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Sample records for polarized butanol target

  1. Solid Polarized Targets and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabb, D. G.

    2008-01-01

    Examples are given of dynamically polarized targets in use today and how the subsystems have changed to meet the needs of todays experiments. Particular emphasis is placed on target materials such as ammonia and lithium deuteride. Recent polarization studies of irradiated materials such as butanol, deuterated butanol, polyethylene, and deuterated polyethylene are presented. The operation of two non-DNP target systems as well as applications of traditional DNP targets are briefly discussed

  2. Review of polarized ammonium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tatsuo

    1987-01-01

    Recently, ammonia (NH 3 ) and deutron ammonia (ND 3 ), instead of conventional alcohol substances, have been used more frequently as a polarized target substance for experiments of polarization at high energy regions. This article reviews major features of the polarized (deutron) ammonia targets. The dynamic nuclear polarization (DNT) method is widely used in high energy polarization experiments. While only a low polarization degree of hydrogen nucleus of 1.7 percent can be obtained by the Brute force method, DNP can produce polarization as high as ∼ 90 percent (2.5 T, ∼ 200 mK). In 1979, ammonia was irradiated with radiations to form NH 2 free radicals, resulting in the achievement of a high polarization degree of greater than 90 percent (hydrogen). Since then, ammonia and deutron ammonia have increasingly been replacing alcohols including butanol. Irradiation of a target substance with radiations destroys the structure of the substance, leading to a decrease in polarization degree. However, ammonia produces unpaired electrons as a result of irradiation, allowing it to be highly resistant to radiation. This report also present some study results, including observations on effects of radiation on the polarization degree of a target, effects of annealing, and polarization of 14 N. A process for producing an ammonia target is also described. (Nogami, K.)

  3. Polarized targets and beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.

    1985-01-01

    First the experimental situation of the single-pion photoproduction and the photodisintegration of the deuteron is briefly discussed. Then a description of the Bonn polarization facilities is given. The point of main effort is put on the polarized target which plays a vital role in the program. A facility for photon induced double polarization experiments at ELSA will be presented in section 4. Properties of a tensor polarized deuteron target are discussed in section 5. The development in the field of polarized targets, especially on new target materials, enables a new generation of polarized target experiments with (polarized) electrons. Some comments on the use of a polarized target in combination with electron beams will be discussed in section 6. Electron deuteron scattering from a tensor polarized deuteron target is considered and compared with other experimental possibilities. (orig./HSI)

  4. Polarization measurement for internal polarized gaseous targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhenyu; Ye Yunxiu; Lv Haijiang; Mao Yajun

    2004-01-01

    The authors present an introduction to internal polarized gaseous targets, polarization method, polarization measurement method and procedure. To get the total nuclear polarization of hydrogen atoms (including the polarization of the recombined hydrogen molecules) in the target cell, authors have measured the parameters relating to atomic polarization and polarized hydrogen atoms and molecules. The total polarization of the target during our measurement is P T =0.853 ± 0.036. (authors)

  5. The Bochum Polarized Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reicherz, G.; Goertz, S.; Harmsen, J.; Heckmann, J.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Bochum 'Polarized Target' group develops the target material 6 LiD for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. Several different materials like alcohols, alcanes and ammonia are under investigation. Solid State Targets are polarized in magnetic fields higher than B=2.5T and at temperatures below T=1K. For the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization process, paramagnetic centers are induced chemically or by irradiation with ionizing beams. The radical density is a critical factor for optimization of polarization and relaxation times at adequate magnetic fields and temperatures. In a high sensitive EPR--apparatus, an evaporator and a dilution cryostat with a continuous wave NMR--system, the materials are investigated and optimized. To improve the polarization measurement, the Liverpool NMR-box is modified by exchanging the fixed capacitor for a varicap diode which not only makes the tuning very easy but also provides a continuously tuned circuit. The dependence of the signal area upon the circuit current is measured and it is shown that it follows a linear function

  6. The polarized double cell target of the SMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.; Adeva, B.; Arik, E.; Arvidson, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballintijn, M.K.; Bardin, G.; Baum, G.; Berglund, P.; Betev, L.; Bird, I.G.; Birsa, R.; Bjoerkholm, P.; Bonner, B.E.; Botton, N. de; Boutemeur, M.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Bueltmann, S.; Burtin, E.; Cavata, C.; Crabb, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Cuhadar, T.; Torre, S. Dalla; Dantzig, R. van; Derro, B.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Dulya, C.; Dyring, A.; Eichblatt, S.; Faivre, J.C.; Fasching, D.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandez, C.; Forthmann, S.; Frois, B.; Gallas, A.; Garzon, J.A.; Gaussiran, T.; Gilly, H.; Giorgi, M.; Goeler, E. von; Goertz, S.; Gracia, G.; Groot, N. de; Perdekamp, M. Grosse; Guelmez, E.; Haft, K.; Harrach, D. von; Hasegawa, T.; Hautle, P.; Hayashi, N.; Heusch, C.A.; Horikawa, N.; Hughes, V.W.; Igo, G.; Ishimoto, S.; Iwata, T.; Kabuss, E.M.; Kageya, T.; Karev, A.; Kessler, H.J.; Ketel, T.J.; Kiryluk, J.; Kishi, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klostermann, L.; Kraemer, D.; Krivokhijine, V.; Kroeger, W.; Kurek, K.; Kyynaeraeinen, J.; Lamanna, M.; Landgraf, U.; Layda, T.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lehar, F.; Lesquen, A. de; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lindqvist, T.; Litmaath, M.; Lowe, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Marie, F.; Martin, A.; Martino, J.; Matsuda, T.; Mayes, B.; McCarthy, J.S.; Medved, K.; Meyer, W.; Middelkoop, G. van; Miller, D.; Miyachi, Y.; Mori, K.; Moromisato, J.; Nassalski, J.; Naumann, L.; Neganov, B.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Oberski, J.E.J.; Ogawa, A.; Ozben, C.; Parks, D.P.; Pereira, H.; Penzo, A.; Perrot-Kunne, F.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piegaia, R.; Pinsky, L.; Platchkov, S.; Plo, M.; Pose, D.; Postma, H.; Pretz, J.; Pussieux, T.; Pyrlik, J.; Raedel, G.; Reyhancan, I.; Reicherz, G.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.; Roberts, J.B.; Rock, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Rondio, E.; Rosado, A.; Roscherr, B.; Sabo, I.; Saborido, J.; Sandacz, A.; Savin, I.; Schiavon, P.; Schiller, A.; Schueler, K.P.; Segel, R.; Seitz, R.; Semertzidis, Y.; Sever, F.; Shanahan, P.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simeoni, F.; Smirnov, G.I.; Staude, A.; Steinmetz, A.; Stiegler, U.; Stuhrmann, H.; Szleper, M.; Teichert, K.M.; Tessarotto, F.; Thers, D.; Tlaczala, W.; Trentalange, S.; Tripet, A.; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vogt, J.; Voss, R.; Weinstein, R.; Whitten, C.; Windmolders, R.; Willumeit, R.; Wislicki, W.; Witzmann, A.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zaremba, K.; Zhao, J.

    1999-01-01

    The polarized target of the Spin Muon Collaboration at CERN was used for deep inelastic muon scattering experiments during 1993-1996 with a polarized muon beam to investigate the spin structure of the nucleon. Most of the experiments were carried out with longitudinal target polarization and 190 GeV muons, and some were done with transverse polarization and 100 GeV muons. Protons as well as deuterons were polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in three kinds of solid materials -- butanol, ammonia, and deuterated butanol -- with maximum degrees of polarization of 94%, 91% and 60%, respectively. Considerable attention was paid to the accuracies of the NMR polarization measurements and their analyses, the accuracies achieved were between 2.0% and 3.2%. The SMC target system with two cells of opposite polarizations, each cell 65 cm long and 5 cm in diameter, constitutes the largest polarized target system ever built and facilitates accurate spin asymmetry measurements. The design considerations, construction and performance of the target are reviewed

  7. The polarized double cell target of the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Adeva, B; Arik, E; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Ballintijn, M K; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Bird, I G; Birsa, R; Björkholm, P; Bonner, B E; De Botton, N R; Boutemeur, M; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Cavata, C; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dyring, A; Eichblatt, S; Faivre, Jean-Claude; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gaussiran, T; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Gülmez, E; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kishi, A; Kiselev, Yu F; Klostermann, L; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Layda, T; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindqvist, T; Litmaath, M; Loewe, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Neganov, B S; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Parks, D P; Pereira, H; Penzo, Aldo L; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Pussieux, T; Pyrlik, J; Rädel, G; Reyhancan, I; Reicherz, G; Rijllart, A; Roberts, J B; Rock, S E; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Rosado, A; Roscherr, B; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Schüler, K P; Segel, R E; Seitz, R; Semertzidis, Y K; Sever, F; Shanahan, P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Teichert, K M; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Trentalange, S; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Weinstein, R; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1999-01-01

    The polarized target of the Spin Muon Collaboration at CERN was used for deep inelastic muon scattering experiments during 1993 to 1996 with a polarized muon beam to investigate the spin structure of the nucleon. Most of the experiments were carried out with longitudinal target polarization and 190 GeV muons, and some were done with transverse polarization and 100 GeV muons. Protons as well as deuterons were polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in three kinds of solid materials $-$ butanol, ammonia, and deuterated butanol, with maximum degrees of polarization of 94, 91, and 60 \\%, respectively. Considerable attention was paid to the accuracies of the NMR polarization measurements and their analyses. The achieved accuracies were between 2.0 and 3.2 \\%. The SMC target system with two cells of opposite polarizations, each cell 65 cm long and 5 cm in diameter, constitutes the largest polarized target system ever built and facilitates accurate spin asymmetry measurements. The design considerations, the ...

  8. Neutron polarization in polarized 3He targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.; Gibson, B.F.; Payne, G.L.; Bernstein, A.M.; Chupp, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    Simple formulas for the neutron and proton polarizations in polarized 3 He targets are derived assuming (1) quasielastic final states; (2) no final-state interactions; (3) no meson-exchange currents; (4) large momentum transfers; (5) factorizability of 3 He SU(4) response-function components. Numerical results from a wide variety of bound-state solutions of the Faddeev equations are presented. It is found that this simple model predicts the polarization of neutrons in a fully polarized 3 He target to be 87%, while protons should have a slight residual polarization of -2.7%. Numerical studies show that this model works very well for quasielastic electron scattering

  9. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  10. Stanford polarized atomic beam target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavis, D.G.; Dunham, J.S.; Hugg, J.W.; Glavish, H.F.

    1976-01-01

    A polarized atomic beam source was used to produce an atomic hydrogen beam which was in turn used as a polarized proton target. A target density of 2 x 10'' atoms/cm 3 and a target polarization of 0.37 without the use of rf transitions were measured. These measurements indicate that a number of experiments are currently feasible with a variety of polarized target beams

  11. Cryogenic polarized target facility: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, C.; Nash, H.K.; Roberson, N.; Schneider, M.; Seagondollar, W.; Soderstrum, J.

    1985-01-01

    The TUNL cryogenically polarized target facility consists of a 3 He- 4 He dilution refrigerator and a superconducting magnet, together capable of maintaining samples at between 10 and 20 mK in magnetic fields up to 7 Tesla. At these temperatures and magnetic fields brute-force nuclear orientation occurs. Polarizations from 20 to 60% are attainable in about twenty nonzero spin nuclei. Most are metals, ranging in mass from 6 Li to 209 Bi, but the nuclei 1 H and 3 He are also polarizable via this method. The main effort is directed towards a better determination of the effective spin-spin force in nuclei. These experiments are briefly described and the beam stabilization system, cryostat and polarized 3 He targets are discussed

  12. Fusion of a polarized projectile with a polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christley, J.A.; Johnson, R.C.; Thompson, I.J.

    1995-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for a polarized target with both unpolarized and polarized projectiles are studied. Expressions for the observables are given for the case when both nuclei are polarized. Calculations for fusion of an aligned 165 Ho target with 16 O and polarized 7 Li beams are presented

  13. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Budker, D.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Appelt, S.; Bouchard, L. S.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ($\\sim$100 Hz) polarization reversal, and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  14. Polarized few-nucleon targets: new developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeusser, O

    1992-09-01

    We discuss recent improvements in producing polarized few-nucleon targets for nuclear and particle physics experiments. The emphasis is on progress with polarized gas targets intended for experiments at electron and proton storage rings. (author) 54 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Polarized few-nucleon targets: new developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1992-09-01

    We discuss recent improvements in producing polarized few-nucleon targets for nuclear and particle physics experiments. The emphasis is on progress with polarized gas targets intended for experiments at electron and proton storage rings. (author) 54 refs., 1 tab

  16. Nuclear spin polarization of targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Happer, W.

    1990-01-01

    Lasers can be used to produce milligrams to grams of noble gas nuclei with spin polarizations in excess of 50%. These quantities are sufficient to be very useful targets in nuclear physics experiments. Alkali-metal atoms are used to capture the angular momentum of circularly polarized laser photons, and the alkali-metal atoms transfer their angular momentum to noble gas atoms in binary or three-body collisions. Non-radiative collisions between the excited alkali atoms and molecular quenching gases are essential to avoid radiation trapping. The spin exchange can involve gas-phase van der Waals molecules, consisting of a noble gas atom and an alkali metal atom. Surface chemistry is also of great importance in determining the wall-induced relaxation rates of the noble gases

  17. On the large COMPASS polarized deuteron target

    CERN Document Server

    Finger, M; Baum, G; Doshita, N; Finger, M Jr; Gautheron, F; Goertz, St; Hasegawa, T; Heckmann, J; Hess, Ch; Horikawa, N; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kisselev, Y; Koivuniemi, J; Kondo, K; Le Goff, J-M; Magnon, A; Marchand, C; Matsuda, T; Meyer, W; Reicherz, G; Srnka, A

    2006-01-01

    The spin structure of the nucleons is investigated in deep inelastic scattering of a polarized muon beam and a polarized nucleon target in the COMPASS experiment at CERN since 2001. To achieve high luminosities a large solid polarized target is used. The COMPASS polarized target consists of a high cooling power $^{3}$He/$^{4}$He dilution refrigerator capable to maintain working temperature of the target material at about 50mK, a superconducting solenoid and dipole magnet system for longitudinal and transversal magnetic field on the target material, respectively, target cells containing polarizable material, microwave cavities and high power microwave radiation systems for dynamic nuclear polarization and the nuclear magnetic resonance system for nuclear spin polarization measurements. During 2001–2004 experiments superconducting magnet system with opening angle $\\pm$69 mrad, polarized target holder with two target cells and corresponding microwave and NMR systems have been used. For the data taking from 200...

  18. Polarized targets at triangle universities nuclear laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, M.L. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Gould, C.R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Haase, D.G. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Huffman, P.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Keith, C.D. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Roberson, N.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Tornow, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Wilburn, W.S. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A summary of the polarized and aligned nuclear targets which have been constructed and used at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory is given. Statically polarized targets, typically operating at a temperature of 12 mK and a magnetic field of 7 T, have provided significant nuclear polarization in {sup 1}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 27}Al, {sup 93}Nb and {sup 165}Ho. A rotating, aligned {sup 165}Ho target is also in use. A {sup 3}He melting curve thermometer has been developed for use in statically polarized targets. A dynamically polarized proton target is under construction. ((orig.))

  19. System for measuring the proton polarization in a polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Trotsenko, V.I.; Chechetenko, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    The system for measuring the proton polarization in a polarized target representing the high-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is described Q-meter with series connection and a circuit for measuring system resonance characteristic is used for NMR-absorption signal recording. Measuring coil is produced of a strip conductor in order to obtain uniform system sensitivity to polarization state in all target volume and improve signal-to-noise ratio. Polarization measuring system operates ion-line with the M-6000 computer. The total measuring error for the value of free proton polarization in target taking into account the error caused by local depolarization of working substance under irradiation by high-intense photon beam is <= 6%. Long-term application of the described system for measuring the proton polarization in the LUEh-20000 accelerator target used in the pion photoproduction experiments has demonstrated its high reliability

  20. Dynamic nuclear polarization of irradiated target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polarized nucleon targets used in high energy physics experiments usually employ the method of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to polarize the protons or deuterons in an alcohol. DNP requires the presence of paramagnetic centers, which are customarily provided by a chemical dopant. These chemically doped targets have a relatively low polarizable nucleon content and suffer from loss of polarization when subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation. If the paramagnetic centers formed when the target is irradiated can be used in the DNP process, it becomes possible to produce targets using materials which have a relatively high polarizable nucleon content, but which are not easily doped by chemical means. Furthermore, the polarization of such targets may be much more radiation resistant. Dynamic nuclear polarization in ammonia, deuterated ammonia, ammonium hydroxide, methylamine, borane ammonia, butonal, ethane and lithium borohydride has been studied. These studies were conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center using the Yale-SLAC polarized target system. Results indicate that the use of ammonia and deuterated ammonia as polarized target materials would make significant increases in polarized target performance possible

  1. Polarization reversal of proton spins in solid-state targets by superradiance effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichertz, L.A.

    1991-02-01

    Scattering experiments with polarized targets are prepared at the Bonn accelerator ELSA. The new Bonn frozen spin target (BOFROST) developed for real photon experiments at the PHOENICS detector has been tested in the laboratory. Proton polarization values of -99% and +94% in ammonia, -96% and +90% in butanol have been achieved at a magnetic field of 3.5 Tesla. At a temperature of 70 mK and a magnetic field of 0.35 Tesla a very fast spontaneous polarization reversal has been observed. This effect occured at negative polarization only and has been identified as a self-induced superradiance effect in the proton spin system. This work describes the polarization and relaxation measurements at BOFROST and detailed experiments concerning the superradiance effect. (orig.) [de

  2. Polarized internal targets for electronuclear experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van den Brand, J.F.J.

    1993-01-01

    Polarized internal gas targets represent a unique opportunity for the measurement of spin observables in electro-nuclear physics. Two measurements will be discussed. First, spin observables have been measured in elastic and quasi-free scattering of 45, 200, 300, and 415 MeV polarized protons from a polarized 3 He internal gas target at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility Cooler Ring. The data obtained constitute the first measurement of spin correlation parameters using a storage ring with polarized beam and polarized internal gas target. Second, a quasi-free (e,e'p) experiment using tensor polarized deuterium will be discussed. Here, the goal is the measurement of the S- and D-state parts of the proton spectral function by scattering 700 MeV electrons from an atomic beam source. Large acceptance detectors have been used in both experiments. The internal-target technique has broad applicability in nuclear and particle physics

  3. Polarized proton target-IV. Operations manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.; Fletcher, O.; Moretti, A.; Onesto, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard operating procedures are presented for the vacuum, cryogenic, and electronic systems of a polarized proton target. The systems are comprised of (1) a target cryostat; (2) a 4 He pumping system; (3) a 3 He pumping system; (4) a microwave system; (5) a magnet and power supply; (6) a computerized polarization monitor; and (7) miscellaneous auxiliary equipment

  4. Polarized targets in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cates, G.D. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Various approaches are discussed for producing polarized nuclear targets for high energy physics experiments. As a unifying theme, examples are drawn from experiments to measure spin dependent structure functions of nucleons in deep inelastic scattering. This single physics goal has, over roughly two decades, been a driving force in advances in target technology. Actual or planned approaches have included solid targets polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), several types of internal targets for use in storage rings, and gaseous 3 He targets polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping. This last approach is the type of target adopted for SLAC E-142, an experiment to measure the spin structure function of the neutron, and is described in detail

  5. Polarized targets in high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cates, G.D. Jr. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Various approaches are discussed for producing polarized nuclear targets for high energy physics experiments. As a unifying theme, examples are drawn from experiments to measure spin dependent structure functions of nucleons in deep inelastic scattering. This single physics goal has, over roughly two decades, been a driving force in advances in target technology. Actual or planned approaches have included solid targets polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), several types of internal targets for use in storage rings, and gaseous {sup 3}He targets polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping. This last approach is the type of target adopted for SLAC E-142, an experiment to measure the spin structure function of the neutron, and is described in detail.

  6. Polarized gas targets for storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is widely recognized that polarized gas targets in electron storage rings represent a new opportunity for precision nuclear physics studies. New developments in polarized target technology specific to internal applications will be discussed. In particular, polarized gas targets have been used in the VEPP-3 electron ring in Novosibirsk. A simple storage cell was used to increase the total target thickness by a factor of 15 over the simple gas jet target from an atomic beam source. Results from the initial phase of this project will be reported. In addition, the plans for increasing the luminosity by an additional order or magnitude will be presented. The application of this work to polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets for the HERA ring will be noted. The influence of beam-induced depolarization, a phenomena encountered in short-pulse electron storage rings, will be discussed. Finally, the performance tests of laser-driven sources will be presented. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  7. Polarized deuteron elastic scattering from a polarized proton target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelzer, R.; Kuiper, H.; Schoeberl, M.; Berber, S.; Hilmert, H.; Koeppel, R.; Pferdmenges, R. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Physikalisches Inst.); Zankel, H. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1983-01-13

    Measurements are reported of the spin correlation parameter Cy,y for the elastic scattering of 10.0 MeV vector polarized deuterons from a polarized proton target at five CM angles (76/sup 0/,85/sup 0/,98/sup 0/,115/sup 0/,132/sup 0/). The experimental results are compared with different predictions. A Faddeev type calculation on the basis of local potentials also including approximate Coulomb distortion is favoured by our experimental results.

  8. Polarized deuteron elastic scattering from a polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, R.; Kuiper, H.; Schoeberl, M.; Berber, S.; Hilmert, H.; Koeppel, R.; Pferdmenges, R.; Zankel, H.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements are reported of the spin correlation parameter Cy,y for the elastic scattering of 10.0 MeV vector polarized deuterons from a polarized proton target at five CM angles (76 0 ,85 0 ,98 0 ,115 0 ,132 0 ). The experimental results are compared with different predictions. A Faddeev type calculation on the basis of local potentials also including approximate Coulomb distortion is favoured by our experimental results. (orig.)

  9. Physics with polarized electrons and targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    With the advent of electron stretcher or storage rings electron scattering from polarized targets becomes a general new tool for nuclear structure studies. Without such facilities it is necessary to have very dense polarized targets for use with the typical (less or approximately equal 50 μA) electron beams available and very few measurements of this type have been attempted. On the other hand, with electron rings the effective circulating current can be greatly increased. In this case much thinner internal targets may be used while still maintaining the same luminosity as in external beam experiments. In ancticipation of such new experimental capabilities we have re-developed the theoretical basis for discussions of electron scattering from polarized targets using either unpolarized or polarized electron beams. This work takes the formalism of unpolarized (e,e') and extends it in a straightforward way to include general polarizations of electrons, target nuclei, recoil nuclei or any combinations of these polarizations. In the present context it is only possible to provide a brief summary of the general form of the cross section and to present a few illustrative examples of the nuclear structure information that may be extracted from such polarization measurements

  10. System for measuring of proton polarization in polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derkach, A.Ya.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kuz'menko, V.S.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Trotsenko, V.I.; Chechetenko, V.F.

    1981-01-01

    Measurement system of proton polarization in the target, which uses the method of nuclear magnetic resonance is described. To record the signal of NMR-absorption a parallel Q-meter of voltage with analogous subtraction of resonance characteristics of measurement circuit is used. To obtain gradual sensitivity of the system to polarization state in the whole volume of the target the measurement coils is made of tape conductor. The analysis and mathematical modelling of Q-meter are carried out. Corrections for nonlinearity and dispersion are calculated. Key diagrams of the main electron blocks of Q-meter are presented. The system described operates on line with the M6000 computer. Total error of measurement of polarization value of free protons in the target does not exceed 6% [ru

  11. System of measurement of proton polarization in a polarized target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnaukov, I.M.; Chechetenko, V.F.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Telegin, Y.N.; Trotsenko, V.I.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer with high sensitivity. The signal of NMR absorption is recorded by a Q-meter with a series circuit and a circuit for compensation of the resonance characteristic of the measuring circuit. In order to ensure uniform sensitivity of the system to the state of polarization throughout the volume of the target and to enhance the S/N ration the measuring coil is made of a flat conductor. The polarization-measuring system works on-line with an M-6000 computer. The total error of measurement of the polarization of free protons in a target with allowance for the error due to local depolarization of free protons in a target with allowance for the error due to local depolarization of the working substance under irradiation with an intense photon beam is less than or equal to 6%.

  12. Polarized proton target with horizontal spin orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyatova, Eh.I.; Kiselev, Yu.F.; Kozlenko, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    Proton target, the polarization vector of which may be arbitrary oriented in horizontal plane relatively to the beam, is developed and tested. 70% value of polarization is obtained. 0.6 K temperature is acquired through 3 He pumping out continuous cycle. 1.2-propylene glycol - Cr(V) was used as working medium. Magnetic system is made in the form of Helmholtz sperconducting coils with working curren close to critical one. Target polarization is measured by NMR technique using original system of proton signal processing

  13. Improved n-butanol production via co-expression of membrane-targeted tilapia metallothionein and the clostridial metabolic pathway in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Wei-Chih; Lin, Kuo-Hsing; Liu, Chun-Chi; Tsuge, Kenji; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2017-04-11

    N-Butanol has favorable characteristics for use as either an alternative fuel or platform chemical. Bio-based n-butanol production using microbes is an emerging technology that requires further development. Although bio-industrial microbes such as Escherichia coli have been engineered to produce n-butanol, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated toxicity may limit productivity. Previously, we show that outer-membrane-targeted tilapia metallothionein (OmpC-TMT) is more effective as an ROS scavenger than human and mouse metallothioneins to reduce oxidative stress in the host cell. The host strain (BUT1-DE) containing the clostridial n-butanol pathway displayed a decreased growth rate and limited n-butanol productivity, likely due to ROS accumulation. The clostridial n-butanol pathway was co-engineered with inducible OmpC-TMT in E. coli (BUT3-DE) for simultaneous ROS removal, and its effect on n-butanol productivity was examined. The ROS scavenging ability of cells overexpressing OmpC-TMT was examined and showed an approximately twofold increase in capacity. The modified strain improved n-butanol productivity to 320 mg/L, whereas the control strain produced only 95.1 mg/L. Transcriptomic analysis revealed three major KEGG pathways that were significantly differentially expressed in the BUT3-DE strain compared with their expression in the BUT1-DE strain, including genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, fructose and mannose metabolism and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis. These results indicate that OmpC-TMT can increase n-butanol production by scavenging ROS. The transcriptomic analysis suggested that n-butanol causes quinone malfunction, resulting in oxidative-phosphorylation-related nuo operon downregulation, which would diminish the ability to convert NADH to NAD + and generate proton motive force. However, fructose and mannose metabolism-related genes (fucA, srlE and srlA) were upregulated, and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis-related genes (pfkB, pgm) were

  14. Polarized proton and deuteron solid HD targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honig, A.

    1977-01-01

    A decade has now elapsed since HD was proposed as a polarized proton and deuteron target with exceptionally desirable properties. These include a very high free proton proportion, independently polarizable proton and deuteron systems, and a ''frozen-spin'' mode of operation which allows separation of the functions of production and utilization of the highly polarized target. A discussion is given of what can be expected of the polarized HD system right now, without further research. The basic features of solid HD pertinent to its use as a ''frozen-spin'' target are outlined, then a summary is given of the particular experimental results which support the contention that the target will perform successfully, and finally, some feasible operating modes and the expected performances from them are presented

  15. A horizontal dilution refrigerator for polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagawa, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Masaike, A.; Morimoto, K.

    1978-01-01

    A horizontal dilution refrigerator was constructed with a view to the spin frozen target and the deuteron polarized target. High cooling power at high temperature such as 3.7 mW at 400 mK serves for overcoming a heat load of microwave to polarize the nuclear spins in the target material. The cooling power at 50 mK was 50 μW, which is sufficient to hold the high nuclear polarization for long time. The lowest temperature reached was 26 mK. The refrigerator has rather simple heat exchangers, a long stainless steel double tube heat exchanger and two coaxial type heat exchangers with sintered copper. The mixing chamber is made of polytetrafluoroethylene (TFE) and demountable so that the target material can be easily put into it. (Auth.)

  16. Superconducting polarizing magnet for a movable polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anishchenko, N.G.; Bartenev, V.D.; Blinov, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    The superconducting polarizing magnet was constructed for the JINR (Dubna) movable polarized target (MPT) with working volume 200 mm long and 30 mm in diameter. The magnet provides a polarizing magnetic field up to 6 T in the centre with the uniformity of 4.5 x 10 -4 in the working volume of the target. The magnet contains a main solenoidal winding 558 mm long and 206/144 mm in diameters, and compensating and correcting winding placed at its ends. The windings are made of a NbTi wire, impregnated with the epoxy resin and placed in the horizontal cryostat. The diameter of the 'warm' aperture of the magnet cryostat is 96 mm. The design and technology of the magnet winding are described. Results of the magnetic field map measurements, using a NMR-magnetometer are given. A similar magnet constructed at DAPNIA, CEA/Saclay (France), represented a model for the present development. The MPT array is installed in the beam line of polarized neutrons produced by break-up of polarized deuterons extracted from the synchrophasotron of the Laboratory of High Energies (LHE), JINR (Dubna)

  17. COMPASS polarized target for Drell-Yan

    CERN Document Server

    Pešek, M

    2014-01-01

    In the COMPASS Drell–Yan experiment the pion beam with momen tum of 190 GeV/ c and in- tensity up to 10 8 pions/s will interact with transversely polarized proton t arget producing muon pair via Drell–Yan process. The solid-state NH 3 will be polarized by dynamic nuclear polar- ization. Maximum polarization reached during data taking i s expected to be up to 90%. The non-interacting beam and other particles produced inside t he target will be stopped in the hadron absorber after the target. Two target cells, sepparated by a 20 cm gap in between, each 55 cm long and 4 cm in diameter give the target material volume about 691 cm 3 . The target platform needs to be moved by 2.3 m in upstream dire ction from the position used in previous experiments in order to accomodate the absorber. D uring the beam time higher radiation is expected in the area of the control room. Thus a new target r emote control system is needed. The target magnet is undergoing a substantial upgrade. Drell–Yan data taking is expected t...

  18. New investigations of polarized solid HD targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honig, A.; Whisnant, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Polarized solid HD targets in a frozen-spin mode, with superior nuclear physics characteristics and simple operational configurations, have previously been restricted in their deployment due to a disproportionate target production time with respect to utilization time. Recent investigations have yielded frozen-spin polarization lifetimes, at a convenient target temperature of 1.5 K, of nearly a year for both H and D at high holding fields, and of more than a week at sub-Tesla holding fields. These results, taken together with the advent of new interesting spin-physics using relatively weakly ionizing beams, such as polarized photon beams, remove the above impediment and open up the use of polarized solid HD to long duration nuclear spin-physics experiments. Large, multiple targets can be produced, retrieved from the polarization-production apparatus with a cold-transport (4 K) device, stored for very long times in inexpensive (1.5 K, 7 T) cryostats, and introduced 'off-the-shelf' into in-beam cryostats via the portable cold-transport apparatus. Various modes for achieving polarized H and/or D, as well as already achieved and expected polarization values, are reported. Experimental results are given on Kapitza resistance between the solid HD and the cooling wires necessary to obtain low temperatures during the heat-evolving polarization process. 15 mK is achievable using gold-plated aluminum wires, which constitute 15% extraneous nucleons over the number of polarizable H or D nucleons. Application to more highly ionizing beams is also given consideration. ((orig.))

  19. Modeling alignment enhancement for solid polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, D. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2017-07-15

    A model of dynamic orientation using optimized radiofrequency (RF) irradiation produced perpendicular to the holding field is developed for the spin-1 system required for tensor-polarized fixed-target experiments. The derivation applies to RF produced close to the Larmor frequency of the nucleus and requires the electron spin-resonance linewidth to be much smaller than the nuclear magnetic resonance frequency. The rate equations are solved numerically to study a semi-saturated steady-state resulting from the two sources of irradiation: microwave from the DNP process and the additional RF used to manipulate the tensor polarization. The steady-state condition and continuous-wave NMR lineshape are found that optimize the spin-1 alignment in the polycrystalline materials used as solid polarized targets in charged-beam nuclear and particle physics experiments. (orig.)

  20. On the large COMPASS polarized deuteron target

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ball, J.; Baum, G.; Doshita, N.; Finger Jr., M.; Finger, M.; Gautheron, F.; Goertz, S.; Hasegawa, T.; Heckmann, J.; Hess, C.; Horikawa, N.; Ishimoto, S.; Iwata, T.; Kisselev, Y.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kondo, K.; Le Goff, J.M.; Magnon, A.; Marchand, C.; Matsuda, T.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G.; Srnka, Aleš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, Suppl. F (2006), F295-F305 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 492 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : COMPASS * polarized target * Dilution refrigerator Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  1. Electron scattering with polarized targets at TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Belostotski, S.

    2000-11-01

    Measurements of polarized electron-nucleon scattering can be realized at the TESLA linear collider facility with projected luminosities that are about two orders of magnitude higher than those expected of other experiments at comparable energies. Longitudinally polarized electrons, accelerated as a small fraction of the total current in the e + arm of TESLA, can be directed onto a solid state target that may be either longitudinally or transversely polarized. A large variety of polarized parton distribution and fragmentation functions can be determined with unprecedented accuracy, many of them for the first time. A main goal of the experiment is the precise measurement of the x- and Q 2 -dependence of the experimentally totally unknown quark transversity distributions that will complete the information on the nucleon's quark spin structure as relevant for high energy processes. Comparing their Q 2 -evolution to that of the corresponding helicity distributions constitutes an important precision test of the predictive power of QCD in the spin sector. Measuring transversity distributions and tensor charges allows access to the hitherto unmeasured chirally odd operators in QCD which are of great importance to understand the role of chiral symmetry. The possibilities of using unpolarized targets and of experiments with a real photon beam turn TESLA-N into a versatile next-generation facility at the intersection of particle and nuclear physics. (orig.)

  2. H- ion current from a polarized vapor target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    A method of determining the polarization transferred to hydrogen atoms in charge-exchange reactions is outlined. The method also provides a means of determining target polarizations once the polarization transfer function is known

  3. Characteristics of target polarization by laser ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; Delle Side, D.; Giuffreda, E.; Nassisi, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2015), 601-605 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0454; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Target current in laser-produced plasmas * positive and negative target polarization * space structure of ion front Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2015

  4. Irradiation cryostat for LiH and LiD polarized solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertz, S.

    1991-01-01

    Scattering experiments with polarized nucleon targets are an important tool to understand the nuclear spin structure. Pion photoproduction experiments on polarized protrons and neutrons as well as measurements of the neutron and deuteron formfactors will be performed at ELSA. 7 LiH and 6 LiD seem to be attractive target materials for these experiments, because they offer high proton and deuteron polarisation, respectively. Expecially 6 LiD has further very important advantages compared to the common deuteron target materials as d-Butanol and ND 3 . This work describes the mechanism of DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) in LiH and LiD and gives a view on the nature of the so-called paramagnetic impurities in these materials. In order to maximize the nuclear polarization, the production of these radicals have to take place under well defined temperature conditions. Therefore the first version of an irradiation cryostat was built and tested in regard to its cooling power and temperature adjustment. (orig.)

  5. OMEGA polar-drive target designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Shvydky, A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2012-01-01

    Low-adiabat polar-drive (PD) [Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] implosion designs for the OMEGA [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] laser are described. These designs for cryogenic deuterium–tritium and warm plastic shells use a temporal laser pulse shape with three pickets followed by a main pulse [Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010)]. The designs are at two different on-target laser intensities, with different in-flight aspect ratios (IFARs). These designs permit studies of implosion energetics and target performance closer to ignition-relevant intensities (∼7 × 10 14 W/cm 2 at the quarter-critical surface, where nonlocal heat conduction and laser–plasma interactions can play an important role) but at lower values of IFAR ∼ 22 or at lower intensity (∼3 × 10 14 W/cm 2 ) but at a higher IFAR (IFAR ∼ 32, where shell instability can play an important role). PD geometry requires repointing of laser beams to improve shell symmetry. The higher-intensity designs optimize target performance by repointing beams to a lesser extent, compensating for the reduced equatorial drive by increasing the energies of the repointed beams. They also use custom beam profiles that improve equatorial illumination at the expense of irradiation at higher latitudes. These latter designs will be studied when new phase plates for the OMEGA Laser System, corresponding to the custom beam profiles, are obtained.

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on polarized targets in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-08-01

    Polarization phenomena have played an increasingly important part in the study of nuclei and nucleons in recent years. Polarization studies have been hampered by the relatively few and rather fragile polarized targets which are presently available. The concept of polarized gas targets in storage rings opens a much wider range of possibilities than is available in the external target geometry. This novel method will represent a considerable advance in nuclear physics and will continue to receive much attention in plans for future facilities. An internal, polarized-target station is being planned for the cooler ring at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Internal targets are compatible with recent designs of electron accelerators proposed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Southeastern Universities Research Association. The key to nuclear-science programs based on internal targets pivots on recent developments in polarized atomic beam methods, which include the more recent laser-driven polarized targets. The workshop drew together a unique group of physicists in the fields of high-energy, nuclear and atomic physics. The meeting was organized in a manner that stimulated discussion among the 58 participants and focused on developments in polarized target technology and the underlying atomic physics. An impressive array of future possibilities for polarized targets as well as current developments in polarized target technology were discussed at the workshop. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base

  7. Computer control of the SMC polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Goff, J.M.; Azoulay, R.; Berglund, P.; Dulya, C.; Gournay, J.F.; Hayashi, N.; Kyynaeraeinen, J.; Magnon, A.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Trentalange, S.

    1995-01-01

    The SMC polarized target is controlled through VME crates driven by CPUs working under the VxWorks operating system. The CPUs are connected to a SUN workstation which provides the user interface due to a graphical package named SL-GMS. This results in user friendliness, high modularity and flexibility. The system allows the control of: (1) the superconductive solenoid and the transverse dipole: control of the power supplies; automatic reversal of the spin direction by field rotation; acquisition, display and storage of the electric and cryogenic parameters; generation of alarms; and (2) the dilution refrigerator: evaporator level control; acquisition, display and storage of ∼100 cryogenic parameters; and generation of alarms. ((orig.))

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization tests in some polymers for polarized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, B. van den; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; Bunyatova, E.I.

    1998-01-01

    The results of dynamic polarization tests in polyethylene (PE) and ethylene propylene copolymer (EPC), doped with the stable free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO), are presented. Sizable proton polarizations have been achieved in a magnetic field of 2.5 T at a temperature below 0.3 K and 5T at 1 K

  9. Laser-driven polarized H/D sources and targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.; Seely, J.; Xu, W.

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, Atomic Beam Sources are used to produce targets of nuclear polarized hydrogen (H) or deuterium (D) for experiments using storage rings. Laser-Driven Sources (LDSs) offer a factor of 20-30 gain in the target thickness (however, with lower polarization) and may produce a higher overall figure of merit. The LDS is based on the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping where alkali vapor is polarized by absorbing circularly polarized laser photons. The H or D atoms are nuclear-polarized through spin-exchange collisions with the polarized alkali vapor and through subsequent hyperfine interactions during frequent H-H or D-D collisions

  10. Few-body experiments with polarized beams and polarized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is presented concerning recent polarization experiments in the elastic p-d, p- 3 He, and p- 4 He systems. Mention is made of selected neutron experiments. The nominal energy range is 10 to 1000 MeV. Recent results and interpretations of the p-d system near 10 MeV are discussed. New experiments on the energy dependence of back angle p-d tensor polarization are discussed with respect to resolution of discrepancies and difficulty of theoretical interpretation. Progress is noted concerning multiple scattering interpretation of forward p-d deuteron polarization. Some new results are presented concerning the p- 3 He system and higher energy p- 4 He polarization experiments. 52 references

  11. Report of the workshop on polarized target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, G.R.; Crabb, D.G.; Fernow, R.C.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Gray, S.W.; Hill, D.A.; Jarmer, J.J.; Krisch, A.D.; Krumpolic, M.; Niinikoski, T.O.

    1978-01-01

    The workshop concentrated on an examination of: radiation damage in polarized target materials, a survey of clean target materials, and dynamic polarization results with the new stable Cr(V) complexes. In addition to the normal polarized target experts with backgrounds in high energy physics, low temperature physics and solid state physics, scientists with strong backgrounds in various areas of chemistry and radiation damage physics were included, as these areas were quite crucial to the workshop goals. However, it is clear that much closer collaboration with experts in these areas will be necessary to find polarized target materials that allow more precise experiments on high P 2 perpendicular processes and inclusive processes

  12. Optically pumped electron spin polarized targets for use in the production of polarized ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1979-01-01

    The production of relatively dense electron spin polarized alkali metal vapor targets by optical pumping with intense cw dye lasers is discussed. The target density and electron spin polarization depend on the dye laser intensity and bandwidth, the magnetic field at the target, and the electron spin depolarization time. For example in a magnetic field of 1.5 x 10 3 G, and using 1 W dye laser with a bandwidth of 10 10 Hz one can construct an electron spin polarized Na vapor target with a target thickness of 1.6 x 10 13 atoms/cm 2 and an average electron spin polarization of about 90% even though the Na atoms are completely depolarized at every wall collision. Possible uses of the electron spin polarized targets for the production of intense beams of polarized H - or 3 He - ions are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Design of a tensor polarized deuterium target polarized by spin-exchange with optically pumped NA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    A proposed design for a tensor polarized deuterium target (approx. 10 15 atoms/cm 2 ) for nuclear physics studies in an electron storage ring accelerator is presented. The deuterium atoms undergo electron spin exchange with a highly polarized sodium vapor; this polarization is transferred to the deuterium nuclei via the hyperfine interaction. The deuterium nuclei obtain their tensor polarization through repeated electron spin exchange/hyperfine interactions. The sodium vapor polarization is maintained by standard optical pumping techniques. Model calculations are presented in detail leading to a discussion of the expected performance and the technical obstacles to be surmounted in the development of such a target

  14. Design of a tensor polarized deuterium target polarized by spin-exchange with optically pumped NA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.C.

    1984-05-01

    A proposed design for a tensor polarized deuterium target (approx. 10 15 atoms/cm 2 ) for nuclear physics studies in an electron storage ring accelerator is presented. The deuterium atoms undergo electron spin exchange with a highly polarized sodium vapor; this polarization is transferred to the deuterium nuclei via the hyperfine interaction. The deuterium nuclei obtain their tensor polarization through repeated electron spin exchange/hyperfine interactions. The sodium vapor polarization is maintained by standard optical pumping techniques. Model calculations are presented in detail leading to a discussion of the expected performance and the technical obstacles to be surmounted in the development of such a target. 15 references, 10 figures

  15. Polarized target physics at the Bonn electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.

    1988-12-01

    At the BONN 2.5 GeV electron synchrotron experiments with polarized nucleon targets have a long tradition. Starting with measurements of the target asymmetry in single pion photoproduction off polarized protons, resp. neutrons, the experiments have been concentrated on photodisintegration measurements of polarized deuterons. Parallel to these activities a considerable progress in the field of the target technology, e.g. cryogenics and target materials, has been made, by which all the measurements have profitted enormously. Especially the development of the new target material ammonia has allowed the first use of a polarized deuteron (ND 3 ) target in an intense electron beam. The construction of a frozen spin target, which will be used in combination with a tagged polarized photon beam, makes a new generation of polarized target experiments in photon induced reactions possible. Together with electron scattering off polarized deuterons and neutrons they will be a main activity in the physics program at the new stretcher accelerator ELSA in BONN. (orig.)

  16. Tensor polarized deuteron targets for intermediate energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Schilling, E.

    1985-03-01

    At intermediate energies measurements from a tensor polarized deuteron target are being prepared for the following reactions: the photodisintegration of the deuteron, the elastic pion-deuteron scattering and the elastic electron-deuteron scattering. The experimental situation of the polarization experiments for these reactions is briefly discussed in section 2. In section 3 the definitions of the deuteron polarization and the possibilities to determine the vector and tensor polarization are given. Present tensor polarization values and further improvements in this field are reported in section 4. (orig.)

  17. Electro- and photonuclear physics with polarized beams and targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Two long-standing issues in photonuclear physics, the giant M1 resonance in Pb and deuteron photodisintegration, have been studied recently with polarized photons at Urbana and Frascati, respectively. The implications that this work has for settling these key issues will be discussed. In addition, the advantages of the internal polarized target method for electron scattering studies will be discussed and the technology of internal polarized target development will be reviewed. The first results from a spin-exchange, optically-pumped polarized H and D source will be presented

  18. The SLAC high-density gaseous polarized 3He target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Chupp, T.E.; Smith, T.B.; Cates, G.D.; Driehuys, B.; Middleton, H.; Newbury, N.R.; Hughes, E.W.; Meyer, W.

    1995-01-01

    A large-scale high-pressure gaseous 3 He polarized target has been developed for use with a high-intensity polarized electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This target was used successfully in an experiment to study the spin structure of the neutron. The target provided an areal density of about 7x10 21 nuclei/cm 2 and operated at 3 He polarizations between about 30% and 40% for the six-week duration of the experiment. ((orig.))

  19. Irradiated NH3 and ND3 - two new target materials for polarized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.

    1982-11-01

    A study of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in NH 3 and ND 3 was made at the Bonn 2.5 GeV electron synchrotron. The paramagnetic radicals in the polycristalline ammonia beads were created by irradiation in the high intensity 20 MeV electron beam (> 10 14 electrons/sec) of the injection linac. During irradiation the ammonia beads, produced by dropping into liquid nitrogen, were cooled in liquid argon at approx.= 90 K. DNP measurements were performed at 1 K, 0.5 K and 0.2 K in a 2.5 T magnetic field. Samples of NH 3 , prepared in this way, yielded a maximum proton polarization of 66% at a temperature of 0.5 K with a short polarization build-up time of 9 minutes. ND 3 could be polarized at a temperature of 0.2 K up to 31%. The radiation resistance of the polarization of NH 3 is better than that of butanol. (orig.)

  20. A polarized sup 3 He internal target for storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Poolman, H R; Bulten, H J; Doets, M; Ent, R; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Geurts, D G; Harvey, M; Mul, F A

    2000-01-01

    A polarized sup 3 He internal target was employed at the internal target facility of the Amsterdam electron Pulse Stretcher and Storage ring (AmPS) at the Dutch National Institute for Nuclear and High-Energy Physics (NIKHEF). The unique features of internal targets such as chemical and isotopic purity, high and rapidly reversible polarization, and the ability to manipulate the target spin orientation were successfully demonstrated. A nuclear polarization of 0.50 (0.42) at a sup 3 He gas flow of 1.0 (2.0)x10 sup 1 sup 7 at s sup - sup 1 could be obtained. Operation at a nominal flow of 1x10 sup 1 sup 7 at s sup - sup 1 resulted in a target thickness of 0.7x10 sup 1 sup 5 at cm sup - sup 2 at a target temperature of 17 K.

  1. Polarized proton Target-III operators manual, revision A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.; Moretti, A.; Onesto, F.; Rynes, P.

    1976-04-01

    A revision is given of a manual containing standard operating procedures for the vacuum, cryogenic, and electronic systems of a polarized proton target. The discussion includes the target cryostat, the 3 He and 4 He pumping systems, remote monitors and controls, the microwave system, the magnet and power supply, the computerized polarization monitor, the 4 He liquifier and gas recovery system, and miscellaneous auxiliary equipment

  2. Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0644 TITLE: Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Chun-Ju...Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0644 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a cell population with acquired perpetuating self-renewal properties which

  3. Prospects of polarized fixed target Drell-Yan experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, M X; Jiang, X; Crabb, D G; Chen, J P; Bai, M

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that the Siverse transverse single spin asymmetry in Drell-Yan production in transversely polarized p+p collisions would have an opposite sign compared to what has been observed in the polarized Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) experiments. Experimental confirmation or disproval of this prediction would provide a novel fundamental test of QCD and shed new light on our theoretical understanding of the transverse spin physics phenomena. We discuss the prospects and physics sensitivities of polarized fixed target Drell-Yan experiments that could utilize the existing proton and other hadron beams at Fermilab, and polarized proton beams at RHIC with a polarized solid proton and/or neutron target option. We show that if realized, the new experiments would provide critical measurements of not only the sign change (or not) of Sivers functions, but also the information of quark and antiquark's Sivers distributions over a wide kinematic range.

  4. Nonlinear Magnetic Phenomena in Highly Polarized Target Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Yu F

    2007-01-01

    The report introduces and surveys nonlinear magnetic phenomena which have been observed at high nuclear polarizations in polarized targets of the SMC and of the COMPASS collaborations at CERN. Some of these phenomena, namely the frequency modulation eect and the distortion of the NMR line shape, promote the development of the polarized target technique. Others, as the spin-spin cross-relaxation between spin subsystems can be used for the development of quantum statistical physics. New findings bear on an electromagnetic noise and the spectrally resolved radiation from LiD with negatively polarized nuclei detected by low temperature bolometers. These nonlinear phenomena need to be taken into account for achieving the ultimate polarizations.

  5. Dynamically polarized hydrogen target as a broadband, wavelength-independent thermal neutron spin polarizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jinkui; Garamus, Vasil M.; Mueller, Wilhelm; Willumeit, Regine

    2005-01-01

    A hydrogen-rich sample with dynamically polarized hydrogen nuclei was tested as a wavelength-independent neutron transmission spin polarizer. The experiment used a modified setup of the dynamic nuclear polarization target station at the GKSS research center. The standard solvent sample at the GKSS DNP station was used. It is 2.8mm thick and consists of 43.4wt% water, 54.6wt% glycerol, and 2wt% of EHBA-Cr(v) complex. The wavelength of the incident neutrons for the transmission experiment was λ=8.1A with Δλ/λ=10%. The polarization of neutron beam after the target sample was analyzed with a supermirror analyzer. A neutron polarization of -52% was achieved at the hydrogen polarization of -69%. Further experiments will test the feasibility of other hydrogen-rich materials, such as methane, as the polarizer. A theoretical calculation shows that a polarized methane target would allow over 95% neutron polarizations with more than 30% transmission

  6. Camouflaged target detection based on polarized spectral features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jian; Zhang, Junping; Zou, Bin

    2016-05-01

    The polarized hyperspectral images (PHSI) include polarization, spectral, spatial and radiant features, which provide more information about objects and scenes than traditional intensity or spectrum ones. And polarization can suppress the background and highlight the object, leading to the high potential to improve camouflaged target detection. So polarized hyperspectral imaging technique has aroused extensive concern in the last few years. Nowadays, the detection methods are still not very mature, most of which are rooted in the detection of hyperspectral image. And before using these algorithms, Stokes vector is used to process the original four-dimensional polarized hyperspectral data firstly. However, when the data is large and complex, the amount of calculation and error will increase. In this paper, tensor is applied to reconstruct the original four-dimensional data into new three-dimensional data, then, the constraint energy minimization (CEM) is used to process the new data, which adds the polarization information to construct the polarized spectral filter operator and takes full advantages of spectral and polarized information. This way deals with the original data without extracting the Stokes vector, so as to reduce the computation and error greatly. The experimental results also show that the proposed method in this paper is more suitable for the target detection of the PHSI.

  7. Optically pumped polarized 23Na vapor target for use in polarized ion source. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1984-01-01

    We are currently measuring relaxation times in an optically pumped 23 Na vapor target. Our research is directed toward improvements in the optically pumped Na vapor targets used for the production of polarized H - ions. In this progress report we review the properties of the optically pumped polarized H - ion source and especially the optically pumped Na vapor target employed in this source as well as discussing the progress of our research on relaxation times in an optically pumped Na vapor target. 30 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  8. Broad-aperture polarized proton target with arbitrary orientation of polarization vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, A.A.; Get'man, V.A.; Derkach, A.Ya.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Razumnyj, A.A.; Sorokin, P.V.; Sporov, E.A.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Trotsenko, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Polarized proton target with the Helmholtz broad-aperture superconducting magnetic system is described. Axial aperture α=95 deg, inter-coil access angle β=23 deg. The structure of the target allows various versions of the installation what make sure an arbitrary orientation of polarization vector. The 0.1 W cold output 3 He evaporation cryostat was used to obtain the work temperature 0.5 K allowing quick transformation to a 3 He- 4 He dilution refrigerator. Results of the study are given on the dynamical proton polarization in 1,2-propylenglycol with various stable Cr 5 complexes

  9. A technique for measurement of vector and tensor polarization in solid spin one polarized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kielhorn, W.F.

    1991-06-01

    Vector and tensor polarizations are explicitly defined and used to characterize the polarization states of spin one polarized targets, and a technique for extracting these polarizations from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data is developed. This technique is independent of assumptions about spin temperature, but assumes the target's crystal structure induces a quadrupole interaction with the spin one particles. Analysis of the NMR signals involves a computer curve fitting algorithm implemented with a fast Fourier transform method which speeds and simplifies curve fitting algorithms used previously. For accurate curve fitting, the NMR electronic circuit must be modeled by the fitting algorithm. Details of a circuit, its model, and data collected from this circuit are given for a solid deuterated ammonia target. 37 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs

  10. A technique for measurement of vector and tensor polarization in solid spin one polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielhorn, W.F.

    1991-06-01

    Vector and tensor polarizations are explicitly defined and used to characterize the polarization states of spin one polarized targets, and a technique for extracting these polarizations from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data is developed. This technique is independent of assumptions about spin temperature, but assumes the target's crystal structure induces a quadrupole interaction with the spin one particles. Analysis of the NMR signals involves a computer curve fitting algorithm implemented with a fast Fourier transform method which speeds and simplifies curve fitting algorithms used previously. For accurate curve fitting, the NMR electronic circuit must be modeled by the fitting algorithm. Details of a circuit, its model, and data collected from this circuit are given for a solid deuterated ammonia target. 37 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. MEASUREMENT OF POLARIZATION OBSERVABLES IN VECTOR MESON PHOTOPRODUCTION USING A TRANSVERSELY-POLARIZED FROZEN-SPIN TARGET AND POLARIZED PHOTONS AT CLAS, JEFFERSON LAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Priyashree [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The study of baryon resonances provides a deeper understanding of the strong interaction because the dynamics and relevant degrees of freedom hidden within them are re ected by the properties of the excited states of baryons. Higher-lying excited states at and above 1.7 GeV/c2 are generally predicted to have strong couplings to final states involving a heavier meson, e. g. one of the vector mesons, ρ, ω φ, as compared to a lighter pseudoscalar meson, e. g. π and η. Decays to the ππΝ final states via πΔ also become more important through the population of intermediate resonances. We observe that nature invests in mass rather than momentum. The excited states of the nucleon are usually found as broadly overlapping resonances which may decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. Polarization observables make it possible to isolate single resonance contributions from other interference terms. The CLAS g9 (FROST) experiment, as part of the N* spectroscopy program at Je?erson Laboratory, accumulated photoproduction data using circularly- & linearly-polarized photons incident on a transversely-polarized butanol target (g9b experiment) in the photon energy range 0:3-2:4 GeV & 0:7-2:1 GeV, respectively. In this work, the analysis of reactions and polarization observables which involve two charged pions, either in the fully exclusive reaction γρ -> ρπ+π- or in the semi-exclusive reaction with a missing neutral pion, γρ -> ρπ+π-(π0) will be presented. For the reaction ρπ+π-, eight polarization observables (Is, Ic, Px, Py, Psx; y, Pcx; y) have been extracted. The high statistics data rendered it possible to extract these observables in three dimensions. All of them are first-time measurements. The fairly good agreement of Is, Ic obtained from this analysis with the experimental results from a previous CLAS experiment provides support for the first-time measurements. For the reaction γρ -> ρω -> ρπ+π(π0, five polarization

  12. Long-Lifetime Low-Scatter Neutron Polarization Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Jonathan M.

    2004-01-01

    Polarized neutrons scattering is an important technology for characterizing magnetic and other materials. Polarized helium three (P-3He) is a novel technology for creating polarized beams and, perhaps more importantly, for the analysis of polarization in highly divergent scattered beams. Analysis of scattered beams requires specialized targets with complex geometries to ensure accurate results. Special materials and handling procedures are required to give the targets a long useful lifetime. In most cases, the targets must be shielded from stray magnetic fields from nearby equipment. SRL has developed and demonstrated hybrid targets made from glass and aluminum. We have also developed and calibrated a low-field NMR system for measuring polarization lifetimes. We have demonstrated that our low-field system is able to measure NMR signals in the presence of conducting (metallic) cell elements. We have also demonstrated a non-magnetic valve that can be used to seal the cells. We feel that these accomplishments in Phase I are sufficient to ensure a successful Phase II program. The commercial market for this technology is solid. There are over nine neutron scattering centers in the US and Canada and over 22 abroad. Currently, the US plans to build a new $1.4B scattering facility called the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The technology developed in this project will allow SRL to supply targets to both existing and future facilities. SRL is also involved with the application of P-3He to medical imaging

  13. The tagged photon beam polarization of the jet target experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, N.; Muccifora, V.

    1989-01-01

    The applicability of the residual electron selection method to the tagging method of the jet target laboratory has been studied. With this end in view the behaviour of the polarized bremsstrahlung cross section in the range considered has been analysed, while the polarization increase by means of the RES has been evaluated. The vertical conditions of the focusing of the tagging spectrometer as a function of energy have been determined. Finally the gamma beam density and the tagging efficiency have been calculated

  14. The CERN polarized atomic hydrogen beam target project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubischta, W.; Dick, L.

    1990-01-01

    The UA6-experiment at the CERN p bar p Colider is at present using an unpolarized hydrogen cluster target with a thickness up to 5.10 14 atoms/cm 2 . It is planned to replace this target by a polarized atomic hydrogen beam target with a thickness up to about 10 13 atoms/cm 2 . This paper discusses basic requirements and results of atom optical calculations

  15. Construction and test of a polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aures, R.

    1983-12-01

    This work describes experiments in which for the first time a proton target has been constructed which is polarized by the ''brute-force'' method. This method requires very low temperatures and high magnetic fields. The low temperatures (down to 10 mK) are obtained by a 3 He/ 4 He dilution refrigerator, the magnetic field (up to 9 T) is produced by a superconducting split pair magnet. The proton target has a volume of about 18 cm 3 and consists of pressed titaniumhydride powder, which has a titanium/-hydrogen ratio of 1:1,96. The hydrogen content is 1,3 mol. Titaniumhydride has the advantage of sufficient heat conductivity at low temperatures and a very high proton density. The heat conductivity of the sample is measured, with and without the presence of a magnetic field. Thermodynamical measurements and adiabatic demagnetisation experiments proved quantitatively the polarization of the protons. The polarization of the proton has been measured in a transmission experiment using polarized neutrons of 1.2 MeV. The result shows a good agreement of theoretical and actual polarization. From the results it can be concluded, that this sample can be used successfully as a polarized proton target for neutron scattering experiments to measure spin-correlations. (orig.) [de

  16. Superconducting shielding for a polarized target in PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora Espi, Maria Carmen; Froehlich, Bertold; Dbeyssi, Alaa; Aguar Bartolome, Patricia; Gerz, Kathrin; Ahmed, Samer; Wang, Yadi; Lin, Dexu; Feldbauer, Florian [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Penuelas, Ana [Universitat de Valencia (Spain); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The measurement of the phase between the electric and the magnetic form factors of the proton can be measured using a polarized interaction. A feasible possibility to allow this kind of reactions would be to develop a transversely polarized proton target to be used in the PANDA experiment. The first step to achieve the transverse target polarization is to study the feasibility of shielding the target region from the external 2 T longitudinal magnetic field generated by the PANDA solenoid. BSCOO-2212, a new high-temperature superconductor material, has been identified as a possible candidate to be used for shielding this external magnetic field. Tests at 4 K have taken place in the Helmholtz Institute Mainz with this material, and the first preliminary results are shown here.

