. Reversible near-infrared light directed reflection in a self-organized helical superstructure loaded with upconversion nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Dong, Hao; Li, Yannian; Xue, Chenming; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua; Li, Quan

    2014-03-26

    Adding external, dynamic control to self-organized superstructures with desired functionalities is an important leap necessary in leveraging the fascinating molecular systems for applications. Here, the new light-driven chiral molecular switch and upconversion nanoparticles, doped in a liquid crystal media, were able to self-organize into an optically tunable helical superstructure. The resulting nanoparticle impregnated helical superstructure was found to exhibit unprecedented reversible near-infrared (NIR) light-guided tunable behavior only by modulating the excitation power density of a continuous-wave NIR laser (980 nm). Upon irradiation by the NIR laser at the high power density, the reflection wavelength of the photonic superstructure red-shifted, whereas its reverse process occurred upon irradiation by the same laser but with the lower power density. Furthermore, reversible dynamic NIR-light-driven red, green, and blue reflections in a single thin film, achieved only by varying the power density of the NIR light, were for the first time demonstrated.

  4. The polarized platypus polarized neutron reflectometry made possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saerbeck, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The magnetic moment of the neutron, together with it's highly penetrating non destructive manner, make polarized neutron reflectometry an excellent tool to study magnetic phenomena across surfaces and interfaces of thin films. Unlike other magnetometry techniques which ordinarily yield only average magnetization values or, in case of probes with higher spatial resolution (e.g. electron microscopy or scanning tunnelling microscopy), show a high surface sensitivity, PNR together with magnetic x-ray scattering provides the ability to spatially resolve vector magnetization well beneath the surface [1] The ability to obtain vector magnetization profiles across interfaces and surfaces of thin films and multilayers offers the intriguing possibility to study systematically magnetic configurations and magnetic exchange interactions through intervening layers. In this paper we present the performance of the new polarization system installed on the time of flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS at ANSTO's Bragg Institute. The spin state of the neutrons is polarized and analysed by spatial separation of different neutron spin states using polarizing Fe/Si supermirrors before, and after the sample stage. The supermirrors have a large wavelength acceptance bandwidth of 3 A to 12 A. To control the desired spin direction of the incoming and reflected beam from the sample, two sets of RF spin flippers are installed. In the free space between the spin flippers and the sample stage the neutron spin direction is maintained by two sets of magnetic guide field coils. The new sample environment for studies of magnetic samples includes a 1 T electromagnet and a closed cycle refrigerator which gives access to a temperature range from 4K to 3 50 K .

  5. Direct determination of lycopene content in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Yuwana; Schwartz, Steven J; Francis, David; Baldauf, Nathan A; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E

    2006-01-01

    Lycopene is a potent antioxidant that has been shown to play critical roles in disease prevention. Efficient assays for detection and quantification of lycopene are desirable as alternatives to time- and labor-intensive methods. Attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy was used for quantification of lycopene in tomato varieties. Calibration models were developed by partial least-squares regression (PLSR) using quantitative measures of lycopene concentration from liquid chromatography as reference method. IR spectra showed a distinct marker band at 957 cm(-1) for trans Carbon-Hydrogen (CH) deformation vibration of lycopene. PLSR models predicted the lycopene content accurately and reproducibly with a correlation coefficient (sigma) of 0.96 and standard error of cross-validation ATR-IR spectroscopy allowed for rapid, simple, and accurate determination of lycopene in tomatoes with minimal sample preparation. Results suggest that the ATR-IR method is applicable for high-throughput quantitative analysis and screening for lycopene in tomatoes.

  6. Assessment of tissue viability by polarization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, G.; Anderson, C.; Henricson, J.; Leahy, M.; O'Doherty, J.; Sjöberg, F.

    2008-09-01

    A new and versatile method for tissue viability imaging based on polarization spectroscopy of blood in superficial tissue structures such as the skin is presented in this paper. Linearly polarized light in the visible wavelength region is partly reflected directly by the skin surface and partly diffusely backscattered from the dermal tissue matrix. Most of the directly reflected light preserves its polarization state while the light returning from the deeper tissue layers is depolarized. By the use of a polarization filter positioned in front of a sensitive CCD-array, the light directly reflected from the tissue surface is blocked, while the depolarized light returning from the deeper tissue layers reaches the detector array. By separating the colour planes of the detected image, spectroscopic information about the amount of red blood cells (RBCs) in the microvascular network of the tissue under investigation can be derived. A theory that utilizes the differences in light absorption of RBCs and bloodless tissue in the red and green wavelength region forms the basis of an algorithm for displaying a colour coded map of the RBC distribution in a tissue. Using a fluid model, a linear relationship (cc. = 0.99) between RBC concentration and the output signal was demonstrated within the physiological range 0-4%. In-vivo evaluation using transepidermal application of acetylcholine by the way of iontophoresis displayed the heterogeneity pattern of the vasodilatation produced by the vasoactive agent. Applications of this novel technology are likely to be found in drug and skin care product development as well as in the assessment of skin irritation and tissue repair processes and even ultimately in a clinic case situation.

  7. The foundation of 3D geometry model in omni-directional laser warning system based on diffuse reflection detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weian; Wang, Long; Dong, Qixin

    2011-06-01

    The omni-directional laser warning equipment based on infrared fish-eye lens and short-wave infrared FPA has been used to protect large-scale targets, which can detect the threat laser scattered by the attacked targets or the objects surrounding them, and image the laser spot on FPA, then fix the position of spot. The application offsets the disadvantage of direct interception warner which need disposed largely. Before study of imaging mechanism about the scattered laser spot, the definition of geometry relationship is needed firstly. In this paper we developed a 3D geometry model by analyzing the position relationships in typical battlefield environment among the enemy's threat laser source, the laser spot radiated on one flat surface and our omni-directional laser warning fish-eye lens. The model including R, α, β, d, θ, φ, ψ, δ etc. 8 parameters and 4 coordinate systems was suitable for any general situations. After achievement of the model foundation, we obtained analytic expression of the laser spot contour on flat surface, then attained analytic expression of spot contour on image surface by calculating the object space half-field angle and the azimuth angle relative to fish-eye lens of an arbitrary point at the spot edge on flat surface. The attainment of the expression makes possible that we can analyze the spot energy distributions on image surface and the imaging characteristic of the scattered laser spot via fish-eye lens, then can compute the transmission direction of the threat laser. The foundation of the model in this paper has an importantly basic and guiding meaning to the latter research on this aspect.

  8. A novel total reflection X-ray fluorescence procedure for the direct determination of trace elements in petrochemical products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinosi, Amedeo [Sasol Italy SpA, Paderno Dugnano (Italy); GNR srl, Agrate Conturbia, Novara (Italy); Andriollo, Nunzio [Sasol Italy SpA, Paderno Dugnano (Italy); Pepponi, Giancarlo [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Povo, Trento (Italy); Monticelli, Damiano [Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria - sede di Como, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Ambientali, Como, CO (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    A total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) procedure was developed for the determination of metal traces in petrochemical end products or intermediates for surfactant synthesis. The method combines a fast and straightforward sample preparation, i.e. deposition on the sample holder and evaporation of the sample matrix, with an efficient quantification method based on internal standardization (organic gallium standard). The method developed showed detection limits below 0.05 {mu}g g{sup -1} and in most cases below 0.005 {mu}g g{sup -1}. Fifteen elements (Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Rh, Sn, Sr, V and Zn) were determined in matrices such as paraffins, n-olefins, linear alkylbenzenes, long-chain alkyl alcohols and esters: typical metal contents were below 1 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The results were compared with the reference method ASTM D5708 (test method B) based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy: advantages and drawbacks of the two procedures were critically evaluated. The TXRF method developed showed comparable precision and absence of bias with respect to the reference method. A comparison of the performances of the two methods is presented. (orig.)

  9. A novel total reflection X-ray fluorescence procedure for the direct determination of trace elements in petrochemical products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinosi, Amedeo; Andriollo, Nunzio; Pepponi, Giancarlo; Monticelli, Damiano

    2011-01-01

    A total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) procedure was developed for the determination of metal traces in petrochemical end products or intermediates for surfactant synthesis. The method combines a fast and straightforward sample preparation, i.e. deposition on the sample holder and evaporation of the sample matrix, with an efficient quantification method based on internal standardization (organic gallium standard). The method developed showed detection limits below 0.05 μg g(-1) and in most cases below 0.005 μg g(-1). Fifteen elements (Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Rh, Sn, Sr, V and Zn) were determined in matrices such as paraffins, n-olefins, linear alkylbenzenes, long-chain alkyl alcohols and esters: typical metal contents were below 1 μg g(-1). The results were compared with the reference method ASTM D5708 (test method B) based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy: advantages and drawbacks of the two procedures were critically evaluated. The TXRF method developed showed comparable precision and absence of bias with respect to the reference method. A comparison of the performances of the two methods is presented.

  10. Taking Sides: An Integrative Review of the Impact of Laterality and Polarity on Efficacy of Therapeutic Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Anomia in Chronic Poststroke Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandars, Margaret; Cloutman, Lauren; Woollams, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    Anomia is a frequent and persistent symptom of poststroke aphasia, resulting from damage to areas of the brain involved in language production. Cortical neuroplasticity plays a significant role in language recovery following stroke and can be facilitated by behavioral speech and language therapy. Recent research suggests that complementing therapy with neurostimulation techniques may enhance functional gains, even amongst those with chronic aphasia. The current review focuses on the use of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) as an adjunct to naming therapy for individuals with chronic poststroke aphasia. Our survey of the literature indicates that combining therapy with anodal (excitatory) stimulation to the left hemisphere and/or cathodal (inhibitory) stimulation to the right hemisphere can increase both naming accuracy and speed when compared to the effects of therapy alone. However, the benefits of tDCS as a complement to therapy have not been yet systematically investigated with respect to site and polarity of stimulation. Recommendations for future research to help determine optimal protocols for combined therapy and tDCS are outlined. PMID:26819777

  11. Taking Sides: An Integrative Review of the Impact of Laterality and Polarity on Efficacy of Therapeutic Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Anomia in Chronic Poststroke Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Sandars

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anomia is a frequent and persistent symptom of poststroke aphasia, resulting from damage to areas of the brain involved in language production. Cortical neuroplasticity plays a significant role in language recovery following stroke and can be facilitated by behavioral speech and language therapy. Recent research suggests that complementing therapy with neurostimulation techniques may enhance functional gains, even amongst those with chronic aphasia. The current review focuses on the use of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS as an adjunct to naming therapy for individuals with chronic poststroke aphasia. Our survey of the literature indicates that combining therapy with anodal (excitatory stimulation to the left hemisphere and/or cathodal (inhibitory stimulation to the right hemisphere can increase both naming accuracy and speed when compared to the effects of therapy alone. However, the benefits of tDCS as a complement to therapy have not been yet systematically investigated with respect to site and polarity of stimulation. Recommendations for future research to help determine optimal protocols for combined therapy and tDCS are outlined.

  12. Applicability of direct total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for multielement analysis of geological and environmental objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkashina, T. Yu.; Panteeva, S. V.; Pashkova, G. V.

    2014-09-01

    The research aim is to demonstrate our experience in the applicability of TXRF analysis of various geological and environmental objects using minimal sample treatment. The study was focused on the evaluation of different factors affecting the TXRF results obtained for solid and liquid samples such as rock, mineral, ore, and natural water. Powdered geological samples were prepared as suspensions. Natural water samples were analyzed directly or after dilution. Testing various experimental parameters, e.g. sample amount, type of dispersant, and others was performed. For chosen conditions of the sample preparation procedure analytical figures of merit were estimated. Presented analytical results display the possibilities of TXRF applications in geological and environmental fields.

  13. Direct Analysis of Metal Ions in Solutions with High Salt Concentrations by Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regadío, Mercedes; Riaño, Sofía; Binnemans, Koen; Vander Hoogerstraete, Tom

    2017-04-18

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is becoming more and more popular for elemental analysis in academia and industry. However, simplification of the procedures for analyzing samples with complex compositions and residual matrix effects is still needed. In this work, the effect of an inorganic (CaCl 2 ) and an organic (tetraalkylphosphonium chloride) matrix on metals quantification by TXRF was investigated for liquid samples. The samples were spiked with up to 20 metals at concentrations ranging from 3 to 50 mg L -1 per element, including elements with spectral peaks near the peaks of the matrix elements or near the Raleigh and Compton scattering peaks of the X-ray source (molybdenum anode). The recovery rate (RR) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) were calculated to express the accuracy and the precision of the measured element concentrations. In samples with no matrix effects, good RRs are obtained regardless of the internal standard selected. However, in samples with moderate matrix content, the use of an optimum internal standard (OIS) at a concentration close to that of the analyte significantly improved the quantitative analysis. In samples with high concentrations of inorganic ions, using a Triton X-100 aqueous solution to dilute the sample during the internal standardization resulted in better RRs and lower RSDs compared to using only water. In samples with a high concentration of organic material, pure ethanol gave slightly better results than when a Triton X-100-ethanol solution was used for dilution. Compared to previous methods reported in the literature, the new sample-preparation method gave better accuracy, precision, and sensitivity for the elements tested. Sample dilution with an OIS and the surfactant Triton X-100 (inorganic media) or ethanol (organic media) is recommended for fast routine elemental determination in matrix containing samples, as it does not require special equipment, experimentally derived case-dependent mathematical

  14. Ground measurements of the hemispherical-directional reflectance of Arctic snow covered tundra for the validation of satellite remote sensing products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, C. P.; Marks, A. A.; Green, P.; Mac Arthur, A.; Fox, N.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface albedo is the hemispherical and wavelength integrated reflectance over the visible, near infrared and shortwave infrared regions of the solar spectrum. The albedo of Arctic snow can be in excess of 0.8 and it is a critical component in the global radiation budget because it determines the proportion of solar radiation absorbed, and reflected, over a large part of the Earth's surface. We present here our first results of the angularly resolved surface reflectance of Arctic snow at high solar zenith angles (~80°) suitable for the validation of satellite remote sensing products. The hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF) of Arctic snow covered tundra was measured using the GonioRAdiometric Spectrometer System (GRASS) during a three-week field campaign in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, in March/April 2013. The measurements provide one of few existing HDRF datasets at high solar zenith angles for wind-blown Arctic snow covered tundra (conditions typical of the Arctic region), and the first ground-based measure of HDRF at Ny-Ålesund. The HDRF was recorded under clear sky conditions with 10° intervals in view zenith, and 30° intervals in view azimuth, for several typical sites over a wavelength range of 400-1500 nm at 1 nm resolution. Satellite sensors such as MODIS, AVHRR and VIIRS offer a method to monitor the surface albedo with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, snow reflectance is anisotropic and is dependent on view and illumination angle and the wavelength of the incident light. Spaceborne sensors subtend a discrete angle to the target surface and measure radiance over a limited number of narrow spectral bands. Therefore, the derivation of the surface albedo requires accurate knowledge of the surfaces bidirectional reflectance as a function of wavelength. The ultimate accuracy to which satellite sensors are able to measure snow surface properties such as albedo is dependant on the accuracy of the BRDF model, which can only be assessed

  15. Applicability of direct total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for multielement analysis of geological and environmental objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkashina, T.Yu., E-mail: tcherk@crust.irk.ru; Panteeva, S.V.; Pashkova, G.V.

    2014-09-01

    The research aim is to demonstrate our experience in the applicability of TXRF analysis of various geological and environmental objects using minimal sample treatment. The study was focused on the evaluation of different factors affecting the TXRF results obtained for solid and liquid samples such as rock, mineral, ore, and natural water. Powdered geological samples were prepared as suspensions. Natural water samples were analyzed directly or after dilution. Testing various experimental parameters, e.g. sample amount, type of dispersant, and others was performed. For chosen conditions of the sample preparation procedure analytical figures of merit were estimated. Presented analytical results display the possibilities of TXRF applications in geological and environmental fields. - Highlights: • We study the capability of TXRF to simplify sample treatment for natural materials. • We assess various factors affecting the TXRF results for solid and liquid samples. • Analytical figures of merit were estimated.

  16. Polarization Imaging and Insect Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Adam S.; Ohmann, Paul R.; Leininger, Nick E.; Kavanaugh, James A.

    2010-01-01

    For several years we have included discussions about insect vision in the optics units of our introductory physics courses. This topic is a natural extension of demonstrations involving Brewster's reflection and Rayleigh scattering of polarized light because many insects heavily rely on optical polarization for navigation and communication.…

  17. Do Questions Reflecting Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure from a Questionnaire Predict Direct Measure of Exposure in Owner-Occupied Houses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, C.K. Jennifer; Foty, Richard G.; Wheeler, Amanda J.; Miller, J. David; Evans, Greg; Stieb, David M.; Dell, Sharon D.

    2010-01-01

    Home characteristic questions are used in epidemiological studies and clinical settings to assess potentially harmful exposures in the home. The objective of this study was to determine whether questionnaire-reported home characteristics can predict directly measured pollutants. Sixty home inspections were conducted on a subsample of the 2006 population-based Toronto Child Health Evaluation Questionnaire. Indoor/outdoor air and settled dust samples were analyzed. Mean Fel d 1 was higher (p 50% (61.30 μg/g, versus 6.24 μg/g, p = 0.002). Self-reported presence of a cat, a gas stove, musty odours, mice, and the home’s age and indoor relative humidity over 50% predicted measured indoor levels of cat allergens, NO2, fungal glucan, mouse allergens and dust mite allergens, respectively. These results are helpful for understanding the significance of indoor exposures ascertained by self-reporting in large epidemiological studies and also in the clinical setting. PMID:20948960

  18. Using ZnO-Cr2O3-ZnO heterostructures to characterize polarization penetration depth through non-polar films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Jhang, Jin-Hao; Zhou, Chao; Dagdeviren, Omur E; Chen, Zheng; Schwarz, Udo D; Altman, Eric I

    2017-12-13

    The ability to affect the surface properties of non-polar Cr 2 O 3 films through polar ZnO(0001) and (0001[combining macron]) supports was investigated by characterizing the polarity of ZnO films grown on top of the Cr 2 O 3 surfaces. The growth and geometric and electronic structures of the ZnO films were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, low-energy electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The ZnO growth mode was Stranski-Krastanov, which can be attributed to the ZnO layers initially adopting a non-polar structure with a lower surface tension before transitioning to the polar bulk structure with a higher surface energy. A similar result has been reported for ZnO growth on α-Al 2 O 3 (0001), which is isostructural with Cr 2 O 3 . The polarity of the added ZnO layer was determined by examining the surface morphology following wet chemical etching with atomic force microscopy and by characterizing the surface reactivity via temperature-programmed desorption of alcohols, which strongly depends on the ZnO polarization direction. Consistent with prior work on ZnO growth on bulk Cr 2 O 3 (0001), both measurements indicate that thick Cr 2 O 3 layers support ZnO(0001[combining macron]) growth regardless of the underlying ZnO substrate polarization; however, the polarization direction of ZnO films grown on Cr 2 O 3 films less than three repeat units thick follows the direction of the underlying substrate polarization. These findings show that it is possible to manipulate the surface properties of non-polar materials with a polar substrate, but that the effect does not penetrate past just a couple of repeat units.

  19. Cloud-based opportunities in scientific computing: insights from processing Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Direct Broadcast data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. D.; Hao, W.; Chettri, S.

    2013-12-01

    The cloud is proving to be a uniquely promising platform for scientific computing. Our experience with processing satellite data using Amazon Web Services highlights several opportunities for enhanced performance, flexibility, and cost effectiveness in the cloud relative to traditional computing -- for example: - Direct readout from a polar-orbiting satellite such as the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) requires bursts of processing a few times a day, separated by quiet periods when the satellite is out of receiving range. In the cloud, by starting and stopping virtual machines in minutes, we can marshal significant computing resources quickly when needed, but not pay for them when not needed. To take advantage of this capability, we are automating a data-driven approach to the management of cloud computing resources, in which new data availability triggers the creation of new virtual machines (of variable size and processing power) which last only until the processing workflow is complete. - 'Spot instances' are virtual machines that run as long as one's asking price is higher than the provider's variable spot price. Spot instances can greatly reduce the cost of computing -- for software systems that are engineered to withstand unpredictable interruptions in service (as occurs when a spot price exceeds the asking price). We are implementing an approach to workflow management that allows data processing workflows to resume with minimal delays after temporary spot price spikes. This will allow systems to take full advantage of variably-priced 'utility computing.' - Thanks to virtual machine images, we can easily launch multiple, identical machines differentiated only by 'user data' containing individualized instructions (e.g., to fetch particular datasets or to perform certain workflows or algorithms) This is particularly useful when (as is the case with S-NPP data) we need to launch many very similar machines to process an unpredictable number of

  20. Influence of fluctuating strain on exciton reflection spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1982-01-01

    , for example, between crossed polarizers or from ellipsometric measurements. Assuming the phase fluctuations to obey a Gaussian distribution, σ can be expressed in a simple way in terms of the degree of polarization or the depolarization of the reflected light. σ is then derived in terms of the standard......The influence of an internal distribution of strain on the exciton reflection spectra is investigated. The resulting fluctuating optical constants give rise to a fluctuating phase of reflectivity. The standard deviation σ of these phase fluctuations is the quantity which can be observed...... to derive the dependence of the phase of reflectivity on the direction of the fluctuating optical axis. The results obtained for σ are compared with the experimental depolarization spectra of ZnO. The only fitting parameter is the common standard deviation of the strain components. It is found...

  1. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e+e- collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point

  2. Photopolarimetric properties of leaf and vegetation covers over a wide range of measurement directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongqiu; Peng, Zhiyan; Wu, Di; Lv, Yunfeng

    2018-02-01

    The optical scattering property of the target is the essential signal for passive remote sensing applications. To deepen our understanding of the light reflected from vegetation, we present results of photopolarimetric laboratory measurements from single leaf and two vegetation covers (planophile and erectophile) over a wide range of viewing directions. The bidirectional polarized reflectance factor (BPRF) was used to characterize the polarization property of our samples. We observed positive and negative polarization (-BPRFQ) of all samples in the forward scattering and backward scattering directions, respectively. Based on the comparison of the BPRF among single leaf, planophile vegetation and erectophile vegetation, our measurements demonstrate that the orientation of the leaf is a key factor in describing the amount of polarization in the forward scattering direction. Our measurements also validated certain model results stating that (1) specular reflection generates a portion of polarization in the forward scattering direction and diffuses scattering of polarized light in all hemisphere directions, (2) BPRFU is anti-symmetric in the principal plane from a recent study in which the authors simulated the polarized reflectance of vegetation cover using the vector radiative transfer theory. These photopolarimetric measurement results, which can be completely explained by the theoretical results, are useful in remote sensing applications to vegetation.

