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Sample records for polarization ratio cpr

  1. Optimum compression to ventilation ratios in CPR under realistic, practical conditions: a physiological and mathematical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbs, Charles F; Kern, Karl B

    2002-08-01

    To develop and evaluate a practical formula for the optimum ratio of compressions to ventilations in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The optimum value of a variable is that for which a desired result is maximized. Here the desired result is assumed to be either oxygen delivery to peripheral tissues or a combination of oxygen delivery and waste product removal. Equations describing oxygen delivery and blood flow during CPR as functions of the number of compressions and the number of ventilations delivered over time were developed from principles of classical physiology. These equations were solved explicitly in terms of the compression/ventilation ratio and evaluated for a wide range of conditions using Monte Carlo simulations. As the compression to ventilation ratio was increased from 0 to 50 or more, both oxygen delivery and the combination of oxygen delivery with blood flow increased to maximum values and then gradually declined. For variables typical of standard CPR as taught and specified in international guidelines, maximum values occurred at compression/ventilation ratios near 30:2. For variables typical of actual lay rescuer performance in the field, maximal values occurred at compression/ventilation ratios near 60:2. Current guidelines overestimate the need for ventilation during standard CPR by two to four-fold. Blood flow and oxygen delivery to the periphery can be improved by eliminating interruptions of chest compression for these unnecessary ventilations.

  2. Can the cerebroplacental ratio (CPR) predict intrapartum fetal compromise? : a prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Ann-Sophie; Page, Geert; Dehaene, Isabelle; Roets, Ellen; Roelens, Kristien

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potential clinical use of serial fetal CPR measurements during the last month of pregnancy for the prediction of adverse perinatal outcome in unselected low-risk pregnancies. Methods: A multicenter prospective observational cohort study in 315 consecutively recruited low-risk pregnancies. All eligible pregnancies underwent serial sonographic evaluation of fetal weight and Doppler indices at two week intervals, from 36 weeks gestation until delivery. Data were ...

  3. CPR: Adult

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Adult (2:03) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  4. CPR: Infant

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Infant (1:52) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  5. Hands-Only CPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Implementation OSHA and AHA Alliance Be The Beat Recursos para hispanohablantes en EE UU CPR & AED Awareness ... Implementation OSHA and AHA Alliance Be The Beat Recursos para hispanohablantes en EE UU CPR & AED Awareness ...

  6. CPR Facts and Stats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Implementation OSHA and AHA Alliance Be The Beat Recursos para hispanohablantes en EE UU CPR & AED Awareness ... Implementation OSHA and AHA Alliance Be The Beat Recursos para hispanohablantes en EE UU CPR & AED Awareness ...

  7. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR): First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... minutes. To learn CPR properly, take an accredited first-aid training course, including CPR and how to use an ... and Research. © 1998-2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved.

  8. CPR (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... accidents, near-drowning, suffocation, poisoning, smoke inhalation, electrocution injuries, and suspected sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) . Reading about CPR and learning when it's needed will give you a basic understanding of the concept and procedure, but it's strongly recommended that you ...

  9. Asymmetry ratio in pair production and the degree of linearly polarized photons at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Asai, J

    1999-01-01

    In order to initiate the experiments using linearly polarized tagged photons at intermediate energies, it is imperative to know and to monitor the degree of polarization. The relationship is re-examined between the linear polarization of photons and the asymmetry ratio in pair production by such photons. An improved method is proposed in which pairs are prohibited from entering the cone region around the incident photon beam. By restricting the directions of pairs, the asymmetry ratio is much improved. (author)

  10. Hemodynamic monitoring during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornato, J P

    1993-02-01

    Real-time hemodynamic monitoring provides useful information that can be used to assess and optimize mechanical and pharmacological interventions during CPR. The standard algorithms should always be the initial approach to resuscitation, because they offer a rapid, logical, coordinated series of treatments with proven success. Pressure and flow measurements during conventional, closed-chest CPR in humans indicate that the technique typically produces a hemodynamic state resembling profound cardiogenic shock, with a low systemic arterial pressure, markedly reduced cardiac output, and high intravascular filling pressures. End-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring provides useful, noninvasive information during clinical resuscitation. A low end-tidal carbon dioxide value during resuscitation should alert the rescuers that something is wrong with ventilation, perfusion, and/or carbon dioxide production and should prompt a search for correctable causes. If one or more hemodynamic parameters are being monitored at the time the patient develops cardiac arrest (eg, an intensive care unit patient who has an arterial line and a pulmonary artery catheter in place), it is appropriate for the resuscitation team to pay attention to the data that are generated during the resuscitation, particularly if the initial algorithm approach is not successful. For patients who are not being monitored at the time of their arrest, end-tidal carbon dioxide measurements provide noninvasive, semiquantitative information that can help the team detect and troubleshoot problems during resuscitation. Further research and better, more affordable technologies are needed to provide in- and out-of-hospital resuscitation teams feedback on the hemodynamic effectiveness of their resuscitative efforts.

  11. Perception of CPR quality: Influence of CPR feedback, Just-in-Time CPR training and provider role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Overly, Frank; Kessler, David; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Lin, Yiqun; Doan, Quynh; Duff, Jonathan P; Tofil, Nancy M; Bhanji, Farhan; Adler, Mark; Charnovich, Alex; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Brown, Linda L

    2015-02-01

    Many healthcare providers rely on visual perception to guide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but little is known about the accuracy of provider perceptions of CPR quality. We aimed to describe the difference between perceived versus measured CPR quality, and to determine the impact of provider role, real-time visual CPR feedback and Just-in-Time (JIT) CPR training on provider perceptions. We conducted secondary analyses of data collected from a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial of 324 healthcare providers who participated in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario between July 2012 and April 2014. Participants were randomized to one of four permutations of: JIT CPR training and real-time visual CPR feedback. We calculated the difference between perceived and measured quality of CPR and reported the proportion of subjects accurately estimating the quality of CPR within each study arm. Participants overestimated achieving adequate chest compression depth (mean difference range: 16.1-60.6%) and rate (range: 0.2-51%), and underestimated chest compression fraction (0.2-2.9%) across all arms. Compared to no intervention, the use of real-time feedback and JIT CPR training (alone or in combination) improved perception of depth (p<0.001). Accurate estimation of CPR quality was poor for chest compression depth (0-13%), rate (5-46%) and chest compression fraction (60-63%). Perception of depth is more accurate in CPR providers versus team leaders (27.8% vs. 7.4%; p=0.043) when using real-time feedback. Healthcare providers' visual perception of CPR quality is poor. Perceptions of CPR depth are improved by using real-time visual feedback and with prior JIT CPR training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitters with variable split ratio

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Minggui

    2017-08-15

    Seeking effective terahertz functional devices has always aroused extensive attention. Of particular interest is the terahertz beam splitter. Here, we have proposed, designed, manufactured, and tested a broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitter with a variable split ratio based on an all-dielectric metasurface. The metasurface was created by patterning a dielectric surface of the N-step phase gradient and etching to a few hundred micrometers. The conversion efficiency as high as 81% under the normal incidence at 0.7 THz was achieved. Meanwhile, such a splitter works well over a broad frequency range. The split ratio of the proposed design can be continuously tuned by simply shifting the metasurface, and the angle of emergences can also be easily adjusted by choosing the step of phase gradients. The proposed design is non-polarizing, and its performance is kept under different polarizations.

  13. Ratios of helicity amplitudes for exclusive ρ{sup 0} electroproduction on transversely polarized protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Justus-Liebig Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); University of Michigan, Randall Laboratory of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Akopov, N.; Elbakian, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Marukyan, H.; Petrosyan, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Akopov, Z.; Borissov, A.; Deconinck, W.; Holler, Y.; Rostomyan, A.; Zihlmann, B. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Aschenauer, E.C.; Nowak, W.D. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Augustyniak, W.; Marianski, B.; Trzcinski, A.; Zupranski, P. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Belostotski, S.; Kisselev, A.; Manaenkov, S.I.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Leningrad Region (Russian Federation); Blok, H.P. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef), Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bryzgalov, V.; Ivanilov, A.; Korotkov, V.; Salomatin, Y. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Capitani, G.P.; De Sanctis, E.; Muccifora, V.; Reolon, A.R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Ciullo, G.; Lenisa, P.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Statera, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy); Contalbrigo, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); De Leo, R.; Lagamba, L.; Vilardi, I. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Dueren, M. [Justus-Liebig Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Ellinghaus, F. [University of Colorado, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States); Felawka, L. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, Gruppo Collegato Sanita, Rome (Italy); Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Gavrilov, G. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Leningrad Region (Russian Federation); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Goloskokov, S.V.; Shutov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Jackson, H.E.; Reimer, P.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, Argonne, IL (United States); Joosten, S. [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gent (Belgium); University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); Kaiser, R.; Lehmann, I.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B. [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Karyan, G. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Kozlov, V.; Terkulov, A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kravchenko, P. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Leningrad Region (Russian Federation); Kroll, P.; Schaefer, A. [Universitaet Regensburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Regensburg (Germany); Lapikas, L. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lorenzon, W. [University of Michigan, Randall Laboratory of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Miyachi, Y.; Shibata, T.A. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Movsisyan, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Nass, A.; Rith, K. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Riedl, C. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); Ryckbosch, D.; Tytgat, M.; Haarlem, Y. van [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gent (Belgium); Schnell, G. [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Theoretical Physics, Bilbao (Spain); Basque Foundation for Science, IKERBASQUE, Bilbao (Spain); Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gent (Belgium); Truty, R. [University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); Hulse, C. van [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Theoretical Physics, Bilbao (Spain); Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gent (Belgium); Yaschenko, S. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Collaboration: The HERMES Collaboration

    2017-06-15

    Exclusive ρ{sup 0}-meson electroproduction is studied by the HERMES experiment, using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron/positron beam of HERA and a transversely polarized hydrogen target, in the kinematic region 1.0 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 7.0 GeV{sup 2}, 3.0 GeV < W < 6.3 GeV, and -t{sup '} < 0.4 GeV{sup 2}. Using an unbinned maximum-likelihood method, 25 parameters are extracted. These determine the real and imaginary parts of the ratios of several helicity amplitudes describing ρ{sup 0}-meson production by a virtual photon. The denominator of those ratios is the dominant amplitude, the nucleon-helicity-non-flip amplitude F{sub 0(1)/(2)0(1)/(2)}, which describes the production of a longitudinal ρ{sup 0}-meson by a longitudinal virtual photon. The ratios of nucleon-helicity-non-flip amplitudes are found to be in good agreement with those from the previous HERMES analysis. The transverse target polarization allows for the first time the extraction of ratios of a number of nucleon-helicity-flip amplitudes to F{sub 0(1)/(2)0(1)/(2)}. Results obtained in a handbag approach based on generalized parton distributions taking into account the contribution from pion exchange are found to be in good agreement with these ratios. Within the model, the data favor a positive sign for the π - ρ transition form factor. By also exploiting the longitudinal beam polarization, a total of 71 ρ{sup 0} spin-density matrix elements is determined from the extracted 25 parameters, in contrast to only 53 elements as directly determined in earlier analyses. (orig.)

  14. Ratios of helicity amplitudes for exclusive ρ0 electroproduction on transversely polarized proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manaenkov Serguei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exclusive ρ0-meson electroproduction is studied by the HERMES experiment, using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron/positron beam of HERA and a transversely polarized hydrogen target, in the kinematic region 1.0 GeV2 < Q2 < 7.0 GeV2, 3.0 GeV < W < 6.3 GeV, and −t′ < 0.4 GeV2. Using an unbinned maximum-likelihood method, 25 parameters are extracted. They determine the real and imaginary parts of the ratios of certain helicity amplitudes describing ρ0-meson production by a virtual photon, where the denominator is the dominant amplitude F012012${F_{0{1 \\over 2}}}_{0{1 \\over 2}}$. The latter is the nucleon-helicity-non-flip amplitude, which describes the production of a longitudinal ρ0 meson by a longitudinal virtual photon. The transverse target polarization allows for the first time the extraction of ratios of a number of nucleon-helicity-flip amplitudes to F012012${F_{0{1 \\over 2}}}_{0{1 \\over 2}}$. The ratios of nucleon-helicity-non-flip amplitudes are found to be in good agreement with those from the previous HERMES analysis.

  15. Dispersion and Polarization of Surface Waves Trapped in High Aspect Ratio Electrode Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laude, Vincent; Dühring, Maria Bayard; Moubchir, Hanane

    2007-01-01

    .Phys., 90(5):2492, 2001; Appl. Phys. Lett., 89:083515, 2006.) an experimental and theoretical analysis of the transduction of SAW under a metallic array of electrodes with a large aspect ratio on a piezoelectric substrate, whereby allowing the electrode height to become larger than one wavelength...... additional results on the polarization and the dispersion of the surface waves trapped by high aspect ratio electrode arrays. A finite element model, including periodic boundary conditions along the propagation direction and a perfectly matched layer (PML) to absorb waves away from the surface...... wave vector values....

  16. Spectral, stoichiometric ratio, physicochemical, polarity and photostability studies of newly synthesized chalcone dye in organized media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marwani, Hadi M., E-mail: hmarwani@kau.edu.sa [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Asiri, Abdullah M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Salman A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-04-15

    The main focus of this study was to investigate spectroscopic properties, stoichiometric ratios, physicochemical parameters, polarity and photostability behaviors of newly synthesized chalcone dye in organized media. The chalcone dye, 1-(2,5-Dimethyl-thiophen-3-yl)-3-(9-etnyl-9H-carbazol-3-yl)-propenone (DTEP), was prepared by the reaction of carbazole aldehyde with 3-acetyl-2,5-dimethythiophene. Data obtained from FT-IR, {sup 1}H-–NMR, {sup 13}C-NMR and elemental analysis were consistent with chemical structure of newly prepared DTEP. Increases in fluorescence intensities of DTEP with cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) were observed. In comparison of fluorescence intensities for DTEP with CTAB, reductions in fluorescence intensities for DTEP with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were noticed under the same experimental and instrumental conditions. Additionally, Benesi–Hildebrand method was applied to determine stoichiometric ratios and association constants of DTEP with CTAB and SDS. Stern–Volmer plot was used in order to further confirm the stoichiometric ratio and association constant of DTEP with SDS. Physicochemical parameters such as singlet absorption, molar absorptivity, oscillator strength, dipole moment and fluorescence quantum yield of DTEP were also determined. Fluorescence polarity study displayed that DTEP was sensitive to the polarity of the microenvironment provided by different solvents. Finally, fluorescence steady-state measurements revealed that DTEP has high photostability against photobleaching. -- Highlights: ► Mechanistic understanding of molecular structure of newly synthesized chalcone dye. ► Exploring spectral behaviors and physicochemical parameters of chalcone dye. ► Determination of stoichiometric ratios and association constants of chalcone dye. ► Determination of fluorescence quantum yield in different solvents. ► High photostability against photobleaching of chalcone dye was observed.

  17. Spectral, stoichiometric ratio, physicochemical, polarity and photostability studies of newly synthesized chalcone dye in organized media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwani, Hadi M.; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Khan, Salman A.

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of this study was to investigate spectroscopic properties, stoichiometric ratios, physicochemical parameters, polarity and photostability behaviors of newly synthesized chalcone dye in organized media. The chalcone dye, 1-(2,5-Dimethyl-thiophen-3-yl)-3-(9-etnyl-9H-carbazol-3-yl)-propenone (DTEP), was prepared by the reaction of carbazole aldehyde with 3-acetyl-2,5-dimethythiophene. Data obtained from FT-IR, 1 H-–NMR, 13 C-NMR and elemental analysis were consistent with chemical structure of newly prepared DTEP. Increases in fluorescence intensities of DTEP with cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) were observed. In comparison of fluorescence intensities for DTEP with CTAB, reductions in fluorescence intensities for DTEP with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were noticed under the same experimental and instrumental conditions. Additionally, Benesi–Hildebrand method was applied to determine stoichiometric ratios and association constants of DTEP with CTAB and SDS. Stern–Volmer plot was used in order to further confirm the stoichiometric ratio and association constant of DTEP with SDS. Physicochemical parameters such as singlet absorption, molar absorptivity, oscillator strength, dipole moment and fluorescence quantum yield of DTEP were also determined. Fluorescence polarity study displayed that DTEP was sensitive to the polarity of the microenvironment provided by different solvents. Finally, fluorescence steady-state measurements revealed that DTEP has high photostability against photobleaching. -- Highlights: ► Mechanistic understanding of molecular structure of newly synthesized chalcone dye. ► Exploring spectral behaviors and physicochemical parameters of chalcone dye. ► Determination of stoichiometric ratios and association constants of chalcone dye. ► Determination of fluorescence quantum yield in different solvents. ► High photostability against photobleaching of chalcone dye was observed

  18. Association of Neighborhood Characteristics with Bystander-Initiated CPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Comilla; Magid, David J.; Chan, Paul; Root, Elisabeth D.; McNally, Bryan F.; Kellermann, Arthur L.; Haukoos, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND For persons who have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the probability of receiving bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may be influenced by neighborhood characteristics. METHODS We analyzed surveillance data prospectively submitted from 29 U.S. sites to the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival between October 1, 2005, and December 31, 2009. The neighborhood in which each cardiac arrest occurred was determined from census-tract data. We classified neighborhoods as high-income or low-income on the basis of a median household income threshold of $40,000 and as white or black if more than 80% of the census tract was predominantly of one race. Neighborhoods without a predominant racial composition were classified as integrated. We analyzed the relationship between the median income and racial composition of a neighborhood and the performance of bystander-initiated CPR. RESULTS Among 14,225 patients with cardiac arrest, bystander-initiated CPR was provided to 4068 (28.6%). As compared with patients who had a cardiac arrest in high-income white neighborhoods, those in low-income black neighborhoods were less likely to receive bystander-initiated CPR (odds ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41 to 0.58). The same was true of patients with cardiac arrest in neighborhoods characterized as low-income white (odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.82), low-income integrated (odds ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.70), and high-income black (odds ratio, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.86). The odds ratio for bystander-initiated CPR in high-income integrated neighborhoods (1.03; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.65) was similar to that for high-income white neighborhoods. CONCLUSIONS In a large cohort study, we found that patients who had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in low-income black neighborhoods were less likely to receive bystander-initiated CPR than those in high-income white neighborhoods. (Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  19. Branching ratios, CP asymmetries and polarizations of B→ ψ (2S) V decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Zhou; Li, Ya; Xiao, Zhen-Jun

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the non-leptonic decays B/B_s→ ψ (2S) V with V=(ρ , ω , K^{*}, φ ) by employing the perturbative QCD (pQCD) factorization approach. Here the branching ratios, the CP asymmetries and the complete set of polarization observables are investigated systematically. Besides the traditional contributions from the factorizable and non-factorizable diagrams at the leading order, the next-to-leading order (NLO) vertex corrections could also provide considerable contributions. The pQCD predictions for the branching ratios of the B_{(s)}→ ψ (2S)K^{*}, ψ (2S)φ decays are consistent with the measured values within errors. As for B→ ψ (2S) ρ , ψ (2S) ω decays, the branching ratios can reach the order of 10^{-5} and could be measured in the LHCb and Belle-II experiments. The numerical results show that the direct CP asymmetries of the considered decays are very small. Thus the observation of any large direct CP asymmetry for these decays will be a signal for new physics. The mixing-induced CP asymmetries in the neutral modes are very close to sin 2β _{(s)}, which suggests that these channels can give a cross-check on the measurement of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) angle β and β _s. We find that the longitudinal polarization fractions f_0 are suppressed to ˜ 50% due to the large non-factorizable contributions. The magnitudes and phases of the two transverse amplitudes A_{allel } and A_{\\perp } are roughly equal, which is an indication for the approximate light-quark helicity conservation in these decays. The overall polarization observables of B→ ψ (2S) K^{*0} and B_s→ ψ (2S) φ channels are also in good agreement with the experimental measurements as reported by LHCb and BaBar. Other results can also be tested by the LHCb and Belle-II experiments.

  20. Broadband photonic crystal fiber coupler with polarization selection of coupling ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroszewicz, Leszek R.; Stasiewicz, Karol A.; Marć, Paweł; Szymański, Michał

    2010-09-01

    In the paper a new broadband photonic crystal fiber coupler is presented. The proper application of the biconical taper technology has been used for manufacturing the coupler without air holes collapse in LMA10 fiber (NKT Photonics Crystal). This coupler, operates in the weakly coupling condition, protects coupling operation in range from 900 nm to 1700 nm. The coupling ratio between output arms is depending on wavelength and can be tuning by selection the proper input state of polarization. It gives opportunity to use the broadband crystal fiber coupler in many applications in which it is necessary to tune a coupling between output arms during the measurement.

  1. CPR: A Real Lifesaver (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... English Español CPR: A Real Lifesaver KidsHealth / For Kids / CPR: A Real Lifesaver What's in this article? ...

  2. Measurement error analysis for polarization extinction ratio of multifunctional integrated optic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoliang; Yang, Jun; Li, Chuang; Yu, Zhangjun; Yang, Zhe; Yuan, Yonggui; Peng, Feng; Li, Hanyang; Hou, Changbo; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yuan, Libo; Xu, Jianming; Zhang, Chao; Yu, Quanfu

    2017-08-20

    Measurement error for the polarization extinction ratio (PER) of a multifunctional integrated optic chip (MFIOC) utilizing white light interferometry was analyzed. Three influence factors derived from the all-fiber device (or optical circuit) under test were demonstrated to be the main error sources, including: 1) the axis-alignment angle (AA) of the connection point between the extended polarization-maintaining fiber (PMF) and the chip PMF pigtail; 2) the oriented angle (OA) of the linear polarizer; and 3) the birefringence dispersion of PMF and the MFIOC chip. Theoretical calculations and experimental results indicated that by controlling the AA range within 0°±5°, the OA range within 45°±2° and combining with dispersion compensation process, the maximal PER measurement error can be limited to under 1.4 dB, with the 3σ uncertainty of 0.3 dB. The variations of birefringence dispersion effect versus PMF length were also discussed to further confirm the validity of dispersion compensation. A MFIOC with the PER of ∼50  dB was experimentally tested, and the total measurement error was calculated to be ∼0.7  dB, which proved the effectiveness of the proposed error reduction methods. We believe that these methods are able to facilitate high-accuracy PER measurement.

  3. Polarization modeling and predictions for DKIST part 3: focal ratio and thermal dependencies of spectral polarization fringes and optic retardance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, David M.; Sueoka, Stacey R.

    2018-01-01

    Data products from high spectral resolution astronomical polarimeters are often limited by fringes. Fringes can skew derived magnetic field properties from spectropolarimetric data. Fringe removal algorithms can also corrupt the data if the fringes and object signals are too similar. For some narrow-band imaging polarimeters, fringes change the calibration retarder properties and dominate the calibration errors. Systems-level engineering tools for polarimetric instrumentation require accurate predictions of fringe amplitudes, periods for transmission, diattenuation, and retardance. The relevant instabilities caused by environmental, thermal, and optical properties can be modeled and mitigation tools developed. We create spectral polarization fringe amplitude and temporal instability predictions by applying the Berreman calculus and simple interferometric calculations to optics in beams of varying F/ number. We then apply the formalism to superachromatic six-crystal retarders in converging beams under beam thermal loading in outdoor environmental conditions for two of the world's largest observatories: the 10-m Keck telescope and the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST). DKIST will produce a 300-W optical beam, which has imposed stringent requirements on the large diameter six-crystal retarders, dichroic beamsplitters, and internal optics. DKIST retarders are used in a converging beam with F/ ratios between 8 and 62. The fringe spectral periods, amplitudes, and thermal models of retarder behavior assisted DKIST optical designs and calibration plans with future application to many astronomical spectropolarimeters. The Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph with polarimetry instrument at Keck also uses six-crystal retarders in a converging F / 13 beam in a Cassegrain focus exposed to summit environmental conditions providing observational verification of our predictions.

  4. Polarization ratio enhancement of a-plane GaN light emitting diodes by asymmetric two-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Yen; Li, Hsiang-Wei; Yin, Yu-Feng; Wang, Yu-Ting; Lin, Yen-Chen; Wu, Yuh-Renn; Huang, Jian Jang; Lin, Da-Wei; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Fabricating photonic crystals (PhCs) on GaN based non-polar light emitting diodes (LEDs) is an effective way to increase light extraction and meanwhile to preserve or improve polarization ratio. In this work, a-plane GaN LEDs with two-dimensional PhCs were demonstrated. With the E // m polarized modes (which mean the optical polarization with the electric field parallel to m-axis) as the target of diffraction, we matched E//m modes to the photonic bands and aligned E//c modes to fall within the photonic band gap. The results show stronger E//m but weaker E//c mode diffractions on both c- and m-axes. At the vertical direction, the polarization ratio is enhanced from 45.8% for the planar device to 52.3% for the LEDs with PhCs

  5. Polar and non-polar organic aerosols from large-scale agricultural-waste burning emissions in Northern India: Implications to organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on characteristics of organic aerosols (polar and non-polar) and total organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio (OM/OC) from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy- and wheat-residue) burning emissions in Northern India. Aerosol samples from an upwind location (Patiala: 30.2°N, 76.3°E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain were analyzed for non-polar and polar fractions of organic carbon (OC1 and OC2) and their respective mass (OM1 and OM2). On average, polar organic aerosols (OM2) contribute nearly 85% of the total organic mass (OM) from the paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. The water-soluble-OC (WSOC) to OC2 ratio, within the analytical uncertainty, is close to 1 from both paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. However, temporal variability and relatively low WSOC/OC2 ratio (Av: 0.67±0.06) is attributed to high moisture content and poor combustion efficiency during paddy-residue burning, indicating significant contribution (∼30%) of aromatic carbon to OC2. The OM/OC ratio for non-polar (OM1/OC1∼1.2) and polar organic aerosols (OM2/OC2∼2.2), hitherto unknown for open agricultural-waste burning emissions, is documented in this study. The total OM/OC ratio is nearly identical, 1.9±0.2 and 1.8±0.2, from paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Branching ratios, CP asymmetries and polarizations of B → ψ(2S)V decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui, Zhou [North China University of Science and Technology, College of Sciences, Tangshan (China); Li, Ya; Xiao, Zhen-Jun [Nanjing Normal University, Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-09-15

    We analyze the non-leptonic decays B/B{sub s} → ψ(2S)V with V = (ρ, ω, K*, φ) by employing the perturbative QCD (pQCD) factorization approach. Here the branching ratios, the CP asymmetries and the complete set of polarization observables are investigated systematically. Besides the traditional contributions from the factorizable and non-factorizable diagrams at the leading order, the next-to-leading order (NLO) vertex corrections could also provide considerable contributions. The pQCD predictions for the branching ratios of the B{sub (s)} → ψ(2S)K*, ψ(2S)φ decays are consistent with the measured values within errors. As for B → ψ(2S)ρ, ψ(2S)ω decays, the branching ratios can reach the order of 10{sup -5} and could be measured in the LHCb and Belle-II experiments. The numerical results show that the direct CP asymmetries of the considered decays are very small. Thus the observation of any large direct CP asymmetry for these decays will be a signal for new physics. The mixing-induced CP asymmetries in the neutral modes are very close to sin 2β{sub (s)}, which suggests that these channels can give a cross-check on the measurement of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) angle β and β{sub s}. We find that the longitudinal polarization fractions f{sub 0} are suppressed to ∝ 50% due to the large non-factorizable contributions. The magnitudes and phases of the two transverse amplitudes A {sub parallel} and A {sub perpendicular} {sub to} are roughly equal, which is an indication for the approximate light-quark helicity conservation in these decays. The overall polarization observables of B → ψ(2S)K{sup *0} and B{sub s} → ψ(2S)φ channels are also in good agreement with the experimental measurements as reported by LHCb and BaBar. Other results can also be tested by the LHCb and Belle-II experiments. (orig.)