  17. A polarized atomic-beam target for COSY-Juelich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eversheim, P. D.; Altmeier, M.; Felden, O.; Glende, M.; Walker, M.; Hiemer, A.; Gebel, R.

    1998-01-01

    An atomic-beam target (ABT) for the EDDA experiment has been built in Bonn and was tested for the very first time at the cooler synchrotron COSY. The ABT differs from the polarized colliding-beams ion source for COSY in the DC-operation of the dissociator and the use of permanent 6-pole magnets. At present the beam optics of the ABT is set-up for maximum density in the interaction zone, but for target-cell operation it can be modified to give maximum intensity. The modular concept of this atomic ground-state target allows to provide all vector- (and tensor) polarizations for protons and deuterons, respectively. Up to now the polarization of the atomic-beam could be verified by the EDDA experiment to be > or approx. 80% with a density in the interaction zone of > or approx. 10 11 atoms/cm 2

  18. Laser-driven polarized hydrogen and deuterium internal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    After completing comprehensive tests of the performance of the source with both hydrogen and deuterium gas, we began tests of a realistic polarized deuterium internal target. These tests involve characterizing the atomic polarization and dissociation fraction of atoms in a storage cell as a function of flow and magnetic field, and making direct measurements of the average nuclear tensor polarization of deuterium atoms in the storage cell. Transfer of polarization from the atomic electron to the nucleus as a result of D-D spin-exchange collisions was observed in deuterium, verifying calculations suggesting that high vector polarization in both hydrogen and deuterium can be obtained in a gas in spin temperature equilibrium without inducing RF transitions between the magnetic substates. In order to improve the durability of the system, the source glassware was redesigned to simplify construction and installation and eliminate stress points that led to frequent breakage. Improvements made to the nuclear polarimeter, which used the low energy 3 H(d,n) 4 He reaction to analyze the tensor polarization of the deuterium, included installing acceleration lenses constructed of wire mesh to improve pumping conductance, construction of a new holding field coil, and elimination of the Wien filter from the setup. These changes substantially simplified operation of the polarimeter and should have reduced depolarization in collisions with the wall. However, when a number of tests failed to show an improvement of the nuclear polarization, it was discovered that extended operation of the system with a section of teflon as a getter for potassium caused the dissociation fraction to decline with time under realistic operating conditions, suggesting that teflon may not be a suitable material to eliminate potassium from the target. We are replacing the teflon surfaces with drifilm-coated ones and plan to continue tests of the polarized internal target in this configuration

  19. Simulation and Automation of Microwave Frequency Control in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for Solid Polarized Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Gonaduwage; Johnson, Ian; Keller, Dustin

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is used in most of the solid polarized target scattering experiments. Those target materials must be irradiated using microwaves at a frequency determined by the difference in the nuclear Larmor and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) frequencies. But the resonance frequency changes with time as a result of radiation damage. Hence the microwave frequency should be adjusted accordingly. Manually adjusting the frequency can be difficult, and improper adjustments negatively impact the polarization. In order to overcome these difficulties, two controllers were developed which automate the process of seeking and maintaining the optimal frequency: one being a standalone controller for a traditional DC motor and the other a LabVIEW VI for a stepper motor configuration. Further a Monte-Carlo simulation was developed which can accurately model the polarization over time as a function of microwave frequency. In this talk, analysis of the simulated data and recent improvements to the automated system will be presented. DOE.

  20. Michel Borghini as a Mentor and Father of the Theory of Polarization in Polarized Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Wim

    2016-02-01

    This paper is a contribution to the memorial session for Michel Borghini at the Spin 2014 conference in Bejing, honoring his pivotal role for the development of polarized targets in high energy physics. Borghini proposed for the first time the correct mechanism for dynamic polarization in polarized targets using organic materials doped with free radicals. In these amorphous materials the spin levels are broadened by spin-spin interactions and g-factor anisotropy, which allows a high dynamic polarization of nuclei by cooling of the spin-spin interaction reservoir. In this contribution I summarize the experimental evidence for this mechanism. These pertinent experiments were done at CERN in the years 1971 - 1974, when I was a graduate student under the guidance of Michel Borghini. I finish by shortly describing how Borghini’s spin temperature theory is now applied in cancer therapy.

  1. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-01-01

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10 18 atoms/s, where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells

  2. Calibration of the Fermilab E-704 polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    This report lists the final, best estimate of the target polarization P T as a function of time for all of the periods during which scattering data were (or may have been) collected. The information under ''RUN'' refers to Δσ L -runs. The notation ''sfs'' stands for ''start of frozen spin,'' ''efs'' for ''end of frozen spin,'' ''→ la'' for ''go to large-aperture'' target magnet position, and ''nla'' for ''not large-aperture'' position, i.e., the target magnet is in ''polarizing'' position. Where the ''NOTE'' column is blank it means that all standard frozen-spin conditions were in effect: the target temperature was reduced and the magnet was in large-aperture position. The timing marks were developed on the basis of three criteria: (1) the availability of direct NMR data, (2) the inclusion of major Target and Run boundaries, and (3) the arbitrary inclusion of enough ''minor'' Run boundaries to shorten large timing gaps. The sign of the P T -values is given in the NMR convention: (+) corresponds to predominant occupation of the Zeeman ground state (the ''thermal'' NMR-signals are considered positive). Since the target magnet field pointed upstream, (+) corresponds to target spin antiparallel to the beam momentum. The estimated uncertainty on P T is ±6.5% (2σ), and the estimated uncertainty on the ratio of values for the two signs of polarization, P T (+)/PT(-), is ±4.3% (2σ)

  3. Feasibility study of a transversely polarized target in PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, Bertold [Helmholtz Institut Mainz (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    PANDA (Antiproton Annihilation at Darmstadt) is a key project at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), currently under construction at the GSI Darmstadt. PANDA is a state of the art detector for antiproton-proton fixed target experiments. A transversely polarized target in PANDA would allow the determination of the proton electromagnetic form factors in the time-like region with unprecedented accuracy and the first-time extraction of their imaginary part, opening a new window for investigating the nucleon structure. As a first step for achieving a transverse target polarization, the target region has to be shielded against the 2 T longitudinal magnetic flux from the solenoid of the PANDA spectrometer. We present numerical simulations and experimental results on intense magnetic flux shielding using a high temperature superconducting hollow cylinder.

  4. Cryogenic control system of the large COMPASS polarized target

    CERN Document Server

    Gautheron, F; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Doshita, N; Görtz, S; Gustafsson, K K; Horikawa, N; Kisselev, Yu V; Koivuniemi, J H; Kondo, K; Meyer, Werner T; Reicherz, G

    2004-01-01

    The dilution refrigerator used to cool the large COMPASS polarized target is monitored through a PC running LabVIEW trademark 6.1 under Windows 2000 trademark . About 60 parameters of the target (temperatures, pressures, flow rates) are continuously plotted and checked. They are periodically recorded in an Oracle trademark database and in a data file. An alarm for every parameter can be individually activated and optionally connected to a GSM (Global System for Mobile Communication) delivery message system. A web server receives and publishes the online status of the target with online tables and graphics on a dedicated COMPASS polarized target information web site. A Siemens programmable logic controller (PLC) powered by an uninterruptable source keeps the cryogenic system safe and stable during the long beam periods by controlling valves and interlocks. This safety feature protects the dilution refrigerator against potential damages in case of power failure.

  5. Local field in LiD polarized target material

    CERN Document Server

    Kisselev, Yu V; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Doshita, N; Gautheron, F; Görtz, S; Horikawa, N; Koivuniemi, J H; Kondo, K; Magnon, A; Meyer, Werner T; Reicherz, G

    2004-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the first and the second moments of D, **6Li and **7Li (I greater than 1/2) NMR lines in a granulated LiD- target material as a function of nuclear polarizations and the data has been compared with a theory elaborated by Abragam, Roinel and Bouffard for monocrystalline samples. The experiments were carried out in the large COMPASS twin-target at CERN. The static local magnetic field of the polarized nuclei was measured by frequency shift between the NMR-signals in the two oppositely polarized cells and lead to the first moment, whereas the investigation of the second moment was done through Gaussian approximation. The average field magnitude in granulated material was estimated 20% larger than the value given by the calculations for monocrystalline samples of cylindrical shape. The second moment shows a qualitative agreement with the theory but it is slightly larger at the negative than at the positive polarization. In a polarized mode, the moments depend on the saturated microw...

  6. Feasibility study of a transversely polarized target in PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Heybat; Deiseroth, Malte; Khaneft, Dmitry; Noll, Oliver; Valente, Roserio; Zambrana, Manuel [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Ahmed, Samer [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Capozza, Luigi; Dbeyssi, Alaa; Froehlich, Bertold; Lin, Dexu; Maas, Frank; Mora Espi, Maria Carmen; Morales Morales, Cristina; Rodriguez Pineiro, David; Zimmermann, Iris [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The PANDA (Antiproton Annihilation at Darmstadt) spectrometer, located at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), is an excellent tool for exploring the nucleon structure. An unpolarized target allows the determination of the electromagnetic time-like form factor of the proton. An additional experiment in which the target is transversely polarized is necessary for the first-time extraction of their imaginary part. A transverse polarization requires the shielding of the 2 T longitudinal field from the PANDA-Solenoid at the target volume and an additional transverse holding field. We present results from our first experiment at the Institut fuer Kernphysik in Mainz on intense magnetic flux shielding using a BSCCO (bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide) thin-wall hollow cylinder at 4.2 K and a 1.4 T external magnetic field and compare this to numerical calculations.

  7. Quasielastic nucleon scattering using polarized beams and targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1990-07-01

    Inelastic scattering of polarized intermediate energy nucleons to continuum nuclear states is discussed with emphasis on recent results. Spin momentum correlations of protons in polarized targets of 3 He were observed for the first time. Complete spin observables in (p,p') show effects of the nuclear spin-isospin response and of an NN interaction modified by the nuclear medium. A comparison of Gamow Teller and isovector M1 giant resonance strengths in the sd shell provides evidence for large meson exchange current effects in the M1. (Author) (37 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.)

  8. Pentanol-based target material with polarized protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyatova, E.I.

    1992-01-01

    1-pentanol is a promising material for a target with polarized protons owing to its high resistance to radiation damage. To develop the target, the solutions of 1-pentanol or 2-pentanol with complexes of pentavalent chromium ware investigated. The material based EHBA-Cr(V) solution in a glass-like matrix, consisting of 1-pentanol, 3-pentanol and 1,2-propanediol, was proposed as a target material. It was investigated by the electron paramagnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry methods. 24 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  9. Interaction between amylose and 1-butanol during 1-butanol-hydrochloric acid hydrolysis of normal rice starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiuting; Wei, Benxi; Zhang, Bao; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the interaction between amylose and 1-butanol during the 1-butanol-hydrochloric acid (1-butanol-HCl) hydrolysis of normal rice starch. The interaction model between amylose and 1-butanol was proposed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), (13)C cross polarization and magic angle spinning NMR analysis ((13)C CP/MAS NMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermalgravimetric analysis (TGA). GC-MS data showed that another form of 1-butanol existed in 1-butanol-HCl-hydrolyzed normal rice starch, except in the form of free molecules absorbed on the starch granules. The signal of 1-butanol-HCl-hydrolyzed starch at 100.1 ppm appeared in the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectrum, indicating that the amylose-1-butanol complex was formed. DSC and TGA data also demonstrated the formation of the complex, which significantly affected the thermal properties of normal rice starch. These findings revealed that less dextrin with low molecular weight formed might be attributed to resistance of this complex to acid during 1-butanol-HCl hydrolysis. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. VME online system of the Bonn polarized nucleon targets and polarization measurements on NH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiel, W.

    1991-02-01

    The measurement of spin observables is the main purpose of the PHOENICS detector at the Bonn Electron Accelerator ELSA. Therefore a new frosen spin target was built allowing any spin orientation by means of two perpendicular holding fields and the use of a polarizing field up to 7 Tesla. With a vertical dilution refrigerator the polarization can be frozen at a temperature of 70 mK. This thesis describe a VME based control and monitor system for the various parts of this target. It mainly consists of a VIP processor together with different kinds of I/O and interface boards. Caused by its modular structure in hard- and software it can be easyly set up to control and monitor different hardware environments. A menu and command oriented user interface running on an ATARI computer allows a comfortable operation. Secondly the new NMR system is described in detail. It is based on the Liferpool module allowing a dispersion user interface running on an ATARI computer allows a comfortable operation. Secondly the new NMR system is described in detail. It is based on the Liverpool module allowing a dispersion free detection and a simple adjustment to different magnetic fields. A similar VME system takes care of all the necessary task for the polarization measurements. Fast optodecoupled analog I/O modules a e used as an interface to the NMR hardware. Finally the first measurements with this target are presented. Using NH 3 as target material and a polarizing field of 3.5 Tesla a proton polarization of +94% and -100% could be achieved. By lowering the magnetic field to 0.35 Tesla a superradiance effect was observed. (orig.)

  11. Polarized proton target-III. Operations manual, revision B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.; Moretti, A.; Onesto, F.; Rynes, P.

    1978-01-01

    The manual presented contains certain standard operating procedures for the vacuum, cryogenic, and electronic systems of PPT-III. In total, these systems comprise the following major divisions: (1) the target cryostat; (2) the 4 He pumping system; (3) the 3 He pumping system; (4) the remote monitors and controls; (5) the microwave system; (6) the magnet and power supply; (7) the computerized polarization monitor; (8) the 4 He liquefier and gas recovery system; and (9) miscellaneous auxiliary equipment

  12. Combining orthogonal polarization for elongated target detection with GPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lualdi, Maurizio; Lombardi, Federico

    2014-01-01

    For an accurate imaging of ground penetrating radar data the polarization characteristics of the propagating electromagnetic (EM) wavefield and wave amplitude variations with antenna pattern orientation must be taken into account. For objects that show some directionality feature and cylindrical shape any misalignment between transmitter and target can strongly modify the polarization state of the backscattered wavefield, thus conditioning the detection capability of the system. Hints on the depolarization can be used to design the optimal GPR antenna survey to avoid omissions and pitfalls during data processing. This research addresses the issue of elongated target detection through a multi azimuth (or multi polarization) approach based on the combination of mutually orthogonal GPR data. Results from the analysis of the formal scattering problem demonstrate how this strategy can reach a scalar formulation of the scattering matrix and achieve a rotational invariant quantity. The effectiveness of the algorithm is then evaluated with a detailed field example showing results closely proximal to those obtained under the optimal alignment condition: detection is significantly improved and the risk of target missing is reduced. (paper)

  13. Remote Monitoring of the Polarized Target's Control for E1039

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, David; SeaQuest Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The 1039 experiment at FNAL will further our understanding of spin structure by measuring the contribution that sea quarks orbital angular momentum provide to overall nucleon spin. It is accepted that the valence-quarks of nucleons only provide 30% of the total nucleon spin. To study the nucleon's sea quark contribution, E1039 will use the Drell-Yan process by colliding 120 GeV un-polarized beam protons with polarized ammonia targets of hydrogen and deuterium. The asymmetric spin distributions of resulting dimuons will be measured. These asymmetries are sensitive, among other effects, to the orbital angular momentum contribution of the sea quarks. The polarized target requires a multi-stage vacuum pump located near the target. Since access to its present controls will not be possible during running, remote control and monitoring upgrades were required. A secondary control panel was purchased and tested. Information from the programmable logic controller (PLC) must be fed into our data stream to enable remote monitoring and to signal possible alarm conditions. This solution and the program created using explicit TCP/IP messaging to extract data tags from the PLC and log it within our databases will be presented. Supported by U.S. D.O.E. Medium Energy Nuclear Physics under Grant DE-FG02-03ER41243.

  14. Scattering of polarized electrons from polarized targets: Coincidence reactions and prescriptions for polarized half-off-shell single-nucleon cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, J.A.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; Donnelly, T.W.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; Poulis, G.I.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA

    1993-01-01

    Coincidence reactions of the type vector A( vector e, e'N)B involving the scattering of polarized electrons from polarized targets are discussed within the context of the plane-wave impulse approximation. Prescriptions are developed for polarized half-off single-nucleon cross sections; the different prescriptions are compared for typical quasi-free kinematics. Illustrative results are presented for coincidence polarized electron scattering from typical polarized nuclei. (orig.)

  15. Polarization imaging enhancement for target vision through haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai-Ying; Zhang, San-Xi; Li, Jie; LI, Bin; Tang, Zi-li; Liu, Biao; Jia, Wen-Wu

    2016-10-01

    Haze, fog, and smoke are turbid medium in the atmosphere which usually degrade viewing condition of outdoor scenes. The resulted images lose contrast and color fidelity with serious degradation. Due to loss of large detailed information of measured scene, it will usually lead to invalid detection and measurement. The suspended particles in the atmosphere and the scene being measured give rise to polarization changes by their reflection. In the process of reflection, absorption and scattering, the object itself can be determined by its own polarization characteristics. Based on this point, we proposed an approach for target vision through haze. This approach is based on the polarization differences between the scene being measured and the scattering background to move the haze effects. It can realize a great visibility enhancement and enable the scene rendering even if imaged under restricted viewing conditions with low polarization. In this work, the detailed theoretical operation principle is presented. A validating imaging system is established and the corresponding experiment is carried out. We present the experimental results of haze-free image of scene with recovered high contrast. This method also can be used to effectively enhance the imaging performance of any other optical system.

  16. Polarized target as analyzer of polarization of particle beam with spin Ssub(B)=1/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovin, V.M.; Golubeva, M.B.; Gornushkin, Yu.A.

    1982-01-01

    A possibility of using a polarized target as a target analyzer of beam particle polarization (Ssub(T)=1/2 Psub(T) vector) so that all the components of beam polarization Ssub(B)=1/2 anti Psub(B) should be determined in one experiment, is revealed. A proton polarization target is considered as a polarization target-analyzer. Asub(SK) and Asub(kk) asymmetry tensors are considered for elastic pp and pn scatterings by amplitudes of NN scattering which attain the values of 0.3-0.9 at 95-400 MeV. Asub(kk)(pp) and Asub(sk)(pp) are experimentally measured in the 445-576 MeV range. It is found that their highest absolute values are equal to 0.4-0.5 and 0.2-0.3 respectively. Elastic proton scattering on polarized electrons may be another variant of using polarized target for measuring proton beam polarization. Asub(sk) and Asub(kk) components of asymmetry tensor of elastic pe scattering are graphically presented. A possibility of using a polarized charge with spin I=1/2 as a target-analyzer of particle beam polarization is marked

  17. Optimum measurement and analysis of small polarization asymmetry in high-energy inelastic scattering using a polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinikoski, T.O.

    1976-01-01

    Optimum linear filter theory is employed for maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio in measurements of small polarization asymmetry in the presence of severe counting efficiency fluctuation, most likely to occur in high-energy inclusive and inelastic scattering experiments, using a polarized target. The r.m.s. error of the polarization asymmetry is obtained in closed form, allowing numeric optimization of the operation of the target. Guidelines are given for processing the record of data. (Auth.)

  18. Unravelling the influence of carbon dioxide on the adsorptive recovery of butanol from fermentation broth using ITQ-29 and ZIF-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Calvo, Ana; Van der Perre, Stijn; Claessens, Benjamin; Calero, Sofia; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2018-04-18

    The vapor phase adsorption of butanol from ABE fermentation at the head space of the fermenter is an interesting route for the efficient recovery of biobutanol. The presence of gases such as carbon dioxide that are produced during the fermentation process causes a stripping of valuable compounds from the aqueous into the vapor phase. This work studies the effect of the presence of carbon dioxide on the adsorption of butanol at a molecular level. With this aim in mind Monte Carlo simulations were employed to study the adsorption of mixtures containing carbon dioxide, butanol and ethanol. Molecular models for butanol and ethanol that reproduce experimental properties of the molecules such as polarity, vapor-liquid coexistence or liquid density have been developed. Pure component isotherms and heats of adsorption have been computed and compared to experimental data to check the accuracy of the interacting parameters. Adsorption of butanol/ethanol mixtures has been studied in absence and presence of CO2 on two representative materials, a pure silica LTA zeolite and a hydrophobic metal-organic framework ZIF-8. To get a better understanding of the molecular mechanism that governs the adsorption of the targeted mixture in the selected materials, the distribution of the molecules inside the structures was analyzed. The combination of these features allows obtaining a deeper understanding of the process and to identify the role of carbon dioxide in the butanol purification process.

  19. Distillation of hydrogen isotopes for polarized HD targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, T., E-mail: takeshi@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 10-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Bouchigny, S. [IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay (France); CEA LIST, BP6-92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses, CEDEX (France); Didelez, J.-P. [IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay (France); Fujiwara, M. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 10-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Fukuda, K. [Kansai University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Shizuki Awaji 656-2131 (Japan); Kohri, H.; Kunimatsu, T.; Morisaki, C.; Ono, S. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 10-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Rouille, G. [IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay (France); Tanaka, M. [Kobe Tokiwa University, Ohtani-cho 2-6-2, Nagata, Kobe 653-0838 (Japan); Ueda, K.; Uraki, M.; Utsuro, M. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 10-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Wang, S.Y. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan (China); Yosoi, M. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 10-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a new cryogenic distillation system to purify Hydrogen-Deuteride (HD) gas for polarized HD targets in LEPS experiments at SPring-8. A small amount of ortho-H{sub 2} ({approx}0.01%) in the HD gas plays an important role in efficiently polarizing the HD target. Since there are 1-5% impurities of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} in commercially available HD gases, it is necessary to purify the HD gas up to {approx}99.99%. The distillation system is equipped with a cryogenic distillation unit filled with many small stainless steel cells called 'Heli-pack'. The distillation unit consists of a condenser part, a rectification part, and a reboiler part. The unit is kept at the temperature of 17-21 K. The Heli-pack has a large surface area that makes a good contact between gases and liquids. An amount of 5.2 mol of commercial HD gas is fed into the distillation unit. Three trials were carried out to purify the HD gas by changing temperatures (17.5 K and 20.5 K) and gas extraction speeds (1.3 ml/min and 5.2 ml/min). The extracted gas was analyzed using a gas analyzer system combining a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a gas chromatograph. One mol of HD gas with a purity better than 99.99% has been successfully obtained for the first time. The effective NTP (Number of Theoretical Plates), which is an indication of the distillation performances, is obtained to be 37.2{+-}0.6. This value is in good agreement with a designed value of 37.9. The HD target is expected to be efficiently polarized under a well-controlled condition by adding an optimal amount of ortho-H{sub 2} to the purified HD gas.

  20. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium of {water + phenol + (1-butanol, or 2-butanol, or tert-butanol)} systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadlich de Oliveira, Leonardo; Aznar, Martin

    2010-01-01

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) and binodal curve data were determined for the systems (water + phenol + tert-butanol) at T = 298.15 K, (water + phenol + 2-butanol) and (water + phenol + 1-butanol) at T = 298.15 K and T = 313.15 K by the combined techniques of densimetry and refractometry. Type I curve (for tert-butanol) and Type II curves (for 1- and 2-butanol) were found. The data were correlated with the NRTL model and the parameters estimated present root mean square deviations below 2% for the system with tert-butanol and lower than 0.8% for the other systems.

  1. Optically pumped polarized alkali atomic beams and targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1984-01-01

    The optical pumping of 23 Na and 6 Li atomic beams is discussed. Experiments on the optical pumping of 23 Na atomic beams using either a single mode dye laser followed by a double passed acousto-optic modulator or a multimode dye laser are reported. The optical pumping of a 23 Na vapor target for use in a polarized H - ion source is discussed. Results on the use of viton as a wall coating with a long relaxation time are reported. 31 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  2. 16th International Workshop on Polarized Sources, Targets, and Polarimetry (PSTP 2015)

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The Workshop on Polarized Sources, Targets and Polarimetry has been a tradition for more than 20 years, moving between Europe, USA and Japan. The XVIth International Workshop on Polarized Sources, Targets and Polarimetry (PSTP 2015) will take place at the Ruhr-University of Bochum, Germany. The workshop addresses the physics and technological challenges related to polarized gas/solid targets, polarized electron/positron/ion/neutron sources, polarimetry and their applications. will be published in Proceedings of Science

  3. Polarization Observables T and F in single π0- and η-Photoproduction off quasi-free Nucleons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strub Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Single π0- and η-photoproduction off a transversally polarized d-butanol target has been measured with circularly polarized bremsstrahlung photons generated by the MAMI-C electron microtron. With the nearly 4π acceptance of the combined Crystal Ball/TAPS setup the double polarization observable F and the target asymmetry T can be extracted for the first time for polarized, quasi-free neutrons over a wide energy and angular range.

  4. Improved techniques for the analysis of experiments with polarized targets. [1 to 2 GeV/c, polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrelet, E.

    1975-06-01

    An experiment was performed at the Bevatron to measure the polarization in the reaction ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/n from a polarized target, at beam momenta between 1 and 2 GeV/c. Concentration is placed on the original aspects of our analysis, in particular: the geometrical reconstruction of the elastic events; the use of the high analyzing power of the reaction studied to probe the polarization of the target in magnitude and distribution; a study of the statistical estimation of the polarization parameter; a detailed study of the quasielastic background. (JFP)

  5. Summary of the XIII International Workshop on Polarized Sources, Targets and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathmann, F.

    2011-01-01

    The workshops on polarized sources, targets, and polarimetry are held every two years. The present meeting took place in Ferrara, Italy, and was organized by the University of Ferrara. Sessions on Polarized Proton and Deuterium Sources, Polarized Electron Sources, Polarimetry, Polarized Solid Targets, and Polarized Internal Targets, highlighted topics, recent developments, and progress in the field. A session decicated to Future Facilities provided an overview of a number of new activities in the spin-physics sector at facilities that are currently in the planning stage. Besides presenting a broad overview of polarized ion sources, electron sources, solid and gaseous targets, and their neighboring fields, the workshop also addressed the application of polarized atoms in applied sciences and medicine that is becoming increasingly important.

  6. PST 2009: XIII International Workshop on Polarized Sources Targets and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenisa, Paolo

    2011-05-01

    The workshops on polarized sources, targets, and polarimetry are held every two years. In 2009 the meeting took place in Ferrara, Italy, and was organized by the University of Ferrara and INFN. Sessions on Polarized Proton and Deuterium Sources, Polarized Electron Sources, Polarimetry, Polarized Solid Targets, and Polarized Internal Targets, highlighted topics, recent developments, and progress in the field. A session dedicated to Future Facilities provided an overview of a number of new activities in the spin-physics sector at facilities that are currently in the planning stage. Besides presenting a broad overview of polarized ion sources, electron sources, solid and gaseous targets, and their neighbouring fields, the workshop also addressed the application of polarized atoms in applied sciences and medicine that is becoming increasingly important.

  7. The Jefferson Lab Frozen Spin Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Keith, James Brock, Christopher Carlin, Sara Comer, David Kashy, Josephine McAndrew, David Meekins, Eugene Pasyuk, Joshua Pierce, Mikell Seely

    2012-08-01

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200-300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin relaxation times as high as 4000 hours were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  8. The HERMES polarized hydrogen and deuterium gas target in the HERA electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.

    2005-01-01

    The HERMES hydrogen and deuterium nuclear-polarized gas targets have been in use since 1996 with the polarized electron beam of HERA at DESY to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Polarized atoms from a Stern-Gerlach Atomic Beam Source are injected into a storage cell internal to the HERA electron ring. Atoms diffusing from the center of the storage cell into a side tube are analyzed to determine the atomic fraction and the atomic polarizations. The atoms have a nuclear polarization, the axis of which is defined by an external magnetic holding field. The holding field was longitudinal during 1996-2000, and was changed to transverse in 2001. The design of the target is described, the method for analyzing the target polarization is outlined, and the performance of the target in the various running periods is presented

  9. The HERMES polarized hydrogen and deuterium gas target in the HERA electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Peking University, Beijing

    2004-08-01

    The HERMES hydrogen and deuterium nuclear-polarized gas targets have been in use since 1996 with the polarized electron beam of HERA at DESY to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Polarized atoms from a Stern-Gerlach Atomic Beam Source are injected into a storage cell internal to the HERA electron ring. Atoms diffusing from the center of the storage cell into a side tube are analyzed to determine the atomic fraction and the atomic polarizations. The atoms have a nuclear polarization, the axis of which is defined by an external magnetic holding field. The holding field was longitudinal during 1996-2000, and was changed to transverse in 2001. The design of the target is described, the method for analyzing the target polarization is outlined, and the performance of the target in the various running periods is presented. (orig.)

  10. Commissioning experiment of the polarized internal gas target with deuterium at ANKE/COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Boxing [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Collaboration: ANKE-Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    In order to conduct the production experiments with polarized deuterium target and (un)polarized proton beam at ANKE/COSY, a commissioning experiment of the polarized internal target with deuterium is imperative. The commissioning experiment includes the measurements of both the vector (Q{sub y}) and tensor (Q{sub yy}) polarization of the deuterium gas target through the nuclear reactions with large and well known analyzing powers, which can be detected in ANKE. The dependence of the polarizations along the storage cell is also determined. The poster presents the physics case for the experiments with deuterium polarized internal target and the apparatus needed for the commissioning experiment, as well as the procedure of extraction for spin observables.

  11. Status of the hydrogen and deuterium atomic beam polarized target for NEPTUN experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balandikov, N.I.; Ershov, V.P.; Fimushkin, V.V.; Kulikov, M.V.; Pilipenko, Y.K.; Shutov, V.B.

    1995-01-01

    NEPTUN-NEPTUN-A is a polarized experiment at Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK, IHEP) with two internal targets. Status of the atomic beam polarized target that is being developed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna is presented. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  12. Performance of a hydrogen/deuterium polarized gas target in a storage ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buuren, L.D.; Szczerba, D.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bulten, H.J.; Klous, S.; Mul, F.A.; Poolman, H.R.; Simani, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a hydrogen/deuterium polarized gas target in a storage ring is presented. The target setup consisted of an atomic beam source, a cryogenic storage cell and a Breit-Rabi polarimeter. High frequency transition units were constructed to produce vector polarized hydrogen and

  13. Performance of a Polarized Deuterium Internal Target in a Medium-Energy Electron Storage Ring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Z.L.; Ferro Luzzi, M.M.E.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bulten, H.J.; Alarcon, R.; van Bommel, R.; Botto, T.; Bouwhuis, M.; Buchholz, M.; Choi, S.; Comfort, J.; Doets, M.; Dolfini, S.; Ent, R.; Gaulard, C.; de Jager, C.W.; Lang, J.; de Lange, D.J.; Miller, M.A.; Passchier, E.; Passchier, I.; Poolman, H.R.; Six, E.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Unal, O.; de Vries, H.

    1996-01-01

    A polarized deuterium target internal to a medium-energy electron storage ring is described in the context of spindependent (e, e′d) and (e ,e′p) experiments. Tensor polarized deuterium was produced in an atomic beam source and injected into a storage cell target. A Breit-Rabi polarimeter was used

  14. TESLA-N electron scattering with polarized targets at TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotokov, V.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of polarized eN scattering can be realized at the TESLA linear collider facility at DESY with luminosities that are about two orders of magnitude higher than those expected for other experiments at comparable energies. A large variety of polarized parton distribution and fragmentation functions can be determined with unprecedented accuracy, many of them for the first time

  15. A cryostat to hold frozen-spin polarized HD targets in CLAS: HDice-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, M.M., E-mail: mlowry@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Bass, C.D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); D' Angelo, A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Universita' di Roma ‘Tor Vergata’, and INFN Sezione di Roma ‘Tor Vergata’, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Deur, A.; Dezern, G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Hanretty, C. [University of Virginia, 1400 University Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ho, D. [Carnegie-Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Kageya, T.; Kashy, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Khandaker, M. [Norfolk State University, 700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States); Laine, V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Université Blaise Pascal, 34 Avenue Carnot, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); O' Connell, T. [University of Connecticut, 115 N Eagleville Road, Storrs-Mansfield, CT 06269 (United States); Pastor, O. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Peng, P. [University of Virginia, 1400 University Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Sandorfi, A.M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Sokhan, D. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Bat 100 – M053, Orsay 91406 (France); and others

    2016-04-11

    The design, fabrication, operation, and performance of a {sup 3/4}He dilution refrigerator and superconducting magnet system for holding a frozen-spin polarized hydrogen deuteride target in the Jefferson Laboratory CLAS detector during photon beam running is reported. The device operates both vertically (for target loading) and horizontally (for target bombardment). The device proves capable of maintaining a base temperature of 50 mK and a holding field of 1 T for extended periods. These characteristics enabled multi-month polarization lifetimes for frozen spin HD targets having proton polarization of up to 50% and deuteron up to 27%.

  16. A polarized solid {sup 3}He target for neutron transmission experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, C.D. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Gould, C.R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Haase, D.G. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Huffman, P.R. [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Roberson, N.R. [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Seely, M.L. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Tornow, W. [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Wilburn, W.S. [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a solid {sup 3}He polarized nuclear target which we have used for measurements of the spin dependence of the n-{sup 3}He interaction at MeV energies. The target, which contains 0.4 mole of {sup 3}He was polarized to 38% at 12 mK in a field of 7 T. The target is suitable for nuclear physics measurements which are insensitive to the large magnetic field and produce beam heating of tenths of microwatts.We discuss refinements and paths to improved solid {sup 3}He targets at higher polarizations and lower fields. ((orig.)).

  17. Measurement of pzz of the laser-driven polarized deuterium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.; Coulter, K.P.; Holt, R.J.; Poelker, M.; Potterveld, D.P.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Buchholz, M.; Neal, J.; van den Brand, J.F.J.

    1993-01-01

    The question of whether nuclei are polarized as a result of H-H (D-D) spin-exchange collisions within the relatively dense gas of a laser-driven source of polarized hydrogen (deuterium) can be addressed directly by measuring the nuclear polarization of atoms from the source. The feasibility of using a polarimeter based on the D + T → n + 4 He reaction to measure the tensor polarization of deuterium in an internal target fed by the laser-driven source has been tested. The device and the measurements necessary to test the spin-exchange polarization theory are described

  18. A polarized {sup 3}He target for the photon beam at MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimmer, J., E-mail: j.krimmer@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Staudinger Weg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Aguar Bartolome, P.; Ahrens, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Altieri, S. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Universita di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Arends, H.J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Heil, W.; Karpuk, S.; Otten, E.W. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Staudinger Weg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Pedroni, P. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Salhi, Z. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Staudinger Weg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Thomas, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-08-21

    A polarized {sup 3}He target has been installed for the first time inside the 4{pi} Crystal Ball detector at the tagged photon beam of the MAinz MIcrotron (MAMI). It has been demonstrated that the system works reliably and that the polarization losses during handling of the polarized gas are under control. Initial polarization values up to 70% and total relaxation times up to 20 h could be obtained during a first test beam time devoted to the measurement of the double polarized photoabsorption cross-section in the {Delta}(1232) baryon resonance region.

  19. Effect of nonlinearity of spin interaction with electromagnetic resonance field on characteristics of polarized nuclear target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertij, A.A.; Gavrilov, S.P.; Shestopalov, V.P.

    1990-01-01

    Interaction of incident nuclear particle beam with J = 1/2 (neutrons) spin and (J = 1/2) protons with the target substance is considered. It is shown that neutron polarization at the target exit and neutron transparency (G) of the target depend significantly on incident wave amplitude level and physical parameter values which characterize the target, such as target temperature, resonator mirror reflection factor, number of spins interacting with the field, etc. Under interaction of neutrons with a target resonator which features a high mirror reflection factor and low losses for absorption which is not related to magnetic dipole absorption, a bistable response of neutron polarization and G manifests itself. 1 ref

  20. Investigation of polarized-proton target materials by differential calorimetry: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.A.; Hill, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    A simple differential calorimeter was designed and operated for an investigation of the thermodynamic properties of polarized target materials. The calibration and use of the calorimeter are discussed, after a brief exposition of our motivation for this work. The results of a preliminary study of target materials is presented with emphasis on the relevance of the glass state to dynamic polarization in chemically-doped targets

  1. The Spin Structure of the Neutron Determined Using a Polarized He-3 Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, H

    2004-01-06

    Described is a study of the internal spin structure of the neutron performed by measuring the asymmetry in spin-dependent deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from nuclear polarized {sup 3}He. Stanford Linear Accelerator experiment E142's sample of 400 million scattering events collected at beam energies between 19 and 26 GeV led to the most precise measurement of a nucleon spin structure function to date. The {sup 3}He target represents a major advance in polarized target technology, using the technique of spin exchange with optically pumped rubidium vapor to produce a typical {sup 3}He nuclear polarization of 34% in a 30cm long target cell with a gas density of 2.3 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The target polarization was measured to {+-}7% using an Adiabatic Fast Passage NMR system calibrated with the thermal equilibrium polarization of the protons in a sample of water. The relatively high polarization and target thickness were the result of the development of large volume glass target cells which had inherent nuclear spin relaxation times for the {sup 3}He gas of as long as 70 hours. A target cell production procedure is presented which focuses on special glass blowing techniques to minimize surface interactions with the {sup 3}He nuclei and careful gas purification and vacuum system procedures to reduce relaxation inducing impurities.

  2. On feasibility of the experiments with a polarized deuteron beam and a polarized target at Charles University in relation with polarized fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plis, Yu.A.

    2001-01-01

    There is an interest in the problem of polarized fusion with the neutron-free d 3 He reaction. Up to now, the experimental data on the cross sections of two dd reactions, which produce neutrons at once or through secondary dt reaction, are absent for polarized deuterons. There is a relatively cheap way to carry out the experiments with polarized deuterons at the Charles University in Prague. A polarized deuteron beam with energy from 100 keV up to approximately 1 MeV may be produced on the Van de Graaff accelerator by the channeling of a deuteron beam through magnetized Ni single crystal foil, according M. Kaminsky [Phys. Rev. Lett. 23, 819 (1969)]. This method permits to produce a polarized deuteron beam of an energy ≤1 MeV with a current of ∼1 nA, vector polarization P 3 up to 2/3 and tensor polarization P 33 =0. It will be necessary to modify the existing polarized target at Charles University for work with a low energy deuteron beam [N. S. Borisov et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 345, 421 (1994)

  3. Proton and neutron polarized targets for nucleon-nucleon experiments at SATURNE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.; Combet, M.; Sans, J.L.; Benda, B.; Chaumette, P.; Deregel, J.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A.P.; Gaudron, C.; Lehar, F.; Janout, Z.; Khachaturov, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    A SATURNE polarized target has been used for nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering and transmission experiments for 15 years. The polarized proton target is a 70 cm 3 cartridge loaded with Pentanol-2. For polarized neutron target, two cartridges loaded with 6 LiD and 6 LiH are set in the refrigerator and can be quickly inserted in the beam. First experiments using 6 Li products in quasielastic pp or pn analyzing power measurements are compared with the same observables measured in a free nucleon-nucleon scattering using polarized proton targets. Angular distribution as a function of a kinematically conjugate angle and coplanarity in nucleon-nucleon scattering is shown for different targets. (author)

  4. Polarized photoproduction from nuclear targets with arbitrary spin and relation to deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoodbhoy, P.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge; Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad

    1990-01-01

    Inclusive photo-production from polarized targets of arbitrary spin is analyzed by using multipoles. The Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule, which was originally fromulated for spin-1/2 targets, is generalized to all spins and multipoles, and shown to have some interesting consequences. Measurements to test the new rules, or to derive nuclear structure information from them, could be incorporated into existing plans at electron accelerator facilities. Finally, the possible relevance of these generalized sum rules to sum rules measurable in polarized lepton-polarized target deep inelastic inclusive scattering is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Prospects for a deuterium internal target, tensor polarized by optical pumping: spin exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The prospects for a tensor polarized deuterium target (approx. 10 15 atoms/cm 2 ) appropriate for nuclear physics studies in medium and high energy particle storage rings are discussed. Using the technique of electron spin exchange with an optically pumped sodium (or potassium) vapor, we hope to polarize deuterium at a rate approx. 10 17 atoms/sec. Predictions for the deuterium polarization for a particular target cell design will be presented leading to the identification of the required optical pumping power and cell wall depolarization probability to attain optimum performance. The technical obstacles to be surmounted in such a target design will also be discussed

  6. Multitarget global sensitivity analysis of n-butanol combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dingyu D Y; Davis, Michael J; Skodje, Rex T

    2013-05-02

    A model for the combustion of butanol is studied using a recently developed theoretical method for the systematic improvement of the kinetic mechanism. The butanol mechanism includes 1446 reactions, and we demonstrate that it is straightforward and computationally feasible to implement a full global sensitivity analysis incorporating all the reactions. In addition, we extend our previous analysis of ignition-delay targets to include species targets. The combination of species and ignition targets leads to multitarget global sensitivity analysis, which allows for a more complete mechanism validation procedure than we previously implemented. The inclusion of species sensitivity analysis allows for a direct comparison between reaction pathway analysis and global sensitivity analysis.

  7. Polarized proton and deuteron targets for the usage in intensive proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Get'man, V.A.; Derkach, A.Ya.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Razumnyj, A.A.; Sorokin, P.V.; Sporo, E.A.; Telegin, Yu.N.

    1982-01-01

    Polarized proton and deuteron targets are developed and tested for conducting investigations in intense photon beams. A flowsheet of polarization targets which includes: working agent of the target, superconducting magnet, cryostat of 3 He evaporation with 3 He pumping and recirculation systems, SHF system of 4 mm range for polarization pumping, measuring system of target polarization protons is presented. Working agent of the targets includes frozen balls with 1.5 mm diameter. Ethylene-glucol and 1.2-propylene-glycol were used as a working substance for proton targets. Completely deuterated ethylene-glycol was used for the deuteron target. Vertical magnetic field with 2.7 T intensity is produced by a superconducting magnetic system. Polarization pumping is exercised at 75 GHz frequency. Q-meter of direct current is used for determination of polarization. Working temperature of the cryostat is approximately 0.5 K. The lock device permits to exercise replacement of the target working agent during 30 minutes

  8. Polarimetry of the polarized hydrogen deuteride HDice target under an electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, Vivien E. [Blaise Pascal Univ., Aubiere (France)

    2013-10-01

    The study of the nucleon structure has been a major research focus in fundamental physics in the past decades and still is the main research line of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). For this purpose and to obtain statistically meaningful results, having both a polarized beam and a highly efficient polarized target is essential. For the target, this means high polarization and high relative density of polarized material. A Hydrogen Deuteride (HD) target that presents both such characteristics has been developed first at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and brought to the Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2008. The HD target has been shown to work successfully under a high intensity photon beam (BNL and Jefferson Lab). However, it remained to be seen if the target could stand an electron beam of reasonably high current (nA). In this perspective, the target was tested for the first time in its frozen spin mode under an electron beam at Jefferson Lab in 2012 during the g14 experiment. This dissertation presents the principles and usage procedures of this HD target. The polarimetry of this target with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) during the electron beam tests is also discussed. In addition, this dissertation also describes another way to perform target polarimetry with the elastic scattering of electrons off a polarized target by using data taken on helium-3 during the E97-110 experiment that occurred in Jefferson Lab's Hall A in 2003.

  9. QED corrections in deep-inelastic scattering from tensor polarized deuteron target

    CERN Document Server

    Gakh, G I

    2001-01-01

    The QED correction in the deep inelastic scattering from the polarized tensor of the deuteron target is considered. The calculations are based on the covariant parametrization of the deuteron quadrupole polarization tensor. The Drell-Yan representations in the electrodynamics are used for describing the radiation real and virtual particles

  10. Polarization observables for strangeness photoproduction on a frozen spin target with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fegan, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The FROST experiment at Jefferson Lab used the CLAS detector in Hall B with the intention of performing a complete measurement of polarization observables associated with strangeness photoproduction, in combination with data from previous JLab experiments. This was achieved by utilizing the FROST polarized target in conjunction with polarized photon beams, allowing direct measurement of beam-target double polarization observables. By studying strangeness reactions, such as γp → K + Λ 0 , it may be possible to find 'missing' baryon resonances, predicted by symmetric quark models but not observed in previous experiments, whose results are consistent with the di-quark model. It is thought these 'missing' resonances remain undiscovered because they have different coupling strengths for different reaction channels, such as the strangeness reactions, whereas the current data is dominated by studies of pN reactions. Observing these resonances therefore has important implications for our knowledge of the excited states of nucleons, and the models predicting the quark interactions within them. The G polarization observable is one of the beam-target double polarization observables, associated with a longitudinally polarized target and a linearly polarized photon beam, and its measurement for the strangeness reaction γp → K + Λ 0 is the focus of the work presented.

  11. Moeller polarimeter for VEPP-3 storage ring based on internal polarized gas jet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyug, M.V.; Grigoriev, A.V.; Kiselev, V.A.; Lazarenko, B.A.; Levichev, E.B.; Mikaiylov, A.I.; Mishnev, S.I.; Nikitin, S.A.; Nikolenko, D.M.; Rachek, I.A.; Shestakov, Yu.V.; Toporkov, D.K.; Zevakov, S.A.; Zhilich, V.N.

    2005-01-01

    A new method to determine the polarization of an electron beam circulating in a storage ring by a non-destructive way, based on measuring the asymmetry in scattering of beam electrons on electrons of the internal polarized gas jet target, has been developed and tested at the VEPP-3 storage ring

  12. Polarization Calculation and Underwater Target Detection Inspired by Biological Visual Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Shen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In challenging underwater environments, the polarization parameter maps calculated by the Stokes model are characterized by the high noise and error, harassing the underwater target detection tasks. In order to solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel bionic polarization calculation and underwater target detection method by modeling the visual system of mantis shrimps. This system includes many operators including a polarization-opposition calculation, a factor optimization and a visual neural network model. A calibration learning method is proposed to search the optimal value of the factors in the linear subtraction model. Finally, a six-channel visual neural network model is proposed to detect the underwater targets. Experimental results proved that the maps produced by the polarization-opposition parameter is more accurate and have lower noise than that produced by the Stokes parameter, achieving better performance in underwater target detection tasks.

  13. Electron spin resonance and its implication on the maximum nuclear polarization of deuterated solid target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckmann, J.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.; Reicherz, G.; Goertz, S.

    2006-01-01

    ESR spectroscopy is an important tool in polarized solid target material research, since it allows us to study the paramagnetic centers, which are used for the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The polarization behavior of the different target materials is strongly affected by the properties of these centers, which are added to the diamagnetic materials by chemical doping or irradiation. In particular, the ESR linewidth of the paramagnetic centers is a very important parameter, especially concerning the deuterated target materials. In this paper, the results of the first precise ESR measurements of the deuterated target materials at a DNP-relevant magnetic field of 2.5 T are presented. Moreover, these results allowed us to experimentally study the correlation between ESR linewidth and maximum deuteron polarization, as given by the spin-temperature theory

  14. First use of a laser-driven polarized H/D target at the IUCF cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, K.; Brack, J.; Cadman, R. V.; Cummings, W. J.; Fedchak, J.; Fox, B.; Gao, H.; Grosshauser, C.; Holt, R. J.; Jones, C.; Kinney, E.; Kowalczyk, R.; Lu, Z.-T.; Miller, M. A.; Nagengast, W.; Owen, B.; Rith, K.; Schmidt, F.; Schulte, E.; Sowinski, J.; Sperisen, F.; Stenger, J.; Thorsland, E.; Williamson, S.

    1997-01-01

    The HERMES Laser-Driven Target Task Force (Argonne, Erlangen and Illinois) is charged with developing a polarized H/D target for use in the HERA ring at DESY. Rapid progress was made in the beginning of 1996, leading us to the decision to test the target in a realistic experimental environment. In particular, polarizations of 0.6 and flows above 10 18 atoms·s -1 have been achieved on the bench. The laser-driven target and a simple detector system are currently installed in Cooler storage ring at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility in order to test its applicability to nuclear physics experiments. Target polarizations are being measured using the rvec H(p, p) and rvec D(p, p) reactions. Initial tests were reasonably successful and the target is well along toward becoming viable for nuclear physics

  15. Target mass effects in polarized deep-inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccione, A.

    1998-01-01

    We present a computation of nucleon mass corrections to nucleon structure functions for polarized deep-inelastic scattering. We perform a fit to existing data including mass corrections at first order in m 2 /Q 2 and we study the effect of these corrections on physically interesting quantities. We conclude that mass corrections are generally small, and compatible with current estimates of higher twist uncertainties, when available. (orig.)

  16. A highly polarized hydrogen/deuterium internal gas target embedded in a toroidal magnetic spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheever, D.; Ihloff, E.; Kelsey, J.; Kolster, H.; Meitanis, N.; Milner, R.; Shinozaki, A.; Tsentalovich, E.; Zwart, T.; Ziskin, V.; Xiao, Y.; Zhang, C.

    2006-01-01

    A polarized hydrogen/deuterium internal gas target has been constructed and operated at the internal target region of the South Hall Ring (SHR) of the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center to carry out measurements of spin-dependent electron scattering at 850MeV. The target used an Atomic Beam Source (ABS) to inject a flux of highly polarized atoms into a thin-walled, coated storage cell. The polarization of the electron beam was determined using a Compton laser backscattering polarimeter. The target polarization was determined using well-known nuclear reactions. The ABS and storage cell were embedded in the Bates Large Acceptance Toroidal Spectrometer (BLAST), which was used to detect scattered particles from the electron-target interactions. The target has been designed to rapidly (∼8h) switch operation from hydrogen to deuterium. Further, this target was the first to be operated inside a magnetic spectrometer in the presence of a magnetic field exceeding 2kG. An ABS intensity 2.5x10 16 at/s and a high polarization (∼70%) inside the storage cell have been achieved. The details of the target design and construction are described here and the performance over an 18 month period is reported

  17. Cryogenic polarized-target facility. Progress report, July 1, 1981-June 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this three-year research project is to build a cryogenically polarized target facility for measuring total neutron cross sections for polarized neutrons incident on polarized nuclei. The components of the system have been assembled at TUNL during the current contract period. These include the dilution-refrigerator support assembly, the dilution-refrigerator itself, the dewar, the beam line, the shielding cave for the neutron source, and the neutron-detector shield and rolling-cart assembly. The dilution refrigerator is presently undergoing testing at liquid-nitrogen and liquid-helium temperatures. Experiments with aluminum and copper targets are scheduled for the coming contract period

  18. High magnetic field uniformity superconducting magnet for a movable polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anishchenko, N.G.; Bartenev, V.D.; Blinov, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    The superconducting polarizing magnet was constructed for movable polarized target (MPT) with working volume 200 mm long and 30 mm in diameter. The magnet provides a polarizing magnetic field up to 6 T with the uniformity of 4.5 x 10 -4 in the working volume of the target. The magnet windings are made of a NbTi wire, impregnated with the epoxy resin and placed in the horizontal cryostat with 'warm' aperture diameter of 96 mm. The design and technology of the magnet winding are described. Results of the magnetic field map measurements using a NMR-magnetometer are given. The MPT set-up is installed in the beam line of polarized neutrons produced by break-up of polarized deuterons extracted from the Synchrophasotron of the Laboratory of High Energies (LHE), JINR, Dubna

  19. Spin Interactions and Cross-checks of Polarization in NH$_{3}$ Target

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Yu; Doshita, N; Gautheron, F; Hess, Ch; Iwata, T; Koivuniemi, J; Kondo, K; Magnon, A; Mallot, G; Michigami, T; Meyer, W; Reicherz, G

    2008-01-01

    We study the magnetic structure of irradiated ammonia (NH$_{3}$) polarized by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization method at 0.2 K and at 2.5 T field. In this material, the electron spins, induced by ionizing radiation, couple $^{14}$N and $^{1}$H spins by the indirect spin-spin interaction. As a result, the local frequencies of $^{1}$H-spins are varied depending on $^{14}$N spin polarizations and lead to an asymmetry in the proton signal. This asymmetry allowes a good detection of $^{14}$N spins directly on the proton Larmor frequency. In the long COMPASS target at CERN, we use the cross-checks between spectral asymmetries and integral polarizations to decrease the relative error for longitudinal target polarizations up to $\\pm$2.0%.

  20. Medium effects in DIS from polarized nuclear targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanchiotti, Huner; Garcia Canal, Carlos A.; Tarutina, Tatiana [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Departamento de Fisica, C.C. 67, La Plata (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de La Plata, IFLP(CONICET), C.C. 67, La Plata (Argentina); Vento, Vicente [Universidad de Valencia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Departamento de Fisica Teorica and Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    The behavior of the nucleon structure functions in lepton nuclei deep inelastic scattering, both polarized and unpolarized, due to nuclear structure effects is reanalyzed. The study is performed in two schemes: an x-rescaling approach, and one in which there is an increase of sea quark components in the in-medium nucleon, related to the low-energy N-N interaction. In view of a recent interesting experimental proposal to study the behavior of the proton spin structure functions in nuclei we proceed to compare these approaches in an effort to enlighten the possible phenomenological interest of such difficult experiment. (orig.)

  1. Development of high-performance alkali-hybrid polarized 3He targets for electron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep T.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Tobias, W. A.; Averett, T. D.; Kelleher, A.; Mooney, K. E.; Nelyubin, V. V.; Wang, Yunxiao; Zheng, Yuan; Cates, G. D.

    2015-05-01

    Background: Polarized 3He targets have been used as effective polarized neutron targets for electron scattering experiments for over twenty years. Over the last ten years, the effective luminosity of polarized 3He targets based on spin-exchange optical pumping has increased by over an order of magnitude. This has come about because of improvements in commercially-available lasers and an improved understanding of the physics behind the polarization process. Purpose: We present the development of high-performance polarized 3He targets for use in electron scattering experiments. Improvements in the performance of polarized 3He targets, target properties, and operating parameters are documented. Methods: We utilize the technique of alkali-hybrid spin-exchange optical pumping to polarize the 3He targets. Spectrally narrowed diode lasers used for the optical pumping greatly improved the performance. A simulation of the alkali-hybrid spin-exchange optical pumping process was developed to provide guidance in the design of the targets. Data was collected during the characterization of 24 separate glass target cells, each of which was constructed while preparing for one of four experiments at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, Virginia. Results: From the data obtained we made determinations of the so-called X -factors that quantify a temperature-dependent and as-yet poorly understood spin-relaxation mechanism that limits the maximum achievable 3He polarization to well under 100%. The presence of the X -factor spin-relaxation mechanism was clearly evident in our data. Good agreement between the simulation and the actual target performance was obtained by including details such as off-resonant optical pumping. Included in our results is a measurement of the K -3He spin-exchange rate coefficient kseK=(7.46 ±0.62 ) ×10-20cm3/s over the temperature range 503 K to 563 K. Conclusions: In order to achieve high performance under the operating conditions described in this paper

  2. Luminance and chromatic contributions to a hyperacuity task: isolation by contrast polarity and target separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Cooper, Bonnie; Lee, Barry B

    2012-03-01

    Vernier thresholds are known to be elevated when a target pair has opposite contrast polarity. Polarity reversal is used to assess the role of luminance and chromatic pathways in hyperacuity performance. Psychophysical hyperacuity thresholds were measured for pairs of gratings of various combinations of luminance (Lum) and chromatic (Chr) contrast polarities, at different ratios of luminance to chromatic contrast. With two red-green gratings of matched luminance and chromatic polarity (+Lum+Chr), there was an elevation of threshold at isoluminance. When both luminance and chromatic polarity were mismatched (-Lum-Chr), thresholds were substantially elevated under all conditions. With the same luminance contrast polarity and opposite chromatic polarity (+Lum-Chr) thresholds were only elevated close to isoluminance; in the reverse condition (-Lum+Chr), thresholds were elevated as in the -Lum-Chr condition except close to equiluminance. Similar data were obtained for gratings isolating the short-wavelength cone mechanism. Further psychophysical measurements assessed the role of target separation with matched or mismatched contrast polarity; similar results were found for luminance and chromatic gratings. Comparison physiological data were collected from parafoveal ganglion cells of the macaque retina. Positional precision of ganglion cell signals was assessed under conditions related to the psychophysical measurements. On the basis of these combined observations, it is argued that both magnocellular, parvocellular, and koniocellular pathways have access to cortical positional mechanisms associated with vernier acuity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeting NCK-Mediated Endothelial Cell Front-Rear Polarity Inhibits Neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrac, Alexandre; Genet, Gael; Ola, Roxana; Zhang, Feng; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Han, Jinah; Zhang, Jiasheng; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Chedotal, Alain; Schwartz, Martin A; Eichmann, Anne

    2016-01-26

    Sprouting angiogenesis is a key process driving blood vessel growth in ischemic tissues and an important drug target in a number of diseases, including wet macular degeneration and wound healing. Endothelial cells forming the sprout must develop front-rear polarity to allow sprout extension. The adaptor proteins Nck1 and 2 are known regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and polarity, but their function in angiogenesis is poorly understood. Here, we show that the Nck adaptors are required for endothelial cell front-rear polarity and migration downstream of the angiogenic growth factors VEGF-A and Slit2. Mice carrying inducible, endothelial-specific Nck1/2 deletions fail to develop front-rear polarized vessel sprouts and exhibit severe angiogenesis defects in the postnatal retina and during embryonic development. Inactivation of NCK1 and 2 inhibits polarity by preventing Cdc42 and Pak2 activation by VEGF-A and Slit2. Mechanistically, NCK binding to ROBO1 is required for both Slit2- and VEGF-induced front-rear polarity. Selective inhibition of polarized endothelial cell migration by targeting Nck1/2 prevents hypersprouting induced by Notch or Bmp signaling inhibition, and pathological ocular neovascularization and wound healing, as well. These data reveal a novel signal integration mechanism involving NCK1/2, ROBO1/2, and VEGFR2 that controls endothelial cell front-rear polarity during sprouting angiogenesis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Targeting NCK-Mediated Endothelial Cell Front-Rear Polarity Inhibits Neo-Vascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrac, Alexandre; Genet, Gael; Ola, Roxana; Zhang, Feng; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Han, Jinah; Zhang, Jiasheng; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Chedotal, Alain; Schwartz, Martin A.; Eichmann, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Sprouting angiogenesis is a key process driving blood vessel growth in ischemic tissues and an important drug target in a number of diseases, including wet macular degeneration and wound healing. Endothelial cells forming the sprout must develop front-rear polarity to allow sprout extension. The adaptor proteins Nck1 and 2 are known regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and polarity, but their function in angiogenesis is poorly understood. Here we show that the Nck adaptors are required for endothelial cell front-rear polarity and migration downstream of the angiogenic growth factors VEGF-A and Slit2. Methods and Results Mice carrying inducible, endothelial-specific Nck1/2 deletions fail to develop front-rear polarized vessel sprouts and exhibit severe angiogenesis defects in the postnatal retina and during embryonic development. Inactivation of NCK1 and 2 inhibits polarity by preventing Cdc42 and Pak2 activation by VEGF-A and Slit2. Mechanistically, NCK binding to ROBO1 is required for both Slit2 and VEGF induced front-rear polarity. Selective inhibition of polarized endothelial cell migration by targeting Nck1/2 prevents hypersprouting induced by Notch or Bmp signaling inhibition, as well as pathological ocular neovascularization and wound healing. Conclusions These data reveal a novel signal integration mechanism involving NCK1/2, ROBO1/2 and VEGFR2 that controls endothelial cell front-rear polarity during sprouting angiogenesis. PMID:26659946

  5. Target recognition of log-polar ladar range images using moment invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenze; Han, Shaokun; Cao, Jie; Yu, Haoyong

    2017-01-01

    The ladar range image has received considerable attentions in the automatic target recognition field. However, previous research does not cover target recognition using log-polar ladar range images. Therefore, we construct a target recognition system based on log-polar ladar range images in this paper. In this system combined moment invariants and backpropagation neural network are selected as shape descriptor and shape classifier, respectively. In order to fully analyze the effect of log-polar sampling pattern on recognition result, several comparative experiments based on simulated and real range images are carried out. Eventually, several important conclusions are drawn: (i) if combined moments are computed directly by log-polar range images, translation, rotation and scaling invariant properties of combined moments will be invalid (ii) when object is located in the center of field of view, recognition rate of log-polar range images is less sensitive to the changing of field of view (iii) as object position changes from center to edge of field of view, recognition performance of log-polar range images will decline dramatically (iv) log-polar range images has a better noise robustness than Cartesian range images. Finally, we give a suggestion that it is better to divide field of view into recognition area and searching area in the real application.