  3. Reflectance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Cooper, K.; Randolph, M.

    1984-01-01

    A classical description of the one dimensional radiative transfer treatment of vegetation canopies was completed and the results were tested against measured prairie (blue grama) and agricultural canopies (soybean). Phase functions are calculated in terms of directly measurable biophysical characteristics of the canopy medium. While the phase functions tend to exhibit backscattering anisotropy, their exact behavior is somewhat more complex and wavelength dependent. A Monte Carlo model was developed that treats soil surfaces with large periodic variations in three dimensions. A photon-ray tracing technology is used. Currently, the rough soil surface is described by analytic functions and appropriate geometric calculations performed. A bidirectional reflectance distribution function is calculated and, hence, available for other atmospheric or canopy reflectance models as a lower boundary condition. This technique is used together with an adding model to calculate several cases where Lambertian leaves possessing anisotropic leaf angle distributions yield non-Lambertian reflectance; similar behavior is exhibited for simulated soil surfaces.

  4. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  5. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  6. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  7. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    Reflection has moved from the margins to the mainstream in supervision. Notions of reflection have become well established since the late 1980s. These notions have provided useful framing devices to help conceptualize some important processes in guidance and counseling. However, some applications...... of these notions have distorted their original connotations and taken an excessively instrumentalistic and individualistic approach to their use. This paper will argue that we are, in the 2000s, seeing a questioning of an overly instrumentalistic and individualistic view of learning and development previously...... associated with reflection and an exploration of alternative conceptions that view reflection within the context of settings which have a more group- and team-based orientation. Drawing on an action research project on health care supervision, the paper questions whether we should reject earlier views...

  8. Grazing incidence polarized neutron scattering in reflection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pramana – Journal of Physics. Current Issue : Vol. 90, Issue 1 · Current Issue Volume 90 | Issue 1. January 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  9. Grazing incidence polarized neutron scattering in reflection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    along with suppression of training effect in exchange coupled system was microscopically identified using neutron ..... reversal mechanism and suppression of training in an exchange-coupled system by Paul et al are worth ...... density functional calculations based on Korringa–Kohn–Rostoker–Coherent potential-.

  10. Reflection Positive Doubles

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffe, Arthur; Janssens, Bas

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce reflection positive doubles, a general framework for reflection positivity, covering a wide variety of systems in statistical physics and quantum field theory. These systems may be bosonic, fermionic, or parafermionic in nature. Within the framework of reflection positive doubles, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for reflection positivity. We use a reflection-invariant cone to implement our construction. Our characterization allows for a direct interpretation in t...

  11. Geometric effects on the flux and polarization signals of Jupiter-sized exoplanets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmer (student TUDelft), Chris; Rossi, L.C.G.; Stam, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    The direct detection of reflected starlight from exoplanets marks the beginning of a new era in the characterization of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. The flux and in particular the linear polarization signals from such planets are sensitive to atmospheric structure and composition, but other

  12. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  13. Direct band gap measurement of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films using high-resolution reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Sung [Analytical Engineering Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Cheoncheon-dong 300, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Jong-Bong; Ko, Dong-Su; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, KiHong; Kim, Seong Heon; Yun, Dong-Jin; Ham, YongNam; Park, Gyeong Su [Analytical Engineering Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Taewon [Energy lab, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dongho, E-mail: dhlee0333@gmail.com; Nam, Junggyu [PV Development Team, Energy Solution Business Division, Samsung SDI, 467 Beonyeong-ro, Cheonan-si, Chungcheongnam-do 331-330 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hee Jae [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Gaesin-dong, Heungdeok-gu, Cheongju, 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Pyung-Ho; Choi, Byoung-Deog, E-mail: bdchoi@skku.edu [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Cheoncheon-dong 300, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-29

    To investigate the band gap profile of Cu(In{sub 1−x},Ga{sub x})(Se{sub 1−y}S{sub y}){sub 2} of various compositions, we measured the band gap profile directly as a function of in-depth using high-resolution reflection energy loss spectroscopy (HR-REELS), which was compared with the band gap profile calculated based on the auger depth profile. The band gap profile is a double-graded band gap as a function of in-depth. The calculated band gap obtained from the auger depth profile seems to be larger than that by HR-REELS. Calculated band gaps are to measure the average band gap of the spatially different varying compositions with respect to considering its void fraction. But, the results obtained using HR-REELS are to be affected by the low band gap (i.e., out of void) rather than large one (i.e., near void). Our findings suggest an analytical method to directly determine the band gap profile as function of in-depth.

  14. Direct band gap measurement of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 thin films using high-resolution reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Sung; Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Jong-Bong; Ko, Dong-Su; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, KiHong; Kim, Seong Heon; Yun, Dong-Jin; Ham, YongNam; Park, Gyeong Su; Song, Taewon; Lee, Dongho; Nam, Junggyu; Kang, Hee Jae; Choi, Pyung-Ho; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the band gap profile of Cu(In 1−x ,Ga x )(Se 1−y S y ) 2 of various compositions, we measured the band gap profile directly as a function of in-depth using high-resolution reflection energy loss spectroscopy (HR-REELS), which was compared with the band gap profile calculated based on the auger depth profile. The band gap profile is a double-graded band gap as a function of in-depth. The calculated band gap obtained from the auger depth profile seems to be larger than that by HR-REELS. Calculated band gaps are to measure the average band gap of the spatially different varying compositions with respect to considering its void fraction. But, the results obtained using HR-REELS are to be affected by the low band gap (i.e., out of void) rather than large one (i.e., near void). Our findings suggest an analytical method to directly determine the band gap profile as function of in-depth

  15. Effect of modulation of the particle size distributions in the direct solid analysis by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Ramón; Friedrich K., E. Josue; Redrejo, M. J.

    2018-02-01

    The main goal of this work was to investigate, in a systematic way, the influence of the controlled modulation of the particle size distribution of a representative solid sample with respect to the more relevant analytical parameters of the Direct Solid Analysis (DSA) by Total-reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) quantitative method. In particular, accuracy, uncertainty, linearity and detection limits were correlated with the main parameters of their size distributions for the following elements; Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb. In all cases strong correlations were finded. The main conclusion of this work can be resumed as follows; the modulation of particles shape to lower average sizes next to a minimization of the width of particle size distributions, produce a strong increment of accuracy, minimization of uncertainties and limit of detections for DSA-TXRF methodology. These achievements allow the future use of the DSA-TXRF analytical methodology for development of ISO norms and standardized protocols for the direct analysis of solids by mean of TXRF.

  16. Larger spontaneous polarization ferroelectric inorganic-organic hybrids: [PbI3](infinity) chains directed organic cations aggregation to Kagomé-shaped tubular architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Rong; Li, Dong-Ping; Ren, Xiao-Ming; Song, You; Jin, Wan-Qin

    2010-01-13

    Four isostructural inorganic-organic hybrid ferroelectric compounds, assembled from achiral 3-R-benzylidene-1-aminopyridiniums (R = NO(2), Br, Cl, or F for 1-4, respectively) and [PbI(3)](-) anions with the chiral Kagomé-shaped tubular aggregating architecture, show larger spontaneous polarizations.

  17. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Polarization Measurements of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Burton, Michael G.; Schultz, A. S. B.

    2006-01-01

    We present 2 micrometer polarization measurements of positions in the BN region of the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) made with NICMOS Camera 2 (0.2" resolution) on Hubble Space Telescope. Our goals are to seek the sources of heating for IRc2, 3, 4, and 7, identify possible young stellar objects (YSOs), and characterize the grain alignment in the dust clouds along the lines-of-sight to the stars. Our results are as follows: BN is approximately 29% polarized by dichroic absorption and appears to be the illuminating source for most of the nebulosity to its north and up to approximately 5" to its south. Although the stars are probably all polarized by dichroic absorption, there are a number of compact, but non-point-source, objects that could be polarized by a combination of both dichroic absorption and local scattering of star light. We identify several candidate YSOs, including an approximately edge-on bipolar YSO 8.7" east of BN, and a deeply-embedded IRc7, all of which are obviously self-luminous at mid-infrared wavelengths and may be YSOs. None of these is a reflection nebula illuminated by a star located near radio source I, as was previously suggested. Other IRc sources are clearly reflection nebulae: IRc3 appears to be illuminated by IRc2-B or a combination of the IRc2 sources, and IRc4 and IRc5 appear to be illuminated by an unseen star in the vicinity of radio source I, or by Star n or IRc2-A. Trends in the magnetic field direction are inferred from the polarization of the 26 stars that are bright enough to be seen as NICMOS point sources. Their polarization ranges from N less than or equal to 1% (all stars with this low polarization are optically visible) to greater than 40%. The most polarized star has a polarization position angle different from its neighbors by approximately 40 degrees, but in agreement with the grain alignment inferred from millimeter polarization measurements of the cold dust cloud in the southern part of OMC-1. The polarization

  18. Probing the Accretion Geometry of Black Holes with X-Ray Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitman, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    In the coming years, new space missions will be able to measure X-ray polarization at levels of 1% or better in the approx.1-10 keV energy band. In particular, X-ray polarization is an ideal tool for determining the nature of black hole (BH) accretion disks surrounded by hot coronae. Using a Monte Carlo radiation transport code in full general relativity, we calculate the spectra and polarization features of these BH systems. At low energies, the signal is dominated by the thermal flux coming directly from the optically thick disk. At higher energies, the thermal seed photons have been inverse-Compton scattered by the corona, often reflecting back off the disk before reaching the observer, giving a distinctive polarization signature. By measuring the degree and angle of this X-ray polarization, we can infer the BH inclination, the emission geometry of the accretion flow, and also determine the spin of the black hole.

  19. Tri Band Dual Polarized Patch Antenna System For Next Generation Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Daniyal Ali Shah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In fifth generation networks much emphasis is given to reduce the handset and base station sizes while incorporating even more features for ubiquitous connectivity. Polarization diversity is one of the methods in which a single multi-polarized antenna brings the advantages of antenna diversity. The multiband handset antennas can be made dual-polarized for improved compensation of fading effects of propagation environment especially in terrestrial bands. This paper focuses on the outcomes of the development of a horizontal and vertical polarized patch antenna scheme that operates on 3 bands 900 MHz 1.8 GHz and 2.4 GHz. The antenna system is tested for gain directivity reflection loss polarization radiation pattern and other parameters. The results are published and found are found to satisfy the requirements of cellular and data communication networks in the specified bands.

  20. Developing Atmospheric Retrieval Methods for Direct Imaging Spectroscopy of Gas Giants in Reflected Light I: Methane Abundances and Basic Cloud Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, R. E.; Marley, M. S.; Lewis, N.; Line, M.; Traub, W.; Zahnle, K.

    2016-01-01

    Reflected light spectroscopy and photometry of cool, directly imaged extrasolar giant planets are expected to be performed in the next decade by space-based telescopes equipped with optical wavelength coronagraphs and integral field spectrographs, such as the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). We are developing a new atmospheric retrieval methodology to help assess the science return and inform the instrument design for such future missions, and ultimately interpret the resulting observations. Our retrieval technique employs an albedo model coupled with both a Markov chain Monte Carlo Ensemble Sampler (emcee) and a multimodal nested sampling algorithm (MultiNest) to map the posterior distribution. This combination makes the global evidence calculation more robust for any given model, and highlights possible discrepancies in the likelihood maps. Here we apply this methodology to simulated spectra of cool giant planets. As a proof-of-concept, our current atmospheric model contains 1 or 2 cloud layers, methane as a major absorber, and a H2-He background gas. This 6-to-9 parameter model is appropriate for Jupiter-like planets and can be easily expanded in the future. In addition to deriving the marginal likelihood distribution and confidence intervals for the model parameters, we perform model selection to determine the significance of methane and cloud detection as a function of expected signal-to-noise, in the presence of spectral noise correlations. After internal validation, the method is applied to realistic reflected-light spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and HD 99492 c, a likely observing target. We find that the presence or absence of clouds and methane can be determined with high accuracy, while parameters uncertainties are model-dependent.

  1. PGE2 suppresses NK activity in vivo directly and through adrenal hormones: Effects that cannot be reflected by ex-vivo assessment of NK cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meron, G.; Tishler, Y.; Shaashua, L.; Rosenne, E.; Levi, B.; Melamed, R.; Gotlieb, N.; Matzner, P.; Sorski, L.; Ben-Eliyahu, S.

    2013-01-01

    Surgery can suppress in vivo levels of NK cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) through various mechanisms, including catecholamine-, glucocorticoid (CORT)-, and prostaglandin (PG)-mediated responses. However, PGs are synthesized locally following tissue damage, driving proinflammatory and CORT responses, while their systemic levels are often unaffected. Thus, we herein studied the role of adrenal factors in mediating in vivo effects of PGs on NKCC, using adrenalectomized and sham-operated F344 rats subjected to surgery or PGE2 administration. In vivo and ex-vivo approaches were employed, based on intravenous administration of the NK-sensitive MADB106 tumor line, and based on ex-vivo assessment of YAC-1 and MADB106 target-line lysis. Additionally, in vitro studies assessed the kinetics of the impact of epinephrine, CORT, and PGE2 on NKCC. The results indicated that suppression of NKCC by epinephrine and PGE2 are short lasting, and cannot be evident when these compounds are removed from the in vitro assay milieu, or in the context of ex-vivo assessment of NKCC. In contrast, the effects of CORT are long-lasting and are reflected in both conditions even after its removal. Marginating-pulmonary NKCC was less susceptible to suppression than circulating NKCC, when tested against the xenogeneic YAC-1 target line, but not against the syngeneic MADB106 line, which seems to involve different cytotoxicity mechanisms. Overall, these findings indicate that elevated systemic PG levels can directly suppress NKCC in vivo, but following laparotomy adrenal hormones mediate most of the effects of endogenously-released PGs. Additionally, the ex-vivo approach seems limited in reflecting the short-lasting NK-suppressive effects of catecholamines and PGs. PMID:23153554

  2. Prolactin/Jak2 directs apical/basal polarization and luminal linage maturation of mammary epithelial cells through regulation of the Erk1/2 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengming Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tissue development/remodeling requires modulations in both cellular architecture and phenotype. Aberration in these processes leads to tumorigenesis. During the pregnancy/lactation cycle the mammary epithelial cells undergo complex morphological and phenotypic programs resulting in the acquisition of apical/basal (A/B polarization and cellular maturation necessary for proper lactation. Still the hormonal regulations and cellular mechanisms controlling these events are not entirely elucidated. Here we show that prolactin (PRL/Jak2 pathway in mammary epithelial cells uniquely signals to establish A/B polarity as determined by the apical localization of the tight junction protein zona occludens 1 (ZO-1 and the basal/lateral localization of E-cadherin, and the apical trafficking of lipid droplets. As well, our results indicate that this pathway regulates mammary stem cell hierarchy by inducing the differentiation of luminal progenitor (EpCAMhi/CD49fhi cells to mature luminal (EpCAMhi/CD49flow cells. Moreover, our data indicate that PRL/Jak2 coordinates both of these cellular events through limiting the mitogen activated protein kinase (Erk1/2 pathway. Together our findings define a novel unifying mechanism coupling mammary epithelial cell A/B polarization and terminal differentiation.

  3. DEVELOPING ATMOSPHERIC RETRIEVAL METHODS FOR DIRECT IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY OF GAS GIANTS IN REFLECTED LIGHT. I. METHANE ABUNDANCES AND BASIC CLOUD PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupu, Roxana E. [BAER Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Lewis, Nikole [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Line, Michael [Univ. California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Traub, Wesley A., E-mail: Roxana.E.Lupu@nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Upcoming space-based coronagraphic instruments in the next decade will perform reflected light spectroscopy and photometry of cool directly imaged extrasolar giant planets. We are developing a new atmospheric retrieval methodology to help assess the science return and inform the instrument design for such future missions, and ultimately interpret the resulting observations. Our retrieval technique employs a geometric albedo model coupled with both a Markov chain Monte Carlo Ensemble Sampler ( emcee ) and a multimodal nested sampling algorithm ( MultiNest ) to map the posterior distribution. This combination makes the global evidence calculation more robust for any given model and highlights possible discrepancies in the likelihood maps. As a proof of concept, our current atmospheric model contains one or two cloud layers, methane as a major absorber, and a H{sub 2}–He background gas. This 6-to-9 parameter model is appropriate for Jupiter-like planets and can be easily expanded in the future. In addition to deriving the marginal likelihood distribution and confidence intervals for the model parameters, we perform model selection to determine the significance of methane and cloud detection as a function of expected signal-to-noise ratio in the presence of spectral noise correlations. After internal validation, the method is applied to realistic spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and HD 99492c, a model observing target. We find that the presence or absence of clouds and methane can be determined with high confidence, while parameter uncertainties are model dependent and correlated. Such general methods will also be applicable to the interpretation of direct imaging spectra of cloudy terrestrial planets.

  4. Direct and simultaneous quantification of tannin mean degree of polymerization and percentage of galloylation in grape seeds using diffuse reflectance fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christos; Kyraleou, Maria; Voskidi, Eleni; Kotseridis, Yorgos; Taranilis, Petros A; Kallithraka, Stamatina

    2015-02-01

    The direct and simultaneous quantitative determination of the mean degree of polymerization (mDP) and the degree of galloylation (%G) in grape seeds were quantified using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy and partial least squares (PLS). The results were compared with those obtained using the conventional analysis employing phloroglucinolysis as pretreatment followed by high performance liquid chromatography-UV and mass spectrometry detection. Infrared spectra were recorded in solid state samples after freeze drying. The 2nd derivative of the 1832 to 1416 and 918 to 739 cm(-1) spectral regions for the quantification of mDP, the 2nd derivative of the 1813 to 607 cm(-1) spectral region for the degree of %G determination and PLS regression were used. The determination coefficients (R(2) ) of mDP and %G were 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. The corresponding values of the root-mean-square error of calibration were found 0.506 and 0.692, the root-mean-square error of cross validation 0.811 and 0.921, and the root-mean-square error of prediction 0.612 and 0.801. The proposed method in comparison with the conventional method is simpler, less time consuming, more economical, and requires reduced quantities of chemical reagents and fewer sample pretreatment steps. It could be a starting point for the design of more specific models according to the requirements of the wineries. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Direct quantitative screening of influenza A virus without DNA amplification by single-particle dual-mode total internal reflection scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Yeung, Edward S; Kang, Seong Ho

    2017-01-15

    Quantitative screening of influenza A (H7N9) virus without DNA amplification was performed based on single-particle dual-mode total internal reflection scattering (SD-TIRS) with a transmission grating (TG). A gold nanopad was utilized as a substrate for the hybridization of probe DNA molecules with the TIRS nanotag (silver-nanoparticle). The TG effectively isolated the scattering signals in first-order spectral images (n=+1) of the nanotag from that of the substrate, providing excellent enhancement of signal-to-noise and selectivity. By using single-DNA molecule/TIRS nanotag hybridization, target DNA molecules of H7N9 were detected down to 74 zM, which is at least 100,000 times lower than the current detection limit of 9.4fM. By simply modifying the design of the probe DNA molecules, this technique can be used to directly screen other viral DNAs in various human biological samples at the single-molecule level without target amplification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ventral polarization vision in tabanids: horseflies and deerflies (Diptera: Tabanidae) are attracted to horizontally polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Gábor; Majer, József; Horváth, Loránd; Szivák, Ildikó; Kriska, György

    2008-11-01

    Adult tabanid flies (horseflies and deerflies) are terrestrial and lay their eggs onto marsh plants near bodies of fresh water because the larvae develop in water or mud. To know how tabanids locate their host animals, terrestrial rendezvous sites and egg-laying places would be very useful for control measures against them, because the hematophagous females are primary/secondary vectors of some severe animal/human diseases/parasites. Thus, in choice experiments performed in the field we studied the behavior of tabanids governed by linearly polarized light. We present here evidence for positive polarotaxis, i.e., attraction to horizontally polarized light stimulating the ventral eye region, in both males and females of 27 tabanid species. The novelty of our findings is that positive polarotaxis has been described earlier only in connection with the water detection of some aquatic insects ovipositing directly into water. A further particularity of our discovery is that in the order Diptera and among blood-sucking insects the studied tabanids are the first known species possessing ventral polarization vision and definite polarization-sensitive behavior with known functions. The polarotaxis in tabanid flies makes it possible to develop new optically luring traps being more efficient than the existing ones based on the attraction of tabanids by the intensity and/or color of reflected light.

  7. Comprehension of direct extraction of hydrophilic antioxidants using vegetable oils by polar paradox theory and small angle X-ray scattering analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne Sylvie; Ruiz, Karine; Rossignol Castera, Anne; Bauduin, Pierre; Diat, Olivier; Chemat, Farid

    2015-04-15

    Since the polar paradox theory rationalised the fact that polar antioxidants are more effective in nonpolar media, extractions of phenolic compounds in vegetable oils were inspired and achieved in this study for obtaining oils enriched in phenolic compounds. Moreover, the influence of surfactants on the extractability of phenolic compounds was experimentally studied first, followed by the small angle X-ray scattering analysis for the oil structural observation before and after extraction so as to better understand the dissolving mechanism underpinning the extraction. The results showed a significant difference on the extraction yield of phenolic compounds among oils, which was mainly dependent on their composition instead of the unsaturation of fatty acids. Appropriate surfactant additions could significantly improve extraction yield for refined sunflower oils, which 1% w/w addition of glyceryl oleate was determined as the optimal. Besides, 5% w/w addition of lecithin performed the best in oil enrichments compared with mono- and di-glycerides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K.; Weibull, Jörgen W.