  7. CPR Instruction in a Human Anatomy Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutton, Lewis M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction can be included in a college anatomy and physiology course. Equipment and instructors are provided locally by the Red Cross or American Heart Association. (MA)

  8. Evidence for Water Ie on the Moon: Results for Anomalous Polar Craters from the LRO Mini-RF Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudis, P.D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  9. Evidence for Water Ice on the Moon: Results for Anomalous Polar Craters from the LRO Mini-RF Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  10. ROSC rates and live discharge rates after cardiopulmonary resuscitation by different CPR teams - a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tak Kyu; Park, Young Mi; Do, Sang-Hwan; Hwang, Jung-Won; Song, In-Ae

    2017-12-04

    Previous studies have reported that the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is closely associated with patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare patient CPR outcomes across resident, emergency medicine, and rapid response teams. The records of patients who underwent CPR at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2016 were analyzed retrospectively. Return of spontaneous circulation, 10- and 30-day survival, and live discharge after return of spontaneous circulation were compared across patients treated by the three CPR teams. Of the 1145 CPR cases, 444 (39%) were conducted by the resident team, 431 (38%) by the rapid response team, and 270 (23%) by the emergency medicine team. The adjusted odds ratios for the return of spontaneous circulation and subsequent 10-day survival among patients who received CPR from the resident team compared to the rapid response team were 0.59 (P = 0.001) and 0.71 (P = 0.037), respectively. There were no significant differences in the 30-day survival and rate of live discharge between patients who received CPR from the rapid response and resident teams; likewise, no significant differences were observed between patients who received CPR from the emergency medicine and rapid response teams. Patients receiving CPR from the rapid response team may have higher 10-day survival and return of spontaneous circulation rates than those who receive CPR from the resident team. However, our results are limited by the differences in approach, time of CPR, and room settings between teams.

  11. A Note on the Radiative and Collisional Branching Ratios in Polarized Radiation Transport with Coherent Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, R.; del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the implementation of physically meaningful branching ratios between the CRD and partial redistribution contributions to the emissivity of a polarized multi-term atom in the presence of both inelastic and elastic collisions. Our derivation is based on a recent theoretical formulation of partially coherent scattering, and it relies on a heuristic diagrammatic analysis of the various radiative and collisional processes to determine the proper form of the branching ratios. The expression we obtain for the emissivity is {\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}=[{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(1)-{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}{{f}.{{s}}.}(2)]+{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(2), where {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(1) and {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(2) are the emissivity terms for the redistributed and partially coherent radiation, respectively, and where “f.s.” implies that the corresponding term must be evaluated assuming a flat-spectrum average of the incident radiation. This result is shown to be in agreement with prior literature on the subject in the limit of the unpolarized multi-level atom.

  12. Circularly Polarized Microstrip Yagi Array Antenna with Wide Beamwidth and High Front-to-Back Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Hao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A circularly polarized (CP Microstrip Yagi array antenna (MSYA is designed in order to achieve high front-to-back ratio R(F/B and high gain over wide range in the forward radiation space. A Wilkinson power divider owning two output ways with the same magnitude and different phase is used to feed the antenna. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the effects of some key geometrical sizes on the antenna’s performance. A prototype of the antenna is fabricated, and good agreement between the measured results and the numerical simulations is observed. The overlap bandwidth of VSWR ≤ 1.5 and AR ≤ 3 dB is about 11%. The steering angle (α between the peak gain direction and the broadside can achieve 35°, R(F/B reaches 19 dB, and the gain at the front point (G0 is only 4.3 dB lower than the maximum gain (Gm. The antenna has a wide beamwidth CP radiation pattern over wide spatial range including 0° ≤ θ ≤ 90° in vertical plane and −35° ≤ φ ≤ 55° in horizontal plane.

  13. Ratios of regioisomers of minor acylglycerols less polar than triricinolein in castor oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have recently reported the identification of forty new minor molecular species of acylglycerols containing hydroxy fatty acids less polar than triricinolein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts. The ratios of regioisomers of triacylglycerols (ABC and AAB types) and ...

  14. Applying CPR to a gas utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, R.

    1995-01-01

    The latest management tool to hit the United States over the past five years is Core Process Re-engineering (CPR). Though not as radical a procedure as the well-known rescue method it shares an abbreviation with, it is viewed as the radical thinking of a business process. CPR has helped breathe new life into gas and electric utilities in recent years, which have been using it to find ways to increase customer satisfaction, decrease operating costs, reduce process time and/or increase quality. The first phase of a typical project identifies and reviews current processes and obtains information that can point out re-engineering opportunities. The second phase involves the actual redesign of the current process. In this phase new teams may be formed, since the skill requirements are different (creative thinking becomes very important, for instance). Once alternatives are finalized and approved, the actual change process begins. Implementing all the recommendations can take several years, primarily because of labor and regulatory implications; therefore, planning the implementation is the most important part of the project. First, develop an overall implementation strategy. This overall strategy should address four major questions: What to implement? Who will implement? When to implement? How to implement? CPR is not an automatic solution to a problem. Any company wanting to expedite a CPR effort should consider the following factors: Align the CPR objectives to the overall company objectives; Ensure that senior management is actively involved and supports the CPR activities; Select the right team of people and ensure they are committed to the project; Develop a case for change and instill a sense of urgency in all the stakeholders; Focus on business results and not on specific activities; and Communicate, communicate, communicate

  15. EEG CHARACTERISTICS AND THYROID PROFILE RATIO IN ADOLESCENTS OF SUBPOLAR AND POLAR EUROPEAN NORTH AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Demin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Features of brain bioelectric activity and thyroid system in adolescents living in Subpolar andPolar regionsof the North are considered. Hyperactivity of subcortical diencephalic brain structures in adolescents of the Polar region is revealed. Adolescents of Subpolar region have more intensive age optimization of neurodynamic processes. There are noted latitude distinctions of thyroid hormones role for age formation of brain bioelectric activity in adolescents.

  16. CPR - child (1 to 8 years old)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 8 years old) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. CPR stands ... sure you follow the guidelines for using children's car seats . Teach your child firearm safety. If you have guns in your home, keep ...

  17. Arecibo Radar Observation of Near-Earth Asteroids: Expanded Sample Size, Determination of Radar Albedos, and Measurements of Polarization Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejoly, Cassandra; Howell, Ellen S.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Springmann, Alessondra; Virkki, Anne; Nolan, Michael C.; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Brozovic, Marina; Giorgini, Jon D.

    2017-10-01

    The Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) population ranges in size from a few meters to more than 10 kilometers. NEAs have a wide variety of taxonomic classes, surface features, and shapes, including spheroids, binary objects, contact binaries, elongated, as well as irregular bodies. Using the Arecibo Observatory planetary radar system, we have measured apparent rotation rate, radar reflectivity, apparent diameter, and radar albedos for over 350 NEAs. The radar albedo is defined as the radar cross-section divided by the geometric cross-section. If a shape model is available, the actual cross-section is known at the time of the observation. Otherwise we derive a geometric cross-section from a measured diameter. When radar imaging is available, the diameter was measured from the apparent range depth. However, when radar imaging was not available, we used the continuous wave (CW) bandwidth radar measurements in conjunction with the period of the object. The CW bandwidth provides apparent rotation rate, which, given an independent rotation measurement, such as from lightcurves, constrains the size of the object. We assumed an equatorial view unless we knew the pole orientation, which gives a lower limit on the diameter. The CW also provides the polarization ratio, which is the ratio of the SC and OC cross-sections.We confirm the trend found by Benner et al. (2008) that taxonomic types E and V have very high polarization ratios. We have obtained a larger sample and can analyze additional trends with spin, size, rotation rate, taxonomic class, polarization ratio, and radar albedo to interpret the origin of the NEAs and their dynamical processes. The distribution of radar albedo and polarization ratio at the smallest diameters (≤50 m) differs from the distribution of larger objects (>50 m), although the sample size is limited. Additionally, we find more moderate radar albedos for the smallest NEAs when compared to those with diameters 50-150 m. We will present additional trends we

  18. Determination of the onset time in polarization power ratio Z/H for precursor of Sumatra earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahadi, S., E-mail: su4idi@yahoo.com [Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha No.10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Puspito, N. T.; Ibrahim, G. [Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha No.10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Saroso, S. [National Institute of Aeronautic and Space (LAPAN), Jl. Djunjunan No. 133, Bandung 40173 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    Determination of onset time precursors of strong earthquakes (Mw > 5) and distance (d < 500 km) using geomagnetic data from Geomagnetic station KTB, Sumatra and two station references DAV, Philippine and DAW, Australia. separate techniques are required in its determination. Not the same as that recorded in the kinetic wave seismograms can be determined by direct time domain. Difficulties associated with electromagnetic waves seismogenic activities require analysis of the transformed signal in the frequency domain. Determination of the frequency spectrum will determine the frequency of emissions emitted from the earthquake source. The aim is to analyze the power amplitude of the ULF emissions in the horizontal component (H) and vertical component (Z). Polarization power ratio Z/H is used for determining the sign of earthquake precursors controlled by the standard deviation. The pattern recognition polarization ratio should be obtained which can differentiate emissions from seismogenic effects of geomagnetic activity. ULF emission patterns generated that seismogenic effect has duration > 5 days and the dominance of emission intensity recorded at the Z component and for the dominance of the emission intensity of geomagnetic activity recorded in the component H. The result shows that the onset time is determined when the polarization power ratio Z/H standard deviation over the limit (p ± 2 σ) which has a duration of > 5 days.

  19. Interruptions in Chest Compressions by Surf Lifeguards: A Comparison of Face-mask Ventilation in Over-the-head CPR vs Standard CPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørkjær, Louise; Bomholt, Katrine Bjørnshave; Krogh, Kristian

    in OH-CPR and standard CPR with face-mask ventilation and randomized to a crossover comparison on a manikin. CPR quality data were obtained from the manikin and video recordings. Interruptions in chest compressions were used as a primary measure of CPR quality. A sample size of 14 participants......Introduction: Ventilation is a priority in drowning resuscitation. Over-the-head CPR (OH-CPR), i.e. with the rescuer located at the top of the victim’s head instead of alongside the victim’s torso, has been demonstrated to be superior when doing bag-valve-mask ventilation compared to standard CPR....... The International Life Saving Federation recommends CPR using face-mask ventilation. It is currently unknown if OH-CPR using face-mask ventilation improves CPR quality. We hypothesized that OH-CPR is superior to standard CPR with face-mask ventilation among surf lifeguards. Methods: Surf lifeguards were trained...

  20. Novel adhesive glove device (AGD) for active compression-decompression (ACD) CPR results in improved carotid blood flow and coronary perfusion pressure in piglet model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udassi, Jai P; Udassi, Sharda; Shih, Andre; Lamb, Melissa A; Porvasnik, Stacy L; Zaritsky, Arno L; Haque, Ikram U

    2012-06-01

    ACD-CPR improves coronary and cerebral perfusion. We developed an adhesive glove device (AGD) and hypothesized that ACD-CPR using an AGD provides better chest decompression resulting in improved carotid blood flow as compared to standard (S)-CPR. Prospective, randomized and controlled animal study. Sixteen anesthetized and ventilated piglets were randomized after 3 min of untreated VF to receive either S-CPR or AGD-ACD-CPR by a PALS certified single rescuer with compressions of 100 min(-1) and C:V ratio of 30:2. AGD consisted of a modified leather glove exposing the fingers and thumb. A wide Velcro patch was sewn to the palmer aspect of the glove and the counter Velcro patch was adhered to the pig's chest wall. Carotid blood flow was measured using ultrasound. Data (mean±SD) was analyzed using one way ANOVA and unpaired t-test; p-value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Right atrial pressure (mmHg) during the decompression phase was lower during AGD-ACD-CPR (-3.32±2.0) when compared to S-CPR (0.86±1.8, p=0.0007). Mean carotid blood flow was 53.2±27.1 (% of baseline blood flow in ml/min) in AGD vs. 19.1±12.5% in S-CPR, p=0.006. Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP, mmHg) was 29.9±5.8 in AGD vs. 22.7±6.9 in S-CPR, p=0.04. There was no significant difference in time to ROSC and number of epinephrine doses. Active chest decompression during CPR using this simple and inexpensive adhesive glove device resulted in significantly better carotid blood flow during the first 2 min of CPR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Real-time photonic sampling with improved signal-to-noise and distortion ratio using polarization-dependent modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dong; Zhang, Zhiyao; Liu, Yong; Li, Xiaojun; Jiang, Wei; Tan, Qinggui

    2018-04-01

    A real-time photonic sampling structure with effective nonlinearity suppression and excellent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance is proposed. The key points of this scheme are the polarization-dependent modulators (P-DMZMs) and the sagnac loop structure. Thanks to the polarization sensitive characteristic of P-DMZMs, the differences between transfer functions of the fundamental signal and the distortion become visible. Meanwhile, the selection of specific biases in P-DMZMs is helpful to achieve a preferable linearized performance with a low noise level for real-time photonic sampling. Compared with the quadrature-biased scheme, the proposed scheme is capable of valid nonlinearity suppression and is able to provide a better SNR performance even in a large frequency range. The proposed scheme is proved to be effective and easily implemented for real time photonic applications.

  2. Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  3. CPR in the nursing home: fool's errand or looming dilemma?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, D

    2011-09-01

    The indications for CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) have expanded greatly since the technique was introduced and theoretically it can be attempted on all prior to death. Policy initiatives (such as the British Medical Association\\/Royal College of Nursing guidelines) have attempted to provide a clinical rationale for the withholding of inappropriate CPR. Traditionally a care home was felt to be an inappropriate environment to attempt CPR but increased use of advance directives may bring the issue to the fore in this setting.

  4. Measurement of the branching ratio and polarization for J/psi→γf(1270)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.; Partridge, R.; Peck, C.; Porter, F.C.; Antreasyan, D.; Gu, Y.F.; Kollmann, W.; Richardson, M.; Strauch, K.; Wacker, K.; Weinstein, A.; Aschman, D.; Burnett, T.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyne, D.; Newman, C.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Gelphman, D.; Hofstadter, R.; Horisberger, R.; Kirkbride, I.; Kolanoski, H.; Koenigsmann, K.; Lee, R.; Liberman, A.; O'Reilly, J.; Osterheld, A.; Pollock, B.; Tompkins, J.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Chestnut, R.; Gaiser, J.; Godfrey, J.; Kiesling, C.; Lockman, W.; Oreglia, M.; Scharre, D.L

    1982-01-01

    The decay J/psi→γf(1270), f(1270)→π 0 π 0 has been studied. The γf decay branching ratio is measured to be (1.48 +- 0.25 +- 0.30) x 10 -3 . A fit to the f production and decay angular distributions yields the values A 1 /A 0 = 0.88 +- 0.13 and A 2 /A 0 = 0.04 +- 0.19, where A/sub lambda/ are the f helicity amplitudes. These results disagree with the values predicted from a QCD two-gluon-exchange model

  5. Advantage of CPR-first over call-first actions for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in nonelderly patients and of noncardiac aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamikura, Takahisa; Iwasaki, Hose; Myojo, Yasuhiro; Sakagami, Satoru; Takei, Yutaka; Inaba, Hideo

    2015-11-01

    To assess the benefit of immediate call or cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). Of 952,288 OHCAs in 2005-2012, 41,734 were bystander-witnessed cases without prehospital involvement of physicians but with bystander CPR (BCPR) on bystander's own initiative. From those OHCAs, we finally extracted the following three call/BCPR groups: immediate Call+CPR (N=10,195, emergency call/BCPR initiated at 0 or 1 min after witness, absolute call-BCPR time interval=0 or 1 min), immediate Call-First (N=1820, emergency call placed at 0 or 1 min after witness, call-to-BCPR interval=2-4 min), immediate CPR-First (N=5446, BCPR initiated at 0 or 1 min after witness, BCPR-to-call interval=2-4 min). One-month neurologically favourable survivals were compared among the groups. Critical comparisons between Call-First and CPR-First groups were made considering arrest aetiology, age, and bystander-patient relationship after confirming the interactions among variables. The overall survival rates in immediate Call+CPR, Call-First, and CPR-First groups were 11.5, 12.4, and 11.5%, respectively without significant differences (p=0.543). Subgroup analyses by multivariate logistic regression following univariate analysis disclosed that CPR-first group is more likely to survive in subgroups of noncardiac aetiology (adjusted odds ratio; 95% confidence interval, 2.01; 1.39-2.98) and of nonelderly OHCAs (1.38; 1.09-1.76). Immediate CPR-first action followed by an emergency call without a large delay may be recommended when a bystander with sufficient skills to perform CPR witnesses OHCAs in nonelderly people and of noncardiac aetiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. On the interpretation of flipping ratio measurements on rocking curves in polarized neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzynski, L.

    1980-01-01

    The measurements of the flipping ratio, R, vs crystal misseting angle, σ, from the Bragg position may bring important information on the homogeneity of the mosaic block distribution in ferro or ferrimagnetic crystals. It is shown that even if the sample is free from extinction, a small variation of the flipping ratio may be present if the neutron spin-flipper used in the experiment has efficiency dependence on the neutron wavelength. This effect is rather trivial and may be of importance only if both R and σ are sufficiently large. By far more important effect is due to the multiple Bragg scattering. This phenomenon is also neutron wavelength dependent and depends much on the resolution of the neutron diffractometer. While the differential equations for multiple Bragg scattering are of Zachariassen's type the resolution is treated within the framework of Caglioti et al. theory. It is shown that the multiple scattering, if present, affects seriously the shape of R(σ) and may be a source of errors in the interpretation of e.g. magnetic form factor data. A good example of this is given by the (331) reflection from Cosub(0.92)Fesub(0.08) alloy. (author)

  7. Association between oxidative stress index and post-CPR early mortality in cardiac arrest patients: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Hasan; Türkdoğan, Kenan Ahmet; Zorlu, Ali; Aydın, Hüseyin; Kurt, Recep; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2015-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a series of lifesaving actions that improve the chance of survival following cardiac arrest (CA). Many clinical and laboratory parameters, such as the presence of asystole, out-of-hospital CPR, and duration of cardiac arrest, are associated with failed CPR in patients with CA. Asystole is a state of no cardiac electrical activity, along with the absence of contractions of the myocardium and absence of cardiac output. Oxidative stress index (OSI), which is the ratio of total oxidative status to total antioxidant status, increases by ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated whether OSI levels in patients with CA could predict early mortality after CPR. This study has a prospective observational cohort design. Five patients with a history of cancer, four patients who developed hemolysis in their blood, six patients who were transferred to our hospital from other hospitals, and six patients in whom blood samples for OSI could not be stored properly were excluded. Finally, a total of 90 in-hospital or out-of-hospital CA patients and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers as the control group were evaluated prospectively. The patients were classified according to the CPR response into a successful group (n=46) and a failed group (n=44). Comparisons between groups were performed using one-way ANOVA with post hoc analysis by Tukey's HSD or independent samples t-test and the Kruskal-Wallis tests or Mann- Whitney U test for normally and abnormally distributed data, respectively. Also, we used chi-square test, Spearman's correlation test, univariate and multible logistic regression analyses, and receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. OSI was 3.0±4.0, 5.6±4.3, and 8.7±3.8 in the control group, the successful CPR group, and the failed CPR group, respectively (pOSI on admission, ischemia-modified albumin, presence of asystole, mean duration of cardiac arrest, out-of-hospital CPR, pH, and potassium and sodium levels were

  8. High extinction ratio and low transmission loss thin-film terahertz polarizer with a tunable bilayer metal wire-grid structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhe; Parrott, Edward P J; Park, Hongkyu; Chan, Hau Ping; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2014-02-15

    A thin-film terahertz polarizer is proposed and realized via a tunable bilayer metal wire-grid structure to achieve high extinction ratios and good transmission. The polarizer is fabricated on top of a thin silica layer by standard micro-fabrication techniques to eliminate the multireflection effects. The tunable alignment of the bilayer aluminum-wire grid structure enables tailoring of the extinction ratio and transmission characteristics. Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), a fabricated polarizer is characterized, with extinction ratios greater than 50 dB and transmission losses below 1 dB reported in the 0.2-1.1 THz frequency range. These characteristics can be improved by further tuning the polarizer parameters such as the pitch, metal film thickness, and lateral displacement.

  9. Study of Branching Ratio And Polarization Fraction in Neutral B Meson Decays to Negative Rho Meson Positive Kaon Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Baosen; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-03-07

    We present the preliminary results on the search for B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup -}K*{sup +}. The data sample comprises 122.7 million B{bar B} pairs in the e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation through the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance collected during 1999-2003 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). We obtain an upper limit of the branching ratio at 90% confidence level as {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup -}K*{sup +}) < 17.2 x 10{sup -6}. The fitted result on the polarization fraction shows no evidence that the decay is longitudinally dominated as predicted by various theoretical models.

  10. A novel protocol for dispatcher assisted CPR improves CPR quality and motivation among rescuers-A randomized controlled simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Stinne Eika; Nebsbjerg, Mette Amalie; Krogh, Lise Qvirin; Bjørnshave, Katrine; Krogh, Kristian; Povlsen, Jonas Agerlund; Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad; Grøfte, Thorbjørn; Kirkegaard, Hans; Løfgren, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Emergency dispatchers use protocols to instruct bystanders in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Studies changing one element in the dispatcher's protocol report improved CPR quality. Whether several changes interact is unknown and the effect of combining multiple changes previously reported to improve CPR quality into one protocol remains to be investigated. We hypothesize that a novel dispatch protocol, combining multiple beneficial elements improves CPR quality compared with a standard protocol. A novel dispatch protocol was designed including wording on chest compressions, using a metronome, regular encouragements and a 10-s rest each minute. In a simulated cardiac arrest scenario, laypersons were randomized to perform single-rescuer CPR guided with the novel or the standard protocol. a composite endpoint of time to first compression, hand position, compression depth and rate and hands-off time (maximum score: 22 points). Afterwards participants answered a questionnaire evaluating the dispatcher assistance. The novel protocol (n=61) improved CPR quality score compared with the standard protocol (n=64) (mean (SD): 18.6 (1.4)) points vs. 17.5 (1.7) points, pCPR. A novel bundle of care protocol improved CPR quality score and motivation among rescuers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cuticle genes CpCPR63 and CpCPR47 may confer resistance to deltamethrin in Culex pipiens pallens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xueli; Guo, Juxin; Ye, Wenyun; Guo, Qin; Huang, Yun; Ma, Lei; Zhou, Dan; Shen, Bo; Sun, Yan; Zhu, Changliang

    2017-08-01

    Cuticular proteins (CPs) are implicated in insecticide resistance in mosquito populations. Here, we investigated the role of cuticular genes in regulation of insecticide resistance in Culex pipiens pallens. We identified two CpCPRs (CpCPR63 and CpCPR47) that exhibited higher transcript levels in pyrethroid-resistant strains than in susceptible strains. Mosquito mortality was increased after knockdown of CpCPR genes by dsRNA injection. The RNA interference experiment suggested an interaction between CpCPR63 and CpCPR47, as silencing of one gene resulted in decreased expression of the other. These findings revealed that CpCPRs may regulate pyrethroid resistance and could be used as a potential genetic marker to monitor pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes.