  6. Development Of A Hydrogen And Deuterium Polarized Gas Target For Application In Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, Willy

    2009-01-01

    The exploration of spin degrees of freedom in nuclear and high-energy interactions requires the use of spin-polarized projectiles and/or spin-polarized targets. During the last two decades, the use of external beams from cyclotrons has to a large extent been supplanted by use of circulating beams stored in storage rings. In these experiments, the circulating particles pass millions of times through targets internal to the ring. Thus the targets need to be very thin to avoid beam loss by scattering out of the acceptance aperture of the ring.

  7. A study of lithium deuteride as a material for a polarized target

    CERN Document Server

    Bültmann, S; Day, D B; Fatemi, R D; Gardner, B; Harris, C M; Johnson, J R; Mccarthy, J S; McKee, P M; Meyer, Werner T; Penttilae, S I; Ponikvar, E; Rijllart, A; Rondon, Oscar A; Lorant, S S; Tobias, W A; Trentalange, S; Zhu, H; Zihlmann, B; Zimmermann, D

    1999-01-01

    Experiment E155 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) measured the spin-dependent structure of the proton and neutron, using for the first time sup 6 LiD as the polarized deuteron target material in a high-energy electron beam. This compound provides a significantly higher dilution factor than any other solid deuteron target material currently used in high-energy physics experiments. Results of the polarization behavior of the sup 6 LiD target material before and after exposure to the 50 GeV/c electron beam used in E155 are presented.

  8. Performance of a hydrogen/deuterium polarized gas target in a storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buuren, L.D. van; Szczerba, D.; Brand, J.F.J. van den; Bulten, H.J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Klous, S.; Kolster, H.; Lang, J.; Mul, F.A.; Poolman, H.R.; Simani, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a high-density polarized hydrogen/deuterium gas target internal to a medium-energy electron storage ring is presented. Compared to our previous electron scattering experiments with tensor-polarized deuterium at NIKHEF (Zhou et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 378 (1996) 40; Ferro-Luzzi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 2630; Van den Brand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 (1997) 1235; Bouwhuis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 687; Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 687) the target figure of merit, (polarization) 2 xluminosity, was improved by more than an order of magnitude. The target density was increased by upgrading the flux of nuclear-polarized atoms injected into the storage cell and by using a longer (60 cm) and colder (∼70 K) storage cell. A maximal target thickness of 1.2 (1.1)±0.1x10 14 nuclei/cm 2 was achieved with deuterium (hydrogen). With typical beam currents of 110 mA, this corresponds to a luminosity of about 8.4 (7.8)±0.8x10 31 e - nuclei cm -2 s -1 . By reducing the molecular background and using a stronger target guide field, a higher polarization was achieved. The target was used in combination with a 720 MeV polarized electron beam stored in the AmPS ring (NIKHEF) to measure spin observables in electron-proton and electron-deuteron scattering. Scattered electrons were detected in a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer. Ejected hadrons were detected in a single time-of-flight scintillator array. The product of beam and target vector polarization, P e P t , was determined from the known spin-correlation parameters of e'p quasi-elastic (or elastic) scattering. With the deuterium (hydrogen) target, values up to P e P t =0.49±0.03 (0.32±0.03) were obtained with an electron beam polarization of P e =0.62±0.04 (0.56±0.03) as measured with a Compton backscattering polarimeter (Passchier et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 414 (1998) 4988). From this, we deduce a cell-averaged target polarization of P t =0.78±0.07 (0.58±0

  9. Spin filtering neutrons with a proton target dynamically polarized using photo-excited triplet states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, M.; Brandt, B. van den; Eichhorn, T.R.; Hautle, P.; Wenckebach, W.Th.

    2012-01-01

    In a test of principle a neutron spin filter has been built, which is based on dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using photo-excited triplet states. This DNP method has advantages over classical concepts as the requirements for cryogenic equipment and magnets are much relaxed: the spin filter is operated in a field of 0.3 T at a temperature of about 100 K and has performed reliably over periods of several weeks. The neutron beam was also used to analyze the polarization of the target employed as a spin filter. We obtained an independent measurement of the proton spin polarization of ∼0.13 in good agreement with the value determined with NMR. Moreover, the neutron beam was used to measure the proton spin polarization as a function of position in the naphthalene sample. The polarization was found to be homogeneous, even at low laser power, in contradiction to existing models describing the photo-excitation process.

  10. Detailed studies of a high-density polarized hydrogen gas target for storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapfe, K.; Brueckner, W.; Gaul, H.G.; Grieser, M.; Lin, M.T.; Moroz, Z.; Povh, B.; Rall, M.; Stechert, B.; Steffens, E.; Stenger, J.; Stock, F.; Tonhaeuser, J.; Montag, C.; Rathmann, F.; Fick, D.; Braun, B.; Graw, G.; Haeberli, W.

    1996-01-01

    A high-density target of polarized atomic hydrogen gas for applications in storage rings was produced by injecting atoms from an atomic beam source into a T-shaped storage cell. The influence of the internal gas target on electron-cooled beams of 27 MeV α-particles and 23 MeV protons in the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring has been studied in detail. Target polarization and target thickness were measured by means of 27 MeV α-particles. For hyperfine states 1+2 a target thickness of n=(0.96±0.04) x 10 14 H/cm 2 was achieved with the cell walls cooled to 100 K. Working with a weak magnetic holding field (∼5 G) the maximum target polarization was P T =0.84±0.02 when state 1 and P T =0.46±0.01 when states 1+2 were injected. The target polarization was found to be constant over a period of 3 months with a net charge of Q∼100 C passing the storage cell. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of in situ butanol recovery by vacuum during acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butanol fermentation is product limiting due to butanol toxicity to microbial cells. Butanol (boiling point: 118 deg C) boils at a greater temperature than water (boiling point: 100 deg C) and application of vacuum technology to integrated acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation and recovery may ...

  12. Initial investigations of (np)-scattering with a polarized deuterium target at ANKE-COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Boxing

    2015-07-01

    The understanding of the forces among nucleons is fundamental to the whole of nuclear and hadronic physics. The nucleon-nucleon (NN) scattering is the ideal probe to study the nuclear forces. The scattering amplitudes for the complete description of the NN interactions can be reconstructed from phase-shift analyses (PSA), which requires measurements with polarized experiments. The existing data allow to extract unambiguous proton-proton (pp) amplitudes below 2 GeV. However, there is very little known about the neutron-proton (np) system above 800 MeV nucleon energy. THE ANKE-COSY collaboration has embarked on a systematic program which aims to extract the np scattering amplitudes through the deuteron-proton charge-exchange process dp→{pp}{sub s}n. First part of the program via polarized deuteron beam and hydrogen target allowed successful measurement of np amplitudes up to 1.135 GeV nucleon energy, which is the maximum nucleon energy that can be accessed with deuteron beam at COSY. Via inverse kinematics, i.e. using a proton beam incident on a polarized deuterium target will allow to enhance the np study up to 2.8 GeV, the highest energy available at COSY. The method of inverse kinematics has to be validated prior to the production experiment. As the proof-of-principle (POP) experiment, the initial research has been conducted at proton energy T{sub p}=600 MeV using a polarized deuterium target. The projectiles were measured by two silicon tracking telescopes (STT) placed closed to the target and by the ANKE sub-detection systems. Four polarization modes of the deuterium target were employed. In order to increase the effective target thickness, polarized deuterium atoms produced by the atomic beam source (ABS) was filled into a storage cell, where the circulating COSY beam collides with the target. The target polarizations were measured using the proton-deuteron elastic reaction. The vector and tensor analyzing powers A{sub y} and A{sub yy} of pvector d

  13. Physics in the GeV region with polarized targets in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    There is evidence from the D(γ,p)n reaction that the meson-exchange model is failing in the GeV region. Surprisingly, it appears that the new (Dγ,p)n data favor the energy dependence of the nuclear chromodynamics model rather that of the meson-exchange model. Application of the polarization method to electron scattering studies is in its infancy, and it is potentially a very powerful technique. The internal target method coupled with laser-driven polarized targets should represent an important tool for nuclear physics

  14. Solvents (butanol, acetone, and ethanol)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarovenko, V L; Nakhmanovich, B M

    1963-07-17

    The method involves use of carbohydrate containing plant raw-material, e.g., hydrolyzates of corn cob and pulp. The material is subjected to fermentation with acetone-butanol bacteria with addition of starch-industry wastes as source of proteins (gluten and gluten-containing water) and nutrient salts.

  15. A Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Functions Using a Polarized HE-3 Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure function, g 1 n (x). The measurement was made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC using a longitudinally polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam, and a 3 He target polarized by spin exchange with optically pumped rubidium. A target polarization as high as 50% was achieved. The elements of the experiment which pertain to the polarized 3 He target will be described in detail in this thesis. To achieve a precision measurement, it has been necessary to minimize the systematic error from the uncertainty in the target parameters. All of the parameters of the target have been carefully measured, and the most important parameters of the target have been measured using multiple techniques. The polarization of the target was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and has been calibrated using both proton NMR and by measuring the shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance frequency due to the 3 He polarization. The fraction of events which originated in the 3 He, as measured by the spectrometers, has been determined using a physical model of the target and the spectrometers. It was also measured during the experiment using a variable pressure 3 He reference cell in place of the polarized 3 He target. The spin dependent structure function g 1 n (z) was measured in the Bjorken x range of 0.014 2 of 5 (GeV/c) 2 . One of the primary motivations for this experiment was to test the Bjorken sum rule. Because the experiment had smaller statistical errors and a broader kinematic coverage than previous experiments, the behavior of the spin structure function g 1 n (x) could be studied in detail at low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. It was found that g 1 n (x) has a strongly divergent behavior at low values of x, calling into question the methods commonly used to extrapolate the value of g 1 n (x) to low x. The precision of the measurement made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC puts a tighter

  16. A Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Functions Using a Polarized HE-3 Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T

    2003-11-05

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure function, g{sub 1}{sup n}(x). The measurement was made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC using a longitudinally polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam, and a {sup 3}He target polarized by spin exchange with optically pumped rubidium. A target polarization as high as 50% was achieved. The elements of the experiment which pertain to the polarized {sup 3}He target will be described in detail in this thesis. To achieve a precision measurement, it has been necessary to minimize the systematic error from the uncertainty in the target parameters. All of the parameters of the target have been carefully measured, and the most important parameters of the target have been measured using multiple techniques. The polarization of the target was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and has been calibrated using both proton NMR and by measuring the shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance frequency due to the {sup 3}He polarization. The fraction of events which originated in the {sup 3}He, as measured by the spectrometers, has been determined using a physical model of the target and the spectrometers. It was also measured during the experiment using a variable pressure {sup 3}He reference cell in place of the polarized {sup 3}He target. The spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(z) was measured in the Bjorken x range of 0.014 < x < 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. One of the primary motivations for this experiment was to test the Bjorken sum rule. Because the experiment had smaller statistical errors and a broader kinematic coverage than previous experiments, the behavior of the spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) could be studied in detail at low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. It was found that g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) has a strongly divergent behavior at low values of x, calling into question the methods commonly used to extrapolate the value of g

  17. Magnetic shielding for a transversely polarized target in the longitudinal field of the PANDA solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, Bertold; Ahmed, Samer; Dbeyssi, Alaa; Mora Espi, Maria Carmen; Gerz, Kathrin; Lin, Dexu; Maas, Frank; Martinez, Ana Penuelas; Morales, Cristina; Wang, Yadi [Helmholtz Institut Mainz (Germany); Aguar Bartolome, Patricia [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A transversely polarized target in PANDA would allow for the first time access to the imaginary part of the time like electromagnetic proton form factors, namely the phase angle in the imaginary plane between electric and magnetic form factors. Moreover it would allow for a number of other target single spin asymmetries revealing nucleon structure observables connected with the transverse spin structure of the proton. As a first step for achieving a transverse target polarization, the target region has to be shielded against the 2 T longitudinal magnetic flux from the solenoid of the PANDA spectrometer. We present experimental results on intense magnetic flux shielding using a BSCCO-2212 high temperature superconducting hollow cylinder at liquid helium temperature.

  18. Detection-Discrimination Method for Multiple Repeater False Targets Based on Radar Polarization Echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. W. ZONG

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeat false targets (RFTs, created by the digital radio frequency memory (DRFM system of jammer, are widely used in practical to effectively exhaust the limited tracking and discrimination resource of defence radar. In this paper, common characteristic of radar polarization echoes of multiple RFTs is used for target recognition. Based on the echoes from two receiving polarization channels, the instantaneous polarization radio (IPR is defined and its variance is derived by employing Taylor series expansion. A detection-discrimination method is designed based on probability grids. By using the data from microwave anechoic chamber, the detection threshold of the method is confirmed. Theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that the method is valid and feasible. Furthermore, the estimation performance of IPRs of RFTs due to the influence of signal noise ratio (SNR is also covered.

  19. Target correlation and polarization effects on the electron impact ionization of He atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Hari P, E-mail: hps1@physics.ucf.edu [Physics Department, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2011-03-28

    We have reported here the results of our investigation of the effects of electron correlation and polarization of the target in the incident channel on the electron impact ionization of the helium atom. The triple differential cross section (TDCS) is calculated for 28.6 eV incident electron energy for the case when the two final-state outgoing electrons share 4.0 eV excess energy equally and unequally and leave in the opposite direction. The electron correlation and polarization of the He-target in the initial state are considered completely ab initio using the recently extended multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method. The electron correlation between the two outgoing electrons in the final state is included through the variationally determined screening potential. It is found that both target correlation and polarization in the incident channel play an important role; the polarization has larger effect on the TDCS than the target correlation. We compared our results with available experimental and theoretical data.

  20. Polarization Observables from two-pion and ρ meson photoproduction on polarized HD target at JLab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonta, Irene [Univ. of Rome, Tor Vergata (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    The preliminary results discussed in this theses have been carried out with the Nuclear Physics group of the Department of Physics at the University of Rome Tor Vergata, under the supervision of Prof. A. D’Angelo.On March 2012 I joined the CLAS collaboration at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, in Virginia, USA, and became a term member after a probation period of 9 months. As a member I could participate to the g14 data taking, started on November 18th 2011 and finished on May 18th 2012. In that period I was in charge of the timing calibration of the CLAS forward electromagnetic spectrometer. For the duration of the experiment, I was also responsible of the Raman laboratory located at the University of Rome Tor Vergata, where the Raman measurements were performed. The Raman measurements were crucial for determining the relative concentrations of H2 and D2 in the Hydrogen-Deuteride gas which was used for the target of the g14 experiment.

  1. Elucidating the contributions of multiple aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases to butanol and ethanol production in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zongjie; Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2016-06-20

    Ethanol and butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum share common aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases. However, little is known about the relative contributions of these multiple dehydrogenases to ethanol and butanol production respectively. The contributions of six aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases of C. acetobutylicum on butanol and ethanol production were evaluated through inactivation of the corresponding genes respectively. For butanol production, the relative contributions from these enzymes were: AdhE1 > BdhB > BdhA ≈ YqhD > SMB_P058 > AdhE2. For ethanol production, the contributions were: AdhE1 > BdhB > YqhD > SMB_P058 > AdhE2 > BdhA. AdhE1 and BdhB are two essential enzymes for butanol and ethanol production. AdhE1 was relatively specific for butanol production over ethanol, while BdhB, YqhD, and SMB_P058 favor ethanol production over butanol. Butanol synthesis was increased in the adhE2 mutant, which had a higher butanol/ethanol ratio (8.15:1) compared with wild type strain (6.65:1). Both the SMB_P058 mutant and yqhD mutant produced less ethanol without loss of butanol formation, which led to higher butanol/ethanol ratio, 10.12:1 and 10.17:1, respectively. To engineer a more efficient butanol-producing strain, adhE1 could be overexpressed, furthermore, adhE2, SMB_P058, yqhD are promising gene inactivation targets. This work provides useful information guiding future strain improvement for butanol production.

  2. Porcine aminopeptidase N mediated polarized infection by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in target cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Yingying; Li, Xiaoxue; Bai, Yunyun [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); Lv, Xiaonan [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); CAS Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience & Technology of China, Beijing 100090 (China); Herrler, Georg [Institute for Virology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover D-30559 (Germany); Enjuanes, Luis [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CNB-CSIC), Campus Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Zhou, Xingdong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); Qu, Bo [Faculty of Life Sciences, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); Meng, Fandan [Institute for Virology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover D-30559 (Germany); Cong, Chengcheng [College Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Medicine, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110161 (China); Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was characterized. Indirect immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed PEDV can be successfully propagated in immortalized swine small intestine epithelial cells (IECs). Infection involved porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN), a reported cellular receptor for PEDV, transient expression of pAPN and siRNA targeted pAPN increased and decreased the infectivity of PEDV in IECs, respectively. Subsequently, polarized entry into and release from both Vero E6 and IECs was analyzed. PEDV entry into polarized cells and pAPN grown on membrane inserts occurs via apical membrane. The progeny virus released into the medium was also quantified which demonstrated that PEDV is preferentially released from the apical membrane. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pAPN, the cellular receptor for PEDV, mediates polarized PEDV infection. These results imply the possibility that PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in intestinal epithelial cells. - Highlights: • PEDV infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was characterized. • Porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN) facilitated PEDV infection in IECs. • PEDV entry into and release from polarized cell via its apical membrane. • PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in IECs.

  3. Porcine aminopeptidase N mediated polarized infection by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong, Yingying; Li, Xiaoxue; Bai, Yunyun; Lv, Xiaonan; Herrler, Georg; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhou, Xingdong; Qu, Bo; Meng, Fandan; Cong, Chengcheng; Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing

    2015-01-01

    Infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was characterized. Indirect immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed PEDV can be successfully propagated in immortalized swine small intestine epithelial cells (IECs). Infection involved porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN), a reported cellular receptor for PEDV, transient expression of pAPN and siRNA targeted pAPN increased and decreased the infectivity of PEDV in IECs, respectively. Subsequently, polarized entry into and release from both Vero E6 and IECs was analyzed. PEDV entry into polarized cells and pAPN grown on membrane inserts occurs via apical membrane. The progeny virus released into the medium was also quantified which demonstrated that PEDV is preferentially released from the apical membrane. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pAPN, the cellular receptor for PEDV, mediates polarized PEDV infection. These results imply the possibility that PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in intestinal epithelial cells. - Highlights: • PEDV infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was characterized. • Porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN) facilitated PEDV infection in IECs. • PEDV entry into and release from polarized cell via its apical membrane. • PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in IECs

  4. Implementation of the Polarized HD target at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaden Djalali; David Tedeschi

    2007-01-01

    The original goal of this proposal was to study frozen spin polarized targets (HD target and other technologies) and produce a conceptual design report for the implementation of such a target in the HALL B detector of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). During the first two years of the proposal, we came to the conclusion that the best suited target for JLab was a frozen spin target and helped with the design of such a target. We have not only achieved our original goal but have exceeded it by being involved in the actual building and testing of parts the target. The main reason for this success has been the hiring of a senior research associate, Dr. Oleksandr Dzyubak, who had more than 10 years of experience in the field of frozen spin polarized targets. The current grant has allowed the USC nuclear physics group to strengthen its role in the JLab collaboration and make important contribution to both the detector development and the scientific program

  5. Problems with the microbial production of butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan-Ning; Li, Liang-Zhi; Xian, Mo; Ma, Yu-Jiu; Yang, Jian-Ming; Xu, Xin; He, Dong-Zhi

    2009-09-01

    With the incessant fluctuations in oil prices and increasing stress from environmental pollution, renewed attention is being paid to the microbial production of biofuels from renewable sources. As a gasoline substitute, butanol has advantages over traditional fuel ethanol in terms of energy density and hygroscopicity. A variety of cheap substrates have been successfully applied in the production of biobutanol, highlighting the commercial potential of biobutanol development. In this review, in order to better understand the process of acetone-butanol-ethanol production, traditional clostridia fermentation is discussed. Sporulation is probably induced by solvent formation, and the molecular mechanism leading to the initiation of sporulation and solventogenesis is also investigated. Different strategies are employed in the metabolic engineering of clostridia that aim to enhancing solvent production, improve selectivity for butanol production, and increase the tolerance of clostridia to solvents. However, it will be hard to make breakthroughs in the metabolic engineering of clostridia for butanol production without gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic background of clostridia and developing more efficient genetic tools for clostridia. Therefore, increasing attention has been paid to the metabolic engineering of E. coli for butanol production. The importation and expression of a non-clostridial butanol-producing pathway in E. coli is probably the most promising strategy for butanol biosynthesis. Due to the lower butanol titers in the fermentation broth, simultaneous fermentation and product removal techniques have been developed to reduce the cost of butanol recovery. Gas stripping is the best technique for butanol recovery found so far.

  6. Influence of laser-target interaction on the polarization of a CO2-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, K.; Herziger, G.; Loosen, P.; Seelig, W.

    1988-01-01

    Laser materials processing shows a special peculiarity compared to other customary techniques: the generally reflecting target introduces optical feedback into the system. This feedback changes the mode properties of the laser radiation according to the targets dynamics. The authors report on one of these aspects of laser-target interaction resulting in the change of the polarization of the incident light. Based of rate equations, a theoretical model is presented in this paper that allows the calculation of this change with respect of the target properties, yielding a simple relation for the two orthogonal planes of polarization of a laser mode. This relation turns out to be linearly dependent of a function ψ (t) which describes the optical feedback. The relation holds for target reflexions of up to 10% and four times larger than τ 2 x τ 2 /τ 1 - τ 2 (where τ 1 , τ 2 are the time constants of the passive resonator for the two orthogonal planes of polarization). The model offers a method for the modulation for the modulation of laser radiation without change of frequency or intensity. It might also be of interest for high-power CO 2 laser cutting and welding of metals

  7. Initial research of np scattering with polarized deuterium target at ANKE/COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Boxing [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 73000 Lanzhou (China); Collaboration: ANKE-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    With the goal of understanding the nuclear forces, the ANKE collaboration has been working on a systematic NN spin program for many years. Due to the lack of free neutron sources experimental data of np scattering are very rare, especially at higher energies. It has been shown that using phase shift analysis (PSA) it is possible to reconstruct np scattering amplitudes from the spin observables of pd → {pp}{sub {sup 1}S{sub 0}}n charge-exchange reaction. So far experiments were conducted using polarized deuteron beams and hydrogen target, which led to valuable results. To extend the research up to the highest nucleon energy available at COSY (2.8 GeV), proton beam and polarized deuterium target will be used. This talk presents the results of the commissioning experiment of a deuterium target at ANKE with emphasis on the initial research of charge-exchange reaction.

  8. The polarized atomic-beam target for the EDDA experiment and the time-reversal invariance test at COSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eversheim, P.D.; Altmeier, M.; Felden, O.

    1996-01-01

    For the the EDDA experiment, which was set up to measure the p-vector - p-vector excitation function during the acceleration ramp of the cooler synchrotron COSY at Juelich, a polarized atomic-beam target was designed regarding the restrictions imposed by the geometry of the EDDA detector. Later, when the time-reversal invariance experiment is to be performed, the EDDA detector will serve as efficient internal polarimeter and the source has to deliver tensor polarized deuterons. The modular design of this polarized atomic-beam target that allows to meet these conditions are discussed in comparison to other existing polarized atomic-beam targets. (orig.)

  9. The polarized atomic-beam target for the EDDA experiment and the time-reversal invariance test at COSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversheim, P. D.; Altmeier, M.; Felden, O.

    1997-02-01

    For the the EDDA experiment, which was set up to measure the p¯-p¯ excitation function during the acceleration ramp of the cooler synchrotron COSY at Jülich, a polarized atomic-beam target was designed regarding the restrictions imposed by the geometry of the EDDA detector. Later, when the time-reversal invariance experiment is to be performed, the EDDA detector will serve as efficient internal polarimeter and the source has to deliver tensor polarized deuterons. The modular design of this polarized atomic-beam target that allows to meet these conditions will be discussed in comparison to other existing polarized atomic-beam targets.

  10. NMR parallel Q-meter with double-balanced-mixer detection for polarized target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissevain, J.; Tippens, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    A constant-voltage, parallel-tuned nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit, patterned after a Liverpool design, has been developed for polarized target experiments. Measuring the admittance of the resonance circuit allows advantageous use of double-balanced mixer detection. The resonant circuit is tolerant of stray capacitance between the NMR coil and the target cavity, thus easing target-cell-design constraints. The reference leg of the circuit includes a voltage-controlled attenuator and phase shifter for ease of tuning. The NMR output features a flat background and has good linearity and stability

  11. Target and double spin asymmetries of deeply virtual π0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target and CLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The target and double spin asymmetries of the exclusive pseudoscalar channel e→p→→epπ0 were measured for the first time in the deep-inelastic regime using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS. The data were collected over a large kinematic phase space and divided into 110 four-dimensional bins of Q2, xB, −t and ϕ. Large values of asymmetry moments clearly indicate a substantial contribution to the polarized structure functions from transverse virtual photon amplitudes. The interpretation of experimental data in terms of generalized parton distributions (GPDs provides the first insight on the chiral-odd GPDs H˜T and ET, and complement previous measurements of unpolarized structure functions sensitive to the GPDs HT and E¯T. These data provide a crucial input for parametrizations of essentially unknown chiral-odd GPDs and will strongly influence existing theoretical calculations based on the handbag formalism.

  12. Target and double spin asymmetries of deeply virtual π 0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target and CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A.; Avakian, H.; Burkert, V.; Joo, K.; Kim, W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Badui, R. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garc con, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niccolai, S.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.

    2017-05-01

    The target and double spin asymmetries of the exclusive pseudoscalar channel e→p→→epπ0 were measured for the first time in the deep-inelastic regime using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The data were collected over a large kinematic phase space and divided into 110 four-dimensional bins of Q2, xB, -t and Φ. Large values of asymmetry moments clearly indicate a substantial contribution to the polarized structure functions from transverse virtual photon amplitudes. The interpretation of experimental data in terms of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) provides the first insight on the chiral-odd GPDs H˜T and ET, and complement previous measurements of unpolarized structure functions sensitive to the GPDs HT and E¯T. These data provide a crucial input for parametrizations of essentially unknown chiral-odd GPDs and will strongly influence existing theoretical calculations based on the handbag formalism.

  13. Target and double spin asymmetries of deeply virtual π0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target and CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A.; Avakian, H.; Burkert, V.; Joo, K.; Kim, W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Badui, R. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garc con, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niccolai, S.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.

    2017-05-01

    The target and double spin asymmetries of the exclusive pseudoscalar channel e → p → → epπ0 were measured for the first time in the deep-inelastic regime using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The data were collected over a large kinematic phase space and divided into 110 four-dimensional bins of Q2, xB, -t and ϕ. Large values of asymmetry moments clearly indicate a substantial contribution to the polarized structure functions from transverse virtual photon amplitudes. The interpretation of experimental data in terms of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) provides the first insight on the chiral-odd GPDs H˜T and ET, and complement previous measurements of unpolarized structure functions sensitive to the GPDs HT and EbarT. These data provide a crucial input for parametrizations of essentially unknown chiral-odd GPDs and will strongly influence existing theoretical calculations based on the handbag formalism.

  14. Determination of the double-polarization observable E for the reaction γp→pπ0 in the CBELSA/TAPS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschall, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis the double-polarization observable E for the reaction γp→pπ 0 was determined in the energy range of E γ =600-2400 MeV. For this in the CBELSA/TAPS experiment ar the ELSA electron-stretcher facility a circularly polarized photon beam and a longitudinally polarized butanol target were available. Additionally for the determination of the dilution factor, which specifies the contribution of reactions on the hydrogen of the butanol, data were taken on a hydrogen target and a carbon target. In order to determine the double-polarization observable E two different methods were developed. in the first method exclusively the data on the butanol target were applied and the double-polarization observable E determined by means of the dilution factor. In the second method the sum from the cross sections at antiparallel and parallel spin orientation σ 1/2 and σ 3/2 was expressed by the unpolarized cross section 2σ, which was determined by means of the data on the unpolarized hydrogen target. The results of the double-polarization observable E were compared with the predictions of the three presently most usual partial-wave analyses. While the unpolarized cross section can be well described by all three predictions, already at lowest energies differences occur between the predictions and the data, so that by the extraction of this observable new informations for the partial-wave analyses can be made available.

  15. Transverse polarization of Σ+(1189) in photoproduction on a hydrogen target in CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepali, C. S.; Amaryan, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Fleming, J. A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Torayev, B.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental results on the Σ+(1189) hyperon transverse polarization in photoproduction on a hydrogen target using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory are presented. The Σ+(1189) was reconstructed in the exclusive reaction γ+p→KS0+Σ+(1189) via the Σ+→pπ0 decay mode. The KS0 was reconstructed in the invariant mass of two oppositely charged pions with the π0 identified in the missing mass of the detected pπ+π- final state. Experimental data were collected in the photon energy range Eγ=1.0-3.5 GeV (s range 1.66-2.73 GeV). We observe a large negative polarization of up to 95%. As the mechanism of transverse polarization of hyperons produced in unpolarized photoproduction experiments is still not well understood, these results will help to distinguish between different theoretical models on hyperon production and provide valuable information for the searches of missing baryon resonances.

  16. Recent progress in the development of a polarized proton target for reactions with radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urrego-Blanco, J.P.; Bingham, C.R.; Brandt, B. van den; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Schmelzbach, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Polarization observables in nuclear reactions with stable beams have provided important information concerning structural properties of nuclei and reaction mechanisms and hold great promise in the context of exotic nuclei. We report on the development of a polarized target based on plastic foils of 20-200 μm thickness to be used with radioactive ion beams. The operation of such a target requires a moderately high magnetic field and very low temperatures. The plastic foil is placed inside a chamber attached to the mixing chamber of a 3 He- 4 He dilution refrigerator. Cooling of the foil is achieved via a superfluid film of 4 He that can be supplied through two capillaries. The chamber has two thin, highly uniform silicon nitride windows. An NMR coil is attached to the target to monitor the polarization. Results of a first test to characterize the target system, using the elastic scattering of 38 MeV 12 C by protons in inverse kinematics are presented

  17. The control system of the polarized internal target of ANKE at COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleines, H. [Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Sarkadi, J. [Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Zwoll, K. [Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Engels, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Grigoryev, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Mikirtychyants, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Nekipelov, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Rathmann, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Seyfarth, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: h.seyfarth@fz-juelich.de; Kravtsov, P. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Vasilyev, A. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-10

    The polarized internal target for the ANKE experiment at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Juelich utilizes a polarized atomic beam source to feed a storage cell with polarized hydrogen or deuterium atoms. The nuclear polarization is measured with a Lamb-shift polarimeter. For common control of the two systems, industrial equipment was selected providing reliable, long-term support and remote control of the target as well as measurement and optimization of its operating parameters. The interlock system has been implemented on the basis of SIEMENS SIMATIC S7-300 family of programmable logic controllers. In order to unify the interfacing to the control computer, all front-end equipment is connected via the PROFIBUS DP fieldbus. The process control software was implemented using the Windows-based WinCC toolkit from SIEMENS. The variety of components, to be controlled, and the logical structure of the control and interlock system are described. Finally, a number of applications derived from the present development to other, new installations are briefly mentioned.

  18. The control system of the polarized internal target of ANKE at COSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleines, H.; Sarkadi, J.; Zwoll, K.; Engels, R.; Grigoryev, K.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Nekipelov, M.; Rathmann, F.; Seyfarth, H.; Kravtsov, P.; Vasilyev, A.

    2006-05-01

    The polarized internal target for the ANKE experiment at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Jülich utilizes a polarized atomic beam source to feed a storage cell with polarized hydrogen or deuterium atoms. The nuclear polarization is measured with a Lamb-shift polarimeter. For common control of the two systems, industrial equipment was selected providing reliable, long-term support and remote control of the target as well as measurement and optimization of its operating parameters. The interlock system has been implemented on the basis of SIEMENS SIMATIC S7-300 family of programmable logic controllers. In order to unify the interfacing to the control computer, all front-end equipment is connected via the PROFIBUS DP fieldbus. The process control software was implemented using the Windows-based WinCC toolkit from SIEMENS. The variety of components, to be controlled, and the logical structure of the control and interlock system are described. Finally, a number of applications derived from the present development to other, new installations are briefly mentioned.

  19. Radiative electron rearrangement and polarization in target K x-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamison, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    Two topics in the atomic physics of ion-atom collisions are studied. The first is an investigation of a free-atom decay process that is shown to be a two-electron one-photon decay. This two-electron decay requires an initial state with multiple inner-shell vacancies that has a high probability of creation in ion-atom collisions. Because this decay promotes one electron to a higher shell while allowing the other to fall to a lower shell, it is referred to as radiative electron rearrangement (RER). The investigation of this process includes the experimental study of the x-ray spectra region approx. 150 eV below the characteristic Kα 1 2 target radiation in third period elements when bombarded by various ion beams in the energy range 1 to 2 MeV/amu. Theoretical calculations of the transition energies, line strengths, and line widths are performed to verify the origin of the RER lines. The second topic of consideration is the study of the polarization of Kα satellite radiation from targets of Al and Si. It is shown that the polarization, which is observed experimentally with a curved-crystal polarimeter, is due to the nonstatistical population of the magnetic substates created in specific ion-atom collisions. Further, the polarization of the RER lines is studied. The connection between the polarization of the normal Kα satellite radiation and the polarization of the RER lines adds final proof to their origin as two-electron one-photon transitions

  20. Low and High Temperature Combustion Chemistry of Butanol Isomers in Premixed Flames and Autoignition Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Yasunaga, K; Curran, H J; Tsujimura, T; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K

    2010-12-12

    Butanol is a fuel that has been proposed as a bio-derived alternative to conventional petroleum derived fuels. The structural isomer in traditional 'bio-butanol' fuel is n-butanol, but newer conversion technologies produce iso-butanol as a fuel. In order to better understand the combustion chemistry of bio-butanol, this study presents a comprehensive chemical kinetic model for all the four isomers of butanol (e.g., 1-, 2-, iso- and tert-butanol). The proposed model includes detailed high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. In this study, the primary experimental validation target for the model is premixed flat low-pressure flame species profiles obtained using molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). The model is also validated against previously published data for premixed flame velocity and n-butanol rapid compression machine and shock tube ignition delay. The agreement with these data sets is reasonably good. The dominant reaction pathways at the various pressures and temperatures studied are elucidated. At low temperature conditions, we found that the reaction of alphahydroxybutyl with O{sub 2} was important in controlling the reactivity of the system, and for correctly predicting C{sub 4} aldehyde profiles in low pressure premixed flames. Enol-keto isomerization reactions assisted by HO{sub 2} were also found to be important in converting enols to aldehydes and ketones in the low pressure premixed flames. In the paper, we describe how the structural features of the four different butanol isomers lead to differences in the combustion properties of each isomer.

  1. A polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source for internal target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczerba, D.; Buuren, L.D. van; Brand, J.F.J. van den; Bulten, H.J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Klous, S.; Kolster, H.; Lang, J.; Mul, F.; Poolman, H.R.; Simani, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    A high-brightness hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source is presented. The apparatus, previously used in electron scattering experiments with tensor-polarized deuterium (Ferro-Luzzi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 2630; van den Brand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 (1997) 1235; Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1998) 687; Bouwhuis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 3755), was configured as a source for internal target experiments to measure single- and double-polarization observables, with either polarized hydrogen or vector/tensor polarized deuterium. The atomic beam intensity was enhanced by a factor of ∼2.5 by optimizing the Stern-Gerlach focusing system using high tip-field (∼1.5 T) rare-earth permanent magnets, and by increasing the pumping speed in the beam-formation chamber. Fluxes of (5.9±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s were measured in a diameter 12 mmx122 mm compression tube with its entrance at a distance of 27 cm from the last focusing element. The total output flux amounted to (7.6±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s

  2. Solvent (acetone-butanol: ab) production

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article describes production of butanol [acetone-butanol-ethanol, (also called AB or ABE or solvent)] by fermentation using both traditional and current technologies. AB production from agricultural commodities, such as corn and molasses, was an important historical fermentation. Unfortunately,...

  3. A Gamma Polarimeter for Neutron Polarization Measurement in a Liquid Deuterium Target for Parity Violation in Polarized Neutron Capture on Deuterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komives, A; Sint, A K; Bowers, M; Snow, M

    2005-01-01

    A measurement of the parity-violating gamma asymmetry in n-D capture would yield information on N-N parity violation independent of the n-p system. Since cold neutrons will depolarize in a liquid deuterium target in which the scattering cross section is much larger than the absorption cross section, it will be necessary to quantify the loss of polarization before capture. One way to do this is to use the large circular polarization of the gamma from n-D capture and analyze the circular polarization of the gamma in a gamma polarimeter. We describe the design of this polarimeter.

  4. Effect of Beam Scanning on Target Polarization Scattering Matrix Observed by Fully Polarimetric Phased-array Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mianquan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The polarization feature of a fully Polarimetric Phased-Array Radar (PPAR antenna varies according to the beam-scanning angle, thereby introducing two problems on the target Polarization Scattering Matrix (PSM measurement. First, the antenna polarization basis is defined within the vertical cross-section of an electromagnetic wave propagation direction, and the polarization basis of each beam direction angle is not identical, resulting in the PSM of a fixed-posture target observed by PPAR being not identical for different beam-scanning angles. Second, the cross polarization of the PPAR antenna increases with increasing beamscanning angle, resulting in a crosstalk among the elements of PSM observed by PPAR. This study focuses on the analysis of the abovementioned two aspects of the effect of beam scanning on target PSM observed by PPAR. The results will establish a more accurate observation of the equation for the precision PSM measurement of PPAR.

  5. Laser - Polarized HE-3 Target Used for a Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romalis, M

    2003-11-05

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the deep inelastic neutron spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x). The main motivation for the experiment is a test of the Bjorken sum rule. Because of smaller statistical errors and broader kinematic coverage than in previous experiments, we are able to study in detail the behavior of the spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) for low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. We find that it has a strongly divergent behavior, in contradiction to the naive predictions of the Regge theory. This calls into question the methods commonly used for extrapolation of g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) to x = 0. The difference between the proton and the neutron spin structure functions is less divergent at low x, so a test of the Bjorken sum rule is possible. We confirm the sum rule with an accuracy of 8%. The experiment was performed at SLAC using a 50 GeV polarized electron beam and a polarized {sup 3}He target. In this thesis the polarized target is described in detail. We used the technique of Rb optical pumping and Rb-He spin exchange to polarize the {sup 3}He. Because of a novel mechanical design our target had the smallest dilution ever achieved for a high density gas target. Since this is a precision measurement, particular efforts were made to reduce the systematic errors due to the uncertainty in the target parameters. Most important parameters were measured by more than one method. We implemented novel techniques for measuring the thickness of the glass windows of the target, the {sup 3}He density, and the polarization. In particular, one of the methods for measuring the gas density relied on the broadening of the Rb optical absorption lines by collisions with {sup 3}He atoms. The calibration of this technique resulted in the most precise measurements of the pressure broadening parameters for {sup 3}He as well as several other gases, which are described in an Appendix. The polarization of the {sup 3}He was also measured by

  6. One of the polarized targets that was developed for the S134 experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The target is polarized dynamically as usual in a 25 kg homogeneous magnetic field. It is then cooled to some 50 millidegrees and moved into the large gap of the ETH spectrometer magnet, where the field is 10 kg, with a poorer homogeneity. It stands in front of the beam, in the centre of the detection system, for studying all the spin parameters in the reaction pi-p - K0LAMBDA0 at 5 GeV/c, with an available solid angle of nearly 4 p.

  7. Bounds on Time Reversal Violation From Polarized Neutron Capture With Unpolarized Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E D; Gould, C R; Mitchell, G E; Sharapov, E I

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed constraints on parity-odd time-reversal noninvariant interactions derived from measurements of the energy dependence of parity-violating polarized neutron capture on unpolarized targets. As previous authors found, a perturbation in energy dependence due to a parity (P)-odd time (T)-odd interaction is present. However, the perturbation competes with T-even terms which can obscure the T-odd signature. We estimate the magnitudes of these competing terms and suggest strategies for a practicable experiment.

  8. Hadron-pair production on transversely polarized targets in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Christopher

    2014-07-29

    Nucleons such as protons and neutrons are composite objects made of quarks, which are bound together by the strong force via the exchange of gluons. The probability of finding a quark of flavor q carrying the momentum fraction x of the fast moving parent nucleon is described by a parton distribution function (PDF) f{sub 1}{sup q}(x), the number density. The spin, an intrinsic angular momentum of elementary particles such as quarks but also of composite objects like nucleons, couples with magnetic fields, which allows one to align it. Taking into account this additional parameter, the spin, the scheme of PDFs in leading twist is expanded by the helicity distribution g{sub 1}{sup q}(x) and the transversity distribution h{sub 1}{sup q}(x). The first distribution covers the case where the nucleon and the quark are longitudinally polarized, while a transverse polarization is taken into account by the latter. A tool for the investigation of the PDFs is inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) of electro-magnetic probes off (un)polarized nucleons at fixed-target experiments. This only gives access to f{sub 1}{sup q}(x) and g{sub 1}{sup q}(x), while the chiral-odd nature of the transversity distribution prevents a measurement without detecting the final hadronic states. However, h{sub 1}{sup q}(x) can be observed in semi-inclusive DIS (SIDIS) in combination with another chiral-odd function like the dihadron fragmentation function H{sub 1} {sup angle} {sup q} in the production of a hadron-pair. The resulting experimental challenge is the reason why f{sub 1}{sup q}(x) and g{sub 1}{sup q}(x) have been investigated for almost four decades, while h{sub 1}{sup q}(x) is still subject to recent measurements and analyses. The 160 GeV/c polarized muon beam of CERN's M2 beamline allows the COMPASS experiment to investigate spin effects using polarized solid-state targets. Since the year 2002 COMPASS has collected unique data sets on transversely polarized targets of lithium

  9. Laser polarization dependence of proton emission from a thin foil target irradiated by a 70 fs, intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumi, A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Li, Z.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Orimo, S.; Kado, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Mori, M.; Bulanov, S.V.; Esirkepov, T.; Nemoto, K.; Oishi, Y.; Nayuki, T.; Fujii, T.; Noda, A.; Nakamura, S.

    2005-01-01

    A study of proton emission from a 3-μm-thick Ta foil target irradiated by p-, s-, and circularly polarized laser pulses with respect to the target plane has been carried out. Protons with energies up to 880 keV were observed in the target normal direction under the irradiation by the p-polarized laser pulse, which yielded the highest efficiency for proton emission. In contrast, s- and circularly polarized laser pulses gave the maximum energies of 610 and 680 keV, respectively. The difference in the maximum energy between the p- and s-polarized cases was associated with the difference between the sheath fields estimated from electron spectra

  10. What should be measured in deuteron breakup with polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strokovskij, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    At present, two different approaches are used for interpretation of inclusive data on deuteron breakup with emission of protons-fragments at zero degree by hadrons. According to one of them the observed characteristics of this reaction (cross sections, polarization observables) are determined by the reaction mechanism and the deuteron structure at short distances (in the commonly accepted sense) plays a minor role. According to the other approach it is the deuteron structure at short distances which determines the observed trend of the data. Neither of these approaches can describe the data even qualitatively in the whole investigated region of kinematical variables, having particular success for some narrow region corresponding to long distances. Installation of the polarized proton target at LHE (Laboratory of High Energies) JINR opens an opportunity to perform a rather simple experiment which could discriminate one of these completing approaches. The idea of this experiment is discussed in the present paper. Measurement of the observable suggested here is a particular example of a general problem of a search for spin correlations in inelastic reactions between particles separated well in 4-velocity or rapidity spaces. In our particular case correlations of spin degrees of freedom between particles, one of which is in the target fragmentation region and the other belongs to the projectile fragmentation region, are discussed. 10 refs., 1 fig

  11. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium of {l_brace}water + phenol + (1-butanol, or 2-butanol, or tert-butanol){r_brace} systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadlich de Oliveira, Leonardo [School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Aznar, Martin, E-mail: maznar@feq.unicamp.b [School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) and binodal curve data were determined for the systems (water + phenol + tert-butanol) at T = 298.15 K, (water + phenol + 2-butanol) and (water + phenol + 1-butanol) at T = 298.15 K and T = 313.15 K by the combined techniques of densimetry and refractometry. Type I curve (for tert-butanol) and Type II curves (for 1- and 2-butanol) were found. The data were correlated with the NRTL model and the parameters estimated present root mean square deviations below 2% for the system with tert-butanol and lower than 0.8% for the other systems.

  12. Target asymmetry measurement of deuteron photodisintegration at a photon energy of 550 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Althoff, K.H.; Anton, G.; Bock, B.; Bour, D.; Erbs, P.; Ferber, W.; Gelhausen, H.; Haertel, U.; Havenith, W.; Jahnen, T.; Kaufmann, H.P.; Kaul, O.; Luecking, B.; Menze, D.; Meyer, W.; Miczaika, T.; Rennings, K.; Riechert, H.; Roderburg, E.; Ruhm, W.; Schenuit, E.; Schilling, E.; Schwille, W.; Sternal, G.; Sundermann, D.; Thiel, W.; Thiesmeyer, D.; Wagener, K.

    1984-01-01

    The target asymmetry of the deuteron photodisintegration was measured at a photon energy of 550+-50 MeV and at proton center-off-mass angles between 25 and 155 degrees. D-butanol and ND 3 were used as target material yielding a maximum deuteron polarization of 41%. Proton and neutron were detected in coincidence. The data show a structure which cannot be described by the existing analyses. (orig.)

  13. Electronic device for measuring the polarization parameter in the π-p → π0n charge exchange reaction on a polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehin, S.

    1967-12-01

    An electronic apparatus has been constructed to measure the polarization parameter P 0 (t) in π - p → π 0 n charge exchange scattering at 5.9 GeV/c and 11,2 GeV/c on polarized proton target. This device insures triggering of a heavy plate spark chamber, allowing visualisation of γ rays from the π 0 decays when the associated neutron offers suitable characteristics in direction and energy. The neutron is detected by an array of 32 counters and his energy is measured by a time of flight method. Electronic circuits of this apparatus are described as test and calibration methods used. (author) [fr

  14. Horizontal cryostat for polarized proton targets; Cryostat horizontal pour cibles de protons polarises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roubeau, P M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-11-15

    Continuously fed horizontal cryostat to be used for polarized proton targets; includes: 1 standard storage dewar commercially available; 2 shifting of dewar requiring 10 minutes, without any warming of the target; 3 no conventional nitrogen cooled shield but rather taking advantage of the cold helium vapours evaporated in the transfer line and/or the helium evaporated to cool the polarized crystal; 4 a heat exchanger which reduces by a factor of two the consumption of helium lowering in the same ratio the transfer line and/or the helium evaporated to cool the polarized crystal; 5 regulation of the temperature by means of a needle valve included in the superfluid helium line. This cryostat, used in conjunction with a 1000 l/s pump allows one to maintain at 1.06 deg. K a target, in which is dissipated 1 watt hyper frequency power, with an helium consumption of 40 litres/day (measured directly in the storage dewar). (author) [French] Description d'un cryostat horizontal, a alimentation continue, pour cible de protons polarises, presentant les caracteristiques suivantes: 1 utilisation de vases de stockage de modele commercial; 2 echange de vase en 10 minutes sans rechauffement; 3 absence d'azote liquide remplace par les vapeurs froides de l'helium evapore dans la canalisation de transfert et/ou les vapeurs de l'helium evapore pour refroidir le cristal polarise; 4 utilisation d'un echangeur qui aboutit a reduire de moitie la consommation d'helium, donc la pression d'evaporation, et qui permet, pour une pompe donnee, d'abaisser la temperature de fonctionnement de 0.1 degre environ; 5 reglage de la temperature au moyen d'une vanne a aiguille placee sur le circuit d'helium prerefroidi (superfluide). Ce cryostat, utilise avec une pompe de 1000 l/s permet de maintenir a une temperature de 1.06 deg. K une cible dans laquelle est dissipee une puissance d'hyperfrequence de 1 watt, moyennant une consommation d'helium de 40 litres/jour (mesuree dans le vase de stockage). (auteur)

  15. The Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Function Using Polarized HE-3 Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X

    2004-01-05

    Using a 48.6 GeV polarized electron beam scattering off a polarized {sup 3}He target at Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC), they measured the neutron spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n} over kinematic(x) ranging 0.014 < x <0.7 and 1 < Q{sup 2} < 17GeV{sup 2}. The measurement gave the integral result over the neutron spin structure function {integral}{sub 0.014}{sup 0.7} g{sub 1}{sup n}(x)dx = -0.036 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.005(syst) at an average Q{sup 2} = 5GeV{sup 2}. Along with the proton results from SLAC E143 experiment (0.03 < x) and SMC experiment (0.014 < x < 0.03), they find the Bjorken sum rule appears to be largely saturated by the data integrated down to x of 0.014. However, they observe relatively large values for g{sub 1}{sup n} at low x. The result calls into question the usual methods (Regge theory) for extrapolating to x = 0 to find the full neutron integral {integral}{sub 0}{sup t} g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) dx, needed for testing the Quark-Parton Model (QMP).

  16. Letter of Intent for a Drell-Yan Experiment with a Polarized Proton Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geesaman, D.; Reimer, P.; Brown, C.; Christian, D.; Diefenthaler, M.; Peng, J.C.; Chang, W.C.; Chen, Y.C.; Sawada, S.; Chang, T.H.; Huang, J.; Jiang, X.; Leitch, M.; Klein, A.; Liu, K.; Liu, M.; McGaughey, P.; Beise, E.; Nakahara, K.; Aidala, C.; Lorenzon, W.; Raymond, R.; Badman, T.; Long, E.; Slifer, K.; Zielinski, R.; Guo, R.S.; Goto, Y.; El Fassi, L.; Myers, K.; Ransome, R.; Tadepalli, A.; Tice, B.; Chen, J.P.; Nakano, K.; Shibata, T.A.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Keller, D.; Rondon, O.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the proton is a spin-1/2 particle, but how the constituents (quarks and gluons) assemble to this quantized spin is still a mystery. There is a worldwide effort to map out the individual contributions to the proton spin. It is established that the quark spins contribute around 30%, while the gluon intrinsic angular momentum is still under active investigation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Fully resolving the proton spin puzzle requires information on the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of both quarks and gluons. Recent studies have shown that the so-called transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) can inform us about the OAM of the partons. One of the most important TMDs, and the main focus of this LOI, is the so-called Sivers function. To summarize, we propose to make the first measurement of the Sivers function of sea quarks, which is expected to be non-zero if the sea quarks contribute orbital angular momentum to the proton spin, as expected from the pion cloud model, which also partially explains the E866 results. Thus, we will be able to deduce whether or not sea quark orbital motion contributes significantly to the proton spin. Specifically, we will determine the contribution from the anti-up quarks, with Bjorken-x in the range of ~ 0.1 to 0.5. Drell-Yan production off a polarized proton target has never been measured, and is complementary to the recently approved (stage-1) experiment E1027 at Fermilab, which will measure the Sivers function of the valence quarks using a polarized proton beam on an unpolarized proton target. If the measured sea quark Sivers function is non-zero, we will also determine its sign.

  17. Volumetric properties of ternary (IL + 2-propanol or 1-butanol or 2-butanol + ethyl acetate) systems and binary (IL + 2-propanol or 1-butanol or 2-butanol) and (1-butanol or 2-butanol + ethyl acetate) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahadur, Indra; Deenadayalu, Nirmala; Tywabi, Zikhona; Sen, Sabyasachi; Hofman, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Experimental densities were determined at T = (298.15, 303.15, and 313.15) K. ► IL: methyl trioctylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide was used. ► Virial Based Mixing Rule correlation of the binary excess molar volume data. ► Binary excess molar volume was both negative and positive. ► Ternary excess molar volume data was correlated with the Cibulka equation. - Abstract: The experimental densities for the binary or ternary systems were determined at T = (298.15, 303.15, and 313.15) K. The ionic liquid methyl trioctylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([MOA] + [Tf 2 N] − ) was used for three of the five binary systems studied. The binary systems were ([MOA] + [Tf 2 N] − + 2-propanol or 1-butanol or 2-butanol) and (1-butanol or 2-butanol + ethyl acetate). The ternary systems were {methyl trioctylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide + 2-propanol or 1-butanol or 2-butanol + ethyl acetate}. The binary and ternary excess molar volumes for the above systems were calculated from the experimental density values for each temperature. The Redlich–Kister smoothing polynomial was fitted to the binary excess molar volume data. Virial-Based Mixing Rules were used to correlate the binary excess molar volume data. The binary excess molar volume results showed both negative and positive values over the entire composition range for all the temperatures. The ternary excess molar volume data were successfully correlated with the Cibulka equation using the Redlich–Kister binary parameters.

  18. Isolation of butanol- and isobutanol-tolerant bacteria and physiological characterization of their butanol tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Manabu; Katayama, Taiki; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Mitani, Yasuo; Meng, Xian-Ying; Hori, Tomoyuki; Narihiro, Takashi; Morita, Naoki; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Yumoto, Isao; Kimura, Nobutada; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2013-11-01

    Despite their importance as a biofuel production platform, only a very limited number of butanol-tolerant bacteria have been identified thus far. Here, we extensively explored butanol- and isobutanol-tolerant bacteria from various environmental samples. A total of 16 aerobic and anaerobic bacteria that could tolerate greater than 2.0% (vol/vol) butanol and isobutanol were isolated. A 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed that the isolates were phylogenetically distributed over at least nine genera: Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Rummeliibacillus, Brevibacillus, Coprothermobacter, Caloribacterium, Enterococcus, Hydrogenoanaerobacterium, and Cellulosimicrobium, within the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Ten of the isolates were phylogenetically distinct from previously identified butanol-tolerant bacteria. Two relatively highly butanol-tolerant strains CM4A (aerobe) and GK12 (obligate anaerobe) were characterized further. Both strains changed their membrane fatty acid composition in response to butanol exposure, i.e., CM4A and GK12 exhibited increased saturated and cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) and long-chain fatty acids, respectively, which may serve to maintain membrane fluidity. The gene (cfa) encoding CFA synthase was cloned from strain CM4A and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant E. coli showed relatively higher butanol and isobutanol tolerance than E. coli without the cfa gene, suggesting that cfa can confer solvent tolerance. The exposure of strain GK12 to butanol by consecutive passages even enhanced the growth rate, indicating that yet-unknown mechanisms may also contribute to solvent tolerance. Taken together, the results demonstrate that a wide variety of butanol- and isobutanol-tolerant bacteria that can grow in 2.0% butanol exist in the environment and have various strategies to maintain structural integrity against detrimental solvents.

  19. Measurements of the spin structure of the nucleon using SPHICE: A strongly polarized hydrogen and deuterium ice target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babusci, D.; Blecher, M.; Breuer, M.; Caracappa, A.; Commeaux, C.; Didelez, J.; Fan, Q.; Giordano, G.; Hicks, K.; Hoblit, S.; Hoffmann-Rothe, P.; Honig, A.; Kistner, O.C.; Khandaker, M.; Li, Z.; Lucas, M.A.; Matone, G.; Miceli, L.; Preedom, B.M.; Rigney, M.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Schaerf, C.; Thorn, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Frozen-spin HD polarized targets operating between 0.4 and 4K, used with cold-transfer (4K) techniques, provide great configurational flexibility. Their long depolarization times under target usage conditions assure reasonable match between polarization production and usage times, for weakly ionizing beam fluxes, and the very long relaxation times at fields above 7T (∼1 yr.) provide an economical storage mode and open-quote open-quote off-the-shelf close-quote close-quote availability. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  20. Sources of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, L.

    1983-01-01

    Various sources of polarized neutrons are reviewed. Monoenergetic source produced with unpolarized or polarized beams, white sources of polarized neutrons, production by transmissions through polarized hydrogen targets and polarized thermal neutronsare discussed, with appropriate applications included. (U.K.)

  1. Effect of H-wave polarization on laser radar detection of partially convex targets in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ocla, Hosam

    2010-07-01

    A study on the performance of laser radar cross section (LRCS) of conducting targets with large sizes is investigated numerically in free space and random media. The LRCS is calculated using a boundary value method with beam wave incidence and H-wave polarization. Considered are those elements that contribute to the LRCS problem including random medium strength, target configuration, and beam width. The effect of the creeping waves, stimulated by H-polarization, on the LRCS behavior is manifested. Targets taking large sizes of up to five wavelengths are sufficiently larger than the beam width and are sufficient for considering fairly complex targets. Scatterers are assumed to have analytical partially convex contours with inflection points.

  2. Near infrared spectral polarization imaging of prostate cancer tissues using Cybesin: a receptor-targeted contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, W. B.; Tang, G. C.; Liang, Kexian; Achilefu, S.; Alfano, R. R.

    2013-03-01

    Cybesin, a smart contrast agent to target cancer cells, was investigated using a near infrared (NIR) spectral polarization imaging technique for prostate cancer detection. The approach relies on applying a contrast agent that can target cancer cells. Cybesin, as a small ICG-derivative dye-peptide, emit fluorescence between 750 nm and 900 nm, which is in the "tissue optical window". Cybesin was reported targeting the over-expressed bombesin receptors in cancer cells in animal model and the human prostate cancers over-expressing bombesin receptors. The NIR spectral polarization imaging study reported here demonstrated that Cybesin can be used as a smart optical biomarker and as a prostate cancer receptor targeted contrast agent.