    2007-01-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  9. Political polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avinash K; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2007-05-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  10. Probing the valley filtering effect by Andreev reflection in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon with a ballistic point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Zhou, Tao; Chen, Wei

    2017-12-01

    The ballistic point contact (BPC) with zigzag edges in graphene is a main candidate for a valley filter, in which the polarization of the valley degree of freedom can be selected by using a local gate voltage. Here, we propose to detect the valley filtering effect by Andreev reflection. By using both scattering matrix analysis and numerical simulation, we show that Andreev reflection is strongly suppressed as the incident electron and reflected hole propagate through different bands of BPC with opposite chirality. The conductance as a function of both the incident energy of electron and the local gate voltage at the BPC is obtained, with which the parametric region for a perfect valley filter and the direction of the valley polarization can be determined. As the length of the BPC increases, the conductance exhibits an oscillatory decay behavior, indicating a negative correlation between Andreev reflection and valley polarization.

  11. A discrete spherical harmonics method for radiative transfer analysis in inhomogeneous polarized planar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapimo, Romuald; Tagne Kamdem, Hervé Thierry; Yemele, David

    2018-03-01

    A discrete spherical harmonics method is developed for the radiative transfer problem in inhomogeneous polarized planar atmosphere illuminated at the top by a collimated sunlight while the bottom reflects the radiation. The method expands both the Stokes vector and the phase matrix in a finite series of generalized spherical functions and the resulting vector radiative transfer equation is expressed in a set of polar directions. Hence, the polarized characteristics of the radiance within the atmosphere at any polar direction and azimuthal angle can be determined without linearization and/or interpolations. The spatial dependent of the problem is solved using the spectral Chebyshev method. The emergent and transmitted radiative intensity and the degree of polarization are predicted for both Rayleigh and Mie scattering. The discrete spherical harmonics method predictions for optical thin atmosphere using 36 streams are found in good agreement with benchmark literature results. The maximum deviation between the proposed method and literature results and for polar directions \\vert μ \\vert ≥0.1 is less than 0.5% and 0.9% for the Rayleigh and Mie scattering, respectively. These deviations for directions close to zero are about 3% and 10% for Rayleigh and Mie scattering, respectively.

  12. OCAPI: a multidirectional multichannel polarizing imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Naour, C.; Eichen, G.; Léon, J. F.

    2017-11-01

    OCAPI (Optical Carbonaceous and anthropogenic Aerosols Pathfinder Instrument) is an imager dedicated to the observation of the spectral, directional and polarized signatures of the solar radiance reflected by the Earth-Atmosphere system. The measurements are used to study air quality and pollution by tracking aerosol quantity, types and circulation at various scales in the visible range. The main characteristics of OCAPI are a 110° along track and cross track field of view, eight polarized channels distributed between 320 and 2130 nm. The resolution is 4 x 4 km2 in the visible and the shortwave infrared (SWIR) range, and 10 x 10 km2 in the UV. The instrumental concept is derived from POLDER and PARASOL with additional channels in the UV and SWIR to better determine aerosol properties and constrain Earth surface and cloud contributions in the detected signal. It is based on three wide field-ofview telecentric optics (UV, Visible and SWIR), a rotating wheel bearing spectral and polarized filters and two dimensional detector arrays at the focal plane of the optics. The instrument requirements, concept and budgets are presented.

  13. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2008-11-25

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  14. A polarizing neutron periscope for neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Michael; Boeni, Peter; Calzada, Elbio; Muehlbauer, Martin; Neubauer, Andreas; Schillinger, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    Optical neutron polarizers like guides or benders destroy the collimation of a neutron beam due to multiple reflections or scattering. This makes them unsuitable for their use in polarized neutron radiography, because the beam collimation is essential to obtain high spatial resolution. We have developed a neutron polarizer based on the principle of an optical periscope with a zigzag double reflection on two parallel high-m supermirror polarizers. If the supermirrors are perfectly parallel and flat, the beam collimation is left unchanged by such a device. A first proof of concept version of this type of polarizer was built and tested. We expect to achieve a beam polarization of up to 99% with an improved version yet to be built.

  15. A polarizing neutron periscope for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Michael [FRM II, Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E21, James Franck Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: Michael.Schulz@frm2.tum.de; Boeni, Peter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E21, James Franck Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Calzada, Elbio; Muehlbauer, Martin [FRM II, Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E21, James Franck Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Neubauer, Andreas [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E21, James Franck Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schillinger, Burkhard [FRM II, Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E21, James Franck Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2009-06-21

    Optical neutron polarizers like guides or benders destroy the collimation of a neutron beam due to multiple reflections or scattering. This makes them unsuitable for their use in polarized neutron radiography, because the beam collimation is essential to obtain high spatial resolution. We have developed a neutron polarizer based on the principle of an optical periscope with a zigzag double reflection on two parallel high-m supermirror polarizers. If the supermirrors are perfectly parallel and flat, the beam collimation is left unchanged by such a device. A first proof of concept version of this type of polarizer was built and tested. We expect to achieve a beam polarization of up to 99% with an improved version yet to be built.

  16. Promoting Diversity Through Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (Polar ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, J. D.; Hotaling, L. A.; Garza, C.; Van Dyk, P. B.; Hunter-thomson, K. I.; Middendorf, J.; Daniel, A.; Matsumoto, G. I.; Schofield, O.

    2017-12-01

    Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) is an education and outreach program designed to provide public access to the Antarctic and Arctic regions through polar data and interactions with the scientists. The program provides multi-faceted science communication training for early career scientists that consist of a face-to face workshop and opportunities to apply these skills. The key components of the scientist training workshop include cultural competency training, deconstructing/decoding science for non-expert audiences, the art of telling science stories, and networking with members of the education and outreach community and reflecting on communication skills. Scientists partner with educators to provide professional development for K-12 educators and support for student research symposia. Polar ICE has initiated a Polar Literacy initiative that provides both a grounding in big ideas in polar science and science communication training designed to underscore the importance of the Polar Regions to the public while promoting interdisciplinary collaborations between scientists and educators. Our ultimate objective is to promote STEM identity through professional development of scientists and educators while developing career awareness of STEM pathways in Polar science.

  17. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  18. On polarization in biomembranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zecchi, Karis Amata

    close to physiological conditions, making these effects biologically relevant. In this work, we consider the case of asymmetric membranes which can display spontaneous polarization in the absence of a field. Close to the phase transition, we find that the membrane displays piezoelectric, flexoelectric...... on different geometries point in the direction of a flexoelectric mechanism behind current rectification in lipid bilayers. Finally, we suggest that our updated equivalent circuit should be included in the interpretation of elctrophysiological data....

  19. Polarization Spectra of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present simulated spectra of the flux and degree of polarization of starlight that is reflected by extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). In particular the polarization depends strongly on the structure of the planetary atmosphere, and appears to be a valuable tool for the characterization of EGPs.

  20. The physics of polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    This course is intended to give a description of the basic physical concepts which underlie the study and the interpretation of polarization phenomena. Apart from a brief historical introduction (Sect. 1), the course is organized in three parts. A first part (Sects. 2 - 6) covers the most relevant facts about the polarization phenomena that are typically encountered in laboratory applications and in everyday life. In Sect. 2, the modern description of polarization in terms of the Stokes parameters is recalled, whereas Sect. 3 is devoted to introduce the basic tools of laboratory polarimetry, such as the Jones calculus and the Mueller matrices. The polarization phenomena which are met in the reflection and refraction of a beam of radiation at the separation surface between two dielectrics, or between a dielectric and a metal, are recalled in Sect. 4. Finally, Sect. 5 gives an introduction to the phenomena of dichroism and of anomalous dispersion and Sect. 6 summarizes the polarization phenomena that are commonly encountered in everyday life. The second part of this course (Sects. 7-14) deals with the description, within the formalism of classical physics, of the spectro-polarimetric properties of the radiation emitted by accelerated charges. Such properties are derived by taking as starting point the Liénard and Wiechert equations that are recalled and discussed in Sect. 7 both in the general case and in the non-relativistic approximation. The results are developed to find the percentage polarization, the radiation diagram, the cross-section and the spectral characteristics of the radiation emitted in different phenomena particularly relevant from the astrophysical point of view. The emission of a linear antenna is derived in Sect. 8. The other Sections are devoted to Thomson scattering (Sect. 9), Rayleigh scattering (Sect. 10), Mie scattering (Sect. 11), bremsstrahlung radiation (Sect. 12), cyclotron radiation (Sect. 13), and synchrotron radiation (Sect. 14

  1. The Reflective Learning Continuum: Reflecting on Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, James W.; Hay, Amanda; Drago, William

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research that considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This article describes the use of an instrument that can be used to measure four identified levels of a…

  2. Geomagnetic polarity transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ronald T.; McFadden, Phillip L.

    1999-05-01

    The top of Earth's liquid outer core is nearly 2900 km beneath Earth's surface, so we will never be able to observe it directly. This hot, dense, molten iron-rich body is continuously in motion and is the source of Earth's magnetic field. One of the most dynamic manifestations at Earth's surface of this fluid body is, perhaps, a reversal of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately, the most recent polarity transition occurred at about 780 ka, so we have never observed a transition directly. It seems that a polarity transition spans many human lifetimes, so no human will ever witness the phenomenon in its entirety. Thus we are left with the tantalizing prospect that paleomagnetic records of polarity transitions may betray some of the secrets of the deep Earth. Certainly, if there are systematics in the reversal process and they can be documented, then this will reveal substantial information about the nature of the lowermost mantle and of the outer core. Despite their slowness on a human timescale, polarity transitions occur almost instantaneously on a geological timescale. This rapidity, together with limitations in the paleomagnetic recording process, prohibits a comprehensive description of any reversal transition both now and into the foreseeable future, which limits the questions that may at this stage be sensibly asked. The natural model for the geomagnetic field is a set of spherical harmonic components, and we are not able to obtain a reliable model for even the first few harmonic terms during a transition. Nevertheless, it is possible, in principle, to make statements about the harmonic character of a geomagnetic polarity transition without having a rigorous spherical harmonic description of one. For example, harmonic descriptions of recent geomagnetic polarity transitions that are purely zonal can be ruled out (a zonal harmonic does not change along a line of latitude). Gleaning information about transitions has proven to be difficult, but it does seem

  3. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. In men, peripheral estradiol levels directly reflect the action of estrogens at the hypothalamo-pituitary level to inhibit gonadotropin secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Raven (Garrett); F.H. de Jong (Frank); J.-M. Kaufman (Jean-Marc); W.A. de Ronde (Willem)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractContext: Estradiol inhibits gonadotropin release in men by an action at the hypothalamus and pituitary. Because of the tissue-specific regulation of aromatase, peripheral estradiol levels may not reflect brain estradiol concentrations. Objective: We evaluated whether local aromatization

  5. Polarization periodicity in the B1 columnar phase determined by resonant x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folcia, C.L.; Pindak, R.; Ortega, J.; Etxebarria, J.; Pan, L.; Wang, S.; Huang, C.C.; Ponsinet, V.; Barois, P. and Gimeno, N.

    2011-07-14

    We report structural results that evidence the polarization distribution of the blocks in the columnar phase of an achiral bent-core liquid crystal. The study was performed using resonant x-ray diffraction at the sulfur K edge on oriented samples aligned on substrates. The extra periodicity is revealed through the violation of the systematic extinction rule of the structural symmetry group along the experimentally accessible diffraction direction. Further data obtained from the polarization analysis of a resonant reflection give information concerning the transition mechanism between B{sub 1} and B{sub 2} phases.

  6. Polarization Periodicity in the B(1) Columnar Phase Determined by Resonant X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Folcia; J Ortega; J Etxebarria; L Pan; S Wang; C Huang; V Ponsinet; P Barois; R Pindak; N Gimeno

    2011-12-31

    We report structural results that evidence the polarization distribution of the blocks in the columnar phase of an achiral bent-core liquid crystal. The study was performed using resonant x-ray diffraction at the sulfur K edge on oriented samples aligned on substrates. The extra periodicity is revealed through the violation of the systematic extinction rule of the structural symmetry group along the experimentally accessible diffraction direction. Further data obtained from the polarization analysis of a resonant reflection give information concerning the transition mechanism between B{sub 1} and B{sub 2} phases.

  7. Transmission Magnitude and Phase Control for Polarization-Preserving Reflectionless Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Do-Hoon; Ptitcyn, Grigorii; Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Tretyakov, Sergei A.

    2018-03-01

    For transmissive applications of electromagnetic metasurfaces, an array of subwavelength Huygens' meta-atoms are typically used to eliminate reflection and achieve a high-transmission power efficiency together with a wide transmission phase coverage. We show that the underlying principle of low reflection and full control over transmission is asymmetric scattering into the specular reflection and transmission directions that results from a superposition of symmetric and antisymmetric scattering components, with Huygens' meta-atoms being one example configuration. Available for oblique illumination in TM polarization, a meta-atom configuration comprising normal and tangential electric polarizations is presented, which is capable of reflectionless, full-power transmission and a 2 π transmission phase coverage as well as full absorption. For lossy metasurfaces, we show that a complete phase coverage is still available for reflectionless designs for any value of absorptance. Numerical examples in the microwave and optical regimes are provided.

  8. Reflective photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Goeke, Ronald S.

    2018-03-06

    A photovoltaic module includes colorized reflective photovoltaic cells that act as pixels. The colorized reflective photovoltaic cells are arranged so that reflections from the photovoltaic cells or pixels visually combine into an image on the photovoltaic module. The colorized photovoltaic cell or pixel is composed of a set of 100 to 256 base color sub-pixel reflective segments or sub-pixels. The color of each pixel is determined by the combination of base color sub-pixels forming the pixel. As a result, each pixel can have a wide variety of colors using a set of base colors, which are created, from sub-pixel reflective segments having standard film thicknesses.

  9. Observation of Fermi Arc Surface States Induced by Organic Memristive/Memcapacitive Devices with a Double-Helical Polarized Single-Wall Nanotube Membrane for Direct Chelating with Matrix Matelloproteinase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. CHEN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Matrix Matelloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 plays a key role in many diseases. A new type of dual-functioning device was developed for fast, direct ultrasensitive detection of MMP-2. We report a memristive/memcapacitive device with vertex double-helical polarized biomimetic protein nanotubules forming double membranes with potential gradient mimicking mitochondria’s inner double membrane has developed. We also report Fermi arcs with nodes on the surface of the nanostructured membrane was observed at the first time by using a 3D real-time - energy-current dynamic mapping method based on data obtained from the Cyclic Voltammetry (CV method. The memristive/memcapacitive device comprises a cross- linked organic polymer having single-wall cross-bar polarized nanotube self-assembling membrane (SAM on a gold chip, under an applied potential, a pair of vertex double- helical circular current flow induced the Fermi arcs states occurrence and these Fermi arcs promoted a direct chelating with zinc ions of the MMP-2 to become possible without any antibody, tracer, or reagent used at room temperature was accomplished. We observed the pair of Dirac Cones became alignment and strengthened with each other in the presence of MMP-2 compared without MMP-2. The MMP-2 can be detected with ag/mL level sensitivity and the value of Detection of Limits (DOL reached orders of magnitude lower than published reports with simplified procedures by a Chronoamperometry (CA method and a Double Step Chronopotentiometry (DSCPO method using NIST SRM 965A standard human serum, respectively. The results show a feasible application for developing the commercial fast and real-time MMP monitoring devices for various diseases.

  10. Multiscaled polarization effects in Suneve coronata (Lepidoptera) and other insects: application to anti-counterfeiting of banknotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, S.; Boulenguez, J.; Bálint, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The scales of many Lepidoptera and the elytra of quite a number of Coleoptera possess specialized micro- and nano-structures that produce special polarization effects. They are constituted by concave multilayered cavities. This leads to two different effects: (1) interferential non-polarized coloration by reflection near normal incidence in the middle of the cavities and (2) polarized interferential colouration at lower wavelength after double reflection near the Brewster incidence at the periphery of the cavities. The macroscopic appearance resembles the “pointillist effect” with one of the component polarized while the other one is not. The first one can be extinguished with linear polarizer so that the colour is modified. In most insects, the structure is locally symmetric; hence, no macroscopic effects can be seen. In certain species, this symmetry is partly broken, and a slight effect can be observed. In the wing dorsal surface of the fascinating neotropical butterflies genus Suneve, perpendicular structures of two different kinds in size polarize the reflected light. The larger one is constituted by the convex cover scales whose apex falls perpendicularly on the bases of the following scales, creating long polarized valley (50 μm width) transversally running across the wing. The smaller one is constituted by the ridges of the scales (2 μm apart) that polarize light in the perpendicular direction. Adapted multilayered structures can be deposited onto banknotes to create anti-counterfeiting patterns as a further development of protection and security. Different effects can be produced by the use of such structures. (1) Changes of luminosity: A specific pattern will be constituted by two different areas: one with horizontal concave multilayered structures, and the other one with vertical structures. Under unpolarized light, the reflected spectra of these different areas are identical and no pattern appears. Under polarized light, i.e., through a linear

  11. Macrophage polarization differs between apical granulomas, radicular cysts, and dentigerous cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Manuel; Schlittenbauer, Tilo; Moebius, Patrick; Büttner-Herold, Maike; Ries, Jutta; Preidl, Raimund; Geppert, Carol-Immanuel; Neukam, Friedrich W; Wehrhan, Falk

    2018-01-01

    Apical periodontitis can appear clinically as apical granulomas or radicular cysts. There is evidence that immunologic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of both pathologies. In contrast to radicular cysts, the dentigerous cysts have a developmental origin. Macrophage polarization (M1 vs M2) is a main regulator of tissue homeostasis and differentiation. There are no studies comparing macrophage polarization in apical granulomas, radicular cysts, and dentigerous cysts. Forty-one apical granulomas, 23 radicular cysts, and 23 dentigerous cysts were analyzed in this study. A tissue microarray (TMA) of the 87 consecutive specimens was created, and CD68-, CD11c-, CD163-, and MRC1-positive macrophages were detected by immunohistochemical methods. TMAs were digitized, and the expression of macrophage markers was quantitatively assessed. Radicular cysts are characterized by M1 polarization of macrophages while apical granulomas show a significantly higher degree of M2 polarization. Dentigerous cysts have a significantly lower M1 polarization than both analyzed periapical lesions (apical granulomas and radicular cysts) and accordingly, a significantly higher M2 polarization than radicular cysts. Macrophage cell density in dentigerous cysts is significantly lower than in the periapical lesions. The development of apical periodontitis towards apical granulomas or radicular cysts might be directed by macrophage polarization. Radicular cyst formation is associated with an increased M1 polarization of infiltrating macrophages. In contrast to radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts are characterized by a low macrophage infiltration and a high degree of M2 polarization, possibly reflecting their developmental rather than inflammatory origin. As M1 polarization of macrophages is triggered by bacterial antigens, these results underline the need for sufficient bacterial clearance during endodontic treatment to prevent a possible M1 macrophage-derived stimulus for radicular cyst

  12. Inherent polarization entanglement generated from a monolithic semiconductor chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Rolf T.; Kolenderski, Piotr; Kang, Dongpeng

    2013-01-01

    Creating miniature chip scale implementations of optical quantum information protocols is a dream for many in the quantum optics community. This is largely because of the promise of stability and scalability. Here we present a monolithically integratable chip architecture upon which is built...... a photonic device primitive called a Bragg reflection waveguide (BRW). Implemented in gallium arsenide, we show that, via the process of spontaneous parametric down conversion, the BRW is capable of directly producing polarization entangled photons without additional path difference compensation, spectral...... as a serious contender on which to build large scale implementations of optical quantum processing devices....

  13. Inherent polarization entanglement generated from a monolithic semiconductor chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Rolf T; Kolenderski, Piotr; Kang, Dongpeng; Abolghasem, Payam; Scarcella, Carmelo; Della Frera, Adriano; Tosi, Alberto; Helt, Lukas G; Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Sipe, J E; Weihs, Gregor; Helmy, Amr S; Jennewein, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Creating miniature chip scale implementations of optical quantum information protocols is a dream for many in the quantum optics community. This is largely because of the promise of stability and scalability. Here we present a monolithically integratable chip architecture upon which is built a photonic device primitive called a Bragg reflection waveguide (BRW). Implemented in gallium arsenide, we show that, via the process of spontaneous parametric down conversion, the BRW is capable of directly producing polarization entangled photons without additional path difference compensation, spectral filtering or post-selection. After splitting the twin-photons immediately after they emerge from the chip, we perform a variety of correlation tests on the photon pairs and show non-classical behaviour in their polarization. Combined with the BRW's versatile architecture our results signify the BRW design as a serious contender on which to build large scale implementations of optical quantum processing devices.

  14. Precessing deuteron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the acceleration in the Nuclotron of deuterons polarized in the horizontal plane is considered. This horizontal polarization is named precessing polarization. The effects of the main magnetic field and synchrotron oscillations are included. The precessing polarization is supposed to be used in studying the polarization parameters of the elastic dp back-scattering and other experiments

  15. Ect2/Pbl acts via Rho and polarity proteins to direct the assembly of an isotropic actomyosin cortex upon mitotic entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, André; Vlassaks, Evi; Pichaud, Franck; Baum, Buzz

    2015-03-09

    Entry into mitosis is accompanied by profound changes in cortical actomyosin organization. Here, we delineate a pathway downstream of the RhoGEF Pbl/Ect2 that directs this process in a model epithelium. Our data suggest that the release of Pbl/Ect2 from the nucleus at mitotic entry drives Rho-dependent activation of Myosin-II and, in parallel, induces a switch from Arp2/3 to Diaphanous-mediated cortical actin nucleation that depends on Cdc42, aPKC, and Par6. At the same time, the mitotic relocalization of these apical protein complexes to more lateral cell surfaces enables Cdc42/aPKC/Par6 to take on a mitosis-specific function-aiding the assembly of a relatively isotropic metaphase cortex. Together, these data reveal how the repolarization and remodeling of the actomyosin cortex are coordinated upon entry into mitosis to provide cells with the isotropic and rigid form they need to undergo faithful chromosome segregation and division in a crowded tissue environment. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. PolarTrack: Optical Outside-In Device Tracking that Exploits Display Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rädle, Roman; Jetter, Hans-Christian; Fischer, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    PolarTrack is a novel camera-based approach to detecting and tracking mobile devices inside the capture volume. In PolarTrack, a polarization filter continuously rotates in front of an off-the-shelf color camera, which causes the displays of observed devices to periodically blink in the camera feed....... The periodic blinking results from the physical characteristics of current displays, which shine polarized light either through an LC overlay to produce images or through a polarizer to reduce light reflections on OLED displays. PolarTrack runs a simple detection algorithm on the camera feed to segment...... tracking accuracy and precision with similar tracking reliability. PolarTrack works as standalone multi-device tracking but is also compatible with existing camera-based tracking systems and can complement them to compensate for their limitations....