  12. Training hospital providers in basic CPR skills in Botswana: Acquisition, retention and impact of novel training techniques☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Peter A.; Sutton, Robert M.; Tsima, Billy; Steenhoff, Andrew P.; Shilkofski, Nicole; Boulet, John R.; Davis, Amanda; Kestler, Andrew M.; Church, Kasey K.; Niles, Dana E.; Irving, Sharon Y.; Mazhani, Loeto; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Globally, one third of deaths each year are from cardiovascular diseases, yet no strong evidence supports any specific method of CPR instruction in a resource-limited setting. We hypothesized that both existing and novel CPR training programs significantly impact skills of hospital-based healthcare providers (HCP) in Botswana. Methods HCP were prospectively randomized to 3 training groups: instructor led, limited instructor with manikin feedback, or self-directed learning. Data was collected prior to training, immediately after and at 3 and 6 months. Excellent CPR was prospectively defined as having at least 4 of 5 characteristics: depth, rate, release, no flow fraction, and no excessive ventilation. GEE was performed to account for within subject correlation. Results Of 214 HCP trained, 40% resuscitate ≥1/month, 28% had previous formal CPR training, and 65% required additional skills remediation to pass using AHA criteria. Excellent CPR skill acquisition was significant (infant: 32% vs. 71%, p training. Using existing training, HCP acquire and retain skills, yet often require remediation. Novel techniques with increased student: instructor ratio and feedback manikins were not different compared to traditional instruction. PMID:22561463

  13. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)-related posterior rib fractures in neonates and infants following recommended changes in CPR techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, I; Pingen, A; Schiffmann, H; Vogel, M; Vlajnic, D; Ganschow, R; Born, M

    2014-07-01

    Posterior rib fractures are highly indicative of non-accidental trauma (NAT) in infants. Since 2000, the "two-thumbs" technique for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of newborns and infants has been recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA). This technique is similar to the grip on an infant's thorax while shaking. Is it possible that posterior rib fractures in newborns and infants could be caused by the "two-thumbs" technique? Using computerized databases from three German children's hospitals, we identified all infants less than 12 months old who underwent professional CPR within a 10-year period. We included all infants with anterior-posterior chest radiographs taken after CPR. Exclusion criteria were sternotomy, osteopenia, various other bone diseases and NAT. The radiographs were independently reviewed by the Chief of Pediatric Radiology (MB) and a Senior Pediatrician, Head of the local Child Protection Team (IF). Eighty infants with 546 chest radiographs were identified, and 50 of those infants underwent CPR immediately after birth. Data concerning the length of CPR was available for 41 infants. The mean length of CPR was 11min (range: 1-180min, median: 3min). On average, there were seven radiographs per infant. A total of 39 infants had a follow-up radiograph after at least 10 days. No rib fracture was visible on any chest X-ray. The results of this study suggest rib fracture after the use of the "two-thumbs" CPR technique is uncommon. Thus, there should be careful consideration of abuse when these fractures are identified, regardless of whether CPR was performed and what technique used. The discovery of rib fractures in an infant who has undergone CPR without underlying bone disease or major trauma warrants a full child protection investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Simulation of advanced accumulator and its application in CPR1000 LBLOCA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hongwei; Shan, Jianqiang; Gou, Junli; Cao, Jianhua; Shen, Yonggang; Fu, Xiangang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The analysis model was developed for advanced accumulator. • The sensitivity analysis of each key parameter was performed. • The LBLOCA was analyzed for the CPR1000 with advanced accumulator. • The analysis shows that advanced accumulator can improve CPR1000 safety performance. - Abstract: The advanced accumulator is designed to improve the safety and reliability of CPR1000 by providing a small injection flow to keep the reactor core in flooded condition. Thus, the core still stays in a cooling state without the intervention of low pressure safety injection and the startup grace time of the low pressure safety injection pump can be greatly extended. A new model for the advanced accumulator, which is based on the basic conservation equations, is developed and incorporated into RELAP5/MOD 3.3. The simulation of the advanced accumulator can be carried out and results show that the behavior of the advanced accumulator satisfied its primary design target. There is a large flow in the advanced accumulator at the initial stage. When the accumulator water level is lower than the stand pipe, a vortex appears in the damper, which results in a large pressure drop and a small flow. And then the sensitivity analysis is performed and the major factors which affected the flow rate of the advanced accumulator were obtained, including the damper diameter, the initial volume ratio of the water and the nitrogen and the diameter ratio of the standpipe and the small pipe. Additionally, the primary coolant loop cold leg double-ended guillotine break LBLOCA in CPR1000 with advanced accumulator is analyzed. The results show that the criterion for maximum cladding temperature limit (1477 K) (NRC, 1992) can be met ever with 200 s after the startup of the low pressure safety injection. From this point of view, passive advanced accumulator can strive a longer grace time for LPSI. Thus the reliability, safety and economy of the reactor system can be improved

  15. Broadband silicon polarization beam splitter with a high extinction ratio using a triple-bent-waveguide directional coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jun Rong; Ang, Thomas Y L; Sahin, Ezgi; Pawlina, Bryan; Chen, G F R; Tan, D T H; Lim, Soon Thor; Png, Ching Eng

    2017-11-01

    We report on the design and experimental demonstration of a broadband silicon polarization beam splitter (PBS) with a high extinction ratio (ER)≥30  dB. This was achieved using triple-bent-waveguide directional coupling in a single PBS, and cascaded PBS topology. For the single PBS, the bandwidths for an ER≥30  dB are 20 nm for the quasi-TE mode, and 70 nm for the quasi-TM mode when a broadband light source (1520-1610 nm) was employed. The insertion loss (IL) varies from 0.2 to 1 dB for the quasi-TE mode and 0.2-2 dB for the quasi-TM mode. The cascaded PBS improved the bandwidth of the quasi-TE mode for an ER≥30  dB to 90 nm, with a low IL of 0.2-2 dB. To the best of our knowledge, our PBS system is one of the best broadband PBSs with an ER as high as ∼42  dB and a low IL below 1 dB around the central wavelength, and experimentally demonstrated using edge-coupling.

  16. Electron-ion temperature ratio estimations in the summer polar mesosphere when subject to HF radio wave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, H.; La Hoz, C.; Havnes, O.; Rietveld, M.

    2014-10-01

    We have inferred the electron temperature enhancements above mesospheric altitudes under Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) conditions when the ionosphere is exposed to artificial HF radio wave heating. The proposed method uses the dependence of the radar cross section on the electron-to-ion temperature ratio to infer the heating factor from incoherent scatter radar (ISR) power measurements above 90 km. Model heating temperatures match our ISR estimations between 90 and 130 km with 0.94 Pearson correlation index. The PMSE strength measured by the MORRO MST radar is about 50% weaker during the heater-on period when the modeled electron-to-ion mesospheric temperature is approximately 10 times greater than the unperturbed value. No PMSE weakening is found when the mesospheric temperature enhancement is by a factor of three or less. The PMSE weakening and its absence are consistent with the modeled mesospheric electron temperatures. This consistency supports to the proposed method for estimating mesospheric electron temperatures achieved by independent MST and ISR radar measurements.

  17. Effects of bystander CPR following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest on hospital costs and long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geri, Guillaume; Fahrenbruch, Carol; Meischke, Hendrika; Painter, Ian; White, Lindsay; Rea, Thomas D; Weaver, Marcia R

    2017-06-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with a greater likelihood of survival to hospital discharge after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However the long-term survival benefits in relationship to cost have not been well-studied. We evaluated bystander CPR, hospital-based costs, and long-term survival following OHCA in order to assess the potential cost-effectiveness of bystander CPR. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of consecutive EMS-treated OHCA patients >=12years who arrested prior to EMS arrival and outside a nursing facility between 2001 and 2010 in greater King County, WA. Utstein-style information was obtained from the EMS registry, including 5-year survival. Costs from the OHCA hospitalization were obtained from the Washington State Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System. Cost effectiveness was based on hospital costs divided by quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for a 5-year follow-up window. Of the 4448 eligible patients, 18.5% (n=824) were discharged alive from hospital and 12.1% (n=539) were alive at 5 years. Five-year survival was higher in patients who received bystander CPR (14.3% vs. 8.7%, phospitalization was USD 19,961 (40,498) for all admitted patients and USD 75,175 (52,276) for patients alive at year 5. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio associated with bystander CPR was USD 48,044 per QALY. Based on this population-based investigation, bystander CPR was positively associated with long-term survival and appears cost-effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ratios of regioisomers of minor acylglycerols less polar than triricinolein in castor oil estimated by mass spectrometry and the biosynthesis of tetraacylglycerols in castor

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have recently reported the identification of forty new minor molecular species of acylglycerols containing hydroxy fatty acids less polar than triricinolein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts. The ratios of regioisomers of triacylglycerols (ABC and AAB types) and ...

  19. Measuring surface-area-to-volume ratios in soft porous materials using laser-polarized xenon interphase exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. P.; Mair, R. W.; Hoffmann, D.; Hrovat, M. I.; Rogers, R. A.; Topulos, G. P.; Walsworth, R. L.; Patz, S.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate a minimally invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique that enables determination of the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of soft porous materials from measurements of the diffusive exchange of laser-polarized 129Xe between gas in the pore space and 129Xe dissolved in the solid phase. We apply this NMR technique to porous polymer samples and find approximate agreement with destructive stereological measurements of S/V obtained with optical confocal microscopy. Potential applications of laser-polarized xenon interphase exchange NMR include measurements of in vivo lung function in humans and characterization of gas chromatography columns.

  20. Assessment of in-vessel corium retention in CPR1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xing; Zhang Shishun; Lin Jiming

    2011-01-01

    The In-Vessel corium Retention (IVR) strategy of Chinese 1000 MW class commercial pressurized water reactor (CPR1000) is assessed by Risk-Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM). Four representative severe accident scenarios are selected for the IVR assessment in this paper. According to four representative severe accident scenarios consequence calculated by the deterministic code combined with engineering judgment, the input probability distribution of the assessment is determined. Success probability of IVR from the viewpoint of thermal failure is then predicted using MOPOL code. MOPOL is a code developed basing on the well known ROAAM frame and heat transfer model of corium. It is demonstrated that the success probability of IVR by Reactor Cavity Flooding in CPR1000 is potentially higher than 99%. Application of IVR strategy in CPR1000 is envisioned probable if a further more comprehensive risk-benefit evaluation conclusion is positive. (authors)

  1. 77 FR 74278 - Proposed Information Collection (Internet Student CPR Web Registration Application); Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Internet Student CPR Web Registration Application); Comment... use of other forms of information technology. Title: Internet Student CPR Web Registration Application... solicits comments on information needed to establish an online web registration application. DATES: Written...

  2. Resuscitation team perceptions of family presence during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich; McCoy, Jon; Bell, Ginette; Haussman, Kristen; Joiner, Jennifer; Marcoux, Kelly Keefe; Magarelli, Karen; Mahoney, Kathleen; Maldonado, Linda; Mastro, Kari A; Milloria, Amy; Tamburri, Linda M; Tortajada, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    The literature supports family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and its many perceived benefits for patients and their families. It also suggests that, overall, health care professionals are supportive of this practice. There have not been any published studies to date that have looked at the perception of family presence from the multidisciplinary resuscitation or code team's perspective. The purpose of this study was to describe the multidisciplinary care provider's understanding and perceived barriers of family presence during CPR in an academic medical center. This study is a quantitative, exploratory, descriptive study that utilized survey methodology. The sample included all members of an urban academic medical center's resuscitation response team. The study findings reveal that, overall, code team members feel that family members should be allowed to remain at the bedside during CPR but that challenges exist including education deficits and mixed feelings that may result from family presence; the study participants caring for neonates and children were more favorable to family presence during CPR than their adult counterparts. Barriers remain related to family presence during resuscitation. Education is needed for all members of the health care team to facilitate collaborative changes in resuscitation practices. Education should include information regarding institutional policies, methods for incorporating family members into the code process, and interventions to support the psychosocial needs of family members.

  3. The Effectiveness of Using Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) Against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the impact of the use of CPR in submitting general Chemistry (123L) laboratory report. This is expected to improve writing skills and alleviate grading burdens particularly when dealing with a large class due to lack sufficient instructors and high grading burden. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and t-test ...

  4. Correlation of CCV Between In-Cylinder Swirl Ratio and Polar Velocity Profile in Valve Seat Region Using LES Under Motored Engine Condition★

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiaofeng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of Transparent Combustion Chamber (TCC3 engine Large-Eddy Simulation (LES result was carried out to investigate Cycle-to-Cycle Variation (CCV correlation between in-cylinder swirl ratio and flow in the valve seat region of the intake port to address a challenging question on “What causes CCV of in-cylinder flow”. Polar Velocity (PV profile, mean velocities normal to a ring-shaped cutting surface in the valve seat region, is calculated to depict intake port flow. A Net Polar Velocity (NPV can be defined by performing the vector sum of the polar velocity around the intake valve. A standard deviation of PV is also calculated from azimuthal distribution of PV magnitudes relative to its mean value. The analysis of 18 LES cycles of TCC3 engine with a two-valve, pancake-shaped combustion chamber shows that similar CCV of in-cylinder swirl ratio patterns are observed at different crank angles from Intake Valve Opening (IVO to Exhaust Valve Opening (EVO. Further analysis shows clear correlations of CCV between in-cylinder swirl ratio and NPV magnitude and the standard deviation of PV at selected crank angles from IVO to EVO. The correlations get significantly better with the ring-shaped cutting surface moves from up-stream to downstream of the valve-seat region. This study reveals that the CCV of in-cylinder swirl ratio is built up gradually from upstream to downstream in the intake port and valve-seat region. Further evaluation of the analysis method is planned for a four-valve engine as an evaluation metric for better engine intake port design and combustion chamber optimization.

  5. Marginally effective medical care: ethical analysis of issues in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilberman, M; Kutner, J; Parsons, D; Murphy, D J

    1997-12-01

    Outcomes from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) remain distressingly poor. Overuse of CPR is attributable to unrealistic expectations, unintended consequences of existing policies and failure to honour patient refusal of CPR. We analyzed the CPR outcomes literature using the bioethical principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice and developed a proposal for selective use of CPR. Beneficence supports use of CPR when most effective. Non-maleficence argues against performing CPR when the outcomes are harmful or usage inappropriate. Additionally, policies which usurp good clinical judgment and moral responsibility, thereby contributing to inappropriate CPR usage, should be considered maleficent. Autonomy restricts CPR use when refused but cannot create a right to CPR. Justice requires that we define which medical interventions contribute sufficiently to health and happiness that they should be made universally available. This ordering is necessary whether one believes in the utilitarian standard or wishes medical care to be universally available on fairness grounds. Low-yield CPR fails justice criteria. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation should be performed when justified by the extensive outcomes literature; not performed when not desired by the patient or not indicated; and performed infrequently when relatively contraindicated.

  6. Improving workplace safety training using a self-directed CPR-AED learning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Mary E; Cazzell, Mary; Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Cason, Carolyn L

    2009-04-01

    Adequate training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) is an important component of a workplace safety training program. Barriers to traditional in-classroom CPR-AED training programs include time away from work to complete training, logistics, learner discomfort over being in a classroom setting, and instructors who include information irrelevant to CPR. This study evaluated differences in CPR skills performance between employees who learned CPR using a self-directed learning (SDL) kit and employees who attended a traditional instructor-led course. The results suggest that the SDL kit yields learning outcomes comparable to those obtained with traditional instructor-led courses and is a more time-efficient tool for CPR-AED training. Furthermore, the SDL kit overcomes many of the barriers that keep individuals from learning CPR and appears to contribute to bystanders' confidently attempting resuscitation.

  7. Ratios of regioisomers of minor acylglycerols less polar than triricinolein in castor oil estimated by mass spectrometry (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ratios of regioisomers of triacylglycerols (TAG) have been estimated by mass spectrometry using the fact that the neutral loss of fatty acid (FA) from the sn-2 position is energetically less favored in comparison with that from sn-1,3 positions. However regioisomeric TAG standards were needed fo...

  8. Influences of poly[(styrene)x-stat-(chloromethylstyrene)y]s additives on dewetting behaviors of polystyrene thin films: effects of polar group ratio and film thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangjan, Suntree; Traiphol, Nisanart; Traiphol, Rakchart

    2012-01-01

    This contribution investigates the addition of poly(styrene-stat-chloromethylstyrene (ClMS))s as dewetting inhibitors of polystyrene (PS) thin films with thicknesses ranging from 12 to 38 nm. The ClMS ratios in the copolymers are 5, 25 and 45 mol%. Atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy are utilized to follow morphological changes of blended PS/copolymer films upon annealing above their glass transition temperatures. We have found that thermal stability of the PS films is greatly improved when a small amount of the copolymers is added into the system. The polar ClMS groups provide anchoring sites with the polar SiO x /Si substrate while the styrene segments favorably interact with the PS matrix. The effectiveness of the copolymers as dewetting inhibitors is also found to increase with mole ratio of ClMS group. While the stability of PS films is systematically improved upon addition of the highly substituted copolymers, using the copolymer with relatively low ratio of ClMS group could lead to the opposite result. This class of copolymers can be utilized for improving thermal stability of ultrathin PS films. The fundamental knowledge from this study is also important for designing or selecting structure of additives used to improve the stability of polymeric thin films. - Highlights: ► Efficient method for improving stability of polystyrene (PS) thin films. ► Poly(styrene-stat-chloromethylstyrene)s are used as dewetting inhibitors. ► Thermal stability of blended PS/copolymers greatly improved. ► Effectiveness of the copolymers increases with mole ratio of chloromethylstyrene group. ► Important results for designing materials in coating application.

  9. [Lever type push-pull device for ACD-CPR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Tohru; Sugiyama, Goro

    2004-01-01

    Prolonged use of the CardioPump can cause fatigue and may impair performing the ACD-CPR maneuver accurately. We applied a lever mechanism to lessen the fatigue. The fixed part of the lever consists of a 40 cm metal pipe, 2 cm in diameter, mounted vertically to a rectangular metal base plate (45 cm x 20 cm) placed under the patient when the device is used. The fulcrum of the lever is positioned at any height on the vertical tube. One end of the 65 cm lever was connected to a pin-joint hub at the fulcrum. The height of the fulcrum is adjusted for each patient according to the anterior-posterior dimension of the thorax. The Cardio-Pump is mounted in a frame which is movable along the shaft of the lever between the fulcrum and the handle at the operator end of the lever. ACD-CPR is performed by lowering and raising the handle. The range of motion is controlled for safety by observing the movement of the chest wall of the patient from the side. We were able to maintain ACD-CPR with this device for more than 30 minutes without significant fatigue.

  10. Proton elastic form factor ratios to Q{sup 2} = 3.5 GeV{sup 2} by polarization transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Punjabi; C.F. Perdrisat; et al

    2005-01-01

    The ratio of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors, G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}}, was obtained by measuring P{sub t} and P{sub {ell}}, the transverse and longitudinal recoil proton polarization components, respectively, for the elastic {rvec e}p {yields} e{rvec p} reaction in the four-momentum transfer squared range of 0.5 to 3.5 GeV{sup 2}. In the single-photon exchange approximation, the ratio G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} is directly proportional to the ratio P{sub t}/P{sub {ell}}. The simultaneous measurement of P{sub t} and P{sub {ell}} in a polarimeter reduces systematic uncertainties. The results for the ratio G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} show a systematic decrease with increasing Q{sup 2}, indicating for the first time a definite difference in the distribution of charge and magnetization in the proton. The data have been re-analyzed and systematic uncertainties have become significantly smaller than previously published results.

  11. Planktonic foraminiferal biogeography in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean: Contribution from CPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilland, Julie; Fabri-Ruiz, Salomé; Koubbi, Philippe; Monaco, Claire Lo; Cotte, Cédric; Hosie, Graham W.; Sanchez, Sophie; Howa, Hélène

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) Southern Ocean-Continuous Plankton Recorder (SO-CPR) Survey, the oceanic regions around Crozet and Kerguelen Islands were investigated in February-March 2013. Living planktonic Foraminifera (LPF) were collected in the upper mixed layer with a CPR along a 2160 nautical mile sea transect that crossed main hydrological fronts in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. In the SO-CPR database, mean total abundances of Foraminifera occurring during late austral summer are highly variable at an inter-annual scale, from 10 to 250 ind.m-3, representing 10-40% of the total zooplankton abundance, respectively. In the Southern Ocean, major inter-annual changes in zooplankton community structure were already reported. In this study, we describe the large scale distributional pattern of individual planktonic foraminiferal species living in near-surface waters of the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, and we attempt to explain why major spatial variability in relative species abundances occurs during a late austral summer. In February-March 2013, LPF total abundances recorded between 42.86°S and 56.42°S ranged from 0 to a maximum of 258 ind.m-3. In the Open Ocean Zone, the LPF community was composed of four major species (Globigerinita uvula, Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, Neogloboquadrina incompta, Globigerina bulloides). Generally, LPF total abundances are supposed to mirror primary production induced by hydrological fronts or induced by topography near Crozet and Kerguelen Islands. However, during late austral summer 2013, high foraminiferal abundances in the upper mixed layer did not always match the pattern of near-surface primary production (high Chl-a concentration areas delineated from satellite imagery). Low LPF standing stocks in late austral summer in the Southern Ocean contrasted with the presence of high densities of heavily silicified diatoms. This suggests that the late bloom

  12. Depolarization ratio of polar stratospheric clouds in coastal Antarctica: comparison analysis between ground-based Micro Pulse Lidar and space-borne CALIOP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Córdoba-Jabonero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs play an important role in polar ozone depletion, since they are involved in diverse ozone destruction processes (chlorine activation, denitrification. The degree of that ozone reduction is depending on the type of PSCs, and hence on their occurrence. Therefore PSC characterization, mainly focused on PSC-type discrimination, is widely demanded. The backscattering (R and volume linear depolarization (δV ratios are the parameters usually used in lidar measurements for PSC detection and identification. In this work, an improved version of the standard NASA/Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL-4, which includes a built-in depolarization detection module, has been used for PSC observations above the coastal Antarctic Belgrano II station (Argentina, 77.9° S 34.6° W, 256 m a.s.l. since 2009. Examination of the MPL-4 δV feature as a suitable index for PSC-type discrimination is based on the analysis of the two-channel data, i.e., the parallel (p- and perpendicular (s- polarized MPL signals. This study focuses on the comparison of coincident δV-profiles as obtained from ground-based MPL-4 measurements during three Antarctic winters with those reported from the space-borne lidar CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellite in the same period (83 simultaneous cases are analysed for 2009–2011 austral winter times. Three different approaches are considered for the comparison analysis between both lidar profile data sets in order to test the degree of agreement: the correlation coefficient (CC, as a measure of the relationship between both PSC vertical structures; the mean differences together with their root mean square (RMS values found between data sets; and the percentage differences (BIAS, parameter also used in profiling comparisons between CALIOP and other ground-based lidar systems. All of them are examined as a function

  13. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) plus delayed defibrillation versus immediate defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; He, Qing; Yang, Li J; Liu, Guan J; Jones, Alexander

    2014-09-12

    lists of relevant International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) evidence worksheets. Our participant group consisted of adults over 18 years of age presenting with OHCA who were in VF or pulseless VT at the time of emergency medical service (EMS) paramedic arrival. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of one and one-half to three minutes of CPR versus defibrillation as initial therapy on survival and neurological outcomes of these participants. We excluded observational and cross-over design studies. Two review authors independently extracted the data. We contacted study authors to ask for additional data when required. The risk ratio (RR) for each outcome was calculated and summarized in the meta-analysis after heterogeneity was considered. We used Review Manager software for all analyses. We included four RCTs with a total of 3090 enrolled participants (one study used a cluster-randomized design). Three trials were considered to have a relatively low risk of bias, and one trial was considered to have a relatively high risk. When survival to hospital discharge was compared, 38 of 320 (11.88%) participants survived to discharge in the initial CPR plus delayed defibrillation group compared with 39 of 338 participants (11.54%) in the immediate defibrillation group (RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.20, Chi(2) = 10.78, degrees of freedom (df) = 5, P value 0.06, I(2) = 54%, low-quality evidence).When we compared the neurological outcome at hospital discharge (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.93, low-quality evidence), the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.15,low-quality evidence) and survival at one year (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.24 to 2.49, low-quality evidence), we could not rule out the superiority of either treatment.Adverse effects were not associated with either treatment. Owing to the low quality of available evidence, we have been unable to determine

  14. Study of 3D-growth conditions for selective area MOVPE of high aspect ratio GaN fins with non-polar vertical sidewalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Jana; Steib, Frederik; Zhou, Hao; Ledig, Johannes; Nicolai, Lars; Fündling, Sönke; Schimpke, Tilman; Avramescu, Adrian; Varghese, Tansen; Trampert, Achim; Straßburg, Martin; Lugauer, Hans-Jürgen; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    GaN fins are 3D architectures elongated in one direction parallel to the substrate surface. They have the geometry of walls with a large height to width ratio as well as small footprints. When appropriate symmetry directions of the GaN buffer are used, the sidewalls are formed by non-polar {1 1 -2 0} planes, making the fins particularly suitable for many device applications like LEDs, FETs, lasers, sensors or waveguides. The influence of growth parameters like temperature, pressure, V/III ratio and total precursor flow on the fin structures is analyzed. Based on these results, a 2-temperature-step-growth was developed, leading to fins with smooth side and top facets, fast vertical growth rates and good homogeneity along their length as well as over different mask patterns. For the core-shell growth of fin LED heterostructures, the 2-temperature-step-growth shows much smoother sidewalls and less crystal defects in the InGaN QW and p-GaN shell compared to structures with cores grown in just one step. Electroluminescence spectra of the 2-temperature-step-grown fin LED are demonstrated.

  15. An analytical framework for common-pool resource–large technical system (CPR-LTS constellations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Blomkvist

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an analytical framework for a special phenomenon: when a common-pool resource (CPR institution and a large technical system (LTS are connected and mutually interdependent. The CPR in this case is a node managed by its appropriators within a centrally planned and managed system; here named CPR-LTS constellations. Our framework is empirically derived from two historical investigations of CPR institutions within two LTSs, the agricultural-technical system and the road transport system of Sweden. By comparing similarities and differences it is possible to identify paths to successes and failures. To understand why one survived and the other disappeared we connect Elinor Ostrom’s theories about management of CPRs with Thomas P. Hughes’s theories about LTSs. We are proposing a framework that can bridge the gap between theories about management of CPRs and LTSs. By combining the two theories it should be possible to better understand how small-scale producers using bottom-up CPRs can be linked to top-down LTSs.We will argue that to fit within an LTS, a CPR needs alignment between different parts or components within the constellation/system and alignment with other systems and institutions in society. We propose three analytical levels to deal with the phenomenon of aligning a CPR project to an existing, large sociotechnical system:Local alignment (CPR: How are CPRs organized and managed at local sites?Sociotechnical alignment (CPR-LTS: How are CPRs connected to the sociotechnical system?Contextual alignment: How are CPR-LTS constellations aligned with neighboring institutions and systems in society?Our work indicates that for successful management of a CPR-LTS constellation it is important that the CPR be included in legislation and that government agencies support the CPR in alignment with the LTS. Legislators must recognize the CPR-part in the CPR-LTS constellation so that its institutional body is firmly established in

  16. Pay It Forward: High School Video-based Instruction Can Disseminate CPR Knowledge in Priority Neighborhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiah Han

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The implementation of creative new strategies to increase layperson cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and defibrillation may improve resuscitation in priority populations. As more communities implement laws requiring CPR training in high schools, there is potential for a multiplier effect and reach into priority communities with low bystander-CPR rates. Methods: We investigated the feasibility, knowledge acquisition, and dissemination of a high school-centered, CPR video self-instruction program with a “pay-it-forward” component in a low-income, urban, predominantly Black neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois with historically low bystander-CPR rates. Ninth and tenth graders followed a video self-instruction kit in a classroom setting to learn CPR. As homework, students were required to use the training kit to “pay it forward” and teach CPR to their friends and family. We administered pre- and post-intervention knowledge surveys to measure knowledge acquisition among classroom and “pay-it-forward” participants. Results: Seventy-one classroom participants trained 347 of their friends and family, for an average of 4.9 additional persons trained per kit. Classroom CPR knowledge survey scores increased from 58% to 93% (p < 0.0001. The pay-it-forward cohort saw an increase from 58% to 82% (p < 0.0001. Conclusion: A high school-centered, CPR educational intervention with a “pay-it-forward” component can disseminate CPR knowledge beyond the classroom. Because schools are centrally-organized settings to which all children and their families have access, school-based interventions allow for a broad reach that encompasses all segments of the population and have potential to decrease disparities in bystander CPR provision.