  3. Feasibility study of electron-scattering experiments with a tensor-polarized deuterium target in an electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.; Geesaman, D.F.; Goodman, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of using a spin-exchange optical-pumping method to produce a high flux of tensor-polarized deuterium atoms is being tested. In this method, alkali atoms are polarized by optical pumping and the polarization is transferred to deuterium by successive spin-exchange collisions. In a test with a simple model the authors achieved 10 mW of laser power absorbed to the spin-exchange process with deuterium. Construction of a more sophisticated prototype was completed and tests are in progress. Dissociation fractions in excess of 80% for deuterium molecules have been achieved thus far. In order to optimize the performance of the prototype target, a computerized model of the target was constructed. A section of a differential-pumping system was constructed and tested. It was possible to sustain more than the required 5 orders-of-magnitude pressure drop in a distance of approximately 1.5 m

  4. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings. Annual report, February 1, 1986-January 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, W.

    1986-01-01

    Insertion of an internal polarized gas target into storage rings for protons, antiprotons or electrons would permit interesting new experiments, particularly if the circulating beam is polarized as well. The purpose of the present project is the development of a polarized gas target, based on injection of polarized hydrogen or deuterium atoms into a storage cell in order to build up the required target thickness. A method has been developed and tested, which permits measurement of the target polarization under realistic conditions (i.e., in the presence of an intense ion beam) without the need for a large accelerator. First measurements with an oxidized aluminum cell have been made. It is proposed to study wall depolarization in storage cells and to search for suitable wall conditions (wall material, coating, temperature, vacuum conditions) to permit eventual construction of a polarized gas target for a storage ring

  5. Asymmetry measurements in nucleon--nucleon scattering with polarized beams and targets at ZGS to Fermilab energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakosawa, A.

    1977-01-01

    Results of various asymmetry measurements in nucleon-nucleon scattering with polarized beams and targets at ZGS energies are presented. A possible direct-channel resonance in the pp system is discussed. Most of the discussion above ZGS energies are aimed at future measurements

  6. Analyzing power measurements for the (π+,π0) reaction on a polarized 13C target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goergen, J.J.

    1991-05-01

    The analyzing powers A y differential cross sections dσ/dΩ for the reaction 13 C(π + ,π 0 ) 13 N have been measured for forward scattering angles at an incident pion kinetic energy of T pi + = 163 MeV by using a transversely polarized target. Analyzing powers and reaction cross sections impose stringent constrains on nuclear reaction models and can be used to test the present understanding of nuclear structure for 1p-shell nuclei. The resulting A y are compared to the predictions of first-order Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation (DWIA) calculations, which reproduce well the differential cross sections. Although there is qualitative agreement at forward angles, the quantitative agreement is poor, especially at scattering angles larger than 50 degrees. Since the DWIA calculations do not appear to be strongly sensitive to the assumed nuclear structure model, the discrepancy in describing the analyzing powers suggests that the reaction mechanism may not yet be well understood and higher order corrections may be important. Also measured were the analyzing powers for the elementary charge exchange reaction π - bar p → π degrees n over the same angular range and at an incident pion kinetic energy of T pi - = 161 MeV. The results are compared to the most recents phase shift predictions. Within the experimental uncertainties, phase shift calculations agree with the measured A y and no changes in the πN phase shifts near the P 33 resonance are needed to describe the data

  7. Double-polarization observable G in neutral-pion photoproduction off the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, A.; Lang, M.; Afzal, F.; Beck, R.; Boese, S.; Funke, C.; Gottschall, M.; Gruener, M.; Hammann, C.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, J.; Hoffmeister, P.; Honisch, C.; Kaiser, D.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kalischewski, F.; Klassen, P.; Klempt, E.; Koop, K.; Kube, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Mueller, J.; Muellers, J.; Piontek, D.; Schmidt, C.; Seifen, T.; Sokhoyan, V.; Spieker, K.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; Pee, H. van; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Winnebeck, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Eberhardt, H.; Bantes, B.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Frommberger, F.; Goertz, S.; Hammann, D.; Hillert, W.; Jude, T.; Kammer, S.; Kleber, V.; Klein, F.; Reeve, S.; Runkel, S.; Schmieden, H. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Anisovich, A.V.; Bayadilov, D.; Nikonov, V.; Sarantsev, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Bichow, M.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik I, Bochum (Germany); Brinkmann, K.T.; Gutz, E. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Crede, V. [Florida State University, Department of Physics, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Dieterle, M.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Witthauer, L. [Universitaet Basel, Institut fuer Physik, Basel (Switzerland); Friedrich, S.; Makonyi, K.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M. [Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Gridnev, A.; Lopatin, I. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Wilson, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Florida State University, Department of Physics, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Collaboration: The CBELSA/TAPS Collaboration

    2017-01-15

    This paper reports on a measurement of the double-polarization observable G in π{sup 0} photoproduction off the proton using the CBELSA/TAPS experiment at the ELSA accelerator in Bonn. The observable G is determined from reactions of linearly polarized photons with longitudinally polarized protons. The polarized photons are produced by bremsstrahlung off a diamond radiator of well-defined orientation. A frozen spin butanol target provides the polarized protons. The data cover the photon energy range from 617 to 1325 MeV and a wide angular range. The experimental results for G are compared to predictions by the Bonn-Gatchina (BnGa), Juelich-Bonn (JueBo), MAID and SAID partial wave analyses. Implications of the new data for the pion photoproduction multipoles are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Collisional pumping for the production of intense spin-polarized neutral beams: target considerations. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stearns, J.W.; Burrell, C.F.; Kaplan, S.N.; Pyle, R.V.; Ruby, L.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1985-04-01

    Polarized beams at intensity levels heretofore not considered feasible have recently been proposed for heating and fueling fusion plasmas. Polarized-beam fueling could increase fusion rates by 50% as well as allow control of the directionality of the fusion products. A process which we have recently described, and called collisional pumping, promises to produce beams of polarized ions vastly more intense than producible by current methods

  9. First measurement of target and double spin asymmetries for polarized e- polarized p --> e p pi0 in the nucleon resonance region above the Delta(1232)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biselli, Angela; Burkert, Volker; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bookwalter, Craig; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bosted, Peter; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Feuerbach, Robert; Fersch, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hassall, Neil; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kil; Park, Seungkyung; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Price, John; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Raue, Brian; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Smith, Elton; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vineyard, Michael; Vlassov, Alexander; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Weygand, Dennis; Williams, M.; Wolin, Elliott; Wood, Michael; Yegneswaran, Amrit; Yurov, Mikhail; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2008-10-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.045204
    The exclusive channel polarized proton(polarized e,e prime p)pi0 was studied in the first and second nucleon resonance regions in the Q2 range from 0.187 to 0.770 GeV2 at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Longitudinal target and beam-target asymmetries were extracted over a large range of center-of-mass angles of the pi0 and compared to the unitary isobar model MAID, the dynamic model by Sato and Lee, and the dynamic model DMT. A strong sensitivity to individual models was observed, in particular for the target asymmetry and in the higher invariant mass region. This data set, once included in the global fits of the above models, is expected to place strong constraints on the electrocoupling amplitudes A_{1/2} and S_{1/2} for the Roper resonance N(1400)P11, and the N(1535)S11 and N(1520)D13 states.

  10. Account of magnetic field effects of polarized proton target on charged particle trajectories in experiments with magnetic spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telegin, Yu.N.; Ranyuk, Yu.N.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Sporov, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    Some effects of the influence of magnetic field of a polarized proton target (PPT) on trajectories of secondary particles in experiments using magnetic spectrometers are considered. It is shown that these effects can be eliminated by the target shift relatively to the spectrometer rotation axis and variation of the spectrometer installation angle. Numerical calculations of the correction values were performed for emitted particle momenta of 100-800 MeB/s and working intensity of the H 0 magnetic field H 0 =27 kG. The influence of the PPT magnetic field on the functions of angular and energy resolution in the γp→π + n experiment is investigated. The results obtained can be used in experiments with a polarized proton target

  11. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Single-beam, single-target, and double spin asymmetries for hard exclusive electroproduction of a photon on the proton e →p →→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer and a longitudinally polarized NH3 14 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 four-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of generalized parton distributions. The measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H ˜ Compton form factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  12. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e→p→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  13. Solvents (butanol, acetone, and ethanol). [USSR Patent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarovenko, V L; Nakhmanovich, B M

    1963-07-17

    The method involves use of carbohydrate-containing plant raw-material, e.g. hydrolyzates of corn cob and pulp. The material is subjected to fermentation with acetone-butanol bacteria with addition of starch-industry wastes as source of proteins (gluten and gluten-containing water) and nutrient salts.

  14. Comparative Autoignition Trends in Butanol Isomers at Elevated Pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Weber, Bryan W.

    2013-03-21

    Autoignition experiments of stoichiometric mixtures of s-, t-, and i-butanol in air have been performed using a heated rapid compression machine (RCM). At compressed pressures of 15 and 30 bar and for compressed temperatures in the range 715-910 K, no evidence of a negative temperature coefficient region in terms of ignition delay response is found. The present experimental results are also compared with previously reported RCM data of n-butanol in air. The order of reactivity of the butanols is n-butanol > s-butanol ≈ i-butanol > t-butanol at the lower pressure but changes to n-butanol > t-butanol > s-butanol > i-butanol at higher pressure. In addition, t-butanol shows preignition heat release behavior, which is especially evident at higher pressures. To help identify the controlling chemistry leading to this preignition heat release, off-stoichiometric experiments are further performed at 30 bar compressed pressure, for t-butanol at φ = 0.5 and φ = 2.0 in air. For these experiments, higher fuel loading (i.e., φ = 2.0) causes greater preignition heat release (as indicated by greater pressure rise) than the stoichiometric or φ = 0.5 cases. Comparison of the experimental ignition delays with the simulated results using two literature kinetic mechanisms shows generally good agreement, and one mechanism is further used to explore and compare the fuel decomposition pathways of butanol isomers. Using this mechanism, the importance of peroxy chemistry in the autoignition of the butanol isomers is highlighted and discussed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. The role of macrophage polarization on bipolar disorder: Identifying new therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Bruna M; Géa, Luiza P; Colombo, Rafael; Barbé-Tuana, Florência M; Kapczinski, Flávio; Rosa, Adriane Ribeiro

    2016-07-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic, severe and disabling disease; however, its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Recent evidence has suggested that inflammation and immune dysregulation play a significant role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. This review is aimed to highlight the importance of systemic inflammation in modulating the inflammatory response of microglia and hence its potential involvement with bipolar disorder. We also discuss novel therapeutic strategies that emerge from this new research. This article presents a theoretical synthesis of the effects of systemic inflammation on the immune response of the central nervous system in bipolar disorder. The complex relationship between stress, pro-inflammatory cytokines and microglial dysfunction is summarized, emphasizing the role of the kynurenine pathway in this process and, consequently, their effects on neuronal plasticity. Bipolar patients demonstrate increased serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α) and lower hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis sensitivity. This imbalance in the immune system promotes a change in blood-brain barrier permeability, leading to an inflammatory signal spread in the central nervous system from the periphery, through macrophages activation (M1 polarization). Chronic microglial activation can result in neuronal apoptosis, neurogenesis inhibition, hippocampal volume reduction, lower neurotransmitters synthesis and cytotoxicity, by increasing glutamate production and kynurenine metabolism. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms involved in the immune system imbalance and its potential involvement in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Consequently, new strategies that normalize the immune-inflammatory pathways may provide a valuable therapeutic target for the treatment of these disorders. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  16. Phenotypic characterisation of Saccharomyces spp. for tolerance to 1-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, A M; Wimalasena, T T; Greetham, D

    2014-11-01

    Biofuels are expected to play a role in replacing crude oil as a liquid transportation fuel, and research into butanol has highlighted the importance of this alcohol as a fuel. Butanol has a higher energy density than ethanol, butanol-gasoline blends do not separate in the presence of water, and butanol is miscible with gasoline (Szulczyk, Int J Energy Environ 1(1):2876-2895, 40). Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a fermentative organism in the biofuel industry producing ethanol from glucose derived from starchy plant material; however, it typically cannot tolerate butanol concentrations greater than 2 % (Luong, Biotechnol Bioeng 29 (2):242-248, 27). 90 Saccharomyces spp. strains were screened for tolerance to 1-butanol via a phenotypic microarray assay and we observed significant variation in response with the most tolerant strains (S. cerevisiae DBVPG1788, S. cerevisiae DBVPG6044 and S. cerevisiae YPS128) exhibiting tolerance to 4 % 1-butanol compared with S. uvarum and S. castelli strains, which were sensitive to 3 % 1-butanol. Response to butanol was confirmed using traditional yeast methodologies such as growth; it was observed that fermentations in the presence of butanol, when using strains with a tolerant background, were significantly faster. Assessing for genetic rationale for tolerance, it was observed that 1-butanol-tolerant strains, when compared with 1-butanol-sensitive strains, had an up-regulation of RPN4, a transcription factor which regulates proteasome genes. Analysing for the importance of RPN4, we observed that a Δrpn4 strain displayed a reduced rate of fermentation in the presence of 1-butanol when compared with the BY4741 background strain. This data will aid the development of breeding programmes to produce better strains for future bio-butanol production.

  17. Effect of initial-state target polarization on the single ionization of helium by 1-keV electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shi-Yan; Ma Xiao-Yan; Li Xia; Miao Xiang-Yang; Jia Xiang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    We report new results of triple differential cross sections for the single ionization of helium by 1-KeV electron impact at the ejection energy of 10 eV. Investigations have been made for both the perpendicular plane and the plane perpendicular to the momentum transfer geometries. The present calculation is based on the three-Coulomb wave function. Here we have also incorporated the effect of target polarization in the initial state. A comparison is made between the present calculation with the results of other theoretical methods and a recent experiment [Dürr M, Dimopoulou C, Najjari B, Dorn A, Bartschat K, Bray I, Fursa D V, Chen Z, Madison D H and Ullrich J 2008 Phys. Rev. A 77 032717]. At an impact energy of 1 KeV, the target polarization is found to induce a substantial change of the cross section for the ionization process. We observe that the effect of target polarization plays a dominant role in deciding the shape of triple differential cross sections. (atomic and molecular physics)

  18. Development of a High Temperature Microbial Fermentation Processfor Butanol Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeor, Jeffery D.; Reed, David W.; Daubaras, Dayna L.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2016-01-01

    Transforming renewable biomass into cost competitive high-performance biofuels and bioproducts is key to US energy security. Butanol production by microbial fermentation and chemical conversion to polyolefins, elastomers, drop-in jet or diesel fuel, and other chemicals is a promising solution. A high temperature fermentation process can facilitate butanol recovery up to 40%, by using gas stripping. Other benefits of fermentation at high temperatures are optimal hydrolysis rates in the saccharification of biomass which leads to maximized butanol production, decrease in energy costs associated with reactor cooling and capital cost associated with reactor design, and a decrease in contamination and cost for maintaining a sterile environment. Butanol stripping at elevated temperatures gives higher butanol production through constant removal and continuous fermentation. We describe methods used in an attempt to genetically prepare Geobacillus caldoxylosiliticus for insertion of a butanol pathway. Methods used were electroporation of electrocompetent cells, ternary conjugation with E. coli, and protoplast fusion.

  19. Development of a High Temperature Microbial Fermentation Processfor Butanol Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeor, Jeffery D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reed, David W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Daubaras, Dayna L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Vicki S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Transforming renewable biomass into cost competitive high-performance biofuels and bioproducts is key to US energy security. Butanol production by microbial fermentation and chemical conversion to polyolefins, elastomers, drop-in jet or diesel fuel, and other chemicals is a promising solution. A high temperature fermentation process can facilitate butanol recovery up to 40%, by using gas stripping. Other benefits of fermentation at high temperatures are optimal hydrolysis rates in the saccharification of biomass which leads to maximized butanol production, decrease in energy costs associated with reactor cooling and capital cost associated with reactor design, and a decrease in contamination and cost for maintaining a sterile environment. Butanol stripping at elevated temperatures gives higher butanol production through constant removal and continuous fermentation. We describe methods used in an attempt to genetically prepare Geobacillus caldoxylosiliticus for insertion of a butanol pathway. Methods used were electroporation of electrocompetent cells, ternary conjugation with E. coli, and protoplast fusion.

  20. Real-time multi-target ranging based on chaotic polarization laser radars in the drive-response VCSELs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dongzhou; Xu, Geliang; Luo, Wei; Xiao, Zhenzhen

    2017-09-04

    According to the principle of complete chaos synchronization and the theory of Hilbert phase transformation, we propose a novel real-time multi-target ranging scheme by using chaotic polarization laser radar in the drive-response vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). In the scheme, to ensure each polarization component (PC) of the master VCSEL (MVCSEL) to be synchronized steadily with that of the slave VCSEL, the output x-PC and y-PC from the MVCSEL in the drive system and those in the response system are modulated by the linear electro-optic effect simultaneously. Under this condition, by simulating the influences of some key parameters of the system on the synchronization quality and the relative errors of the two-target ranging, related operating parameters can be optimized. The x-PC and the y-PC, as two chaotic radar sources, are used to implement the real-time ranging for two targets. It is found that the measured distances of the two targets at arbitrary position exhibit strong real-time stability and only slight jitter. Their resolutions are up to millimeters, and their relative errors are very small and less than 2.7%.

  1. Semi-inclusive DIS Experiments Using Transversely Polarized Targets in Hall-A: Current Results and Future Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allada Kalyan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of single (SSA and double spin asymmetries (DSA in semiinclusive DIS reactions using polarized targets provide a powerful method to probe transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs. In particular, the experimentally measured SSA on nucleon targets can help in extracting the transversity and Sivers distribution functions of u and d-quarks. Similarly, the measured DSA are sensitive to the quark spin-orbital correlations, and provide an access to the TMD parton distribution function (g1T. A recent experiment conducted in Hall-A Jefferson Lab using transversely polarized 3He provide first such measurements on “effective” neutron target. The measurement was performed using 5.9 GeV beam from CEBAF and measured the target SSA/DSA in the SIDIS reaction 3He↑(e, e′π±X. The kinematical range, x = 0.19 ~ 0.34, at Q2 = 1.77 ~ 2.73 (GeV/c2, was focused on the valence quark region. The results from this measurement along with our plans for future high precision measurements in Hall-A are presented.

  2. Targeting of SNAP-23 and SNAP-25 in polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, SH; Roche, PA; Anderson, HA; van Ijzendoorn, SCD; Zhang, M; Mostov, KE; Weimbs, T

    1998-01-01

    SNAP-23 is the ubiquitously expressed homologue of the neuronal SNAP-25, which functions in synaptic vesicle fusion, We have investigated the subcellular localization of SNAP-23 in polarized epithelial cells, In hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cells and in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, the

  3. [Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the following topics: the Wisconsin test facility for storage cells; results of target tests; the new UHV target test system; funding request for a new atomic beam system; and planning of storage ring experiments

  4. The movable polarized target as a basic equipment for high energy spin physics experiments at the JINR-Dubna accelerator complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehar, F.; Adiasevich, B.; Androsov, V.P.; Angelov, N.; Anischenko, N.; Antonenko, V.; Ball, J.; Baryshevsky, V.G.; Bazhanov, N.A.; Belyaev, A.A.; Benda, B.; Bodyagin, V.; Borisov, N.; Borzunov, Yu.; Bradamante, F.; Bunyatova, E.; Burinov, V.; Chernykh, E.; Combet, M.; Datskov, A.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A.P.; Fontaine, J.M.; Get`man, V.A.; Giorgi, M.; Golovanov, L.; Grebenyuk, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gurevich, G.; Hasegawa, T.; Hill, D.; Horikawa, N.; Igo, G.; Janout, Z.; Kalinnikov, V.A.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kasprzyk, T.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Kirillov, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Kousmine, E.S.; Kovalenko, A.; Kovaljov, A.I.; Ladygin, V.P.; Lazarev, A.; Leconte, P.; Lesquen, A. de; Lukhanin, A.A.; Mango, S.; Martin, A.; Matafonov, V.N.; Matyushevsky, E.; Mironov, S.; Neganov, A.B.; Neganov, B.S.; Nomofilov, A.; Perelygin, V.; Plis, Yu.; Pilipenko, Yu.; Pisarev, I.L.; Piskunov, N.; Polunin, Yu.; Popkov, Yu.P.; Propov, A.A.; Prokofiev, A.N.; Rekalo, M.P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Sans, J.L.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sharov, V.; Shilov, S.; Shishov, Yu.; Sitnik, I.M.; Sorokin, P.V.; Spinka, H.; Sporov, E.A.; Strunov, L.N.; Svetov, A.; De Swart, J.J.; Telegin, Yu.P.; Tolmashov, I.; Trentalange, S.; Tsvinev, A.; Usov, Yu.A.; Vikhrov, V.V.; Whitten, C.A.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarubin, A.; Zhdanov, A.A.; Zolin, L. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee]|[I.V. Kurchatov Inst. of Atomic Energy, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)]|[Lab. of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)]|[Lab. of High Energy Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)]|[Lab. National SATURNE, CNRS, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Inst. of Physics, Belarus Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus)]|[Dept. of Physics, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    A movable polarized proton target is planned to be installed in polarized beams of the Synchrophasotron-Nuclotron complex in order to carry out a spin physics experimental program at Dubna. The project is described and the first proposed experiments are discussed. ((orig.))

  5. The movable polarized target as a basic equipment for high energy spin physics experiments at the JINR-Dubna accelerator complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehar, F.; Adiasevich, B.; Androsov, V.P.; Angelov, N.; Anischenko, N.; Antonenko, V.; Ball, J.; Baryshevsky, V.G.; Bazhanov, N.A.; Belyaev, A.A.; Benda, B.; Bodyagin, V.; Borisov, N.; Borzunov, Yu.; Bradamante, F.; Bunyatova, E.; Burinov, V.; Chernykh, E.; Combet, M.; Datskov, A.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A.P.; Fontaine, J.M.; Get'man, V.A.; Giorgi, M.; Golovanov, L.; Grebenyuk, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gurevich, G.; Hasegawa, T.; Hill, D.; Horikawa, N.; Igo, G.; Janout, Z.; Kalinnikov, V.A.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kasprzyk, T.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Kirillov, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Kousmine, E.S.; Kovalenko, A.; Kovaljov, A.I.; Ladygin, V.P.; Lazarev, A.; Leconte, P.; Lesquen, A. de; Lukhanin, A.A.; Mango, S.; Martin, A.; Matafonov, V.N.; Matyushevsky, E.; Mironov, S.; Neganov, A.B.; Neganov, B.S.; Nomofilov, A.; Perelygin, V.; Plis, Yu.; Pilipenko, Yu.; Pisarev, I.L.; Piskunov, N.; Polunin, Yu.; Popkov, Yu.P.; Propov, A.A.; Prokofiev, A.N.; Rekalo, M.P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Sans, J.L.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sharov, V.; Shilov, S.; Shishov, Yu.; Sitnik, I.M.; Sorokin, P.V.; Spinka, H.; Sporov, E.A.; Strunov, L.N.; Svetov, A.; De Swart, J.J.; Telegin, Yu.P.; Tolmashov, I.; Trentalange, S.; Tsvinev, A.; Usov, Yu.A.; Vikhrov, V.V.; Whitten, C.A.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarubin, A.; Zhdanov, A.A.; Zolin, L.

    1995-01-01

    A movable polarized proton target is planned to be installed in polarized beams of the Synchrophasotron-Nuclotron complex in order to carry out a spin physics experimental program at Dubna. The project is described and the first proposed experiments are discussed. ((orig.))

  6. Simulation of a short-cable Q-meter for measuring the deuteron target polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Trotsenko, V.I.; Chechetenko, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    Simulation of Q-meter with a phase automatic-frequency control of a reception circuit is carried out in the paper. Effect of circuit parameters and connecting cable on Q-meter sensitivity and magnitude of distortions of recorded signal is studied. It is shown that usage of the cable with a length of lambda/12-lambda/10 instead of traditional semiwave one enables to increase essentially the circuit sensitivity at the same distortion rate. Errors conditioned by distortions of the deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) signal forms in the reception circuit, which can effect essertially on accuracy of deuteron polarization detection by the method of DMR spectrum decomposition, are discussed. It is shown that in the case of utilization of a short cable the polarization error due to spectrum distortions does not exceed 4...5%

  7. Exercise enhances wound healing and prevents cancer progression during aging by targeting macrophage polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren C

    2014-07-01

    Physical activity, which can include regular and repetitive exercise training, has been shown to decrease the incidence of age-related diseases. Aging is characterized by aberrant immune responses, including impaired wound healing and increased cancer risk. The behavior and polarized phenotype of tissue macrophages are distinct between young and old organisms. The balance of M1 and M2 macrophages is altered in the aged tissue microenvironment, with a tilt towards an M2-dominant macrophage population, as well as its associated signaling pathways. These M2-type responses may result in unresolved inflammation and create an environment that impairs wound healing and is favorable for cancer growth. We discuss the concept that exercise training can improve the regulation of macrophage polarization and normalize the inflammatory process, and thereby exert anticancer effects and enhance wound healing in older humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, W.

    1991-01-01

    The present report contains the progress report for the second year of the 3-year budget period, and proposes work for the third year. Progress has been made on the two major components of the project, the tests of storage cells for polarized atoms under various operating conditions, and the construction of a new atomic beam source which conforms to the high vacuum requirements of storage rings

  9. Butanol biorefineries: Use of novel technologies to produce biofuel butanol from sweet sorghum bagasse (SSB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to produce butanol biofuel at a competitive price, agricultural residues such as SSB should be used. This feedstock was studied as a substitute to corn to lower feedstock costs and broaden beyond a food crop. In addition, cutting edge science & technology was applied. In these studies we us...

  10. Proton targets for the PHOENICS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.

    1988-10-01

    In the first part of the thesis the construction and test operation of a hydrogen target for the PHOENICS experiment at the Bonn 3.5 GeV accelerator ELSA is described. First of all it shall serve as target for calibration measurements of the counter arrangement. The cooling time of the hydrogen liquefier until the complete filling of the target cell was determined to 4 h 30 m. Via a magnet valve the clearance of the cell into a storage container is possible. In the second part of the thesis measurements on the polarization properties of the target material ammonia are presented. The maximal nucleon polarization in the dilution operation of the cryostat at about 250 mK was determined to 77 -3 +2 % for positive and to 72 -3 +2 % for negative polarization direction and is by this comparable with the values reached for butanol. The required build-up time is with 2.1 h by a factor about two larger than for butanol targets. A determination of Landes g factor of the NH 3 radicals present in the target yielded the value of g = 2.0037. By variation of the magnet field a microwave absorption signal could be taken up which can be identified by the ESR line of the ammonia radical. The half width resulted to 60 ± 5 Gauss. Experiments on the magnet-field dependence of the relaxation time at 1 K and 250 mK showed that in the field-range from 0.4 to 2.5 Tesla the relaxation time varied at 1 K from 16 sec to 14 min and at 250 mK from 2.7 h to 40.3 h. A ratio-formation yielded a crude estimation of the relaxation time to be expected at 50 mK and 0.4 T in the order of magnitude of 2 months. (orig./HSI) [de

  11. A Large-Acceptance Detector System for Electron Scattering from Polarized Internal targets.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, E.; Bouwhuis, M.; Choi, S.; Zhou, Z.L.; Alarcon, R.; Anghinolfi, M.; Botto, T.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bulten, H.J.; Dimitroyannis, D.; Doets, M.; Ent, R.; Ferro Luzzi, M.M.E.; Higinbotham, D.W.; de Jager, C.W.; Lang, J.; de Lange, D.J.; Nikolenko, D.; Nooren, G.J.; Papadakis, N.; Passchier, I.; Popov, S.G.; Rachek, I.; Ripani, M.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Taiuti, M.; Vodinas, N.; de Vries, H.

    1997-01-01

    The design and the performance of a non-magnetic detector setup for internal target physics at the NIKHEF electron-scattering facility is described. The detector setup, used in the first internal-target experiment at the AmPS ring, measures the spin dependence in the elastic and break-up reaction

  12. Dynamic deuteron polarization measurements performed in a new type of horizontal dilution cryostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Althoff, K.H.; Kaul, O.; Riechert, H.; Schilling, E.

    1982-05-01

    We have reached 31% deuteron polarization in D- ammonia (ND 3 ) and 27% in D- butanol (C 4 D 10 O). The dynamic polarization experiments were performed at a magnetic field of 2.5 T in a new type of horizontal dilution cryostat. This dilution cryostat, built for target asymmetry measurements with a photon beam, was developed with special regard to fast cool-down and easy loading of the target material. The cooling power is 5 mW at 0.2 K, 20 mW at 0.3 K and 34 mW at 0.4 K. Starting from room temperature the lowest temperature of 165 mK is reached in about 2 h including the loading of the target material. (orig.)

  13. Analyzing powers and proton spin transfer coefficients in the elastic scattering of 800 MeV polarized protons from an L-type polarized deuteron target at small momentum transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.L.

    1986-10-01

    Analyzing powers and spin transfer coefficients which describe the elastic scattering of polarized protons from a polarized deuteron target have been measured. The energy of the proton beam was 800 MeV and data were taken at laboratory scattering angles of 7, 11, 14, and 16.5 degrees. One analyzing power was also measured at 180 degrees. Three linearly independent orientations of the beam polarization were used and the target was polarized parallel and antiparallel to the direction of the beam momentum. The data were taken with the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (experiment 685). The results are compared with multiple scattering predictions based on Dirac representations of the nucleon-nucleon scattering matrices. 27 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Butanol production from thin stillage using Clostridium pasteurianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Sang, Byoung-In; Um, Youngsoon

    2011-04-01

    The production of butanol from thin stillage by Clostridium pasteurianum DSM 525 was evaluated in the paper. At initial pH values ranging from 5.0 to 7.0 C. pasteurianum DSM 525 produced 6.2-7.2 g/L of butanol utilizing glycerol in thin stillage as the main carbon source, with yields of 0.32-0.44 g butanol produced/g glycerol consumed, which are higher than previously reported yields (e.g., 0.14-0.31 g butanol/g glycerol, Biebl, 2001). Lactic acid in the thin stillage acted as a buffering agent, maintaining the pH of the medium within a range of 5.7-6.1. Lactic acid was also utilized along with glycerol, enhancing butanol production (6.5 g/L butanol vs. 8.7 g/L butanol with 0 and 16 g/L lactic acid, respectively). These results demonstrate the feasibility of cost-effective butanol production using thin stillage as a nutrient-containing medium with a pH buffering capacity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Eco-efficient butanol separation in the ABE fermentation process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patraşcu, Iulian; Bîldea, Costin Sorin; Kiss, Anton A.

    2017-01-01

    Butanol is considered a superior biofuel, as it is more energy dense and less hygroscopic than the more popular ethanol, resulting in higher possible blending ratios with gasoline. However, the production cost of the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process is still high, mainly due to the

  16. Characteristics of Butanol Isomers Oxidation in a Micro Flow Reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Hamzah, Muhamad Firdaus

    2017-01-01

    Ignition and combustion characteristics of n-butanol/air, 2-butanol.air and isobutanol/air mixtures at stoichiometric (ϕ = 1) and lean (ϕ = 0.5) conditions were investigated in a micro flow reactor with a controlled temperature profile from 323 K

  17. Butanol Production from Leftover Beverages and Sport Drinks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raganati, Francesca; Procentese, Alessandra; Montagnaro, Fabio; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: (1) to identify an alternative disposal process for the industry of high-sugar-content beverages (HSCBs) and (2) to contribute to the study of butanol production from non-edible feedstocks. HSCBs were used as a renewable feedstock to produce butanol by

  18. Effects of n-butanol on barley microspore embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Ana Maria; Nielsen, Nanna; Jensen, Anni

    2014-01-01

    crosses with different microspore embryogenesis capacities were selected for n-butanol application in anther and isolated microspore cultures. Application of 0.1 % n-butanol after a mannitol stress treatment in anther culture significantly increased the number of embryos (up to almost twice) and green...

  19. Future utilization of polarized beams and targets at the ZGS. Report of the Technical Advisory Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-04-01

    A program is proposed for upgrading the usefulness and attractiveness of ZGS polarized facilities to the user community. It is hoped that the advance approval or completion of parts (or all) of such a program will lead to an accelerated interest in proposing experiments unique to the ZGS, which will open new dimensions in the understanding of high energy phenomena. Recommendations are summarized, and a discussion is given of past activities and future plans of various experimental groups and ZGS facilities. A series of arguments is made concerning possible future ZGS facilities which do not necessarily relate to any specific experiments, suggested or proposed

  20. Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, David E. [Environmental Energy Inc., Blacklick, OH (United States); Yang, Shang-Tian [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

    2005-08-25

    Butanol replaced gasoline gallon for gallon in a 10,000 miles trip across the United States without the need to highly modify a ’92 Buick (your existing car today). Butanol can now be made for less than ethanol and yields more Btu’s from the same corn, making the plow to tire equation positive – more energy out than it takes to make it and Butanol is much safer. Butanol when substituted for gasoline gives better gas mileage and does not pollute as tested in 10 states. Butanol should now receive the same recognition as ethanol in U.S. legislation “ethanol/butanol”. There is abundant plant biomass present as low-value agricultural commodities or processing wastes requiring proper disposal to avoid pollution problems. One example is in the corn refinery industry, which processes more than 13% of the ~9.5 billion bushels (~240 million metric tons) of corn annually produced in the U.S. to produce high-fructose-corn-syrup, dextrose, starch, and fuel alcohol, and generates more than 10 million metric tons of corn byproducts that are currently of limited use and pose significant environmental problems. The abundant inexpensive renewable resources as feedstock for fermentation, and recent advances in the fields of biotechnology and bioprocessing have resulted in a renewed interest in the fermentation production of chemicals and fuels, including n-butanol. The historic acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum is one of the oldest known industrial fermentations. It was ranked second only to ethanol fermentation by yeast in its scale of production, and is one of the largest biotechnological processes ever known. However, since the 1950's industrial ABE fermentation has declined continuously, and almost all butanol is now produced via petrochemical routes (Chemical Marketing Reporter, 1993). Butanol is an important industrial solvent and is a better fuel for replacing gasoline – gallon for gallon than ethanol. Current butanol

  1. Hadron-pair production on transversely polarized targets in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Christopher

    Nucleons such as protons and neutrons are composite objects made of quarks, which are bound together by the strong force via the exchange of gluons. The probability of finding a quark of flavor q carrying the momentum fraction x of the fast moving parent nucleon is described by a parton distribution function (PDF) f q 1 ( x ) , the number density. The spin, an intrinsic angular momentum of elementary particles such as quarks but also of composite objects like nucleons, couples with magnetic fields, which allows one to align it. Taking into account this additional parameter, the spin, the scheme of PDFs in leading twist is expanded by the helicity distribution g q 1 ( x ) and the transversity distribution h q 1 ( x ) . The first distribution covers the case where the nucleon and the quark are longitudinally polarized, while a transverse polarization is taken into account by the latter. A tool for the investigation of the PDFs is inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) of electro- magnetic probes off (un)pola...

  2. Optimization Study for Butanol Extraction from Butanol-Water Using Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) as Solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Izzati Ab Rahim; Mohd Irfan Hatim Mohamed Dzahir; Wan Nurul Hidayah Wan Othman

    2015-01-01

    The oil crisis, warned the humanity's depends on oil was not sustainable and recently, there are plenty of renewable resources had been developed. Much attention has been given to the solvent extraction process to separate butanol from butanol-water mixture using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) as a solvent. In this respect, the use of FAME as a green solvent which are locally available has greater potential for butanol extraction process. Therefore, an experimental work has been carried out to study its feasibility as a potential solvent. A single stage extraction process as performed to evaluate the ability to achieve optimal extract butanol. The extraction process was carried out to evaluate the distribution coefficient of butanol with the effects of other parameters such as reaction temperature (50-70 degree Celsius) and butanol-water mixture to solvent ratio (1:1, 1:1.5, 1:2). The constant parameter is the stirring speed (300 rpm). Response Surface Methodology (RSM) in conjunction with the Central Composition Design (CCD) as employed to statistically evaluate and optimize the butanol extraction process. It was found that the distribution coefficient has achieved an optimum level of 1.92 % at the following conditions: (i) butanol-water mixtures to solvent ratio (1:1.48) and (ii) reaction temperature (62.75 degree Celsius). (author)

  3. Organic high ionic strength aqueous two-phase solvent system series for separation of ultra-polar compounds by spiral high-speed counter-current chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yun; Liu, Gang; Ma, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Ito, Yoichiro

    2011-01-01

    Existing two-phase solvent systems for high-speed countercurrent chromatography cover the separation of hydrophobic to moderately polar compounds, but often fail to provide suitable partition coefficient values for highly polar compounds such as sulfonic acids, catecholamines and zwitter ions. The present paper introduces a new solvent series which can be applied for the separation of these polar compounds. It is composed of 1-butanol, ethanol, saturated ammonium sulfate and water at various volume ratios and consists of a series of 10 steps which are arranged according to the polarity of the solvent system so that the two-phase solvent system with suitable K values for the target compound(s) can be found in a few steps. Each solvent system gives proper volume ratio and high density difference between the two phases to provide a satisfactory level of retention of the stationary phase in the spiral column assembly. The method is validated by partition coefficient measurement of four typical polar compounds including methyl green (basic dye), tartrazine (sulfonic acid), tyrosine (zwitter ion) and epinephrine (a catecholamine), all of which show low partition coefficient values in the polar 1-butanol-water system. The capability of the method is demonstrated by separation of three catecholamines. PMID:22033108

  4. DOMESTIC BUTANOL-PRODUCING STRAINS OF THE Clostridium GENUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Tigunova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to summarize the results of own research concerning obtaining butanol producing strains of Clostridium genus, to identify them by physiological, morphological and genetic methods. Further study of characteristics and biological features of the strains, and various approaches in biotechnological process of butanol production are discussed. The work includes methods to increase butanol accumulation by producer strains. Perspectives of using chemical mutagenesis in Clostridia as a method of increasing butanol production are considered. The feasibility of using non-food raw material as a substrate for fermentation is discussed. Different methods of pretreatment and their impact on the accumulation of butanol in the liquid medium are compared. Butanol accumulation is shown to increase significantly if the synthesis precursors are added as components of enzymatic medium, and the “reverse bard” is used to reduce waste production without affecting the level of butanol synthesis. The problem of conservation of producing strains is given, and protective medium for microorganisms during the freeze-drying is defined.

  5. Spin-polarized 3He nuclear targets and metastable 4He atoms by optical pumping with a tunable, Nd:YAP laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohler, C.L.; Schearer, L.D.; Leduc, M.; Nacher, P.J.; Zachorowski, L.; Milner, R.G.; McKeown, R.D.; Woodward, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    Several Nd:YAP lasers were constructed which could be broadly tuned in the 1083-nm region which includes the helium 2 3 S-2 3 P transition, using a Lyot filter and thin, uncoated etalons within the laser cavity. 1 W of power could be extracted at 1083 nm through a 1% transmitting output coupler. This laser beam was used to optically pump metastable 4 He and 3 He 2 3 S helium atoms in a weak discharge cell, spin polarizing the metastable ensemble. In a 3 He cell the polarization is transferred to the nuclear spin system. A 3 He target cell at 0.3 Torr was polarized to 52% in a few minutes. We describe the application of this system to the design of polarized targets for experiments in nuclear physics

  6. NEW STRAIN PRODUCERS OF BIOBUTANOL. III. METHODS OF INCREASED BUTANOL ACCUMULATION FROM BIOMASS OF SWITCHGRASS Panicum virgatum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigunova O. O.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to enlarge accumulation of butanol from switchgrass Panicum virgatum L. biomass using strains-producers obtained from grounds and silts of Kyiv lakes. The objects of the study were strains of C. acetobutylicum ІМВ B-7407 (IFBG C6H, Clostridium acetobutylicum IFBG C6H 5М and Clostridium tyrobutyricum IFBG C4B from the "Collections of microbial strains and lines of plants for food and agricultural biotechnology" of the Public Institution "Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics" of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. Gas chromatography was used to determine the alcohol concentration at the stage of solvent synthesis. To determine the effect of butanol precursors during cultivation, butyric, lactic and acetic acids were used. Optimization of processing parameters, which was based on the needs of cultures, allowed us to increase the yield by 20 and 50% for the initial and mutant strain respectively. Using synthetic precursors (such as lactic, butyric and acetic acid during cultivation increased total concentration of butanol by 1.7 times. To optimize the process, a study was carried out using acetone- butyl grains. Using of acetone-butyl grains in concentrations up to 60% does not affect the synthesis of butanol by C. acetobutylicum IFBG C6H 5M. Increasing the concentration of grains led to decrease in accumulation of butanol. Almost double increase in accumulation of the target product (butanol was achieved using two-stage fermentation and/or precursors of synthesis. It was shown the possibility of using acetone-butyl grains in fermentation. As a result the mass fraction of the waste was reduced.

  7. Polarized secondary radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaika, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods of polarized radioactive nuclei beam production: a) a method nuclear interaction of the non-polarized or polarized charged projectiles with target nuclei; b) a method of polarization of stopped reaction radioactive products in a special polarized ion source with than following acceleration; c) a polarization of radioactive nuclei circulating in a storage ring are considered. Possible life times of the radioactive ions for these methods are determined. General schemes of the polarization method realizations and depolarization problems are discussed

  8. Impact of zinc supplementation on the improved fructose/xylose utilization and butanol production during acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You-Duo; Xue, Chuang; Chen, Li-Jie; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass and dedicated energy crops such as Jerusalem artichoke are promising alternatives for biobutanol production by solventogenic clostridia. However, fermentable sugars such as fructose or xylose released from the hydrolysis of these feedstocks were subjected to the incomplete utilization by the strains, leading to relatively low butanol production and productivity. When 0.001 g/L ZnSO4·7H2O was supplemented into the medium containing fructose as sole carbon source, 12.8 g/L of butanol was achieved with butanol productivity of 0.089 g/L/h compared to only 4.5 g/L of butanol produced with butanol productivity of 0.028 g/L/h in the control without zinc supplementation. Micronutrient zinc also led to the improved butanol production up to 8.3 g/L derived from 45.2 g/L xylose as sole carbon source with increasing butanol productivity by 31.7%. Moreover, the decreased acids production was observed under the zinc supplementation condition, resulting in the increased butanol yields of 0.202 g/g-fructose and 0.184 g/g-xylose, respectively. Similar improvements were also observed with increasing butanol production by 130.2 % and 8.5 %, butanol productivity by 203.4% and 18.4%, respectively, in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations from sugar mixtures of fructose/glucose (4:1) and xylose/glucose (1:2) simulating the hydrolysates of Jerusalem artichoke tubers and corn stover. The results obtained from transcriptional analysis revealed that zinc may have regulatory mechanisms for the sugar transport and metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum L7. Therefore, micronutrient zinc supplementation could be an effective way for economic development of butanol production derived from these low-cost agricultural feedstocks. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. New industrial butanol-producing organism, Clostridium amylovorum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldi, M S

    1964-01-01

    A new Clostridium was isolated from starch-containing substances; it ferments corn and potato starch and sugar molasses, giving important yields of butanol and acetone; it is gram-positive, strictly anaerobic and sporulates in plectron form.

  10. Process for the fermentative production of acetone, butanol and ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassner, David A.; Jain, Mahendra K.; Datta, Rathin

    1991-01-01

    A process including multistage continuous fermentation followed by batch fermentation with carefully chosen temperatures for each fermentation step, combined with an asporogenic strain of C. acetobutylicum and a high carbohydrate substrate concentration yields extraordinarily high butanol and total solvents concentrations.

  11. Compressed liquid densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galicia-Luna, Luis A. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: lgalicial@ipn.mx; Camacho-Camacho, Luis E. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-02-15

    (p, {rho}, T) properties were determined in liquid phase for 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. The uncertainty is estimated to be lower than {+-}0.2 kg . m{sup -3} for the experimental densities. Nitrogen and water were used as reference fluids for the calibration of the vibrating tube densimeter. Experimental densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol were correlated with a short empirical equation and the 11-parameter Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling equation of state (BWRS EoS) using a least square optimization. Statistical values to evaluate the different correlations were reported. Published densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol are compared with values calculated with the BWRS EoS using the parameters obtained in this work. The experimental data determined here are also compared with available correlations for 1-butanol and 2-butanol.

  12. Compressed liquid densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel; Galicia-Luna, Luis A.; Camacho-Camacho, Luis E.

    2007-01-01

    (p, ρ, T) properties were determined in liquid phase for 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. The uncertainty is estimated to be lower than ±0.2 kg . m -3 for the experimental densities. Nitrogen and water were used as reference fluids for the calibration of the vibrating tube densimeter. Experimental densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol were correlated with a short empirical equation and the 11-parameter Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling equation of state (BWRS EoS) using a least square optimization. Statistical values to evaluate the different correlations were reported. Published densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol are compared with values calculated with the BWRS EoS using the parameters obtained in this work. The experimental data determined here are also compared with available correlations for 1-butanol and 2-butanol

  13. Modular design of metabolic network for robust production of n-butanol from galactose-glucose mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun Gyu; Lim, Jae Hyung; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Refactoring microorganisms for efficient production of advanced biofuel such as n-butanol from a mixture of sugars in the cheap feedstock is a prerequisite to achieve economic feasibility in biorefinery. However, production of biofuel from inedible and cheap feedstock is highly challenging due to the slower utilization of biomass-driven sugars, arising from complex assimilation pathway, difficulties in amplification of biosynthetic pathways for heterologous metabolite, and redox imbalance caused by consuming intracellular reducing power to produce quite reduced biofuel. Even with these problems, the microorganisms should show robust production of biofuel to obtain industrial feasibility. Thus, refactoring microorganisms for efficient conversion is highly desirable in biofuel production. In this study, we engineered robust Escherichia coli to accomplish high production of n-butanol from galactose-glucose mixtures via the design of modular pathway, an efficient and systematic way, to reconstruct the entire metabolic pathway with many target genes. Three modular pathways designed using the predictable genetic elements were assembled for efficient galactose utilization, n-butanol production, and redox re-balancing to robustly produce n-butanol from a sugar mixture of galactose and glucose. Specifically, the engineered strain showed dramatically increased n-butanol production (3.3-fold increased to 6.2 g/L after 48-h fermentation) compared to the parental strain (1.9 g/L) in galactose-supplemented medium. Moreover, fermentation with mixtures of galactose and glucose at various ratios from 2:1 to 1:2 confirmed that our engineered strain was able to robustly produce n-butanol regardless of sugar composition with simultaneous utilization of galactose and glucose. Collectively, modular pathway engineering of metabolic network can be an effective approach in strain development for optimal biofuel production with cost-effective fermentable sugars. To the best of our

  14. Separation of S-wave pseudoscalar and pseudovector amplitudes in π-p→π+π-n reaction on polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Rybicki, K.

    1996-06-01

    A new analysis of S-wave production amplitudes for the reaction π - p→π + π - n on a transversely polarized target is performed. It is based on the results obtained by CERN-Cracow-Munich collaboration in the ππ energy range from 600 MeV to 1600 MeV at 17.2 GeV/c π - momentum. Energy-independent separation of the S-wave pseudoscalar amplitude (π exchange) from the pseudovector amplitude (a 1 exchange) is carried out using assumptions much weaker than those in all previous analyses. We show that, especially around 1000 MeV and around 1500 MeV, the a 1 exchange amplitude cannot be neglected. The scalar-isoscalar ππ phase shift are calculated using fairly weak assumptions. Our results are consistent both with the so called ''up'' and the well-known ''down'' solution, provided we choose those in which the S-wave phases increase slower with the effective ππ mass than the P-wave phases. Above 1420 MeV both sets of phase shifts increase with energy faster than in the experiment on an unpolarized target. This fact can be related to the presence of scalar resonance f o (1500). (author). 41 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  15. The synthesis of [1-11C]-butanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helus, F.; Maier-Borst, W.; Oberdorfer, F.; Silvester, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    11 C-labelled butanol has been synthesised for use as a tracer in the assessment of regional blood supply for substrate utilisation in tumors. 11 CO 2 was produced by the 14 N(p,a) 11 C reactions in a cyclotron. 11 C-butanol was formed by the carboxylation of n-propyl magnesium chlorides with 11 CO 2 , and reduction of the resulting 11 C-butyric acid with LiAlH 4 . (U.K.)

  16. Scattering of polarized 7Li by 120Sn and projectile-target spin-dependent interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuragi, Y.; Yahiro, M.; Kamimura, M.; Tanifuji, M.

    1986-07-01

    Scattering of 7 Li by 120 Sn targets at E lab = 44 MeV is investigated in the coupled-channel frame by taking account of the projectile virtual excitations to the lowest three excited states. Calculations are performed by the cluster-folding (CF) interactions and the double-folding (DF) one. Both interactions reproduce very well the expeimental data on the cross section, the vector analyzing power, the second-rank tensor ones and the third-rank tensor one in elastic and projectile inelastic scattering, although some differences are found between the CF results and the DF ones. In the calculation, the virtual excitations of the projectile are important for most of the analyzing powers and the spin-orbit interaction is indispensable for the vector analyzing power. These features are in contrast to those in 7 Li - 58 Ni scattering at 20 MeV and are interpreted as over-Coulomb-barrier effects. The scattering amplitudes and the analyzing powers are investigated by the invariant amplitude method, which provides a key connecting the spin-dependent interactions to the analyzing powers. The method proposes an important relationship between the tensor analyzing powers, which is useful in analyses of both theoretical and experimental results. Finally, it is found that in the elastic scattering the second-rank tensor analyzing powers are proportional to the strength of the second-rank tensor interaction and the vector and third-rank tensor analyzing powers to the square or cube of the strength of this interaction, while in the inelastic scattering the cross section is proportional to the square of the strength of the tensor interaction, other quantities being weakly dependent on the strength. (author)

  17. Notes on T-invariance and polarization effects in the elastic scattering of a particle with spin 1/2 on the unpolarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyuboshits, V.V.; Lyuboshits, V.L.

    1998-01-01

    In the frames of T-invariance the analysis of the general dependence of the elastic scattering effective cross section of a particle with spin 1/2 on the unpolarized target with arbitrary spin upon the initial and final polarizations of the particle has been performed. On the base of the T-symmetry of the differential scattering cross section only, without traditional consideration of the spin structure of scattering amplitudes, a simple proof of the Wolfenstein theorem is obtained (this theorem states that the degree of transverse polarization, arising in the elastic scattering of an unpolarized particle on the unpolarized target, is equal to the coefficient of left-right asymmetry in the elastic scattering of the same but transversally polarized particle on the same target). Meantime, it is ascertained that in the case of P-parity violation (conserving T-invariance) there exists no analogous universal relation between the degree of longitudinal polarization and the coefficient of P-odd spin asymmetry in the scattering of longitudinally polarized particles. It is shown, further, that under T-invariance the amplitude and cross section of 'backward' scattering of neutrons on zero-spin nuclei do not depend on spin, and the observation of such a dependence would testify unambiguously to the T-invariance violation. However, according to the fulfilled estimates, the T-noninvariant spin asymmetry in the 'backward' scattering is very small (about 10 -8 - 10 -7 )

  18. Recovery of Butanol by Counter-Current Carbon Dioxide Fractionation with its Potential Application to Butanol Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Solana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A counter-current CO2 fractionation method was applied as a mean to recover n-butanol and other compounds that are typically obtained from biobutanol fermentation broth from aqueous solutions. The influence of operating variables, such as solvent-to-feed ratio, temperature, pressure and feed solution composition was experimentally studied in terms of separation efficiency, butanol removal rate, total removal and butanol concentration in the extract at the end of the continuous cycle. With respect to the temperature and pressure conditions investigated, results show that the highest separation efficiency was obtained at 35 °C and 10.34 MPa. At these operating conditions, 92.3% of the butanol present in the feed solution was extracted, and a concentration of 787.5 g·L−1 of butanol in the extract was obtained, starting from a feed solution of 20 g·L−1. Selectivity was calculated from experimental data, concluding that our column performs much better than a single equilibrium stage. When adding ethanol and acetone to the feed solution, ethanol was detected in the water-rich fraction (raffinate, whereas the highest concentration of acetone was found in the butanol rich fraction (extract.

  19. Ionization of oriented targets by intense circularly polarized laser pulses: Imprints of orbital angular nodes in the two-dimensional momentum distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Christian; Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    We solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a few-cycle circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulse that interacts with an oriented target exemplified by an argon atom, initially in a 3px or 3py state. The photoelectron momentum distributions show distinct signatures o...

  20. Prospects and challenges for the recovery of 2-butanol produced by vacuum fermentation - a techno-economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Joana P C; Lopez-Gomez, Gustavo; Reyes, Noelia G; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2017-07-01

    The conceptual design of a bio-based process for 2-butanol production is presented for the first time. Considering a hypothetical efficient producing strain, a vacuum fermentation is proposed to alleviate product toxicity, but the main challenge is the energy-efficient product recovery from the vapor. Three downstream scenarios were examined for this purpose: 1) multi-stage vapor recompression; 2) temperature swing adsorption; and 3) vapor absorption. The processes were simulated using Aspen Plus, considering a production capacity of 101 kton/yr. Process optimization was performed targeting the minimum selling price of 2-butanol. The feasibility of the different configurations was analyzed based on the global energy requirements and capital expenditure. The use of integrated adsorption and absorption minimized the energy duty required for azeotrope purification, which represents 11% of the total operational expenditure in Scenario 1. The minimum selling price of 2-butanol as commodity chemical was estimated as 1.05 $/kg, 1.21 $/kg, and 1.03 $/kg regarding the fermentation integrated with downstream scenarios 1), 2), and 3), respectively. Significant savings in 2-butanol production could be achieved in the suggested integrated configurations if more efficient microbial strains were engineered, and more selective adsorption and absorption materials were found for product recovery. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Henry's law constants and infinite dilution activity coefficients of cis-2-butene, dimethylether, chloroethane, and 1,1-difluoroethane in methanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, isobutanol, tert-butanol, 1-pentanol, 2-pentanol, 3-pentanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-2-butanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Yoshimori; Kobashi, Takahiro; Shinjo, Hiroshi; Kumada, Shinya; Watanabe, Yusuke; Niya, Wataru; Tateishi, Yoko

    2006-01-01

    Henry's law constants and infinite dilution activity coefficients of cis-2-butene, dimethylether, chloroethane, and 1,1-difluoroethane in methanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, isobutanol, tert-butanol, 1-pentanol, 2-pentanol, 3-pentanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-2-butanol in the temperature range of 250 K to 330 K were measured by a gas stripping method and partial molar excess enthalpies were calculated from the activity coefficients. A rigorous formula for evaluating the Henry's law constants from the gas stripping measurements was used for the data reduction of these highly volatile mixtures. The uncertainty is about 2% for the Henry's law constants and 3% for the estimated infinite dilution activity coefficients. In the evaluation of the infinite dilution activity coefficients, the nonideality of the solute such as the fugacity coefficient and Poynting correction factor cannot be neglected, especially at higher temperatures. The estimated uncertainty of the infinite dilution activity coefficients includes 1% for nonideality

  2. Nuclear polarization and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaettli, H.

    1985-01-01

    Different possibilities for the use of polarized nuclei in thermal neutron scattering on condensed matter are reviewed. Highly polarized nuclei are the starting point for studying dipolar magnetic order. Systematic measurement of spin-dependent scattering lengths is possible on samples with polarized nuclei. Highly polarized hydrogen should help to unravel complicated structures in chemistry and biology. The use of polarized proton targets as an energy-independent neutron polarizer in the thermal and epithermal region should be considered afresh. (author)

  3. Recent results from the NN-interaction studies with polarized beams and targets at ANKE-COSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymov, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    Adding to the nucleon-nucleon scattering database is one of the major priorities of the ANKE collaboration. Such data are necessary ingredients, not only for the understanding of nuclear forces, but also for the description of meson production and other nuclear reactions at intermediate energies. By measuring the cross section, deuteron analysing powers, and spin-correlation parameters in the dp → {pp}sn reaction, where {pp}s represents the 1S0 state, information has been obtained on small-angle neutron-proton spin-flip charge-exchange amplitudes. The measurements of pp elastic scattering by the COSY-EDDA have had a major impact on the partial wave analysis of this reaction above 1 GeV. However, these experiments only extended over the central region of c.m. angles, 300 < θcm < 1500, that has left major ambiguities in the phase shift analysis by the SAID group. In contrast, the small angle region is accessible at ANKE-COSY, that allowed measurement of the differential cross section and the analysing power at 50 < θcm < 300 in the 0.8 — 2.8 GeV energy range. The data on the pn elastic scattering are much more scarce than those of pp, especially in the region above 1.15 GeV. The study of the dp → {pp}s n reaction provides the information about the pn elastic scattering at large angles. The small angle scattering was studied with the polarized proton COSY beam and an unpolarised deuterium gas target. The detection the spectator proton in the ANKE vertex silicon detector allowed to use the deuterium target as an effective neutron one. The analysing powers of the process were obtained at six beam energies from 0.8 to 2.4 GeV.

  4. Effect of Nonlocal Electron Transport in Both Directions on the Symmetry of Polar-Drive--Ignition Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Shvydky, A.; Moses, G.; Cao, D.; Marinak, M. M.

    2012-10-01

    A nonlocal, multigroup diffusion model for thermal electron transportfootnotetextG. P. Schurtz, Ph. D. Nicola"i, and M. Busquet, Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000). has been added to the 2-D hydrodynamic code DRACO. This model has been applied to simulations of polar-drive (PD) NIF ignition designs. Previous simulations were carried out with a constant flux-limiter model in both the radial and transverse directions. Due to the nonsymmetry of PD illumination, these implosions suffer from low-mode nonuniformities that affect their performance. Nonlocal electron transport in both directions is expected to reduce these nonuniformities. The 2-D thermal electron flux from simulations, using either the nonlocal model or the standard flux-limited approach, will be compared and the effect of the nonlocal transport model on the growth of the nonuniformities and on target performance will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  5. Enhancing the intestinal absorption of molecules containing the polar guanidino functionality: a double-targeted prodrug approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-01-28

    A prodrug strategy was applied to guanidino-containing analogues to increase oral absorption via hPEPT1 and hVACVase. l-Valine, l-isoleucine, and l-phenylalanine esters of [3-(hydroxymethyl)phenyl]guanidine (3-HPG) were synthesized and evaluated for transport and activation. In HeLa/hPEPT1 cells, Val-3-HPG and Ile-3-HPG exhibited high affinity to hPEPT1 (IC(50): 0.65 and 0.63 mM, respectively), and all three l-amino acid esters showed higher uptake (2.6- to 9-fold) than the parent compound 3-HPG. Val-3-HPG and Ile-3-HPG demonstrated remarkable Caco-2 permeability enhancement, and Val-3-HPG exhibited comparable permeability to valacyclovir. In rat perfusion studies, Val-3-HPG and Ile-3-HPG permeabilities were significantly higher than 3-HPG and exceeded/matched the high-permeability standard metoprolol, respectively. All the l-amino acid 3-HPG esters were effectively activated in HeLa and Caco-2 cell homogenates and were found to be good substrates of hVACVase (k(cat)/K(m) in mM(-1) x s(-1): Val-3-HPG, 3370; Ile-3-HPG, 1580; Phe-3-HPG, 1660). In conclusion, a prodrug strategy is effective at increasing the intestinal permeability of polar guanidino analogues via targeting hPEPT1 for transport and hVACVase for activation.