  17. Polare maskuliniteter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Anne Hauan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper my aim is to read and understand the journal of Gerrit de Veer from the last journey of William Barents to the Arctic Regions in 1596 and the journal of captain Junge on his hunting trip from Tromsø to Svalbard in 1834.It is nearly 240 years between this to voyages. The first journal is known as the earliest report from the arctic era. Gerrit de Veer adds instructive copper engravings to his text and give us insight in the crews meeting with this new land. Captain Junges journal is found together with his dead crew in a house in a fjord nearby Ny-Ålesund and has no drawings, but word. Both of these journals may be read as sources of the knowledge and understanding of the polar region. They might also unveil the ideas of how to deal with and survive under the challenges that is given. In addition one can ask if the sources can tell us more about how men describe their challenges. Can the way they expressed themselves in the journals give us an understanding of masculinity? And not least help us to create good questions of the change in the ideas of masculinities which is said to follow the change in understanding of the wilderness.

  18. Dynamics of superconducting order parameter through ultrafast normal-to-superconducting phase transition in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ from multipulse polarization-resolved transient optical reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, I.; Baranov, V. V.; Toda, Y.; Oda, M.; Kurosawa, T.; Kabanov, V. V.; Mertelj, T.; Mihailovic, D.

    2017-11-01

    A systematic temperature-dependent study of the femtosecond optical superconducting (SC) state destruction and recovery in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ cuprate superconductor by means of the all-optical polarization-sensitive multipulse spectroscopy is presented. At low temperatures and a partial SC state suppression, an anisotropic SC-gap recovery time scale is suggested by the data. The SC state destruction and recovery dynamics are compared to the recent TR-ARPES-inferred SC-gap dynamics and a qualitative agreement is found. Using a phenomenological response function, the experimental data are also compared to time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model simulations.

  19. Specular neutron reflectivity and beyond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A polarized neutron reflectometer for vertical samples is available at Dhruva reactor guide hall, Trombay. The reflectometer has been designed for horizontal scattering vector. It uses a position-sensitive detector for obtaining the reflectivity pattern. This arrangement allows one to obtain diffuse or off-specular intensity around ...

  20. Specular neutron reflectivity and beyond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A polarized neutron reflectometer for vertical samples is available at Dhruva reactor guide hall, Trombay. The reflectometer has been designed for horizontal scattering vector. It uses a position-sensitive detector for obtaining the reflectivity pattern. This arrangement allows one to obtain diffuse or off-specular ...

  1. The optics of secondary polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, D.C.

    1990-05-01

    Polarized protons can be produced by the parity-violating decay of either lambda or sigma hyperons. A secondary bema of polarized protons can then be produced without the difficult procedure of accelerating polarized protons. The preservation of the polarization while the protons are being transmitted to a final focus places stringent limitations on the optics of the beam line. The equations of motion of a polarized particle in a magnetic field have been solved to first order for quadrupole and dipole magnets. The lowest order terms indicate that the polarization vector will be restored to its original direction upon passage through a magnetic system if the momentum vector is unaltered. Higher-order terms may be derived by an expansion in commutators of the rotation matrix and its longitudinal derivative. The higher-order polarization rotation terms then arise from the non-commutivity of the rotation matrices by large angles in three-dimensional space. 5 refs., 3 figs

  2. Broadband asymmetric transmission of linearly polarized electromagnetic waves based on chiral metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Lincy; Yogesh, N.; Subramanian, V.

    2018-01-01

    The giant optical activity of chiral metamaterials (CMMs) holds great potential for tailoring the polarization state of an electromagnetic (EM) wave. In controlling the polarization state, the aspect of asymmetric transmission (AT), where a medium allows the EM radiation to pass through in one direction while restricting it in the opposite direction, adds additional degrees of freedom such as one-way channelling functionality. In this work, a CMM formed by a pair of mutually twisted slanted complementary metal strips is realized for broadband AT accompanied with cross-polarization (CP) conversion for linearly polarized EM waves. Numerically, the proposed ultra-thin (˜λ/42) CMM shows broadband AT from 8.58 GHz to 9.73 GHz (bandwidth of 1.15 GHz) accompanied with CP transmission magnitude greater than 0.9. The transmission and reflection spectra reveal the origin of the asymmetric transmission as the direction sensitive cross polarization conversion and anisotropic electric coupling occurring in the structure which is then elaborated with the surface current analysis and electric field distribution within the structure. An experiment is carried out to verify the broadband AT based CP conversion of the proposed CMM at microwave frequencies, and a reliable agreement between numerical and experimental results is obtained. Being ultra-thin, the reported broadband AT based CP conversion of the proposed CMM is useful for controlling radiation patterns in non-reciprocal EM devices and communication networks.

  3. Personal Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Personal Reflections. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 6 Issue 3 March 2001 pp 90-93 Personal Reflections. Why did I opt for Career in Science? Jayant V Narlikar · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 9 Issue 8 August 2004 pp 89-89 ...

  4. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  5. The Role of Self-Reflection, Emotional Management of Feedback, and Self-Regulation Processes in Self-Directed Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents and explores a framework of self-directed leadership development (SDLD) to advance conceptual understanding and practical applications for self-development approaches to development of leaders in organizations. Drawing on a diversified literature associated with experiential learning, emotion research, and social cognitive…

  6. Applicability of direct total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis for selenium determination in solutions related to environmental and geochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margui, E., E-mail: eva.margui@udg.edu [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Girona. Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Atominstitut TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria); Floor, G.H.; Hidalgo, M. [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Girona. Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Kregsamer, P. [Atominstitut TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria); Roman-Ross, G. [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Girona. Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Streli, C. [Atominstitut TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria); Queralt, I. [Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' , CSIC. Sole Sabaris s/n. 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    A significant amount of environmental studies related to selenium determination in different environmental compartments have been published in the last years due to the narrow range between the Se nutritious requirement as essential element and toxic effects upon exposure. However, the direct analysis of complex liquid samples like natural waters and extraction solutions presents significant problems related to the low Se concentrations and the complicated matrix of this type of samples. The goal of the present research was to study the applicability of direct TXRF analysis of different type of solutions commonly used in environmental and geochemical studies, confirm the absence or presence of matrix effects and evaluate the limits of detection and accuracy for Se determination in the different matrices. Good analytical results were obtained for the direct analysis of ground and rain water samples with limits of detection for Se two orders of magnitude lower than the permissible Se concentration in drinking waters ([Se] = 10 {mu}g/L) according to the WHO. However, the Se detection limits for more complex liquid samples such as thermal waters and extraction solutions were in the {mu}g/L range due to the presence of high contents of other elements present in the matrix (i.e., Br, Fe, Zn) or the high background of the TXRF spectrum that hamper the Se determination at trace levels. Our results give insight into the possibilities and drawbacks of direct TXRF analysis and to a certain extent the potential applications in the environmental and geochemical field.

  7. Quantifying Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, Gordon Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    This paper documents 1st semester student reflections on “learning to learn” in a team-based PBL environment with quantitative and qualitative student reflective feedback on the learning gains of 60 Architectural Technology and Construction Management students at VIA University College, Denmark....... It contrasts the students’ self-assessment in a range of ‘product’ skills such as Revit, Structural Design, Mathematics of construction, Technical Installations; as well as ‘process’ competencies such as ‘Working in a team’, Sharing knowledge, Maintaining a portfolio and Reflecting ON learning and FOR learning......´ These are all based on Blooms taxonomy and levels of competence and form a major part of individual student and group learning portfolios. Key Words :Project-Based learning, Reflective Portfolios, Self assessment, Defining learning gains, Developing learning strategies , Reflections on and for learning...

  8. In situ study by polarization modulated Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the structure and orientation of lipids and amphipathic peptides at the air-water interface

    OpenAIRE

    Cornut, I.; Desbat, B.; Turlet, J.M.; Dufourcq, J.

    1996-01-01

    Free amphipathic peptides and peptides bound to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) were studied directly at the air/water interface using polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PMIRRAS). Such differential reflectivity measurements proved to be a sensitive and efficient technique to investigate in situ the respective conformations and orientations of lipid and peptide molecules in pure and mixed films. Data obtained for melittin, a natural hemolytic peptide, ar...

  9. The effect of bi-directional reflectance distribution function on the estimation of vegetation indices and leaf area index (LAI): A case study of the vegetation in succession stages after forest fire in northwestern Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, K.; Matsuyama, H.; Tsuzuki, H.; Sweda, T.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the dependence of the satellite data on sun/sensor geometry must be considered in the case of monitoring vegetation from satellites. Vegetation structure causes uneven scattering of sunlight, which is expressed by bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). The purpose of this study is to estimate the effect of BRDF of monitoring vegetation using the reflectance of visible and near-infrared bands. We investigated the vegetation in succession stages after forest fire (main species: spruce) in the northwestern Canada. BRF (Bidirectional Reflectance Factor) was measured in the seven sites of some succession stages, along with the measurements of leaf area index (LAI) and biomass. The main results obtained in this study are summarized as follows. (1) In each site, the difference of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) value around 0.1-0.2 was caused by BRDF when the sensor angle was changed from -15deg to 15 deg, being equivalent to the standard image of IKONOS. Also, LAI estimated by NDVI varied from 22% to 65% of the average. (2) The robustness of other vegetation indices to BRDF was compared. The reflectance of the near-infrared band normalized by the sum of other bands (nNIR), and Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI) were investigated along with NDVI. It is clarified that nNIR was most robust in the site where vegetation existed. GEMI was most robust in the sites of scarce vegetation, while NDVI was strongly affected by BRDF in such sites

  10. Polarized View of Supercooled Liquid Water Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven E.; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, where liquid droplets exist at temperatures below 0 C present a well known aviation hazard through aircraft icing, in which SLW accretes on the airframe. SLW clouds are common over the Southern Ocean, and climate-induced changes in their occurrence is thought to constitute a strong cloud feedback on global climate. The two recent NASA field campaigns POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX, based in Palmdale, California, January-February 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, based in Houston, Texas in August- September 2013) provided a unique opportunity to observe SLW clouds from the high-altitude airborne platform of NASA's ER-2 aircraft. We present an analysis of measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during these experiments accompanied by correlative retrievals from other sensors. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. It is a scanning sensor taking samples at 0.8deg intervals within 60deg from nadir in both forward and backward directions. This unique angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg. Simple parametric fitting algorithms applied to the polarized reflectance provide retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT),which allows retrieval of the droplet size distribution without assuming a size distribution shape. We present an overview of the RSP campaign datasets available from the NASA GISS website, as well as two detailed examples of the retrievals. In these case studies we focus on cloud fields with spatial features

  11. Seasonal soybean crop reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaster, E. W. (Principal Investigator); Chance, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented from field measurements of 1980 including 5 acquisitions of handheld radiometer reflectance measurements, 7 complete sets of parameters for implementing the Suits mode, and other biophysical parameters to characterize the soybean canopy. LANDSAT calculations on the simulated Brazilian soybean reflectance are included along with data collected during the summer and fall on 1981 on soybean single leaf optical parameters for three irrigation treatments. Tests of the Suits vegetative canopy reflectance model for the full hemisphere of observer directions as well as the nadir direction show moderate agreement for the visible channels of the MSS and poor agreement in the near infrared channel. Temporal changes in the spectral characteristics of the single leaves were seen to occur as a function of maturity which demonstrates that the absorptance of a soybean single leaf is more a function of thetransmittancee characteristics than the seasonally consistent single leaf reflectance.

  12. 1.55-μm VCSEL with polarization-independent HCG mirror on SOI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunemi, Yoshihiro; Yokota, Nobuhide; Majima, Shota; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Katayama, Takeo; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2013-11-18

    We designed and fabricated a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) incorporating a polarization-independent high-index-contrast subwavelength grating (HCG) mirror on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) for a novel polarization-bistable device on a silicon substrate. The VCSEL consists of the HCG mirror, an active layer with InGaAsP quantum wells having optical gain around 1.55 μm, and an Al0.9Ga0.1As/Al0.16Ga0.84As DBR. We used direct wafer bonding for the bonding between the active layer and the AlGaAs DBR, and benzocyclobutene (BCB) bonding for the bonding between the active layer and the polarization-independent HCG mirror. The reflectivity of the HCG embedded with BCB was measured, resulting in a 200-nm-high reflectivity band with reflectivity higher than 99% and a small polarization dependence of ± 1%. We achieved lasing of the fabricated HCG-VCSEL at 1527 nm under an optical short pulse excitation with an average power of 50 mW (~0.2 mJ/cm2) at 240 K.

  13. Reflection ciphers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boura, Christina; Canteaut, Anne; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde

    2017-01-01

    study the necessary properties for this coupling permutation. Special care has to be taken of some related-key distinguishers since, in the context of reflection ciphers, they may provide attacks in the single-key setting.We then derive some criteria for constructing secure reflection ciphers...... and analyze the security properties of different families of coupling permutations. Finally, we concentrate on the case of reflection block ciphers and, as an illustration, we provide concrete examples of key schedules corresponding to several coupling permutations, which lead to new variants of the block...

  14. The Probing Radio Signal Polarization Effect on Separation Efficiency of Surface Target Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Pinchuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was a quantitative analysis of the level of interference with radar monitoring characteristics of surface targets, caused by the scattered electromagnetic field, arising due to the interaction between radio waves and sea surface, which is a study aspect a radiooceanography encompasses. Backscatter signal, arising from the interaction of radio waves and sea surface, extends in a direction opposite the probing radar signal of spread marine and coastal radar stations.With radar sounding of sea surface at high incidence angles of radio waves, a basic physical mechanism to form the received signal is resonant (Bragg scattering, and at small incidence angles of radio waves it is quasi-specular reflection. Consequently, the energy of electromagnetic radiation, backscattered by the sea surface, depends on the type of wave polarization: for horizontal polarization it is less than for vertical one.The paper presents a mathematical model, which describes dependence of interference level caused by interaction between radio waves and sea surface, on the radio wave polarization for the case when the same polarization is used to sent-out and receive a radio wave.To determine the noise reduction to be achievable with radar monitoring the surface targets by selecting the polarization of the probing radar signal, a signal/noise ratio is analyzed for its different polarizations.It is shown that in order to reduce the noise level caused by the interaction between radio waves and sea surface, it is possible to use the differences in the level of scattered radio signals of different polarization: with horizontally-polarized radar operation at incidence angles of 75°- 85° a signal/noise ratio is by 20-35 dB higher than that of vertically- polarized one.

  15. Community-based physical activity and wheelchair mobility programs for individuals with spinal cord injury in Canada: Current reflections and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Krista L; Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Kelly P; Sweet, Shane N

    2017-11-01

    A clear need has been identified to find strategies and opportunities, beyond services provided during rehabilitation, to enhance community-based mobility and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) participation among members of the spinal cord injury (SCI) population. This review of existing mobility and LTPA programs that are available for individuals with SCI in Canada reflects the authors' current knowledge of existing evidence-based and community-based programs. The authors aim to highlight the gaps between existing programs and future needs. The major gaps identified in this brief clinical report include the need for: community-based mobility training programs, patient reported outcomes, assessment of long-term impact of programs, identifying the best approaches for program delivery, and developing researcher-stakeholder partnerships. Evidence-based mobility programs and community-based LTPA do exist, and the available research shows their promise. Despite the growing research for LTPA and mobility programs among adults with SCI, many gaps remain. Additional partnerships, community engagement practices, service program funding and health policy changes are needed to address the highlighted gaps to optimize community-based programs and enhance the lives of adults with SCI.

  16. Direct Determination of Oxidation States of Uranium in Mixed-Valent Uranium Oxides Using Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Kaushik; Khooha, Ajay; Das, Gangadhar; Tiwari, M K; Misra, N L

    2017-01-03

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF)-based X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy has been used to determine the oxidation state of uranium in mixed-valent U 3 O 8 and U 3 O 7 uranium oxides. The TXRF spectra of the compounds were measured using variable X-ray energies in the vicinity of the U L 3 edge in the TXRF excitation mode at the microfocus beamline of the Indus-2 synchrotron facility. The TXRF-based X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (TXRF-XANES) spectra were deduced from the emission spectra measured using the energies below and above the U L 3 edge in the XANES region. The data processing using TXRF-XANES spectra of U(IV), U(V), and U(VI) standard compounds revealed that U present in U 3 O 8 is a mixture of U(V) and U(VI), whereas U in U 3 O 7 is mixture of U(IV) and U(VI). The results obtained in this study are similar to that reported in literature using the U M edge. The present study has demonstrated the possibility of application of TXRF for the oxidation state determination and elemental speciation of radioactive substances in a nondestructive manner with very small amount of sample requirement.

  17. Listeners' processing of a given reduced word pronunciation variant directly reflects their exposure to this variant: Evidence from native listeners and learners of French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sophie; Ernestus, Mirjam

    2017-04-24

    In casual conversations, words often lack segments. This study investigates whether listeners rely on their experience with reduced word pronunciation variants during the processing of single segment reduction. We tested three groups of listeners in a lexical decision experiment with French words produced either with or without word-medial schwa (e.g., /ʀəvy/ and /ʀvy/ for revue). Participants also rated the relative frequencies of the two pronunciation variants of the words. If the recognition accuracy and reaction times (RTs) for a given listener group correlate best with the frequencies of occurrence holding for that given listener group, recognition is influenced by listeners' exposure to these variants. Native listeners' relative frequency ratings correlated well with their accuracy scores and RTs. Dutch advanced learners' accuracy scores and RTs were best predicted by their own ratings. In contrast, the accuracy and RTs from Dutch beginner learners of French could not be predicted by any relative frequency rating; the rating task was probably too difficult for them. The participant groups showed behaviour reflecting their difference in experience with the pronunciation variants. Our results strongly suggest that listeners store the frequencies of occurrence of pronunciation variants, and consequently the variants themselves.

  18. Observing the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization with Variable-delay Polarization Modulators for the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kathleen; CLASS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The search for inflationary primordial gravitational waves and the optical depth to reionization, both through their imprint on the large angular scale correlations in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), has created the need for high sensitivity measurements of polarization across large fractions of the sky at millimeter wavelengths. These measurements are subjected to instrumental and atmospheric 1/f noise, which has motivated the development of polarization modulators to facilitate the rejection of these large systematic effects.Variable-delay polarization modulators (VPMs) are used in the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) telescopes as the first element in the optical chain to rapidly modulate the incoming polarization. VPMs consist of a linearly polarizing wire grid in front of a moveable flat mirror; varying the distance between the grid and the mirror produces a changing phase shift between polarization states parallel and perpendicular to the grid which modulates Stokes U (linear polarization at 45°) and Stokes V (circular polarization). The reflective and scalable nature of the VPM enables its placement as the first optical element in a reflecting telescope. This simultaneously allows a lock-in style polarization measurement and the separation of sky polarization from any instrumental polarization farther along in the optical chain.The Q-Band CLASS VPM was the first VPM to begin observing the CMB full time in 2016. I will be presenting its design and characterization as well as demonstrating how modulating polarization significantly rejects atmospheric and instrumental long time scale noise.

  19. Conversion from surface wave to surface wave on reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    can be transmitted without changing its direction (nevertheless the amplitude varies). For other media parameters, only normally incident surface waves can be converted to surface waves. We propose applications of the predicted conversion as a beam splitter and polarization filter for surface waves.......We discuss the reflection and transmission of an incident surface wave to a pure surface wave state at another interface. This is allowed only for special media parameters: at least one of the media must be magnetic. We found such material characteristics that the obliquely incident surface wave...

  20. 10-Gbit/s direct modulation of a TO-56-can packed 600-μm long laser diode with 2% front-facet reflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Ying; Su, Yu-Chuan; Li, Yi-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Lin; Lin, Gong-Cheng; Chen, Shian-Ming; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-10-21

    A 600-μm long-cavity laser diode with a front-facet reflectance of 2% is demonstrated as a colorless OC-192 transmitter for the future DWDM-PON, which is packed in a TO-56-can package of only 4-GHz frequency bandwidth but can be over-bandwidth modulated with 10-Gbit/s non-return-to-zero data-stream. The coherent injection-locking successfully suppresses its side-mode intensity and noise floor level, which further improves its modulation throughput at higher frequencies. With increasing the coherent injection-locking power from -12 to -3 dBm, the side-mode suppression ratio significantly increases from 39 to 50 dB, which also suppresses the frequency chirp from -12 to -4 GHz within a temporal range of 150 ps. The dense but weak longitudinal modes (with 0.6-nm spacing) in the long-cavity laser diode suppresses to one single-mode in a 100-GHz wide DWDM channel for carrying the OC-192 data at 9.953 Gbit/s. Such an over-bandwidth modulated laser diode still exhibits an on/off extinction ratio of 6.68 dB and a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.96 dB, which can provide a back-to-back receiving power sensitivity of -12.2 dBm at BER of 10⁻⁹. After 25-km DSF transmission of the OOK data-stream at a bit rate up to 10 Gbit/s, the receiving power sensitivity is -10.1 dBm at a requested BER of 10⁻⁹.

  1. High-efficiency broadband polarization converter based on Ω-shaped metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyao; Huang, Lingling; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Juan; Wang, Yongtian

    2017-11-01

    The polarization state, which cannot be directly detected by human eyes, forms an important characteristic of electromagnetic waves. Control of polarization states has long been pursued for various applications. Conventional polarization converters can hardly meet the requirements in lab-on-chip systems, due to the involvement of bulk materials. Here, we propose the design and realization of a linear to circular polarization converter based on metasurfaces. The metasurface is deliberately designed using achiral two-fold mirror symmetry Ω-shaped antennas. The converter integrates a ground metal plane, a spacer dielectric layer and an antenna array, leading to a high conversion efficiency and broad operating bandwidth in the near infrared regime. The calculated Stokes parameters indicate an excellent conversion of linear to circular polarization for the reflected light. The tunability of the bandwidth by oblique incidence and by modulating the thickness of the dielectric layer is also introduced and demonstrated, which shows great flexibilities for such metasurface converters. The proposed metasurface may open up intriguing possibilities towards the realization of ultrathin nanophotonic devices for polarization manipulation and wavefront engineering.