  17. Pay It Forward: High School Video-based Instruction Can Disseminate CPR Knowledge in Priority Neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rios, Marina; Han, Josiah; Cano, Alejandra; Ramirez, Victor; Morales, Gabriel; Campbell, Teri L; Hoek, Terry Vanden

    2018-03-01

    The implementation of creative new strategies to increase layperson cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation may improve resuscitation in priority populations. As more communities implement laws requiring CPR training in high schools, there is potential for a multiplier effect and reach into priority communities with low bystander-CPR rates. We investigated the feasibility, knowledge acquisition, and dissemination of a high school-centered, CPR video self-instruction program with a "pay-it-forward" component in a low-income, urban, predominantly Black neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois with historically low bystander-CPR rates. Ninth and tenth graders followed a video self-instruction kit in a classroom setting to learn CPR. As homework, students were required to use the training kit to "pay it forward" and teach CPR to their friends and family. We administered pre- and post-intervention knowledge surveys to measure knowledge acquisition among classroom and "pay-it-forward" participants. Seventy-one classroom participants trained 347 of their friends and family, for an average of 4.9 additional persons trained per kit. Classroom CPR knowledge survey scores increased from 58% to 93% (p < 0.0001). The pay-it-forward cohort saw an increase from 58% to 82% (p < 0.0001). A high school-centered, CPR educational intervention with a "pay-it-forward" component can disseminate CPR knowledge beyond the classroom. Because schools are centrally-organized settings to which all children and their families have access, school-based interventions allow for a broad reach that encompasses all segments of the population and have potential to decrease disparities in bystander CPR provision.

  18. CPR Instruction in U.S. High Schools: What Is the State in the Nation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lorrel E; Lynes, Carlos; Carroll, Travis; Halperin, Henry

    2017-11-28

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in high schools is required by law in the majority of U.S. states. However, laws differ from state to state, and it is unknown how this legislation is being enacted. The authors sent a cross-sectional, closed survey to educational superintendents in 32 states with CPR laws in June 2016. The authors subsequently performed direct examination and categorization of CPR legislation in 39 states (several states passed legislation as of September 2017). Survey results indicated differing practices with regard to CPR instruction in areas such as course content (63% perform automated external defibrillator training), instructor (47% used CPR-certified teachers/coaches, 30% used other CPR-certified instructors, 11% used noncertified teachers/coaches), and method (7% followed American Red Cross methods, 55% followed American Heart Association methods). CPR laws differ, although almost all (97%) require hands-on training. Although hands-on practice during CPR instruction in high school is required by law in the majority of U.S. states, there is currently no standardized method of implementation. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Keep pushing! Limiting interruptions to CPR; bag-valve mask versus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This has led to first responders and paramedics performing single rescuer CPR using a bag-valve-mask (BVM) device as opposed to the historical practice of intubating and ventilating via an endotracheal tube. Bag-valve-mask ventilations, especially during single rescuer CPR, are however associated with complications ...

  20. CprK crystal structures reveal mechanism for transcriptional control of halorespiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joyce, M.G.; Levy, C.; Gabor, K.; Pop, S.M.; Biehl, B.D.; Doukov, T.I.; Ryter, J.M.; Mazon, H.; Smidt, H.; Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Ragsdale, S.W.; Oost, van der J.; Leys, D.

    2006-01-01

    Halorespiration is a bacterial respiratory process in which haloorganic compounds act as terminal electron acceptors. This process is controlled at transcriptional level by CprK, a member of the ubiquitous CRP-FNR family. Here we present the crystal structures of oxidized CprK in presence of the

  1. Report on the Southern Ocean Continuous Plankton Recorder (SO-CPR Standards Workshop 2016: SCAR SO-CPR Database Expert Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio T. Takahashi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The“Southern Ocean Continuous Plankton Recorder (SO-CPR Survey Standards Workshop”was held at the Australian Antarctic Division on 12−16December 2016. The purposes of the workshop were to confirm that consistent and high standards of species identification, methodology, and data quality were being maintained amongst the main analysts in the SO-CPR Survey, and to discuss future training methods, including a SO-CPR manual that will include a counting rule book, and a future road map for the SO-CPR program. During the workshop we discussed a range of topics including: taxonomic resolution issues (particularly for Foraminifera and euphausiid larval identification and staging; laboratory methods (preservation and storage, with emphasis on maintaining correct pH; shipboard techniques; training methods; data handling (metadata, database, data sharing; gap analysis (spatial, temporal, data, quantitative; and future workshops/conferences, including comprehensive training workshops for emerging SO-CPR survey partners (India. We agreed that there should be a larger workshop every two years to ensure that the high standards of the SO-CPR program are maintained.

  2. Mechanical active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ACD-CPR) versus manual CPR according to pressure of end tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO2) during CPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, C; Karlsson, T; Axelsson, A B; Herlitz, J

    2009-10-01

    In animal and human studies, measuring the pressure of end tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO2) has been shown to be a practical non-invasive method that correlates well with the pulmonary blood flow and cardiac output (CO) generated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study aims to compare mechanical active compression-decompression (ACD) CPR with standard CPR according to P(ET)CO2 among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), during CPR and with standardised ventilation. This prospective, on a cluster level, pseudo-randomised pilot trial took place in the Municipality of Göteborg. During a 2-year period, all patients aged >18 years suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) of presumed cardiac etiology were enrolled. The present analysis included only tracheally intubated patients in whom P(ET)CO2 was measured for 15 min or until the detection of a pulse-giving rhythm. In all, 126 patients participated in the evaluation, 64 patients in the mechanical chest compression group and 62 patients in the control group. The group receiving mechanical ACD-CPR obtained the significantly highest P(ET)CO2 values according to the average (p=0.04), initial (p=0.01) and minimum (p=0.01) values. We found no significant difference according to the maximum value between groups. In this hypothesis generating study mechanical ACD-CPR compared with manual CPR generated the highest initial, minimum and average value of P(ET)CO2. Whether these data can be repeated and furthermore be associated with an improved outcome after OHCA need to be confirmed in a large prospective randomised trial.

  3. Augmented survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims with the use of mobile phones for emergency communication under the DA-CPR protocol getting information from callers beside the victim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Akira; Myojo, Yasuhiro; Wato, Yukihiro; Inaba, Hideo

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the impacts of emergency calls made using mobile phones on the quality of dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DA-CPR) and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) that were not witnessed by emergency medical service (EMS). In this prospective study, we collected data for 2530 DA-CPR-attempted medical emergency cases (517 using mobile phones and 2013 using landline phones) and 2980 non-EMS-witnessed OHCAs (600 using mobile phones and 2380 using landline phones). Time factors and quality of DA-CPR, backgrounds of callers and outcomes of OHCAs were compared between mobile and landline phone groups. Emergency calls are much more frequently placed beside the arrest victim in mobile phone group (52.7% vs. 17.2%). The positive predictive value and acceptance rate of DA-CPR in mobile phone group (84.7% and 80.6%, respectively) were significantly higher than those in landline group (79.2% and 70.9%). The proportion of good-quality bystander CPR in mobile phone group was significantly higher than that in landline group (53.5% vs. 45.0%). When analysed for all non-EMS-witnessed OHCAs, rates of 1-month survival and 1-year neurologically favourable survival in mobile phone group (7.8% and 3.5%, respectively) were higher than those in landline phone group (4.6% and 1.9%; pmobile phone calls were associated with increased 1-month survival in the subgroup of OHCAs receiving bystander CPR (adjusted odds ratio, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.15-2.92). Emergency calls made using mobile phones are likely to augment the survival from OHCAs by improving DA-CPR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparing three CPR feedback devices and standard BLS in a single rescuer scenario: a randomised simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapletal, Bernhard; Greif, Robert; Stumpf, Dominik; Nierscher, Franz Josef; Frantal, Sophie; Haugk, Moritz; Ruetzler, Kurt; Schlimp, Christoph; Fischer, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    Efficiently performed basic life support (BLS) after cardiac arrest is proven to be effective. However, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is strenuous and rescuers' performance declines rapidly over time. Audio-visual feedback devices reporting CPR quality may prevent this decline. We aimed to investigate the effect of various CPR feedback devices on CPR quality. In this open, prospective, randomised, controlled trial we compared three CPR feedback devices (PocketCPR, CPRmeter, iPhone app PocketCPR) with standard BLS without feedback in a simulated scenario. 240 trained medical students performed single rescuer BLS on a manikin for 8min. Effective compression (compressions with correct depth, pressure point and sufficient decompression) as well as compression rate, flow time fraction and ventilation parameters were compared between the four groups. Study participants using the PocketCPR performed 17±19% effective compressions compared to 32±28% with CPRmeter, 25±27% with the iPhone app PocketCPR, and 35±30% applying standard BLS (PocketCPR vs. CPRmeter p=0.007, PocketCPR vs. standard BLS p=0.001, others: ns). PocketCPR and CPRmeter prevented a decline in effective compression over time, but overall performance in the PocketCPR group was considerably inferior to standard BLS. Compression depth and rate were within the range recommended in the guidelines in all groups. While we found differences between the investigated CPR feedback devices, overall BLS quality was suboptimal in all groups. Surprisingly, effective compression was not improved by any CPR feedback device compared to standard BLS. All feedback devices caused substantial delay in starting CPR, which may worsen outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High-precision dual-inlet IRMS measurements of the stable isotopes of CO2 and the N2O / CO2 ratio from polar ice core samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Bauska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An important constraint on mechanisms of past carbon cycle variability is provided by the stable isotopic composition of carbon in atmospheric carbon dioxide (δ13C-CO2 trapped in polar ice cores, but obtaining very precise measurements has proven to be a significant analytical challenge. Here we describe a new technique to determine the δ13C of CO2 at very high precision, as well as measuring the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios. In this method, ancient air is extracted from relatively large ice samples (~400 g with a dry-extraction "ice grater" device. The liberated air is cryogenically purified to a CO2 and N2O mixture and analyzed with a microvolume-equipped dual-inlet IRMS (Thermo MAT 253. The reproducibility of the method, based on replicate analysis of ice core samples, is 0.02‰ for δ13C-CO2 and 2 ppm and 4 ppb for the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios, respectively (1σ pooled standard deviation. Our experiments show that minimizing water vapor pressure in the extraction vessel by housing the grating apparatus in a ultralow-temperature freezer (−60 °C improves the precision and decreases the experimental blank of the method to −0.07 ± 0.04‰. We describe techniques for accurate calibration of small samples and the application of a mass-spectrometric method based on source fragmentation for reconstructing the N2O history of the atmosphere. The oxygen isotopic composition of CO2 is also investigated, confirming previous observations of oxygen exchange between gaseous CO2 and solid H2O within the ice archive. These data offer a possible constraint on oxygen isotopic fractionation during H2O and CO2 exchange below the H2O bulk melting temperature.

  6. Bench evaluation: three face-shield CPR barrier devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, M; Deao, D; Moon, L; Peters, K; Cavanaugh, S

    1995-06-01

    Due to the fear of disease transmission, the practice of mouth-to-mouth (M-M) rescue breathing is rarely performed; to address this concern, many types of CPR barrier devices have been developed. These include bag-valve-mask devices, mouth-to-mask devices, and face shields (FS). The purpose of this study was to measure the volumes delivered during mouth-to-face shield (M-FS) breathing, to measure the back pressure and calculate the resistance to flow through their 1-way valves, and to test for backward leak of gas through the valves. Three FS brands were evaluated: Kiss of Life (KOL), MicroSHIELD (Micro) and Res-Cue Key (RCK). Volume delivered during M-M and M-FS breathing was evaluated by 10 rescuers who used the devices while performing rescue breathing on a CPR mannequin. Back pressure was measured and resistance calculated by directing airflow through the 1-way valves. Backward leak was evaluated by measuring the O2 concentration at the rescuer side of the valve while 100% O2 was directed toward the patient side of the valve. Differences among the brands were evaluated using analysis of variance. The mean (SD) values for volumes in L were: M-M 1.00 (0.25), Micro 0.77 (0.20), RCK 0.64 (0.10), and KOL 0.24 (0.11). Mean values for back pressure in cm H2O at 50 L/min were Micro 16.7 (1.29), KOL 7.22 (0.13), and RCK 2.15 (0.16). Significant backward leak only occurred with RCK. Not one of the FSs tested met all of the requirements suggested by the American Heart Association and by the International Standards Organization.

  7. Metronome improves compression and ventilation rates during CPR on a manikin in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Karl B; Stickney, Ronald E; Gallison, Leanne; Smith, Robert E

    2010-02-01

    We hypothesized that a unique tock and voice metronome could prevent both suboptimal chest compression rates and hyperventilation. A prospective, randomized, parallel design study involving 34 pairs of paid firefighter/emergency medical technicians (EMTs) performing two-rescuer CPR using a Laerdal SkillReporter Resusci Anne manikin with and without metronome guidance was performed. Each CPR session consisted of 2 min of 30:2 CPR with an unsecured airway, then 4 min of CPR with a secured airway (continuous compressions at 100 min(-1) with 8-10 ventilations/min), repeated after the rescuers switched roles. The metronome provided "tock" prompts for compressions, transition prompts between compressions and ventilations, and a spoken "ventilate" prompt. During CPR with a bag/valve/mask the target compression rate of 90-110 min(-1) was achieved in 5/34 CPR sessions (15%) for the control group and 34/34 sessions (100%) for the metronome group (pmetronome or control group during CPR with a bag/valve/mask. During CPR with a bag/endotracheal tube, the target of both a compression rate of 90-110 min(-1) and a ventilation rate of 8-11 min(-1) was achieved in 3/34 CPR sessions (9%) for the control group and 33/34 sessions (97%) for the metronome group (pMetronome use with the secured airway scenario significantly decreased the incidence of over-ventilation (11/34 EMT pairs vs. 0/34 EMT pairs; pmetronome was effective at directing correct chest compression and ventilation rates both before and after intubation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Implementing Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) in a Large-lecture Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, A. S.; Bettis, E. A., III; Russell, J. E.; Van Horne, S.; Sipola, M.; Rocheford, M. K.; Colombo, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Assessing writing assignments and providing students the opportunity to meaningfully revise the assignments are challenging for instructors of large enrollment science classes. We included two individual writing assignments and peer assessments as part of course assessment for a large Introduction to Environmental Science course. In order to facilitate the assessment, Calibrated Peer Review (CPR), a web-based application developed by UCLA that enables frequent writing assignments in any discipline and with any class size, was adopted. The CPR assignment process involved four steps: submitting a writing assignment, calibrating each student's review skills, reviewing peers' writing, and assessing one's own writing assignment (self-assessment). A rubric was provided to guide students through each writing assignment and the same rubric was used in calibration, review, and self-assessment scoring. Once the instructors uploaded the writing prompts, rubrics, sample writings and answer keys into the CPR system, the CPR software fully directed all student activity (writing assignment submission, calibrations, reviews, and self-assessment). Students were able to view their results within the CPR program, including their self-calibration scores, reviewing scores, peers' ratings and feedback, total earned scores, and self-assessment scores. Surveys independently administered at the conclusion of the CPR assignments indicated that sixty to seventy-five percent of the students perceived that CPR was helpful in their learning, improved their writing and evaluation skills, and that the process of reviewing other students' essays and their own essays was more helpful than the comments received from peers. These survey results are in agreement with the well-established educational research literature that shows the benefits of peer review and peer assessment to student learning. Our experience with CPR in a large enrollment science course indicates that thoughtful planning of the

  9. The Cerebro-placental Ratio as a Prognostic Factor of Foetal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A foetal birth score < 7 was 66 times more often in mothers with cerebro-placental ratio< 1.0 than mothers with CPR 1.0. (P 0.05). Low birth weight was 4.7 times more likely among mothers with cerebroplacental ratio < 1.0.as compared to those with mothers with CPR1.0 (95% CI 2, 11.1; p0.001). A foetal birth score < 7 was ...

  10. Arabidopsis CPR5 independently regulates seed germination and postgermination arrest of development through LOX pathway and ABA signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilan Gao

    Full Text Available The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA and the lipoxygenases (LOXs pathway play important roles in seed germination and seedling growth and development. Here, we reported on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis CPR5 in the ABA signaling and LOX pathways. The cpr5 mutant was hypersensitive to ABA in the seed germination, cotyledon greening and root growth, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing CPR5 were insensitive. Genetic analysis demonstrated that CPR5 gene may be located downstream of the ABI1 in the ABA signaling pathway. However, the cpr5 mutant showed an ABA independent drought-resistant phenotype. It was also found that the cpr5 mutant was hypersensitive to NDGA and NDGA treatment aggravated the ABA-induced delay in the seed germination and cotyledon greening. Taken together, these results suggest that the CPR5 plays a regulatory role in the regulation of seed germination and early seedling growth through ABA and LOX pathways independently.

  11. Effect of bystander CPR initiation prior to the emergency call on ROSC and 30day survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Palsgaard Møller, Thea; Kjær Ersbøll, Annette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed at evaluating if time for initiation of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) - prior to the emergency call (CPRprior) versus during the emergency call following dispatcher-assisted CPR (CPRduring) - was associated with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC...... and corresponding emergency calls were evaluated. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to evaluate the association between time for initiation of bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of CPRprior. RESULTS: The study...... included 548 emergency calls for OHCA patients receiving bystander CPR, 34.9% (n=191) in the CPRprior group and 65.1% (n=357) in the CPRduring group. Multivariable analyses showed no difference in ROSC (OR=0.88, 95% CI: 0.56-1.38) or 30-day survival (OR=1.14, 95% CI: 0.68-1.92) between CPRprior...

  12. Mobile-phone dispatch of laypersons for CPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringh, Mattias; Rosenqvist, Mårten; Hollenberg, Jacob; Jonsson, Martin; Fredman, David; Nordberg, Per; Järnbert-Pettersson, Hans; Hasselqvist-Ax, Ingela; Riva, Gabriel; Svensson, Leif

    2015-06-11

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by bystanders is associated with increased survival rates among persons with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We investigated whether rates of bystander-initiated CPR could be increased with the use of a mobile-phone positioning system that could instantly locate mobile-phone users and dispatch lay volunteers who were trained in CPR to a patient nearby with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We conducted a blinded, randomized, controlled trial in Stockholm from April 2012 through December 2013. A mobile-phone positioning system that was activated when ambulance, fire, and police services were dispatched was used to locate trained volunteers who were within 500 m of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; volunteers were then dispatched to the patients (the intervention group) or not dispatched to them (the control group). The primary outcome was bystander-initiated CPR before the arrival of ambulance, fire, and police services. A total of 5989 lay volunteers who were trained in CPR were recruited initially, and overall 9828 were recruited during the study. The mobile-phone positioning system was activated in 667 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests: 46% (306 patients) in the intervention group and 54% (361 patients) in the control group. The rate of bystander-initiated CPR was 62% (188 of 305 patients) in the intervention group and 48% (172 of 360 patients) in the control group (absolute difference for intervention vs. control, 14 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, 6 to 21; Pmobile-phone positioning system to dispatch lay volunteers who were trained in CPR was associated with significantly increased rates of bystander-initiated CPR among persons with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (Funded by the Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation and Stockholm County; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01789554.).

  13. Rescuer fatigue under the 2010 ERC guidelines, and its effect on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Catherine H; Heggie, James; Jones, Christopher M; Thorne, Christopher J; Hulme, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    Updated life-support guidelines were published by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) in 2010, increasing the required depth and rate of chest compression delivery. This study sought to determine the impact of these guidelines on rescuer fatigue and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance. 62 Health science students performed 5 min of conventional CPR in accordance with the 2010 ERC guidelines. A SkillReporter manikin was used to objectively assess temporal change in determinants of CPR quality. Participants subjectively reported their end-fatigue levels, using a visual analogue scale, and the point at which they believed fatigue was affecting CPR delivery. 49 (79%) participants reported that fatigue affected their CPR performance, at an average of 167 s. End fatigue averaged 49.5/100 (range 0-95). The proportion of chest compressions delivered correctly decreased from 52% in min 1 to 39% in min 5, approaching significance (p=0.071). A significant decline in chest compressions reaching the recommended depth occurred between the first (53%) and fifth (38%) min (p=0.012). Almost half this decline (6%) was between the first and second minutes of CPR. Neither chest compression rate, nor rescue breath volume, were affected by rescuer fatigue. Fatigue affects chest compression delivery within the second minute of CPR under the 2010 ERC guidelines, and is poorly judged by rescuers. Rescuers should, therefore, be encouraged to interchange after 2 min of CPR delivery. Team leaders should be advised to not rely on rescuers to self-report fatigue, and should, instead, monitor for its effects.

  14. Cerebroplacental ratio thresholds measured within two weeks of birth and the risk of Cesarean section for intrapartum fetal compromise and adverse neonatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Bligh, Larissa; Alsolai, Amal A; Greer, Ristan M; Kumar, Sailesh

    2017-06-08

    Prediction of intrapartum fetal compromise in uncomplicated, term pregnancies is a global obstetric challenge. Currently, no widely accepted screening test for this condition exists, although the cerebroplacental ratio (CPR) shows promise. We aimed to prospectively evaluate the screening performance of the CPR 10 th centile for detection of Cesarean section for intrapartum fetal compromise (IFC) and composite adverse neonatal outcome (ANO) in low-risk women from 36 weeks and to determine the best CPR threshold from three previously described in the literature. In a blinded, prospective, observational, cohort study, 483 women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies underwent fortnightly CPR measurement from 36 weeks to delivery and intrapartum and neonatal outcomes were recorded. The CPR 10 th centile threshold screening test performance was calculated for emergency Cesarean section for IFC and composite ANO, incorporating acidosis at birth, Apgar Cesarean section for IFC and 17.9% had a composite ANO. Sensitivity and specificity for CPR Cesarean section IFC and composite ANO, respectively. Comparing the three CPR thresholds, CPR Cesarean section for IFC area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.72, composite ANO area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.58), although its predictive utility was only fair for Cesarean section for IFC and poor for composite ANO. The CPR 10 th centile may be useful as a component of a risk assessment tool for Cesarean section for IFC in low risk pregnancies at term. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. XPS study of Li/Nb ratio in LiNbO{sub 3} crystals. Effect of polarity and mechanical processing on LiNbO{sub 3} surface chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skryleva, E.A., E-mail: easkryleva@gmail.com; Kubasov, I.V., E-mail: kubasov.ilya@gmail.com; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph.V., E-mail: kiruhancev-korneev@yandex.ru; Senatulin, B.R., E-mail: borisrs@yandex.ru; Zhukov, R.N., E-mail: rom_zhuk@mail.ru; Zakutailov, K.V., E-mail: zakkonst@gmail.com; Malinkovich, M.D., E-mail: malinkovich@yandex.ru; Parkhomenko, Yu.N., E-mail: parkh@rambler.ru

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • XPS Li/Nb ratio measurement uncertainty in LNbO3 specimens was obtained. • The effect of polarization on surface chemistry was observed only on cleaves. • Li/Nb ratio on positive cleave surface is higher than on negative one. • The positive cleave surface adsorbs fluorine more efficiently than negative one. • Mechanical processing of crystals reduces surface Li/Nb. - Abstract: Different sections of congruent lithium niobate (CLN) crystals have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We have developed a method for measuring the lithium-to-niobium atomic ratio Li/Nb from the ratio of the Li1s and Nb4s spectral integral intensities with an overall error of within 8 %. Polarity and mechanical processing affect the Li/Nb ratio on CLN crystal surfaces. The Li/Nb ratio is within the tolerance (0.946 ± 0.074) on the negative cleave surface Z, and there is excess lithium (Li/Nb = 1.25 ± 0.10) on the positive surface. The positive surfaces of the 128° Y cut plates after long exposure to air exhibit LiOH formation indications (obvious lithium excess, higher Li1s spectral binding energy and a wide additional peak in the O1s spectrum produced by nonstructural oxygen). XPS and glow discharge optical electron spectroscopy showed that mechanical processing of differently oriented crystals (X, Z and 128° Y) and different polarities dramatically reduces the Li/Nb ratio. In situ fluorine adsorption experiments revealed the following regularities: fluorine adsorption only occurred on crystal cleaves and was not observed for mechanically processed specimens. Positive cleave surfaces have substantially higher fluorine adsorption capacity compared to negative ones.

  16. In vitro Th1 and Th2 cell polarization is severely influenced by the initial ratio of naïve and memory CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Lars; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2013-01-01

    Robust in vitro systems are important in elucidating mechanisms regarding the heterogenetic nature of in vivo immune responses and contribute with knowledge to design good in vivo experiments. In this study, we show that initial Th1 and in particular Th2 polarization was negatively influenced by ...

  17. Production of a highly active, soluble form of the cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR A) from Candida tropicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Mark

    2006-08-01

    The present invention provides soluble cytochrome p450 reductase (CPR) proteins from Candida sp. having an altered N-terminal region which results in reduced hydrophobicity of the N-terminal region. Also provided are host cells comprising the subject soluble CPR proteins. In addition, the present invention provides nucleotide and corresponding amino acid sequences for soluble CPR proteins and vectors comprising the nucleotide sequences. Methods for producing a soluble CPR, for increasing production of a dicarboxylic acid, and for detecting a cytochrome P450 are also provided.

  18. CPR artifact removal in ventricular fibrillation ECG signals using Gabor multipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Tobias; Klotz, Andreas; Kracher, Günther; Baubin, Michael; Feichtinger, Hans G; Gilly, Hermann; Amann, Anton

    2009-02-01

    We present an algorithm for discarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) components from ventricular fibrillation ECG (VF ECG) signals and establish a method for comparing CPR attenuation on a common dataset. Removing motion artifacts in ECG allows for uninterrupted rhythm analysis and reduces "hands-off" time during resuscitation. The current approach assumes a multichannel setting where the information of the corrupted ECG is combined with an additional pressure signal in order to estimate the motion artifacts. The underlying algorithm relies on a localized time-frequency transformation, the Gabor transform, that reveals the perturbation components, which, in turn, can be attenuated. The performance of the method is evaluated on a small set of test signals in the form of error analysis and compared to two well-established CPR removal algorithms that use an adaptive filtering system and a state-space model, respectively. We primarily point out the potential of the algorithm for successful artifact removal; however, on account of the limited set of human VF and animal asystole CPR signals, we refrain from a statistical analysis of the efficiency of CPR attenuation. The results encourage further investigations in both the theoretical and the clinical setup.