  6. Genetic Engineering In BioButanol Production And Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Rao

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The growing need to address current energy and environmental problems has sparked an interest in developing improved biological methods to produce liquid fuels from renewable sources. Higher-chain alcohols possess chemical properties that are more similar to gasoline. Ethanol and butanol are two products which are used as biofuel. Butanol production was more concerned than ethanol because of its high octane number. Unfortunately, these alcohols are not produced efficiently in natural microorganisms, and thus economical production in industrial volumes remains a challenge. The synthetic biology, however, offers additional tools to engineer synthetic pathways in user-friendly hosts to help increase titers and productivity of bio-butanol. Knock out and over-expression of genes is the major approaches towards genetic manipulation and metabolic engineering of microbes. Yet there are TargeTron Technology, Antisense RNA and CRISPR technology has a vital role in genome manipulation of C.acetobutylicum. This review concentrates on the recent developments for efficient production of butanol and butanol tolerance by various genetically engineered microbes.

  7. Effects of humus on acetone-butanol fermentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovats, J

    1963-01-01

    Adding 6 to 8 g humus-rich soil dried at 80/sup 0/ to 100 cc sterilized molasses, containing 3.8 sucrose and 0.1% (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/, inoculated with acetone-butanol fermentative bacteria, increased acetone, butanol, and ethanol yields by 30, 50, and 40%, respectively. The acetone-to-butanol ratio increased from 1.85 to 2.1-2.3 in low and 2.6-2.8 in high sucrose-molasses concentrations. Yields of total organic solvents increased from 25 to 36-8% of the sucrose present. Inorganic salts from ashed humus soils were only 10 to 20% less effective in enhancing fermentation than the whole soil. It is postulated that the fermentation is enhanced by trace elements present in the soil.

  8. Development of a high temperature microbial fermentation process for butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeor, Jeffery D. St. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reed, David W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Daubaras, Dayna L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Vicki S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Transforming renewable biomass into cost-competitive high-performance biofuels and bioproducts is key to the U.S. future energy and chemical needs. Butanol production by microbial fermentation for chemical conversion to polyolefins, elastomers, drop-in jet or diesel fuel, and other chemicals is a promising solution. A high temperature fermentation process could decrease energy costs, capital cost, give higher butanol production, and allow for continuous fermentation. In this paper, we describe our approach to genetically transform Geobacillus caldoxylosiliticus, using a pUCG18 plasmid, for potential insertion of a butanol production pathway. Transformation methods tested were electroporation of electrocompetent cells, ternary conjugation with E. coli donor and helper strains, and protoplast fusion. These methods have not been successful using the current plasmid. Growth controls show cells survive the various methods tested, suggesting the possibility of transformation inhibition from a DNA restriction modification system in G. caldoxylosiliticus, as reported in the literature.

  9. Polarization Utilization in Radar Target Reconstruction: C-Wide (Multi-Frequency) Band Relationship of a Target’s Characteristic Operators with Its Unique Set of Natural Eigenfrequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-14

    the left half of the s- plane . These are representation independent. We shall be interested in these poles only. These poles are the complex...on the Left Half Plane Asymptotic Behavior of the SEM Expansion of Surface Currents, Published in Special Issue on the Singularity Expansion Method...precisely, the polarization chart is an orthogonal projection of the Poincare Sphere on a plane , having polar coordinates p= cos (2-) and

  10. Characteristics of Butanol Isomers Oxidation in a Micro Flow Reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Hamzah, Muhamad Firdaus

    2017-05-01

    Ignition and combustion characteristics of n-butanol/air, 2-butanol.air and isobutanol/air mixtures at stoichiometric (ϕ = 1) and lean (ϕ = 0.5) conditions were investigated in a micro flow reactor with a controlled temperature profile from 323 K to 1313 K, under atmospheric pressure. Sole distinctive weak flame was observed for each mixture, with inlet fuel/air mixture velocity set low at 2 cm/s. One-dimensional computation with comprehensive chemistry and transport was conducted. At low mixture velocities, one-stage oxidation was confirmed from heat release rate profiles, which was broadly in agreement with the experimental results. The weak flame positions were congruent with literature describing reactivity of the butanol isomers. These weak flame responses were also found to mirror the trend in Anti-Knock Indexes of the butanol isomers. Flux and sensitivity analyses were performed to investigate the fuel oxidation pathways at low and high temperatures. Further computational investigations on oxidation of butanol isomers at higher pressure of 5 atm indicated two-stage oxidation through the heat release rate profiles. Low temperature chemistry is accentuated in the region near the first weak cool flame for oxidation under higher pressure, and its impact on key species – such as hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide and carbon monoxide – were considered. Both experimental and computational findings demonstrate the advantage of employing the micro flow reactor in investigating oxidation processes in the temperature region of interest along the reactor channel. By varying physical conditions such as pressure, the micro flow reactor system is proven to be highly beneficial in elucidating oxidation behavior of butanol isomers in conditions in engines such as those that mirror HCCI operations.

  11. Marine target detection in quad-pol synthetic aperture radar imagery based on the relative phase of cross-polarized channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunhua; Li, Huimin; Zhang, Yanmin; Guo, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    A focus on marine target detection in noise corrupted fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is presented. The property of the relative phase between two cross-polarized channels reveals that the relative phases evaluated within sea surface area or noise corrupted area are widely spread phase angle region [-π,π] due to decorrelation effect; however, the relative phases are concentrated to zero and ±π for real target and its first-order azimuth ambiguities (FOAAs), respectively. Exploiting this physical behavior, the reciprocal of the mean square value of the relative phase (RMSRP) is defined as a new parameter for target detection, and the experiments based on fully polarimetric Radarsat-2 SAR images show that the strong noise and the FOAAs can be effectively suppressed in RMSRP image. Meanwhile, validity of the new parameter for target detection is also verified by two typical Radarsat-2 SAR images, in which targets' ambiguities and strong noise are present.

  12. Single-spin asymmetry in electro-production of {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} pairs from a transversely polarized proton target at the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiao-Rui

    2008-10-15

    In this thesis, the measurement of an azimuthal amplitude of the asymmetry in the lepto-production of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} pairs at the HERMES experiment is reported. The experiment was carried out at DESY in Germany, utilizing the longitudinally polarized 27.6 GeV electron/positron beam of the HERA storage ring in combination with a longitudinally or transversely polarized gaseous target internal to the beam pipe. For the present measurement, the transversely polarized proton target was used and the beam polarization was averaged out in order to measure the asymmetry A{sub UT}. A Ring Imaging Cerenkov (RICH) detector allows the precise identification of pions, kaons and protons over essentially the entire momentum range of the experiment. The asymmetry A{sub UT} for {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} pair production was measured for the first time in the world by HERMES. The amplitudes are extracted as functions of different kinematic variables, which can facilitate the comparison with the theoretical models and the extraction of transversity with combination of the measurement of the dihadron fragmentation function. (orig.)

  13. Single-spin asymmetry in electro-production of π+ π- pairs from a transversely polarized proton target at the HERMES experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiao-Rui

    2008-09-01

    In this thesis, the measurement of an azimuthal amplitude of the asymmetry in the lepto-production of π + π - pairs at the HERMES experiment is reported. The experiment was carried out at DESY in Germany, utilizing the longitudinally polarized 27.6 GeV electron/positron beam of the HERA storage ring in combination with a longitudinally or transversely polarized gaseous target internal to the beam pipe. For the present measurement, the transversely polarized proton target was used and the beam polarization was averaged out in order to measure the asymmetry A UT . A Ring Imaging Cerenkov (RICH) detector allows the precise identification of pions, kaons and protons over essentially the entire momentum range of the experiment. The asymmetry A UT for π + π - pair production was measured for the first time in the world by HERMES. The amplitudes are extracted as functions of different kinematic variables, which can facilitate the comparison with the theoretical models and the extraction of transversity with combination of the measurement of the dihadron fragmentation function. (orig.)

  14. Some problems of local production of acetone and butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, C; Chang, Y P

    1959-01-01

    Conditions of laboratory and plant cultivation of acetone-butanol fermentation bacteria are considered (effects of pH of the medium, temperature, and starch content in raw material on yield of fermentation products) and also the conditions of isolation of the final products produced.

  15. Mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum and process for making butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mahendra K.; Beacom, Daniel; Datta, Rathin

    1993-01-01

    A biologically pure asporogenic mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum is produced by growing sporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 4259 and treating the parent strain with ethane methane sulfonate. The mutant which as been designated C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 is useful in an improved ABE fermentation process, and produces high concentrations of butanol and total solvents.

  16. LYOPHILIZATION EFFECT ON PRODUCTIVITY OF BUTANOL-PRODUCING STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Tigunova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of lyophilization effect on the productivity of butanol-producing strains was the aim of our research. For this purpose we used butanol-producing strains; technical glycerol; biomass of switchgrass Panicum virgatum L. Lyophilization was performed using a lyophilization-drying. The effect of the protective medium on residual moisture of freezedrying cultures suspensions depending on the concentration of glucose and sucrose was studed. It was shown that the lowest residual moisture was attained by using glucose and sucrose in amount of 10% and if the samples of freeze-drying bacteria had been saved for one month at 4 οC the productivity did not decrease. As temperature preservation was increased the productivity of the cultures was gradually decreased and it was greatly reduced at 30 οC. So the protective medium composition was optimized for lyophilization of butanol-producing strains as follows: sucrose 10.0%; gelatin 10.0%; agar 0.02%. It was shown that the preservation of samples of freeze-drying bacteria for six months at a temperature of 4 οC did not affect the productivity of strains. It was found that cultures could use glycerol as a carbon source for butanol accumulation before lyophilization.

  17. Chemical structures of an n-butanol counterflow flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarathy, S.M.; Thomson, M.J. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2007-07-01

    N-butanol, also known as biobutanol, is an attractive alternative biofuel that can replace gasoline in transportation applications. Biobutanol can be produced via the fermentation of sugars, starches, and lignocellulose obtained from agricultural feedstocks. Although biobutanol offers several advantages over ethanol, its detailed combustion characteristics are not well known. In order to determine the effect of fuel structure on combustion products, this paper presented the results of a study that examined the emission and temperature profiles of an n-butanol counterflow flame. The paper presented the experimental data and discussed the potential reaction mechanisms that rationalized the observed species profiles. It was found that significant quantities of acetylene, acetaldehyde, ethane, and propene were measured in the n-butanol flame and that the reaction pathways leading to the formation of these compounds were yet to be identified. In addition, significant concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were found. Results will be utilized to validate a detailed chemical kinetic model for n-butanol combustion. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Metabolic engineering toward 1-butanol derivatives in solvent producing clostridia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemerink, M.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Chapter 1 of this thesis gives an overview about the history of the acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The responsible solventogenic clostridia with their central metabolism are briefly discussed. Despite the fact that scientific research on the key organisms of the ABE process has

  19. Intermediate species measurement during iso-butanol auto-ignition

    KAUST Repository

    Ji, Weiqi

    2015-10-01

    © 2015 The Combustion Institute.Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. This work presents the time histories of intermediate species during the auto-ignition of iso-butanol at high pressure and intermediate temperature conditions obtained using a rapid compression machine and recently developed fast sampling system. Iso-butanol ignition delays were acquired for iso-butanol/O2 mixture with an inert/O2 ratio of 7.26, equivalence ratio of 0.4, in the temperature range of 840-950 K and at pressure of 25 bar. Fast sampling and gas chromatography were used to acquire and quantify the intermediate species during the ignition delay of the same mixture at P = 25.3 bar and T = 905 K. The ignition delay times and quantitative measurements of the mole fraction time histories of methane, ethene, propene, iso-butene, iso-butyraldehyde, iso-butanol, and carbon monoxide were compared with predictions from the detailed mechanisms developed by Sarathy et al., Merchant et al., and Cai et al. It is shown that while the Sarathy mechanism well predicts the overall ignition delay time, it overpredicts ethene by a factor of 6-10, underpredicts iso-butene by a factor of 2, and overpredicts iso-butyraldehyde by a factor of 2. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were carried out to identify the reactions responsible for the observed inadequacy. The rates of iso-butanol hydrogen atom abstraction by OH radical and the beta-scission reactions of hydroxybutyl radicals were updated based on recently published quantum calculation results. Significant improvements were achieved in predicting ignition delay at high pressures (25 and 30 bar) and the species concentrations of ethene and iso-butene. However, the updated mechanism still overpredicts iso-butyraldehyde concentrations. Also, the updated mechanism degrades the prediction in ignition delay at lower pressure (15 bar) compared to the original mechanism developed by Sarathy et al.

  20. Intermediate species measurement during iso-butanol auto-ignition

    KAUST Repository

    Ji, Weiqi; Zhang, Peng; He, Tanjin; Wang, Zhi; Tao, Ling; He, Xin; Law, Chung K.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Combustion Institute.Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. This work presents the time histories of intermediate species during the auto-ignition of iso-butanol at high pressure and intermediate temperature conditions obtained using a rapid compression machine and recently developed fast sampling system. Iso-butanol ignition delays were acquired for iso-butanol/O2 mixture with an inert/O2 ratio of 7.26, equivalence ratio of 0.4, in the temperature range of 840-950 K and at pressure of 25 bar. Fast sampling and gas chromatography were used to acquire and quantify the intermediate species during the ignition delay of the same mixture at P = 25.3 bar and T = 905 K. The ignition delay times and quantitative measurements of the mole fraction time histories of methane, ethene, propene, iso-butene, iso-butyraldehyde, iso-butanol, and carbon monoxide were compared with predictions from the detailed mechanisms developed by Sarathy et al., Merchant et al., and Cai et al. It is shown that while the Sarathy mechanism well predicts the overall ignition delay time, it overpredicts ethene by a factor of 6-10, underpredicts iso-butene by a factor of 2, and overpredicts iso-butyraldehyde by a factor of 2. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were carried out to identify the reactions responsible for the observed inadequacy. The rates of iso-butanol hydrogen atom abstraction by OH radical and the beta-scission reactions of hydroxybutyl radicals were updated based on recently published quantum calculation results. Significant improvements were achieved in predicting ignition delay at high pressures (25 and 30 bar) and the species concentrations of ethene and iso-butene. However, the updated mechanism still overpredicts iso-butyraldehyde concentrations. Also, the updated mechanism degrades the prediction in ignition delay at lower pressure (15 bar) compared to the original mechanism developed by Sarathy et al.

  1. Quantitative proteomics reveals dynamic responses of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to next-generation biofuel butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoxu; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiangxin; Qiao, Jianjun; Zhang, Weiwen

    2013-01-14

    Butanol is a promising biofuel, and recent metabolic engineering efforts have demonstrated the use of photosynthetic cyanobacterial hosts for its production. However, cyanobacteria have very low tolerance to butanol, limiting the economic viability of butanol production from these renewable producing systems. The existing knowledge of molecular mechanism involved in butanol tolerance in cyanobacteria is very limited. To build a foundation necessary to engineer robust butanol-producing cyanobacterial hosts, in this study, the responses of Synechocystis PCC 6803 to butanol were investigated using a quantitative proteomics approach with iTRAQ - LC-MS/MS technologies. The resulting high-quality dataset consisted of 25,347 peptides corresponding to 1452 unique proteins, a coverage of approximately 40% of the predicted proteins in Synechocystis. Comparative quantification of protein abundances led to the identification of 303 differentially regulated proteins by butanol. Annotation and GO term enrichment analysis showed that multiple biological processes were regulated, suggesting that Synechocystis probably employed multiple and synergistic resistance mechanisms in dealing with butanol stress. Notably, the analysis revealed the induction of heat-shock protein and transporters, along with modification of cell membrane and envelope were the major protection mechanisms against butanol. A conceptual cellular model of Synechocystis PCC 6803 responses to butanol stress was constructed to illustrate the putative molecular mechanisms employed to defend against butanol stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Elucidating the contributions of multiple aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases to butanol and ethanol production in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Zongjie; Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol and butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum share common aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases. However, little is known about the relative contributions of these multiple dehydrogenases to ethanol and butanol production respectively. The contributions of six aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases of C. acetobutylicum on butanol and ethanol production were evaluated through inactivation of the corresponding genes respectively. For butanol production, the relative contributions from thes...

  3. Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-31

    Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

  4. Uses of laser optical pumping to produce polarized ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    Laser optical pumping can be used to produce polarized alkali atom beams or polarized alkali vapor targets. Polarized alkali atom beams can be converted into polarized alkali ion beams, and polarized alkali vapor targets can be used to produce polarized H - or 3 He - ion beams. In this paper the authors discuss how the polarized alkali atom beams and polarized alkali vapor targets are used to produce polarized ion beams with emphasis on the production of polarized negative ion beams

  5. A novel in situ gas stripping-pervaporation process integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation for hyper n-butanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chuang; Liu, Fangfang; Xu, Mengmeng; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Lijie; Ren, Jiangang; Bai, Fengwu; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Butanol is considered as an advanced biofuel, the development of which is restricted by the intensive energy consumption of product recovery. A novel two-stage gas stripping-pervaporation process integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was developed for butanol recovery, with gas stripping as the first-stage and pervaporation as the second-stage using the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixed matrix membrane (MMM). Compared to batch fermentation without butanol recovery, more ABE (27.5 g/L acetone, 75.5 g/L butanol, 7.0 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced in the fed-batch fermentation, with a higher butanol productivity (0.34 g/L · h vs. 0.30 g/L · h) due to reduced butanol inhibition by butanol recovery. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 155.6 g/L butanol (199.9 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 610.8 g/L butanol (656.1 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 85.6 g/L butanol (129.7 g/L ABE). Fed with the aqueous phase of the condensate from first-stage gas stripping, the second-stage pervaporation using the CNTs-PDMS MMM produced a condensate containing 441.7 g/L butanol (593.2 g/L ABE), which after mixing with the organic phase from gas stripping gave a highly concentrated product containing 521.3 g/L butanol (622.9 g/L ABE). The outstanding performance of CNTs-PDMS MMM can be attributed to the hydrophobic CNTs giving an alternative route for mass transport through the inner tubes or along the smooth surface of CNTs. This gas stripping-pervaporation process with less contaminated risk is thus effective in increasing butanol production and reducing energy consumption. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Measurement of "pretzelosity" asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized 3He target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Qian, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Huang, J.; Katich, J.; Wang, Y.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H.-J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J. C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R. D.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; Širca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L.-G.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries of semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target was performed at Jefferson Laboratory in the kinematic region of 0.16 polarization approximation, we extracted the corresponding neutron asymmetries from the measured 3He asymmetries and cross-section ratios between the proton and 3He. Our results show that both π± on 3He and on neutron pretzelosity asymmetries are consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties.

  7. New experimental possibility to search for the ratio of a possible T-violating amplitude to the weak-interaction amplitude in polarized neutron transmission through a polarized nuclear target

    CERN Document Server

    Lukashevich, V V; Dallman, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers a spin-dependent neutron interaction with optical potentials (fields) from the strong interaction, the weak interaction, and an assumed T-violating interaction. The vector sum of these fields and their interferences determines an effective field of the target with an angular position in space due to polar and azimuthal angles. The phase of the azimuthal component is found to be the sum of two angles. The tangent of the first angle is equal to the ratio of the T-violating forward-scattering amplitude D to the weak-interaction amplitude C. The quantity is of interest. The tangent of the second angle depends on the spin rotation in the residual pseudomagnetic field of the target, and it can be treated as a background effect. This paper shows that the second angle has different signs in measurements with polarized and unpolarized neutrons; thus, two measurements allow it to be compensated for. In addition, the use of the Ramsey method of separated oscillatory fields for measurement of the neu...

  8. Inotropic and chronotropic effects of crude extract and its butanol fraction of dry fruit of aegle marmelos linn. in isolated working rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.U.

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Aegle marmelos Linn. is a most edible part of the tree, ripe, unripe and dry fruit is recommended for wide variety of disorders. Lack of pharmacological evaluation limits the use to nutritional value. Dry and ripe fruit of A. marmelos was investigated as crude extract and its butanol fraction in isolated working male Wistar rat heart. Aortic out flow, coronary effluent, cardiac output, dP/dt(max), dP/dt(min), systolic and diastolic pressure, heart rate, and aortic pressure were measured. Preload and after load was kept constant. These parameters are relevant to cardiac physiology and pathological conditions. All the concentrations of crude extract caused concentration-dependent effects. The crude extract decreased coronary effluent at 100.0 and 300.0 mg/mL, increased the dP/dt(max) at 300.0 mg/mL, systolic pressure and aortic pressure were observed maximum at 100.0 mg/mL. Whereas, aortic out flow, dP/dt(min) diastolic pressure and cardiac output and heart rate remained unaffected. The butanol fraction increased the aortic outflow, dP/dt(max), aortic pressure at 10.0 and 30.0 mg/mL maximally. Whereas, dP/dt(min), diastolic pressure and cardiac output remained unaffected. Coronary effluent at 1.0, 10.0, and 30.0 mg/mL and heart rate at 10.0 and 30.0 mg/mL were decreased maximally. It seems that the bioactive compound got concentrated in butanol fraction according to polarity of the solvent. The crude extract and butanol fraction were found to be positive inotropic whereas, butanol fraction showed negative chronotropic effect as well. (author)

  9. Acetone-butanol fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates for the butanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Tatyana; Semyonov, Sergey

    2017-11-01

    It is known that the use of lignocellulosic hydrolysates reduces the production cost of biofuel such as biobutanol and bioethanol. But for the most successful application of the hydrolysates for the biofuel production, it is necessary to apply an inexpensive and effective detoxification method and to use of cost-effective growth factors. In the present study, we evaluated the use of an acid hydrolysate of spruce and an enzymatic hydrolysate of miscanthus cellulose for the biobutanol production. To remove inhibitors from the hydrolysates, we applied the traditional physicochemical method with overliming and the biodetoxification method based on the use of the specially adapted activated sludge. Calcium hydroxide (150 g/L) was used for the neutralization. The biological method of detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates was carried out under non-sterile conditions at room temperature by the specially adapted activated sludge of the urban wastewater treatment plants. The acetone-butanol fermentation was carried out by a strain of bacteria Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The treatment by overliming removed 84-85 % and 83-86% of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and furfural from the hydrolysates respectively. Using the method of biodetoxification the content of furfural decreased by 98% and concentration of 5-HMF - by 97-99%. In the present study as an inexpensive source of growth substances for the fermentation of the hydrolysates it has been suggested to use decantate of the brewer's spent grain. The obtained results showed that the brewer's spent grain can be used in the biofuel production as efficiently as the synthetic growth substances.

  10. Recent trends in acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keikhosro Karim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the renewable fuels considered as a suitable substitute to petroleum-based gasoline, butanol has attracted a great deal of attention due to its unique properties. Acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE can be produced biologically from different substrates, including sugars, starch, lignocelluloses, and algae. This process was among the very first biofuel production processes which was commercialized during the First World War. The present review paper discusses the different aspects of the ABE process and the recent progresses made. Moreover, the microorganisms and the biochemistry of the ABE fermentation as well as the feedstocks used are reviewed. Finally, the challenges faced such as low products concentration and products` inhibitory effects on the fermentation are explained and different possible solutions are presented and reviewed.

  11. System-level modeling of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chen; Seo, Seung-Oh; Lu, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is a metabolic process of clostridia that produces bio-based solvents including butanol. It is enabled by an underlying metabolic reaction network and modulated by cellular gene regulation and environmental cues. Mathematical modeling has served as a valuable strategy to facilitate the understanding, characterization and optimization of this process. In this review, we highlight recent advances in system-level, quantitative modeling of ABE fermentation. We begin with an overview of integrative processes underlying the fermentation. Next we survey modeling efforts including early simple models, models with a systematic metabolic description, and those incorporating metabolism through simple gene regulation. Particular focus is given to a recent system-level model that integrates the metabolic reactions, gene regulation and environmental cues. We conclude by discussing the remaining challenges and future directions towards predictive understanding of ABE fermentation. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Extractions of isoquinoline alkaloids with butanol and octanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorová, Jana; Babica, Jan; Marek, Radek; Paulová, Hana; Táborská, Eva; Dostál, Jirí

    2010-09-01

    Six different isoquinoline alkaloids (sanguinarine, chelerythrine, berberine, coptisine, allocryptopine, and protopine) were extracted by butanol and octanol from aqueous solution, pH 4.5. The samples were analyzed by HPLC. Butanol extraction was non-selective, alkaloids passed into organic phase in 83-98%. Octanol extraction provided more selective yields: sanguinarine 99%, chelerythrine 94%, berberine 18%, coptisine 16%, allocryptopine 7.5%, protopine 7%. Further, we tested octanol treatment of extract from Dicranostigma lactucoides. The octanol extraction yields were also selective: sanguinarine 98%, chelerythrine 92%, chelirubine 92.5%, protopine 6% and allocryptopine 3.5%. 6-Butoxy-5,6-dihydrosanguinarine and 6-butoxy-5,6-dihydrochelerythrine were prepared and their NMR and MS data are reported and discussed. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis of (1-/sup 11/C)-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberdorfer, F; Helus, F; Maier-Borst, W [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.); Silvester, D J [Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). M.R.C. Cyclotron Unit

    1982-09-20

    A method for carrier-free labelling of n-butanol with the positron emitting radionuclide carbon-11 (half-life 20.4 min) is described. Labelling was achieved by carboxylation of n-propyl magnesium chloride with /sup 11/C-labelled carbon dioxide and the subsequent reduction of the resulting free (1-/sup 11/C)-butyric acid with LiAlH/sub 4/ after hydrolysis of the Grignard complex. The procedure permits /sup 11/C-labelled butanol to be prepared in high activity and high radiochemical purity for in vivo biological studies only 25 min after the start of carboxylation of the Grignard compound. Gas chromatography and HPLC were used to assess the purity of the product. To maintain carrier-free conditions, atmospheric carbon dioxide was rigorously excluded from all reagents and every parts of the apparatus.

  14. The synthesis of [1-11C]-butanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberdorfer, F.; Helus, F.; Maier-Borst, W.; Silvester, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    A method for carrier-free labelling of n-butanol with the positron emitting radionuclide carbon-11 (half-life 20.4 min) is described. Labelling was achieved by carboxylation of n-propyl magnesium chloride with 11 C-labelled carbon dioxide and the subsequent reduction of the resulting free [1- 11 C]-butyric acid with LiAlH 4 after hydrolysis of the Grignard complex. The procedure permits 11 C-labelled butanol to be prepared in high activity and high radiochemical purity for in vivo biological studies only 25 min after the start of carboxylation of the Grignard compound. Gas chromatography and HPLC were used to assess the purity of the product. To maintain carrier-free conditions, atmospheric carbon dioxide was rigorously excluded from all reagents and every parts of the apparatus. (author)

  15. IRIS Toxicological Review of n-Butanol (External Review Draft ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of n-butanol that will appear in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. EPA is undertaking an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for n-butanol. IRIS is an EPA database containing Agency scientific positions on potential adverse human health effects that may result from chronic (or lifetime) exposure to chemicals in the environment. IRIS contains chemical-specific summaries of qualitative and quantitative health information in support of two steps of the risk assessment paradigm, i.e., hazard identification and dose-response evaluation. IRIS assessments are used in combination with specific situational exposure assessment information to evaluate potential public health risk associated with environmental contaminants.

  16. Selectivities of rare earth oxide catalysts for dehydration of butanols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, S.; Trillo, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The catalytic dehydration of 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and 2-butanol over La 2 O 3 , CeO 2 , Pr 6 O 11 , Sm 2 O 3 , Eu 2 O 3 , Dy 2 O 3 , Ho 2 O 3 , and Yb 2 O 3 is studied. Because of the gradual variation of the general properties of 4f oxides, the former group has been considered a likely series to analyze the existence of definite correlations between alkene distribution and catalyst properties, often reported in the literature. According to our study, the effect of temperature on product distribution may strongly restrict the validity of such correlations. This point is discussed on the basis of the linear relationships found here between the activation energy (E/sub a/) and the log of the preexponential factor

  17. An economic evaluation of biological conversion of wheat straw to butanol: A biofuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, N.; Saha, B.C.; Cotta, M.A.; Singh, V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► An economic evaluation of bioconversion of wheat straw to butanol was performed. ► Wheat straw and utilities impact butanol economics significantly. ► Sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide affect butanol production cost adversely. ► Annexation of butanol plant to an existing distillery improves butanol economics. ► Butanol production cost from wheat straw was estimated to be $1.31–1.00/kg. - Abstract: A cost estimation study was performed for a biological butanol production plant with a capacity of 150 × 10 6 kg butanol/year. Wheat straw (WS) was used as a feedstock. In addition to butanol, acetone (78.05 × 10 6 kg/year) and ethanol (28.54 × 10 6 kg/year) would also be produced. The total capital cost for this plant was $193.07 × 10 6 . This exercise was based in part on data generated in our laboratory and in part on data obtained from literature. The design, mass balance, and energy balance simulations were performed using SuperPro Designer (Version 8.5003, 2012). For butanol production wheat straw would be pretreated with dilute (1% v/v) sulfuric acid at 121 °C for 1 h followed by separate hydrolysis (using enzymes), fermentation and recovery. Enzyme cost for wheat straw hydrolysis was adapted from literature ($0.16/kg butanol). Utilities which included steam/high pressure steam, cooling/chilling water, and electricity represented the major cost of the operation (49.18%) followed by raw materials (26.81%). Based on batch fermentation of wheat straw hydrolysate and distillative recovery of acetone butanol ethanol (ABE), butanol production cost was estimated to be $1.30/kg for a grass-rooted/green-field plant. Application of a membrane recovery process could reduce this price to $1.00/kg for a plant annexed to an existing distillery.

  18. Experimental investigation of n-butanol/diesel fuel blends and n-butanol fumigation – Evaluation of engine performance, exhaust emissions, heat release and flammability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Şahin, Zehra; Durgun, Orhan; Aksu, Orhan N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • n-Butanol/diesel fuel blends and n-butanol fumigation investigated experimentally. • Flammability analysis of n-butanol performed. • Smoke decreases significantly for n-butanol/diesel fuel blends and n-butanol fumigation. • HC emission increases significantly for n-butanol/diesel fuel blends and n-butanol fumigation. • 2% n-Butanol/diesel fuel blend decreases slightly BSFC. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is to investigate and compare the effects of n-butanol/diesel fuel blends (nBDFBs) and n-butanol fumigation (nBF) on the engine performance and exhaust emissions in a turbocharged automobile diesel engine. Also, evaluations based on heat release and flammability analysis have been done. Experiments have been performed for various n-nBDFBs and nBF at different engine speeds and loads. For nBDFBs and nBF tests; nB2, nB4 and nB6 and nBF2, nBF4 and nBF6n-butanol percentages were selected. Here, for example nB2 and nBF2 contains 2% n-butanol and 98% diesel fuel by volume respectively. The test results showed that smoke decreases significantly by applying both of these two methods. However, decrement ratios of smoke for fumigation method are higher than that of blend method. NO x emission decreases for nB2, but it increases for nB4 and nB6 at selected engine speeds and loads. NO x emission decreases generally for nBF. For nB2 and nB4, BSFC decreases slightly but it increases for nB6. For nBF, BSFC increases at all of the test conditions. Adding n-butanol to diesel fuel becomes expensive for two methods. For nBDFBs, heat release rate (HRR) diagrams exhibit similar typical characteristic to NDF. However, for nBF, HRR shows slightly different pattern from NDF and a double peak is observed in the HRR diagram. The first peak occurs earlier than NDF and the second peak takes places later. In addition, this diagram shows that the first peak becomes larger and the second peak diminishes as n-butanol ratio is increased. Because of pilot injection of

  19. DAQ systems for the high energy and nuclotron internal target polarimeters with network access to polarization calculation results and raw data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isupov, A.Yu.

    2004-01-01

    On-line data acquisition (DAQ) system for the Nuclotron Internal Target Polarimeter (ITP) at the LHE, JINR, is explained in respect of design and implementation, based on the distributed data acquisition and processing system qdpb. Software modules specific for this implementation (dependent on ITP data contents and hardware layout) are discussed briefly in comparison with those for the High Energy Polarimeter (HEP) at the LHE, JINR. User access methods both to raw data and to results of polarization calculations of the ITP and HEP are discussed

  20. Biofuel Production Using Butanol and Used Transformer Oil

    OpenAIRE

    J.Antony Pradeep; K.Kishore Kumar, UG Scholars; D.Balasubramanian Asst Prof

    2016-01-01

    Energy demand of the world increases tremendously. The use of fossil fuels to this extent makes it limited and it is an important cause for global warming. To reduce the emission of greenhouse gases and fossil fuel usage, many developments were made using renewable energy. Ethanol was used as a substitute for gasoline lately but it is highly corrosive and need separate tankers for transportation. Instead of using ethanol, butanol will give high mileage, less corrosive and has higher flash and...

  1. LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS AFTER EXPLOSIVE AUTOHYDROLYSIS AS SUBSTRATE TO BUTANOL OBTAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigunova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was investigation of the effect of the explosive autohydrolysis on lignocellulosic biomass (saving, switchgrass biomass for consequent use as a substrate to produce biofuels such as butanol. Butanol-producing strains, switchgrass Panicum virgatum L. biomass and its components after autohydrolysis were used in study. The thermobaric pressure pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass was carried out using specially designed equipment. The effect of explosive autohydrolysis on lignocellulosic biomass for further use in producing biofuels using microbial conversion was studied. Components of lignocellulosic biomass were fractionated after undergoing thermobaric treatment. The possibility of using different raw material components after using explosive autohydrolysis processing to produce biobutanol was found. Products of switchgrass biomass autohydrolysis were shown to need further purification before fermentation from furfural formed by thermobaric pretreatment and inhibiting the growth of microorganisms. The ability of strains of the genus Clostridium to use cellulose as a substrate for fermentation was proved. It was found that using explosive autohydrolysis pretreatment to savings allowed boosting the butanol accumulation by 2 times.

  2. Fragrance material review on 2-methyl-4-phenyl-2-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, J; Jones, L; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-methyl-4-phenyl-2-butanol when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-methyl-4-phenyl-2-butanol is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohols and is a tertiary alcohol. The AAAs are a structurally diverse class of fragrance ingredients that includes primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl alcohols covalently bonded to an aryl (Ar) group, which may be either a substituted or unsubstituted benzene ring. The common structural element for the AAA fragrance ingredients is an alcohol group -C-(R1)(R2)OH and generically the AAA fragrances can be represented as an Ar-C-(R1)(R2)OH or Ar-Alkyl-C-(R1)(R2)OH group. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 2-methyl-4-phenyl-2-butanol were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire Aryl Alkyl Alcohols will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Aryl Alkyl Alcohols in fragrances. assessment of aryl alkyl alcohols when used as fragrance ingredients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. IRIS Toxicological Review of n-Butanol (Interagency Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    On September 8, 2011, the Toxicological Review of n-Butanol (External Review Draft) was released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Offices before public release. In the new IRIS process, introduced by the EPA Administrator, all written comments on IRIS assessments submitted by other federal agencies and White House Offices will be made publicly available. Accordingly, interagency comments with EPA's response and the interagency science consultation draft of the IRIS Toxicological Review of n-Butanol and the charge to external peer reviewers are posted on this site. EPA is undertaking an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for n-butanol. IRIS is an EPA database containing Agency scientific positions on potential adverse human health effects that may result from chronic (or lifetime) exposure to chemicals in the environment. IRIS contains chemical-specific summaries of qualitative and quantitative health information in support of two steps of the risk assessment paradigm, i.e., hazard identification and dose-response evaluation. IRIS assessments are used in combination with specific situational exposure assessment information to evaluate potential public health risk associated with environmental contaminants.

  4. Techniques in polarization physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausnitzer, G.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the current status of the technical tools necessary to perform different kinds of polarization experiments is presented, and the absolute and relative accuracy with which data can be obtained is discussed. A description of polarized targets and sources of polarized fast neutrons is included. Applications of polarization techniques to other fields is mentioned briefly. (14 figures, 3 tables, 110 references) (U.S.)

  5. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y. X.; Wang, Y.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, C.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Katich, J.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H.-J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J.-C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; Širca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L.-G.; Tobias, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1

  6. Butanol production by bioconversion of cheese whey in a continuous packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raganati, F; Olivieri, G; Procentese, A; Russo, M E; Salatino, P; Marzocchella, A

    2013-06-01

    Butanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 fermentation was investigated. Unsupplemented cheese whey was adopted as renewable feedstock. The conversion was successfully carried out in a biofilm packed bed reactor (PBR) for more than 3 months. The PBR was a 4 cm ID, 16 cm high glass tube with a 8 cm bed of 3mm Tygon rings, as carriers. It was operated at the dilution rate between 0.4h(-1) and 0.94 h(-1). The cheese whey conversion process was characterized in terms of metabolites production (butanol included), lactose conversion and biofilm mass. Under optimized conditions, the performances were: butanol productivity 2.66 g/Lh, butanol concentration 4.93 g/L, butanol yield 0.26 g/g, butanol selectivity of the overall solvents production 82 wt%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Measurement of the neutron electric form factor at very large momentum transfer using polaried electrions scattering from a polarized helium-3 target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelleher, Aidan [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge of the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the nucleon is essential for an understanding of nucleon structure. Of the form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron has been measured over the smallest range in Q2 and with the lowest precision. Jefferson Lab experiment 02-013 used a novel new polarized 3 He target to nearly double the range of momentum transfer in which the neutron form factor has been studied and to measure it with much higher precision. Polarized electrons were scattered off this target, and both the scattered electron and neutron were detected. Gn E was measured to be 0.0242 ± 0.0020(stat) ± 0.0061(sys) and 0.0247 ± 0.0029(stat) ± 0.0031(sys) at Q2 = 1.7 and 2.5 GeV2 , respectively.

  8. The influence of the polarization and power of a photon target on the near-threshold detachment of fast H- ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemov, A.S.; Avidzba, A.A.; Vartazaryan, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    The results of theoretical investigation of the single- and two-photon detachment of fast negative hydrogen ions obtained in the framework of the zero-range-potential approximation at a photon energy above the single-photon threshold, are presented. The corresponding cross sections and near-threshold partial distributions of photoelectrons in the space of transverse momenta and energy of the laboratory frame are investigated in detail for various light-field polarization and the cross angles of ion and photon fluxes. For purposes of beam diagnostics the possibility of effective control of the fast H - ion photodetachment in a probing laser target is shown. Taking into account single-photon and background two-photon detachment channels the expressions, that allow one to obtain the resulting distributions of photoelectrons for various light power and photon energy in the near-threshold area of interest, are presented. Choosing the target power, the space orientation of the momentum and polarization of photons, one can realize the conditions of transfer of needed information about the beam to fast electrons of hydrogen atoms with a maximum accuracy. (author). 44 refs., 19 figs

  9. Mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates: Shock tube ignition delay time measurements and chemical kinetic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    AlRamadan, Abdullah S.

    2015-10-01

    The demand for fuels with high anti-knock quality has historically been rising, and will continue to increase with the development of downsized and turbocharged spark-ignition engines. Butanol isomers, such as 2-butanol and tert-butanol, have high octane ratings (RON of 105 and 107, respectively), and thus mixed butanols (68.8% by volume of 2-butanol and 31.2% by volume of tert-butanol) can be added to the conventional petroleum-derived gasoline fuels to improve octane performance. In the present work, the effect of mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates has been investigated in a high-pressure shock tube facility. The ignition delay times of mixed butanols stoichiometric mixtures were measured at 20 and 40bar over a temperature range of 800-1200K. Next, 10vol% and 20vol% of mixed butanols (MB) were blended with two different toluene/n-heptane/iso-octane (TPRF) fuel blends having octane ratings of RON 90/MON 81.7 and RON 84.6/MON 79.3. These MB/TPRF mixtures were investigated in the shock tube conditions similar to those mentioned above. A chemical kinetic model was developed to simulate the low- and high-temperature oxidation of mixed butanols and MB/TPRF blends. The proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data with some deviations at low temperatures. The effect of mixed butanols addition to TPRFs is marginal when examining the ignition delay times at high temperatures. However, when extended to lower temperatures (T < 850K), the model shows that the mixed butanols addition to TPRFs causes the ignition delay times to increase and hence behaves like an octane booster at engine-like conditions. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  10. Conceptual design of heterogeneous azeotropic distillation process for ethanol dehydration using 1-butanol as entrainer

    OpenAIRE

    Paritta Prayoonyong

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of a heterogeneous azeotropic distillation process for ethanol dehydration using 1-butanol as entrainer is presented. The residue curve map of the ethanol/water/1-butanol mixture is computationally generated using non-random twoliquid thermodynamic model. It is found that 1-butanol leads to a residue curve map topological structure different from that generated by typical entrainers used in ethanol dehydration. Synthesis...

  11. Fermentation and genomic analysis of acetone-uncoupled butanol production by Clostridium tetanomorphum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fuyu; Bao, Guanhui; Zhao, Chunhua; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin; Dong, Hongjun

    2016-02-01

    In typical acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, acetone is the main by-product (50 % of butanol mass) of butanol production, resulting in a low yield of butanol. It is known that some Clostridium tetanomorphum strains are able to produce butanol without acetone in nature. Here, we described that C. tetanomorphum strain DSM665 can produce 4.16 g/L butanol and 4.98 g/L ethanol at pH 6.0, and 9.81 g/L butanol and 1.01 g/L ethanol when adding 1 mM methyl viologen. Butyrate and acetate could be reassimilated and no acetone was produced. Further analysis indicated that the activity of the acetate/butyrate:acetoacetyl-CoA transferase responsible for acetone production is lost in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. The genome of C. tetanomorphum DSM665 was sequenced and deposited in DDBJ, EMBL, and GenBank under the accession no. APJS00000000. Sequence analysis indicated that there are no typical genes (ctfA/B and adc) that are typically parts of an acetone synthesis pathway in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. This work provides new insights in the mechanism of clostridial butanol production and should prove useful for the design of a high-butanol-producing strain.

  12. Photoproduction of η mesons from the neutron: Cross sections and double polarization observable E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witthauer, L.; Dieterle, M.; Challand, T.; Kaeser, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Rostomyan, T.; Walford, N.K.; Werthmueller, D. [University of Basel, Department of Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Afzal, F.; Beck, R.; Boese, S.; Funke, C.; Gottschall, M.; Gruener, M.; Hammann, C.; Hartmann, J.; Hoffmeister, P.; Honisch, C.; Kaiser, D.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kalischewski, F.; Klassen, P.; Koop, K.; Lang, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Mueller, J.; Muellers, J.; Piontek, D.; Schmidt, C.; Seifen, T.; Sokhoyan, V.; Spieker, K.; Thiel, A.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; Pee, H. van; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Winnebeck, A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Anisovich, A.V.; Bayadilov, D.; Nikonov, V.; Sarantsev, A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Gatchina (Russian Federation); Bantes, B.; Dutz, H.; Eberhardt, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Frommberger, F.; Goertz, S.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hillert, W.; Jude, T.; Kammer, S.; Kleber, V.; Klein, F.; Schmieden, H. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Bichow, M.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik I, Bochum (Germany); Brinkmann, K.T.; Gutz, E. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Crede, V. [Florida State University, Department of Physics, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Friedrich, S.; Makonyi, K.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M. [Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Gridnev, A.; Lopatin, I. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Gatchina (Russian Federation); Wilson, A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Florida State University, Department of Physics, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Collaboration: The CBELSA/TAPS Collaboration

    2017-03-15

    Results from measurements of the photoproduction of η mesons from quasifree protons and neutrons are summarized. The experiments were performed with the CBELSA/TAPS detector at the electron accelerator ELSA in Bonn using the η → 3π{sup 0} → 6γ decay. A liquid deuterium target was used for the measurement of total cross sections and angular distributions. The results confirm earlier measurements from Bonn and the MAMI facility in Mainz about the existence of a narrow structure in the excitation function of γn → nη. The current angular distributions show a forward-backward asymmetry, which was previously not seen, but was predicted by model calculations including an additional narrow P{sub 11} state. Furthermore, data obtained with a longitudinally polarized, deuterated butanol target and a circularly polarized photon beam were analyzed to determine the double polarization observable E. Both data sets together were also used to extract the helicity-dependent cross sections σ{sub 1/2} and σ{sub 3/2}. The narrow structure in the excitation function of γn → nη appears associated with the helicity-1/2 component of the reaction. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries with respect of both beam charge and transverse target polarization in exclusive electroproduction of real photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z. [Yerevan Physics Institute (AR)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    Azimuthal asymmetries in exclusive electroproduction of real photons are measured for the first time with respect to transverse target polarisation, providing new constraints on Generalized Parton Distributions. From the same data set on a hydrogen target, new results for the beam-charge asymmetry are also extracted with better precision than those previously reported. By comparing model calculations with measured asymmetries attributed to the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes, a model-dependent constraint is obtained on the total angular momenta carried by up and down quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  14. NUCLEON POLARIZATION IN 3-BODY MODELS OF POLARIZED LI-6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHELLINGERHOUT, NW; KOK, LP; COON, SA; ADAM, RM

    1993-01-01

    Just as He-3 --> can be approximately characterized as a polarized neutron target, polarized Li-6D has been advocated as a good isoscalar nuclear target for the extraction of the polarized gluon content of the nucleon. The original argument rests upon a presumed ''alpha + deuteron'' picture of Li-6,

  15. NMR dispersion measurement of dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, K.; Cox, S.F.J.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring dynamic nuclear polarization from the NMR dispersive susceptibility is examined. Two prototype instruments are tested in a polarized proton target using organic target material. The more promising employs a tunnel diode oscillator, inside the target cavity, and should provide a precise polarization measurement working at a frequency far enough from the main resonance for the disturbance of the measured polarization to be negligible. Other existing methods for measuring target polarization are briefly reviewed. (author)

  16. The predominant WT1 isoform (+KTS) encodes a DNA-binding protein targeting the planar cell polarity gene Scribble in renal podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Julie; Rivera, Miguel N; Kim, Woo Jae; Starbuck, Kristen; Haber, Daniel A

    2010-07-01

    WT1 encodes a tumor suppressor first identified by its inactivation in Wilms' Tumor. Although one WT1 splicing variant encodes a well-characterized zinc finger transcription factor, little is known about the function of the most prevalent WT1 isoform, whose DNA binding domain is disrupted by a three-amino acid (KTS) insertion. Using cells that conditionally express WT1(+KTS), we undertook a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and cloning analysis to identify candidate WT1(+KTS)-regulated promoters. We identified the planar cell polarity gene Scribble (SCRB) as the first WT1(+KTS) target gene in podocytes of the kidney. WT1 and SCRB expression patterns overlap precisely in developing renal glomeruli of mice, and WT1(+KTS) binds to a 33-nucleotide region within the Scribble promoter in mouse and human cell lines and kidneys. Together, our results support a role for the predominant WT1(+KTS) isoform in transcriptional regulation and suggest a link between the WT1-dependent tumor suppressor pathway and a key component of the planar cell polarity pathway.

  17. The predominant WT1 isoform (+KTS) encodes a DNA binding protein targeting the planar cell polarity gene Scribble in renal podocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Julie; Rivera, Miguel N.; Kim, Woo Jae; Starbuck, Kristen; Haber, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    WT1 encodes a tumor suppressor, first identified by its inactivation in Wilms Tumor. While one WT1 splicing variant encodes a well-characterized zinc finger transcription factor, little is known about the function of the most prevalent WT1 isoform, whose DNA binding domain is disrupted by a three amino acid (KTS) insertion. Using cells which conditionally express WT1(+KTS), we undertook a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and cloning (ChIP-cloning) analysis to identify candidate WT1(+KTS) regulated promoters. We identified the planar cell polarity (PCP) gene Scribble (SCRB) as the first WT1(+KTS) target gene in podocytes of the kidney. WT1 and SCRB expression patterns overlap precisely in developing renal glomeruli of mice, and WT1(+KTS) binds to a 33 nucleotide region within the Scribble promoter in both mouse and human cell lines and kidneys. Together, our results support a role for the predominant WT1(+KTS) isoform in transcriptional regulation and suggest a link between the WT1-dependent tumor suppressor pathway and a key component of the planar cell polarity pathway. PMID:20571064

  18. On the possibility of using lithium-6 deuteride, irradiated with gas discharge plasma in a target with polarized nuclei of deuterium and lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyatova, E.I.; Bubnov, N.N.; Solodovnikov, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    A target with polarized nuclei made on the basis of irradiated lithium-6 deuteride is of great interest for carrying out investigations in elementary particle physics. Up to now high-energy electrons have been used for generation of F-centers in 6 LiD. It is shown that one can, in principle, use ultraviolet irradiation and gas discharge plasma for generation of F-centers in 6 LiD. Both types of irradiation cause electron paramagnetic resonance signals from conductance electrons of lithium and form F-centers in 6 LiD. It seems possible to obtain the necessary samples by exposing 6 LiD to the gas discharge plasma. 9 refs.; 2 figs

  19. Mono-energetic ion beam acceleration in solitary waves during relativistic transparency using high-contrast circularly polarized short-pulse laser and nanoscale targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Shah, R. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Fernandez, J. C.; Jung, D.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    In recent experiments at the Trident laser facility, quasi-monoenergetic ion beams have been obtained from the interaction of an ultraintense, circularly polarized laser with a diamond-like carbon target of nm-scale thickness under conditions of ultrahigh laser pulse contrast. Kinetic simulations of this experiment under realistic laser and plasma conditions show that relativistic transparency occurs before significant radiation pressure acceleration and that the main ion acceleration occurs after the onset of relativistic transparency. Associated with this transition are a period of intense ion acceleration and the generation of a new class of ion solitons that naturally give rise to quasi-monoenergetic ion beams. An analytic theory has been derived for the properties of these solitons that reproduces the behavior observed in kinetic simulations and the experiments.

  20. Hybrid Vapor Stripping-Vapor Permeation Process for Recovery and Dehydration of 1-Butanol and Acetone/Butanol/Ethanol from Dilute Aqueous Solutions. Part 1. Process Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Fermentative production of butanol is limited to low concentrations, typically less than 2 wt% solvent, due to product inhibition. The result is high separation energy demand by conventional distillation approaches, despite favorable vapor-liquid equilibrium and parti...

  1. Novel developments in butanol fermentation: Microbial genetics to agricultural substrates, process technology, and downstream processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butanol is the major product of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE; ratio 3:6:1) fermentation. It can be produced from various carbohydrates such as glucose, corn, molasses, and whey permeate (a by-product of the dairy industry) using microbial strains such as Clostridium beijerinckii and/or C. acetobuty...

  2. Mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates: Shock tube ignition delay time measurements and chemical kinetic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    AlRamadan, Abdullah S.; Badra, Jihad; Javed, Tamour; Alabbad, Mohammed; Bokhumseen, Nehal; Gaillard, Patrick; Babiker, Hassan; Farooq, Aamir; Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    work, the effect of mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates has been investigated in a high-pressure shock tube facility. The ignition delay times of mixed butanols stoichiometric mixtures were measured at 20 and 40bar over a temperature range

  3. Conceptual design of heterogeneous azeotropic distillation process for ethanol dehydration using 1-butanol as entrainer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paritta Prayoonyong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of a heterogeneous azeotropic distillation process for ethanol dehydration using 1-butanol as entrainer is presented. The residue curve map of the ethanol/water/1-butanol mixture is computationally generated using non-random twoliquid thermodynamic model. It is found that 1-butanol leads to a residue curve map topological structure different from that generated by typical entrainers used in ethanol dehydration. Synthesised by residue curve map analysis, the distillation flowsheet for ethanol dehydration by 1-butanol comprises a double-feed column integrated with an overhead decanter and a simple column. The double-feed column is used to recover water as the top product, whereas the simple column is used for recovering ethanol and 1-butanol. The separation feasibility and the economically near-optimal designs of distillation columns in the flowsheet are evaluated and identified by using the boundary value design method. The distillation flowsheet using 1-butanol is compared with the conventional process using benzene as entrainer. Based on their total annualised costs, the ethanol dehydration process using 1-butanol is less economically attractive than the process using benzene. However, 1-butanol is less toxic than benzene.

  4. Production of n-butanol from whey filtrate using Clostridium acetobutylicum NCIB 2951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, I S

    1980-01-01

    Production of the important solvent n-butanol by traditional fermentation of corn mash or molasses by Clostridium acetobutylicum produces a mixed end product in the ratio butanol:acetone:ethanol 6:3:1. Laboratory experiments have shown that H2SO4 casein whey after ultrafiltration to remove protein (DSA 40, 5658) is a possible substrate for butanol fermentation, which would also reduce a major waste disposal problem. The organism was maintained in the casein whey permeate; inocula were heat-shocked at 70 degrees Celcius for 90 s, followed by incubation at 30 degrees Celcius for 3 days to provide working cultures. Whey permeate supplemented with 0.5% (w/v) yeast extract was adjusted to pH 6.5 with 1 M NH4OH, inoculated with 5% culture and incubated at 30 degrees Celcius. Cell counts were recorded daily, together with residual lactose concentration and production of butyric acid, acetic acid, butanol, acetone and ethanol (determined by GLC). Initially butyric and acetic acids were produced, but after 2 days conversion to butanol and acetone began. Cell growth ceased after 3 days, but conversion continued to reach a maximum yield of butanol after 5 days, in the favourable ratio of butanol:acetone:ethanol of 10:1:1. Inhibition by end products prevented complete utilization of the lactose. Omission of the yeast supplement produced a slower but similar fermentation reaching a butanol yield of 1.3% after 7 days. The ultrafiltration may not be necessary. (Refs. 3).

  5. Single and Double Spin Asymmetries for Deeply Virtual Exclusive π0 Production on Longitudinally Polarized Proton Target with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Andrew [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive processes probe the internal structure of nucleons through measurements of structure functions and their ratios, which are sensitive to the chiral-even generalized parton distributions (GPDs) and the chiral-odd transversity GPDs. The GPDs encode correlations of parton distributions in longitudinal momentum space and transverse impact parameter space and are accessible through the measurements of the xB and t dependence of meson production. The wide kinematic coverage of CLAS detector allowed measurements of exclusive π0 electroproduction in full azimuthal range. The target and double spin asymmetries for the deeply virtual exclusive π0 electroproduction were measured for the first time in the DIS region. The experiment was carried out at Hall B, Jefferson Lab using the longitudinally polarized electron beam with energy of up to 6 GeV and a dynamically polarized NH3 target with spins of free protons aligned along the beam axis. All four final-state particles from exclusive channel, electron, proton and two photons from π0 decay, were identified. The asymmetries were fitted according to their angular modulations in the hadronic center-of-mass system, and their moments were extracted. The data comparison with two handbag-based calculations involving the contribution from both chiral-even and chiral-odd GPDs was performed in wide kinematic range. The applicability of a formalism based on generalized parton distributions within the framework of modified perturbative approach is discussed.

  6. Polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    The book on 'polarized neutrons' is intended to inform researchers in condensed matter physics and chemistry of the diversity of scientific problems that can be investigated using polarized neutron beams. The contents include chapters on:- neutron polarizers and instrumentation, polarized neutron scattering, neutron polarization analysis experiments and precessing neutron polarization. (U.K.)

  7. Experimental and kinetic modeling investigation of rich premixed toluene flames doped with n-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyang; Yuan, Wenhao; Li, Tianyu; Li, Wei; Yang, Jiuzhong; Qi, Fei

    2018-04-25

    n-Butanol is a promising renewable biofuel and has a lot of advantages as a gasoline additive compared with ethanol. Though the combustion of pure n-butanol has been extensively investigated, the chemical structures of large hydrocarbons doped with n-butanol, especially for aromatic fuels, are still insufficiently understood. In this work, rich premixed toluene/n-butanol/oxygen/argon flames were investigated at 30 Torr with synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry (SVUV-PIMS). The blending ratio of n-butanol was varied from 0 to 50%, while the equivalence ratio was maintained at a quite rich value (1.75) for the purpose of studying the influence of n-butanol on the aromatic growth process. Flame species including radicals, reactive molecules, isomers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were identified and their mole fraction profiles were measured. A kinetic model of toluene/n-butanol combustion was developed from our recently reported toluene and n-butanol models. It is observed that the production of most toluene decomposition products and larger aromatics was suppressed as the blending ratio of n-butanol increases. Meanwhile, the addition of n-butanol generally enhanced the formation of most observed C2-C4 hydrocarbons and C1-C4 oxygenated species. The rate of production (ROP) analysis and experimental observations both indicate that the interaction between toluene and n-butanol in their decomposition processes mainly occurs at the formation of small intermediates, e.g. acetylene and methyl. In particular, the interaction between toluene and n-butanol in methyl formation influences the formation of large monocyclic aromatics such as ethylbenzene, styrene and phenylacetylene, making their maximum mole fractions decay slowly upon increasing the blending ratio of n-butanol compared with toluene and benzyl. The increase of the blending ratio of n-butanol reduces the formation of key PAH precursors such as benzyl, fulvenallenyl

  8. O-15-butanol PET activation study on declarative memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, B.J.; Schmidt, D.; Mottaghy, F.M.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W.; Forschungszentrum Juelich; Halsband, U.; Tellmann, L.; Herzog, H.

    1998-01-01

    Aim: In this study, neuroanatomical correlates of encoding and retrieval in paired associate learning were evaluated with positron emission tomography using auditorily presented highly imaginable words. Methods: Six right-handed normal male volunteers took part in the study. Each subject underwent six O-15-butanol PET scans. On each of the six trials the memory task began with the injection of a bolus of O-15-butanol. The subjects had to learn and retrieve twelve word pairs (highly imaginable words, not semantically related). The presentation of nonsense words served as reference condition. Results: Recall accuracy after 2-4 presentations was high during the PET measurement. In both encoding and retrieval we found anterior cingulate activation. We show bilateral dorsalateral prefrontal activation during the encoding of auditorily presented word pair associates, whereas retrieval led to left frontal activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of the precuneus in the retrieval of highly imaginable world-pair associates. Conclusion: Our results support the hypothesis of the presence of distributed widespread brain structures subserving episodic declarative memory. (orig.) [de

  9. Molecular dynamics of tert-butanol studied by neutron transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, L.Q.; Fulfaro, R.; Vinhas, L.A.

    1974-01-01

    Neutron transmission of the globular compound tert-butanol (CH 3 ) 3 COH have been measured in the temperature interval O 0 C to 40 0 C for 6.13 A neutrons and in the neutron wavelength range 4A to 7.5A in the liquid and solid states. Results show that the cross-section difference at the state transition in 24 0 C is 13%, while it is only approximately 1% at the first order phase transition in 14 0 C. Evidence of existence of third crystalline phase with the lowest cross-section has been found. The barrier to interval methyl rotation in the solid states is estimated as (3.=+ - 0.5) Kcal/mol and does change much over the phase and state transitions. The observed dynamical changes must be due to movements of the whole molecule and evidence that tert-butanol is not in the strict sense a plastic crystal. Correlation with heat capacity results is discussed

  10. Polarization: A Must for Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidal M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent realistic simulations confirm that the polarization of the fuel would improve significantly the DT fusion efficiency. We have proposed an experiment to test the persistence of the polarization in a fusion process, using a terawatt laser hitting a polarized HD target. The polarized deuterons heated in the plasma induced by the laser can fuse producing a 3He and a neutron in the final state. The angular distribution of the neutrons and the change in the corresponding total cross section are related to the polarization persistence. The experimental polarization of DT fuel is a technological challenge. Possible paths for Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF and for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF are reviewed. For MCF, polarized gas can be used. For ICF, cryogenic targets are required. We consider both, the polarization of gas and the polarization of solid DT, emphasizing the Dynamic Nuclear polarization (DNP of HD and DT molecules.