  2. Molecular orientation of submonolayer rhodamine-6G on quartz substrates: A comparative study using reflection and transmission UV-Vis spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elking, M.D.; He, G.; Xu, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Reflection and transmission UV-Vis spectroscopy have been applied to study the molecular orientation and surface density of rhodamine-6G molecules physisorbed on optically flat quartz (SiO 2 ) substrates. Our results have shown that for the s-polarized excitation, the submonolayer of physisorbed rhodamine-6G dye molecules causes enhanced reflection in the wavelength region from 400 nm to 600 nm where the electronic transition takes place. For the p-polarized excitation, the reflection is enhanced when the angle of incidence is smaller than Brewster close-quote s angle of quartz at 55.6 degree, and the reflection is reduced when the angle of incidence is larger than Brewster close-quote s angle of quartz. An independent method has been established in this paper by which the molecular orientation can be determined accurately by carrying out optical measurements in both the reflection and transmission directions. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  4. Reflection of light from an anisotropic medium

    OpenAIRE

    Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Ignatovich, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    We present here a general approach to treat reflection and refraction of light of arbitrary polarization from single axis anisotropic plates. We show that reflection from interface inside the anisotropic medium is accompanied by beam splitting and can create surface waves.

  5. Electrochemical regulation of budding yeast polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Haupt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells are naturally surrounded by organized electrical signals in the form of local ion fluxes, membrane potential, and electric fields (EFs at their surface. Although the contribution of electrochemical elements to cell polarity and migration is beginning to be appreciated, underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we show that an exogenous EF can orient cell polarization in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, directing the growth of mating projections towards sites of hyperpolarized membrane potential, while directing bud emergence in the opposite direction, towards sites of depolarized potential. Using an optogenetic approach, we demonstrate that a local change in membrane potential triggered by light is sufficient to direct cell polarization. Screens for mutants with altered EF responses identify genes involved in transducing electrochemical signals to the polarity machinery. Membrane potential, which is regulated by the potassium transporter Trk1p, is required for polarity orientation during mating and EF response. Membrane potential may regulate membrane charges through negatively charged phosphatidylserines (PSs, which act to position the Cdc42p-based polarity machinery. These studies thus define an electrochemical pathway that directs the orientation of cell polarization.

  6. Polarization Observations of the Fermi blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Bindu; S. Jorstad, A. P. Marscher (BU, USA), K. Sokolovsky (IAASARS, Greece), I. Agudo (CSIC, Spain)

    2018-01-01

    Ever since the revolutionary discovery by the Fermi mission that active galactic nuclei (AGN) produce copious amounts of high-energy emission, its origin has remained elusive. Using high-frequency radio interferometry (VLBI) polarization imaging, we could probe the magnetic field topology of the compact high-energy emission regions in blazars. A case study for blazar 3C 279 reveals presence of multiple gamma-ray emission regions. The observed anti-correlation between gamma-ray flux and percentage polarization at optical bands challenges the current high-energy emission models. In addition to the turbulent component responsible for gamma-ray flares, our analysis suggests the presence of a steady polarized component having with its polarization direction aligned along the jet axis. The steady polarized component could possibly be the toroidal component of the helical magnetic field. To better understand the acceleration processes in jets, high-energy polarization missions are of great importance.

  7. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. IV. Polarization timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Goosmann, R. W.; Marin, F.; Savić, D.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Optical observations cannot resolve the structure of active galactic nuclei (AGN), and a unified model for AGN was inferred mostly from indirect methods, such as spectroscopy and variability studies. Optical reverberation mapping allowed us to constrain the spatial dimension of the broad emission line region and thereby to measure the mass of supermassive black holes. Recently, reverberation was also applied to the polarized signal emerging from different AGN components. In principle, this should allow us to measure the spatial dimensions of the sub-parsec reprocessing media. Aim. We conduct numerical modeling of polarization reverberation and provide theoretical predictions for the polarization time lag induced by different AGN components. The model parameters are adjusted to the observational appearance of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. Methods: We modeled scattering-induced polarization and tested different geometries for the circumnuclear dust component. Our tests included the effects of clumpiness and different dust prescriptions. To further extend the model, we also explored the effects of additional ionized winds stretched along the polar direction, and of an equatorial scattering ring that is responsible for the polarization angle observed in pole-on AGN. The simulations were run using a time-dependent version of the STOKES code. Results: Our modeling confirms the previously found polarization characteristics as a function of the observer`s viewing angle. When the dust adopts a flared-disk geometry, the lags reveal a clear difference between type 1 and type 2 AGN. This distinction is less clear for a torus geometry where the time lag is more sensitive to the geometry and optical depth of the inner surface layers of the funnel. The presence of a scattering equatorial ring and ionized outflows increased the recorded polarization time lags, and the polar outflows smooths out dependence on viewing angle, especially for the higher optical depth of the

  8. Reflective optics

    CERN Document Server

    Korsch, Dietrich

    1991-01-01

    This is the first book dedicated exclusively to all-reflective imaging systems. It is a teaching tool as well as a practical design tool for anyone who specializes in optics, particularly for those interested in telescopes, infrared, and grazing-incidence systems. The first part of the book describes a unified geometric optical theory of all-reflective imaging systems (from near-normal to grazing incidence) developed from basic principles. The second part discusses correction methods and a multitude of closed-form solutions of well-corrected systems, supplemented with many conventional and unc

  9. Adapting the HSV polarization-color mapping for regions with low irradiance and high polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Tyo, J; Ratliff, Bradley M; Alenin, Andrey S

    2016-10-15

    Many mappings from polarization into color have been developed so that polarization information can be displayed. One of the most common of these maps the angle of linear polarization into color hue and degree of linear polarization into color saturation, while preserving the irradiance information from the polarization data. While this strategy enjoys wide popularity, there is a large class of polarization images for which it is not ideal. It is common to have images where the strongest polarization signatures (in terms of degree of polarization) occur in regions of relatively low irradiance: either in shadow in reflective bands or in cold regions in emissive bands. Since the irradiance is low, the chromatic properties of the resulting images are generally not apparent. Here we present an alternate mapping that uses the statistics of the angle of polarization as a measure of confidence in the polarization signature, then amplifies the irradiance in regions of high confidence, and leaves it unchanged in regions of low confidence. Results are shown from an LWIR and a visible spectrum imager.

  10. Polar transport in plants mediated by membrane transporters: focus on mechanisms of polar auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naramoto, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    Directional cell-to-cell transport of functional molecules, called polar transport, enables plants to sense and respond to developmental and environmental signals. Transporters that localize to plasma membranes (PMs) in a polar manner are key components of these systems. PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers, which are the most studied polar-localized PM proteins, are implicated in the polar transport of auxin that in turn regulates plant development and tropic growth. In this review, the regulatory mechanisms underlying polar localization of PINs, control of auxin efflux activity, and PIN abundance at PMs are considered. Up to date information on polar-localized nutrient transporters that regulate directional nutrient movement from soil into the root vasculature is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Polarization Signals of Common Spacecraft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravseth, Ian; Culp, Robert D.; King, Nicole

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report documenting the results of the polarization testing of near-planar objects with various reflectance properties. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the portion of the reflected signal which is polarized for materials commonly used in space applications. Tests were conducted on several samples, with surface characteristics ranging from highly reflective to relatively dark. The measurements were obtained by suspending the test object in a beam of collimated light. The amount of light falling on the sample was controlled by a circular aperture placed in the light field. The polarized reflectance at various phase angles was then measured. A nonlinear least squares fitting program was used for analysis. For the specular test objects, the reflected signals were measured in one degree increments near the specular point. Otherwise, measurements were taken every five degrees in phase angle. Generally, the more diffuse surfaces had lower polarized reflectances than their more specular counterparts. The reflected signals for the more diffuse surfaces were spread over a larger phase angle range, while the signals from the more specular samples were reflected almost entirely within five degrees of angular deviation from the specular point. The method used to test all the surfaces is presented. The results of this study will be used to support the NASA Orbital Debris Optical Signature Tests. These tests are intended to help better understand the reflectance properties of materials often used in space applications. This data will then be used to improve the capabilities for identification and tracking of space debris.

  12. Personal Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Jochen and Werner Heisenberg. Personal Reflections Volume 10 Issue 1 January 2005 pp 93-96. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/01/0093-0096. Resonance – Journal of ...

  13. PERSONAL REFLECTIONS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Resonance journal of science education. April 2015 Volume 20 Number 4. GENERALARTICLES ... Development of. Probability Theory. K B Athreya. Classroom. Tutorial on Phyloge- netic Inference –1. Felix Bast. 360. 346. 286. PERSONAL REFLECTIONS. 368 The Road to IISc. M L Munjal (Transcribed by Maneesh Kunte).

  14. Influência da direção de semeadura do milho nas variáveis reflectância e índice de vegetação verde normalizado Influence of the row direction of corn on the reflectance and green normalized difference vegetation index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo G. de Souza

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Com este trabalho, objetivou-se estudar a influência da direção de semeadura do milho (Zea Mays L. na sua reflectância na banda 550 nm (r550 e no Índice de Vegetação Verde da Diferença Normalizado - IVVDN, visando fornecer informações necessárias à viabilização de um sistema de aplicação localizada de nitrogênio (N em tempo real. O sistema de semeadura utilizado foi o direto, administrando-se os nutrientes de acordo com análise do solo e com uma taxa de N de 160 kg ha-1. As linhas de semeadura foram localizadas na direção Norte-Sul e Leste-Oeste. Conclui-se que o milho semeado na direção Leste-Oeste apresentou valores para reflectância r550 e índice de vegetação IVVDN menores e menos dependente da hora do dia que o milho semeado na direção Norte-Sul. O IVVDN mostrou-se mais apropriado para uso em sistemas de aplicação de fertilizantes a taxas variáveis em tempo real utilizando-se técnicas de sensoriamento remoto, por se mostrar menos sensível á direção de semeadura.The objective of this work was to study the influence of the row direction of corn (Zea mays on its spectral properties measured in the field, including the green normalized difference vegetation index (Green NDVI. Spectral properties of corn are known to be related to the nitrogen (N status of the corn and may form the basis for real-time site-specific rates of N application. Row direction effects on spectral properties may be substantial before canopy closure. If so, it will be necessary to account for these effects in order to accurately predict the N need of corn from spectral measurements. Corn was planted directly, with no tillage, in North-South (NS and East-West (EW oriented rows. Nitrogen was applied as ammonium nitrate at a rate of 160 kg N ha-1. Reflectance was measured with spectral radiometers placed 30 cm above individual plants. Reflectance and green NDVI were bly dependent on time of day for corn in NS rows, and much less so for corn

  15. Monitoring of an esterification reaction by on-line direct liquid sampling mass spectrometry and in-line mid infrared spectrometry with an attenuated total reflectance probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Andrew W.; McAulay, Edith A.J. [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry and CPACT, University of Strathclyde, 295 Cathedral Street, Glasgow, G1 1XL (United Kingdom); Nordon, Alison, E-mail: alison.nordon@strath.ac.uk [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry and CPACT, University of Strathclyde, 295 Cathedral Street, Glasgow, G1 1XL (United Kingdom); Littlejohn, David, E-mail: d.littlejohn@strath.ac.uk [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry and CPACT, University of Strathclyde, 295 Cathedral Street, Glasgow, G1 1XL (United Kingdom); Lynch, Thomas P. [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry and CPACT, University of Strathclyde, 295 Cathedral Street, Glasgow, G1 1XL (United Kingdom); Lancaster, J. Steven [Hull Research and Technology Centre, BP Chemicals, Hull, HU12 8DS (United Kingdom); Wright, Robert G. [Thermo Fisher Scientific, Winsford, Cheshire, CW7 3GA (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • High efficiency thermal vaporiser designed and used for on-line reaction monitoring. • Concentration profiles of all reactants and products obtained from mass spectra. • By-product formed from the presence of an impurity detected by MS but not MIR. • Mass spectrometry can detect trace and bulk components unlike molecular spectrometry. - Abstract: A specially designed thermal vaporiser was used with a process mass spectrometer designed for gas analysis to monitor the esterification of butan-1-ol and acetic anhydride. The reaction was conducted at two scales: in a 150 mL flask and a 1 L jacketed batch reactor, with liquid delivery flow rates to the vaporiser of 0.1 and 1.0 mL min{sup −1}, respectively. Mass spectrometry measurements were made at selected ion masses, and classical least squares multivariate linear regression was used to produce concentration profiles for the reactants, products and catalyst. The extent of reaction was obtained from the butyl acetate profile and found to be 83% and 76% at 40 °C and 20 °C, respectively, at the 1 L scale. Reactions in the 1 L reactor were also monitored by in-line mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry; off-line gas chromatography (GC) was used as a reference technique when building partial least squares (PLS) multivariate calibration models for prediction of butyl acetate concentrations from the MIR spectra. In validation experiments, good agreement was achieved between the concentration of butyl acetate obtained from in-line MIR spectra and off-line GC. In the initial few minutes of the reaction the profiles for butyl acetate derived from on-line direct liquid sampling mass spectrometry (DLSMS) differed from those of in-line MIR spectrometry owing to the 2 min transfer time between the reactor and mass spectrometer. As the reaction proceeded, however, the difference between the concentration profiles became less noticeable. DLSMS had advantages over in-line MIR spectrometry as it was easier to

  16. Monitoring of an esterification reaction by on-line direct liquid sampling mass spectrometry and in-line mid infrared spectrometry with an attenuated total reflectance probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, Andrew W.; McAulay, Edith A.J.; Nordon, Alison; Littlejohn, David; Lynch, Thomas P.; Lancaster, J. Steven; Wright, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High efficiency thermal vaporiser designed and used for on-line reaction monitoring. • Concentration profiles of all reactants and products obtained from mass spectra. • By-product formed from the presence of an impurity detected by MS but not MIR. • Mass spectrometry can detect trace and bulk components unlike molecular spectrometry. - Abstract: A specially designed thermal vaporiser was used with a process mass spectrometer designed for gas analysis to monitor the esterification of butan-1-ol and acetic anhydride. The reaction was conducted at two scales: in a 150 mL flask and a 1 L jacketed batch reactor, with liquid delivery flow rates to the vaporiser of 0.1 and 1.0 mL min −1 , respectively. Mass spectrometry measurements were made at selected ion masses, and classical least squares multivariate linear regression was used to produce concentration profiles for the reactants, products and catalyst. The extent of reaction was obtained from the butyl acetate profile and found to be 83% and 76% at 40 °C and 20 °C, respectively, at the 1 L scale. Reactions in the 1 L reactor were also monitored by in-line mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry; off-line gas chromatography (GC) was used as a reference technique when building partial least squares (PLS) multivariate calibration models for prediction of butyl acetate concentrations from the MIR spectra. In validation experiments, good agreement was achieved between the concentration of butyl acetate obtained from in-line MIR spectra and off-line GC. In the initial few minutes of the reaction the profiles for butyl acetate derived from on-line direct liquid sampling mass spectrometry (DLSMS) differed from those of in-line MIR spectrometry owing to the 2 min transfer time between the reactor and mass spectrometer. As the reaction proceeded, however, the difference between the concentration profiles became less noticeable. DLSMS had advantages over in-line MIR spectrometry as it was easier to generate

  17. Observations of polarization of stellar radiation in R-associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlova, L.A.; Rspaev, F.K.

    1986-01-01

    New observational data have been obtained on BVR polarization parameters of stars in reflection nebulae in the Cas, Per R1, Ser, CMa R1 regions. Several stars are found to show variable polarization. For some of stars intrinsic polarization is derived. The effect of interstellar polarization has been taken into account by means of the Serkovski method. The connection of polarization vector with nebula structure considered. The local magnetic field is detected for CMa R1 region the scale of which is defined by association diameter

  18. Specular, diffuse and polarized imagery of an oat canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern C.; De Venecia, Kurt J.

    1988-01-01

    Light, polarized by specular reflection, has been found to be an important part of the light scattered by several measured plant canopies. The authors investigate for one canopy the relative importance of specularly reflected sunlight, specularly reflected light from other sources including skylight, and diffusely upwelling light. Polarization images are used to gain increased understanding of the radiation transfer process in a plant canopy. Analysis of the results suggests that properly analyzed polarized remotely sensed data, acquired under specific atmospheric conditions by a specially designed sensor, potentially provide measures of physiological and morphological states of plants in a canopy.

  19. Holographic reflector for reflective LCDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsushi; Murillo-Mora, Luis M.; Iwata, Fujio

    1997-05-01

    We describe a new holographic optical element to improve the image's quality of a reflective liquid crystal displays (LCDs). This new holographic reflector consists basically of 2 layers: a volume type transmission hologram layer and a metallic reflection layer. Compared with conventional reflectors for reflective LCDs, a high optical efficiency can be obtained because the hologram is able to concentrate the reflected light to the observer's eyes. Also, it avoids the problems of glare in the LCDs by deviating the reflected incident light (used for display) away from the direction of the direct reflection light. The transmission hologram's low wavelength selectivity permits us to obtain a near white color reflector for reflective LCDs which for multiple applications is the preferable color for the background.

  20. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live......In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  1. Polarization Statistics on 0.01 Hz Waves in the Lunar Plasma Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, S. K.; Halekas, J. S.; Harada, Y.; Farrell, W. M.; McFadden, J. P.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2017-12-01

    One generating mechanism for waves in the lunar plasma environment is through the process of resonant interactions with non-solar wind ions. In particular, this mechanism is believed to be a main generator of waves that lie near the ion cyclotron frequency; around 0.01 Hz. Both left-handed and right-handed polarization in the spacecraft frame has been observed for waves in this frequency range. Due to the effects of Doppler shift from the solar wind, the intrinsic polarization of the waves is not necessarily the same as their polarization in the spacecraft frame. A significant source of non-solar wind ions is incoming solar wind protons that are reflected by localized crustal magnetic fields on the lunar surface. Previous statistical studies have looked at the distribution of non-solar wind ions and 0.01 Hz waves around the Moon, and how they are influenced by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. Here we investigate the polarization statistics of 0.01 Hz waves around the Moon using ARTEMIS data from August 2011 through December 2016. Initial statistics on observation rates and location indicate that waves that appear left-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame are more common and have a broader spatial distribution around the Moon; waves that appear right-hand polarized are less frequently observed and are more centralized to the dawn side of the Moon. We further investigate how the distributions are related to IMF direction and lunar phase, and we make comparisons between non-solar wind ion distributions and polarization distributions. Additionally, we use a combination of wave analysis and ion tracing simulations to examine the intrinsic properties of these waves.

  2. Reflective Learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    self-directed learning views learners as responsible owners and managers of their own learning process. Self-directed learning integrates self-management with self-monitoring (the process whereby the learners monitor evaluate and regulate their cognitive learning strategies) (Bolhuis,. 1996; Garrison, 1997). The benefits ...

  3. Polarization and ellipticity of high-order harmonics from aligned molecules generated by linearly polarized intense laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, C. D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations for polarization and ellipticity of high-order harmonics from aligned N 2 , CO 2 , and O 2 molecules generated by linearly polarized lasers. Within the rescattering model, the two polarization amplitudes of the harmonics are determined by the photo-recombination amplitudes for photons emitted with polarization parallel or perpendicular to the direction of the same returning electron wave packet. Our results show clear species-dependent polarization states, in excellent agreement with experiments. We further note that the measured polarization ellipse of the harmonic furnishes the needed parameters for a 'complete' experiment in molecules.

  4. Label-free investigation of the effects of lithium niobate polarization on cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracchia, B.; Gennari, O.; Paturzo, M.; Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.

    2017-06-01

    The determination of contact area is pivotal to understand how biomaterials properties influence cell adhesion. In particular, the influence of surface charges is well-known but still controversial, especially when new functional materials and methods are introduced. Here, we use for the first time Holographic Total Internal Reflection Microscopy (HoloTIRM) to study the influence of the spontaneous polarization of ferroelectric lithium niobate (LN) on the adhesion properties of fibroblast cells. The selective illumination of a very thin region directly above the substrate, achieved by Total Internal Reflection, provides high-contrast images of the contact regions. Holographic recording, on the other hand, allows for label-free quantitative phase imaging of the contact areas between cells and LN. Phase signal is more sensitive in the first 100nm and, thus more reliable in order to locate focal contacts. This work shows that cells adhering on negatively polarized LN present a significant increase of the contact area in comparison with cells adhering on the positively polarized LN substrate, as well as an intensification of contact vicinity. This confirms the potential of LN as a platform for investigating the role of charges on cellular processes. The similarity of cell adhesion behavior on negatively polarized LN and glass control also confirms the possibility to use LN as an active substrate without impairing cell behavior.

  5. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  6. Invisibility via reflecting coating

    OpenAIRE

    Burdzy, Krzysztof; Kulczycki, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    We construct a subset $A$ of the unit disc with the following properties. (i) The set $A$ is the finite union of disjoint line segments. (ii) The shadow of $A$ is arbitrarily close to the shadow of the unit disc in "most" directions. (iii) If the line segments are considered to be mirrors reflecting light according to the classical law of specular reflection then most light rays hitting the set emerge on the other side of the disc moving along a parallel line and shifted by an arbitrarily sma...

  7. Propagation of polarized light in turbid media: simulated animation sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Gang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2000-01-01

    A time-resolved Monte Carlo technique was used to simulate the propagation of polarized light in turbid media. Calculated quantities include the reflection Mueller matrices, the transmission Mueller matrices, and the degree of polarization (DOP). The effects of the polarization state of the incident light and of the size of scatterers on the propagation of DOP were studied. Results are shown in animation sequences.