  19. How to provide around-the-clock CPR certification without losing any sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umlauf, M G

    1990-01-01

    Teaching and reviewing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to employees is an important part of the role and responsibilities of hospital nurse educators. The new teaching technologies of computer-assisted instruction and interactive video have been merged into a teaching/learning system that was tested by a rural federal hospital. Over a 2-month period, more than one third of the hospital's staff members were certified in CPR by the standards of the American Heart Association with the learning system. Ease of operation, employee enthusiasm, and easy access to the equipment were identified as important factors that contributed to the successful implementation of this innovative CPR training/review program. Additional evaluation of the system confirmed that the system was efficient, cost effective, and time-saving.

  20. Metronome Use for Coordination of Breaths and Cardiac Compressions Delivered by Minimally-Trained Caregivers During Two-Person CPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Victor, IV; West, Sarah; Austin, Paul; Branson, Richard; Beck, George

    2005-01-01

    Astronaut crew medical officers (CMO) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) receive 40 hours of medical training over 18 months before each mission, including two-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (2CPR) as recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA). Recent studies have concluded that the use of metronomic tones improves the coordination of 2CPR by trained clinicians. 2CPR performance data for minimally-trained caregivers has been limited. The goal of this study was to determine whether use of a metronome by minimally-trained caregivers (CMO analogues) would improve 2CPR performance. 20 pairs of minimally-trained caregivers certified in 2CPR via AHA guidelines performed 2CPR for 4 minutes on an instrumented manikin using 3 interventions: 1) Standard 2CPR without a metronome [NONE], 2) Standard 2CPR plus a metronome for coordinating compression rate only [MET], 3) Standard 2CPR plus a metronome for coordinating both the compression rate and ventilation rate [BOTH]. Caregivers were evaluated for their ability to meet the AHA guideline of 32 breaths-240 compressions in 4 minutes. All (100%) caregivers using the BOTH intervention provided the required number of ventilation breaths as compared with the NONE caregivers (10%) and MET caregivers (0%). For compressions, 97.5% of the BOTH caregivers were not successful in meeting the AHA compression guideline; however, an average of 238 compressions of the desired 240 were completed. None of the caregivers were successful in meeting the compression guideline using the NONE and MET interventions. This study demonstrates that use of metronomic tones by minimally-trained caregivers for coordinating both compressions and breaths improves 2CPR performance. Meeting the breath guideline is important to minimize air entering the stomach, thus decreasing the likelihood of gastric aspiration. These results suggest that manifesting a metronome for the ISS may augment the performance of 2CPR on orbit and thus may

  1. A systematic review and pooled analysis of CPR-associated cardiovascular and thoracic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew C; Rosati, Shannon F; Suffredini, Anthony F; Schrump, David S

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of thoracic injuries resulting from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not well characterized. We describe a case in which a CPR-associated atrial rupture was identified with ultrasound and successfully managed in the intensive care unit with a bedside thoracotomy and atrial repair. We then describe a systematic review with pooled data analysis of CPR-associated cardiovascular, pulmonary, pleural, and thoracic wall injuries. PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched to identify relevant published studies. Unpublished studies were identified by searching the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, and Google. Inclusion criteria for the pooled analysis were any clinical or autopsy study in which (a) patients underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation, (b) chest compressions were administered either manually or with the assistance of active compression-decompression devices, and (c) autopsy or dedicated imaging assessments were conducted to identify complications. Exclusion criteria for the pooled analysis were pre-clinical studies, case reports and abstracts. Nine-hundred twenty-eight potentially relevant references were identified. Twenty-seven references met inclusion criteria. A systematic review of the literature is provided with pooled data analysis. The incidence of reported CPR-associated cardiovascular and thoracic wall injuries varies widely. CPR with active compression-decompression devices has a higher reported incidence of cardiopulmonary injuries. Bedside ultrasound may be a useful adjunct to assess and risk-stratify patients to identify serious or life-threatening CPR-associated injuries. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. It isn't like this on TV: Revisiting CPR survival rates depicted on popular TV shows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portanova, Jaclyn; Irvine, Krystle; Yi, Jae Yoon; Enguidanos, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Public perceptions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be influenced by the media. Nearly two decades ago, a study found that the rates of survival following CPR were far higher in popular TV shows than actual rates. In recent years, major strides toward enhanced education and communication around life sustaining interventions have been made. This study aimed to reassess the accuracy of CPR portrayed by popular medical TV shows. Additionally, we sought to determine whether these shows depicted discussions of care preferences and referenced advance directives. Three trained research assistants independently coded two leading medical dramas airing between 2010 and 2011, Grey's Anatomy and House. Patient characteristics, CPR survival rates, and goals of care discussions were recorded. CPR was depicted 46 times in the 91 episodes, with a survival rate of 69.6%. Among those immediately surviving following CPR, the majority (71.9%) survived to hospital discharge and 15.6% died before discharge. Advance directive discussions only occurred for two patients, and preferences regarding code status (8.7%), intubation (6.5%) and feeding (4.3%) rarely occurred. Both popular TV shows portrayed CPR as more effective than actual rates. Overall, the shows portrayed an immediate survival rate nearly twice that of actual survival rates. Inaccurate TV portrayal of CPR survival rates may misinform viewers and influence care decisions made during serious illness and at end of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Seeking Augmented Information Content Concerning Diurnal Precipitation Achieved by Combining TRMM-PR and CloudSat-CPR Radar Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric A.; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Carty, Hezekiah

    2008-01-01

    The CloudSat satellite's Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) is a highly sensitive 94 GHz (W-band) nadir viewing radar system flown in retrograde sun synchronous orbit useful for determining the vertical structure of cloud hydrometeors down to sensitivity of approx. -30 dBZ reflectivity factor. Given this sensitivity, it is possible to unambiguously measure precipitation rates in clouds over a spectrum extending from approx. 0.08 - 3.0 mm hr (sup -1) down to altitudes of 0.5 km with approx.0.25 km vertical binning. This enables an effective means to measure a great deal of the drizzle and light rain spectrum. However, because of its near-polar sunsynchronous orbit, CloudSat cannot sample the diurnal cycle of precipitation, nor with its nadir-only CPR view can it obtain a high duty cycle in sampling precipitation at fixed local times over fixed positions. On the other hand, the TRMM satellite, which is flown in a non-sunsynchronous 35-degree inclined orbit carrying the 13.8 GHz KU-band Precipitation Radar (PR) scanning through nadir over an approx. 225 km swath, can sample both the diurnal cycle and with a much improved duty cycle relative to CloudSat. Moreover, the PR and CPR have the same 0.25 km vertical binning capability. The PR's greatest shortcoming is its approx. +17 dBZ sensitivity, which eliminates the possibility of measuring rain rates below -0.3-0.5 mm hr(sup -1), which can involve rainfall accumulations of up to 50% of the total over some regions. This begs the question of whether by combining CPR and PR data sets, whether it is possible to obtain an augmented measurement of the diurnal precipitation cycle. By collecting complimentary datasets during CloudSat and TRMM satellite orbit crossings within a delta t = 45-min proximity window, it is possible to demonstrate that whenever TRMM detects a precipitation signal, the correlations along the vertical axis between the reflectivities acquired from the CPR and PR are in inverse proportion to the magnitude of the

  4. Apps4CPR: A review study of mobile applications for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M. (2013, 23 September). Apps4CPR: A review study of mobile applications for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and support. Presentation given during the 6th World Congress on Social Media, Mobile Apps and Internet/Web 2.0 in Medicine, Health, and Biomedical Research, London, UK.

  5. Accident Analysis of Chinese CPR1000 in Response to Station Blackout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Juyoul [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Cilliers, Anthonie [North-West University, Potchefstroom (South Africa)

    2016-10-15

    Stress tests required evaluation of the consequences of loss of safety functions from any initiating event (e.g., earthquake or flooding) causing loss of electrical power, including station blackout (SBO). The SBO scenario involves a loss of offsite power, failure of the redundant emergency diesel generators, failure of alternate current (AC) power restoration and the eventual degradation of the reactor coolant pump (RCP) seals resulting in a long term loss of coolant. Using PCTRAN/CPR1000, this study analyses the station blackout on a Chinese CPR1000 which is the most representative type reactor in terms of number of reactors, operating period, power capacity and geological distance from Korean Peninsula. Both the physical effects of the accidents as well as the releases of radioisotopes are calculated and discussed. Station blackout simulation was conducted in this study. The resulting effects seen are consistent with other stress test station blackout tests used utilizing licensed simulation codes. An exact comparison is however not possible as the plants on which the simulations was done vary greatly and the limitations of availability to Chinese FSAR. PCTRAN/CPR1000 is an extremely useful simulation package that provides engineers and scientists very accurate feedback to how a nuclear power plant would react as a whole under various plant conditions. It is able to do this extremely fast as well. As a training tool PCTRAN/CPR1000 provides hands-on experience with many of the primary plant operations and develops an intuitive understanding of the plant.

  6. Training and Confidence Level of Junior Anaesthetists in CPR- Experience in A Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desalu Ibironke

    2008-01-01

    There is low confidence among junior anaesthetists in Nigeria in performance of CPR, poor knowledge of ECG interpretation of cardiac arrest rhythm and little practice in defibrillation. The establishment of a Resuscitation council would ensure adequate and frequent training which would improve knowledge, boost confidence and result in better patient care.

  7. Organ donation in cardiac arrest patients treated with extracorporeal CPR: A single centre observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, Maria Chiara; Coppo, Anna; Vargiolu, Alessia; Villa, Jacopo; Rota, Matteo; Avalli, Leonello; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    In a consecutive cohort of cardiac arrest (CA) treated with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR), we describe the incidence of brain death (BD), the eligibility for organ donation and the short-term follow-up of the transplanted organs. All refractory in- and out-of-hospital CA admitted to our Cardiac Intensive Care Unit between January 2011 and September 2016 treated with eCPR were enrolled in the study. 112 CA patients received eCPR. 82 (73.2%) died in hospital, 25 BD (22.3%) and 57 for other causes (50.9%). At the time of first neurological evaluation after rewarming, variables related to evolution to BD were a lower GCS (3 [3-3] vs. 8 [3-11], pdonation in BD patients was 56%, with 39 donated organs: 23 kidneys, 12 livers, and 4 lungs. 89.74% of the transplanted organs reached an early good functional recovery. In refractory CA patients treated with eCPR, the prevalence of BD is high. This population has a high potential for considering organ donation. Donated organs have a good outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  9. Design of the RINSE Trial: The Rapid Infusion of cold Normal Saline by paramedics during CPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Ian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR now recommends therapeutic hypothermia (TH (33°C for 12-24 hours as soon as possible for patients who remain comatose after resuscitation from shockable rhythm in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and that it be considered for non shockable rhythms. The optimal timing of TH is still uncertain. Laboratory data have suggested that there is significantly decreased neurological injury if cooling is initiated during CPR. In addition, peri-arrest cooling may increase the rate of successful defibrillation. This study aims to determine whether paramedic cooling during CPR improves outcome compared standard treatment in patients who are being resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/Design This paper describes the methodology for a definitive multi-centre, randomised, controlled trial of paramedic cooling during CPR compared with standard treatment. Paramedic cooling during CPR will be achieved using a rapid infusion of large volume (20-40 mL/kg to a maximum of 2 litres ice-cold (4°C normal saline. The primary outcome measure is survival at hospital discharge. Secondary outcome measures are rates of return of spontaneous circulation, rate of survival to hospital admission, temperature on arrival at hospital, and 12 month quality of life of survivors. Discussion This trial will test the effect of the administration of ice cold saline during CPR on survival outcomes. If this simple treatment is found to improve outcomes, it will have generalisability to prehospital services globally. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01172678

  10. Evaluation of the GPM-DPR snowfall detection capability: Comparison with CloudSat-CPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Daniele; Panegrossi, Giulia; Sanò, Paolo; Marra, Anna Cinzia; Dietrich, Stefano; Johnson, Benjamin T.; Kulie, Mark S.

    2017-11-01

    An important objective of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is the detection of falling snow, since it accounts for a significant fraction of precipitation in the mid-high latitudes. The GPM Core Observatory carries the first spaceborne Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR), designed with enhanced sensitivity to detect lighter liquid and solid precipitation. The primary goal of this study is to assess the DPR's ability to identify snowfall using near-coincident CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) observations and products as an independent reference dataset. CloudSat near global coverage and high sensitivity of the W-band CPR make it very suitable for snowfall-related research. While DPR/CPR radar sensitivity disparities contribute substantially to snowfall detection differences, this study also analyzes other factors such as precipitation phase discriminators that produce snowfall identification discrepancies. Results show that even if the occurrence of snowfall events correctly detected by DPR products is quite small compared to CPR (around 5-7%), the fraction of snowfall mass is not negligible (29-34%). A direct comparison of CPR and DPR reflectivities illustrates that DPR misdetection is worsened by a noise-reducing DPR algorithm component that corrects the measured reflectivity. This procedure eliminates the receiver noise and side lobe clutter effects, but also removes radar signals related to snowfall events that are associated with relatively low reflectivity values. In an effort to increase DPR signal fidelity associated with snowfall, this paper proposes a simple algorithm using matched DPR Ku/Ka radar reflectivities producing an increase of the fraction of snowfall mass detected by DPR up to 59%.

  11. Progress Towards a Global Understanding of Plankton Dynamics: The Global Alliance of CPR Surveys (GACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, S.; Richardson, A.; Melrose, C.; Muxagata, E.; Hosie, G.; Verheye, H.; Hall, J.; Edwards, M.; Koubbi, P.; Abu-Alhaija, R.; Chiba, S.; Wilson, W.; Nagappa, R.; Takahashi, K.

    2016-02-01

    The Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) was first used in 1931 to routinely sample plankton and its continued deployment now sustains the longest-running, and spatially most extensive marine biological sampling programme in the world. Towed behind, for the most part commercial, ships it collects plankton samples from the surface waters that are subsequently analysed to provide taxonomically-resolved abundance data on a broad range of planktonic organisms from the size of coccolithophores to euphausiids. Plankton appear to integrate changes in the physical environment and by underpinning most marine food-webs, pass on this variability to higher trophic levels which have societal value. CPRs are deployed increasingly around the globe in discrete regional surveys that until recently interacted in an informal way. In 2011 the Global Alliance of CPR Surveys (GACS) was launched to bring these surveys together to collaborate more productively and address issues such as: methodological standardization, data integration, capacity building, and data analysis. Early products include a combined global database and regularly-released global marine ecological status reports. There are, of course, limitations to the exploitation of CPR data as well as the current geographic coverage. A current focus of GACS is integration of the data with models to meaningfully extrapolate across time and space. In this way the output could be used to provide more robust synoptic representations of key plankton variables. Recent years have also seen the CPR used as a platform in itself with the inclusion of additional sensors and water samplers that can sample the microplankton. The archive of samples has already been used for some molecular investigations and curation of samples is maintained for future studies. Thus the CPR is a key element of any regional to global ocean observing system of biodiversity.

  12. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form-factor ratio G(En) / G(Mn) via the H-2(polarized-e, e-prime,polarized-n)H-1 reaction to Q**2 = 1.45-(GeV/c)**2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley Plaster; A.Yu. Semenov; A. Aghalaryan; Erick Crouse; Glen MacLachlan; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Hartmuth Arenhovel; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Alan Baldwin; David Barkhuff; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Michael Christy; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; T. Eden; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Ashot Gasparian; Kenneth Garrow; Paul Gueye; Calvin Howell; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; Richard Madey; D. Manley; Pete Markowitz; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Allena Opper; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Brian Raue; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Nikolai Savvinov; Irina Semenova; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Stepan Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Shawn Taylor; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; John Watson; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

    2006-02-01

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G{sub En}/G{sub Mn}, deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic {sup 2}H({rvec e}, e{prime}{rvec n}) {sup 1}H reaction, at three Q{sup 2} values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The data at Q{sup 2} = 1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2} are the first direct experimental measurements of GEn employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} region and stand as the most precise determinations of GEn for all values of Q{sup 2}.

  13. Use of impedance threshold device in conjunction with our novel adhesive glove device for ACD-CPR does not result in additional chest decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Andre; Udassi, Sharda; Porvasnik, Stacy L; Lamb, Melissa A; Badugu, Srinivasarao; Venkata, Giridhar Kaliki; Lopez-Colon, Dalia; Haque, Ikram U; Zaritsky, Arno L; Udassi, Jai P

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the hemodynamic effects of using an adhesive glove device (AGD) to perform active compression-decompression CPR (AGD-CPR) in conjunction with an impedance threshold device (ITD) in a pediatric cardiac arrest model. Controlled, randomized animal study. In this study, 18 piglets were anesthetized, ventilated, and continuously monitored. After 3min of untreated ventricular fibrillation, animals were randomized (6/group) to receive either standard CPR (S-CPR), active compression-decompression CPR via adhesive glove device (AGD-CPR) or AGD-CPR along with an ITD (AGD-CPR+ITD) for 2min at 100-120compressions/min. AGD is delivered using a fingerless leather glove with a Velcro patch on the palmer aspect and the counter Velcro patch adhered to the pig's chest. Data (mean±SD) were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with pair wise multiple comparisons to assess differences between groups. p-Value≤0.05 was considered significant. Both AGD-CPR and AGD-CPR+ITD groups produced lower intrathoracic pressure (IttP, mmHg) during decompression phase (-13.4±6.7, p=0.01 and -11.9±6.5, p=0.01, respectively) in comparison to S-CPR (-0.3±4.2). Carotid blood flow (CBF, % of baseline mL/min) was higher in AGD-CPR and AGD-CPR+ITD (respectively 64.3±47.3%, p=0.03 and 67.5±33.1%, p=0.04) as compared with S-CPR (29.1±12.5%). Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP, mmHg) was higher in AGD-CPR and AGD-CPR+ITD (respectively 19.7±4.6, p=0.04 and 25.6±12.1, p=0.02) when compared to S-CPR (9.6±9.1). There was no statistically significant difference between AGD-CPR and AGD-CPR+ITD groups with reference to intra-thoracic pressure, carotid blood flow and coronary perfusion pressure. Active compression decompression delivered by this simple and inexpensive adhesive glove device resulted in improved cerebral blood flow and coronary perfusion pressure. There was no statistically significant added effect of ITD use along with AGD-CPR on the decompression of the chest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  14. Rescuers' effect on active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ACD-CPR) operating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Fong-Gong; Wu, Tsung-Hsiey

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to consider the perceptions of rescuers of ACD operation and their anatomy characteristics are evaluated to yield a better understanding on operation of ACD. A prospective, descriptive study to evaluate professional providers received ACD training. A total of 39 emergency medical professional participated in this study. CPR is performed as both ACD and standard CPR on a manikin separately. 56.4% of the participants felt that the ACD device was not easy or was very difficult to use. The easy-to-use group had a greater height, shoulder to iliac crest distance, shoulder to knee distance, and forearm length. The taller rescuers operate ACD more easily. In addition, women might operate ACD more difficultly. Modifying the operation of ACD (such as by putting a blanket put under the rescuer's knee or using footstool) was recommended and seems reasonable. These issues should be addressed on training.

  15. Kinematics and dynamics analysis of a novel 2PC-CPR parallel mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel parallel mechanism of two translations and one rotation freedom degrees two-prismatic joint-cylindrical joint-one-cylindrical joint-prismatic joint-revolute joint (2PC-CPR is proposed. The mechanism can be applied to write Chinese characters and to classify productions with the appropriated control. In this article, the kinematics and dynamics analysis are systematically conducted with the following procedure. First of all, the 2PC-CPR parallel mechanism is designed by GF set and the freedom degree of the mechanism is calculated using screw theory. Then the formula for solving the inverse/forward displacement, velocity, and acceleration is derived based on the geometrical constraints. The dynamics model is established by using virtual work principle. Finally, kinematics SimMechanics model is created by the co-simulation of SolidWorks and MATLAB software, and its workspace is analyzed.

  16. Automated external defibrillator availability and CPR training among state police agencies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Lior M; Wallace, Sarah K; Leary, Marion; Tucker, Kathryn D; Becker, Lance B; Abella, Benjamin S

    2012-07-01

    Access to automated external defibrillators and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training are key determinants of cardiac arrest survival. State police officers represent an important class of cardiac arrest first responders responsible for the large network of highways in the United States. We seek to determine accessibility of automated external defibrillators and CPR training among state police agencies. Contact was attempted with all 50 state police agencies by telephone and electronic mail. Officers at each agency were guided to complete a 15-question Internet-based survey. Descriptive statistics of the responses were performed. Attempts were made to contact all 50 states, and 46 surveys were completed (92% response rate). Most surveys were filled out by police leadership or individuals responsible for medical programs. The median agency size was 725 (interquartile range 482 to 1,485) state police officers, with 695 (interquartile range 450 to 1,100) patrol vehicles ("squad cars"). Thirty-three percent of responding agencies (15/46) reported equipping police vehicles with automated external defibrillators. Of these, 53% (8/15) equipped less than half of their fleet with the devices. Regarding emergency medical training, 78% (35/45) of state police agencies reported training their officers in automated external defibrillator usage, and 98% (44/45) reported training them in CPR. One third of state police agencies surveyed equipped their vehicles with automated external defibrillators, and among those that did, most equipped only a minority of their fleet. Most state police agencies reported training their officers in automated external defibrillator usage and CPR. Increasing automated external defibrillator deployment among state police represents an important opportunity to improve first responder preparedness for cardiac arrest care. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  17. Pulmonary emboli cardiac arrest with CPR complication: Liver laceration and massive abdominal bleed, a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Lundqvist, John; Jakobsson, Jan G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Massive pulmonary emboli may cause right ventricular failure and backward stasis with parenchymal organ swelling thus increasing the risk for laceration, e.g. if CPR is needed. Presentation of case: A 28-year-old Colombian female with no medical history but taking contraceptive pills and having had a recent longer flight was admitted to Danderyds hospital Emergency Department because of respiratory failure. She developed cardiac arrest in the emergence department following th...

  18. An Appropriate Compression Pace is Important for Securing the Quality of Hands-only CPR : A manikin study

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Tanigawa, Koichi; Ishikawa, Masami; Ouhara, Kazuhisa; Oue, Kana; Yoshinaka, Taiga; Kurihara, Hidemi; Irifune, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    It is important to implement good quality chest compressions for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This manikin study examined the effects of different compression rates on chest compression depth variables using a metronome sound guide. Fifty sixth-year dentistry students participated in the study. Each participant performed CPR at 3 different compression rates, 110, 100, and 90 compressions per min (pace-110-g, pace-100-g, and pace-90-g) for 2 consecutive one-minute sets with a ten-secon...

  19. Prevention of oral bacterial flora transmission by using mouth-to-mask ventilation during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cydulka, R K; Connor, P J; Myers, T F; Pavza, G; Parker, M

    1991-01-01

    The Emergency Cardiac Care Committee of the American Heart Association has recently recommended utilizing protective barrier precautions during CPR (1,2). We assessed 17 mask and faceshield resuscitation devices for adequacy of barrier protection. Eight of the devices were faceshields (CPR Microshield, Hygenic, MedCare Mask, Resusci, Samaritan, Sealeasy, Portex); 8 were mask devices (Laerdal, Dyna Med, MTM Emergency Lung Ventilator, MTM Emergency Resuscitator, Res-Q-Flo, Rightway Mouth-to-Mask Resuscitation, Trufit), and one of the devices did not meet the criteria for either faceshield or mask (Lifesaver). All masks were disinfected, applied to the investigator's face as directed by the manufacturers' instructions, and then cultured for oral aerobic bacterial flora on the rescuer side. No mask devices cultured positive for oral aerobic bacterial flora, while 6 of 8 faceshield devices cultured positive for oral aerobic bacterial flora (P less than 0.007). The CPR Microshield and the Portex faceshield were the only devices that did not develop a positive culture. We conclude that all ventilation devices with a one-way valve, except the Sealeasy device, provide adequate barrier type protection from oral aerobic bacterial flora when simulating mouth-to-barrier type protection when performing mouth-to-mouth ventilation.

  20. Computer-Based CPR Simulation Towards Validation of AHA/ERC Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Alka Rachel; Manivannan, M; Ramakrishnan, T V

    2017-06-01

    As per the AHA 2015 and ERC 2015 guidelines for resuscitation, chest compression depth should be between 5 and 6 cm with a rate of 100-120 compressions per minute. Theoretical validation of these guidelines is still elusive. We developed a computer model of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) system to validate these guidelines. A lumped element computer model of the cardiovascular system was developed to simulate cardiac arrest and CPR. Cardiac output was compared for a range of compression pressures and frequencies. It was observed from our investigation that there is an optimum compression pressure and rate. The maximum cardiac output occurred at 100 mmHg, which is approximately 5.7 cm, and in the range of 100 to 120 compressions per minute with an optimum value at 110 compressions per minute, validating the guidelines. Increasing the pressure or the depth of compression beyond the optimum, limits the blood flow by depleting the volume in the cardiac chambers and not allowing for an effective stroke volume. Similarly increasing the compression rate beyond the optimum degrades the ability of the chambers to pump blood. The results also bring out the importance of complete recoil of the chest after each compression with more than 400% increase in cardiac output from 90% recoil to 100% recoil. Our simulation predicts that the recommendation to compress harder and faster is not the best counsel as there is an optimum compression pressure and rate for high-quality CPR.