  11. Butanol fermentation of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru; From, Nikolaj; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    Seaweed represents an abundant, renewable, and fast-growing biomass resource for 3rd generation biofuel production. This study reports an efficient butanol fermentation process carried out by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422 using enzymatic hydrolysate of the sugar-rich brown seaweed Laminaria...... digitata harvested from the coast of the Danish North Sea as substrate. The highest butanol yield (0.42g/g-consumed-substrates) compared to literature was achieved, with a significantly higher butanol:acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) molar ratio (0.85) than typical (0.6). This demonstrates the possibility...... of using the seaweed L. digitata as a potential biomass for butanol production. For the first time, consumption of alginate components was observed by C. beijerinckii DSM-6422. The efficient utilization of sugars and lactic acid further highlighted the potential of using this strain for future development...

  12. Excess Molar Volumes and Viscosities for Binary Mixtures of 1-Alkoxypropan-2-ols with 1-Butanol,and 2-Butanol at 298.15 K and Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAL Amalendu; GABA Rekha

    2007-01-01

    Excess molar volumes VEm and kinematic viscosities v have been measured as a function of composition for binary mixtures of propylene glycol monomethyl ether (1-methoxy-2-propanol),MeOCH2CH(OH)Me,propylene glycol monoethyl ether (1-ethoxy-2-propanol), EtOCH2CH(OH)Me,propylene glycol monopropyl ether (1-propoxy-2-propanol), PrOCH2CH(OH)Me, propylene glycol monobutyl ether (1-butoxy-2-propanol),BuOCH2CH(OH)Me,and propylene glycol tert-butyl ether (1-tert-butoxy-2-propanol),t-BuOCH2CH(OH)Me with 1-butanol,and 2-butanol,at 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure.The excess molar volumes are negative across the entire range of composition for all the systems with 1-butanol,and positive for the systems 2-butanol+1-methoxy-2-propanol,and +1-propoxy-2-propanol,negative for the systems 2-butanol+1-butoxy-2-propanol,and change sign for the systems 2-butanol+1-ethoxy-2-propanol,and +1-tert-butoxy-2-propanol.From the experimental data,the deviation in dynamic viscosity η from Σxiηi has been calculated.Both excess molar volumes and viscosity deviations have been correlated using a Redlich-Kister type polynomial equation by the method of least-squares for the estimation of the binary coefficients and the standard errors.

  13. The influence of n-butanol blending on the ignition delay times of gasoline and its surrogate at high pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Agbro, Edirin; Tomlin, Alison S.; Lawes, Malcolm; Park, Sungwoo; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    between those of stoichiometric gasoline and stoichiometric n-butanol across the temperature range studied. At lower temperatures, delays for the blend were however, much closer to those of n-butanol than gasoline despite n-butanol being only 20

  14. Emission, efficiency, and influence in a diesel n-butanol dual-injection engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yanchun; Chen, Zheng; Liu, Jingping

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dual-injection combustion for diesel n-butanol dual-fuel is investigated. • Higher EGR rate results in lower NOx and ITE, but higher smoke, HC and CO. • Larger butanol fraction results in lower smoke and ITE, but higher NOx, HC and CO. • Advanced injection can decrease smoke, HC and CO, and increase ITE. • Coupling of butanol fraction, EGR and injection timing makes for a better performance. - Abstract: In this work, a dual-injection combustion mode for diesel n-butanol dual-fuel, combined direct injection (DI) of diesel with port fuel injection (PFI) of n-butanol, was introduced. Effects of n-butanol fraction, EGR rate and injection timing on this mode were studied on a modified single-cylinder diesel engine at the speed of 1400 r/min and the IMEP of 1.0 MPa. The results indicate that with increased EGR rate, NOx emissions reduce, but smoke emissions increase. As n-butanol fraction is increased, smoke emissions decrease with a small increase in NOx. However, higher HC and CO emissions, higher indicated specific fuel consumption (ISFC) and lower indicated thermal efficiency (ITE) have to be paid with increased n-butanol fraction, especially at high EGR condition. Advancing diesel injection timing suitably has the capacity of mitigating those costs and further decreasing smoke emissions with a small penalty in NOx emissions. Coupling of large butanol fraction, high EGR rate, and advanced injection suitably contributes to a better balance between emissions and efficiency in the diesel n-butanol dual-injection engine

  15. Investigation on the lean combustion performance of a hydrogen-enriched n-butanol engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bo; Ji, Changwei; Wang, Shuofeng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • H_2 addition avails improving thermal efficiency of n-butanol engines. • Lean burn limit of n-butanol engine is extended by H_2 addition. • H_2 addition shortens the n-butanol engine combustion duration. • HC and CO from the n-butanol engine are decreased by H_2 addition. - Abstract: n-Butanol is a feasible fuel candidate for spark-ignition engines. The current paper carried out an experiment to explore effects of hydrogen addition on further improving the performance of a n-butanol engine under the part load and lean conditions. Within the test, the engine intake pressure and speed were respectively kept at 61.5 kPa and 1400 rpm. The volumetric fractions of hydrogen in the total intake gas (hydrogen + air) were constrained at 0 and 3%, respectively. Under a certain hydrogen blending level, the global excess air ratio of in-cylinder charge which was changed from the stoichiometric to near the lean burn limit was adjusted by varying the n-butanol injection duration. The experimental results confirmed that the brake thermal efficiency was heightened and the lean burn limit was extended after the hydrogen addition. Besides, compared with the pure n-butanol combustion, the hydrogen enrichment enables the engine to gain dropped ignition delay and rapid combustion duration. Moreover, CO and HC from the pure n-butanol engine were reduced by the hydrogen addition. NOx were generally reduced when the excess air ratio was raised. This suggested that NOx from the hydrogen-enriched butanol engine could also be controlled by lean combustion.

  16. Separation of S-wave pseudoscalar and pseudovector amplitudes in {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n reaction on polarized target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Rybicki, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-06-01

    A new analysis of S-wave production amplitudes for the reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n on a transversely polarized target is performed. It is based on the results obtained by CERN-Cracow-Munich collaboration in the {pi}{pi} energy range from 600 MeV to 1600 MeV at 17.2 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} momentum. Energy-independent separation of the S-wave pseudoscalar amplitude ({pi} exchange) from the pseudovector amplitude (a{sub 1} exchange) is carried out using assumptions much weaker than those in all previous analyses. We show that, especially around 1000 MeV and around 1500 MeV, the a{sub 1} exchange amplitude cannot be neglected. The scalar-isoscalar {pi}{pi} phase shift are calculated using fairly weak assumptions. Our results are consistent both with the so called ``up`` and the well-known ``down`` solution, provided we choose those in which the S-wave phases increase slower with the effective {pi}{pi} mass than the P-wave phases. Above 1420 MeV both sets of phase shifts increase with energy faster than in the experiment on an unpolarized target. This fact can be related to the presence of scalar resonance f{sub o}(1500). (author). 41 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab.

  17. High-temperature oxidation chemistry of n-butanol--experiments in low-pressure premixed flames and detailed kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, N; Harper, M R; Green, W H

    2011-12-07

    An automated reaction mechanism generator is used to develop a predictive, comprehensive reaction mechanism for the high-temperature oxidation chemistry of n-butanol. This new kinetic model is an advancement of an earlier model, which had been extensively tested against earlier experimental data (Harper et al., Combust. Flame, 2011, 158, 16-41). In this study, the model's predictive capabilities are improved by targeting isomer-resolved quantitative mole fraction profiles of flame species in low-pressure flames. To this end, a total of three burner-stabilized premixed flames are isomer-selectively analyzed by flame-sampling molecular-beam time-of-flight mass spectrometry using photoionization by tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. For most species, the newly developed chemical kinetic model is capable of accurately reproducing the experimental trends in these flames. The results clearly indicate that n-butanol is mainly consumed by H-atom abstraction with H, O, and OH, forming predominantly the α-C(4)H(9)O radical (CH(3)CH(2)CH(2)˙CHOH). Fission of C-C bonds in n-butanol is only predicted to be significant in a similar, but hotter flame studied by Oßwald et al. (Combust. Flame, 2011, 158, 2-15). The water-elimination reaction to 1-butene is found to be of no importance under the premixed conditions studied here. The initially formed isomeric C(4)H(9)O radicals are predicted to further oxidize by reacting with H and O(2) or to decompose to smaller fragments via β-scission. Enols are detected experimentally, with their importance being overpredicted by the model.

  18. Developing a mesophilic co-culture for direct conversion of cellulose to butanol in consolidated bioprocess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Cao, Guangli; Zheng, Ju; Fu, Defeng; Song, Jinzhu; Zhang, Junzheng; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of butanol production from cellulosic biomass is a promising strategy for cost saving compared to other processes featuring dedicated cellulase production. CBP requires microbial strains capable of hydrolyzing biomass with enzymes produced on its own with high rate and high conversion and simultaneously produce a desired product at high yield. However, current reported butanol-producing candidates are unable to utilize cellulose as a sole carbon source and energy source. Consequently, developing a co-culture system using different microorganisms by taking advantage of their specific metabolic capacities to produce butanol directly from cellulose in consolidated bioprocess is of great interest. This study was mainly undertaken to find complementary organisms to the butanol producer that allow simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to butanol in their co-culture under mesophilic condition. Accordingly, a highly efficient and stable consortium N3 on cellulose degradation was first developed by multiple subcultures. Subsequently, the functional microorganisms with 16S rRNA sequences identical to the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profile were isolated from consortium N3. The isolate Clostridium celevecrescens N3-2 exhibited higher cellulose-degrading capability was thus chosen as the partner strain for butanol production with Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824. Meanwhile, the established stable consortium N3 was also investigated to produce butanol by co-culturing with C. acetobutylicum ATCC824. Butanol was produced from cellulose when C. acetobutylicum ATCC824 was co-cultured with either consortium N3 or C. celevecrescens N3-2. Co-culturing C. acetobutylicum ATCC824 with the stable consortium N3 resulted in a relatively higher butanol concentration, 3.73 g/L, and higher production yield, 0.145 g/g of glucose equivalent. The newly isolated microbial consortium N3 and strain C. celevecrescens N3

  19. Fuel spray and combustion characteristics of butanol blends in a constant volume combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yu; Li, Jun; Jin, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A sudden drop is observed in spray penetration for B10S10D80 fuel at 800 and 900 K. • With increasing of temperature, auto-ignition timings of fuels become unperceivable. • Low n-butanol addition has little effect on autoignition timings from 800 to 1200 K. • n-Butanol additive can reduce soot emissions at the near-wall regions. • Larger soot reduction is seen at higher ambient temperatures for n-butanol addition. - Abstract: The processes of spray penetrations, flame propagation and soot formation and oxidation fueling n-butanol/biodiesel/diesel blends were experimentally investigated in a constant volume combustion chamber with an optical access. B0S20D80 (0% n-butanol, 20% soybean biodiesel, and 80% diesel in volume) was prepared as the base fuel. n-Butanol was added into the base fuel by volumetric percent of 5% and 10%, denoted as B5S15D80 (5% n-butanol/15% soybean biodiesel/80% diesel) and B10S10D80 (10% n-butanol/10% soybean biodiesel/80% diesel). The ambient temperatures at the time of fuel injection were set to 800 K, 900 K, 1000 K, and 1200 K. Results indicate that the penetration length reduces with the increase of n-butanol volumes in blending fuels and ambient temperatures. The spray penetration presents a sudden drop as fueling B10S10D80 at 800 K and 900 K, which might be caused by micro-explosion. A larger premixed combustion process is observed at low ambient temperatures, while the heat release rate of high ambient temperatures presents mixing controlled diffusion combustion. With a lower ambient temperature, the auto-ignition delay becomes longer with increasing of n-butanol volume in blends. However, with increasing of ambient temperatures, the auto-ignition timing between three fuels becomes unperceivable. Generally, low n-butanol addition has a limited or no effect on the auto-ignition timing in the current conditions. Compared with the base fuel of B0S20D80, n-butanol additive with 5% or 10% in volume can reduce soot

  20. Measurements of Polarization Transfers in Real Compton Scattering by a proton target at JLAB. A new source of information on the 3D shape of the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanelli, Cristiano V. [Sapienza Univ. of Rome (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    In this thesis work, results of the analysis of the polarization transfers measured in real Compton scattering (RCS) by the Collaboration E07-002 at the Je fferson Lab Hall-C are presented. The data were collected at large scattering angle (theta_cm = 70deg) and with a polarized incident photon beam at an average energy of 3.8 GeV. Such a kind of experiments allows one to understand more deeply the reaction mechanism, that involves a real photon, by extracting both Compton form factors and Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) (also relevant for possibly shedding light on the total angular momentum of the nucleon). The obtained results for the longitudinal and transverse polarization transfers K_LL and K_LT, are of crucial importance, since they confirm unambiguously the disagreement between experimental data and pQCD prediction, as it was found in E99-114 experiment, and favor the Handbag mechanism. The E99-114 and E07-002 results can contribute to attract new interest on the great yield of the Compton scattering by a nucleon target, as demonstrated by the recent approval of an experimental proposal submitted to the Jefferson Lab PAC 42 for a Wide-angle Compton Scattering experiment, at 8 and 10 GeV Photon Energies. The new experiments approved to run with the updated 12 GeV electron beam at JLab, are characterized by much higher luminosities, and a new GEM tracker is under development to tackle the challenging backgrounds. Within this context, we present a new multistep tracking algorithm, based on (i) a Neural Network (NN) designed for a fast and efficient association of the hits measured by the GEM detector which allows the track identification, and (ii) the application of both a Kalman filter and Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoother to further improve the track reconstruction. The full procedure, i.e. NN and filtering, appears very promising, with high performances in terms of both association effciency and reconstruction accuracy, and these preliminary results will

  1. Linearly polarized photons at ELSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, Holger [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    To investigate the nucleon resonance regime in meson photoproduction, double polarization experiments are currently performed at the electron accelerator ELSA in Bonn. The experiments make use of a polarized target and circularly or linearly polarized photon beams. Linearly polarized photons are produced by coherent bremsstrahlung from an accurately aligned diamond crystal. The orientation of the crystal with respect to the electron beam is measured using the Stonehenge-Technique. Both, the energy of maximum polarization and the plane of polarization, can be deliberately chosen for the experiment. The linearly polarized beam provides the basis for the measurement of azimuthal beam asymmetries, such as {sigma} (unpolarized target) and G (polarized target). These observables are extracted in various single and multiple meson photoproduction channels.

  2. The effect of fermentable carbohydrate on sporulation and butanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum P262

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awang, G.M.; Ingledew, W.M.; Jones, G.A. (Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Applied Microbiology and Food Science)

    1992-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether or not a variation in the type of carbohydrate fermented by Clostridium acetobutylicum could be exploited to inhibit sporulation during the butanol-producing phase of fermentation and thus enhance butanol production. C. acetobutylicum P262 was found to ferment a wide variety of carbohydrates, but butanol production was not necessarily enhanced when percentage sporulation was low. Butanol concentration was more related to the total amount of acidic end-products (acetic and butyric acid) reutilized by the microorganism for solvent production and to the type and amount of carbohydrate utilized. Fermentation of cellobiose led to conditions resulting in complete acid reutilization and the highest butanol concentration (10.4-10.6 g/l). In cultures containing a mixture of glucose and cellobiose, glucose repression of cellobiose utilization resulted in lower butanol concentrations (6.6-7.5 g/l). Sporulation was dependent on the type of carbohydrate utilized by the microorgamism. Glucose had a greater enhancing effect on the sporulation process (22-42%) than starch (9-12%) or cellobiose (22-34%). It was concluded that whereas the type of carbohydrate fermented has a specific effect on the extent of sporulation of a culture, conditions of low sporulation did not enhance butanol concentration unless carbohydrate utilization and the reutilization of acidic products were high. (orig.).

  3. Experimental investigation on CRDI engine using butanol-biodiesel-diesel blends as fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divakar Shetty, A. S.; Dineshkumar, L.; Koundinya, Sandeep; Mane, Swetha K.

    2017-07-01

    In this research work an experimental investigation of butanol-biodisel-diesel blends on combustion, performance and emission characteristics of a direct injection (DI) diesel engine is carried out. The blends are prepared at different proportions and fuel properties such as calorific value, viscosity, flash point and fire point, cloud point, pour point of butanol (B), biodiesel (B), diesel (D), biodiesel-diesel (BD) blends and butanol-biodiesel-diesel (BBD) blends are determined. The engine test is conducted at different speed and load. From the results obtained for fuel properties we can observe that the flash, fire and pour point, viscosity and density are decreasing by increasing the percentage of butanol in BBD blends. It is also observed that the performance parameters such as brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and exhaust gas temperature increases with increase in the proportion of butanol in BBD blend. However, the brake specific fuel consumption (BFSC) decreases with increase in the proportion of butanol in BBD blend. The increase of butanol in BBD blends also influence to increase on emission characteristic such as carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx).

  4. Central depressant activity of butanol fraction of Securinega virosa root bark in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, Mohammed Garba; Yaro, Abdullahi Hamza; Musa, Aliyu Muhammad; Anuka, Joseph Akponso; Abdu-Aguye, Ibrahim; Hussaini, Isa Marte

    2012-05-07

    Securinega virosa is a commonly used medicinal plant in African traditional medicine in the management of epilepsy and mental illness. Previous studies in our laboratory showed that the crude methanol root bark extract of the plant possesses significant behavioral effect in laboratory animals. In an attempt to isolate and characterize the biological principles responsible for the observed activity, this study is aimed at evaluating the central depressant activity of the butanol fraction of the methanol root bark extract of Securinega virosa. The medial lethal dose of the butanol fraction was estimated using the method of Lorke. Preliminary phytochemical screening was conducted on the butanol fraction using standard protocol. The behavioral effect of the butanol fraction (75, 150 and 300mg/kg) was evaluated using diazepam induced sleep test, hole-board test, beam walking assay, staircase test, open field test and elevated plus maze assay, all in mice. The median lethal dose of the butanol fraction was estimated to be 1256.9mg/kg. The preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, alkaloids, flavonoids, cardiac glycosides, similar to those found in the crude methanol extract. The butanol fraction significantly (Ptime taken to complete the task and number of foot slips in the beam walking assay, suggesting that it does not induce significant motor coordination deficit. Diazepam (2mg/kg), the standard agent used significantly (Popen field test, the butanol fraction significantly reduced the number of square crossed as well as the number of rearing. However, the butanol fraction did not significantly alter the behavior of mice in the elevated plus maze assay, while diazepam (0.5mg/kg) significantly (Ptime spent in the open arm and reduced the number of closed arm entry. The findings of this study suggest that the butanol fraction of Securinega virosa root bark contains some bioactive principles that are sedative in nature. Copyright

  5. Reaction Mechanisms and HCCI Combustion Processes of Mixtures of n-Heptane and the Butanols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu eWang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A reduced primary reference fuel (PRF-Alcohol-Di-tert-butyl Peroxide (DTBP mechanism with 108 species and 435 reactions, including sub-mechanisms of PRF, methanol, ethanol, DTBP and the four butanol isomers, is proposed for homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI engine combustion simulations of butanol isomers/n-heptane mixtures. HCCI experiments fuelled with butanol isomer/n-heptane mixtures on two different engines are conducted for the validation of proposed mechanism. The mechanism has been validated against shock tube ignition delays, laminar flame speeds, species profiles in premixed flames and engine HCCI combustion data, and good agreements with experimental results are demonstrated under various validation conditions. It is found that although the reactivity of neat tert-butanol is the lowest, mixtures of tert-butanol/n-heptane exhibit the highest reactivity among the butanol isomer/n-heptane mixtures if the n-heptane blending ratio exceeds 20% (mole. Kinetic analysis shows that the highest C-H bond energy in the tert-butanol molecule is partially responsible for this phenomenon. It is also found that the reaction tC4H9OH+CH3O2 =tC4H9O+CH3O2H plays important role and eventually produces the OH radical to promote the ignition and combustion. The proposed mechanism is able to capture HCCI combustion processes of the butanol/n-heptane mixtures under different operating conditions. In addition, the trend that tert-butanol /n-heptane has the highest reactivity is also captured in HCCI combustion simulations. The results indicate that the current mechanism can be used for HCCI engine predictions of PRF and alcohol fuels.

  6. Effect of Si/Al{sub 2} Ratio on 2-butanol Dehydration over HY Zeolite Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Euna; Choi, Hyeonhee; Jeon, Jong-Ki [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Synthesis of butenes through dehydration of 2-butanol was investigated over HY zeolite catalysts. 2-Butanol dehydration reaction was carried out in a fixed bed catalytic reactor. 2-Butanol conversion was increased with increase of Si/Al{sub 2} ratio of HY zeolite catalysts, which can be ascribed to increase of acid strength with increase of Si/Al{sub 2} ratio. Selectivities to 1-butene, trans-2-butene, and cis-2-butene were not greatly influenced by the change of the Si/Al{sub 2} ratio of HY zeolite. As a result, it was advantageous to use a HY zeolite catalyst with 60 Si/Al{sub 2} ratio for maximizing the yield of 1-butene in the dehydration of 2-butanol. The optimal reaction temperature for maximizing the yield of 1-butene was 250 .deg. C over HY (60) catalyst.

  7. Effect of Si/Al2 Ratio on 2-butanol Dehydration over HY Zeolite Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Euna; Choi, Hyeonhee; Jeon, Jong-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of butenes through dehydration of 2-butanol was investigated over HY zeolite catalysts. 2-Butanol dehydration reaction was carried out in a fixed bed catalytic reactor. 2-Butanol conversion was increased with increase of Si/Al 2 ratio of HY zeolite catalysts, which can be ascribed to increase of acid strength with increase of Si/Al 2 ratio. Selectivities to 1-butene, trans-2-butene, and cis-2-butene were not greatly influenced by the change of the Si/Al 2 ratio of HY zeolite. As a result, it was advantageous to use a HY zeolite catalyst with 60 Si/Al 2 ratio for maximizing the yield of 1-butene in the dehydration of 2-butanol. The optimal reaction temperature for maximizing the yield of 1-butene was 250 .deg. C over HY (60) catalyst

  8. Detoxification of furfural residues hydrolysate for butanol fermentation by Clostridium saccharobutylicum DSM 13864.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jin-Jun; Han, Rui-Zhi; Xu, Guo-Chao; Gong, Lei; Xing, Wan-Ru; Ni, Ye

    2018-07-01

    The toxicity of furfural residues (FRs) hydrolysate is a major obstacle in its application. This work focused on the detoxification of FRs hydrolysate and its application in butanol fermentation. Combination of activated carbon and resin 717 was appropriate for the detoxification of hydrolysate. Mixed sterilization of FRs hydrolysate and corn steep liquor (CSL) was better than the separate ones, since proteins in CSL could adsorb and remove toxic components during sterilization. The results further confirmed that simultaneous sterilization of activated carbon + resin and fermentation medium was more efficient for detoxification and butanol production, in which 76.4% of phenolic compounds and 99.3% of Maillard reaction products were removed, 8.48 g/L butanol and 12.61 g/L total solvent were obtained. This study provides feasible and economic approaches for the detoxification of FRs hydrolysate and its application in butanol production. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of n-Butanol on Chromosomal Damage in Mice Bone Marrow Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Mansouri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: n-Butanol is a four-carbon alcohol used widely in foods, cosmetics industries, biology and chemistry research laboratories, and other fields. Long time-effects of inhalation or consumption of small amounts of Butanol on human health are still unknown. On the other hand, numerous reports about the development of n-Butanol toxicity are available. The main objective of the study was to investigate the effects of inhaled and oral administration of n-Butanol as a long-term in vivo investigation.Materials and Methods: Small white laboratory, male mice (20-30 g were used in 11 groups (n=4 including experimental 1 to 6, 1 to 4 control "A” and positive control groups. Experimental groups 1-3, for 10, 20, and 40 days; 5 hours a day were inside a box with ventilation facilities exposed to air saturated with n-Butanol vapor. Experimental groups 4 to 6, received water containing n-Butanol 0.2%, 1% and 5% for 10 days. Control groups B, 1 to 3 was placed for 10, 20, and 40 days inside a similar box exposed to normal air, respectively. Control group B 4 received water without any particular substance for 10 days. The positive control group received 30µl subcutaneous vinblastine. Bone marrow cells were extracted 24 hours after treatments and stained by May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining and the number of micronucleus was counted. Vinblastine, as a positive control, increased an average of micronucleus numbers significantly compared to control group (P<0.001.Results: n-Butanol inhalation caused no significant difference in 1-3 experimental groups in the average numbers of micronucleus compared to control group, even in the 40 days treatment group, average numbers of micronucleus was decreased comparing to control group (P<0.05. Also, oral administration of 0.2% and 1% n-Butanol had no effect on the average micronucleus numbers compared to the control group, while oral administration of 5% n-Butanol caused even decrease in average numbers of micronucleus

  10. Solubility of carbon dioxide, methane, and ethane in 1-butanol and saturated liquid densities and viscosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariznovi, Mohammad; Nourozieh, Hossein; Abedi, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental solubilities of CH 4 , C 2 H 6 , and CO 2 in 1-butanol and saturated liquid properties. • Solubilities and saturated liquid densities were predicted with SRK and PR EOS. • Solubility of C 2 H 6 in 1-butanol is higher than CH 4 and CO 2 . • Liquid density and viscosity reduces with dissolution of CH 4 and C 2 H 6 . • Dissolution of CO 2 increases liquid density and reduces liquid viscosity. -- Abstract: A designed pressure–volume–temperature (PVT) apparatus has been used to measure the (vapor + liquid) equilibrium properties of three binary mixtures (methane +, ethane +, and carbon dioxide + 1-butanol) at two temperatures (303 and 323) K and at the pressures up to 6 MPa. The solubility of the compressed gases in 1-butanol and the saturated liquid densities and viscosities were measured. In addition, the density and viscosity of pure 1-butanol were measured at two temperatures (303 and 323) K and at the pressures up to 10 MPa. The experimental results show that the solubility of the gases in 1-butanol increases with pressure and decreases with temperature. The dissolution of gases in 1-butanol causes a decline in the viscosity of liquid phase. The saturated liquid density follows a decreasing trend with the solubility of methane and ethane. However, the dissolution of carbon dioxide in 1-butanol leads to an increase in the density of liquid phase. The experimental data are well correlated with Soave–Redlich–Kwong (SRK) and Peng–Robinson (PR) equations of state (EOSs). SRK EOS was slightly superior for correlating the saturated liquid densities

  11. Impact of higher n-butanol addition on combustion and performance of GDI engine in stoichiometric combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zheng; Yang, Feng; Xue, Shuo; Wu, Zhenkuo; Liu, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of 0–50% n-butanol addition on GDI engine are experimentally studied. • Higher n-butanol fractions increase combustion pressure and fasten burning rate. • Higher n-butanol fractions increase BSFC but improve BTE. • Higher n-butanol fractions enhance combustion stability but increase knock intensity. • Higher n-butanol fractions reduce exhaust temperature and NOx emissions. - Abstract: An experimental study was carried out on a turbocharged gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine fueled by n-butanol/gasoline blends. Effects of n-butanol percents (15%, 30%, and 50%) on combustion and performance of the engine operating on stoichiometric combustion condition were discussed and also compared with pure gasoline in this paper. The results indicate that n-butanol/gasoline blends increase combustion pressure and pressure rise rate, fasten burning rate, and shorten ignition delay and combustion duration, as compared to pure gasoline. Moreover, these trends are impacted more evidently with increased n-butanol fraction in the blends. In addition, higher n-butanol percent of gasoline blends increase combustion temperature but decrease the temperature in the later stage of expansion stroke, which contributes to the control of exhaust temperature at high-load. With regards to engine performance, higher n-butanol percent in the blends results in increased brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE). However, higher n-butanol addition helps to improve combustion stability but shows slightly higher knock possibility in high-load. In that case, the knock trend could be weakened by retarding ignition timing. Moreover, higher n-butanol addition significantly decreases NOx emissions, but it increases CO emissions obviously.

  12. Combustion of n-butanol/diesel mixtures in prechamber diesel engines. Die Verbrennung von n-Butanol-Dieselkraftstoff-Gemischen im Vorkammer-Dieselmotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, E

    1989-01-01

    Systematic tests showed that n-butane was the most promising diesel fuel substitute. Mixtures of n-butanol and diesel fuel were tested on an engine test bench, and the performance was compared with commercial diesel fuels. Pollutant concentrations in the exhaust (soot, particulates, and NO/sub x/) were lower than with unmixed diesel fuel, while the engine performance remained more or less constant. In the problematic operating ranges, partial thermal insulation of the combustion chamber improved the performance of the n-butanol/diesel fuel mixture. (orig.) With 60 figs.

  13. Polarization of lanthanum nucleus by dynamic polarization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Toshikazu; Ishimoto, Shigeru; Masuda, Yasuhiro; Morimoto, Kimio

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary studies have been carried out concerning the application of a dynamic polarization method to polarizing lanthanum fluoride single crystal to be employed as target in experiments with time reversal invariance. The present report briefly outlines the dynamic polarization method and describes some preliminary studies carried out so far. Dynamic polarization is of particular importance because no techniques are currently available that can produce highly polarized static nucleus. Spin interaction between electrons and protons (nuclei) plays a major role in the dynamic polarization method. In a thermal equilibrium state, electrons are polarized almost completely while most protons are not polarized. Positively polarized proton spin is produced by applying microwave to this system. The most hopeful candidate target material is single crystal of LaF 3 containing neodymium because the crystal is chemically stable and easy to handle. The spin direction is of great importance in experiments with time reversal invariance. The spin of neutrons in the target can be cancelled by adjusting the external magnetic field applied to a frozen polarized target. In a frozen spin state, the polarity decreases slowly with a relaxation time that depends on the external magnetic field and temperature. (N.K.)

  14. N-butanol and isobutanol as alternatives to gasoline: Comparison of port fuel injector characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenkl Michael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on an experimental investigation of the relationship between the pulse width of a gasoline engine port fuel injector and the quantity of the fuel injected when butanol is used as a fuel. Two isomers of butanol, n-butanol and isobutanol, are considered as potential candidates for renewable, locally produced fuels capable of serving as a drop-in replacement fuel for gasoline, as an alternative to ethanol which poses material compatibility and other drawbacks. While the injected quantity of fuel is typically a linear function of the time the injector coil is energized, the flow through the port fuel injector is complex, non ideal, and not necessarily laminar, and considering that butanol has much higher viscosity than gasoline, an experimental investigation was conducted. A production injector, coupled to a production fueling system, and driven by a pulse width generator was operated at various pulse lengths and frequencies, covering the range of engine rpm and loads on a car engine. The results suggest that at least at room temperature, the fueling rate remains to be a linear function of the pulse width for both n-butanol and isobutanol, and the volumes of fuel injected are comparable for gasoline and both butanol isomers.

  15. An Experimental and Numerical Study of N-Dodecane/Butanol Blends for Compression Ignition Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Wakale, Anil Bhaurao; Mohamed, Samah; Naser, Nimal; Jaasim, Mohammed; Banerjee, Raja; Im, Hong G.; Sarathy, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Alcohols are potential blending agents for diesel that can be effectively used in compression ignition engines. This work investigates the use of n-butanol as a blending component for diesel fuel using experiments and simulations. Dodecane was selected as a surrogate for diesel fuel and various concentrations of n-butanol were added to study ignition characteristics. Ignition delay times for different n-butanol/dodecane blends were measured using the ignition quality tester at KAUST (KR-IQT). The experiments were conducted at pressure of 21 and 18 bar, temperature ranging from 703-843 K and global equivalence ratio of 0.85. A skeletal mechanism for n-dodecane and n-butanol blends with 203 species was developed for numerical simulations. The mechanism was developed by combining n-dodecane skeletal mechanism containing 106 species and a detailed mechanism for all the butanol isomers. The new mixture mechanism was validated for various pressure, temperature and equivalence ratio using a 0-D homogeneous reactor model from CHEMKIN for pure base fuels (n-dodecane and butanol). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE was used to further validate the new mechanism. The new mechanism was able to reproduce the experimental results from IQT at different pressure and temperature conditions.

  16. Butanol fermentation of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaoru; From, Nikolaj; Angelidaki, Irini; Huijgen, Wouter J J; Bjerre, Anne-Belinda

    2017-08-01

    Seaweed represents an abundant, renewable, and fast-growing biomass resource for 3rd generation biofuel production. This study reports an efficient butanol fermentation process carried out by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422 using enzymatic hydrolysate of the sugar-rich brown seaweed Laminaria digitata harvested from the coast of the Danish North Sea as substrate. The highest butanol yield (0.42g/g-consumed-substrates) compared to literature was achieved, with a significantly higher butanol:acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) molar ratio (0.85) than typical (0.6). This demonstrates the possibility of using the seaweed L. digitata as a potential biomass for butanol production. For the first time, consumption of alginate components was observed by C. beijerinckii DSM-6422. The efficient utilization of sugars and lactic acid further highlighted the potential of using this strain for future development of large-scale cost-effective butanol production based on (ensiled) seaweed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Performance and emission characteristics of compression ignition engine operating with false flax biodiesel and butanol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Atakan Akar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fuel properties, engine performance, and emission characteristics of diesel fuel, false flax biodiesel, and their blends with butanol have been evaluated. Blend ratios used in this study were diesel–biodiesel–butanol (70% diesel–20% biodiesel–10% butanol and 60% diesel–20% biodiesel–20% butanol by volume and biodiesel–diesel (20% biodiesel–80% diesel and 100% biodiesel by volume. Experiments showed that 10% alcohol addition to diesel and biodiesel fuels caused a decrease in torque value up to 8.57%. When butanol ratio raised to 20%, torque value decreased to an average of 12.7% and power values decreased to an average of 13.57%. Specific fuel consumption increased to an average of 10.63% and 12.80% with 10% and 20% butanol addition, respectively. Alcohol addiction into conventional diesel and biodiesel fuel slightly increased NOX emissions. Supplement of alcohol decreased CO and CO2 emissions when it was entrained to diesel and increased it when it was added to biodiesel. It means that addition of alcohol to diesel changed CO and CO2 emissions.

  18. A comparative experimental and computational study of methanol, ethanol, and n-butanol flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veloo, Peter S.; Wang, Yang L.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Laminar flame speeds and extinction strain rates of premixed methanol, ethanol, and n-butanol flames were determined experimentally in the counterflow configuration at atmospheric pressure and elevated unburned mixture temperatures. Additional measurements were conducted also to determine the laminar flame speeds of their n-alkane/air counterparts, namely methane, ethane, and n-butane in order to compare the effect of alkane and alcohol molecular structures on high-temperature flame kinetics. For both propagation and extinction experiments the flow velocities were determined using the digital particle image velocimetry method. Laminar flame speeds were derived through a non-linear extrapolation approach based on direct numerical simulations of the experiments. Two recently developed detailed kinetics models of n-butanol oxidation were used to simulate the experiments. The experimental results revealed that laminar flame speeds of ethanol/air and n-butanol/air flames are similar to those of their n-alkane/air counterparts, and that methane/air flames have consistently lower laminar flame speeds than methanol/air flames. The laminar flame speeds of methanol/air flames are considerably higher compared to both ethanol/air and n-butanol/air flames under fuel-rich conditions. Numerical simulations of n-butanol/air freely propagating flames, revealed discrepancies between the two kinetic models regarding the consumption pathways of n-butanol and its intermediates. (author)

  19. An Experimental and Numerical Study of N-Dodecane/Butanol Blends for Compression Ignition Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Wakale, Anil Bhaurao

    2018-04-03

    Alcohols are potential blending agents for diesel that can be effectively used in compression ignition engines. This work investigates the use of n-butanol as a blending component for diesel fuel using experiments and simulations. Dodecane was selected as a surrogate for diesel fuel and various concentrations of n-butanol were added to study ignition characteristics. Ignition delay times for different n-butanol/dodecane blends were measured using the ignition quality tester at KAUST (KR-IQT). The experiments were conducted at pressure of 21 and 18 bar, temperature ranging from 703-843 K and global equivalence ratio of 0.85. A skeletal mechanism for n-dodecane and n-butanol blends with 203 species was developed for numerical simulations. The mechanism was developed by combining n-dodecane skeletal mechanism containing 106 species and a detailed mechanism for all the butanol isomers. The new mixture mechanism was validated for various pressure, temperature and equivalence ratio using a 0-D homogeneous reactor model from CHEMKIN for pure base fuels (n-dodecane and butanol). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE was used to further validate the new mechanism. The new mechanism was able to reproduce the experimental results from IQT at different pressure and temperature conditions.

  20. Spin exchange in polarized deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przewoski, B. von; Meyer, H.O.; Balewski, J.; Doskow, J.; Ibald, R.; Pollock, R.E.; Rinckel, T.; Wellinghausen, A.; Whitaker, T.J.; Daehnick, W.W.; Haeberli, W.; Schwartz, B.; Wise, T.; Lorentz, B.; Rathmann, F.; Pancella, P.V.; Saha, Swapan K.; Thoerngren-Engblom, P.

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the vector and tensor polarization of an atomic deuterium target as a function of the target density. The polarized deuterium was produced in an atomic beam source and injected into a storage cell. For this experiment, the atomic beam source was operated without rf transitions, in order to avoid complications from the unknown efficiency of these transitions. In this mode, the atomic beam is vector and tensor polarized and both polarizations can be measured simultaneously. We used a 1.2-cm-diam and 27-cm-long storage cell, which yielded an average target density between 3 and 9x10 11 at/cm 3 . We find that the tensor polarization decreases with increasing target density while the vector polarization remains constant. The data are in quantitative agreement with the calculated effect of spin exchange between deuterium atoms at low field

  1. Development of a High-Efficiency Transformation Method and Implementation of Rational Metabolic Engineering for the Industrial Butanol Hyperproducer Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum Strain N1-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Nicolaus A; Li, Jeffrey; Bedi, Ripika; Turchi, Barbara; Liu, Xiaoji; Miller, Michael J; Zhang, Wenjun

    2017-01-15

    While a majority of academic studies concerning acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) production by Clostridium have focused on Clostridium acetobutylicum, other members of this genus have proven to be effective industrial workhorses despite the inability to perform genetic manipulations on many of these strains. To further improve the industrial performance of these strains in areas such as substrate usage, solvent production, and end product versatility, transformation methods and genetic tools are needed to overcome the genetic intractability displayed by these species. In this study, we present the development of a high-efficiency transformation method for the industrial butanol hyperproducer Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum strain N1-4 (HMT) ATCC 27021. Following initial failures, we found that the key to creating a successful transformation method was the identification of three distinct colony morphologies (types S, R, and I), which displayed significant differences in transformability. Working with the readily transformable type I cells (transformation efficiency, 1.1 × 10 6 CFU/μg DNA), we performed targeted gene deletions in C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 using a homologous recombination-mediated allelic exchange method. Using plasmid-based gene overexpression and targeted knockouts of key genes in the native acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) metabolic pathway, we successfully implemented rational metabolic engineering strategies, yielding in the best case an engineered strain (Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum strain N1-4/pWIS13) displaying an 18% increase in butanol titers and 30% increase in total ABE titer (0.35 g ABE/g sucrose) in batch fermentations. Additionally, two engineered strains overexpressing aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases (encoded by adh11 and adh5) displayed 8.5- and 11.8-fold increases (respectively) in batch ethanol production. This paper presents the first steps toward advanced genetic engineering of the industrial butanol

  2. ARGONNE/ NOVOSIBIRSK: Storing polarized deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Promising new results come from a collaboration between the Institute of Physics, Novosibirsk, and the US Argonne Laboratory, initiated in 1988 to look at the possibilities for using polarized (spin oriented) gas targets in high current electron storage rings, the object being to maximize target polarization levels

  3. Improvement of the butanol production selectivity and butanol to acetone ratio (B:A) by addition of electron carriers in the batch culture of a new local isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Shukor, Hafiza; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Improvement in the butanol production selectivity or enhanced butanol:acetone ratio (B:A) is desirable in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium strains. In this study, artificial electron carriers were added to the fermentation medium of a new isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1 in order to improve the butanol yield and B:A ratio. The results revealed that medium supplementation with electron carriers changed the metabolism flux of electron and carbon in ABE fermentation by YM1. A decrease in acetone production, which subsequently improved the B:A ratio, was observed. Further improvement in the butanol production and B:A ratios were obtained when the fermentation medium was supplemented with butyric acid. The maximum butanol production (18.20 ± 1.38 g/L) was gained when a combination of methyl red and butyric acid was added. Although the addition of benzyl viologen (0.1 mM) and butyric acid resulted in high a B:A ratio of 16:1 (800% increment compared with the conventional 2:1 ratio), the addition of benzyl viologen to the culture after 4 h resulted in the production of 18.05 g/L butanol. Manipulating the metabolic flux to butanol through the addition of electron carriers could become an alternative strategy to achieve higher butanol productivity and improve the B:A ratio. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative studies of citric acid, acetone-butanol, and alcohol fermentation processes in beet molasses from several sugar factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovats, J; Zuckerind, Z

    1963-01-01

    Citric acid (I) fermentation is the most sensitive to volatile acids and coloring matter contents of molasses, and butanol fermentation, the least. Citric acid and alcohol production decrease as volatile acids and coloring matter increase, but this last factor has a favorable effect on the acetone-butanol fermentation. Molasses which are suitable for citric acid production are also suitable for alcohol but not always for acetone-butanol.

  5. First measurement of the polarization observable E and helicity-dependent cross sections in single π0 photoproduction from quasi-free nucleons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dieterle

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The double-polarization observable E and the helicity-dependent cross sections σ1/2 and σ3/2 have been measured for the first time for single π0 photoproduction from protons and neutrons bound in the deuteron at the electron accelerator facility MAMI in Mainz, Germany. The experiment used a circularly polarized photon beam and a longitudinally polarized deuterated butanol target. The reaction products, recoil nucleons and decay photons from the π0 meson were detected with the Crystal Ball and TAPS electromagnetic calorimeters. Effects from nuclear Fermi motion were removed by a kinematic reconstruction of the π0N final state. A comparison to data measured with a free proton target showed that the absolute scale of the cross sections is significantly modified by nuclear final-state interaction (FSI effects. However, there is no significant effect on the asymmetry E since the σ1/2 and σ3/2 components appear to be influenced in a similar way. Thus, the best approximation of the two helicity-dependent cross sections for the free neutron is obtained by combining the asymmetry E measured with quasi-free neutrons and the unpolarized cross section corrected for FSI effects under the assumption that the FSI effects are similar for neutrons and protons.

  6. Controlling Citrate Synthase Expression by CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing for n-Butanol Production in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heo, Min-Ji; Jung, Hwi-Min; Um, Jaeyong

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 was successfully demonstrated in Esherichia coli to effectively produce n-butanol in a defined medium under microaerobic condition. The butanol synthetic pathway genes including those encoding oxygen-tolerant alcohol dehydrogenase were overexpressed in metabolically...... prediction program, UTR designer, and modified using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing method to reduce its expression level. E. coli strains with decreased citrate synthase expression produced more butanol and the citrate synthase activity was correlated with butanol production. These results demonstrate...

  7. Influence of Solid Target Reflectivity and Incident Angle on Depolarization Ratio and Reflected Energy from Polarized Lights: Experimental Results of the May 2008 Field Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    enviromental targets . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Figure 25: Relative reectivity of environmental targets . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Figure 26: Relationship...Environmental targets and position of the center . . . . . . . . . . 41 Table 11: Depolarization ratio of enviromental targets...42 Table 12: Relative reectivity results of enviromental targets . . . . . . . . . 42 Table 13: Sand papers and position of the center

  8. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  9. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii from sugar beet pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Carolina; Infante, Celia; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; Lucas, Susana; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2015-08-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) has been investigated as a promising feedstock for ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii. Although lignin content in SBP is low, a pretreatment is needed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation yields. Autohydrolysis at pH 4 has been selected as the best pretreatment for SBP in terms of sugars release and acetone and butanol production. The best overall sugars release yields from raw SBP ranged from 66.2% to 70.6% for this pretreatment. The highest ABE yield achieved was 0.4g/g (5.1g/L of acetone and 6.6g/L butanol) and 143.2g ABE/kg SBP (62.3g acetone and 80.9g butanol) were obtained when pretreated SBP was enzymatically hydrolyzed at 7.5% (w/w) solid loading. Higher solid loadings (10%) offered higher acetone and butanol titers (5.8g/L of acetone and 7.8g/L butanol). All the experiments were carried out under not-controlling pH conditions reaching about 5.3 in the final samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of n-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, EricJ.; Chan, Rossana; Prasad, Nilu; Myers, Samuel; Petzold, Christopher; Redding, Alyssa; Ouellet, Mario; Keasling, JayD.

    2008-11-25

    BackgroundIncreasing energy costs and environmental concerns have motivated engineering microbes for the production of ?second generation? biofuels that have better properties than ethanol.Results& ConclusionsSaccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered with an n-butanol biosynthetic pathway, in which isozymes from a number of different organisms (S. cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Ralstonia eutropha) were substituted for the Clostridial enzymes and their effect on n-butanol production was compared. By choosing the appropriate isozymes, we were able to improve production of n-butanol ten-fold to 2.5 mg/L. The most productive strains harbored the C. beijerinckii 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which uses NADH as a co-factor, rather than the R. eutropha isozyme, which uses NADPH, and the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase from S. cerevisiae or E. coli rather than that from R. eutropha. Surprisingly, expression of the genes encoding the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii (bcd and etfAB) did not improve butanol production significantly as previously reported in E. coli. Using metabolite analysis, we were able to determine which steps in the n-butanol biosynthetic pathway were the most problematic and ripe for future improvement.

  11. Treatment of Waste Lubricating Oil by Chemical and Adsorption Process Using Butanol and Kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto; Ramadhan, B.; Wiyanti, D.

    2018-04-01

    Treatment of waste lubricating oil by chemical and adsorption process using butanol and kaolin has been done. Quality of lubricating oil after treatment was analysis using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of the treatment of butanol, KOH, and kaolin to metals contain in waste lubricating oil treatment have been evaluated. Treatment of waste lubricating oil has been done using various kaolin weight, butanol, and KOH solution. The result of this research show metal content of Ca, Mg, Pb, Fe and Cr in waste lubricating oil before treatment are 1020.49, 367.02, 16.40, 36.76 and 1,80 ppm, respectively. The metal content of Ca, Mg, Pb, Fe and Cr in the waste lubricating oil after treatment are 0.17, 9.85, 34.07, 78.22 and 1.20 ppm, respectively. The optimum condition for treatment of waste lubricating oil using butanol, KOH, and kaolin is 30 mL, 3.0 g and 1.5 g, respectively. Chemical and adsorption method using butanol and kaolin can be used for decrease of metals contain in waste lubricating oil.

  12. miR-181a Induces Macrophage Polarized to M2 Phenotype and Promotes M2 Macrophage-mediated Tumor Cell Metastasis by Targeting KLF6 and C/EBPα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Bi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages can acquire a variety of polarization status and functions: classically activated macrophages (M1 macrophages; alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages. However, the molecular basis of the process is still unclear. Here, this study addresses that microRNA-181a (miR-181a is a key molecule controlling macrophage polarization. We found that miR-181a is overexpressed in M2 macrophages than in M1 macrophages. miR-181a expression was decreased when M2 phenotype converted to M1, whereas it increased when M1 phenotype converted to M2. Overexpression of miR-181a in M1 macrophages diminished M1 phenotype expression while promoting polarization to the M2 phenotype. In contrast, knockdown of miR-181a in M2 macrophages promoted M1 polarization and diminished M2 phenotype expression. Mechanistically, Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6 and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα is a potential target of miR-181a and luciferase assay confirmed that KLF6 and C/EBPα translation is suppressed by miR-181a through interaction with the 3′UTR of KLF6 and C/EBPα mRNA. Further analysis showed that induction of miR-181a suppressed KLF6 and C/EBPα protein expression. Importantly, miR-181a also diminishes M2 macrophages-mediated migration and invasion capacity of tumor cells. Collectively, our results suggest that miR-181a plays a significant role in regulating macrophage polarization through directly target KLF6 and C/EBPα.

  13. Hydrophobic Hyflon® AD/PVDF membranes for butanol dehydration via pervaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Jalal, Taghreed

    2015-10-21

    Novel hydrophobic Hyflon® AD /PVDF membranes were developed and investigated for n-butanol dehydration via pervaporation. The coating protocols for thin defect-free Hyflon® AD selective layer on the PVDF support was optimized. Water and n-butanol transport was measured, analyzing the effect of operating conditions. The water flux through the newly developed membranes was higher than 150 g/m2.h with selectivity for water higher than 99 wt %. The focus was on the use of Hyflon® AD as the selective layer for n-butanol dehydration. The membrane application can be extended to other solvents, supporting an effective and simple method for dehydration with hydrophobic membranes.

  14. Hydrophobic Hyflon® AD/PVDF membranes for butanol dehydration via pervaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Jalal, Taghreed; Bettahalli Narasimha, Murthy Srivatsa; Le, Ngoc Lieu; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Novel hydrophobic Hyflon® AD /PVDF membranes were developed and investigated for n-butanol dehydration via pervaporation. The coating protocols for thin defect-free Hyflon® AD selective layer on the PVDF support was optimized. Water and n-butanol transport was measured, analyzing the effect of operating conditions. The water flux through the newly developed membranes was higher than 150 g/m2.h with selectivity for water higher than 99 wt %. The focus was on the use of Hyflon® AD as the selective layer for n-butanol dehydration. The membrane application can be extended to other solvents, supporting an effective and simple method for dehydration with hydrophobic membranes.

  15. Butanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in a continuous packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Fabio; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Marzocchella, Antonio; Salatino, Piero

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we report on a butanol production process by immobilized Clostridium acetobutylicum in a continuous packed bed reactor (PBR) using Tygon rings as a carrier. The medium was a solution of lactose (15-30 g/L) and yeast extract (3 g/L) to emulate the cheese whey, an abundant lactose-rich wastewater. The reactor was operated under controlled conditions with respect to the pH and to the dilution rate. The pH and the dilution rate ranged between 4 and 5, the dilution rate between 0.54 and 2.4 h(-1) (2.5 times the maximum specific growth rate assessed for suspended cells). The optimal performance of the reactor was recorded at a dilution rate of 0.97 h(-1): the butanol productivity was 4.4 g/Lh and the selectivity of solvent in butanol was 88%(w).

  16. [Particulate distribution characteristics of Chinese phrase V diesel engine based on butanol-diesel blends].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Di-Ming; Xu, Ning; Fan, Wen-Jia; Zhang, Tao

    2014-02-01

    With a common rail diesel engine without any modification and the engine exhaust particle number and particle size analyzer EEPS, this study used the air-fuel ratio to investigate the particulate number concentration, mass concentration and number distribution characteristics of a diesel engine fueled with butanol-diesel blends (Bu10, Bu15, Bu20, Bu30 and Bu40) and petroleum diesel. The results show: for all test fuels, the particle number distributions turn to be unimodal. With the increasing of butanol, numbers of nucleation mode particles and small accumulation mode particle decrease. At low speed and low load conditions, the number of large accumulation mode particle increases slightly, but under higher speed and load conditions, the number does not increase. When the fuels contain butanol, the total particle number concentration and mass concentration in all conditions decrease and that is more obvious at high speed load.

  17. Comparative analysis of the Performance and Emission Characteristics of ethanol-butanol-gasoline blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Sumit; Singh, Perminderjit, Dr; Singh, Gurtej

    2018-02-01

    Global warming and energy security being the global problems have shifted the focus of researchers on the renewable sources of energy which could replace petroleum products partially or as a whole. Ethanol and butanol are renewable sources of energy which can be produced through fermentation of biomass. A lot of research has already been done to develop suitable ethanol-gasoline blends. In contrast very little literature available on the butanol-gasoline blends. This research focuses on the comparison of ethanol-gasoline fuels with butanol-gasoline fuels with regard to the emission and performance in an SI engine. Experiments were conducted on a variable compression ratio SI engine at 1600 rpm and compression ratio 8. The experiments involved the measurement of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen and unburned hydrocarbons emission and among performance parameters brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency were recorded at three loads of 2.5kgs (25%), 5kgs (50%) and 7.5kgs (75%). Results show that ethanol and butanol content in gasoline have decreased brake specific fuel consumption, carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions while the brake thermal efficiency and oxides of nitrogen are increased. Results indicate thatbutanol-gasoline blends have improved brake specific fuel consumption, carbon monoxide emissions in an SI engine as compared to ethanol-gasoline blends. The carbon dioxide emissions and brake thermal efficiencies are comparable for ethanol-gasoline blends and butanol-gasoline blends. The butanol content has a more adverse effect on emissions of oxides of nitrogen than ethanol.

  18. Investigation of n-butanol as fuel in a four-cylinder MPFI SI engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhamodaran, Gopinath; Esakkimuthu, Ganapathy Sundaram; Pochareddy, Yashwanth Kutti; Sivasubramanian, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Global concern over rising greenhouse gas emission levels and the availability of fossil fuels has led to the development of biofuels, and the use of gasoline formulations with oxygenated compounds has become common practice for improving fuel quality. This empirical study evaluated the effects of oxygenated gasoline fuel blends on air quality. Tests were conducted on a four-stroke, four-cylinder multi-point fuel injection (MPFI) spark ignition (SI) engine using an eddy current dynamometer to investigate the combustion and emissions behaviour of n-butanol blends. Blends comprising n-butanol (N10, N20, and N30) and unleaded gasoline were tested over a rotational speed range of 1400 rpm–2800 rpm under a constant load of 20 Nm. The results obtained indicate that use of n-butanol blends produced lower hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) levels than unleaded gasoline but nitrogen oxide (NO_x) emissions were found to be higher. When ignition timing was retarded, NOx emissions for all n-butanol blends decreased. The peak in-cylinder pressures and heat release rates for the blends were also found to be higher than for unleaded gasoline (UG). COV_I_M_E_P of gasoline was higher than that of n-butanol/gasoline blends. - Highlights: • Using oxygenated compound gasoline formulations is common for improving fuel quality. • Blends of n-butanol with unleaded gasoline were tested between 1400 rpm and 2800 rpm. • Blends increased brake thermal efficiency and produced lower HC and CO but higher NOx. • Lower NOx was observed when ignition timing was retarded. • Peak in-cylinder pressures and heat release rates for blends were higher.

  19. Summary of the polarized beam working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienands, U.; Dyck, O. van.

    1989-05-01

    The polarized beam working group reviewed the AGS Bookster and TRIUMF KAON Factory facilities, heard an overview of the subject of siberian snakes, discussed internal polarized gas targets, and made recommendations for further study

  20. Butanol production from concentrated lactose/whey permeate: Use of pervaporation membrane to recover and concentrate product

    Science.gov (United States)

    In these studies butanol (acetone butanol ethanol, or ABE) was produced from concentrated lactose/whey permeate containing 211 gL-1 lactose. Fermentation of such a highly concentrated lactose solution was possible due to simultaneous product removal using a pervaporation membrane. In this system a p...

  1. Towards helium-3 neutron polarizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasset, F.

    1995-01-01

    With a large absorption cross-section entirely due to antiparallel spin capture, polarized helium-3 is presently the most promising broad-band polarizer for thermal and epithermal neutrons. Immediate interest was raised amongst the neutron community when a dense gaseous 3 He polarizer was used for the first time in 1988, on a pulsed neutron beam at Los Alamos. With 20 W of laser power on a 30 cm long, 8.6 atm target, 40% 3 He polarization was achieved in a recent polarized electron scattering experiment at SLAC. In this technique the 3 He nuclei are polarized directly at an appropriate high pressure through spin-exchange collisions with a thick, optically pumped rubidium vapor. A different and competitive approach is being presently developed at Mainz University in collaboration with ENS Paris and now the ILL. A discharge is established in pure 3 He at low pressure producing excited metastable atoms which can be optically pumped with infra-red light. Highly effective exchange collision with the atoms remaining in the ground state quickly produces 75% polarization at 1.5 mbar. A truly non-magnetic system then compresses the polarized gas up to several bars as required. The most recent machine comprises a two-stage glass-titanium compressor. In less than 1 h it can inflate a 100 cm 3 target cell with three bars of polarized gas. The very long relaxation times (several days) now being obtained at high pressure with a special metallic coating on the glass walls, the polarized cell can be detached and inserted in the neutron beam as polarizer. We expect 50% 3 He-polarization to be reached soon, allowing such filters to compete favorably with existing Heusler-crystal polarizers at thermal and short neutron wavelengths. It must be stressed that such a system based on a 3 He polarization factory able to feed several passive, transportable, polarizers is well matched to neutron scattering needs. (orig.)

  2. Isolasi Dan Identifikasi Terpenoid dari Fraksi n-Butanol Herba Lampasau (Diplazium esculentum Swartz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dewi Astuti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Telah dilakukan penelitian yang bertujuan untuk mengidentifikasi senyawa kimia yang diisolasi dari fraksi n-butanol ekstrak metanol herba lampasau (Diplazium esculentum Swartz. Ekstrak metanol diperoleh secara maserasi dan difraksinasi berturut-turut denganpetroleum eter, etil asetat, dan n-butanol. Fraksi n­-butanol difraksinasidengan kromatografi kolom dengan fase diam silika gel dihasilkan fraksi A, B, C, dan D. Fraksi B dimurnikan dengan kromatografi lapis tipis preparatif pada silika geldihasilkan isolat B1. Isolat B1 berupa padatan tidak berwarna danberfluoresensi putih di bawah lampu UV 366 nm. Panjang gelombang maksimum pada spektra UV  isolat B1 adalah 225 nm dan 272.5 nm yang menunjukkan adanya ikatan rangkap tak terkonjugasi. Spektra IR isolat B1 menunjukkan adanya gugus C=C, –OH, C=O lakton, –CO, C–H ulur, dan C–H tekuk. Spektra 1H-NMR isolat B1 menunjukkan sinyal proton pada ikatan rangkap, proton –OH, proton pada –CH2 yang terikat atom oksigen, serta proton gugus metil –CH3. Berdasarkan data spektra UV, IR, dan 1H-NMR maka isolat B1 disarankan sebagai turunan senyawa triterpenoid hopan-lakton. Kata kunci : diplazium esculentum Swartz, fraksi n-butanol, triterpenoid hopan-lakton  Abstract The research  aims to identify chemical compounds isolated fromn-butanol fraction methanol extract of lampasau herbs (Diplazium esculentum Swartz. The methanol extract was obtained by maceration and fractioned by petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, andn-butanol. N-butanol fraction was fractionated using column chromatography on silica gel produced fractions A, B, C, and D. Fraction B was purified by preparative thin layer chromatography on silica gel produced isolate B1. Isolate B1was colorless solid and has white fluorescent under UV lamp 366 nm. The maximum wavelength on UV spectra of B1 are 225 nm and 272,5 nm indicates the unconjugated double bond. IR spectra of B1 showed the vibration of C=C, –OH, C=O lactone, –CO, C

  3. Effects of port fuel injection (PFI) of n-butanol and EGR on combustion and emissions of a direct injection diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zheng; Liu, Jingping; Wu, Zhenkuo; Lee, Chiafon

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A DI diesel engine with PFI of n-butanol in combination with EGR is investigated. • Butanol concentration and EGR have a coupled impact on combustion process. • A combination of butanol PFI and EGR can break through tradeoff between NOx and soot. • DI diesel with butanol PFI has lower ITE than DI of diesel–butanol blends. - Abstract: An experimental investigation was conducted on a direct injection (DI) diesel engine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), coupled with port fuel injection (PFI) of n-butanol. Effects of butanol concentration and EGR rate on combustion, efficiency, and emissions of the tested engine were evaluated, and also compared to a DI mode of diesel–butanol blended fuel. The results show butanol concentration and EGR rate have a coupled impact on combustion process. Under low EGR rate condition, both the peak cylinder pressure and the peak heat release rate increase with increased butanol concentration, but no visible influence was found on the ignition delay. Under high EGR rate condition, however, the peak cylinder pressure and the peak heat release rate both decrease with increased butanol concentration, accompanied by longer ignition delay and longer combustion duration. As regard to the regulated emissions, HC and CO emissions increase with increased butanol concentration, causing higher indicated specific fuel consumption (ISFC) and lower indicated thermal efficiency (ITE). It is also noted that butanol PFI in combination with EGR can change the trade-off relationship between NOx and soot, and simultaneously reduce both into a very low level. Compared with the DI mode of diesel–butanol blended fuel, however, the DI diesel engine with butanol PFI has higher HC and CO emissions and lower ITE. Therefore, future research should be focused on overcoming the identified shortcomings by an improved injection strategy of butanol PFI

  4. Estimation of VLE of binary systems (tert-butanol + 2-ethyl-1-hexanol) and (n-butanol + 2-ethyl-1-hexanol) using GMDH-type neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketabchi, S.; Ghanadzadeh, H.; Ghanadzadeh, A.; Fallahi, S.; Ganji, M.