  8. Robotic data acquisition of directional reflectance factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bausch, W.C.; Lund, D.M.; Blue, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    A data collection platform for rapid and repeatable positioning of a down-looking radiometer was constructed using commercially available instrumentation and hardware. The platform also accommodated a second radiometer to measure irradiance at the same instant the other radiometer measured target radiance. Stepper motors position the down-looking radiometer at programmed view zenith and view azimuth angles. A Polycorder and stepper motor interface control the stepper motors while data acquisition is the sole responsibility of the Polycorder. Less than 15 min is required to measure target radiance from a full set of measurements consisting of 182 combinations of view zenith and view azimuth angles. Positioning accuracy of the viewing radiometer is within ± 0.2° for a nominal 15° angular movement. The system has proven to be dependable, easy to use, highly mobile, and adaptable. (author)

  9. Vector Sky Glint Corrections for Above Surface Retrieval of the Subsurface Polarized Light Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilerson, A.; Foster, R.; McGilloway, A.; Ibrahim, A.; El-habashi, A.; Carrizo, C.; Ahmed, S.

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge of the underwater light field is fundamental to determining the health of the world's oceans and coastal regions. For decades, traditional remote sensing retrieval methods that rely solely on the spectral intensity of the water-leaving light have provided indicators of marine ecosystem health. As the demand for retrieval accuracy rises, use of the polarized nature of light as an additional remote sensing tool is becoming necessary. In order to observe the underwater polarized light field from above the surface (for ship, shore, or satellite applications), a method of correcting the above water signal for the effects of polarized surface-reflected skylight is needed. For three weeks in July-August 2014, the NASA Ship Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR) cruise continuously observed the polarized radiance of the ocean and the sky using a HyperSAS-POL system. The system autonomously tracks the Sun position and the heading of the research vessel in order to maintain a fixed relative solar azimuth angle (i.e. ±90°) and therefore avoid the specular reflection of the sunlight. Additionally, in-situ inherent optical properties (IOPs) were continuously acquired using a set of instrument packages modified for underway measurement, hyperspectral radiometric measurements were taken manually at all stations, and an underwater polarimeter was deployed when conditions permitted. All measurements, above and below the sea surface, were combined and compared in an effort to first develop a glint (sky + Sun) correction scheme for the upwelling polarized signal from a wind-driven ocean surface and compare with one assuming that the ocean surface is flat. Accurate retrieval of the subsurface vector light field is demonstrated through comparisons with polarized radiative transfer codes and direct measurements made by the underwater polarimeter.

  10. Reflective Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel Jørgensen, Andriette

    2016-01-01

    In Breve fra min Have (Letters from my Garden), the Swedish landscape architect, Sven-Ingvar Andersson, produces dialogues about his garden to a wide circle of friends, colleagues, deceased and still living acquaintances such as Karen Blixen, Gertrude Stein, C. Th. Sørensen, Albrecht Dürer, Peter...... Høeg etetera. The dialogues work as a tool of reflection in terms of providing opportunity to examine his own beliefs, to explore the possible reasons for engaging in a particular activity. On the basis of Sven-Ingvar Andersson’s book a teaching program at the Aarhus School of Architecture provides...

  11. Inspiring Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchie, Mammo

    2011-01-01

    A numberof Chris Freeman's colleagues were asked to reflect on what they thought describes his life and work in a few words. Some of the colleagues replied including former SPRU students that were taught or supervised by Chris Freeman. Their views on what they thought were Chris Freeman's defining...... life is not free from fluctuations, cycles, disruptions, crises and destructions both human and ecological. Innovation research ought to position itself to address environmental, financial and economic crises. The third is innovation research for development by addressing not only poverty erdaication...

  12. Calibration of the instrumental polarization in LEST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    A method to calibrate the instrumental polarization of LEST (i.e., of the optics in front of the polarization and analysis package at the LEST secondary focus) is described and analysed. A laser sends a beam from the LEST observing room at ground level backwards through the telescope. The modulated return beam that has been reflected at the 2.4 m entrance window is received by the detector system at the end focus in the LEST observing room. Because of a wedge in the entrance window the reflections at the front and back window surfaces may be examined separately. The detected laser beam signals at the three AC frequencies are recorded as functions of the position angle of the modulator package at the LEST secondary focus. Aided by a theorem that is proven in the present paper, the information recorded by the detector system allows all unknowns of the instrumental polarization to be fully determined.

  13. Generating highly polarized nuclear spins in solution using dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolber, J.; Ellner, F.; Fridlund, B.

    2004-01-01

    A method to generate strongly polarized nuclear spins in solution has been developed, using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) at a temperature of 1.2K, and at a field of 3.354T, corresponding to an electron spin resonance frequency of 94GHz. Trityl radicals are used to directly polarize 13C...... and other low-γ nuclei. Subsequent to the DNP process, the solid sample is dissolved rapidly with a warm solvent to create a solution of molecules with highly polarized nuclear spins. Two main applications are proposed: high-resolution liquid state NMR with enhanced sensitivity, and the use...

  14. POLARIZED LIGHT IN PHYSIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Tondiy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The data on polarized light (PS - a new promising treatment, rehabilitation and prevention, which took its deserved place among the known therapeutic physical factors and may even compete with laser radiation of low and LED therapy. It is reflected the significant contribution of domestic scientists in the study of aircraft action on the body, its introduction in the treatment, rehabilitation and prevention of grippe, ARI. These action's mechanisms of the aircraft on the electro-physiological processes in the body that have the leading role in the regulation of its life. The new moment in the study of aircraft on the body is the evidence of its positive impact on the mechanisms of self body - its different units: the disease's banning - a revitalization of the stress-protective, stress-limiting system antioxidial, detoxification and other protection systems, the formation by the body antiviral and antimicrobial specific substances (interferon and lysozyme, activation of the immune system, phagocytosis, protective functions of skin. The protective and mobilizing role of the second link is studied: which is triggered in case of occurrence of disease or preexisting diseases: PL mobilized processes of restitution, reparations, compensation, immunity and microcirculation. The authors studied the possibility of aircraft's using to enhance performance, reduce side effects of physical factors, which are often used in the treatment (electric methods, treatment by sound, fresh and mineral water, etc..

  15. Rotating scanning polarization profile monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukup, J.; Green, P.W.; Holm, L.; Korkmaz, E.; Mullin, S.; Roy, G.; Stocki, a.T. [Dept. of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2N5 (Canada); Berdoz, A.R.; Birchal, J.; Campbell, J.R.; Hamian, A.A.; Page, S.A.; Ramsay, W.D.; Reitzner, S.D.; Sekulovich, A.M.; van Oers, a.W.T.H. [Dept. of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Bowman, J.D.; Mischke, R.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Davis, C.A.; Healey, D.C.; Helmer, R.; Levy, C.D.P.; Schmor, a.P.W. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Titov, N.A.; Zelenskii, A.N. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, SU 117312 (Russian Federation)

    1995-05-05

    A polarimeter capable of determining transverse component polarization profile of the 222 MeV proton beam both in horizontal ({ital x}) and vertical ({ital y}) directions with faster than 1 Hz scanning frequency has been developed and built as part of the preparations in the TRIUMF Experiment 497 measuring the flavour conserving hadronic weak interaction (parity violation measurement). The design features and test performance results are presented. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. Dual Polarized Waveguide Phased Array for SAR Application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, K.K.; Visser, H.J.; Keizer, W.P.M.N.; Turner, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    A modal technique is employed to evaluate the suitability of a square waveguide element for use in a dual polarized phased array. The element is found to possess low active reflection coefficient and high cross-polar isolation over the bandwith and scan volume that are typically required for SAR

  17. Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of 3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the 3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the 3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the 3 He for spin-polarizing the 3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the 3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with 3 He to spin-polarize the 3 He atoms

  18. A note on polarized light from magnetars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capparelli, L.M.; Damiano, A.; Polosa, A.D. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Rome (Italy); Maiani, L. [CERN, Theory Department, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-11-15

    In a recent paper it is claimed that vacuum birefringence has been experimentally observed for the first time by measuring the degree of polarization of visible light from a magnetar candidate, a neutron star with a magnetic field presumably as large as B ∝ 10{sup 13} G. The role of such a strong magnetic field is twofold. First, the surface of the star emits, at each point, polarized light with linear polarization correlated with the orientation of the magnetic field. Depending on the relative orientation of the magnetic axis of the star with the direction to the distant observer, a certain degree of polarization should be visible. Second, the strong magnetic field in the vacuum surrounding the star could enhance the effective degree of polarization observed: vacuum birefringence. We compare experimental data and theoretical expectations concluding that the conditions to support a claim of strong evidence of vacuum birefringence effects are not met. (orig.)

  19. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  20. Modeling soil moisture-reflectance

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Etienne; Decamps, Henri

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Spectral information on soil is not easily available as vegetation and farm works prevent direct observation of soil responses. However, there is an increasing need to include soil reflectance values in spectral unmixing algorithms or in classification approaches. In most cases, the impact of soil moisture on the reflectance is unknown and therefore ignored. The objective of this study was to model reflectance changes due to soil moisture in a real field situation usin...

  1. Retrieval of aerosol microphysical and optical properties above liquid clouds from POLDER/PARASOL polarization measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Waquet

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the current aerosol retrievals from passive sensors are restricted to cloud-free scenes, which strongly reduces our ability to monitor the aerosol properties at a global scale and to estimate their radiative forcing. The presence of aerosol above clouds (AAC affects the polarized light reflected by the cloud layer, as shown by the spaceborne measurements provided by the POlarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances (POLDER instrument on the PARASOL satellite. In a previous work, a first retrieval method was developed for AAC scenes and evaluated for biomass-burning aerosols transported over stratocumulus clouds. The method was restricted to the use of observations acquired at forward scattering angles (90–120° where polarized measurements are highly sensitive to fine-mode particle scattering. Non-spherical particles in the coarse mode, such as mineral dust particles, do not much polarize light and cannot be handled with this method. In this paper, we present new developments that allow retrieving also the properties of mineral dust particles above clouds. These particles do not much polarize light but strongly reduce the polarized cloud bow generated by the liquid cloud layer beneath and observed for scattering angles around 140°. The spectral attenuation can be used to qualitatively identify the nature of the particles (i.e. accumulation mode versus coarse mode, i.e. mineral dust particles versus biomass-burning aerosols, whereas the magnitude of the attenuation is related to the optical thickness of the aerosol layer. We also use the polarized measurements acquired in the cloud bow to improve the retrieval of both the biomass-burning aerosol properties and the cloud microphysical properties. We provide accurate polarized radiance calculations for AAC scenes and evaluate the contribution of the POLDER polarization measurements for the simultaneous retrieval of the aerosol and cloud properties. We investigate various scenes

  2. Performance comparison of polarized white light emitting diodes using wire-grid polarizers with polymeric and glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jung-Chieh; Chou, Shih-Chieh

    2018-03-01

    Polarized white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) packaged with reflective metal wire-grid polarizer of polymeric and glass substrates were investigated. The performance comparison of polymeric wire-grid polarizer film (WGF) and nano wire-grid polarizer (NWGP) with glass substrate was evaluated. The transverse electric field (TE) polarization transmittance of WGF is less than that of NWGP due to its smaller grid parameters. Despite of the higher duty cycle of WGF, the angular-dependent extinction ratio (ER) of the polarized WLEDs (PWLEDs) with WGF is higher than that of with NWGP. Regarding increasing drive currents, the PWLEDs with NWGP had better color stability than that with WGF due to better substrate thermal stability. In summary, linewidth, period and substrate material are the crucial factors for the PWLED packaging using wire grid polarizer.

  3. Climate change and the increasing impact of polar bears on bird populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouke eProp

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is becoming warmer at a high rate, and contractions in the extent of sea ice are currently changing the habitats of marine top-predators dependent on ice. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus depend on sea ice for hunting seals. For these top-predators, longer ice-free seasons are hypothesized to force the bears to hunt for alternative terrestrial food, such as eggs from colonial breeding birds. We analyzed time-series of polar bear observations at four locations on Spitsbergen (Svalbard and one in east Greenland. Summer occurrence of polar bears, measured as the probability of encountering bears and the number of days with bear presence, has increased significantly from the 1970/80s to the present. The shifts in polar bear occurrence coincided with trends for shorter sea ice seasons and less sea ice during the spring in the study area. This resulted in a strong inverse relationship between the probability of bear encounters on land and the length of the sea ice season. Within ten years after their first appearance on land, polar bears had advanced their arrival dates by almost 30 days. Direct observations of nest predation showed that polar bears may severely affect reproductive success of the barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis, common eider (Somateria mollissima and glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus. Nest predation was strongest in years when the polar bears arrived well before hatch, with more than 90% of all nests being predated. The results are similar to findings from Canada, and large-scale processes, such as climate and subsequent habitat changes, are pinpointed as the most likely drivers in various parts of the Arctic. We suggest that the increasing, earlier appearance of bears on land in summer reflects behavioral adaptations by a small segment of the population to cope with a reduced hunting range on sea ice. This exemplifies how behavioral adaptations may contribute to the cascading effects of climate change.

  4. Teachers’ way of reflecting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Lea

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to insights on teachers’ thinking and practice by building partly on the large amount of prior research in the field of continuing professional development (in line with ISATT), and partly on examples from an empirical small-scale study executed in Denmark. The purpose......-ers’ reflections on practice. Based on this model, the paper provides a proposal regarding how to work with teachers’ professional development and learning processes. Educational implications and future research directions are discussed....

  5. Reflected Glory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The nebula Messier 78 takes centre stage in this image taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, while the stars powering the bright display take a backseat. The brilliant starlight ricochets off dust particles in the nebula, illuminating it with scattered blue light. Igor Chekalin was the overall winner of ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition with his image of this stunning object. Messier 78 is a fine example of a reflection nebula. The ultraviolet radiation from the stars that illuminate it is not intense enough to ionise the gas to make it glow - its dust particles simply reflect the starlight that falls on them. Despite this, Messier 78 can easily be observed with a small telescope, being one of the brightest reflection nebulae in the sky. It lies about 1350 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter) and can be found northeast of the easternmost star of Orion's belt. This new image of Messier 78 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin in his winning entry to the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. The pale blue tint seen in the nebula in this picture is an accurate representation of its dominant colour. Blue hues are commonly seen in reflection nebulae because of the way the starlight is scattered by the tiny dust particles that they contain: the shorter wavelength of blue light is scattered more efficiently than the longer wavelength red light. This image contains many other striking features apart from the glowing nebula. A thick band of obscuring dust stretches across the image from the upper left to the lower right, blocking the light from background stars. In the bottom right corner, many curious pink structures are also visible, which are created by jets of material being ejected from stars that have recently formed and are still buried deep in dust clouds. Two bright stars, HD 38563A and

  6. Is Polar Bear Hair Fiber Optic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Daniel W.

    1998-05-01

    New direct measurement of high optical attenuation rates in polar bear hairs 2 8 dB mm in the visible and reanalysis of the data of Tributsch et al . Sol. Energy Mater. 21, 219 (1990) seem to rule out the UV waveguiding proposed by Grojean et al . Appl. Opt. 19, 339 (1980) . The case against fiber-optic polar bear hairs is summarized, and four conditions are given that any variation of the model of Grojean et al . would have to satisfy.

  7. High reflectance with steep reflection phase spectrum by guided-mode resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Katsuaki; Asai, Kosuke; Ko, Yeong Hwan; Kintaka, Kenji; Lee, Kyu Jin; Inoue, Junichi; Ura, Shogo; Magnusson, Robert

    2016-12-01

    A guided-mode resonance mirror (GMRM) consisting of a subwavelength grating integrated in an optical waveguide on a highly reflective substrate was predicted to give interesting characteristics of high reflectance with a steep reflection-phase spectrum. This time, the characteristics were experimentally demonstrated for the first time. A GMRM of 1535 nm resonance wavelength was designed and fabricated for a vertically injected wave from the air with TE polarization. The reflectance was measured to be higher than -1 dB over the wavelength from 1520 to 1560 nm. The reflection phase varied by π for a wavelength change of 10 nm.

  8. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  9. Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Polarization Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Waluschka, Eugene; Wang, Menghua

    2016-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is one of five instruments onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite that launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on October 28, 2011. It is a whiskbroom radiometer that provides +/-56.28deg scans of the Earth view. It has 22 bands, among which 14 are reflective solar bands (RSBs). The RSBs cover a wavelength range from 410 to 2250 nm. The RSBs of a remote sensor are usually sensitive to the polarization of incident light. For VIIRS, it is specified that the polarization factor should be smaller than 3% for 410 and 862 nm bands and 2.5% for other RSBs for the scan angle within +/-45deg. Several polarization sensitivity tests were performed prelaunch for SNPP VIIRS. The first few tests either had large uncertainty or were less reliable, while the last one was believed to provide the more accurate information about the polarization property of the instrument. In this paper, the measured data in the last polarization sensitivity test are analyzed, and the polarization factors and phase angles are derived from the measurements for all the RSBs. The derived polarization factors and phase angles are band, detector, and scan angle dependent. For near-infrared bands, they also depend on the half-angle mirror side. Nevertheless, the derived polarization factors are all within the specification, although the strong detector dependence of the polarization parameters was not expected. Compared to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on both Aqua and Terra satellites, the polarization effect on VIIRS RSB is much smaller.

  10. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  11. Polarization in Sagittarius A*

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the current state of polarization observations of Sagittarius A*, the compact radio source and supermassive black hole candidate in the Galactic Center. These observations are providing new tools for understanding accretion disks, jets and their environments. Linear polarization observations have shown that Sgr A* is unpolarized at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. However, recent single-dish observations indicate that Sgr A* may have strong linear polarization at frequencies higher...

  12. Solar Lyman-Alpha Polarization Observation of the Chromosphere and Transition Region by the Sounding Rocket Experiment CLASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Kubo, Masahito; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Shinnosuke; Hara, Hiroshi; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Giono, Gabriel; hide

    2015-01-01

    We are planning an international rocket experiment Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is (2015 planned) that Lyman a line (Ly(alpha) line) polarization spectroscopic observations from the sun. The purpose of this experiment, detected with high accuracy of the linear polarization of the Ly(alpha) lines to 0.1% by using a Hanle effect is to measure the magnetic field of the chromosphere-transition layer directly. For polarization photometric accuracy achieved that approx. 0.1% required for CLASP, it is necessary to realize the monitoring device with a high throughput. On the other hand, Ly(alpha) line (vacuum ultraviolet rays) have a sensitive characteristics that is absorbed by the material. We therefore set the optical system of the reflection system (transmission only the wavelength plate), each of the mirrors, subjected to high efficiency of the multilayer coating in accordance with the role. Primary mirror diameter of CLASP is about 30 cm, the amount of heat about 30,000 J is about 5 minutes of observation time is coming mainly in the visible light to the telescope. In addition, total flux of the sun visible light overwhelmingly large and about 200 000 times the Ly(alpha) line wavelength region. Therefore, in terms of thermal management and 0.1% of the photometric measurement accuracy achieved telescope, elimination of the visible light is essential. We therefore, has a high reflectivity (> 50%) in Lya line, visible light is a multilayer coating be kept to a low reflectance (<5%) (cold mirror coating) was applied to the primary mirror. On the other hand, the efficiency of the polarization analyzer required chromospheric magnetic field measurement (the amount of light) Conventional (magnesium fluoride has long been known as a material for vacuum ultraviolet (MgF2) manufactured ellipsometer; Rs = 22%) about increased to 2.5 times were high efficiency reflective polarizing element analysis. This device, Bridou et al. (2011) is proposed "that is

  13. Polarization at SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs

  14. Thoughts on Reflection (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been some acknowledgement in the published literature that reflection is a crucial element of the evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP model we have adopted (Booth 2004, 2006; Grant 2007; Helliwell 2007. As we work through a problem and try to incorporate the best available evidence into our decision making, reflection is required at several stages, including the very identification of the problem through to our assessment of the process itself and what we have learned in order to inform future practice. However, reflection and reflective writing have not fully been integrated into the process we espouse, and very little has been done to look more closely at this element of the model and how it can be integrated into professional learning.In a recently published research article, Sen (2010 confirms the relationship between reflection and several aspects of professional practice. These include critical review and decision making, two aspects that are tied closely to the evidence based process. Sen notes: Students were more likely to show evidence of learning, self‐development, the ability to review issues crucially, awareness of their own mental functions, ability to make decision [sic] and being empowered when they had mastered the art of reflective practice and the more deeply analytical reflective writing. (p.84 EBLIP (the journal tries to incorporate elements of reflection within the articles we publish. While we clearly believe in the need for our profession to do quality research and publish that research so that it can be accessible to practitioners, we also know that research cannot be looked at in isolation. Our evidence summaries are one way of reflecting critically on previously published research, and in the same vein, our classics bring older research studies back to the foreground. This work needs to continue to be discussed and looked at for its impact on our profession.More directly, the Using

  15. High-Reflectivity Multi-Layer Coatings for the CLASP Sounding Rocket Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Kubo, Masahito; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Kobiki, Toshihiko; Giono, Gabriel; Auchere, Frederic; hide

    2015-01-01

    We are planning an international rocket experiment Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is (2015 planned) that Lyman alpha line (Ly alpha line) polarization spectroscopic observations from the sun. The purpose of this experiment, detected with high accuracy of the linear polarization of the Ly alpha lines to 0.1% by using a Hanle effect is to measure the magnetic field of the chromosphere-transition layer directly. For polarization photometric accuracy achieved that approximately 0.1% required for CLASP, it is necessary to realize the monitoring device with a high throughput. On the other hand, Ly alpha line (vacuum ultraviolet rays) have a sensitive characteristics that is absorbed by the material. We therefore set the optical system of the reflection system (transmission only the wavelength plate), each of the mirrors, subjected to high efficiency of the multilayer coating in accordance with the role. Primary mirror diameter of CLASP is about 30 cm, the amount of heat about 30,000 J is about 5 minutes of observation time is coming mainly in the visible light to the telescope. In addition, total flux of the sun visible light overwhelmingly large and about 200 000 times the Ly alpha line wavelength region. Therefore, in terms of thermal management and 0.1% of the photometric measurement accuracy achieved telescope, elimination of the visible light is essential. We therefore, has a high reflectivity (greater than 50%) in Ly alpha line, visible light is a multilayer coating be kept to a low reflectance (less than 5%) (cold mirror coating) was applied to the primary mirror. On the other hand, the efficiency of the polarization analyzer required chromospheric magnetic field measurement (the amount of light) Conventional (magnesium fluoride has long been known as a material for vacuum ultraviolet (MgF2) manufactured ellipsometer; Rs = 22%) about increased to 2.5 times were high efficiency reflective polarizing element analysis. This device, Bridou et al

  16. Suomi NPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands Operational Calibration Reprocessing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Blonski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiometric calibration coefficients for the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite reflective solar bands have been reprocessed from the beginning of the Suomi NPP (National Polar-orbiting Partnership mission until present. An automated calibration procedure, implemented in the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration JPSS (Joint Polar Satellite System operational data production system, was applied to reprocess onboard solar calibration data and solar diffuser degradation measurements. The latest processing parameters from the operational system were used to include corrected solar vectors, optimized directional dependence of attenuation screens transmittance and solar diffuser reflectance, updated prelaunch calibration coefficients without an offset term, and optimized Robust Holt-Winters filter parameters. The parameters were consistently used to generate a complete set of the radiometric calibration coefficients for the entire duration of the Suomi NPP mission. The reprocessing has demonstrated that the automated calibration procedure can be successfully applied to all solar measurements acquired from the beginning of the mission until the full deployment of the automated procedure in the operational processing system. The reprocessed calibration coefficients can be further used to reprocess VIIRS SDR (Sensor Data Record and other data products. The reprocessing has also demonstrated how the automated calibration procedure can be used during activation of the VIIRS instruments on the future JPSS satellites.