  1. Study of Survival Rate After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in Hospitals of Kermanshah in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Afshin; Jalali, Amir; Almasi, Afshin; Naderipour, Arsalan; Kalhori, Reza Pourmirza; Khodadadi, Amineh

    2015-01-01

    Background: After CPR, the follow-up of survival rate and caused complications are the most important practices of the medical group. This study was performed aimed at determining the follow-up results after CPR in patients of university hospitals in Kermanshah in 2014. Methods: In this prospective study, 320 samples were examined. A purposive sampling method was used, and data was collected using a researcher-made information form with content and face validity and reliability of r= 0.79. Data was analyzed with STATA9 software and statistical tests, including calculation of the success rate, relative risk (RR), chi-square and Fisher at significance level of P < 0.05. Results: The initial success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was equal to 15.3%, while the ultimate success rate (discharged alive from the hospital) was as 10.6%. The six-month success rate after resuscitation was 8.78% than those who were discharged alive. There were no significant statistical differences between different age groups regarding the initial success rate of resuscitation (P = 0.14), and the initial resuscitation success rate was higher in patients in morning shift (P = 0.02). Conclusion: By the results of study, it is recommended to increase the medical - nursing knowledge and techniques for personnel in the evening and night shifts. Also, an appropriate dissemination of health care staff in working shifts should be done to increase the success rate of CPR procedure. PMID:25560341

  2. Education and age affect skill acquisition and retention in lay rescuers after a European Resuscitation Council CPR/AED course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexopoulou, Konstantina; Chalkias, Athanasios; Dontas, Ioannis; Pliatsika, Paraskevi; Giannakakos, Charalampos; Papapanagiotou, Panagiotis; Aggelina, Afroditi; Moumouris, Theodoros; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether education and age affect skill acquisition and retention in lay rescuers after a European Resuscitation Council (ERC) CPR/AED course. Because of the importance of bystander CPR/AED skills in the setting of cardiac arrest, acquisition and retention of resuscitation skills has gained a great amount of interest. The ERC CPR/AED course format for written and practical evaluation was used. Eighty lay people were trained and evaluated at the end of the course, as well as at one, three, and six months. Retention of CPR/AED skills improved over time, recording the lowest practical scores at one month after initial training and the lowest written scores at initial training. In practical evaluation scores, when examined longitudinally, age presented a significant adverse effect and higher background education presented a non-significant positive effect. Moreover, regarding written evaluation scores, when examined longitudinally, education presented a significant positive effect while age did not significantly correlate with written scores. Education and age affected retention of CPR/AED skills in lay rescuers. Also, our results suggest that the ERC CPR/AED course format may be poorly designed to discriminate between participants with different levels of practical and written resuscitation skills and merit a thorough investigation in future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Plant Immunity Regulating F-Box Protein CPR1 Supports Plastid Function in Absence of Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Hedtmann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The redox imbalanced 6 mutant (rimb6 of Arabidopsis thaliana was isolated in a genetic screening approach for mutants with defects in chloroplast-to-nucleus redox signaling. It has an atypically low activation status of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin-A promoter in the seedling stage. rimb6 shows wildtype-like germination, seedling development and greening, but slower growth and reduced biomass in the rosette stage. Mapping of the casual mutation revealed that rimb6 carries a single nucleotide polymorphism in the gene encoding CONSTITUTIVE EXPRESSER OF PATHOGENESIS RELATED (PR GENES 1, CPR1 (At4g12560, leading to a premature stop codon. CPR1 is known as a repressor of pathogen signaling and regulator of microtubule organization. Allelism of rimb6 and cpr1 revealed a function of CPR1 in chloroplast stress protection. Expression studies in pathogen signaling mutants demonstrated that CPR1-mediated activation of genes for photosynthesis and chloroplast antioxidant protection is, in contrast to activation of pathogen responses, regulated independently from PAD4-controlled salicylic acid (SA accumulation. We conclude that the support of plastid function is a basic, SA-independent function of CPR1.

  4. The Plant Immunity Regulating F-Box ProteinCPR1Supports Plastid Function in Absence of Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedtmann, Christiane; Guo, Wei; Reifschneider, Elena; Heiber, Isabelle; Hiltscher, Heiko; van Buer, Jörn; Barsch, Aiko; Niehaus, Karsten; Rowan, Beth; Lortzing, Tobias; Steppuhn, Anke; Baier, Margarete

    2017-01-01

    The redox imbalanced 6 mutant ( rimb6) of Arabidopsis thaliana was isolated in a genetic screening approach for mutants with defects in chloroplast-to-nucleus redox signaling. It has an atypically low activation status of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin-A promoter in the seedling stage. rimb6 shows wildtype-like germination, seedling development and greening, but slower growth and reduced biomass in the rosette stage. Mapping of the casual mutation revealed that rimb6 carries a single nucleotide polymorphism in the gene encoding CONSTITUTIVE EXPRESSER OF PATHOGENESIS RELATED (PR) GENES 1, CPR1 (At4g12560), leading to a premature stop codon. CPR1 is known as a repressor of pathogen signaling and regulator of microtubule organization. Allelism of rimb6 and cpr1 revealed a function of CPR1 in chloroplast stress protection. Expression studies in pathogen signaling mutants demonstrated that CPR1-mediated activation of genes for photosynthesis and chloroplast antioxidant protection is, in contrast to activation of pathogen responses, regulated independently from PAD4-controlled salicylic acid (SA) accumulation. We conclude that the support of plastid function is a basic, SA-independent function of CPR1.

  5. Formulation Optimization of Sustained-Release Ammonio Methacrylate Copolymer Microspheres. Effects of Log P and Concentration of Polar Cosolvents, and Role of the Drug/Copolymer Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piroska Szabó-Révész

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work were the formulation optimization of the preparation process parameters and to evaluate spray-dried sustained-release microspheres using ammonio methacrylate copolymer (AMC as a polymer matrix. The effects of log P and the concentrations of the cosolvents (acetone, methyl ethyl ketone and n-butyl acetate and different drug/copolymer ratios as independent variables on the physicochemical parameters (the W1/O emulsion viscosity, the microsphere production yield, the average particle size, the encapsulation efficiency and the cumulative in vitro drug release as dependent variables were studied. The optimization was carried out on the basis of the 33 factorial design study. The optimization process results showed that addition of polar cosolvents proved effective, linear relationships were observed between the independent and the dependent variables. The best conditions were achieved by microspheres prepared by using a low/medium cosolvent log P, cosolvent concentration of 25–50% v/v and a drug/copolymer ratio of 1:16. The microspheres ensured sustained release with Nernst and Baker-Lonsdale release profiles.

  6. Effect of one-rescuer compression/ventilation ratios on cardiopulmonary resuscitation in infant, pediatric, and adult manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikantan, Shoba Krishnan; Berg, Robert A; Cox, Tim; Tice, Lisa; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2005-05-01

    Optimal chest compression to ventilation ratio (C:V) for one-rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not known, with current American Heart Association recommendations 3:1 for newborns, 5:1 for children, and 15:2 for adults. C:V ratios influence effectiveness of CPR, but memorizing different ratios is educationally cumbersome. We hypothesized that a 10:2 ratio might provide adequate universal application for all age arrest victims. Clinical study. Tertiary care children's hospital. Thirty-five health care providers. Thirty-five health care providers performed 5-min epochs of one-rescuer CPR at C:V ratios of 3:1, 5:1, 10:2, and 15:2 in random order on infant, pediatric, and adult manikins. Compressions were paced at 100/min by metronome. The number of effective compressions and ventilations delivered per minute was recorded by a trained basic life support instructor. Subjective assessments of fatigue (self-report) and exertion (change in rescuer pulse rate compared with baseline) were assessed. Analysis was by repeated measures analysis of variance and paired Student's t-test. Effective infant compressions per minute did not differ by C:V ratio, but ventilations per minute were greater at 3:1 vs. 5:1, 10:2, and 15:2 (p 15:2 (p CPR (p metronome-paced, one-rescuer CPR. Low ratios of 3:1, 5:1, and 10:2 favor ventilation, and high ratios of 15:2 favor compression, especially in adult manikins. Rescuers subjectively preferred C:V ratios of 10:2 and 15:2 over 3:1 or 5:1. Infant CPR caused less exertion and subjective fatigue than pediatric or adult CPR technique, without significant difference by C:V ratio. We speculate that a universal 10:2 C:V ratio for one-rescuer layperson CPR is physiologically reasonable but warrants further study with particular attention to educational value and technique retention.

  7. The impact of CPR and AED training on healthcare professionals' self-perceived attitudes to performing resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Källestedt Marie-Louise

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare professionals have shown concern about performing mouth-to-mouth ventilation due to the risks to themselves with the procedure. However, little is known about healthcare professionals' fears and attitudes to start CPR and the impact of training. Objective To examine whether there were any changes in the attitudes among healthcare professionals to performing CPR from before to after training. Methods Healthcare professionals from two Swedish hospitals were asked to answer a questionnaire before and after training. The questions were relating to physical and mental discomfort and attitudes to CPR. Statistical analysis used was generalized McNemar's test. Results Overall, there was significant improvement in 10 of 11 items, reflecting various aspects of attitudes to CPR. All groups of health care professionals (physicians, nurses, assistant nurses, and "others" = physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social welfare officers, psychologists, biomedical analysts felt more secure in CPR knowledge after education. In other aspects, such as anxiety prior to a possible cardiac arrest, only nurses and assistant nurses improved. The concern about being infected, when performing mouth to mouth ventilation, was reduced with the most marked reduction in physicians (75%; P Conclusion In this hospital-based setting, we found a positive outcome of education and training in CPR concerning healthcare professionals' attitudes to perform CPR. They felt more secure in their knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In some aspects of attitudes to resuscitation nurses and assistant nurses appeared to be the groups that were most markedly influenced. The concern of being infected by a disease was low.

  8. Long-Term Retrospective Analysis of Mackerel Spawning in the North Sea: A New Time Series and Modeling Approach to CPR Data

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Teunis; Kristensen, Kasper; Payne, Mark; Edwards, Martin; Schrum, Corinna; Pitois, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    We present a unique view of mackerel (Scomber scombrus) in the North Sea based on a new time series of larvae caught by the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey from 1948-2005, covering the period both before and after the collapse of the North Sea stock. Hydrographic backtrack modelling suggested that the effect of advection is very limited between spawning and larvae capture in the CPR survey. Using a statistical technique not previously applied to CPR data, we then generated a larval ...

  9. Neonatal Acid-Base Status in Fetuses with Abnormal Vertebro- and Cerebro-Placental Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Roselló, José; Khalil, Asma; Ferri-Folch, Blanca; Perales-Marín, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    A low cerebro-placental ratio (CPR) at term suggests the existence of failure to reach growth potential (FRGP) with a higher risk of poor neonatal acid-base status. This study aimed to evaluate whether similar findings were also seen in the vertebral artery (vertebro-placental ratio, VPR), supplying 30% of the cerebral flow. We studied term fetuses classified into groups according to birth weight (BW), CPR and VPR. BW was expressed in centiles and ratios in multiples of the median (MoM). Subsequently, associations with neonatal pH values were evaluated by means of regression curves and Mann-Whitney tests. VPR MoM correlated with BW centiles (p < 0.0001, R2 = 0.042) and its distribution resembled that of CPR MoM (p < 0.001). When both arteries were compared, adequate-for-gestational-age (AGA) fetuses with either low CPR or low VPR had lower neonatal venous pH values (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively). However, in case of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) fetuses, only those with low VPR had significantly lower neonatal arterial and venous pH values (p < 0.05). Blood flow in the vertebral artery mimics that in the middle cerebral artery supporting the FRGP model. Both CPR and VPR identify AGA fetuses with lower neonatal pH values, but only VPR identifies SGA with lower pH values. Hypoxemia might be reflected as a generalized cerebral vasodilation demonstrated as low CPR and VPR.

  10. Functions of standard CPR training on performance qualities of medical volunteers for Mt. Taishan International Mounting Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanshan, Meng; Lin, Zhao; Wenqing, Liu; Chunlei, Lu; Yongqiang, Liu; Naiyi, Li

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a sudden emergency procedure that requires a rapid and efficient response, and personnel training in lifesaving procedures. Regular practice and training are necessary to improve resuscitation skills and reduce anxiety among the staff. As one of the most important skills mastered by medical volunteers serving for Mt. Taishan International Mounting Festival, we randomly selected some of them to evaluate the quality of CPR operation and compared the result with that of the untrained doctors and nurses. In order to evaluate the functions of repeating standard CPR training on performance qualities of medical volunteers for Mt. Taishan International Mounting Festival, their performance qualities of CPR were compared with those of the untrained medical workers working in emergency departments of hospitals in Taian. The CPR performance qualities of 52 medical volunteers (Standard Training Group), who had continually taken part in standard CPR technical training for six months, were tested at random and were compared with those of 68 medical workers (Compared Group) working in emergency departments of hospitals in Taian who hadn't attended CPR training within a year. The QCPR 3535 monitor (provided by Philips Company) was used to measure the standard degree of single simulated CPR performance, including the chest compression depth, frequency, released pressure between compressions and performance time of compression and ventilation, the results of which were recorded in the table and the number of practical compression per minute was calculated. The data were analyzed by x2 Test and t Test. The factors which would influence CPR performance, including gender, age, placement, hand skill, posture of compression and frequency of training, were classified and given parameters, and were put to Logistic repression analysis. The CPR performance qualities of volunteers were much higher than those of the compared group. The overall pass rates

  11. CPR in medical schools: learning by teaching BLS to sudden cardiac death survivors – a promising strategy for medical students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herkner Harald

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR training is gaining more importance for medical students. There were many attempts to improve the basic life support (BLS skills in medical students, some being rather successful, some less. We developed a new problem based learning curriculum, where students had to teach CPR to cardiac arrest survivors in order to improve the knowledge about life support skills of trainers and trainees. Methods Medical students who enrolled in our curriculum had to pass a 2 semester problem based learning session about the principles of cardiac arrest, CPR, BLS and defibrillation (CPR-D. Then the students taught cardiac arrest survivors who were randomly chosen out of a cardiac arrest database of our emergency department. Both, the student and the Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD survivor were asked about their skills and knowledge via questionnaires immediately after the course. The questionnaires were then used to evaluate if this new teaching strategy is useful for learning CPR via a problem-based-learning course. The survey was grouped into three categories, namely "Use of AED", "CPR-D" and "Training". In addition, there was space for free answers where the participants could state their opinion in their own words, which provided some useful hints for upcoming programs. Results This new learning-by-teaching strategy was highly accepted by all participants, the students and the SCD survivors. Most SCD survivors would use their skills in case one of their relatives goes into cardiac arrest (96%. Furthermore, 86% of the trainees were able to deal with failures and/or disturbances by themselves. On the trainer's side, 96% of the students felt to be well prepared for the course and were considered to be competent by 96% of their trainees. Conclusion We could prove that learning by teaching CPR is possible and is highly accepted by the students. By offering a compelling appreciation of what CPR can achieve in using

  12. Strain measurement in and analysis for hydraulic test of CPR1000 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dan; Zhuang Dongzhen

    2013-01-01

    The strain measurement in hydraulic test of CPR1000 reactor pressure vessel performed in Dongfang Heavy Machinery Co., Ltd. is introduced. The detail test scheme and method was introduced and the measurement results of strain and stress was given. Meanwhile the finite element analysis was performed for the pressure vessel, which was generally matched with the measurement results. The reliability of strain measurement was verified and the high strength margin of vessel was shown, which would give a good reference value for the follow-up hydraulic tests and strength analysis of reactor pressure vessel. (authors)

  13. Preliminary assessment of a combined passive safety system for typical 3-loop PWR CPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zijiang; Shan, Jianqiang, E-mail: jqshan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Gou, Junli

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • A combined passive safety system was placed on a typical 3-loop PWR CPR1000. • Three accident analyses show the three different accident mitigation methods of the passive safety system. • The three mitigation methods were proved to be useful. - Abstract: As the development of the nuclear industry, passive technology turns out to be a remarkable characteristic of advanced nuclear power plants. Since the 20th century, much effort has been given to the passive technology, and a number of evolutionary passive systems have developed. Thoughts have been given to upgrade the existing reactors with passive systems to meet stricter safety demands. In this paper, the CPR1000 plant, which is one kind of mature pressurized water reactor plants in China, is improved with some passive systems to enhance safety. The passive systems selected are as follows: (1) the reactor makeup tank (RMT); (2) the advanced accumulator (A-ACC); (3) the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST); (4) the passive emergency feed water system (PEFS), which is installed on the secondary side of SGs; (5) the passive depressurization system (PDS). Although these passive components is based on the passive technology of some advanced reactors, their structural and trip designs are adjusted specifically so that it could be able to mitigate accidents of the CPR1000. Utilizing the RELAP5/MOD3.3 code, accident analyses (small break loss of coolant accident, large break loss of coolant accident, main feed water line break accident) of this improved CPR1000 plant were presented to demonstrate three different accident mitigation methods of the safety system and to test whether the passive safety system preformed its function well. In the SBLOCA, all components of the passive safety system were put into work sequentially, which prevented the core uncover. The LBLOCA analysis illustrates the contribution of the A-ACCs whose small-flow-rate injection can control the maximum cladding

  14. Conducting multisite research studies in nursing education: brief practice of CPR skills as an exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Hallmark, Beth F; Haus, Carol; Kardong-Edgren, Suzie E; McColgan, Jacqueline Keegan; Rogers, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Few large, multisite studies have been conducted in nursing education, and literature pertaining to conducting those studies is lacking. We recently completed a randomized trial to examine the effects of brief practice on nursing students' retention of CPR psychomotor skills. The purpose of this article is to describe strategies for implementing a multisite study in nursing education, using our research as an exemplar. Strategies are presented for structuring a multisite study; selecting, preparing, and communicating with team members across sites; selecting sites; recruiting and retaining participants; managing the technical aspects of an intervention; and collecting and managing data. Ethical considerations also are explored. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. The process and risk of the CPR1000 cold function test in the cold area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tinghao; Zhang Jian; Ji Dapeng; Shi Quanjian; Tian Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Hong yanhe nuclear power station is the first CPR1000 reactor which is under construction in the cold area of north China. It is also the first time to carry out the cold functional test (CFT) in the winter of north China. The preparation and process of CFT are described in the paper. According to the experience feedback of CFT of Unit 1, the risk and solution which are significance for the CFT of the other NPS in the cold area are analysed. (authors)

  16. Outcome of Prolonged Ventricular Fibrillation and CPR in a Rat Model of Chronic Ischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangshao Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic left ventricular (LV dysfunction are assumed to have a lower chance of successful CPR and lower likelihood of ultimate survival. However, these assumptions have rarely been documented. Therefore, we investigated the outcome of prolonged ventricular fibrillation (VF and CPR in a rat model of chronic LV dysfunction. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to (1 chronic LV dysfunction: animals underwent left coronary artery ligation; and (2 sham control. Echocardiography was used to measure cardiac performance before surgery and 4 weeks after surgery. Four weeks after surgical intervention, 8 min of VF was induced and defibrillation was delivered after 8 min of CPR. LV dilation and low ejection fraction were observed 4 weeks after coronary ligation. With optimal chest compressions, coronary perfusion pressure values during CPR were well maintained and indistinguishable between groups. There were no differences in resuscitability and numbers of shock required for successful resuscitation between groups. Despite the significantly decreased cardiac index in LV dysfunction animals before induction of VF, no differences in cardiac index were observed between groups following resuscitation, which was associated with the insignificant difference in postresuscitation survival. In conclusion, the outcomes of CPR were not compromised by the preexisting chronic LV dysfunction.

  17. CPR - infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as 4 to 6 minutes later. Machines called automated external defibrillators (AEDs) can be found in many ... side down. Follow the guidelines for using infant car seats. Teach your baby the meaning of "don' ...

  18. An appropriate compression pace is important for securing the quality of hands-only CPR--a manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Tanigawa, Koichi; Ishikawa, Masami; Ouhara, Kazuhisa; Oue, Kana; Yoshinaka, Taiga; Kurihara, Hidemi; Irifune, Masahiro

    2014-09-01

    It is important to implement good quality chest compressions for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This manikin study examined the effects of different compression rates on chest compression depth variables using a metronome sound guide. Fifty sixth-year dentistry students participated in the study. Each participant performed CPR at 3 different compression rates, 110, 100, and 90 compressions per min (pace-110-g, pace-100-g, and pace-90-g) for 2 consecutive one-minute sets with a ten-second break between the sets. The percentage of compressions deeper than 5 cm at pace-110-g decreased significantly from 22.1 ± 4.7% in the first set to 16.7 ± 4.4%* in the second set (*p CPR.

  19. The effect of formal training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR skills on medical students perceived self-sufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaghaghi A

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Experience of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in real clinical setting is not easily possible for all medical students. Purpose: To assess medical student perceived self-sufficiency on three procedural skill on internship courses after they had taken a training course in clerkship period. Methods: Forty three medical students who had attended a workshop on CPR, tracheal intubations and venopuncture answered the questionnaires on their perceived self-sufficiency in performing these procedures after serving a few months as interns. Results: The mean score for perceived self-sufficiency (PSS was 75.84 (±18.63.Thre were a high correlation between the score given for the applicability of training in real life situation and the stress reduction scores on first time performing the procedure. Conclusion: The high degree of correlation between PSS scores and applicability scores, may warrant the consideration of new methods in procedural skills. Keywords: SKILL TRAINING, CPR TRAINING, PERCEIVED SELF-SUFFICIENCY

  20. Emergency nurses' current practices and understanding of family presence during CPR.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madden, Eilis

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: To examine emergency nurses\\' current practices and understanding of family presence during CPR in the emergency department, Cork University Hospital, Republic of Ireland. METHOD: A quantitative descriptive design was used in the study. A questionnaire developed by ENA was distributed to emergency nurses working in a level I trauma emergency department at Cork University Hospital. The total sample number was 90, including all emergency nurses with at least 6 months\\' emergency nursing experience. RESULTS: Emergency nurses often took families to the bedside during resuscitation efforts (58.9%) or would do so if the opportunity arose (17.8%). A high percentage (74.4%) of respondents would prefer a written policy allowing the option of family presence during CPR. The most significant barrier to family witnessed resuscitation (FWR) was conflicts occurring within the emergency team. The most significant facilitator to FWR was a greater understanding of health care professionals on the benefits of FWR to patients and families, indicating the need for educational development. CONCLUSION: The findings of the study and previously published studies indicate the need for development of written polices and guidelines on the practice to meet the needs of patients, families, and staff by providing consistent, safe, and caring practices for all involved in the resuscitation process. Recommendations of the study include the development of a written policy and an educational programme on the safe implementation and practices of FWR.

  1. Importance of basic CPR techniques. A study in the Region of Murcia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Arturo Abraldes Valeiras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Annually in Spain many people die from diseases related to heart. Heart attack is the main cause of such deaths. Know and control the basic techniques of basic Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR are essential to help a person away from these features. This study examined 1 the importance of knowing these techniques in the general population, and 2 the perception of the difficulty of understanding and application of techniques. We used a questionnaire designed "ad hoc" as a tool for collecting information. The instrument was subjected to validation and reliability for the study. The questionnaire was completed by 235 volunteers aged between 10 and 65. We performed a descriptive analysis, based on gender and the variables importance of knowledge and learning / apply techniques. Among the most relevant results, we emphasize an interest of society to improve training in this type of knowledge. Training would be ideal in most age groups of people (teens to seniors. Likewise, CPR techniques are easy to understand and execute a lesser extent, relevant perception among people who acknowledge and application these techniques

  2. The silkworm Bombyx mori cuticular protein CPR55 gene is regulated by the transcription factor βFTZ-F1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saheb Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The insect cuticle is composed of various proteins and formed during the moult under a complex biological process that depends on the cross talk between hormone levels and gene expression. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the ecdysone-dependent temporal regulation mechanisms of cuticular proteins expression and the underlying control of Bombyx mori metamorphosis. The expression of CPR55 was observed from the W3 early stage and peaked at pupation when the ecdysteroid titre declined. CPR55 was induced by the ecdysone pulse, and their expression peaked at 24 h after transfer to a hormone free medium. Transcripts of CPR55 were neither observed after the 20E pulse treatment in the presence of cycloheximide nor after the addition of 20E in V4 wing discs. We analysed the upstream region of the CPR55 gene using a transient reporter assay with a gene gun system which identified only one βFTZ-F1 binding site important for cis-acting elements for the transcription activation of the luciferase reporter gene by an ecdysone pulse. Site-directed mutagenesis of this element in the context of the 589-bp promoter fragment drastically decreased the reporter activity. The nuclear protein bound to βFTZ-F1 sites was identified by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay suggesting that CPR55 expression was regulated by βFTZ-F1 through the ecdysone pulse. The results confirmed that transcription factor, BmβFTZ-F1, binds to the cis-regulatory elements in the promoter of the gene coding for cuticle protein, CPR55, and regulates its expression during B. mori metamorphosis.

  3. Comparison and analysis of the structure and manufacturing technology between the CPR1000 and AP1000 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Enqing; Gao Yongguang; Gao Dianbao

    2014-01-01

    This paper focus on the difference of main body structure between the CPR1000 and AP1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV), and, resultingly, the manufacturing technology difference and attention owing to the structure. According to compare the nozzles position, seal ledge, Quickloc Structure on the AP1000 RPV to CPR1000, expounding the difference on the manufacturing technology of nozzles to upper shell welding transformation control, upper shell or seal ledge welding transformation control, Quickloc instrument nozzle structure welding and nozzle to safe end welding, which need to be attention. (authors)

  4. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  5. A Comparison of Internet-Based Learning and Traditional Classroom Lecture to Learn CPR for Continuing Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Nima; Omrani, Soghra; Hemmati, Naser

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL) and traditional classroom lecture (TCL) for continuing medical education (CME) programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum guidelines training…

  6. Arabidopsis CPR5 is a senescence-regulatory gene with pleiotropic functions as predicted by the evolutionary theory of senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Hai-Chun; Anderson, Lisa; Sturre, Marcel J. G.; Hille, Jacques; Dijkwel, Paul P.