    2010-01-01

    The group method of data handling (GMDH) method was used to estimate (vapour + liquid) equilibrium (VLE) for the binary systems of (tert-butanol + 2-ethy1-1-hexanol) and (n-butanol + 2-ethy1-1-hexanol). Using this method, a new model was proposed, which is suitable for predicting the VLE data. In this publication, the proposed model was 'trained' before requested predictions. The data set was divided into two parts: 70% were used as data for 'training' (either 10 or 12), and 30% were used as a test set, which were randomly extracted from the database (either 14 or 16). After the training on the input-output process, the predicted values were compared with those of experimental values in order to evaluate the performance of the GMDH neural network method. The model values showed a very good regression with the experimental results.

  5. Densities, Ultrasonic Speeds, and Excess Properties of Binary Mixtures of Diethylene Glycol with 1-Butanol, 2-Butanol, and 1,4-Butanediol at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Anwar; Ansari, Sana; Uzair, Sahar; Tasneem, Shadma; Nabi, Firdosa

    2015-11-01

    Densities ρ and ultrasonic speeds u for pure diethylene glycol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, and 1,4-butanediol and for their binary mixtures over the entire composition range were measured at 298.15 K, 303.15 K, 308.15 K, and 313.15 K. Using these data, the excess molar volumes, VE_m, deviations in isentropic compressibilities, {\\varDelta }ks, apparent molar volumes, V_{φi} , partial molar volumes, overline{V}_{m,i} , and excess partial molar volumes, overline{V}_{m,i}^E , have been calculated over the entire composition range, and also the excess partial molar volumes of the components at infinite dilution, overline{V}_{m,i}^{E,infty } have been calculated. The excess functions have been correlated using the Redlich-Kister equation at different temperatures. The variations of these derived parameters with composition and temperature are presented graphically.

  6. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H B [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  7. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  8. Polarization of Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.

    1957-01-01

    The numerical results for the polarization of Bremsstrahlung are presented. The multiple scattering of electrons in the target is taken into account. The angular-and photon energy dependences are seen on the curves for an incident 25 MeV electron energy. (Author) [fr

  9. Neutron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firk, F.W.K.

    1976-01-01

    Some recent experiments involving polarized neutrons are discussed; they demonstrate how polarization studies provide information on fundamental aspects of nuclear structure that cannot be obtained from more traditional neutron studies. Until recently, neutron polarization studies tended to be limited either to very low energies or to restricted regions at higher energies, determined by the kinematics of favorable (p, vector n) and (d, vector n) reactions. With the advent of high intensity pulsed electron and proton accelerators and of beams of vector polarized deuterons, this is no longer the case. One has entered an era in which neutron polarization experiments are now being carried out, in a routine way, throughout the entire range from thermal energies to tens-of-MeV. The significance of neutron polarization studies is illustrated in discussions of a wide variety of experiments that include the measurement of T-invariance in the β-decay of polarized neutrons, a search for the effects of meson exchange currents in the photo-disintegration of the deuteron, the determination of quantum numbers of states in the fission of aligned 235 U and 237 Np induced by polarized neutrons, and the double- and triple-scattering of fast neutrons by light nuclei

  10. A cytoskeletal activator and inhibitor are downstream targets of the frizzled/starry night planar cell polarity pathway in the Drosophila epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Paul N

    2018-04-10

    The frizzled pathway regulates the planar polarity of epithelial cells. In insects this is manifested by the polarity of cuticular structures such as hairs (trichomes) and sensory bristles. A variety of evidence has established that this is achieved by regulating the subcellular location for activating the cytoskeleton in the epithelial cells. How this is accomplished is still poorly understood. In the best-studied tissue, the Drosophila pupal wing two important cytoskeletal regulators have been identified. One, shavenoid (sha), appears to be an activator while the second multiple wing hairs (mwh), appears to be an inhibitor. In vitro biochemistry has confirmed that the Multiple Wing Hairs protein inhibits the elongation of F-actin chains and surprisingly that it also bundles F-actin. These two activities can explain the multifaceted mwh mutant phenotype. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  12. Alternative fuels in domestic heating markets. Experimental testing of n-butanol as component in domestic heating oil; Alternative fluessige Energietraeger im Raumwaermemarkt. Experimentelle Ueberpruefung von n-Butanol als Beimischung zu Heizoel EL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, H.; Dohn, N.; Rheinberg, O. van [RWTH Aachen (Germany). OWI Oel-Waerme-Inst. GmbH

    2012-02-15

    N-butanol has already been tested successfully as partial substitute for diesel fuel. However, to date there are no corresponding studies available regarding the use of n-butanol as bio-component in domestic heating oil. Thus, physical and chemical norm parameters of n-butanol/heating oil blends and their combustion specific characteristics in steady operation were examined. The combustion of blends of domestic heating oil and butanol (up to 20 % (v/v)) in a common yellow burner did not indicate negative influence and did not yield a significant change in emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides or soot. All tests were conducted without any modifications of the burner to the use of n-butanol. The flash point drops below the limit of 55 C with 1 % (v/v) butanol already and is therefore a flammable liquid. Its use as a substitute for heating oil is therefore limited by safety regulations. Practical applications of n-butanol as bio-component could be its utilization in low concentrations or in facilities providing suitable storage capabilities. (orig.)

  13. Fermentation of sweet sorghum syrup to butanol in the presence of natural nutrients and inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet sorghum syrups represent a renewable raw material that can be available year-round for production of biofuels and biochemicals. Sweet sorghum sugars have been used as sources for butanol production in the past but most often the studies focused on sweet sorghum juice and not on sweet sorghum s...

  14. Chiral recognition in electron scattering by S- and R-2-butanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Nykola C.; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Field, David

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described involving the low energy scattering of electrons from the two optical enantiomers S- and R- 2-butanol. Using a synchrotron radiation photoionization source on the ASTRID storage ring, scattering spectra are reported between a few meV and 140 meV at an electron energy...

  15. High-Tg Polynorbornene-Based Block and Random Copolymers for Butanol Pervaporation Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Richard A.; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Takigawa, Tamami; Kashino, Tomomasa; Burtovyy, Oleksandr; Bell, Andrew

    Vinyl addition polymers of substituted norbornene (NB) monomers possess desirably high glass transition temperatures (Tg); however, until very recently, the lack of an applicable living polymerization chemistry has precluded the synthesis of such polymers with controlled architecture, or copolymers with controlled sequence distribution. We have recently synthesized block and random copolymers of NB monomers bearing hydroxyhexafluoroisopropyl and n-butyl substituents (HFANB and BuNB) via living vinyl addition polymerization with Pd-based catalysts. Both series of polymers were cast into the selective skin layers of thin film composite (TFC) membranes, and these organophilic membranes investigated for the isolation of n-butanol from dilute aqueous solution (model fermentation broth) via pervaporation. The block copolymers show well-defined microphase-separated morphologies, both in bulk and as the selective skin layers on TFC membranes, while the random copolymers are homogeneous. Both block and random vinyl addition copolymers are effective as n-butanol pervaporation membranes, with the block copolymers showing a better flux-selectivity balance. While polyHFANB has much higher permeability and n-butanol selectivity than polyBuNB, incorporating BuNB units into the polymer (in either a block or random sequence) limits the swelling of the polyHFANB and thereby improves the n-butanol pervaporation selectivity.

  16. Butanol biorefineries: simultaneous product removal & process integration for conversion of biomass & food waste to biofuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butanol, a superior biofuel, packs 30% more energy than ethanol on a per gallon basis. It can be produced from various carbohydrates and lignocellulosic (biomass) feedstocks. For cost effective production of this renewable and high energy biofuel, inexpensive feedstocks and economical process techno...

  17. Influence of concentration of sucrose on the acetone-butanol fermentation by different strains of Clostridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadue, K; Saroj, K K

    1959-01-01

    To culture media containing (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (0.34 g) and MgSO/sub 4/ (0.16 g), were added 5, 10, and 20% sucrose, respectively; the pH was adjusted to 6.4 with KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/-NaOH buffer; the volume of each medium was made up to 200 ml. The media were sterilized. After cooling, the media at the 5, 10, 20% sucrose levels were inoculated separately with C. butyricum, C. butyricum 6084, C. acetobutylicum NRRL B-527, C. pasteurianum NRRL B-598, C. butylicus NRRL B-592, and C. pasteurianum ATCC 6013. The cultures were incubated for 20 days at 35 degrees. For maximum butanol yield the 5% sucrose level was optimum for all the strains tested. At the 10% sucrose level great increase in sugar consumption occurred with C. butyricum Frolund, C. pasteurianum ATCC-6013, and C. butylicus IAL 15-152. Twice as much sucrose was consumed with C. acetobutylicum ATCC 6013, and NRRL B-572, and C. pasteurianum NRRL B-598. The increased sucrose consumption did not result in increased production of butanol or acetone. No acetone or butanol was formed with C. butyricum Frolund when the sucrose concentration was increased from 5 to 10%. With the increase in sucrose concentration, the formation of butanol and acetone decreased; acid formation was also inhibited.

  18. Chemical constituents in n-butanol fractions of Costus afer ker Gawl leaf and stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godswill Nduka Anyasor

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The bioactive compounds identified in the n-butanol fractions of C. afer leaves and stem may explain the folkloric use of C. afer plant in the treatment of chronic inflammatory and oxidative stress related diseases. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 78-84

  19. A mesophilic Clostridium species that produces butanol from monosaccharides and hydrogen from polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramono, Sandhi Eko; Lam, Yuen Sean; Ong, Say Leong; He, Jianzhong

    2011-10-01

    A unique mesophilic Clostridium species strain BOH3 is obtained in this study, which is capable of fermenting monosaccharides to produce butanol and hydrolyzing polysaccharides to produce hydrogen (H(2)) and volatile fatty acids (VFAs). From 30 g/L of glucose and xylose each, batch culture BOH3 was able to produce 4.67 and 4.63 g/L of butanol. Enhancement treatments by increasing the inoculated cells improved butanol production to 7.05 and 7.41 g/L, respectively. Hydrogen production (2.47 and 1.93 mmol) was observed when cellulose and xylan (10 g/L each) were used, suggesting that strain BOH3 possesses xylanolytic and cellulolytic capabilities. These unique features reveal the strain's novelty as most wild-type solventogenic strains have not been reported to have such properties. Therefore, culture BOH3 is promising in generating butanol and hydrogen from renewable feedstock. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bio-butanol recovery using non-fluorinated task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Chavez, L.Y.; Garsia, C.M.; Schuur, Boelo; de Haan, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    Biobutanol has received major attention as an alternative for and additive to fossil fuels. Biobutanol produced via fermentation is hampered by low butanol concentrations in the fermentation broth. An efficient separation process is required to make biobutanol production economically viable. In this

  1. Performance and fuel conversion efficiency of a spark ignition engine fueled with iso-butanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irimescu, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Iso-butanol use in a port injection spark ignition engine. ► Fuel conversion efficiency calculated based on chassis dynamometer measurements. ► Combined study of engine efficiency and air–fuel mixture temperature. ► Excellent running characteristics with minor fuel system modifications. ► Up to 11% relative drop in part load efficiency due to incomplete fuel vaporization. -- Abstract: Alcohols are increasingly used as fuels for spark ignition engines. While ethanol is most commonly used, long chain alcohols such as butanol feature several advantages like increased heating value and reduced corrosive action. This study investigated the effect of fueling a port injection engine with iso-butanol, as compared to gasoline operation. Performance levels were maintained within the same limits as with the fossil fuel without modifications to any engine component. An additional electronic module was used for increasing fuel flow by extending the injection time. Fuel conversion efficiency decreased when the engine was fueled with iso-butanol by up to 9% at full load and by up to 11% at part load, calculated as relative values. Incomplete fuel evaporation was identified as the factor most likely to cause the drop in engine efficiency.

  2. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-04

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated.

  3. Experimental investigations of butanol-gasoline blends effects on the combustion process in a SI engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merola, Simona Silvia; Tornatore, Cinzia; Machitto, Luca; Valentino, Gerardo; Corcione, Felice Esposito [Istituto Motori-CNR, Naples (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Fuel blend of alcohol and conventional hydrocarbon fuels for a spark-ignition engine can increase the fuel octane rating and the power for a given engine displacement and compression ratio. In this work, the influence of butanol addition to gasoline in a port fuel-injection, spark ignition engine was investigated. The experiments were realized in a single cylinder ported fuel injection SI engine with an external boosting device. The optical accessible engine was equipped with the head of commercial SI turbocharged engine with the same geometrical specifications (bore, stroke, compression ratio) as the research engine. The effect on the spark ignition combustion process of 20% and 40% of n-butanol blended in volume with pure gasoline was investigated through cycle resolved visualization. The engine worked at low speed, medium boosting and wide open throttle. Fuel injections both in closed valve and open valve conditions were considered. Comparisons between the parameters related to the flame luminosity and the pressure signals were performed. Butanol blends allowed working in more advanced spark timing without knocking occurrence. The duration of injection for Butanol blends was increased to obtain stoichiometric mixture. In open valve injection condition, the fuel deposits on intake manifold and piston surfaces decreased, allowing a reduction in fuel consumption. BU40 granted the performance levels of gasoline and in open valve injection allowed to minimize the abnormal combustion effects including the emission of ultrafine carbonaceous particles at the exhaust. In-cylinder investigations were correlated to engine out emissions. (orig.)

  4. IRIS Toxicological Review of Tert-Butyl Alcohol (Tert-Butanol) (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The IRIS Toxicological Review of tert-Butyl Alcohol (tert-Butanol) was released for external peer review in June 2017. EPA’s Science Advisory Board’s (SAB) Chemical Assessment Advisory Committee (CAAC) will conduct a peer review of the scientific basis supporting ...

  5. IRIS Toxicological Review of Tert-Butyl Alcohol (Tert-Butanol) (Public Comment Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is developing an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) assessment of tert-butyl Alcohol (tert-butanol) and has released the public comment draft assessment for public comment and external peer review. When final, the assessment will appear on the IRIS databa...

  6. The Influence of Water on Butanol Isomers Pervaporation Transport through Polyethylene Membrane..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petričkovič, Roman; Setničková, Kateřina; Uchytil, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 107, APR 2 (2013), s. 85-90 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/1165 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : pervaporation * binary mixtures butanol iso mers-water * polyethylene membranes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.065, year: 2013

  7. Butanol is cytotoxic to Lactococcus lactis while ethanol and hexanol are cytostatic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Anne-Mette Meisner; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    resistant lactic acid bacteria. Combined results from alcohol survival rate, live/dead staining, and a novel usage of the beta-galactosidase assay, revealed that while high concentrations of ethanol and hexanol were cytostatic to L. lactis, high concentrations of butanol were cytotoxic, causing irreparable...

  8. Butanol production from food waste: a novel process for producing sustainable energy and reducing environmental pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficient utilization of food waste for fuel and chemical production can positively influence both the energy and environmental sustainability. In these studies we investigated use of food waste to produce butanol by Clostridium beijerinckii P260. In control fermentation, 40.5 g/L of glucose (initia...

  9. Butanol production under microaerobic conditions with a symbiotic system of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pengfei; Wang, Genyu; Wang, Gehua; Børresen, Børre Tore; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan

    2016-01-14

    One major problem of ABE (acetone, butanol and ethanol) fermentation is high oxygen sensitivity of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Currently, no single strain has been isolated or genetically engineered to produce butanol effectively under aerobic conditions. In our previous work, a symbiotic system TSH06 has been developed successfully by our group, and two strains, C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and Bacillus cereus TSH2, were isolated from TSH06. Compared with single culture, TSH06 showed promotion on cell growth and solvent accumulation under microaerobic conditions. To simulate TSH06, a new symbiotic system was successfully re-constructed by adding living cells of B. cereus TSH2 into C. acetobutylicum TSH1 cultures. During the fermentation process, the function of B. cereus TSH2 was found to deplete oxygen and provide anaerobic environment for C. acetobutylicum TSH1. Furthermore, inoculation ratio of C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2 affected butanol production. In a batch fermentation with optimized inoculation ratio of 5 % C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and 0.5 % B. cereus TSH2, 11.0 g/L butanol and 18.1 g/L ABE were produced under microaerobic static condition. In contrast to the single culture of C. acetobutylicum TSH1, the symbiotic system became more aerotolerant and was able to produce 11.2 g/L butanol in a 5 L bioreactor even with continuous 0.15 L/min air sparging. In addition, qPCR assay demonstrated that the abundance of B. cereus TSH2 increased quickly at first and then decreased sharply to lower than 1 %, whereas C. acetobutylicum TSH1 accounted for more than 99 % of the whole population in solventogenic phase. The characterization of a novel symbiotic system on butanol fermentation was studied. The new symbiotic system re-constructed by co-culture of C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2 showed excellent performance on butanol production under microaerobic conditions. B. cereus TSH2 was a good partner for C. acetobutylicum TSH1 by providing an anaerobic

  10. Polarization: A must for fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didelez J.-P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The complete polarization of DT fuel would increase the fusion reactivity by 50% in magnetic as well as in inertial confinements. The persistence of polarization in a fusion process could be tested, using a terawatt laser hitting a polarized HD target. The polarized deuterons heated in the plasma induced by the laser can fuse producing a 3He and a neutron in the final state. The angular distribution of the emitted neutrons and the change in the corresponding total Cross Section (CS can sign the polarization persistence. The polarization of solid H2, D2 or T2 Hydrogen isotopes is very difficult. However, it has been possible to polarize HD, a hetero-molecular form of Hydrogen, by static polarization, at very low temperature and very high field. The radioactivity of DT molecules forbids there high polarization by the static method, therefore one has to develop the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP by RF transitions. The DNP of HD has been investigated in the past. The magnetic properties of HD and DT molecules are very similar, it is therefore expected that any polarization result obtained with HD could be extrapolated to DT.

  11. Inflammatory Mediator Profiling of n-butanol Exposed Upper Airways in Individuals with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Meinertz Dantoft

    Full Text Available Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS is a chronic condition characterized by reports of recurrent symptoms in response to low level exposure to various chemical substances. Recent findings suggests that dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in MCS pathophysiology.The aim of this study was to examine baseline and low dose n-butanol-induced upper airway inflammatory response profiles in MCS subjects versus healthy controls.Eighteen participants with MCS and 18 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Epithelial lining fluid was collected from the nasal cavity at three time points: baseline, within 15 minutes after being exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol in an exposure chamber and four hours after exposure termination. A total of 19 cytokines and chemokines were quantified. Furthermore, at baseline and during the exposure session, participants rated the perceived intensity, valence and levels of symptoms and autonomic recordings were obtained.The physiological and psychophysical measurements during the n-butanol exposure session verified a specific response in MCS individuals only. However, MCS subjects and healthy controls displayed similar upper airway inflammatory mediator profiles (P>0.05 at baseline. Likewise, direct comparison of mediator levels in the MCS group and controls after n-butanol exposure revealed no significant group differences.We demonstrate no abnormal upper airway inflammatory mediator levels in MCS subjects before or after a symptom-eliciting exposure to low dose n-butanol, implying that upper airways of MCS subjects are functionally intact at the level of cytokine and chemokine production and secretory capacity. This suggests that previous findings of increased cytokine plasma levels in MCS are unlikely to be caused by systemic priming via excessive upper airway inflammatory processes.

  12. Inflammatory Mediator Profiling of n-butanol Exposed Upper Airways in Individuals with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus; Claeson, Anna-Sara; Lind, Nina; Nordin, Steven; Brix, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by reports of recurrent symptoms in response to low level exposure to various chemical substances. Recent findings suggests that dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in MCS pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to examine baseline and low dose n-butanol-induced upper airway inflammatory response profiles in MCS subjects versus healthy controls. Eighteen participants with MCS and 18 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Epithelial lining fluid was collected from the nasal cavity at three time points: baseline, within 15 minutes after being exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol in an exposure chamber and four hours after exposure termination. A total of 19 cytokines and chemokines were quantified. Furthermore, at baseline and during the exposure session, participants rated the perceived intensity, valence and levels of symptoms and autonomic recordings were obtained. The physiological and psychophysical measurements during the n-butanol exposure session verified a specific response in MCS individuals only. However, MCS subjects and healthy controls displayed similar upper airway inflammatory mediator profiles (P>0.05) at baseline. Likewise, direct comparison of mediator levels in the MCS group and controls after n-butanol exposure revealed no significant group differences. We demonstrate no abnormal upper airway inflammatory mediator levels in MCS subjects before or after a symptom-eliciting exposure to low dose n-butanol, implying that upper airways of MCS subjects are functionally intact at the level of cytokine and chemokine production and secretory capacity. This suggests that previous findings of increased cytokine plasma levels in MCS are unlikely to be caused by systemic priming via excessive upper airway inflammatory processes.

  13. New pediatric vision screener employing polarization-modulated, retinal-birefringence-scanning-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system: opto-mechanical design and operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I.; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L.

    2014-06-01

    Amblyopia ("lazy eye") is a major public health problem, caused by misalignment of the eyes (strabismus) or defocus. If detected early in childhood, there is an excellent response to therapy, yet most children are detected too late to be treated effectively. Commercially available vision screening devices that test for amblyopia's primary causes can detect strabismus only indirectly and inaccurately via assessment of the positions of external light reflections from the cornea, but they cannot detect the anatomical feature of the eyes where fixation actually occurs (the fovea). Our laboratory has been developing technology to detect true foveal fixation, by exploiting the birefringence of the uniquely arranged Henle fibers delineating the fovea using retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), and we recently described a polarization-modulated approach to RBS that enables entirely direct and reliable detection of true foveal fixation, with greatly enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and essentially independent of corneal birefringence (a confounding variable with all polarization-sensitive ophthalmic technology). Here, we describe the design and operation of a new pediatric vision screener that employs polarization-modulated, RBS-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system, and demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach.

  14. New pediatric vision screener employing polarization-modulated, retinal-birefringence-scanning-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system: opto-mechanical design and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L

    2014-06-01

    Amblyopia ("lazy eye") is a major public health problem, caused by misalignment of the eyes (strabismus) or defocus. If detected early in childhood, there is an excellent response to therapy, yet most children are detected too late to be treated effectively. Commercially available vision screening devices that test for amblyopia's primary causes can detect strabismus only indirectly and inaccurately via assessment of the positions of external light reflections from the cornea, but they cannot detect the anatomical feature of the eyes where fixation actually occurs (the fovea). Our laboratory has been developing technology to detect true foveal fixation, by exploiting the birefringence of the uniquely arranged Henle fibers delineating the fovea using retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), and we recently described a polarization-modulated approach to RBS that enables entirely direct and reliable detection of true foveal fixation, with greatly enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and essentially independent of corneal birefringence (a confounding variable with all polarization-sensitive ophthalmic technology). Here, we describe the design and operation of a new pediatric vision screener that employs polarization-modulated, RBS-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system, and demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach.

  15. A Numerical Study of Spray Characteristics in Medium Speed Engine Fueled by Different HFO/n-Butanol Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Nowruzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, nonreacting and nonevaporating spray characteristics of heavy fuel oil (HFO/n-butanol blends are numerically investigated under two different high pressure injections in medium speed engines. An Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase scheme is used to simulate blend of C14H30 as HFO and 0%, 10%, 15%, and 20% by volume of n-butanol. OpenFOAM CFD toolbox is modified and implemented to study the effect of different blends of HFO/n-butanol on the spray characteristics at 600 and 1000 bar. To validate the presented simulations, current numerical results are compared against existing experimental data and good compliance is achieved. Based on the numerical findings, addition of n-butanol to HFO increases the particles volume in parcels at 600 bar. It was also found that blend fuels increase the number of spray particles and the average velocity of spray compared to pure HFO. Moreover, under injection pressure of 1000 bar, HFO/n-butanol blends compared to pure HFO fuel decrease particles volume in parcels of spray. Another influence of HFO/n-butanol blends is the decrease in average of particles diameter in parcels. Meanwhile, the effect of HFO/n-butanol on spray length is proved to be negligible. Finally, it can be concluded that higher injection pressure improves the spray efficiency.

  16. The SLAC polarized electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.; Frisch, J.

    1995-06-01

    The SLAC polarized electron source employs a photocathode DC high voltage gun with a loadlock and a YAG pumped Ti:sapphire laser system for colliding beam experiments or a flash lamp pumped Ti:sapphire laser for fixed target experiments. It uses a thin, strained GaAs(100) photocathode, and is capable of producing a pulsed beam with a polarization of ≥80% and a peak current exceeding 10 A. Its operating efficiency has reached 99%. The physics and technology of producing high polarization electron beams from a GaAs photocathode will be reviewed. The prospects of realizing a polarized electron source for future linear colliders will also be discussed

  17. Growth of Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms in the presence of n-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halan, Babu; Vassilev, Igor; Lang, Karsten; Schmid, Andreas; Buehler, Katja

    2017-07-01

    Biocatalytic processes often encounter problems due to toxic reactants and products, which reduce biocatalyst viability. Thus, robust organisms capable of tolerating or adapting towards such compounds are of high importance. This study systematically investigated the physiological response of Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms when exposed to n-butanol, one of the potential next generation biofuels as well as a toxic substance using microscopic and biochemical methods. Initially P. taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms did not show any observable growth in the presence of 3% butanol. Prolonged cultivation of 10 days led to biofilm adaptation, glucose and oxygen uptake doubled and consequently it was possible to quantify biomass. Complementing the medium with yeast extract and presumably reducing the metabolic burden caused by butanol exposure further increased the biomass yield. In course of cultivation cells reduced their size in the presence of n-butanol which results in an enlarged surface-to-volume ratio and thus increased nutrient uptake. Finally, biofilm enhanced its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production when exposed to n-butanol. The predominant response of these biofilms under n-butanol stress are higher energy demand, increased biomass yield upon medium complements, larger surface-to-volume ratio and enhanced EPS production. Although we observed a distinct increase in biomass in the presence of 3% butanol it was not possible to cultivate P. taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms at higher n-butanol concentrations. Thereby this study shows that biofilms are not per se tolerant against solvents, and need to adapt to toxic n-butanol concentrations. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. "Dilute-and-inject" multi-target screening assay for highly polar doping agents using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry for sports drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgens, Christian; Guddat, Sven; Orlovius, Anne-Katrin; Sigmund, Gerd; Thomas, Andreas; Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    In the field of LC-MS, reversed phase liquid chromatography is the predominant method of choice for the separation of prohibited substances from various classes in sports drug testing. However, highly polar and charged compounds still represent a challenging task in liquid chromatography due to their difficult chromatographic behavior using reversed phase materials. A very promising approach for the separation of hydrophilic compounds is hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Despite its great potential and versatile advantages for the separation of highly polar compounds, HILIC is up to now not very common in doping analysis, although most manufacturers offer a variety of HILIC columns in their portfolio. In this study, a novel multi-target approach based on HILIC high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry is presented to screen for various polar stimulants, stimulant sulfo-conjugates, glycerol, AICAR, ethyl glucuronide, morphine-3-glucuronide, and myo-inositol trispyrophosphate after direct injection of diluted urine specimens. The usage of an effective online sample cleanup and a zwitterionic HILIC analytical column in combination with a new generation Hybrid Quadrupol-Orbitrap® mass spectrometer enabled the detection of highly polar analytes without any time-consuming hydrolysis or further purification steps, far below the required detection limits. The methodology was fully validated for qualitative and quantitative (AICAR, glycerol) purposes considering the parameters specificity; robustness (rRT  0.99); intra- and inter-day precision at low, medium, and high concentration levels (CV < 20%); limit of detection (stimulants and stimulant sulfo-conjugates < 10 ng/mL; norfenefrine; octopamine < 30 ng/mL; AICAR < 10 ng/mL; glycerol 100 μg/mL; ETG < 100 ng/mL); accuracy (AICAR 103.8-105.5%, glycerol 85.1-98.3% at three concentration levels) and ion suppression/enhancement effects.

  19. Ejectile polarization and nuclear orbitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, A.; Maruyama, T.; Horiuchi, H.

    1992-01-01

    Ejectile polarization phenomena are studied by the use of 'Quantum Molecular Dynamics plus external mean field' model. It is shown that the far-side contribution increases as the incident energy increases or the target charge decreases. The incident energy and the target dependence of ejectile polarization data is reproduced qualitatively. The near- and far-side contributions themselves are calculated to be almost monotone functions of ejectile momentum as is predicted in a simple projectile fragmentation scheme without the assumption that the linear and angular momentum transfers are negligible, and their statistical average results in various shapes in ejectile polarization

  20. Measuring the sea quark polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makdisi, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Spin is a fundamental degree of freedom and measuring the spin structure functions of the nucleon should be a basic endeavor for hadron physics. Polarization experiments have been the domain of fixed target experiments. Over the years large transverse asymmetries have been observed where the prevailing QCD theories predicted little or no asymmetries, and conversely the latest deep inelastic scattering experiments of polarized leptons from polarized targets point to the possibility that little of the nucleon spin is carried by the valence quarks. The possibility of colliding high luminosity polarized proton beams in the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a great opportunity to extend these studies and systematically probe the spin dependent parton distributions specially to those reactions that are inaccessible to current experiments. This presentation focuses on the measurement of sea quark and possibly the strange quark polarization utilizing the approved RHIC detectors

  1. Ionic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    Ferroelectricity occurs in many different kinds of materials. Many of the technologically important solids, which are ferroelectric, can be classified as ionic. Any microscopic theory of ferroelectricity must contain a description of local polarization forces. We have collaborated in the development of a theory of ionic polarization which is quite successful. Its basic assumption is that the polarization is derived from the properties of the individual ions. We have applied this theory successfully to diverse subjects as linear and nonlinear optical response, phonon dispersion, and piezoelectricity. We have developed numerical methods using the local Density approximation to calculate the multipole polarizabilities of ions when subject to various fields. We have also developed methods of calculating the nonlinear hyperpolarizability, and showed that it can be used to explain light scattering experiments. This paper elaborates on this polarization theory

  2. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to √s=500 GeV

  3. Polarization experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halzen, F.

    1977-02-01

    In a theoretical review of polarization experiments two important points are emphasized: (a) their versatility and their relevance to a large variety of aspects of hadron physics (tests of basic symmetries; a probe of strong interaction dynamics; a tool for hadron spectroscopy); (b) the wealth of experimental data on polarization parameters in pp and np scattering in the Regge language and in the diffraction language. (author)

  4. Optically pumped polarized H- ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    The current status and future prospects for the optically pumped polarized H - ion source are discussed. At the present time H - ion currents of 60 μA and with a polarization of 65% have been produced. The ion current and polarization can be increased significantly if the optically pumped Na charge exchange target density and polarization can be increased. Studies of wall surfaces that permit many bounces before depolarizing the Na electron spin and studies of radiation trapping in optically pumped Na indicate that the Na target density and polarization can be increased substantially. 27 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Characterization of an immobilized cell, trickle bed reactor during long term butanol (ABE) fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C H; Okos, M R; Wankat, P C

    1990-06-20

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was performed continuously in an immobilized cell, trickle bed reactor for 54 days without, degeneration by maintaining the pH above 4.3. Column clogging was minimized by structured packing of immobilization matrix. The reactor contained two serial glass columns packed with Clostridium acetobutylicum adsorbed on 12- and 20-in.-long polyester sponge strips at total flow rates between 38 and 98.7 mL/h. Cells were initially grown at 20 g/L glucose resulting in low butanol (1.15 g/L) production encouraging cell growth. After the initial cell growth phase a higher glucose concentration (38.7 g/L) improved solvent yield from 13.2 to 24.1 wt%, and butanol production rate was the best. Further improvement in solvent yield and butanol production rate was not observed with 60 g/L of glucose. However, when the fresh nutrient supply was limited to only the first column, solvent yield increased to 27.3 wt% and butanol selectivity was improved to 0.592 as compared to 0.541 when fresh feed was fed to both columns. The highest butanol concentration of 5.2 g/L occurred at 55% conversion of the feed with 60 g/L glucose. Liquid product yield of immobilized cells approached the theoretical value reported in the literature. Glucose and product concentration profiles along the column showed that the columns can be divided into production and inhibition regions. The length of each zone was dependent upon the feed glucose concentration and feed pattern. Unlike batch fermentation, there was no clear distinction between acid and solvent production regions. The pH dropped, from 6.18-6.43 to 4.50-4.90 in the first inch of the reactor. The pH dropped further to 4.36-4.65 by the exit of the column. The results indicate that the strategy for long term stable operation with high solvent yield requires a structured packing of biologically stable porous matrix such as polyester sponge, a pH maintenance above 4.3, glucose concentrations up to 60 g/L and

  6. Measurement of Single Spin Asymmetry in 3He↑(e, e'K±)X from a Transversely Polarized 3He Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuxiang [Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei (China)

    2015-05-01

    Spin-dependent observables are a powerful tool to probe the internal structure of the nucleon and to study the dynamics of the strong interaction. Experimental study of the nucleon spin structure has provided us with many exciting and often surprising results. The so-called "spin crisis" in the 1980s revealed the limitation of naive quark-parton models and led to a worldwide effort to study the nucleon spin structure. However, this effort has been focused mainly on the nucleon's longitudinal spin structure. Recently, when the pioneer work revealed the significant role that transverse spin plays in understanding the full structure of the nucleon and in understanding the dynamics of the strong interaction, the study of the transverse spin structure became the new focus of the worldwide effort. Jefferson Lab (JLab) is located at Newport News, VA, US. It is equipped with the continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF) and four experimental halls: A, B, C and D. The accelerator can provide a continuous electron beam (2 ns beam bunch) with high polarization (up to ~ 90%) and high current (up to ~ 200μA) for fixed target experiments in all experimental halls. Hall A consists of two standard high-resolution spectrometers (HRS): left HRS (LHRS) and right HRS (RHRS). Another spectrometer, the BigBite spectrometer, can be installed on request by certain experiments. The experiment E06-010 ("Transversity Experiment") at JLab Hall A is the first measurement of the transverse spin structure of the neutron using a transversely polarized 3He target and a 5.89 GeV incident electron beam. The experiment measured target single spin asymmetries (SSA) and beam-target double-pin asymmetries (DSA) in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) processes. It also collected inclusive hadron (pion, kaon and proton) production data parasitically. The scattered electrons were detected in the BigBite spectrometer with

  7. On the high-temperature combustion of n-butanol: Shock tube data and an improved kinetic model

    KAUST Repository

    Vasu, Subith S.; Sarathy, Mani

    2013-01-01

    The combustion of n-butanol has received significant interest in recent years, because of its potential use in transportation applications. Researchers have extensively studied its combustion chemistry, using both experimental and theoretical

  8. The influence of n-butanol blending on the ignition delay times of gasoline and its surrogate at high pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Agbro, Edirin

    2016-09-24

    The influence of blending n-butanol at 20% by volume on the ignition delay times for a reference gasoline was studied in a rapid compression machine (RCM) for stoichiometric fuel/air mixtures at 20 bar and 678-858 K. Delay times for the blend lay between those of stoichiometric gasoline and stoichiometric n-butanol across the temperature range studied. At lower temperatures, delays for the blend were however, much closer to those of n-butanol than gasoline despite n-butanol being only 20% of the mixture. Under these conditions n-butanol acted as an octane enhancer over and above what might be expected from a simple linear blending law. The ability of a gasoline surrogate, based on a toluene reference fuel (TRF), to capture the main trends of the gasoline/n-butanol blending behaviour was also tested within the RCM. The 3-component TRF based on a mixture of toluene, n-heptane and iso-octane was able to capture the trends well across the temperature range studied. Simulations of ignition delay times were also performed using a detailed blended n-butanol/TRF mechanism based on the adiabatic core assumption and volume histories from the experimental data. Overall, the model captured the main features of the blending behaviour, although at the lowest temperatures, predicted ignition delays for stoichiometric n-butanol were longer than those observed. A brute-force local sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the main chemical processes driving the ignition behaviour of the TRF, n-butanol and blended fuels. The reactions of fuel + OH dominated the sensitivities at lower temperatures, with H abstraction from n-butanol from a and 7 sites being key for both the n-butanol and the blend. At higher temperatures the decomposition of H2O2 and reactions of HO2 and that of formaldehyde with OH became critical, in common with the ignition behaviour of other fiiels. Remaining uncertainties in the rates of these key reactions are discussed. Crown Copyright (C) 2016 Published

  9. Alcohol Selectivity in a Synthetic Thermophilic n-Butanol Pathway Is Driven by Biocatalytic and Thermostability Characteristics of Constituent Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loder, Andrew J; Zeldes, Benjamin M; Garrison, G Dale; Lipscomb, Gina L; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-10-01

    n-Butanol is generated as a natural product of metabolism by several microorganisms, but almost all grow at mesophilic temperatures. A synthetic pathway for n-butanol production from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) that functioned at 70°C was assembled in vitro from enzymes recruited from thermophilic bacteria to inform efforts for engineering butanol production into thermophilic hosts. Recombinant versions of eight thermophilic enzymes (β-ketothiolase [Thl], 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase [Hbd], and 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase [Crt] from Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. tengcongensis; trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase [Ter] from Spirochaeta thermophila; bifunctional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase/alcohol dehydrogenase [AdhE] from Clostridium thermocellum; and AdhE, aldehyde dehydrogenase [Bad], and butanol dehydrogenase [Bdh] from Thermoanaerobacter sp. strain X514) were utilized to examine three possible pathways for n-butanol. These pathways differed in the two steps required to convert butyryl-CoA to n-butanol: Thl-Hbd-Crt-Ter-AdhE (C. thermocellum), Thl-Hbd-Crt-Ter-AdhE (Thermoanaerobacter X514), and Thl-Hbd-Crt-Ter-Bad-Bdh. n-Butanol was produced at 70°C, but with different amounts of ethanol as a coproduct, because of the broad substrate specificities of AdhE, Bad, and Bdh. A reaction kinetics model, validated via comparison to in vitro experiments, was used to determine relative enzyme ratios needed to maximize n-butanol production. By using large relative amounts of Thl and Hbd and small amounts of Bad and Bdh, >70% conversion to n-butanol was observed in vitro, but with a 60% decrease in the predicted pathway flux. With more-selective hypothetical versions of Bad and Bdh, >70% conversion to n-butanol is predicted, with a 19% increase in pathway flux. Thus, more-selective thermophilic versions of Bad, Bdh, and AdhE are needed to fully exploit biocatalytic n-butanol production at elevated temperatures. Copyright © 2015, American Society for

  10. Polarized coincidence electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimann, R.L.

    1975-03-01

    A study is made of the inclusive electroproduction of single hadrons off a polarized target. Bjorken scaling laws and the hadron azimuthal distribution are derived from the quark parton model. The polarization asymmetries scale when the target spin is along the direction of the virtual photon, and (apart from significant exception) vanish for transverse spin. These results have a simple explanation; emphasis is given both to the general mathematical formalism and to intuitive physical reasoning. Through this framework other cases are considered: quarks with anomalous magnetic moment; renormalization group effects and asymptotic freedom; production of vector mesons (whose spin state is analysed by their decay); relation to large transverse momentum hadron production; and a covariant parton model calculation. Spin 0 partons and Regge singularities are also considered. All of these cases (apart from the last two) modify the pattern of conclusions. Vector meson production shows polarization enhancements in the density matrix element rhosub(0+); the renormalization group approach does not lead to any significant suppressions. They are also less severe in parton models for large Psub(T) hadrons, and are not supported by the covariantly formulated calculation. The origins of these differences are isolated and used to exemplify the sensitivity polarized hadron electroproduction has to delicate detail that is otherwise concealed. (author)

  11. High acetone-butanol-ethanol production in pH-stat co-feeding of acetate and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Wang, Qunhui; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported the metabolic analysis of butanol and acetone production from exogenous acetate by (13)C tracer experiments (Gao et al., RSC Adv., 5, 8486-8495, 2015). To clarify the influence of acetate on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production, we first performed an enzyme assay in Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Acetate addition was found to drastically increase the activities of key enzymes involved in the acetate uptake (phosphate acetyltransferase and CoA transferase), acetone formation (acetoacetate decarboxylase), and butanol formation (butanol dehydrogenase) pathways. Subsequently, supplementation of acetate during acidogenesis and early solventogenesis resulted in a significant increase in ABE production. To establish an efficient ABE production system using acetate as a co-substrate, several shot strategies were investigated in batch culture. Batch cultures with two substrate shots without pH control produced 14.20 g/L butanol and 23.27 g/L ABE with a maximum specific butanol production rate of 0.26 g/(g h). Furthermore, pH-controlled (at pH 5.5) batch cultures with two substrate shots resulted in not only improved acetate consumption but also a further increase in ABE production. Finally, we obtained 15.13 g/L butanol and 24.37 g/L ABE at the high specific butanol production rate of 0.34 g/(g h) using pH-stat co-feeding method. Thus, in this study, we established a high ABE production system using glucose and acetate as co-substrates in a pH-stat co-feeding system with C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermophysical properties of N, N-dimethylacetamide mixtures with n-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharolkar, Aruna P.; Murugkar, A. G.; Khirade, P. W.; Mehrotra, S. C.

    2017-09-01

    The refraction, dielectric, viscosity, density, data of the binary mixtures of N, N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) with n-butanol at 308.15 and 313.15 K. The measured parameters used to obtain derived properties like Bruggeman factor, molar refraction and excess static dielectric constant, excess inverse relaxation time, excess molar volume and excess viscosity, excess molar refraction. The variation in magnitude with composition and temperature of these quantities has been used to discuss the type, strength and nature of binary interactions. Results confirm that there are strong hydrogen-bond interactions between unlike molecules of DMA+ n-butanol mixtures and that 1: 1 complexes are formed and strength of intermolecular interaction increases with temperature.

  13. Investigation of hydrolysis products in the acetone-butanol fermentation of vegetable agricultural waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakhmanovich, B M

    1960-01-01

    Determinations of the fundamental chemical composition of corn stalk, sunflower husk, and hemp scutch by chromatography were reported, e.g. pentoses (1.98, 1.98, 2.01%), hexoses (1.59, 1.72, 2.01% respectively.) and various amino acids (arginine, asparagine, histidine, glutamine, glycine, lysine, proline, serine, tyrosine, threonine, cysteine, cystine, alanine, and aspartic and glutamic acids). The sterilized products from the hydrolysis (pentoses, hexoses) in a combined mixture with a meal mash were normally fermented at 37/sup 0/ in the presence of acetone-butanol bacteria for 40 to 48 hours, yielding 10.46 to 12.50% of acetone, 15.09 to 18.0% of butanol, 3.79 to 6.08% of ethanol (a total yielding being 30 to 42% of solvents).

  14. Combining regio- and enantioselectivity of lipases for the preparation of (R)-4-chloro-2-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Jonh J; Oromi, Mireia; Cervero, Maria; Balcells, Mercè; Torres, Mercè; Canela, Ramon

    2007-01-01

    Preparation of 98% ee (R)-4-chloro-2-butanol was carried out by the enzymatic hydrolysis of chlorohydrin esters, using fungal resting cells and commercial enzymes. Hydrolyzes were carried out using lipases from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435), C. rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei (Lipozyme IM), Burkolia cepacia, and resting cells of Rhizopus oryzae and Aspergillus flavus. The influence of the enzyme, the solvent, the temperature, and the alkyl chain length on the selectivity of hydrolyzes of isomeric mixtures of chlorohydrin esters is described. Regioselectivity was higher than 95% for some of the tested lipases. Novozym 435 allowed preparation of the (R)-4-chloro-2-butanol after 15 min of reaction at 30-40 degrees C. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Recent advances on conversion and co-production of acetone-butanol-ethanol into high value-added bioproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Fengxue; Dong, Weiliang; Jiang, Yujia; Ma, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Wenming; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Min

    2018-06-01

    Butanol is an important bulk chemical and has been regarded as an advanced biofuel. Large-scale production of butanol has been applied for more than 100 years, but its production through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process by solventogenic Clostridium species is still not economically viable due to the low butanol titer and yield caused by the toxicity of butanol and a by-product, such as acetone. Renewed interest in biobutanol as a biofuel has spurred technological advances to strain modification and fermentation process design. Especially, with the development of interdisciplinary processes, the sole product or even the mixture of ABE produced through ABE fermentation process can be further used as platform chemicals for high value added product production through enzymatic or chemical catalysis. This review aims to comprehensively summarize the most recent advances on the conversion of acetone, butanol and ABE mixture into various products, such as isopropanol, butyl-butyrate and higher-molecular mass alkanes. Additionally, co-production of other value added products with ABE was also discussed.

  16. Improving Fructose Utilization and Butanol Production by Clostridium acetobutylicum via Extracellular Redox Potential Regulation and Intracellular Metabolite Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Jie; Wu, You-Duo; Xue, Chuang; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2017-10-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (JA) can grow well in marginal lands with high biomass yield, and thus is a potential energy crop for biorefinery. The major biomass of JA is from tubers, which contain inulin that can be easily hydrolyzed into a mixture of fructose and glucose, but fructose utilization for producing butanol as an advanced biofuel is poor compared to glucose-based ABE fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. In this article, the impact of extracellular redox potential (ORP) on the process is studied using a mixture of fructose and glucose to simulate the hydrolysate of JA tubers. When the extracellular ORP is controlled above -460 mV, 13.2 g L -1 butanol is produced from 51.0 g L -1 total sugars (40.1 g L -1 fructose and 10.9 g L -1 glucose), leading to dramatically increased butanol yield and butanol/ABE ratio of 0.26 g g -1 and 0.67, respectively. Intracellular metabolite and q-PCR analysis further indicate that intracellular ATP and NADH availabilities are significantly improved together with the fructose-specific PTS expression at the lag phase, which consequently facilitate fructose transport, metabolic shift toward solventogenesis and carbon flux redistribution for butanol biosynthesis. Therefore, the extracellular ORP control can be an effective strategy to improve butanol production from fructose-based feedstock. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effects of butanol-diesel fuel blends on the performance and emissions of a high-speed DI diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakopoulos, D.C.; Rakopoulos, C.D.; Giakoumis, E.G.; Dimaratos, A.M.; Kyritsis, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental investigation is conducted to evaluate the effects of using blends of n-butanol (normal butanol) with conventional diesel fuel, with 8%, 16% and 24% (by volume) n-butanol, on the performance and exhaust emissions of a standard, fully instrumented, four-stroke, high-speed, direct injection (DI), Ricardo/Cussons 'Hydra' diesel engine located at the authors' laboratory. The tests are conducted using each of the above fuel blends or neat diesel fuel, with the engine working at a speed of 2000 rpm and at three different loads. In each test, fuel consumption, exhaust smokiness and exhaust regulated gas emissions such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and total unburned hydrocarbons are measured. The differences in the measured performance and exhaust emission parameters of the three butanol-diesel fuel blends from the baseline operation of the diesel engine, i.e., when working with neat diesel fuel, are determined and compared. It is revealed that this fuel, which can be produced from biomass (bio-butanol), forms a challenging and promising bio-fuel for diesel engines. The differing physical and chemical properties of butanol against those for the diesel fuel are used to aid the correct interpretation of the observed engine behavior.

  18. Vapor-liquid equilibria for the acetone-ethanol-n-propanol-tert-butanol-water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochigi, K.; Uchida, K.; Kojima, K.

    1981-12-01

    This study deals with the measurement of vapor-liquid equilibria for the five-component system acetone-ethanol-n-propanol-tert-butanol-water at 760 mmHg and prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria by the ASOG group contribution method. The five-component system in this work is composed of a part of the components obtained during ethanol production by vapor-phase hydration of ethylene. 6 refs.

  19. Fermentation of molasses-flour mashes by acetone-butanol bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekasina, E V

    1962-01-01

    With Clostridium acetobutylicum used in a continuous fermentation, where the mash passes through 5 to 12 fermenters, sufficient conversion of starch to mono- and disaccharides will occur; the number of fermenters were chosen and mash changed so that fresh mash remains for 34 hours in the cycle. After a 29 hour fermentation average yields were: acetone 4.5, ethanol 3.0, butanol 7.5%.

  20. EFFECT OF COMPOSITION OF FUEL CONTAINING BUTANOL ON WORKING PROCESS PARAMETERS OF DIESEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Hershan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational researches the effect of composition of fuel containing butanol on working process parameters of 4ЧН 11/12,5 diesel engine on the external speed characteristic have been conducted. Nominal power is 140 kW at engine speed 2300 min–1. The engine is equipped with gas turbine pressure charging with intercooling of charging air, accumulator-type fuel-handling system. Calculations of the working process have been made in accordance with the developed computer program and models. Investigations have been carried out in two stages: without any changes in regulation of fuel-handling system and with cyclic fuel delivery that ensure such value of excess air factor at various operational modes which corresponds to the operation with diesel fuel. All the obtained results have been analyzed in the paper. The paper shows changes in mean indicated pressure, specific indicated fuel consumption, indicated efficiency, specific nitrogen oxides emissions for various modes in question while using 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 % mixture of diesel fuel with butanol. Dependences of parameters pertaining to diesel operation have been determined according to external speed characteristic for various mixtures and the obtained data make it possible to justify parameters of the fuel-handling system. It has been recommended to use a diesel fuel-butanol mixture containing 15 % of butanol without any changes in regulating and design engine parameters. It has been revealed that in order to improve parameters of the engine operational process mixture composition must be changed while changing the operational mode. An injector nozzle with a compound needle for the fuel-handling system has been developed and it allows to change fuel composition according to engine operational mode.

  1. Direct Visualization of 2-Butanol Adsorption and Dissociation on TiO2(110)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhenrong; Bondarchuk, Olexsandr; Kay, Bruce D.; White, J. M.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2007-01-01

    Atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of identical regions of a TiO2(110) surface were gathered before and after controlled doses of 2-butanol (CH3CH2CH(OH)CH3) at ambient temperature (∼300 K). When dosing is initiated, 2-butanol preferentially adsorbs at bridge-bonded oxygen vacancy (BBOv) sites and dissociates via O-H, not C-O, bond scission to form paired 2-butoxy and hydroxyl species evidenced by two local maxima in STM line profiles. The measured separation is 0.4 nm, slightly larger than the measured separation (0.3 nm) between neighboring bridge-bonded oxygen anions in the surface unit cell of TiO2(110). As the dose increases, but before all the BBOv are occupied, there is direct STM evidence of hydroxyl proton hopping to an adjacent oxygen anion row. This process is facilitated by species bound to 5-coordinate Ti4+ rows, presumably undissociated 2-butanol, that hop slowly compared the STM imaging time scale. The backbones of these mobile species are centered over the Ti4+ rows with preference for lying parallel to these rows. On the other hand, the carbon backbones of the 2-butoxy species that fill BBOv's are centered over the O2- rows and prefer an orientation perpendicular to these rows. As the oxygen vacancy concentration increases from 0.4 to 11% and 2-butanol is dosed the ratio of mobile species to 2-butoxy species decreases for doses that do not fill all the BBOv

  2. Heat flux characteristics of spray wall impingement with ethanol, butanol, iso-octane, gasoline and E10 fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serras-Pereira, J.; Aleiferis, P.G.; Walmsley, H.L.; Davies, T.J.; Cracknell, R.F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat flux sensors used to characterise the locations of fuel spray wall impingement. • Droplet evaporation modelling used to study the effect of fuel properties. • Behaviour of ethanol and butanol distinctively different to hydrocarbons. -- Abstract: Future fuel stocks for spark-ignition engines are expected to include a significant portion of bio-derived components with quite different chemical and physical properties to those of liquid hydrocarbons. State-of-the-art high-pressure multi-hole injectors for latest design direct-injection spark-ignition engines offer some great benefits in terms of fuel atomisation, as well as flexibility in in-cylinder fuel targeting by selection of the exact number and angle of the nozzle’s holes. However, in order to maximise such benefits for future spark-ignition engines and minimise any deteriorating effects with regards to exhaust emissions, it is important to avoid liquid fuel impingement onto the cylinder walls and take into consideration various types of biofuels. This paper presents results from the use of heat flux sensors to characterise the locations and levels of liquid fuel impingement onto the engine’s liner walls when injected from a centrally located multi-hole injector with an asymmetric pattern of spray plumes. Ethanol, butanol, iso-octane, gasoline and a blend of 10% ethanol with 90% gasoline (E10) were tested and compared. The tests were performed in the cylinder of a direct-injection spark-ignition engine at static conditions (i.e. quiescent chamber at 1.0 bar) and motoring conditions (at full load with inlet plenum pressure of 1.0 bar) with different engine temperatures in order to decouple competing effects. The collected data were analysed to extract time-resolved signals, as well as mean and standard deviation levels of peak heat flux. The results were interpreted with reference to in-cylinder spray formation characteristics, as well as fuel evaporation rates obtained by modelling

  3. Butanol production from wood pulping hydrolysate in an integrated fermentation-gas stripping process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Congcong; Dong, Jie; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2013-09-01

    Wood pulping hydrolysate (WPH) containing mainly xylose and glucose as a potential substrate for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was studied. Due to the inhibitors present in the hydrolysate, several dilution levels and detoxification treatments, including overliming, activated charcoal adsorption, and resin adsorption, were evaluated for their effectiveness in relieving the inhibition on fermentation. Detoxification using resin and evaporation was found to be the most effective method in reducing the toxicity of WPH. ABE production in batch fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii increased 68%, from 6.73 g/L in the non-treated and non-diluted WPH to 11.35 g/L in the resin treated WPH. With gas stripping for in situ product removal, ABE production from WPH increased to 17.73 g/L, demonstrating that gas stripping was effective in alleviating butanol toxicity by selectively separating butanol from the fermentation broth, which greatly improved solvents production and sugar conversion in the fermentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Polarization study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurushev, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    Brief review is presented of the high energy polarization study including experimental data and the theoretical descriptions. The mostimportant proposals at the biggest accelerators and the crucial technical developments are also listed which may become a main-line of spin physics. 35 refs.; 10 figs.; 4 tabs

  5. Polar Stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    These three images were taken on three different orbits over the north polar cap in April 1999. Each shows a different part of the same ice-free trough. The left and right images are separated by a distance of more than 100 kilometers (62 miles). Note the similar layers in each image.

  6. Dynamic polarization of radioactive nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, Yu.F.; Lyuboshits, V.L.; )

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive nuclei, embedded into a frozen polarized proton target, atr proposed to polarize by means of some dynamic polarization methods. Angular distributions of γ-quanta emitted ny 22 Na(3 + ) in the cascade β-γ-radiation are calculated. It is shown that this distribution does not depend on the spin temperature sing at the Boltzmann distribution of populations among the Zeeman magnetic substates, whereas the tensor polarization of quadrupole nuclei, placed in the electric field of the crystal, causes the considerable sing dependence. The new method promises wide opportunities for the magnetic structure investigations as well as for the study of spin-spin interaction dynamics of rare nuclei in dielectrics. Physical-technical advantages and disadvantages of the given method are discussed for the polarization of heavy nuclei in the on-line implantation mode [ru

  7. Experimental investigation on SI engine using gasoline and a hybrid iso-butanol/gasoline fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfasakhany, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • iso-Butanol–gasoline blends (iB) using up to 10 vol.% butanol were examined in SIE. • iB extensively decrease the greenhouse effect of SI engine. • iB without engine tuning led to a drop in engine performance at all speeds. • iB provide higher performance and lower CO and CO 2 emissions than n-butanol blends. • iB grant lower CO and UHC than gasoline at <2900 r/min, but overturn at >2900 r/min. - Abstract: Experimental investigation on pollutant emissions and performance of SI engine fueled with gasoline and iso-butanol–gasoline blends is carried out. Engine was operated at speed range of 2600–3400 r/min for each blend (3, 7 and 10 vol.% iso-butanol) and neat gasoline. Results declare that the CO and UHC emissions of neat gasoline are higher than those of the blended fuels for speeds less than or equal to 2900 r/min; however, for speeds higher than 2900 r/min, we have an opposite impact where the blended fuels produce higher level of CO and UHC emissions than the gasoline fuel. The CO 2 emission at using iso-butanol–gasoline blends is always lower than the neat gasoline at all speeds by up to 43%. The engine performance results demonstrate that using iso-butanol–gasoline blends in SI engine without any engine tuning lead to a drop in engine performance within all speed range. Without modifying the engine system, overall fuel combustion of iso-butanol–gasoline blends was quasi-complete. However, when engine system is optimized for blended fuels, iso-butanol has significant oxygen content and that can lead to a leaner combustion, which improves the completeness of combustion and therefore high performance and less emissions would be obtained. Finally, the performance and emissions of iso-butanol–gasoline blends are compared with those of n-butanol–gasoline blends at similar blended rates and engine working conditions. Such comparison is directed to evaluate the combustion dissimilarity of the two butanol isomers and also to

  8. Design and economic analysis of a macroalgae-to-butanol process via a thermochemical route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okoli, Chinedu O.; Adams, Thomas A.; Brigljević, Boris; Liu, Jay J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel macroalgae-to-butanol plants are designed and assessed for U.S. and S. Korea. • The lowest MBSP of 1.97 $/L was obtained for the S. Korean natural gas import plant. • S. Korean plant with no fossil utilities had lowest CO_2 avoided cost of 620 $/tCO_2e. • Macroalgae-to-butanol plants CO_2 avoided costs are competitive with other biofuels. • CO_2 avoided costs of assessed plants are most sensitive to changes in gasoline price. - Abstract: In this work, a first of its kind assessment of butanol production from macroalgae through a thermochemical route is carried out. Different process configurations were designed and simulated in Aspen Plus to quantify their mass and energy balances. Furthermore, economic and environmental metrics such as the minimum butanol selling price (MBSP), and cost of CO_2 equivalent emissions (CO_2e) avoided were used to assess the potential of the different configurations under different market scenarios, with comparisons carried out amongst the configurations as well as against standard literature references of similar processes. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was used to assess the impact that changes in key parameters have on the considered metrics. The results show that configurations which import natural gas and electricity as utility sources alongside the macroalgae feedstock offer the lowest MBSP, however they do poorly when cost of CO_2e avoided is considered. On the other hand, the configurations which utilize only macroalgae offer the best potential for cost of CO_2e avoided but have the poorest values for MBSP. In addition, the cost of CO_2e avoided obtained for the best configurations are in line with literature references. However, the MBSP values are higher than literature references for butanol derived from cellulosic feedstock primarily due to the high ash content in seaweed. The sensitivity analyses results show that changes in gasoline prices have a very significant effect on the plant

  9. Butanol production from food waste: a novel process for producing sustainable energy and reducing environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haibo; Singh, Vijay; Qureshi, Nasib

    2015-01-01

    Waste is currently a major problem in the world, both in the developing and the developed countries. Efficient utilization of food waste for fuel and chemical production can positively influence both the energy and environmental sustainability. This study investigated using food waste to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) by Clostridium beijerinckii P260. In control fermentation, 40.5 g/L of glucose (initial glucose 56.7 g/L) was used to produce 14.2 g/L of ABE with a fermentation productivity and a yield of 0.22 g/L/h and 0.35 g/g, respectively. In a similar fermentation 81 g/L of food waste (containing equivalent glucose of 60.1 g/L) was used as substrate, and the culture produced 18.9 g/L ABE with a high ABE productivity of 0.46 g/L/h and a yield of 0.38 g/g. Fermentation of food waste at higher concentrations (129, 181 and 228 g/L) did not remarkably increase ABE production but resulted in high residual glucose due to the culture butanol inhibition. An integrated vacuum stripping system was designed and applied to recover butanol from the fermentation broth simultaneously to relieve the culture butanol inhibition, thereby allowing the fermentation of food waste at high concentrations. ABE fermentation integrated with vacuum stripping successfully recovered the ABE from the fermentation broth and controlled the ABE concentrations below 10 g/L during fermentation when 129 g/L food waste was used. The ABE productivity with vacuum fermentation was 0.49 g/L/h, which was 109 % higher than the control fermentation (glucose based). More importantly, ABE vacuum recovery and fermentation allowed near-complete utilization of the sugars (~98 %) in the broth. In these studies it was demonstrated that food waste is a superior feedstock for producing butanol using Clostridium beijerinckii. Compared to costly glucose, ABE fermentation of food waste has several advantages including lower feedstock cost, higher productivity, and less residual sugars.