  17. Tropospheric entrainment as a source of ground level aerosols within the polar Antarctic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, R. S.; Schofield, R.; Keywood, M.; Wilson, S. R.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Paton-Walsh, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Antarctic region is a pristine environment without any significant anthropogenic influence. Measurements of aerosols in this environment therefore allow the study of natural aerosol properties and formation mechanisms in polar conditions, and also allow insight into polar atmospheric dynamics. Measurements in this region have been limited primarily to continental and coastal locations where permanent stations exist, with only one other measurement campaign passing through the sea ice region. The MAPS campaign (Measurements of Aerosols and Precursors during SIPEXII) occurred as part of SIPEX II (Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystems eXperiment II) voyage in Spring, 2012, and produced the first sea-ice focused aerosol dataset aimed at characterizing new particle formation processes in the pack ice off the coast of East Antarctica (~65°S, 120°E). Numerous atmospheric parameters and species were measured, including the number of aerosol particles in the 3-10 nm size range, the range associated with new particle formation. During the latitudinal transect through the sea ice, these measurements were used to identify the polar front - the boundary between the Polar cell and the Ferrel cell. Nuclei concentrations showed a clear and sudden change with latitude, averaging 51cm-3 north of the front in the Ferrel cell, and 766 cm-3 south of the front, in the Polar cell region. The latitudinal location of the polar front was also confirmed by wind directions which reflected global circulation patterns (Ferrel cell westerlies and Polar cell easterlies). Background aerosol populations in the Polar cell fluctuated significantly (3-10 nm particle concentrations ranged between 153 cm-3 to 2312 cm-3) but displayed no growth indicators, suggesting transport. Back-trajectories revealed that air parcels often descended from the free-troposphere within the previous 24-48 hrs. It is proposed that particle formation occurs in the free troposphere from precursors uplifted at the polar front

  18. Measuring polarization dependent dispersion of non-polarizing beam splitter cubes with spectrally resolved white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csonti, K.; Hanyecz, V.; Mészáros, G.; Kovács, A. P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work we have measured the group-delay dispersion of an empty Michelson interferometer for s- and p-polarized light beams applying two different non-polarizing beam splitter cubes. The interference pattern appearing at the output of the interferometer was resolved with two different spectrometers. It was found that the group-delay dispersion of the empty interferometer depended on the polarization directions in case of both beam splitter cubes. The results were checked by inserting a glass plate in the sample arm of the interferometer and similar difference was obtained for the two polarization directions. These results show that to reach high precision, linearly polarized white light beam should be used and the residual dispersion of the empty interferometer should be measured at both polarization directions.

  19. Functional Reflective Polarizer for Augmented Reality and Color Vision Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-03

    optics in multilayer polymer mirrors,” Science 287(5462), 2451–2456 (2000). 10. M. Alpern and T. Wake, “Cone pigments in human deutan colour vision...distinguish between more saturated colors. Last but not least, because of the Helmholtz- Kohlrausch (H-K) effect [30, 31], people psychologically

  20. A simple polarized-based diffused reflectance colour imaging system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The system uses a commercial web camera and a halogen lamp that makes it relatively simple and less expensive for diagnostic research and teaching. The system has been used to demonstrate ... Predicting the area of the sample using a method of counting dark pixels is presented. This method avoids complex and more ...

  1. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP 4 . A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  2. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  3. Airborne Cloud Radar (ACR) Reflectivity, Wakasa Bay, Japan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes 94 GHz co- and cross-polarized radar reflectivity. The Airborne Cloud Radar (ACR) sensor was mounted to a NASA P-3 aircraft flown over the Sea...

  4. Compounds Containing Tetragonal Cu2+ Complexes: Is the dx2–y2–d3z2–r2 Gap a Direct Reflection of the Distortion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Fernández, Pablo; Barriuso, María Teresa; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2013-01-01

    to be not correct through the study of pure K2CuF4-, KCuF3-, and Cu2+-doped KZnF3 and K2ZnF4 model compounds. Indeed, ab initio calculations prove that Δ in these insulating materials also depends on the internal electric field created by the rest of lattice ions on active electrons confined in a given CuF64......It is widely assumed that the gap, Δ, between dx2–y2 and d3z2–r2 orbitals in fluorides and oxides containing tetragonal Cu2+ or Ag2+ complexes directly reflects the tetragonal distortion in the MX6 complex (M = d9 ion; X = F–, O2–). This assumption on that relevant quantity is shown......– complex. This internal field, especially important for layered compounds, is shown to explain all puzzling experimental facts on the d–d transitions of the studied systems and is of interest in the search of new Cu2+ and Ag2+ superconducting materials where a strong correlation between Δ...

  5. Our Polar Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  6. Terahertz polarization imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Valk, N.C.J.; Van der Marel, W.A.M.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the polarization state of a terahertz pulse by using a modified electrooptic sampling setup. To illustrate the power of this method, we show two examples in which the knowledge of the polarization of the terahertz pulse is essential for interpreting the results:

  7. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  8. Polar Science Is Cool!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  9. Measurement of Λ polarization from Z decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajlatouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Aleppo, M.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The polarization of Λ baryons from Z decays is studied with the ALEPH apparatus. Evidence of longitudinal polarization of s quarks from Z decay is observed for the first time. The measured longitudinal Λ polarization is PLΛ = -0.32 ± 0.07 for z = {p}/{p beam} > 0.3 . This agrees with the prediction of -0.39 ± 0.08 from the standard model and the constituent quark model, where the error is due to uncertainties in the mechanism for Λ production. The observed Λ polarization is diluted with respect to the primary s quark polarization by Λ baryons without a primary s quark. Measurements of the Λ forward-backward asymmetry and of the correlation between back-to-back Λ overlineΛ pairs are used to check this dilution. In addition the transverse Λ polarization is measured. An indication of transverse polarization, more than two standard deviations away from zero, is found along the normal to the plane defined by the thrust axis and the Λ direction.

  10. Precision Polarization of Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elise; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Couture, Aaron; Crawford, Christopher; Chupp, Tim; Danagoulian, Areg; Estes, Mary; Hona, Binita; Jones, Gordon; Klein, Andi; Penttila, Seppo; Sharma, Monisha; Wilburn, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Determining polarization of a cold neutron beam to high precision is required for the next generation neutron decay correlation experiments at the SNS, such as the proposed abBA and PANDA experiments. Precision polarimetry measurements were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goal of determining the beam polarization to the level of 10-3 or better. The cold neutrons from FP12 were polarized using optically polarized ^3He gas as a spin filter, which has a highly spin-dependent absorption cross section. A second ^ 3He spin filter was used to analyze the neutron polarization after passing through a resonant RF spin rotator. A discussion of the experiment and results will be given.

  11. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements. PMID:29503479

  12. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements.

  13. Electrically switchable photonic liquid crystal devices for routing of a polarized light wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushnova, Irina I.; Melnikova, Elena A.; Tolstik, Alexei L.; Muravsky, Alexander A.

    2018-04-01

    The new mode of LC alignment based on photoalignment AtA-2 azo dye where the refractive interface between orthogonal orientations of the LC director exists without voltage and disappeared or changed with critical voltage has been proposed. The technology to fabricate electrically controlled liquid crystal elements for spatial separation and switching of linearly polarized light beams on the basis of the total internal reflection effect has been significantly improved. Its distinctive feature is the application of a composite alignment material comprising two sublayers of Nylon-6 and AtA-2 photoalignment azo dye offering patterned liquid crystal director orientation with high alignment quality value q = 0 . 998. The fabricated electrically controlled spatially structured liquid crystal devices enable implementation of propagation directions separation for orthogonally polarized light beams and their switching with minimal crosstalk.

  14. Cholesteric liquid crystals with a broad light reflection band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitov, Michel

    2012-12-11

    The cholesteric-liquid-crystalline structure, which concerns the organization of chromatin, collagen, chitin, or cellulose, is omnipresent in living matter. In technology, it is found in temperature and pressure sensors, supertwisted nematic liquid crystal displays, optical filters, reflective devices, or cosmetics. A cholesteric liquid crystal reflects light because of its helical structure. The reflection is selective - the bandwidth is limited to a few tens of nanometers and the reflectance is equal to at most 50% for unpolarized incident light, which is a consequence of the polarization-selectivity rule. These limits must be exceeded for innovative applications like polarizer-free reflective displays, broadband polarizers, optical data storage media, polarization-independent devices, stealth technologies, or smart switchable reflective windows to control solar light and heat. Novel cholesteric-liquid-crystalline architectures with the related fabrication procedures must therefore be developed. This article reviews solutions found in living matter and laboratories to broaden the bandwidth around a central reflection wavelength, do without the polarization-selectivity rule and go beyond the reflectance limit. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Wien filter for a polarized ions source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez A, P.I.

    1977-01-01

    In order to carry out investigation works about nuclear structure, the Nuclear Center of Mexico has an accelerator Tandem Van de Graff of 12 Mv. Now in this center there is a polarized ions source, in a setting phase, totally constructed in the workshop of the accelerator. This source, supplies an ion beam with a polarization whose propagation direction is not the adequate one for the dispersion and reaction processes wanted to be realized. A filter Wien was used to obtain the correct direction of the polarization vector. The purpose of this work is the study of the filter necessary conditions in order to reach the desirable objective. In the first part some generalities are given about: polarization phenomena, polarized ions source and description of the performance of the Wien filter. In the second part, the problem of the passage of a polarized beam through the filter is tried and solved. Finally, the design and construction of the filter is presented together with the results of the experimentation with the object to justify the suppositions which were taken into consideration in the solution of the filter problem. (author)

  16. OSIRIS (Observing System Including PolaRisation in the Solar Infrared Spectrum) instrument: a multi-directional, polarized radiometer in the visible and shortwave infrared, airborne prototype of 3MI / EPS-SG Eumetsat - ESA mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, C.; Auriol, F.; Nicolas, J. M.; Parol, F.; Riedi, J.; Djellali, M. S.; Cornet, C.; Waquet, F.; Catalfamo, M.; Delegove, C.; Loisil, R.

    2017-12-01

    OSIRIS instrument largely inherits from the POLDER concept developed and operated between 1991 (first airborne prototype) and 2013 (end of the POLDER-3/PARASOL space-borne mission). It consists in two optical systems, one covering the visible to near infrared range (440, 490, 670, 763, 765, 870, 910 and 940 nm) and a second one for the shortwave infrared (940, 1020, 1240, 1360, 1620 and 2200 nm). Each optical system is composed of a wide field-of-view optics (114° and 105° respectively) associated to two rotating wheels with interferential filters (spectral) and analyzers filters (polarization) respectively, and a 2D array of detectors. For each channel, radiance is measured once without analyzer, followed by sequential measurements with the three analyzers shifted by an angle of 60° to reconstruct the total and polarized radiances. The complete acquisition sequence for all spectral channels last a couple of seconds according to the chosen measurement protocol. Thanks to the large field of view of the optics, any target is seen under several viewing angles during the aircraft motion. In a first step we will present the new ground characterization of the instrument based on laboratory measurements (linearity, flat-field, absolute calibration, induced polarization, polarizers efficiency and position), the radiometric model and the Radiometric Inverted Model (RIM) used to develop the Level 1 processing chain that is used to produce level 1 products (normalized radiances, polarized or not, with viewing geometries) from the instrument generated level 0 files (Digital Counts) and attitude information from inertial system. The stray light issues will be specifically discussed. In a second step we will present in-flight radiometric and geometric methods applied to OSIRIS data in order to control and validate ground-based calibrated products: molecular scattering method and sun-glint cross-band method for radiometric calibration, glories, rainbows and sun-glint targets

  17. Videographic Education: Owning the Polar Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, R. W.; Buhr, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    Television and internet-served video is an increasingly important media tool for reaching into society. This talk will present clips from a film designed to educate the public about warming in the polar regions, the socioeconomic and environmental implications of this warming; and the actions we can take to slow down human contributions to climate change. This talk will present a short film Owning the Polar Crisis, which is drawn from footage for Polar Visions, a four segment film available for educational audiences and the public.. The films are unique in that they draw from the perspectives of well-known climate scientists, citizens from all over the planet and natives of the Arctic. The compelling images were taken from numerous locations around the Arctic, including Alaska and Greenland. Owning the Polar Crisis was filmed, directed and produced by Dr. Ryan Vachon, a climate scientist and videographer with an intimate knowledge of the subject matter.

  18. Belief polarization is not always irrational.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jern, Alan; Chang, Kai-min K; Kemp, Charles

    2014-04-01

    Belief polarization occurs when 2 people with opposing prior beliefs both strengthen their beliefs after observing the same data. Many authors have cited belief polarization as evidence of irrational behavior. We show, however, that some instances of polarization are consistent with a normative account of belief revision. Our analysis uses Bayesian networks to characterize different kinds of relationships between hypotheses and data, and distinguishes between cases in which normative reasoners with opposing beliefs should both strengthen their beliefs, cases in which both should weaken their beliefs, and cases in which one should strengthen and the other should weaken his or her belief. We apply our analysis to several previous studies of belief polarization and present a new experiment that suggests that people tend to update their beliefs in the directions predicted by our normative account.

  19. A Reflective Look at Reflecting Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pender, Rebecca L.; Stinchfield, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    This article reviewed existing literature and research on the reflecting team process. There is a dearth of empirical research that explores the reflecting team process and the outcome of counseling that uses reflecting teams. Implications of using reflecting teams for counselors, counselor educators, and clients will be discussed. A call for…

  20. Polarization at the SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z/sup 0/ mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  2. Polarized scintillator targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2000-05-01

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as "live" polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  3. Polarized scintillator targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B. van den E-mail: vandenbrandt@psi.ch; Bunyatova, E.I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S

    2000-05-21

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as 'live' polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  4. Heidelberg polarized alkali source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.; Steffens, E.; Jaensch, H.; Philipps Universitaet, Marburg, Germany)

    1984-01-01

    A new atomic beam type polarized alkali ion source has been installed at Heidelberg. In order to improve the beam polarization considerably optical pumping is applied in combination with an adiabatic medium field transition which results in beams in single hyperfine sublevels. The m state population is determined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Highly polarized beams (P/sub s/ > 0.9, s = z, zz) with intensities of 30 to 130 μA can be extracted for Li + and Na + , respectively

  5. The wavelength dependence of polarization in NGC 2023

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolph, C. D.; Scarrott, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    NGC 2023 is a bright reflection nebula illuminated by the central star HD37903. At 2 microns the nebula is seen solely by reflected light from the central star but in the NIR there is excess radiation that is supposed to arise from thermal emission from a population of small grains (Sellgren, 1984). The unexpectedly high surface brightness at R and I wavelengths has led to the suggestion that even at these wavelengths there is a significant contribution from this thermal emission process (Witt, Schild, and Kraiman, 1984). If the nebula is seen by reflected starlight then this radiation will be linearly polarized. The level of polarization depends on the scattering geometry, grain size distribution, etc., and is typically 20 to 40 percent for nebulae such as NGC 1999 which is morphologically similar to NGC 2023. If, in any waveband, there is a contribution of radiation from emission processes this radiation will be unpolarized and will serve to dilute the scattered radiation to give a lower level of observed polarization. A study of the wavelength dependence of polarization in nebulae in which there may be thermal emission from grains will indicate the contribution from this process to the total luminosity. Polarization maps were produced in BVRI wavebands for the NGC 2023 nebulosity which confirm that at all wavelengths it is a reflection nebula illuminated by a central star. The wavelength dependence of polarization at representative points in the nebula and in a scatter plot of polarization in V and I wavebands at all points at which measurements are given. Results indicate that throughout the nebula there is a general trend for the level of polarization to increase with wavelength and that maximum levels of polarization occur at the longest wavelengths. No evidence is seen in the data for any significant contribution from the thermal emission from grains in the BVRI luminosity of NGC 2023

  6. Polarization measurement in the COMPASS polarized target

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, K; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Doshita, N; Gautheron, F; Görtz, S; Hasegawa, T; Horikawa, N; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kisselev, Yu V; Koivuniemi, J H; Le Goff, J M; Magnon, A; Meyer, W; Reicherz, G; Matsuda, T

    2004-01-01

    Continuous wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to determine the target polarization in the COMPASS experiment. The system is made of the so-called Liverpool Q-meters, Yale-cards, and VME modules for data taking and system controlling. In 2001 the NMR coils were embedded in the target material, while in 2002 and 2003 the coils were mounted on the outer surface of the target cells to increase the packing factor of the material. Though the error of the measurement became larger with the outer coils than with the inner coils, we have performed stable measurements throughout the COMPASS run time for 3 years. The maximum polarization was +57% and -53% as the average in the target cells.

  7. DUAL POLARIZATION ANTENNA ARRAY WITH VERY LOW CROSS POLARIZATION AND LOW SIDE LOBES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    formation of grating lobes are inhibited in selected directions of the radiation and cross polarization within the main lobe is suppressed at least 30 dB below the main lobe peak value. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the antenna elements of the antenna array comprise probe-fed patches......The present invention relates to an antenna array adapted to radiate or receive electromagnetic waves of one or two polarizations with very low cross polarization and low side lobes. An antenna array comprising many antenna elements, e.g. more than ten antenna elements, is provided in which...

  8. A programmable metasurface with dynamic polarization, scattering and focusing control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huanhuan; Cao, Xiangyu; Yang, Fan; Gao, Jun; Xu, Shenheng; Li, Maokun; Chen, Xibi; Zhao, Yi; Zheng, Yuejun; Li, Sijia

    2016-10-01

    Diverse electromagnetic (EM) responses of a programmable metasurface with a relatively large scale have been investigated, where multiple functionalities are obtained on the same surface. The unit cell in the metasurface is integrated with one PIN diode, and thus a binary coded phase is realized for a single polarization. Exploiting this anisotropic characteristic, reconfigurable polarization conversion is presented first. Then the dynamic scattering performance for two kinds of sources, i.e. a plane wave and a point source, is carefully elaborated. To tailor the scattering properties, genetic algorithm, normally based on binary coding, is coupled with the scattering pattern analysis to optimize the coding matrix. Besides, inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) technique is also introduced to expedite the optimization process of a large metasurface. Since the coding control of each unit cell allows a local and direct modulation of EM wave, various EM phenomena including anomalous reflection, diffusion, beam steering and beam forming are successfully demonstrated by both simulations and experiments. It is worthwhile to point out that a real-time switch among these functionalities is also achieved by using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). All the results suggest that the proposed programmable metasurface has great potentials for future applications.

  9. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  10. Assessing the Polarization of a Quantum Field from Stokes Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimov, A. B.; Björk, G.; Söderholm, J.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an operational degree of polarization in terms of the variance of the Stokes vector minimized over all the directions of the Poincaré sphere. We examine the properties of this second-order definition and carry out its experimental determination. Quantum states with the same standard...... (first-order) degree of polarization are correctly discriminated by this new measure. We argue that a comprehensive quantum characterization of polarization properties requires a whole hierarchy of higher-order degrees....

  11. Polarization Techniques for Mitigation of Low Grazing Angle Sea Clutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    standard CFAR false alarm rate while maintaining detections on objects of interest. Moreover, PCL is elegant : It exploits fundamental characteristics of both...cannot measure polarization. Polarization is defined by the path traced by the tip of an EM wave’s electric field vector over one period of propagation...vector phasor propagating in the +z direction. Polarization is defined by the path traced by the tip of this electric field vector phasor over one

  12. Controlling vortex chirality and polarity by geometry in magnetic nanodots

    OpenAIRE

    Agramunt Puig, Sebastià

    2014-01-01

    The independent control of both vortex chirality and polarity is a significant challenge in magnetic devices based on nano-sized magnetic vortex structures. By micromagnetic simulations here, we show that in soft ferromagnetic nanodots with an adequate modulated thickness, the desired combination of chirality and polarity can be achieved just by changing the direction of the in-plane applied magnetic field. Despite the complex behavior, the vortex chirality and polarity control can be summari...