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis CPR5 is a senescence-regulatory gene with pleiotropic functions as predicted by the evolutionary theory of senescence Hai-Chun Jing1,2, Lisa Anderson3, Marcel J.G. Sturre1, Jacques Hille1 and Paul P. Dijkwel1,* 1Molecular Biology of Plants, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and

  7. Updated teaching techniques improve CPR performance measures: a cluster randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettl, Florian; Testori, Christoph; Weiser, Christoph; Fleischhackl, Sabine; Mayer-Stickler, Monika; Herkner, Harald; Schreiber, Wolfgang; Fleischhackl, Roman

    2011-06-01

    The first-aid training necessary for obtaining a drivers license in Austria has a regulated and predefined curriculum but has been targeted for the implementation of a new course structure with less theoretical input, repetitive training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and structured presentations using innovative media. The standard and a new course design were compared with a prospective, participant- and observer-blinded, cluster-randomized controlled study. Six months after the initial training, we evaluated the confidence of the 66 participants in their skills, CPR effectiveness parameters and correctness of their actions. The median self-confidence was significantly higher in the interventional group [IG, visual analogue scale (VAS:"0" not-confident at all,"100" highly confident):57] than in the control group (CG, VAS:41). The mean chest compression rate in the IG (98/min) was closer to the recommended 100 bpm than in the CG (110/min). The time to the first chest compression (IG:25s, CG:36s) and time to first defibrillator shock (IG:86s, CG:92s) were significantly shorter in the IG. Furthermore, the IG participants were safer in their handling of the defibrillator and started with countermeasures against developing shock more often. The management of an unconscious person and of heavy bleeding did not show a difference between the two groups even after shortening the lecture time. Motivation and self-confidence as well as skill retention after six months were shown to be dependent on the teaching methods and the time for practical training. Courses may be reorganized and content rescheduled, even within predefined curricula, to improve course outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  9. A survey of attitudes and factors associated with successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR knowledge transfer in an older population most likely to witness cardiac arrest: design and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brehaut Jamie C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overall survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest rarely exceed 5%. While bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR can increase survival for cardiac arrest victims by up to four times, bystander CPR rates remain low in Canada (15%. Most cardiac arrest victims are men in their sixties, they usually collapse in their own home (85% and the event is witnessed 50% of the time. These statistics would appear to support a strategy of targeted CPR training for an older population that is most likely to witness a cardiac arrest event. However, interest in CPR training appears to decrease with advancing age. Behaviour surrounding CPR training and performance has never been studied using well validated behavioural theories. Methods/Design The overall goal of this study is to conduct a survey to better understand the behavioural factors influencing CPR training and performance in men and women 55 years of age and older. The study will proceed in three phases. In phase one, semi-structured qualitative interviews will be conducted and recorded to identify common categories and themes regarding seeking CPR training and providing CPR to a cardiac arrest victim. The themes identified in the first phase will be used in phase two to develop, pilot-test, and refine a survey instrument based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour. In the third phase of the project, the final survey will be administered to a sample of the study population over the telephone. Analyses will include measures of sampling bias, reliability of the measures, construct validity, as well as multiple regression analyses to identify constructs and beliefs most salient to seniors' decisions about whether to attend CPR classes or perform CPR on a cardiac arrest victim. Discussion The results of this survey will provide valuable insight into factors influencing the interest in CPR training and performance among a targeted group of individuals most susceptible to

  10. Introducing systematic dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (telephone-CPR) in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System (AMPDS): implementation process and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dami, Fabrice; Fuchs, Vincent; Praz, Laurent; Vader, John-Paul

    2010-07-01

    In order to improve the quality of our Emergency Medical Services (EMS), to raise bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates and thereby meet what is becoming a universal standard in terms of quality of emergency services, we decided to implement systematic dispatcher-assisted or telephone-CPR (T-CPR) in our medical dispatch center, a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System. The aim of this article is to describe the implementation process, costs and results following the introduction of this new "quality" procedure. This was a prospective study. Over an 8-week period, our EMS dispatchers were given new procedures to provide T-CPR. We then collected data on all non-traumatic cardiac arrests within our state (Vaud, Switzerland) for the following 12 months. For each event, the dispatchers had to record in writing the reason they either ruled out cardiac arrest (CA) or did not propose T-CPR in the event they did suspect CA. All emergency call recordings were reviewed by the medical director of the EMS. The analysis of the recordings and the dispatchers' written explanations were then compared. During the 12-month study period, a total of 497 patients (both adults and children) were identified as having a non-traumatic cardiac arrest. Out of this total, 203 cases were excluded and 294 cases were eligible for T-CPR. Out of these eligible cases, dispatchers proposed T-CPR on 202 occasions (or 69% of eligible cases). They also erroneously proposed T-CPR on 17 occasions when a CA was wrongly identified (false positive). This represents 7.8% of all T-CPR. No costs were incurred to implement our study protocol and procedures. This study demonstrates it is possible, using a brief campaign of sensitization but without any specific training, to implement systematic dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System such as our EMS that had no prior experience with systematic T-CPR. The results in terms of T-CPR delivery

  11. Repetitive sessions of formative self-testing to refresh CPR skills: a randomised non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpotos, Nicolas; De Wever, Bram; Cleymans, Nick; Raemaekers, Joris; Loeys, Tom; Herregods, Luc; Valcke, Martin; Monsieurs, Koenraad G

    2014-09-01

    To investigate whether repetitive sessions of formative self-testing (RFST) result in an equal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skill level compared to repetitive sessions of formative self-testing with additional practice (RFSTAP). In a non-inferiority trial, 196 third-year medical students were randomised to an RFST or RFSTAP group. Testing and practising took place in a self-learning station equipped with a manikin connected to a computer. Each cycle of RFST consisted of a 2-min CPR test followed by feedback and feedforward. In the RFSTAP group, additional practice consisted of CPR exercises with a computer voice feedback. To be successful, a combined score consisting of ≥70% compressions with a depth of ≥50 mm and ≥70% compressions with complete release (<5 mm) and a compression rate of 100-120 min(-1) and ≥70% ventilations with a volume of 400-1000 ml had to be achieved within 6 weeks. Skill retention was measured after 6 months. The non-inferiority margin was predefined as a 10% difference in success rate. After six weeks the success rate in both groups was 96%: 99/103 (RFST) and 89/93 (RFSTAP). After 6 months, the success rate in the competent students was 26/96 (27%) for RFST and 32/86 (37%) for RFSTAP (three students dropped out in each group). The difference in the success rate between RFSTAP and RFST was 10% and 90% (CI -2 to 23%), respectively. As the upper bound exceeded 10%, non-inferiority was inconclusive. For each CPR skill separately, RFST was non-inferior for ventilation and complete release, superior for compression depth and inferior for compression rate. RFST and RFSTAP were equally effective to refresh skills within 6 weeks. After 6 months, non-inferiority was inconclusive for the combined score. Our results indicate the potential of RFST to refresh CPR skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  13. Scavenging ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krey, P.W.; Toonkel, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    Total 90 Sr fallout is adjusted for dry deposition, and scavenging ratios are calculated at Seattle, New York, and Fayetteville, Ark. Stable-lead scavenging ratios are also presented for New York. These ratios show large scatter, but average values are generally inversely proportional to precipitation. Stable-lead ratios decrease more rapidly with precipitation than do those of 90 Sr, a decrease reflecting a lesser availability of lead to the scavenging processes

  14. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our attraction to another body increases if the body is symmetricaland in proportion. If a face or a structure is in proportion,we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful.The universal ratio of beauty is the 'Golden Ratio', found inmany structures. This ratio comes from Fibonacci numbers.In this article, we explore this ...

  15. Polarization Diversity DPSK Demodulator on the Silicon-on-Insulator Platform with Simple Fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Huang, Bo; Ou, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel polarization diversity DPSK demodulator on the SOI platform with low polarization dependent loss (1.6 dB) and low polarization dependent extinction ratio (<3 dB). System experiments verify the low polarization dependency....

  16. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  17. System for measuring the proton polarization in a polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Trotsenko, V.I.; Chechetenko, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    The system for measuring the proton polarization in a polarized target representing the high-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is described Q-meter with series connection and a circuit for measuring system resonance characteristic is used for NMR-absorption signal recording. Measuring coil is produced of a strip conductor in order to obtain uniform system sensitivity to polarization state in all target volume and improve signal-to-noise ratio. Polarization measuring system operates ion-line with the M-6000 computer. The total measuring error for the value of free proton polarization in target taking into account the error caused by local depolarization of working substance under irradiation by high-intense photon beam is <= 6%. Long-term application of the described system for measuring the proton polarization in the LUEh-20000 accelerator target used in the pion photoproduction experiments has demonstrated its high reliability

  18. Bystander fatigue and CPR quality by older bystanders: a randomized crossover trial comparing continuous chest compressions and 30:2 compressions to ventilations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shawn; Vaillancourt, Christian; Kasaboski, Ann; Taljaard, Monica

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to measure bystander fatigue and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality after five minutes of CPR using the continuous chest compression (CCC) versus the 30:2 chest compression to ventilation method in older lay persons, a population most likely to perform CPR on cardiac arrest victims. This randomized crossover trial took place at three tertiary care hospitals and a seniors' center. Participants were aged ≥55 years without significant physical limitations (frailty score ≤3/7). They completed two 5-minute CPR sessions (using 30:2 and CCC) on manikins; sessions were separated by a rest period. We used concealed block randomization to determine CPR method order. Metronome feedback maintained a compression rate of 100/minute. We measured heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and Borg Exertion Scale. CPR quality measures included total number of compressions and number of adequate compressions (depth ≥5 cm). Sixty-three participants were enrolled: mean age 70.8 years, female 66.7%, past CPR training 60.3%. Bystander fatigue was similar between CPR methods: mean difference in HR -0.59 (95% CI -3.51-2.33), MAP 1.64 (95% CI -0.23-3.50), and Borg 0.46 (95% CI 0.07-0.84). Compared to 30:2, participants using CCC performed more chest compressions (480.0 v. 376.3, mean difference 107.7; pCPR quality decreased significantly faster when performing CCC compared to 30:2. However, performing CCC produced more adequate compressions overall with a similar level of fatigue compared to the 30:2 method.

  19. Increasing CPR duration prior to first defibrillation does not improve return of spontaneous circulation or survival in a swine model of prolonged ventricular fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenberger, Jon C.; Suffoletto, Brian; Salcido, David; Logue, Eric; Menegazzi, James J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The optimum duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) prior to first rescue shock is unknown. Clinical trials have used 90s and 180s. Neither of these durations may be optimal. We sought to determine the optimum duration of CPR prior to first defibrillation attempt and whether this varied depending on the duration of ventricular fibrillation (VF). In this porcine model of basic life support, our outcomes were rates of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival, and coronary perfusion pressure (CPP). Methods We anesthetized and instrumented 45 swine and then induced VF. After 5 or 8 minutes of untreated VF, we randomized the swine to mechanical CPR for 90, 180, or 300s. A single rescue shock (150J biphasic) was then administered. If this shock failed, 2 minutes of mechanical CPR were completed prior to the next rescue shock. CPP was calculated for each 30 second epoch. ROSC was defined as a blood pressure >80mmHg sustained for 60s. Survival was defined as sustained ROSC for 20 minutes. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Fisher’s exact test, and ANOVA. Results In the 5 minute VF cohort, the rate of ROSC did not differ between the three groups (90s: 25%; 180s: 38%; 300s: 38%, p>.05). Survival rates did not differ (90s: 25%; 180s: 25%; 300s: 25%, p>0.05). In the 8 minute VF cohort, no animals experienced ROSC or survival. CPP were calculated by 30 second epoch and did not differ between the three groups (p>0.05). CPPs decline after 180s of CPR. Conclusions ROSC and survival were equivalent regardless of VF duration and CPR duration. When CPR begins late, CPPs are low, stressing the importance of early CPR. We do not recommend 300s of CPR unless a defibrillator is unavailable. PMID:18620793

  20. Fetal cerebro-placental ratio and adverse perinatal outcome: systematic review and meta-analysis of the association and diagnostic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassr, Ahmed Abobakr; Abdelmagied, Ahmed M; Shazly, Sherif A M

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis is to assess the value of fetal cerebro-placental Doppler ratio (CPR) in predicting adverse perinatal outcome in pregnancies with fetal growth restriction (FGR). Three databases were used: MEDLINE, EMBASE (with online Ovid interface) and SCOPUS and studies from inception to April 2015 were included. Studies that reported perinatal outcomes of fetuses at risk of FGR or sonographically diagnosed FGR that were evaluated with CPR were considered eligible. Perinatal outcomes include cesarean section (CS) for fetal distress, APGAR scores at 5 min, neonatal complications and admission to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Pooled data were expressed as odds ratio (OR) and confidence intervals (CI), and the summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve was used to illustrate the diagnostic accuracy of CPR. Seven studies were eligible (1428 fetuses). Fetuses with abnormal CPR were at higher risk of CS for fetal distress (OR=4.49, 95% CI [1.63, 12.42]), lower APGAR scores (OR=4.01, 95% CI [2.65, 6.08]), admission to NICU (OR=9.65, 95% CI [3.02, 30.85]), and neonatal complications (OR=11.00, 95% [3.64, 15.37]) than fetuses who had normal CPR. These risks were higher among studies that included fetuses diagnosed with FGR than fetuses at risk of FGR. Abnormal CPR had higher diagnostic accuracy for adverse perinatal outcomes among "sonographically diagnosed FGR" studies than "at risk of FGR" studies. Abnormal CPR is associated with substantial risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. The test seems to be particularly useful for follow up of fetuses with sonographically diagnosed FGR.

  1. Rationale, design, and implementation protocol of an electronic health record integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR randomized trial in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisnivesky Juan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical prediction rules (CPRs represent well-validated but underutilized evidence-based medicine tools at the point-of-care. To date, an inability to integrate these rules into an electronic health record (EHR has been a major limitation and we are not aware of a study demonstrating the use of CPR's in an ambulatory EHR setting. The integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR trial integrates two CPR's in an EHR and assesses both the usability and the effect on evidence-based practice in the primary care setting. Methods A multi-disciplinary design team was assembled to develop a prototype iCPR for validated streptococcal pharyngitis and bacterial pneumonia CPRs. The iCPR tool was built as an active Clinical Decision Support (CDS tool that can be triggered by user action during typical workflow. Using the EHR CDS toolkit, the iCPR risk score calculator was linked to tailored ordered sets, documentation, and patient instructions. The team subsequently conducted two levels of 'real world' usability testing with eight providers per group. Usability data were used to refine and create a production tool. Participating primary care providers (n = 149 were randomized and intervention providers were trained in the use of the new iCPR tool. Rates of iCPR tool triggering in the intervention and control (simulated groups are monitored and subsequent use of the various components of the iCPR tool among intervention encounters is also tracked. The primary outcome is the difference in antibiotic prescribing rates (strep and pneumonia iCPR's encounters and chest x-rays (pneumonia iCPR only between intervention and control providers. Discussion Using iterative usability testing and development paired with provider training, the iCPR CDS tool leverages user-centered design principles to overcome pervasive underutilization of EBM and support evidence-based practice at the point-of-care. The ongoing trial will determine if this collaborative

  2. Neonatal CPR: room at the top—a mathematical study of optimal chest compression frequency versus body size

    OpenAIRE

    Babbs, Charles F; Meyer, Andrew; Nadkarni, Vinay

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore in detail the expected magnitude of systemic perfusion pressure during standard CPR as a function of compression frequency for different sized people from neonate to adult. Method: A 7-compartment mathematical model of the human cardiopulmonary system—upgraded to include inertance of blood columns in the aorta and vena cavae—was exercised with parameters scaled to reflect changes in body weight from 1 to 70 kg. Results: Maximal systemic perfusion pressure occurs at chest...

  3. Comparison of Knowledge of Medical and Paramedical Intern about of CPR, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastoor Bekhradian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Every day a number of people from the heart stops beating for most of them that this early cessation of heartbeat. With operations of CPR in 4 to 6 minutes of cardiopulmonary arrest and before the onset of brain death can be established circulation and survival for patients with the death of 2 to 4 folds. The aim of this study was to Comparison of knowledge of medical and paramedical intern about of CPCR, 2015. This descriptive analytical and sampling method was census. Restore their data using a standard questionnaire with Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.82 .Spss20 data using statistical software analysis and descriptive statistics and Chi-square test was used. The mean score of 3/6 students that showed poor knowledge of students participating in the study. The lowest score of zero and the highest score was 12. Was found between gender and level of knowledge (p=0/05. Between education and the knowledge of the relationship was not statistically significant (p=0/764. The knowledge of medical and paramedical students groups scheduled for next semester as part of the treatment system personnel are working poor and require special attention in order to provide guidelines for planning authorities to increase the awareness of students.

  4. Institutional property rights structure, common pool resource (CPR), tragedy of the urban commons: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, G; Ho, C S; Ali, H M

    2014-01-01

    There have been a plethora of researches on the significance of public open space (POS) in contributing to societies' sustainability. However, by virtue of identified maladaptive policy-based-property rights structure, such a shared good becomes vulnerable to tragedy of the urban commons (overexploitation) that subsequently leads to burgeoning number of mismanaged POS e.g., degraded and unkempt urban public spaces. By scrutinising the literatures within property rights domain and commons resources, an objective is highlighted in this paper which is to insightfully discourse institutional property rights structure pertaining to the mechanism, roles and interrelationship between property-rights regimes, bundle of property rights and resource domains; types of goods on how they act upon and tie in the POS with the social quandary. In summary, urban POS tragedy can potentially be triggered by the institutional structure especially if the ownership is left under open-access resource regime and ill-defined property rights which both successively constitute the natures of Common Pool Resource (CPR) within the commons, POS. Therefore, this paper sparks an idea to policy makers that property rights structure is a determinant in sustainably governing the POS in which adaptive assignment of property regimes and property rights are impelled

  5. Aseismic safety analysis of a prestressed concrete containment vessel for CPR1000 nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ping; Wang, Qingkang; Kong, Xianjing

    2017-01-01

    The containment vessel of a nuclear power plant is the last barrier to prevent nuclear reactor radiation. Aseismic safety analysis is the key to appropriate containment vessel design. A prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model with a semi-infinite elastic foundation and practical arrangement of tendons has been established to analyze the aseismic ability of the CPR1000 PCCV structure under seismic loads and internal pressure. A method to model the prestressing tendon and its interaction with concrete was proposed and the axial force of the prestressing tendons showed that the simulation was reasonable and accurate. The numerical results show that for the concrete structure, the location of the cylinder wall bottom around the equipment hatch and near the ring beam are critical locations with large principal stress. The concrete cracks occurred at the bottom of the PCCV cylinder wall under the peak earthquake motion of 0.50 g, however the PCCV was still basically in an elastic state. Furthermore, the concrete cracks occurred around the equipment hatch under the design internal pressure of 0.4MPa, but the steel liner was still in the elastic stage and its leak-proof function soundness was verified. The results provide the basis for analysis and design of containment vessels.

  6. Randomised clinical simulation designed to evaluate the effect of telemedicine using Google Glass on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Alonso, Nuria; Pardo Rios, Manuel; Juguera Rodriguez, Laura; Vera Catalan, Tomas; Segura Melgarejo, Francisca; Lopez Ayuso, Belen; Martí Nez Riquelme, Carolina; Lasheras Velasco, Joaquin

    2017-11-01

    Through a clinical simulation, this study aims to assess the effect of telematics support through Google Glass (GG) from an expert physician on performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by a group of nurses, as compared with a control group of nurses receiving no assistance. This was a randomised study carried out at the Catholic University of Murcia (November 2014-February 2015). Nursing professionals from the Emergency Medical Services in Murcia (Spain) were asked to perform in a clinical simulation of cardiac arrest. Half of the nurses were randomly chosen to receive coaching from physicians through GG, while the other half did not receive any coaching (controls). The main outcome of the study expected was successful defibrillation, which restores sinus rhythm. Thirty-six nurses were enrolled in each study group. Statistically significant differences were found in the percentages of successful defibrillation (100% GG vs 78% control; p=0005) and CPR completion times: 213.91 s for GG and 250.31 s for control (average difference=36.39 s (95% CI 12.03 to 60.75), p=0.004). Telematics support by an expert through GG improves success rates and completion times while performing CPR in simulated clinical situations for nurses in simulated scenarios. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Corpuls CPR Generates Higher Mean Arterial Pressure Than LUCAS II in a Pig Model of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Eichhorn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the European Resuscitation Council guidelines, the use of mechanical chest compression devices is a reasonable alternative in situations where manual chest compression is impractical or compromises provider safety. The aim of this study is to compare the performance of a recently developed chest compression device (Corpuls CPR with an established system (LUCAS II in a pig model. Methods. Pigs (n = 5/group in provoked ventricular fibrillation were left untreated for 5 minutes, after which 15 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed with chest compressions. After 15 min, defibrillation was performed every 2 min if necessary, and up to 3 doses of adrenaline were given. If there was no return of spontaneous circulation after 25 min, the experiment was terminated. Coronary perfusion pressure, carotid blood flow, end-expiratory CO2, regional oxygen saturation by near infrared spectroscopy, blood gas, and local organ perfusion with fluorescent labelled microspheres were measured at baseline and during resuscitation. Results. Animals treated with Corpuls CPR had significantly higher mean arterial pressures during resuscitation, along with a detectable trend of greater carotid blood flow and organ perfusion. Conclusion. Chest compressions with the Corpuls CPR device generated significantly higher mean arterial pressures than compressions performed with the LUCAS II device.

  8. The fetal cerebro-placental ratio in diabetic pregnancies is influenced more by the umbilical artery rather than middle cerebral artery pulsatility index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Anthea; Flatley, Christopher; Kumar, Sailesh

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between the cerebro-placental ratio (CPR) and intrapartum and perinatal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by pre-existing insulin dependent diabetes (pT1DM) mellitus, pre-existing non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (pT2DM) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This was a retrospective cohort study of 1281 women with diabetes mellitus birthing at the Mater Mothers' Hospital in Brisbane between 2007 and 2015. The CPR in non-anomalous singleton fetuses was measured between 34+0 and 36+6 weeks gestation and compared between types of DM treatment groups and correlated with intrapartum and perinatal outcomes. Of the study cohort, 9.7% (124/1281) had pT1DM, 5.3% (68/1281) had pT2DM and 85.0% (1089/1281) had GDM. Of women with pT2DM and GDM, 61.8% (42/68) and 28.9% (315/1089) respectively, required insulin during pregnancy. Women with pT1DM had an increased odds of having a CPR 90th centile (OR 2.69, 95% CI: 1.60-4.39, p=0.0001) was higher in the pT1DM cohort. There was however no significant difference in the mean MCA PI between the three groups. Stratification by CPR centiles (<10th centile vs. ≥10th centile) demonstrated a lower birth weight in the CPR <10th centile cohort for all DM categories. The proportion of neonates with birth weights <10th centile were higher in the CPR <10th centile cohort with the GDM cohort having an odds ratio of 8.28 (95% CI 4.22-16.13, p<0.0001) of this complication. The CPR <10th centile cohort also had a greater proportion of adverse composite neonatal outcome regardless of type of DM. Regardless of the type of DM, a low CPR was associated with poorer neonatal outcomes. Women with pT1DM also had the highest mean UA PI and lowest mean CPR despite no difference in the mean MCA PI between the three groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K.; Weibull, Jörgen W.

    2007-01-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  10. Political polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avinash K; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2007-05-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  11. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of mathematical biology. Our attraction to another body increases if the body is sym- metrical and in proportion. If a face or a structure is in pro- ... his practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery, and he developed a mask using the concept of golden ratio. The mask is called the. Marquardt beauty mask (Figure 1) [1]. Keywords.

  12. Spontaneous growth of polarizing refractory metal ‘nano-fins’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, M. C.; Gentle, A. R.; Arnold, M. D.; Cortie, M. B.

    2018-03-01

    Traditional polymer polarizers degrade in harsh environments and at high temperatures, reducing the polarization effect. In contrast, polarizers produced with refractory metals have vastly improved thermal stability and resistance to harsh environments but are expensive to fabricate. Here we demonstrate prototype refractory metal wire grid polarizers produced by co-sputtering molybdenum and aluminum under specific conditions. Removal of the aluminum through selective dissolution enables the nanostructure array to transmit light. The polarization spans 500–1100 nm and the extinction ratio significantly increases to >100. Possessing broadband polarization and sufficient extinction ratios, the new polarizing film has potential applications in coatings for sunglasses, windows, pyrometers, scientific instruments, and LCD panels.

  13. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  14. The effect of real-time CPR feedback and post event debriefing on patient and processes focused outcomes: A cohort study: trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Fang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac arrest affects 30-35, 000 hospitalised patients in the UK every year. For these patients to be given the best chance of survival, high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR must be delivered, however the quality of CPR in real-life is often suboptimal. CPR feedback devices have been shown to improve CPR quality in the pre-hospital setting and post-event debriefing can improve adherence to guidelines and CPR quality. However, the evidence for use of these improvement methods in hospital remains unclear. The CPR quality improvement initiative is a prospective cohort study of the Q-CPR real-time feedback device combined with post-event debriefing in hospitalised adult patients who sustain a cardiac arrest. Methods/design The primary objective of this trial is to assess whether a CPR quality improvement initiative will improve rate of return of sustained spontaneous circulation in in-hospital-cardiac-arrest patients. The study is set in one NHS trust operating three hospital sites. Secondary objectives will evaluate: any return of spontaneous circulation; survival to hospital discharge and patient cerebral performance category at discharge; quality of CPR variables and cardiac arrest team factors. Methods: All three sites will have an initial control phase before any improvements are implemented; site 1 will implement audiovisual feedback combined with post event debriefing, site 2 will implement audiovisual feedback only and site 3 will remain as a control site to measure any changes in outcome due to any other trust-wide changes in resuscitation practice. All adult patients sustaining a cardiac arrest and receiving resuscitation from the hospital cardiac arrest team will be included. Patients will be excluded if; they have a Do-not-attempt resuscitation order written and documented in their medical records, the cardiac arrest is not attended by a resuscitation team, the arrest occurs out-of-hospital or the patient

  15. Three different CPR management models for riverine nitrogen polluters in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arheimer, B.