  10. Experimental investigation of a spark ignition engine fueled with acetone-butanol-ethanol and gasoline blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuqiang; Meng, Lei; Nithyanandan, Karthik; Lee, Timothy H.; Lin, Yilu; Lee, Chia-fon F.; Liao, Shengming

    2017-01-01

    Bio-butanol is typically produced by acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, however, the recovery of bio-butanol from the ABE mixture involves high costs and energy consumption. Hence it is of interest to study the intermediate fermentation product, i.e. ABE, as a potentially alternative fuel. In this study, an experimental investigation of the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a port fuel-injection SI engine fueled with ABE-gasoline blends was carried out. By testing different ABE-gasoline blends with varying ABE content (0 vol%, 10 vol%, 30 vol% and 60 vol% referred to as G100, ABE10, ABE30 and ABE60), ABE formulation (A:B:E of 1:8:1, 3:6:1 and 5:4:1 referred to as ABE(181), ABE(361) and ABE(541)), and water content (0.5 vol% and 1 vol% water referred to as W0.5 and W1), it was found that ABE(361)30 performed well in terms of engine performance and emissions, including brake thermal efficiency (BTE), brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and nitrogen oxides (NO_x) emissions. Then, ABE(361)30 was compared with conventional fuels, including E30, B30 (30 vol% ethanol or butanol blended with gasoline) and pure gasoline (G100) under various equivalence ratios and engine loads. Overall, a higher BTE (0.2–1.4%) and lower CO (1.4–4.4%), UHC (0.3–9.9%) and NO_x (4.2–14.6%) emissions were observed for ABE(361)30 compared to those of G100 in some cases. Therefore, ABE could be a good alternative fuel to gasoline due to the environmentally benign manufacturing process (from non-edible biomass feedstock and without a recovery process), and the potential to improve energy efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions. - Highlights: • ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) was used as a green alternative fuel. • ABE-gasoline blends with various ratios of ABE, ABE component and water were test. • Combustion, performance and emissions characteristics were investigated. • Adding ABE into

  11. Radioimmunoassay for abscisic acid: properties of cross-reacting polar metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Page-Degivry, M.; Bulard, C. (Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques, 06 - Nice (France))

    When the radioimmunoassay developed for abscisic acid (ABA) estimation was applied to a plant extract, results appeared overestimated. Purification by thin-layer chromatography established that ABA in its free and alkali-hydrolysable forms constituted only a small part of the immunoreactive material. The major source of the cross-reactivity was a group of polar metabolites, poorly soluble in ether and well recovered by ethyl acetate and butanol. These immunoreactive metabolites were compared with polar metabolites already described in experiments where (/sup 14/C)ABA was fed to plant tissue, particularly with recently identified glucosides of ABA and dihydrophaseic acid.

  12. A radioimmunoassay for abscisic acid: properties of cross-reacting polar metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Page-Degivry, M.; Bulard, C.

    1984-01-01

    When the radioimmunoassay developed for abscisic acid (ABA) estimation was applied to a plant extract, results appeared overestimated. Purification by thin-layer chromatography established that ABA in its free and alkali-hydrolysable forms constituted only a small part of the immunoreactive material. The major source of the cross-reactivity was a group of polar metabolites, poorly soluble in ether and well recovered by ethyl acetate and butanol. These immunoreactive metabolites were compared with polar metabolites already described in experiments wher e [ 14 C]ABA was fed to plant tissue, particularly with recently identified glucosides of ABA and dihydrophaseic acid

  13. Pion elastic scattering from polarized 13C in the energy region of the P33 resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yifen, Yen

    1992-08-01

    Asymmetries (A y ) and differential cross sections (dσ/dΩ) were measured for π + and π - elastic scattering using polarized and unpolarized 13 C targets. The experiment was done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility with the pion beam from the Low Energy Pion channel. The scattered pions were detected with the Large Acceptance Spectrometer. The 13 C nuclei in 13 C-enriched 1-butanol were polarized by the dynamic nuclear polarilization method. Angular distributions of both A y and dσ/dΩ were measured below the P 33 resonance at the incident energy of 130 MeV for π + and π - , and above the resonance at 223 MeV for π + and at 226 MeV for π - . In addition, A y and dσ/dΩ were measured in a range of momentum transfers, 1.75 ≤ q ≤ 2.05 fm - , at several energies. At 130 MeV, the values of A y are significantly different from zero for π - scattering. For π + at 130 MeV and for both π - and π + at all other energies, the A y are mostly consistent with zero. Theoretical analyses were done using different nuclear structure models. The data were not reproduced by the presently available nuclear wave functions. It was found that the asymmetry is strongly sensitive to the quadrupole spin flip part of the transition. The data of this thesis complement measurements of the magnetic form factor from electron scattering. In attempts to fit both the asymmetry and the magnetic form factor, it was found that the pion asymmetry data are not reproduced by the wavefunctions which fit the magnetic form factor at low momentum transfers

  14. Impact of nanoparticles and butanol on properties and spray characteristics of waste cooking oil biodiesel and pure rapeseed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. H.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable biofuels can offset greenhouse gases by replacing fossil fuels destined for internal combustion engines. However, biofuels have their own setbacks and may lead to poor combustion inside the engine cylinder. In this study, nanoparticles and butanol were blended either separately or together with waste cooking oil biodiesel and neat rape seed oil to investigate the impact of these additives on the properties and spray characteristics. The investigation comprised of three stages, with each having an effect on how the next stage of the investigation was conducted. Initially, the physicochemical characteristics of 25ppm, 50ppm, 75ppm and 100ppm concentrations of aluminium oxide and copper oxide nanoparticle blends with fossil diesel, waste cooking oil biodiesel and rapeseed oil were investigated. The results from first stage investigation showed that, in general, blends containing aluminium oxide nanoparticles gave better results for almost all the concentrations when compared with copper oxide nanoparticle blends with the same nanoparticle concentrations. Overall, waste cooking oil biodiesel blended with 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticle showed most promising results like the flash point of 159.3°C, kinematic viscosity @40°C of 4.66 cSt, and gross calorific value of 44.43 MJ/kg. These values were 61.6% higher, 51.3% higher and 3.2% lower than that of corresponding fossil diesel values. Subsequently, in the second stage of the study, the addition of butanol was investigated to assess its ability to enhance the emulsion of biofuel-nanoparticles blends. Four blends containing 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol, and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol, with and without 100ppm Al2O3 were prepared. Results showed that the kinematic viscosity of the fuel blends containing 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticles were decreased by 0.4% and 3.3%, for 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol blends respectively, when compared to without

  15. Impact of nanoparticles and butanol on properties and spray characteristics of waste cooking oil biodiesel and pure rapeseed oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, K. H.; Hossain, A. K.

    2017-11-01

    Renewable biofuels can offset greenhouse gases by replacing fossil fuels destined for internal combustion engines. However, biofuels have their own setbacks and may lead to poor combustion inside the engine cylinder. In this study, nanoparticles and butanol were blended either separately or together with waste cooking oil biodiesel and neat rape seed oil to investigate the impact of these additives on the properties and spray characteristics. The investigation comprised of three stages, with each having an effect on how the next stage of the investigation was conducted. Initially, the physicochemical characteristics of 25ppm, 50ppm, 75ppm and 100ppm concentrations of aluminium oxide and copper oxide nanoparticle blends with fossil diesel, waste cooking oil biodiesel and rapeseed oil were investigated. The results from first stage investigation showed that, in general, blends containing aluminium oxide nanoparticles gave better results for almost all the concentrations when compared with copper oxide nanoparticle blends with the same nanoparticle concentrations. Overall, waste cooking oil biodiesel blended with 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticle showed most promising results like the flash point of 159.3°C, kinematic viscosity @40°C of 4.66 cSt, and gross calorific value of 44.43 MJ/kg. These values were 61.6% higher, 51.3% higher and 3.2% lower than that of corresponding fossil diesel values. Subsequently, in the second stage of the study, the addition of butanol was investigated to assess its ability to enhance the emulsion of biofuel-nanoparticles blends. Four blends containing 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol, and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol, with and without 100ppm Al2O3 were prepared. Results showed that the kinematic viscosity of the fuel blends containing 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticles were decreased by 0.4% and 3.3%, for 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol blends respectively, when compared to without the nanoparticles. The

  16. Electronic device for measuring the polarization parameter in the {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}n charge exchange reaction on a polarized proton target; Un appareillage electronique destine a la mesure du parametre de polarisation dans la reaction d'echange de charge {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}n sur cible de protons polarises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brehin, S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-12-15

    An electronic apparatus has been constructed to measure the polarization parameter P{sub 0}(t) in {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}n charge exchange scattering at 5.9 GeV/c and 11,2 GeV/c on polarized proton target. This device insures triggering of a heavy plate spark chamber, allowing visualisation of {gamma} rays from the {pi}{sup 0} decays when the associated neutron offers suitable characteristics in direction and energy. The neutron is detected by an array of 32 counters and his energy is measured by a time of flight method. Electronic circuits of this apparatus are described as test and calibration methods used. (author) [French] Un appareillage electronique a ete realise pour mesurer le parametre de polarisation P{sub 0}(t) dans la reaction d'echange de charge {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}n a 5,9 GeV/c et 11,2 GeV/c sur une cible de protons polarises. Ce dispositif assure le declenchement d'une chambre a etincelles a plaques lourdes, permettant de visualiser les {gamma} de desitegration du {pi}{sup 0}, lorsque le neutron associe presente les caracteristiques convenables en direction et en energie. Le neutron est detecte par un ensemble de 32 compteurs et son energie est mesuree par une methode de temps de vol. Les circuits composant cet appareillage sont decrits ainsi que les methodes d'etalonnage et de verification utilisees. (auteur)

  17. Experimental study on emissions and performance of an internal combustion engine fueled with gasoline and gasoline/n-butanol blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfasakhany, Ashraf

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Using of 3 and 7 vol.% n-butanol blends in SI engine is studied for the first time. • Engine performance and emissions depend on both engine speed and blend rates. • CO and UHC for blended fuels are maximum at 3000–3100 r/min. • The higher the rate of n-butanol, the lower the emissions and performance. • This study strongly supports using low blend rates of n-butanol (<10 vol.%) in ICE. - Abstract: In this paper, exhaust emissions and engine performance have been experimentally studied for neat gasoline and gasoline/n-butanol blends in a wide range of working speeds (2600–3400 r/min) without any tuning or modification on the gasoline engine systems. The experiment has the ability of evaluating performance and emission characteristics, such as break power, torque, in-cylinder pressure, volumetric efficiency, exhaust gas temperature and concentrations of CO 2 , CO and UHC. Results of the engine test indicated that using n-butanol–gasoline blended fuels slightly decrease the output torque, power, volumetric efficiency, exhaust gas temperature and in-cylinder pressure of the engine as a result of the leaning effect caused by the n-butanol addition; CO, CO 2 and UHC emissions decrease dramatically for blended fuels compared to neat gasoline because of the improved combustion since n-butanol has extra oxygen, which allows partial reduction of the CO and UHC through formation of CO 2 . It was also noted that the exhaust emissions depend on the engine speed rather than the n-butanol contents

  18. Spray-combustion process characterization in a common rail diesel engine fuelled with butanol-diesel blends by conventional methods and optical diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Silvia Merola

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The target of a sustainable mobility has led to investigate advanced combustion modes and fuels technologies. On the other side, the increasing global energy demand and the decreasing fossil-energy resources are enhancing the interest in the use of renewable alternative fuels for compression ignition engines with the target of near-zero emission levels. Although performance and emissions of alternative-fuel within light-duty diesel engines have been extensively investigated, results of fuel chemical composition impact on combustion by integrated optical methodologies are lacking. In order to meet this challenge, one of the main objectives of the research efforts is to characterize the combustion and species evolution. In this investigation, conventional tests and optical diagnostics were employed to enhance the comprehension of the combustion process and chemical markers in a common rail compression ignition engine powered by butanol-diesel blends. The investigation was focused on the effect of the injection strategy and blend composition on in-cylinder spray combustion and soot formation, through UV-visible digital imaging and natural emission spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in an optically accessible single cylinder high swirl compression ignition engine, equipped with a common rail multi-jets injection system. UV-visible emission spectroscopy was used to follow the evolution of the combustion process chemical markers. Spectral features of OH were identified and followed during the spray combustion process examining different pilot-main dwell timings. Soot spectral evidence in the visible wavelength range was correlated to soot engine out emissions. In this work, conventional and optical data related to diesel fuel blended with 40 % of n-butanol will be presented.

  19. Bio-butanol vs. bio-ethanol: A technical and economic assessment for corn and switchgrass fermented by yeast or Clostridium acetobutylicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfromm, Peter H.; Amanor-Boadu, Vincent; Nelson, Richard; Vadlani, Praveen; Madl, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Fermentation-derived butanol is a possible alternative to ethanol as a fungible biomass-based liquid transportation fuel. We compare the fermentation-based production of n-butanol vs. ethanol from corn or switchgrass through the liquid fuel yield in terms of the lower heating value (LHV). Industrial scale data on fermentation to n-butanol (ABE fermentation) or ethanol (yeast) establishes a baseline at this time, and puts recent advances in fermentation to butanol in perspective. A dynamic simulation demonstrates the technical, economic and policy implications. The energy yield of n-butanol is about half that of ethanol from corn or switchgrass using current ABE technology. This is a serious disadvantage for n-butanol since feedstock costs are a significant portion of the fuel price. Low yield increases n-butanol's life-cycle greenhouse gas emission for the same amount of LHV compared to ethanol. A given fermenter volume can produce only about one quarter of the LHV as n-butanol per unit time compared to ethanol. This increases capital costs. The sometimes touted advantage of n-butanol being more compatible with existing pipelines is, according to our techno-economic simulations insufficient to alter the conclusion because of the capital costs to connect plants via pipeline.

  20. Adsorption of water and butanol in silicalite-1 film studied with in situ attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzaneh, Amirfarrokh; Zhou, Ming; Potapova, Elisaveta; Bacsik, Zoltán; Ohlin, Lindsay; Holmgren, Allan; Hedlund, Jonas; Grahn, Mattias

    2015-05-05

    Biobutanol produced by, e.g., acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is a promising alternative to petroleum-based chemicals as, e.g., solvent and fuel. Recovery of butanol from dilute fermentation broths by hydrophobic membranes and adsorbents has been identified as a promising route. In this work, the adsorption of water and butanol vapor in a silicalite-1 film was studied using in situ attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to better understand the adsorption properties of silicalite-1 membranes and adsorbents. Single-component adsorption isotherms were determined in the temperature range of 35-120 °C, and the Langmuir model was successfully fitted to the experimental data. The adsorption of butanol is very favorable compared to that of water. When the silicalite-1 film was exposed to a butanol/water vapor mixture with 15 mol % butanol (which is the vapor composition of an aqueous solution containing 2 wt % butanol, a typical concentration in an ABE fermentation broth, i.e., the composition of the gas obtained from gas stripping of an ABE broth) at 35 °C, the adsorption selectivity toward butanol was as high as 107. These results confirm that silicalite-1 quite selectively adsorbs hydrocarbons from vapor mixtures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study on the adsorption of water and butanol in silicalite-1 from vapor phase.

  1. Enhancing Butanol Production under the Stress Environments of Co-Culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Integrated with Exogenous Butyrate Addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhen Luo

    Full Text Available In this study, an efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE fermentation strategy integrating Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culturing system with exogenous butyrate addition, was proposed and experimentally conducted. In solventogenic phase, by adding 0.2 g-DCW/L-broth viable S. cerevisiae cells and 4.0 g/L-broth concentrated butyrate solution into C. acetobutylicum culture broth, final butanol concentration and butanol/acetone ratio in a 7 L anaerobic fermentor reached the highest levels of 15.74 g/L and 2.83 respectively, with the increments of 35% and 43% as compared with those of control. Theoretical and experimental analysis revealed that, the proposed strategy could, 1 extensively induce secretion of amino acids particularly lysine, which are favorable for both C. acetobutylicum survival and butanol synthesis under high butanol concentration environment; 2 enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and over-produce intracellular NADH for butanol synthesis in C. acetobutylicum metabolism simultaneously; 3 direct most of extra consumed glucose into butanol synthesis route. The synergetic actions of effective amino acids assimilation, high rates of substrate consumption and NADH regeneration yielded highest butanol concentration and butanol ratio in C. acetobutylicum under this stress environment. The proposed method supplies an alternative way to improve ABE fermentation performance by traditional fermentation technology.

  2. Recent advance in polar seismology: Global impact of the International Polar Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanao, Masaki; Zhao, Dapeng; Wiens, Douglas A.; Stutzmann, Éléonore

    2015-03-01

    The most exciting initiative for the recent polar studies was the International Polar Year (IPY) in 2007-2008. The IPY has witnessed a growing community of seismologists who have made considerable efforts to acquire high-quality data in polar regions. It also provided an excellent opportunity to make significant advances in seismic instrumentation of the polar regions to achieve scientific targets involving global issues. Taking these aspects into account, we organize and publish a special issue in Polar Science on the recent advance in polar seismology and cryoseismology as fruitful achievements of the IPY.

  3. Lipase mediated synthesis of rutin fatty ester: Study of its process parameters and solvent polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisali, C; Belur, Prasanna D; Regupathi, Iyyaswami

    2017-10-01

    Lipophilization of antioxidants is recognized as an effective strategy to enhance solubility and thus effectiveness in lipid based food. In this study, an effort was made to optimize rutin fatty ester synthesis in two different solvent systems to understand the influence of reaction system hydrophobicity on the optimum conditions using immobilised Candida antartica lipase. Under unoptimized conditions, 52.14% and 13.02% conversion was achieved in acetone and tert-butanol solvent systems, respectively. Among all the process parameters, water activity of the system was found to show highest influence on the conversion in each reaction system. In the presence of molecular sieves, the ester production increased to 62.9% in tert-butanol system, unlike acetone system. Under optimal conditions, conversion increased to 60.74% and 65.73% in acetone and tert-butanol system, respectively. This study shows, maintaining optimal water activity is crucial in reaction systems having polar solvents compared to more non-polar solvents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Baryon spectroscopy with polarization observables from CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Steffen [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The spectrum of nucleon excitations is dominated by broad and overlapping resonances. Polarization observables in photoproduction reactions are key in the study of these excitations. They give indispensable constraints to partial-wave analyses and help clarify the spectrum. A series of polarized photoproduction experiments have been performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). These measurements include data with linearly and circularly polarized tagged-photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized proton and deuterium targets, and recoil polarizations through the observation of the weak decay of hyperons. An overview of these studies and recent results will be given.

  5. Butanol production from wheat straw by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation using Clostridium beijerinckii: Part II-Fed-batch fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, Nasib; Saha, Badal C.; Cotta, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    In these studies, Clostridium beijerinckii P260 was used to produce butanol (acetone-butanol-ethanol, or ABE) from wheat straw (WS) hydrolysate in a fed-batch reactor. It has been demonstrated that simultaneous hydrolysis of WS to achieve 100% hydrolysis to simple sugars (to the extent achievable under present conditions) and fermentation to butanol is possible. In addition to WS, the reactor was fed with a sugar solution containing glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose, and mannose. The culture utilized all of the above sugars. It was noticed that near the end of fermentation (286-533 h), the culture had difficulties utilizing xylose. As a result of supplemental sugar feed to the reactor, ABE productivity was improved by 16% as compared with previous studies. In our previous experiment on simultaneous saccharification of WS and fermentation to butanol, a productivity of 0.31 g L -1 h -1 was observed, while in the present studies a productivity of 0.36 g L -1 h -1 was observed. It should be noted that a productivity of 0.77 g L -1 h -1 was observed when the culture was highly active. The fed-batch fermentation was operated for 533 h. It should be noted that C. beijerinckii P260 can be used to produce butanol from WS in integrated fermentations

  6. Numerical analysis of a downsized spark-ignition engine fueled by butanol/gasoline blends at part-load operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scala, F.; Galloni, E.; Fontana, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Bio-fuels will reduce the overall CO_2 emission. • The properties of butanol/gasoline–air mixtures have been determined. • A 1-D model of a SI engine has been calibrated and validated. • The butanol content reduces the combustion duration. • The optimal ignition timing slightly changes. - Abstract: In this paper, the performance of a turbocharged SI engine, firing with butanol/gasoline blends, has been investigated by means of numerical simulations of the engine behavior. When engine fueling is switched from gasoline to alcohol/gasoline mixture, engine control parameters must be adapted. The main necessary modifications in the Electronic Control Unit have been highlighted in the paper. Numerical analyses have been carried out at partial load operation and at two different engine speeds (3000 and 4000 rpm). Several n-butanol/gasoline mixtures, differing for the alcohol contents, have been analyzed. Such engine performances as torque and indicated efficiency have been evaluated. Both these characteristics decrease with the alcohol contents within the mixtures. On the contrary, when the engine is fueled by neat n-butanol, torque and efficiency reach values about 2% higher than those obtained with neat gasoline. Furthermore, the optimal spark timing, for alcohol/gasoline mixture operation, must be retarded (up to 13%) in comparison with the correspondent values of the gasoline operation. In general, engine performance and operation undergo little variations when fuel supplying is switched from gasoline to alcohol/gasoline blends.

  7. Kinetic Study of Esterification of Acetic Acid with n-butanol and isobutanol Catalyzed by Ion Exchange Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit Pal Toor

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Esters are an important pharmaceutical intermediates and very useful perfumery agents. In this study the esterification of acetic acid with n-butanol and iso-butanol over an acidic cation exchange resin, Amberlyst 15 were carried out. The effects of certain parameters such as temperature, catalyst loading, initial molar ratio between reactants on the rate of reaction were studied. The experiments were conducted in a stirred batch reactor in the temperature range of 351.15 K to 366.15K.Variation of parameters on rate of reaction demonstrated that the reaction was intrinsically controlled.The activation energy for the esterification of acetic acid with n-butanol and iso butanol is found to be 28.45 k J/mol and 23.29 kJ/mol respectively. ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 16th December 2010, Revised: 19th March 2011; Accepted: 7th April 2011[How to Cite: A.P. Toor, M. Sharma, G. Kumar, and R. K. Wanchoo. (2011. Kinetic Study of Esterification of Acetic Acid with n-butanol and isobutanol Catalyzed by Ion Exchange Resin. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 6(1: 23-30. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.665.23-30][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.665.23-30 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/665 ] | View in 

  8. On the high-temperature combustion of n-butanol: Shock tube data and an improved kinetic model

    KAUST Repository

    Vasu, Subith S.

    2013-11-21

    The combustion of n-butanol has received significant interest in recent years, because of its potential use in transportation applications. Researchers have extensively studied its combustion chemistry, using both experimental and theoretical methods; however, additional work is needed under specific conditions to improve our understanding of n-butanol combustion. In this study, we report new OH time-history data during the high-temperature oxidation of n-butanol behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 1300-1550 K and at pressures near 2 atm. These data were obtained at Stanford University, using narrow-line-width ring dye laser absorption of the R1(5) line of OH near 306.7 nm. Measured OH time histories were modeled using comprehensive n-butanol literature mechanisms. It was found that n-butanol unimolecular decomposition rate constants commonly used in chemical kinetic models, as well as those determined from theoretical studies, are unable to predict the data presented herein. Therefore, an improved high-temperature mechanism is presented here, which incorporates recently reported rate constants measured in a single pulse shock tube [C. M. Rosado-Reyes and W. Tsang, J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, 116, 9825-9831]. Discussions are presented on the validity of the proposed mechanism against other literature shock tube experiments. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. Separation of the potential G-quadruplex ligands from the butanol extract of Zanthoxylum ailanthoides Sieb. & Zucc. by countercurrent chromatography and preparative high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tian; Cao, Xueli; Xu, Jing; Pei, Hairun; Zhang, Hong; Tang, Yalin

    2017-07-21

    G-quadruplex DNA structure is considered to be a very attractive target for antitumor drug design due to its unique role in maintaining telomerase activities. Therefore, discovering ligands with high stability of G-quadruplex structure is of great interest. In this paper, pH-zone refining counter current chromatography (CCC) and preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were employed for the separation of potent G-quadruplex ligands from the n-butanol fraction of the crude extract of Zanthoxylum ailanthoides, which is a traditional Chinese medicine recently found to display high inhibitory activity against several human cancer cells. The 75% aqueous ethanol extract of the stem bark of Z. ailanthoides and its fractions with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol displayed almost the same G-quadruplex stabilization ability. Here, pH-zone refining CCC was used for the separation of the alkaloids from the n-butanol fraction by a seldom used solvent system composed of dichloromethane-methanol-water (4:1:2.5) with 10mM TEA in the organic stationary phase as retainer and 10mM HCl in the aqueous mobile phase as eluter. Compounds I, II and III were obtained, with purity greater than 95%, in the quantities of 31.2, 94.0, and 26.4mg respectively from 300mg of lipophilic fraction within 80min, which were identified as three tetrahydroprotoberberines isolated for the first time in this plant. In addition, a phenylpropanoid glycoside compound IV (Syringin), an isoquinoline (Magnoflorine, V), and two lignin isomers (+)-lyoniresiol-3α-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (VI) and (-)-lyoniresinol -3α-O-β-D -glucopyranoside (VII) were isolated by traditional CCC together with preparative HPLC. Compounds IV, V, VI and VII were obtained, with purity greater than 95%, in the quantities of 4.0, 13.2, 6.7, and 6.5mg respectively from 960mg of hydrophilic fraction. Among the seven isolated compounds, tetrahydroprotoberberine I, II and III were found to display remarkable

  10. Target preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinn, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    A few of the more interesting of the 210 targets prepared in the Laboratory last year are listed. In addition the author continues to use powdered silver mixed with /sup 9,10/BeO to produce sources for accelerator radio dating of Alaskan and South Polar snow. Currently, he is trying to increase production by multiple sample processing. Also the author routinely makes 3 μg/cm 2 cracked slacked carbon stripper foils and is continuing research with some degree of success in making enriched 28 Si targets starting with the oxide

  11. Measurement of the left-right asymmetry in pion-proton radiative exchange and charge exchange scattering from 301 to 625 MeV/c on a transversely polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, George Jung-Kwang.

    1988-05-01

    The left-right asymmetry A/sub N/ in π/sup /minus//p → γn has been measured at p/sub π = 301, 316, 427, 471, 547, 586, and 625 MeV/c using a transversely polarized target. The final-state neutron and gamma were detected in coincidence by two states of matching neutron and gamma detectors at gamma angles centered around 90/degree and 110/degree/ c.m. A gamma detector consisted of an array of 15 counters, each was 15/times/15/times/25 cm 3 block of lead-glass. A neutron detector consisted of 15 counters also, each one was a cylindrical plastic scintillator 7.6 cm in diameter and 45.7 cm long. The A/sub N/ results are compared with the predictions from the most recent single-pion photoproduction partial-wave analysis by Arai and Fujii. The agreement is poor, casting doubt on the correctness of the value for the radiative-decay amplitude of the neutral Roper resonance now in use. A comparison is made with the 90/degree/recoil proton polarization data of the inverse reaction derived from γd scattering, there are substantial discrepencies. Charge exchange (π/sup /minus/p/ → γ/degree/n) events were the major yield in this experiment. Very precise values of the charge exchange analyzing power were obtained with an error of typically 3%. The charge exchange results are compared with the predictions from recent γn partial wave analyses. At the lower incident energies little difference is seen between the VPI, Karlsruhe-Helsinki, and CMU-LBL analyses, and there is excellent agreement with our experiment. From the onset of the Roper resonance the VPI solution is strongly favored

  12. Polarized neutron capture in polarized 59Co and 165Ho nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosman, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma spectroscopy on the reactions 59 Co(n,γ) 60 Co and 165 Ho(n,γ) 166 Ho with polarized neutrons and polarized targets enabled the assignment of spins to 36 levels in 60 Co and 15 levels in 166 Ho. Several of them had not been reported earlier. The techniques used to polarize neutron beams and targets and the gamma-spectroscopy are extensively discussed

  13. Enzymology of acetone-butanol-isopropanol formation. Final technical report, June 1, 1985--July 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiann-Shin

    1998-03-01

    Several species of anaerobic bacteria within the genus Clostridium produce acetone, n-butanol, and isopropanol (solvents), which are important industrial chemicals and fuel additives. Commercial production of solvents by the clostridia is a classical example of largescale chemical production by bacterial fermentation. Although the fermentation has been in use for decades, it still faces problems that include strain degeneration, a relatively low final product concentration due to butanol toxicity, and a need to fine-tune the growth conditions to achieve a high yield. The long-term goal of this project was to understand the fundamental properties of bacterial solvent production for the purpose of achieving a positive control on the metabolic switch leading to solvent production and on the proportion of useful products formed as well as of developing strategies for preventing the degeneration of producing strains. The objectives for the project included those approved in 1985 for the initial project period and those approved in 1988, 1991, and 1994 when the project was renewed. The objectives for the entire project period may be summarized as (1) To purify and characterize the enzymes that are specifically required for the formation of acetone, butanol, and isopropanol by the clostridia, (2) To clone and characterize the genes that encode enzymes or regulatory proteins for the production of solvents, and the emphasis was to determine the control mechanism for the transcription of the solvent-production genes, (3) To characterize the onset of solvent production and the intra- and extra-cellular parameters surrounding the metabolic switch to solvent production, and (4) To determine the genetic identity of the strains of solvent-producing clostridia that are currently in use by investigators around the world.

  14. Separation of xylose oligomers using centrifugal partition chromatography with a butanol-methanol-water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ching-Shuan; Clausen, Edgar C; Lay, Jackson O; Gidden, Jennifer; Carrier, Danielle Julie

    2013-01-01

    Xylose oligomers are the intermediate products of xylan depolymerization into xylose monomers. An understanding of xylan depolymerization kinetics is important to improve the conversion of xylan into monomeric xylose and to minimize the formation of inhibitory products, thereby reducing ethanol production costs. The study of xylan depolymerization requires copious amount of xylose oligomers, which are expensive if acquired commercially. Our approach consisted of producing in-house oligomer material. To this end, birchwood xylan was used as the starting material and hydrolyzed in hot water at 200 °C for 60 min with a 4 % solids loading. The mixture of xylose oligomers was subsequently fractionated by a centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) with a solvent system of butanol:methanol:water in a 5:1:4 volumetric ratio. Operating in an ascending mode, the butanol-rich upper phase (the mobile phase) eluted xylose oligomers from the water-rich stationary phase at a 4.89 mL/min flow rate for a total fractionation time of 300 min. The elution of xylose oligomers occurred between 110 and 280 min. The yields and purities of xylobiose (DP 2), xylotriose (DP 3), xylotetraose (DP 4), and xylopentaose (DP 5) were 21, 10, 14, and 15 mg/g xylan and 95, 90, 89, and 68 %, respectively. The purities of xylose oligomers from this solvent system were higher than those reported previously using tetrahydrofuran:dimethyl sulfoxide:water in a 6:1:3 volumetric ratio. Moreover, the butanol-based solvent system improved overall procedures by facilitating the evaporation of the solvents from the CPC fractions, rendering the purification process more efficient.

  15. Densities, viscosities, and isobaric heat capacities of the system (1-butanol + cyclohexane) at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torín-Ollarves, Geraldine A.; Martín, M. Carmen; Chamorro, César R.; Segovia, José J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The densities of cyclohexane and its mixtures with 1-butanol were measured. • The excess molar volumes were calculated and correlated. • The viscosities were measured at atmospheric pressure. • The isobaric heat capacities were measured at p = (0.1 to 25) MPa at T = (293.15 and 313.15) K. • A positive deviation from the ideal behavior is observed. - Abstract: The cyclohexane and the system of 1-butanol + cyclohexane have been characterized using densities, viscosities and isobaric heat capacities measurements. For that, the densities were measured in a high-pressure vibrating tube densimeter at five temperatures from (293.15 to 333.15) K and pressures up to 100 MPa. The measurements were correlated with the empirical Tamman–Tait equation. Moreover, the isobaric heat capacities of the binary system were measured in a high-pressure automated flow calorimeter at T = (293.15 and 313.15) K and pressures up to 25 MPa for pure cyclohexane and in admixture with 1-butanol. The excess molar heat capacities were assessed for the mixture and a positive deviation from the ideality was obtained, except for a small part in the region rich in alkanol. The viscosity measurements were carried out, at the calorimeter conditions, for correcting the experimental values of isobaric heat capacities due to friction along the tube. The viscosity was measured at atmospheric pressure in a Stabinger Anton Paar SVM 3000 viscometer in the temperature range of (293.15 to 333.15) K for cyclohexane and the mixtures. At high pressure, the viscosities were estimated using Lucas method

  16. $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ polarization at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Donghee

    2010-01-01

    At the COMPASS experiment $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ particles are produced with high statistics in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) processes of 160 GeV/c polarized muons. Since both, beam and target, are polarized, various studies on the $\\Lambda$ polarization are possible. We present results on the longitudinal polarization transfer from muons to $\\Lambda$ hyperons produced by scattering off an unpolarized isoscalar target and preliminary results on the transverse $\\Lambda$ polarization with a transversely polarized proton target. The $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ polarization can be studied by measuring the acceptance corrected angular distribution of its decay products. The longitudinal spin transfers to $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ produced in the current fragmentation region exhibit different behaviours as a function of $x_{Bj}$ and $x_{F}$. The $x_{Bj}$ and $x_{F}$ dependences of $\\Lambda$ polarization are compatible with zero, while $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ polarization tends to increase with $x_{F}$. Info...

  17. Experimental determination of critical data of multi-component mixtures containing potential gasoline additives 2-butanol by a flow-type apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Maogang; Xin, Nan; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Experimental critical pressures of 2-butanol + hexane + heptane system. - Highlights: • Critical properties of six binary systems and two ternary systems were measured. • Six binary systems containing 2-butanol show non-ideal behavior in their T c –x 1 curves. • Non-ideal behavior of mixtures with 2-butanol relies on azeotropy. • Experimental data for binary systems were fitted well with Redlich–Kister equation. • Critical surfaces of ternary systems were plotted using the Cibulka’s expressions. - Abstract: In this work, we used a flow method for measurement of critical properties of six binary mixtures (2-butanol + cyclohexane, 2-butanol + hexane, 2-butanol + heptane, 2-butanol + octane, 2-butanol + nonane and 2-butanol + decane) and two ternary mixtures (2-butanol + hexane + heptane and 2-butanol + octane + decane). The critical properties were determined by observing the disappearance and reappearance of the gas–liquid phase meniscus in a quartz glass tube. The standard uncertainties of temperatures and pressures for both binary and ternary mixtures were estimated to be less than 0.2 K and 5.2 kPa, respectively. These critical data provide the boundaries of the two-phase regions of the related mixture systems. Six binary systems show non-ideal behaviors in the loci of critical temperatures. We used the Redlich–Kister equations to correlate the critical temperatures and pressures of these systems and listed the binary interaction parameters. The maximum average absolute deviation (AAD) of each binary system between experimental data and calculated results from Redlich–Kister equations is 0.038% for critical temperatures, and 0.244% for critical pressures. Moreover, the two ternary systems were newly reported and correlated by Cibulka’s and Singh’s expressions. The maximum AAD of critical temperatures and critical pressures are 0.103% and 0.433%, respectively.

  18. Polar Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    18 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark-outlined polygons on a frost-covered surface in the south polar region of Mars. In summer, this surface would not be bright and the polygons would not have dark outlines--these are a product of the presence of seasonal frost. Location near: 77.2oS, 204.8oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  19. Green chemistry: Efficient epoxides ring-opening with 1-butanol under microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Vidal, Jesus A.; Duran-Valle, Carlos J.; Ferrera-Escudero, Santiago

    2006-01-01

    Two activated carbons treated with mineral acids (HNO 3 and sulfonitric mixture) have been tested as acid catalysts in the epoxides (1,2-epoxyhexane and styrene oxide) ring-opening reaction with 1-butanol under microwave (MW) irradiation. The mayor obtained product is that resulting of the alcohol addition to the most substituted carbon in the epoxide ring. The most active catalyst is that treated with sulfonitric mixture. The use of a MW oven allows achieving to the complete conversion of styrene oxide in only 2 min

  20. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C H; Okos, M R; Wankat, P C

    1989-06-05

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was successfully carried out in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor. The reactor was composed of two serial columns packed with Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 entrapped on the surface of natural sponge segments at a cell loading in the range of 2.03-5.56 g dry cells/g sponge. The average cell loading was 3.58 g dry cells/g sponge. Batch experiments indicated that a critical pH above 4.2 is necessary for the initiation of cell growth. One of the media used during continuous experiments consisted of a salt mixture alone and the other a nutrient medium containing a salt mixture with yeast extract and peptone. Effluent pH was controlled by supplying various fractions of the two different types of media. A nutrient medium fraction above 0.6 was crucial for successful fermentation in a trickle bed reactor. The nutrient medium fraction is the ratio of the volume of the nutrient medium to the total volume of nutrient plus salt medium. Supplying nutrient medium to both columns continuously was an effective way to meet both pH and nutrient requirement. A 257-mL reactor could ferment 45 g/L glucose from an initial concentration of 60 g/L glucose at a rate of 70 mL/h. Butanol, acetone, and ethanol concentrations were 8.82, 5.22, and 1.45 g/L, respectively, with a butanol and total solvent yield of 19.4 and 34.1 wt %. Solvent productivity in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor was 4.2 g/L h, which was 10 times higher than that obtained in a batch fermentation using free cells and 2.76 times higher than that of an immobilized CSTR. If the nutrient medium fraction was below 0.6 and the pH was below 4.2, the system degenerated. Oxygen also contributed to the system degeneration. Upon degeneration, glucose consumption and solvent yield decreased to 30.9 g/L and 23.0 wt %, respectively. The yield of total liquid product (40.0 wt %) and butanol selectivity (60.0 wt %) remained almost constant. Once the cells were degenerated

  1. Modeling the Fate of Groundwater Contaminants Resulting from Leakage of Butanol-blended Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Toyama et al., 1995) ADH IIG N.R. 14.7 11.12 (Toyama et al., 1995) Pichia pastoris N.R. 4.8 N.R. (Borzeix et al., 1995) Mixed culture ( trickle - bed ... reactor ) 16.8 0.10 42.2 (Heinze and Friedrich, 1997) ( ) ( )1 min ˆ ˆ( ); ; molS S Smg protein mg Ld q Kµµ − ⋅ ; N.R.: not reported Mariano et...Research. 32(7): 2065-2072, 1998. Dagaut, P. and C. Togbe. Oxidation kinetics of butanol-gasoline surrogate mixtures in a jet-stirred reactor

  2. Surface chemistry of 2-butanol and furfural on Cu, Au and Cu/Au single crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Megginson, Rory

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the adsorption of 2-butanol and furfural was investigated on Au (111), Cu (111) and Cu/Au (111) surfaces. It was hoped that by studying how these species adsorbed on these surfaces , insight would be provided into the roles of Cu and Au in the “hydrogen free” hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol. This is a valuable process as currently furfuryl alcohol is derived from crude oil but it is possible to derive furfural from corn husk making it a greener process...

  3. Inflammatory Mediator Profiling of n-butanol Exposed Upper Airways in Individuals with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by reports of recurrent symptoms in response to low level exposure to various chemical substances. Recent findings suggests that dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in MCS pathophysiology. The aim of this study...... inflammatory mediator profiles (P>0.05) at baseline. Likewise, direct comparison of mediator levels in the MCS group and controls after n-butanol exposure revealed no significant group differences. We demonstrate no abnormal upper airway inflammatory mediator levels in MCS subjects before or after a symptom...

  4. Green chemistry: Efficient epoxides ring-opening with 1-butanol under microwave irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Vidal, Jesus A. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, Campus Universitario, Avda. de Elvas, s/n, E-06071-Badajoz (Spain); Duran-Valle, Carlos J. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, Campus Universitario, Avda. de Elvas, s/n, E-06071-Badajoz (Spain)]. E-mail: carlosdv@unex.es; Ferrera-Escudero, Santiago [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C/Senda del Rey, 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-06-30

    Two activated carbons treated with mineral acids (HNO{sub 3} and sulfonitric mixture) have been tested as acid catalysts in the epoxides (1,2-epoxyhexane and styrene oxide) ring-opening reaction with 1-butanol under microwave (MW) irradiation. The mayor obtained product is that resulting of the alcohol addition to the most substituted carbon in the epoxide ring. The most active catalyst is that treated with sulfonitric mixture. The use of a MW oven allows achieving to the complete conversion of styrene oxide in only 2 min.

  5. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. Effective method of fermentation of Riga hydrolyzates of corn cobs and other vegetable waste products for butanol and acetone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakhmanovich, B M; Kameneva, L; Kalnina, V

    1963-01-01

    A simplified method is described for the production of butanol and acetone. The acid mixture (H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/, 10 to 20%; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 90 to 80%) used to hydrolyze corn cobs and other vegetable waste products served also to invert the sugar of molasses which was added in 3 parts to 1 part hydrolyzate on the basis of reducing sugar content. The mixture was then diluted and neutralized with NH/sub 4/OH to pH 6.3 to 6.8. In this way a suitable hydrolyzate medium containing the appropriate amounts of mineral salts as well as invert sugar was provided for fermentation by Clostridium butyricum Prazmowsky. Lignin which precipitated during hydrolysis served as a solid phase which helped to accelerate fermentation. Combined yields of butanol, acetone, and small amounts of ethanol amounted to 30 to 38% of the available sugar; approximately 67% consisted of butanol.

  7. Investigation of uncertainties associated with the production of n-butanol through ethanol catalysis in sugarcane biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Lucas G; Dias, Marina O S; MacLean, Heather L; Bonomi, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the viability of n-butanol production integrated within a first and second generation sugarcane biorefinery. The evaluation included a deterministic analysis as well as a stochastic approach, the latter using Monte Carlo simulation. Results were promising for n-butanol production in terms of revenues per tonne of processed sugarcane, but discouraging with respect to internal rate of return (IRR). The uncertainty analysis determined there was high risk involved in producing n-butanol and co-products from ethanol catalysis. It is unlikely that these products and associated production route will be financially attractive in the short term without lower investment costs, supportive public policies and tax incentives coupled with biofuels' production strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A new process for the valorisation of a bio-alcohol. The oxidehydration of 1-butanol into maleic anhydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldarelli, A.; Cavani, F.; Garone, O.; Pavarelli, G. [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Industriale e dei Materiali; Bologna Univ. (Italy). CIRCC, Research Unit; Dubois, J.L. [ARKEMA, Colombes (France); Mitsova, I.; Simeonova, L. [JSC, Russe (Bulgaria). Orgachim

    2012-07-01

    This paper deals with a study on the gas-phase transformation of 1-butanol into maleic anhydride, using different types of catalysts. Indeed, catalytic acid properties are needed to dehydrate 1-butanol into 1-butene, whereas redox-type properties are required for the oxidation of the olefin into maleic anhydride. The two types of active sites can be combined in bifunctional systems, showing both acid and redox-type properties. We found that vanadyl pyrophosphate catalyzes the one-pot reaction, giving a maximum selectivity to maleic anhydride of 28%. In fact, various side reactions contributed to the formation of by-products, eg, 1-butanol (oxidative) dehydrogenation into butyraldehyde, formation of light carboxylic acids and carbon oxides, and condensation of unsaturated C{sub 4} intermediates (butenes and butadiene) with the formed maleic anhydride to yield heavier compounds. (orig.)

  9. Time reversal tests in polarized neutron reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahi, Koichiro; Bowman, J.D.; Crawford, B.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In recent years the nuclear weak interaction has been studied in the compound nucleus via parity violation. The observed parity-violating effects are strongly enhanced by nuclear structure. The predictions are that the interaction of polarized neutrons with polarized nuclear targets could be also used to perform sensitive tests of time-reversal-violation because of the nuclear enhancements. The author has designed experiments to search for time-reversal violation in neutron-nucleus interactions. He has also developed techniques to polarize neutrons with laser-polarized 3 He gas targets. Using the polarized 3 He neutron spin filter, he has performed two experiments at LANSCE: an absolute neutron beam polarization measurement with an accuracy of 0.2--0.3% and a neutron spin-rotation measurement on a 139 La sample

  10. Polarized Epithermal Neutron Studies of Magnetic Domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfimenkov, V.P.; Chernikov, A.N.; Lason, L.; Mareev, Yu. D.; Novitsky, V.V.; Pikelner, L.B.; Skoy, V.R.; Tsulaya, M.I.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Roberson, N.R.

    1997-01-01

    The average size and shape of magnetic domains in a material can be determined from the precession of polarized neutrons traversing the material. Epithermal neutrons (0.5eV< En<100eV), which process more slowly than thermals, effectively probe the internal structure of samples that are thick or have large domains or large internal fields. Such epithermal neutron measurements require a neutron polarizer and analyzer based on cryogenically polarized spin filters. We discuss the measurements at JINR, Dubna, of magnetic domains in a 2.0 cm. diam. crystal of holmium using 1.7 to 59eV neutrons polarized by a dynamically polarized proton target and analyzed with a statically polarized dysprosium target

  11. Polarized epithermal neutron studies of magnetic domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfimenkov, V.P.; Chernikov, A.N.; Lason, L.; Mareev, Y.D.; Novitsky, V.V.; Pikelner, L.B.; Skoy, V.R.; Tsulaya, M.I.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina; Roberson, N.R.; the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina

    1997-01-01

    The average size and shape of magnetic domains in a material can be determined from the precession of polarized neutrons traversing the material. Epithermal neutrons (0.5eV n <100eV), which precess more slowly than thermals, effectively probe the internal structure of samples that are thick or have large domains or large internal fields. Such epithermal neutron measurements require a neutron polarizer and analyzer based on cryogenically polarized spin filters. We discuss the measurement at JINR, Dubna, of magnetic domains in a 2.0 cm. diam. crystal of holmium using 1.7 to 59 eV neutrons polarized by a dynamically polarized proton target and analyzed with a statically polarized dysprosium target. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. Mean energy polarized neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshin, V.A.; Zaika, N.I.; Kolotyj, V.V.; Prokopenko, V.S.; Semenov, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    Physical bases and realization scheme of a pulsed source of polarized neutrons with the energy of up to 75 MeV are described. The source comprises polarized deuteron source, transport line, low-energy ion and axial injector to the accelerator, U-240 isochronous cyclotron, targets for polarized neutron production, accelerated deuteron transport line and flight bases. The pulsed source of fast neutrons with the energy of up to 75 MeV can provide for highly polarized neutron beams with the intensity by 2-3 orders higher than in the most perfect source of this range which allows one to perform various experiments with high efficiency and energy resolution. 9 refs.; 1 fig

  13. Electronic device for measuring the polarization parameter in the {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}n charge exchange reaction on a polarized proton target; Un appareillage electronique destine a la mesure du parametre de polarisation dans la reaction d'echange de charge {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}n sur cible de protons polarises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brehin, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-12-15

    An electronic apparatus has been constructed to measure the polarization parameter P{sub 0}(t) in {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}n charge exchange scattering at 5.9 GeV/c and 11,2 GeV/c on polarized proton target. This device insures triggering of a heavy plate spark chamber, allowing visualisation of {gamma} rays from the {pi}{sup 0} decays when the associated neutron offers suitable characteristics in direction and energy. The neutron is detected by an array of 32 counters and his energy is measured by a time of flight method. Electronic circuits of this apparatus are described as test and calibration methods used. (author) [French] Un appareillage electronique a ete realise pour mesurer le parametre de polarisation P{sub 0}(t) dans la reaction d'echange de charge {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}n a 5,9 GeV/c et 11,2 GeV/c sur une cible de protons polarises. Ce dispositif assure le declenchement d'une chambre a etincelles a plaques lourdes, permettant de visualiser les {gamma} de desitegration du {pi}{sup 0}, lorsque le neutron associe presente les caracteristiques convenables en direction et en energie. Le neutron est detecte par un ensemble de 32 compteurs et son energie est mesuree par une methode de temps de vol. Les circuits composant cet appareillage sont decrits ainsi que les methodes d'etalonnage et de verification utilisees. (auteur)

  14. Large enhancement of deuteron polarization with frequency modulated microwaves

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067425; Arik, S; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Ballintijn, M K; Bardin,; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Birda, I G; Birsa, R; Bjrkholm, P; Bonner, B E; de Botton, N; Boutemeur, M; Bradamante, Franco; Bressan, A; Brullc, A; Buchanan, J; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Cavata, C; Chen, J P; Clement, J; Clocchiatti, M; Corcoran, M D; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Deshpande, S; Dalla Torre, A; Van Dantzig, R; Dhawan, S; Dulya, C; Dyring, A; Eichblatt, S; Faivre, Jean-Claude; Fasching, D; Day, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Frois, B; Garabatos, C; Garzón, J A; Gaussiran, T; Giorgi, M; von Goeler, E; Goloutvin, Igor A; Gómez, A; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Gülmez, E; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, D; von Harrach, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; De Jong, M; Kabu, E M; Kageya, T; Kaiser, R; Karev, A; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T J; Kiryushin, Yu T; Kishi, A; Kisselev, Yu; Klostermann, L; Krämer, Dietrich; Kukhtin, V; Kyynarinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Lau, V; Krivokhijinea, K; Layda, T; Le Go, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindqvist, T; Litmaath, M; López-Ponte, S; Loewe, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B; McCarthy, J S; van Middelkoop, K; Medved, G; Miller, D; Mitchell, J; Mori, K; Moromisato, J; Mutchler, G S; Nagaitsev, A; Nassalski, J; Naumann, Lutz; Neganov, B; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J E J; Ogawa, A; Okumi, S; Ozben, C S; Penzo, Aldo L; Pérez, C A; Perrot-Kunne, F; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, D; Peshekhonov, H; Pretz, J; Pussieux, T; Pyrlik, J; Reyhancan, I; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Rijllart, A; Roberts, J B; Rock, S E; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, E; Rondon, O; Ropelewski, Leszek; Rosado, A; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Salvato, G; Sandacz, A; Sanders, D; Savin, I; Schiavon, Paolo; Schüler, K P; Segel, R; Seitz, R; Semertzidis, Y; Sergeev, S; Sever, F; Shanahan, P; Sichtermann, E P; Smirnov, G; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stuhrmann, H; Teichert, K M; Tessarotto, F; Thiel, W; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, R; Weinstein, R; Whitten, C; Willumeit, R; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Yañez, A; Zanetti, A M; Zhao, J; Zamiatin, N I

    1996-01-01

    We report a large enhancement of 1.7 in deuteron polarization up to values of 0.6 due to frequency modulation of the polarizing microwaves in a two liters polarized target using the method of dynamic nuclear polarization. This target was used during a deep inelastic polarized muon-deuteron scattering experiment at CERN. Measurements of the electron paramagnetic resonance absorption spectra show that frequency modulation gives rise to additional microwave absorption in the spectral wings. Although these results are not understood theoretically, they may provide a useful testing ground for the deeper understanding of dynamic nuclear polarization.

  15. A neutron beam polarizer for study of parity violation in neutron-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penttilae, S.I.; Bowman, J.D.; Delheij, P.P.; Frankle, C.M.; Haase, D.G.; Postma, H.; Seestrom, S.J.; Yen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamically-polarized proton target operating at 5 Tesla and 1 K has been built to polarize an epithermal neutron beam for studies of parity violation in compound-nuclear resonances. Nearly 0.9 proton polarization was obtained in an electron-beam irradiated ammonia target. This was used to produce a neutron beam polarization of 0.7 at epithermal energies. The combination of the polarized proton target and the LANSCE spallation neutron source produces the most intense pulsed polarized epithermal neutron beam in the world. The neutron-beam polarizer is described and methods to determine neutron beam polarization are presented. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  16. Angular distribution coefficients for γ-ray polarization produced in polarized capture reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, E.A.; Guillemette, J.; Weller, H.R.; Seyler, R.G.

    1999-01-01

    The previous publications have dealt with the angular momentum formalism of both linear and circularly polarized photons in (γ, x) reactions on both polarized and unpolarized targets, and the inverse (capture) reactions initiated by polarized beams. In the present work, utilizing the general formalism of Welton, the authors deal with the linear polarization of the γ-rays which are produced in capture reactions on unpolarized targets, including the possibility of having incident polarized spin 1/2 projectiles. These capture reactions are denoted by a(rvec x, rvec L)c, where rvec x is the incident polarized spin 1/2 projectile and rvec L represents the outgoing polarized γ-ray. They present here the formalism in a convenient form, display a sample table of coefficients, and illustrate its use by means of several examples. A FORTRAN code will be made available for generating similar coefficients for other reactions

  17. Differential modification of oxic and anoxic components of radiation damage by t-butanol, an. OH radical scavenger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afzal, S M.J.; Kesavan, P C [Jawaharlal Nehru Univ., New Delhi (India). School of Life Sciences

    1979-03-01

    Caryopses of a hull-less barley strain (IB 65) were gamma-irradiated (10 to 45 krad) in oxygenated and oxygen-free water in the presence of t-butanol (5 x 10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -1/M), and eight-day seedling growth was then measured. The results showed that t-butanol afforded partial radio-protection against oxic damage and potentiated the anoxic damage in both dry and metabolizing barley seeds. Attention is given to the possible basic differences in the oxygen effect(s) in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and to the involvement of .OH radicals under these conditions.

  18. Enhancing cellulose accessibility of corn stover by deep eutectic solvent pretreatment for butanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guo-Chao; Ding, Ji-Cai; Han, Rui-Zhi; Dong, Jin-Jun; Ni, Ye

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an effective corn stover (CS) pretreatment method was developed for biobutanol fermentation. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs), consisted of quaternary ammonium salts and hydrogen donors, display similar properties to room temperature ionic liquid. Seven DESs with different hydrogen donors were facilely synthesized. Choline chloride:formic acid (ChCl:formic acid), an acidic DES, displayed excellent performance in the pretreatment of corn stover by removal of hemicellulose and lignin as confirmed by SEM, FTIR and XRD analysis. After optimization, glucose released from pretreated CS reached 17.0 g L(-1) and yield of 99%. The CS hydrolysate was successfully utilized in butanol fermentation by Clostridium saccharobutylicum DSM 13864, achieving butanol titer of 5.63 g L(-1) with a yield of 0.17 g g(-1) total sugar and productivity of 0.12 g L(-1)h(-1). This study demonstrates DES could be used as a promising and biocompatible pretreatment method for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into biofuel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biotransformation of furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 during butanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Han, Bei; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2012-02-15

    The ability of fermenting microorganisms to tolerate furan aldehyde inhibitors (furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF)) will enhance efficient bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates to fuels and chemicals. The effect of furfural and HMF on butanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum 824 was investigated. Whereas specific growth rates, μ, of C. acetobutylicum in the presence of furfural and HMF were in the range of 15-85% and 23-78%, respectively, of the uninhibited Control, μ increased by 8-15% and 23-38% following exhaustion of furfural and HMF in the bioreactor. Using high performance liquid chromatography and spectrophotometric assays, batch fermentations revealed that furfural and HMF were converted to furfuryl alcohol and 2,5-bis-hydroxymethylfuran, respectively, with specific conversion rates of 2.13g furfural and 0.50g HMF per g (biomass) per hour, by exponentially growing C. acetobutylicum. Biotransformation of these furans to lesser inhibitory compounds by C. acetobutylicum will probably enhance overall fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to butanol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Continuous acetone-ethanol-butanol fermentation by immobilized cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badr, H.R.; Toledo, R.; Hamdy, M.K. [University of Georgia, Athens (Greece). Food Science and Technology Dept.

    2001-07-01

    Eight Clostridium acetobutylicum strains were examined for {alpha}-amylase and strains B-591, B-594 and P-262 had the highest activities. Defibered-sweet-potato-slurry (DSPS), containing 39.7 g starch l{sup -1}, supplemented with potassium phosphate (1.0 g l{sup -1}), cysteine-HCl (5.0 g l{sup -1}), the antifoam (polypropylene glycol, 0.1 mg ml{sup -1}), was used a continuous feedstock (FS) to a multistage bioreactor system for acetone-ethanol-butanol (AEB) fermentation. The system consisted on four columns (three vertical and one near horizontal) packed with beads containing immobilized cells of C. acetobutylicum P-262. When DSPS was pumped into the bioreactor system, at a flow rate of 2.36 ml min{sup -1}, the effluent has 7.73 g solvents l{sup -1} (1.56, acetone; 0.65, ethanol; 5.52 g, butanol) and no starch. Productivity of total solvents synthesized during continuous operation were 1.0 g 1{sup -1}h{sup -1} and 19.5 % yield compared to 0.12 g l{sup -1}h{sup -1} with 29% yield using the batch system. We proposed using DSPS for AEB fermentation in a continuous mode with immobilized P-262 cells that are active amylase producers which will lead to cost reduction compared to the batch system. (Author)