  13. Freely tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Xiao-Ping; Peng, Ru-Wen; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xu, Di-Hu; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    2015-02-18

    A freely tunable polarization rotator for broadband terahertz waves is demonstrated using a three-rotating-layer metallic grating structure, which can conveniently rotate the polarization of a linearly polarized terahertz wave to any desired direction with nearly perfect conversion efficiency. This low-cost, high-efficiency, and freely tunable device has potential applications as material analysis, wireless communication, and THz imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Polarization Reversal Over Flooded Regions and Applications to Large-Scale Flood Mapping with Spaceborne Scatterometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Liu, W. Timothy; Xie, Xiao-Su

    1999-01-01

    We present the polarization reversal in backscatter over flooded land regions, and demonstrate for the first time the utility of spaceborne Ku-band scatterometer for large-scale flood mapping. Scatterometer data were collected over the globe by the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) operated at 14 GHz on the Japanese ADEOS spacecraft from September 1996 to June 1997. During this time span, several severe floods occurred. Over most land surface, vertical polarization backscatter (Sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) is larger than horizontal polarization backscatter (sigma(sub hh)). Such polarization characteristics is reversed and sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) is smaller than sigma(sub hh) over flooded regions, except under a dense forest canopy. The total backscatter from the flooded landscape consists of direct backscatter and boundary-interaction backscatter. The direct term is contributed by direct backscattering from objects protruding above the water surface, and by backscattering from waves on the water surface. The boundary-interaction term is contributed by the forward scattering from the protruding objects and then reflected from the water surface, and also by the forward scattering from these objects after the water-surface reflection. Over flooded regions, the boundary-interaction term is dominant at large incidence angles and the strong water-surface reflection is much larger for horizontal polarization than the vertical one due to the Brewster effect in transverse-magnetic waves. These scattering mechanisms cause the polarization reversal over flooded regions. An example obtained with the Analytic Wave Theory is used to illustrate the scattering mechanisms leading to the polarization reversal. We then demonstrate the utility of spaceborne Ku-band scatterometer for large-scale flood mapping. We process NSCAT data to obtain the polarization ratio sigma(sub hh)/sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) with colocated data at incidence angles larger than 40 deg. The results over Asian

  15. Polarization vision in cuttlefish in a concealed communication channel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashar; Rutledge; Cronin

    1996-01-01

    Polarization sensitivity is well documented in marine animals, but its function is not yet well understood. Of the cephalopods, squid and octopus are known to be sensitive to the orientation of polarization of incoming light. This sensitivity arises from the orthogonal orientation of neighboring photoreceptors. Electron microscopical examination of the retina of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis L. revealed the same orthogonal structure, suggesting that cuttlefish are also sensitive to linearly polarized light. Viewing cuttlefish through an imaging polarized light analyzer revealed a prominent polarization pattern on the arms, around the eyes and on the forehead of the animals. The polarization pattern disappeared when individuals lay camouflaged on the bottom and also during extreme aggression display, attacks on prey, copulation and egg-laying behavior in females. In behavioral experiments, the responses of cuttlefish to their images reflected from a mirror changed when the polarization patterns of the reflected images were distorted. These results suggest that cuttlefish use polarization vision and display for intraspecific recognition and communication.

  16. Optical polarization in the Serpens Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, D.J.; Scarrott, S.M. (Durham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Taylor, K.N.R. (New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). School of Physics)

    1983-03-01

    Optical polarization maps are presented that indicate that the object is a reflection nebula illuminated by a highly obscured star that is itself seen through magnetically aligned grains. It is proposed that the dust grains overlying the central region of the nebula including the illuminating star are aligned by the local galactic magnetic field that permeates the dark cloud in which the nebula is situated. The formation of the nebula is discussed.

  17. Optical polarization: background and camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škerlind, Christina; Hallberg, Tomas; Eriksson, Johan; Kariis, Hans; Bergström, David

    2017-10-01

    Polarimetric imaging sensors in the electro-optical region, already military and commercially available in both the visual and infrared, show enhanced capabilities for advanced target detection and recognition. The capabilities arise due to the ability to discriminate between man-made and natural background surfaces using the polarization information of light. In the development of materials for signature management in the visible and infrared wavelength regions, different criteria need to be met to fulfil the requirements for a good camouflage against modern sensors. In conventional camouflage design, the aimed design of the surface properties of an object is to spectrally match or adapt it to a background and thereby minimizing the contrast given by a specific threat sensor. Examples will be shown from measurements of some relevant materials and how they in different ways affect the polarimetric signature. Dimensioning properties relevant in an optical camouflage from a polarimetric perspective, such as degree of polarization, the viewing or incident angle, and amount of diffuse reflection, mainly in the infrared region, will be discussed.

  18. A New Dual Circularly Polarized Feed Employing a Dielectric Cylinder-Loaded Circular Waveguide Open End Fed by Crossed Dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hoon Bang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new dual circularly polarized feed that provides good axial ratio over wide angles and low cross-polarized radiation in backward direction. A circular waveguide open end is fed with two orthogonally polarized waves in phase quadrature by a pair of printed crossed dipoles and a compact connectorized quadrature hybrid coupler. The waveguide aperture is loaded with a dielectric cylinder to reduce the cross-polarization beyond 90 degrees off the boresight. The fabricated feed has, at 5.5 GHz, 6.33-dBic copolarized gain, 3-dB beamwidth of 106°, 10-dB beamwidth of 195°, 3-dB axial ratio beamwidth of 215°, maximum cross-polarized gain of −21.4 dBic, and 27-dB port isolation. The reflection coefficient of the feed is less than −10 dB at 4.99–6.09 GHz.

  19. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  20. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function......%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has been implemented in a 1D...

  1. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  2. High reflectance Cr/C multilayer at 250 eV for soft X-ray polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Mingwu; Jiang, Li; Zhang, Zhong; Huang, Qiushi [MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-Structured Materials, Institute of Precision Optical Engineering (IPOE), School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Zhanshan, E-mail: wangzs@tongji.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-Structured Materials, Institute of Precision Optical Engineering (IPOE), School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); She, Rui; Feng, Hua [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Wang, Hongchang [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-01

    X-ray reflection near 45° via multilayer mirrors can be used for astronomical polarization measurements. A Cr/C multilayer mirror (designed for X-ray polarimetry at 250 eV), with a period thickness of 3.86 nm and a bi-layer number of 100, was fabricated using direct current magnetron sputtering. Grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry at 8 keV and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the multilayer structure. Different models were introduced to fit the hard X-ray reflectivity curve, which indicates that the layer thickness of two materials slightly drifts from the bottom to the top of the stack. Both the chromium and carbon layers are amorphous with asymmetric interfaces, while the Cr-on-C interface is slightly wider. Based on the good quality of the multilayer structure, a high reflectivity of 21.8% for the s-polarized light was obtained at 250 eV at a grazing incidence angle of 40.7°. The fabricated Cr/C multilayer mirror exhibits high reflectivity and polarization levels in the energy region of 240 eV–260 eV. - Highlights: • We fabricated Cr/C multilayer with 3.8 nm d-spacing. • X-ray reflectometry was used to determine the exact structure of Cr/C multilayer. • A high reflectivity of 21.8% for the s-polarized light was obtained at 250 eV. • Both Cr and C were found to be amorphous with slightly asymmetric interfaces. • A 4-layer model was used to fit and explain the results.

  3. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Horimoto, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Sukegawa, Kouta; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasma can be anisotropic in laser-produced plasmas. We have developed a new technique to evaluate the polarization degree of the emission lines in the extreme vacuum ultra violet wavelength region. The polarization of the emission lines and the continuums from the lithium-like nitrogen and from helium- and hydrogen-like carbon in recombining plasma is evaluated. Particle simulation in the velocity space gives the time scale for relaxation of anisotropic EVDFs. (author)

  4. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  5. Hsp Polarization Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, Robert

    1991-07-01

    This proposal defines the procedure for determining the instrumental polarization of the polarimetric IDT (IDT#1, POL) on the HSP. 1 of 2 unpolarized standard stars wil be observed using various filter-polarizer combinations. These observations will permit the instrumental polarization to be calibrated. The instrumental polarization must be determined to a high precision in order to vectoriallly remove it from HSP polarization observations to determine the actual astronomical polarization. Final run of proposal will look at one of 2 possible stars previously observed to get another look at the throughput. Revision History: Mark H. Slovak 8/30/88 Translated to V2 proposal instructions (RPSS V6.2) S. Laurent 1/20/89 Updated: Sally Laurent 2/24/89, 3/20/89, 4/13/89, 5/12/89 Modified: P. Stanley 1/15/90 - change to use CTA selected targets only; Fixes for aberration problem - SALM 7/30/90; Based on SV/HSP 1386. New submission changed targets and revised scheduling strategy. Revised: 26 Aug 92 J. Dolan, L. Walter, P. Reppert want to re-run the proposal (3985) one last time to bring down errors.

  6. Han Mural Tombs: Reflection of Correlative Cosmology through Mural Paintings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Vampelj Suhadolnik

    2011-12-01

    cosmologic concepts in the iconographic design of Han mural paintings. A thorough analysis of the iconographic design of murals shows that they possessed not only a decorative function, but together with the architectural structure and other burial objects reflected the entire cosmic image. The analysis of tomb paintings reveals a developed correlative cosmology yin-yang wuxing which manifests its concrete image in symbolic codes of individual iconographic motifs. The article first displays a general review of tombs with murals, and then focuses on depictions in Han tomb murals, discussing representation of the images of celestial bodies, the symbolic polarity of the cosmical forces yin and yang, the symbolism of the four directions and the four seasons and the symbolic circling of the five xings.

  7. Continuous wave terahertz reflection imaging of human colorectal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2013-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, non-ionizing, and nondestructive medical imaging modality for delineating colorectal cancer. Fresh excisions of normal colon tissue were obtained from surgeries performed at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. Reflection measurements of thick sections of colorectal tissues, mounted in an aluminum sample holder, were obtained for both fresh and formalin fixed tissues. The two-dimensional reflection images were acquired by using an optically pumped far-infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz with liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer detector. Using polarizers in the experiment both co-polarized and cross-polarized remittance form the samples was collected. Analysis of the images showed the importance of understanding the effects of formalin fixation while determining reflectance level of tissue response. The resulting co- and cross-polarized images of both normal and formalin fixed tissues showed uniform terahertz response over the entire sample area. Initial measurements indicated a co-polarized reflectance of 16%, and a cross-polarized reflectance of 0.55% from fresh excisions of normal colonic tissues.

  8. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  9. Development of high-polarization Fe/Ge neutron polarizing supermirror: Possibility of fine-tuning of scattering length density in ion beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, R.; Yamazaki, D.; Akutsu, K.; Hanashima, T.; Miyata, N.; Aoki, H.; Takeda, M.; Soyama, K.

    2018-04-01

    The multilayer structure of Fe/Si and Fe/Ge systems fabricated by ion beam sputtering (IBS) was investigated using X-ray and polarized neutron reflectivity measurements and scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The obtained result revealed that the incorporation of sputtering gas particles (Ar) in the Ge layer gives rise to a marked reduction in the neutron scattering length density (SLD) and contributes to the SLD contrast between the Fe and Ge layers almost vanishing for spin-down neutrons. Bundesmann et al. (2015) have shown that the implantation of primary Ar ions backscattered at the target is responsible for the incorporation of Ar particles and that the fraction increases with increasing ion incidence angle and increasing polar emission angle. This leads to a possibility of fine-tuning of the SLD for the IBS, which is required to realize a high polarization efficiency of a neutron polarizing supermirror. Fe/Ge polarizing supermirror with m = 5 fabricated under the same condition showed a spin-up reflectivity of 0.70 at the critical momentum transfer. The polarization was higher than 0.985 for the qz range where the correction for the polarization inefficiencies of the beamline works properly. The result of the polarized neutron reflectivity measurement suggests that the "magnetically-dead" layers formed at both sides of the Fe layer, together with the SLD contrast, play a critical role in determining the polarization performance of a polarizing supermirror.

  10. Bringing Society to a Changing Polar Ocean: Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, O.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental changes in the Arctic and Antarctic appear to be accelerating and scientists are trying to understand both the patterns and the impacts of change. These changes will have profound impact on humanity and create a need for public education about these critical habitats. We have focused on a two-pronged strategy to increase public awareness as well as enable educators to discuss comfortably the implications of climate change. Our first focus is on entraining public support through the development of science documentaries about the science and people who conduct it. Antarctic Edge is a feature length award-winning documentary about climate change that has been released in May 2015 and has garnered interest in movie theatres and on social media stores (NetFlix, ITunes). This broad outreach is coupled with our group's interest assisting educators formally. The majority of current polar education is focused on direct educator engagement through personal research experiences that have impact on the participating educators' classrooms. Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) proposes to improve educator and student engagement in polar sciences through exposure to scientists and polar data. Through professional development and the creation of data tools, Polar ICE will reduce the logistical costs of bringing polar science to students in grades 6-16. We will provide opportunities to: 1) build capacity of polar scientists in communicating and engaging with diverse audiences; 2) create scalable, in-person and virtual opportunities for educators and students to engage with polar scientists and their research through data visualizations, data activities, educator workshops, webinars, and student research symposia; and 3) evaluate the outcomes of Polar ICE and contribute to our understanding of science education practices. We will use a blended learning approach to promote partnerships and cross-disciplinary sharing. This combined multi-pronged approach

  11. Explaining polarization reversals in STEREO wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, Breneman et al. (2011) reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (L plane transverse to the magnetic field showed that the transmitter waves underwent periodic polarization reversals. Specifically, their polarization would cycle through a pattern of right-hand to linear to left-hand polarization at a rate of roughly 200 Hz. The lightning whistlers were observed to be left-hand polarized at frequencies greater than the lower hybrid frequency and less than the transmitter frequency (21.4 kHz) and right-hand polarized otherwise. Only right-hand polarized waves in the inner radiation belt should exist in the frequency range of the whistler mode and these reversals were not explained in the previous paper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by ±200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo (1984) whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by ˜200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al. (2008).

  12. Motion model for a charged particle in a plasma during the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse elliptically polarized propagating in the direction of a static and homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez R, F.; Ondarza R, R.

    2004-01-01

    An analytic model is presented for the description of the motion of a charged particle in the interaction of an elliptically electromagnetic pulse polarized propagating along a static and homogeneous external magnetic field in a plasma starting from the force equation. The method allows to express the solution in terms of the invariant phase, obtaining differential equations for the trajectory of the accelerated particle by means of an electromagnetic pulse of arbitrary and modulated width by an encircling Gaussian. The numerical solutions reported in this work can find varied applications, for example in the physics of the interaction laser-plasma, in the acceleration of particles, in hot plasma and in radioactive effects. (Author)

  13. Model of the motion of a charged particle into a plasma during the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse elliptically polarized propagating in the direction of a static and homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez R, F.; Ondarza R, R.

    2004-01-01

    An analytical model for the description of the movement of a charged particle in the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse elliptically polarized propagating along of a static and homogeneous external magnetic field in a plasma starting from the force equation is presented. The method allows to express the solution in terms of the invariant phase, obtaining differential equations for the trajectory of the accelerated particle by means of an electromagnetic pulse of arbitrary amplitude and modulated by an encircling Gaussian. The numerical solutions reported in this work can find varied applications, for example in the physics of the interaction laser-plasma, in the acceleration of particles, in hot plasma and in radiative effects. (Author)

  14. Relationship between microstructure of the skin surface and surface reflection based on geometric optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenichiro; Miyaki, Masahiro; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Iwata, Kayoko

    2012-06-01

    The behavior of reflected light in skin affects skin appearance and provides clues as to the internal condition of the skin. Surface topography is one of the central physical factors contributing to surface reflection. We tried to clarify the relationship between microstructure of the skin surface and surface reflection based on geometric optics. Microstructures and surface reflections in the left cheeks of adult females were evaluated. Skin topography was acquired measuring replicas using confocal laser microscopy. Surface topography was used to calculate arithmetical mean deviation of the surface (S(a)), and geometric index from gradient of the surface (S(grad)), which is expected to correlate with the directionality of surface reflection (DoSR) based on geometric optics. A surface reflection image was acquired from differently polarized pictures of a face, and the index of surface reflection (I(obs)) was calculated as the average pixel value of the area of shine. Correlations between indices were then evaluated. S(grad) and S(a) showed significant correlation (preflection from the reflection model than S(a). In addition, S(grad) can explain differences in DoSR for some panelists even in the case of an identical S(a). The topographic element involved in DoSR was extracted from height mapping. S(grad) reflects the ratio of flat area, offering a more effective indicator than S(a) for distinguishing topographic characteristics with respect to surface reflection. Copyright © 2012 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reconstructing the atmospheric concentration and emissions of CF4, C2F6 and C3F8 prior to direct atmospheric measurements, using air from polar firn and ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudinger, Cathy; Etheridge, David; Sturges, William; Vollmer, Martin; Miller, Benjamin; Worton, David; Rigby, Matt; Krummel, Paul; Martinerie, Patricia; Witrant, Emmanuel; Rayner, Peter; Battle, Mark; Blunier, Thomas; Fraser, Paul; Laube, Johannes; Mani, Frances; Mühle, Jens; O'Doherty, Simon; Schwander, Jakob; Steele, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Perfluorocarbons are very potent and long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, released predominantly during aluminium production, electronic chip manufacture and refrigeration. Mühle et al. (2010) presented records of the concentration and inferred emissions of CF4 (PFC-14), C2F6 (PFC-116) and C3F8 (PFC-218) from the 1970s up to 2008, using measurements from the Cape Grim Air Archive and a suite of tanks with old Northern Hemisphere air, and the AGAGE in situ network. Mühle et al. (2010) also estimated pre-industrial concentrations of these compounds from a small number of polar firn and ice core samples. Here we present measurements of air from polar firn at four sites (DSSW20K, EDML, NEEM and South Pole) and from air bubbles trapped in ice at two sites (DE08 and DE08-2), along with recent atmospheric measurements to give a continuous record of concentration from preindustrial levels up to the present. We estimate global emissions (with uncertainties) consistent with the concentration records. The uncertainty analysis takes into account uncertainties in characterisation of the age of air in firn and ice by the use of two different (independently-calibrated) firn models (the CSIRO and LGGE-GIPSA firn models). References Mühle, J., A.L. Ganesan, B.R. Miller, P.K. Salameh, C.M. Harth, B.R. Greally, M. Rigby, L.W. Porter, L. P. Steele, C.M. Trudinger, P.B. Krummel, S. O'Doherty, P.J. Fraser, P.G. Simmonds, R.G. Prinn, and R.F. Weiss, Perfluorocarbons in the global atmosphere: tetrafluoromethane, hexafluoroethane, and octafluoropropane, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 5145-5164, doi:10.5194/acp-10-5145-2010, 2010.

  16. The evolution of tensor polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Lee, S.Y.; Ratner, L.

    1993-01-01

    By using the equation of motion for the vector polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization is derived. The evolution equation for the tensor polarization is studied in the presence of an isolate spin resonance and in the presence of a spin rotor, or snake

  17. Non-uniform transmission of supermirror devices for neutron polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, X., E-mail: tongx@ornl.gov [Instrument and Source Design Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge 37831, TN (United States); Robertson, J.L. [Instrument and Source Design Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge 37831, TN (United States); Pynn, R. [Instrument and Source Design Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge 37831, TN (United States); Indiana University Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter, Bloomington 47408, IN (United States)

    2014-12-21

    Polarizing supermirrors have been widely used in neutron scattering facilities where they have been employed as neutron spin filters to polarize neutron beams as well as analyze their polarization. In the past, the performance of polarizing supermirrors has been limited by their small acceptance angle, which made them less suitable for use at short wavelengths or with highly divergent beams. Recent advances in supermirror coatings have led to an array of devices designed to, at least partially, overcome this limitation. V-polarizers and multi-channel polarizers have been employed in several different types of neutron scattering instruments. However, our observations in the field where these types of polarizers are in use have raised concerns about their performance. In this paper, we report on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations performed on a multi-channel polarizer used on a prototype Spin-Echo Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SESANS) instrument to better understand its performance. Our results show that careful simulations of polarizers based on mirror reflection are needed to determine whether a particular design is suitable for SESANS applications.

  18. Carbon dioxide adsorption on a ZnO(101[combining macron]0) substrate studied by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Maria; Weidler, Peter G; Bebensee, Fabian; Nefedov, Alexei; Wöll, Christof

    2014-01-28

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide on the mixed-terminated ZnO(101[combining macron]0) surface of a bulk single crystal was studied by UHV Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS). In contrast to metals, the classic surface selection rule for IRRAS does not apply to bulk oxide crystals, and hence vibrational bands can also be observed for s-polarized light. Although this fact substantially complicates data interpretation, a careful analysis allows for a direct determination of the adsorbate geometry. Here, we demonstrate the huge potential of IR-spectroscopy for investigations on oxide single crystal surfaces by considering all three components of the incident polarized light separately. We find that the tridentate (surface) carbonate is aligned along the [0001] direction. A comparison to data reported previously for CO2 adsorbed on the surfaces of ZnO nanoparticles provides important insight into the role of defects in the surface chemistry of powder particles.

  19. Polar Wavelet Transform and the Associated Uncertainty Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Firdous A.; Tantary, Azhar Y.

    2018-02-01

    The polar wavelet transform- a generalized form of the classical wavelet transform has been extensively used in science and engineering for finding directional representations of signals in higher dimensions. The aim of this paper is to establish new uncertainty principles associated with the polar wavelet transforms in L2(R2). Firstly, we study some basic properties of the polar wavelet transform and then derive the associated generalized version of Heisenberg-Pauli-Weyl inequality. Finally, following the idea of Beckner (Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 123, 1897-1905 1995), we drive the logarithmic version of uncertainty principle for the polar wavelet transforms in L2(R2).

  20. Polar low monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobylev, Leonid; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta; Mitnik, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale atmospheric low pressure weather systems, developing poleward of the main baroclinic zone and associated with high surface wind speeds. Small size and short lifetime, sparse in-situ observations in the regions of their development complicate polar low study. Our knowledge of polar lows and mesocyclones has come almost entirely during the period of satellite remote sensing since, by virtue of their small horizontal scale, it was rarely possible to analyse these lows on conventional weather charts using only the data from the synoptic observing network. However, the effects of intense polar lows have been felt by coastal communities and seafarers since the earliest times. These weather systems are thought to be responsible for the loss of many small vessels over the centuries, although the nature of the storms was not understood and their arrival could not be predicted. The actuality of the polar low research is stipulated by their high destructive power: they are a threat to such businesses as oil and gas exploration, fisheries and shipping. They could worsen because of global warming: a shrinking of sea ice around the North Pole, which thawed to its record minimum in the summer of 2007, is likely to give rise to more powerful storms that form only over open water and can cause hurricane-strength winds. Therefore, study of polar lows, their timely detection, tracking and forecasting represents a challenge for today meteorology. Satellite passive microwave data, starting from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite, remain invaluable source of regularly available remotely sensed data to study polar lows. The sounding in this spectral range has several advantages in comparison with observations in visible and infrared ranges and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data: independence on day time and clouds, regularity and high temporal resolution in Polar Regions. Satellite