    1997-12-31

    Sweden has failed in the environmental goal of reducing the nitrogen transport to the Baltic Sea by 50 per cent in ten years, mainly because of the large amounts of nitrogen still leaching from arable land. The riverine nitrogen problem can be formulated in terms of a CPR problem, as the property rights of the river water are undefined and it is possible to free-ride in the maintenance of the resource by polluting it for personal aim. Swedish water management at present is dominated by a command-and-control policy. However, to master the situation, various propositions of changed institutional arrangements for better management of water resources have been presented recently. This chapter describes and discusses three models that have been proposed for water management in the Swedish environmental policy debate: the community model, the negotiation model and the market model. To be economically efficient and ecologically sustainable, all of these models must be in accordance with local environmental, socio-economic and cultural conditions. According to the analysis, the proposed management models have about the same institutional requirements, although the sensitivity to various requirements may differ among the models. In the chapter it is argued that new policy implementation in Sweden should include regional water administration boards, where monitoring and problem analysis are kept within single catchments. Problem solution should be decentralized so that sub basins are managed according to the model most in accordance with local conditions. As long as the various requests for model success are met, different management models may be used in different parts of the same watershed. This may be possible since the overwhelming need of institutional arrangements is about the same for the three proposed management models and, consequently, they do not exclude each other 42 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  16. 3:1 compression to ventilation ratio versus continuous chest compression with asynchronous ventilation in a porcine model of neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmölzer, Georg M; O'Reilly, Megan; Labossiere, Joseph; Lee, Tze-Fun; Cowan, Shaun; Nicoll, Jessica; Bigam, David L; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-02-01

    In contrast to the resuscitation guidelines of children and adults, guidelines on neonatal resuscitation recommend synchronized 90 chest compressions with 30 manual inflations (3:1) per minute in newborn infants. The study aimed to determine if chest compression with asynchronous ventilation improves the recovery of bradycardic asphyxiated newborn piglets compared to 3:1 Compression:Ventilation cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Term newborn piglets (n=8/group) were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented and exposed to 45-min normocapnic hypoxia followed by asphyxia. Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Piglets were randomized to receive resuscitation with either 3:1 compressions to ventilations (3:1C:V CPR group) or chest compressions with asynchronous ventilations (CCaV) or sham. Continuous respiratory parameters (Respironics NM3(®)), cardiac output, mean systemic and pulmonary artery pressures, and regional blood flows were measured. Piglets in 3:1C:V CPR and CCaV CPR groups had similar time to return of spontaneous circulation, survival rates, hemodynamic and respiratory parameters during CPR. The systemic and regional hemodynamic recovery in the subsequent 4h was similar in both groups and significantly lower compared to sham-operated piglets. Newborn piglets resuscitated by CCaV had similar return of spontaneous circulation, survival, and hemodynamic recovery compared to those piglets resuscitated by 3:1 Compression:Ventilation ratio. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Carbon nanotube fiber terahertz polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubair, Ahmed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Young, Colin C. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Heimbeck, Martin S. [Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Everitt, Henry O. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Pasquali, Matteo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Kono, Junichiro, E-mail: kono@rice.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Conventional, commercially available terahertz (THz) polarizers are made of uniformly and precisely spaced metallic wires. They are fragile and expensive, with performance characteristics highly reliant on wire diameters and spacings. Here, we report a simple and highly error-tolerant method for fabricating a freestanding THz polarizer with nearly ideal performance, reliant on the intrinsically one-dimensional character of conduction electrons in well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The polarizer was constructed on a mechanical frame over which we manually wound acid-doped CNT fibers with ultrahigh electrical conductivity. We demonstrated that the polarizer has an extinction ratio of ∼−30 dB with a low insertion loss (<0.5 dB) throughout a frequency range of 0.2–1.1 THz. In addition, we used a THz ellipsometer to measure the Müller matrix of the CNT-fiber polarizer and found comparable attenuation to a commercial metallic wire-grid polarizer. Furthermore, based on the classical theory of light transmission through an array of metallic wires, we demonstrated the most striking difference between the CNT-fiber and metallic wire-grid polarizers: the latter fails to work in the zero-spacing limit, where it acts as a simple mirror, while the former continues to work as an excellent polarizer even in that limit due to the one-dimensional conductivity of individual CNTs.

  18. Detection of spontaneous pulse using the acceleration signals acquired from CPR feedback sensor in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liang; Chen, Gang; Yang, Zhengfei; Yu, Tao; Quan, Weilun; Li, Yongqin

    2017-01-01

    Reliable detection of return of spontaneous circulation with minimal interruptions of chest compressions is part of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and routinely done by checking pulsation of carotid arteries. However, manual palpation was time-consuming and unreliable even if performed by expert clinicians. Therefore, automated accurate pulse detection with minimal interruptions of chest compression is highly desirable during cardiac arrest especially in out-of-hospital settings. To investigate whether the acceleration (ACC) signals acquired from accelerometer-based CPR feedback sensor can be used to distinguish perfusing rhythm (PR) from pulseless electrical activity (PEA) in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in 49 male adult pigs. ECG, arterial blood pressure (ABP) and ACC waveforms were simultaneously recorded during CPR. 3-second segments containing compression-free signals during chest compression pauses were extracted and only those segments with organized rhythm were used for analysis. PR was defined as systolic arterial pressure >60 mmHg and pulse pressure >10 mmHg, while PEA was defined as an organized rhythm that does not meet the above criteria for PR. Peak correlation coefficient (CCp) of the cross-correlation function between pre-processed ECG and ACC, was used to discriminate PR and PEA. 63 PR and 153 PEA were identified from the total of 1025 extracted segments. CCp was significantly higher for PR as compared to PEA (0.440±0.176 vs. 0.067±0.042, pfeedback sensor can be used to detect the presence of spontaneous pulse with high accuracy.

  19. Detection of spontaneous pulse using the acceleration signals acquired from CPR feedback sensor in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wei

    Full Text Available Reliable detection of return of spontaneous circulation with minimal interruptions of chest compressions is part of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and routinely done by checking pulsation of carotid arteries. However, manual palpation was time-consuming and unreliable even if performed by expert clinicians. Therefore, automated accurate pulse detection with minimal interruptions of chest compression is highly desirable during cardiac arrest especially in out-of-hospital settings.To investigate whether the acceleration (ACC signals acquired from accelerometer-based CPR feedback sensor can be used to distinguish perfusing rhythm (PR from pulseless electrical activity (PEA in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.Cardiac arrest was induced in 49 male adult pigs. ECG, arterial blood pressure (ABP and ACC waveforms were simultaneously recorded during CPR. 3-second segments containing compression-free signals during chest compression pauses were extracted and only those segments with organized rhythm were used for analysis. PR was defined as systolic arterial pressure >60 mmHg and pulse pressure >10 mmHg, while PEA was defined as an organized rhythm that does not meet the above criteria for PR. Peak correlation coefficient (CCp of the cross-correlation function between pre-processed ECG and ACC, was used to discriminate PR and PEA.63 PR and 153 PEA were identified from the total of 1025 extracted segments. CCp was significantly higher for PR as compared to PEA (0.440±0.176 vs. 0.067±0.042, p<0.01 and highly correlated with ABP (r = 0.848, p<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 0.965, 93.6%, 97.5% and 96.7% for the ACC-based automatic spontaneous pulse detection.In this animal model, the ACC signals acquired from an accelerometer-based CPR feedback sensor can be used to detect the presence of spontaneous pulse with high accuracy.

  20. CPR in medical TV shows: non-health care student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alismail A

    2018-02-01

    these shows portray basic life support, especially when not following American Heart Association (AHA guidelines. We recommend the medical advisors in these shows to use AHA guidelines and AHA to expand its expenditures to include medical shows to educate the public on the appropriate action to rescue an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patient. Keywords: medical shows, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, CPR, college student

  1. Convective overshooting top detection with MSG SEVIRI, Himawari-8 AHI, and CloudSat CPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, J.; Kim, M.; Park, S.

    2015-12-01

    Overshooting Tops (OTs) are the clouds that penetrate into the tropopause and grow to the bottom of stratosphere at the top layer of cumulonimbus with very strong updraft. Severe weather conditions such as ground lightning, large hail, strong winds, and heavy rainfall can cause in the cumulonimbus clouds with OTs, with turbulence and lightning occurring very frequently in the area near OTs. In terms of aviation operations, OTs are a very important risk factor. According to Federal Aviation Administration, 509 cases of 4,326 weather-related events from 1992 to 2001were caused by turbulences. The detection of OTs is important to predict the degree and location of severe weather conditions such as turbulence, lightning, and thunderstorms. There are two methods widely used to detect OTs with multispectral images. One is the Water Vapor-InfraRed window channel Brightness Temperature Difference (WV-IRW BTD), which uses the differences in brightness temperatures at an infrared channel (about 11 ㎛). The other approach is the InfraRed Window texture (IRW-texture) method, which is based on the characteristics of OTs that appear a pixel group with low temperatures. The typical IRW-texture algorithm uses simple thresholds to detect OTs, whereas this research proposes an advanced approach based on machine learning techniques such as decision trees, random forest (RF), and support vector machines (SVM) with various variables from geostationary satellite data such as MSG SEVIRI (over Africa) and Himawari AHI (over East Asia) so as to improve the detection of OTs. OT and non-OT samples (e.g. other types of clouds such as stratus and cirrus) were extracted using the CloudSat cloud profiling radar (CPR) and SEVIRI (and Himawari) imagery. Results show that RF produced the best performance in detection of OTs yielding an overall accuracy of 98.33% and a false alarm rate of 9.01%. The user's accuracies of OT and non-OT were similar, whereas the producer's accuracy of non-OT was

  2. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. The Two-Component System CprRS Senses Cationic Peptides and Triggers Adaptive Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Independently of ParRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Luca; Jenssen, Håvard; Bains, Manjeet

    2012-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides pass across the outer membrane by interacting with negatively charged lipopolysaccharide (LPS), leading to outer membrane permeabilization in a process termed self-promoted uptake. Resistance can be mediated by the addition of positively charged arabinosamine through...... ParRS. Here, we report the identification of a new two-component system, CprRS, which, upon exposure to a wide range of antimicrobial peptides, triggered the expression of the LPS modification operon. Thus, mutations in the cprRS operon blocked the induction of the arn operon in response to several...... antimicrobial peptides independently of ParRS but did not affect the response to low Mg2+. Distinct patterns of arn induction were identified. Thus, the responses to polymyxins were abrogated by either parR or cprR mutations, while responses to other peptides, including indolicidin, showed differential...

  4. Studying Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence with Synchrotron Polarization Dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Lazarian, Alex; Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, Jungyeon

    2016-01-01

    We test a new technique of studying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence suggested by Lazarian \\& Pogosyan, using synthetic synchrotron polarization observations. This paper focuses on a one-point statistics, which is termed the polarization frequency analysis, that is characterized by the variance of polarized emission as a function of the square of wavelengths along a single line of sight. We adopt a ratio $\\eta$ of the standard deviation of the line-of-sight turbulent magnetic field to the...

  5. A COMPARISON OF INTERNET-BASED LEARNING AND TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM LECTURE TO LEARN CPR FOR CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser HEMMATI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL and traditional classroom lecture (TCL for continuing medical education (CME programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR curriculum guidelines training either by traditional or by an Internet-based CME. A randomized two-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design was used. Postgraduate general physician trainees of Iran medical schools were participated. Two methods were compared for teaching the newest curriculum guidelines of the American Heart Association: lecture method in which the teacher follows a Power point presentation with linear layout, and with interactive self-assessment and Scenario-based learning, feedback, multimedia with linear and nonlinear layout with the same power point presentation as lecture in terms of text and photography. The data on final CPR exam grades, collected both groups trained physicians, were obtained for a total of 80 physicians in 2011. An independent sample t-test analysis indicated that participants in the IBL format reported significantly higher mean ratings for this format (62.5 ±2.32 than TCL format (54.6±2.18 (p=.001. There were no significant differences between the two groups in cognitive gains (p<0.05. well-designed IBL content can be effective or a supplement component to CME.

  6. Motion detection technology as a tool for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality training: a randomised crossover mannequin pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Federico; Frisoli, Antonio; Loconsole, Claudio; Bannò, Filippo; Tammaro, Gaetano; Imbriaco, Guglielmo; Marchetti, Luca; Cerchiari, Erga L

    2013-04-01

    Outcome after cardiac arrest is dependent on the quality of chest compressions (CC). A great number of devices have been developed to provide guidance during CPR. The present study evaluates a new CPR feedback system (Mini-VREM: Mini-Virtual Reality Enhanced Mannequin) designed to improve CC during training. Mini-VREM system consists of a Kinect(®) (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA) motion sensing device and specifically developed software to provide audio-visual feedback. Mini-VREM was connected to a commercially available mannequin (Laerdal Medical, Stavanger, Norway). Eighty trainees (healthcare professionals and lay people) volunteered in this randomised crossover pilot study. All subjects performed a 2 min CC trial, 1h pause and a second 2 min CC trial. The first group (FB/NFB, n=40) performed CC with Mini-VREM feedback (FB) followed by CC without feedback (NFB). The second group (NFB/FB, n=40) performed vice versa. Primary endpoints: adequate compression (compression rate between 100 and 120 min(-1) and compression depth between 50 and 60mm); compressions rate within 100-120 min(-1); compressions depth within 50-60mm. When compared to the performance without feedback, with Mini-VREM feedback compressions were more adequate (FB 35.78% vs. NFB 7.27%, ppeople in a simulated CA scenario, in terms of compression rate and depth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Update of the Polar SWIFT model for polar stratospheric ozone loss (Polar SWIFT version 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2017-07-01

    The Polar SWIFT model is a fast scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion in polar winter. It is intended for use in global climate models (GCMs) and Earth system models (ESMs) to enable the simulation of mutual interactions between the ozone layer and climate. To date, climate models often use prescribed ozone fields, since a full stratospheric chemistry scheme is computationally very expensive. Polar SWIFT is based on a set of coupled differential equations, which simulate the polar vortex-averaged mixing ratios of the key species involved in polar ozone depletion on a given vertical level. These species are O3, chemically active chlorine (ClOx), HCl, ClONO2 and HNO3. The only external input parameters that drive the model are the fraction of the polar vortex in sunlight and the fraction of the polar vortex below the temperatures necessary for the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. Here, we present an update of the Polar SWIFT model introducing several improvements over the original model formulation. In particular, the model is now trained on vortex-averaged reaction rates of the ATLAS Chemistry and Transport Model, which enables a detailed look at individual processes and an independent validation of the different parameterizations contained in the differential equations. The training of the original Polar SWIFT model was based on fitting complete model runs to satellite observations and did not allow for this. A revised formulation of the system of differential equations is developed, which closely fits vortex-averaged reaction rates from ATLAS that represent the main chemical processes influencing ozone. In addition, a parameterization for the HNO3 change by denitrification is included. The rates of change of the concentrations of the chemical species of the Polar SWIFT model are purely chemical rates of change in the new version, whereas in the original Polar SWIFT model, they included a transport effect caused by the

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa high-level resistance to polymyxins and other antimicrobial peptides requires cprA, a gene that is disrupted in the PAO1 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutu, Alina D; Rodgers, Nicole S; Park, Jihye; Moskowitz, Samuel M

    2015-09-01

    The arn locus, found in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, mediates resistance to polymyxins and other cationic antimicrobial peptides through 4-amino-l-arabinose modification of the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, several two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) control the arn locus, which is necessary but not sufficient for these resistance phenotypes. A previous transposon mutagenesis screen to identify additional polymyxin resistance genes that these systems regulate implicated an open reading frame designated PA1559 in the genome of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Resequencing of this chromosomal region and bioinformatics analysis for a variety of P. aeruginosa strains revealed that in the sequenced PAO1 strain, a guanine deletion at the end of PA1559 results in a frameshift and truncation of a full-length open reading frame that also encompasses PA1560 in non-PAO1 strains, such as P. aeruginosa PAK. Deletion analysis in the PAK strain showed that this full-length open reading frame, designated cprA, is necessary for polymyxin resistance conferred by activating mutations in the PhoPQ, PmrAB, and CprRS TCSs. The cprA gene was also required for PmrAB-mediated resistance to other cationic antimicrobial peptides in the PAK strain. Repair of the mutated cprA allele in the PAO1 strain restored polymyxin resistance conferred by an activating TCS mutation. The deletion of cprA did not affect the arn-mediated lipid A modification, indicating that the CprA protein is necessary for a different aspect of polymyxin resistance. This protein has a domain structure with a strong similarity to the extended short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family that comprises isomerases, lyases, and oxidoreductases. These results suggest a new avenue through which to pursue targeted inhibition of polymyxin resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. RHIC Polarization Decay in FY15 pp Run due to Polarization Profile Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang H.; Adams, P.

    2016-05-23

    The decay over time of ratio between polarization profile and beam profile has been analyzed previously. A follow up question is if we can get the decay of polarization profile and beam profile separately. With the beam profiles obtained from Ion Profile Monitor (IPM), this analysis was done and the results are analyzed. The results show that the contribution from polarization profile and beam profile is similar for yellow ring, but the contribution from polarization profile is much stronger in blue ring, which is consistent with lower polarization Blue ring.

  10. Precessing deuteron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the acceleration in the Nuclotron of deuterons polarized in the horizontal plane is considered. This horizontal polarization is named precessing polarization. The effects of the main magnetic field and synchrotron oscillations are included. The precessing polarization is supposed to be used in studying the polarization parameters of the elastic dp back-scattering and other experiments

  11. Prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients receiving CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriphuwanun V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Visith Siriphuwanun,1 Yodying Punjasawadwong,1 Worawut Lapisatepun,1 Somrat Charuluxananan,2 Ketchada Uerpairojkit2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Purpose: To determine prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR within 24 hours of receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery. Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study approved by the Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai University Hospital Ethical Committee. Data used were taken from records of 751 cardiac arrest patients who received their first CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery between January 1, 2003 and October 31, 2011. The reviewed data included patient characteristics, surgical procedures, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA physical status classification, anesthesia information, the timing of cardiac arrest, CPR details, and outcomes at 24 hours after CPR. Univariate and polytomous logistic regression analyses were used to determine prognostic factors associated with the outcome variable. P-values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The outcomes at 24 hours were death (638/751, 85.0%, survival with complications (73/751, 9.7%, and survival without complications (40/751, 5.3%. The prognostic factors associated with death were: age between 13–34 years (OR =3.08, 95% CI =1.03–9.19; ASA physical status three and higher (OR =6.60, 95% CI =2.17–20.13; precardiopulmonary comorbidity (OR =3.28, 95% CI =1.09–9.90; the condition of patients who were on mechanical ventilation prior to receiving anesthesia (OR =4.11, 95% CI =1.17–14.38; surgery in the upper abdominal site (OR =14.64, 95% CI =2.83–75.82; shock prior to cardiac arrest (OR =6.24, 95% CI =2.53–15

  12. Intruder Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    field coneonenti in the ground-frane in ter-s of j- P... cvcan ’Se ochieved. That result is given in (;.!J-a, b, c) of Ref. !.Tt is re,)eato𔃻 Selo ,: in...steps would leed to tern~s wit’, increasinrjr hipher or ’er veriation with and the ratio 4i). The latter r-tio approaches unity ~ ~ ( a )Ib’)race as

  13. Polare maskuliniteter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Anne Hauan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper my aim is to read and understand the journal of Gerrit de Veer from the last journey of William Barents to the Arctic Regions in 1596 and the journal of captain Junge on his hunting trip from Tromsø to Svalbard in 1834.It is nearly 240 years between this to voyages. The first journal is known as the earliest report from the arctic era. Gerrit de Veer adds instructive copper engravings to his text and give us insight in the crews meeting with this new land. Captain Junges journal is found together with his dead crew in a house in a fjord nearby Ny-Ålesund and has no drawings, but word. Both of these journals may be read as sources of the knowledge and understanding of the polar region. They might also unveil the ideas of how to deal with and survive under the challenges that is given. In addition one can ask if the sources can tell us more about how men describe their challenges. Can the way they expressed themselves in the journals give us an understanding of masculinity? And not least help us to create good questions of the change in the ideas of masculinities which is said to follow the change in understanding of the wilderness.

  14. Atomic processes relevant to polarization plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, T.; Koike, F.; Sakimoto, K.; Okasaka, R.; Kawasaki, K.; Takiyama, K.; Oda, T.; Kato, T.

    1992-04-01

    When atoms (ions) are excited anisotropically, polarized excited atoms are produced and the radiation emitted by these atoms is polarized. From the standpoint of plasma spectroscopy research, we review the existing data for various atomic processes that are related to the polarization phenomena. These processes are: electron impact excitation, excitation by atomic and ionic collisions, photoexcitation, radiative recombination and bremsstrahlung. Collisional and radiative relaxation processes of atomic polarization follow. Other topics included are: electric-field measurement, self alignment, Lyman doublet intensity ratio, and magnetic-field measurement of the solar prominence. (author)

  15. Optimal Chest Compression Rate and Compression to Ventilation Ratio in Delivery Room Resuscitation: Evidence from Newborn Piglets and Neonatal Manikins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solevåg, Anne Lee; Schmölzer, Georg M.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) influences survival and neurologic outcomes after delivery room (DR) CPR. High quality chest compressions (CC) improve cerebral and myocardial perfusion. Improved myocardial perfusion increases the likelihood of a faster ROSC. Thus, optimizing CC quality may improve outcomes both by preserving cerebral blood flow during CPR and by reducing the recovery time. CC quality is determined by rate, CC to ventilation (C:V) ratio, and applied force, which are influenced by the CC provider. Thus, provider performance should be taken into account. Neonatal resuscitation guidelines recommend a 3:1 C:V ratio. CCs should be delivered at a rate of 90/min synchronized with ventilations at a rate of 30/min to achieve a total of 120 events/min. Despite a lack of scientific evidence supporting this, the investigation of alternative CC interventions in human neonates is ethically challenging. Also, the infrequent occurrence of extensive CPR measures in the DR make randomized controlled trials difficult to perform. Thus, many biomechanical aspects of CC have been investigated in animal and manikin models. Despite mathematical and physiological rationales that higher rates and uninterrupted CC improve CPR hemodynamics, studies indicate that provider fatigue is more pronounced when CC are performed continuously compared to when a pause is inserted after every third CC as currently recommended. A higher rate (e.g., 120/min) is also more fatiguing, which affects CC quality. In post-transitional piglets with asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest, there was no benefit of performing continuous CC at a rate of 90/min. Not only rate but duty cycle, i.e., the duration of CC/total cycle time, is a known determinant of CC effectiveness. However, duty cycle cannot be controlled with manual CC. Mechanical/automated CC in neonatal CPR has not been explored, and feedback systems are under-investigated in this

  16. "Utstein style" spreadsheet and database programs based on Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access software for CPR data management of in-hospital resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bruce D; Whitlock, Warren L

    2004-04-01

    In 1997, The American Heart Association in association with representatives of the International Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) published recommended guidelines for reviewing, reporting and conducting in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) outcomes using the "Utstein style". Using these guidelines, we developed two Microsoft Office based database management programs that may be useful to the resuscitation community. We developed a user-friendly spreadsheet based on MS Office Excel. The user enters patient variables such as name, age, and diagnosis. Then, event resuscitation variables such as time of collapse and CPR team arrival are entered from a "code flow sheet". Finally, outcome variables such as patient condition at different time points are recorded. The program then makes automatic calculations of average response times, survival rates and other important outcome measurements. Also using the Utstein style, we developed a database program based on MS Office Access. To promote free public access to these programs, we established at a website. These programs will help hospitals track, analyze, and present their CPR outcomes data. Clinical CPR researchers might also find the programs useful because they are easily modified and have statistical functions.

  17. The addition of voice prompts to audiovisual feedback and debriefing does not modify CPR quality or outcomes in out of hospital cardiac arrest--a prospective, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Andreas; Weber, Thomas P; Wecker, Sascha; Harding, Ulf; Osada, Nani; Van Aken, Hugo; Lukas, Roman P

    2011-03-01

    Chest compression quality is a determinant of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). ERC 2005 guidelines recommend the use of technical devices to support rescuers giving compressions. This prospective randomized study reviewed influence of different feedback configurations on survival and compression quality. 312 patients suffering an OHCA were randomly allocated to two different feedback configurations. In the limited feedback group a metronome and visual feedback was used. In the extended feedback group voice prompts were added. A training program was completed prior to implementation, performance debriefing was conducted throughout the study. Survival did not differ between the extended and limited feedback groups (47.8% vs 43.9%, p = 0.49). Average compression depth (mean ± SD: 4.74 ± 0.86 cm vs 4.84 ± 0.93 cm, p = 0.31) was similar in both groups. There were no differences in compression rate (103 ± 7 vs 102 ± 5 min(-1), p=0.74) or hands-off fraction (16.16% ± 0.07 to 17.04% ± 0.07, p = 0.38). Bystander CPR, public arrest location, presenting rhythm and chest compression depth were predictors of short term survival (ROSC to ED). Even limited CPR-feedback combined with training and ongoing debriefing leads to high chest compression quality. Bystander CPR, location, rhythm and chest compression depth are determinants of survival from out of hospital cardiac arrest. Addition of voice prompts does neither modify CPR quality nor outcome in OHCA. CC depth significantly influences survival and therefore more focus should be put on correct delivery. Further studies are needed to examine the best configuration of feedback to improve CPR quality and survival. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00449969), http://www.clinicalTrials.gov. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. RHIC FY15 pp Run RHIC and AGS polarization analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adams, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-20

    The polarization information is important for the spin physics program in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). There are discrepancies between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements. First, the face value of AGS polarization is higher than RHIC ones in general. Second, the measured polarization profile (described by the profile ratio R) is stronger in AGS than in RHIC. This note analyzes the polarization data from FY15 pp run period. The results show that the differences between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements are reasonable, but the R value difference is puzzling. The difference between blue and yellow ring is worth of spin simulation to explain.

  19. Added value of cerebro-placental ratio and uterine artery Doppler at routine third trimester screening as a predictor of SGA and FGR in non-selected pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial-Crestelo, M; Martinez-Portilla, R J; Cancemi, A; Caradeux, J; Fernandez, L; Peguero, A; Gratacos, E; Figueras, Francesc

    2018-03-04

    The objective of this study is to determine the added value of cerebroplacental ratio (CPR) and uterine Doppler velocimetry at third trimester scan in an unselected obstetric population to predict smallness and growth restriction. We constructed a prospective cohort study of women with singleton pregnancies attended for routine third trimester screening (32 +0 -34 +6 weeks). Fetal biometry and fetal-maternal Doppler ultrasound examinations were performed by certified sonographers. The CPR was calculated as a ratio of the middle cerebral artery to the umbilical artery pulsatility indices. Both attending professionals and patients were blinded to the results, except in cases of estimated fetal weight < p10. The association between third trimester Doppler parameters and small for gestational age (SGA) (birth weight <10th centile) and fetal growth restriction (FGR) (birth weight below the third centile) was assessed by logistic regression, where the basal comparison was a model comprising maternal characteristics and estimated fetal weight (EFW). A total of 1030 pregnancies were included. The mean gestational age at scan was 33 weeks (SD 0.6). The addition of CPR and uterine Doppler to maternal characteristics plus EFW improved the explained uncertainty of the predicting models for SGA (15 versus 10%, p < .001) and FGR (12 versus 8%, p = .03). However, the addition of CPR and uterine Doppler to maternal characteristics plus EFW only marginally improved the detection rates for SGA (38 versus 34% for a 10% of false positives) and did not change the predictive performance for FGR. The added value of CPR and uterine Doppler at 33 weeks of gestation for detecting defective growth is poor.

  20. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  1. Electron-Spin Filters Would Offer Spin Polarization Greater than 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2009-01-01

    A proposal has been made to develop devices that would generate spin-polarized electron currents characterized by polarization ratios having magnitudes in excess of 1. Heretofore, such devices (denoted, variously, as spin injectors, spin polarizers, and spin filters) have typically offered polarization ratios having magnitudes in the approximate range of 0.01 to 0.1. The proposed devices could be useful as efficient sources of spin-polarized electron currents for research on spintronics and development of practical spintronic devices.

  2. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live......In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  3. Pyrethroid-resistance is modulated by miR-92a by targeting CpCPR4 in Culex pipiens pallens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kai; Li, Xixi; Hu, Hongxia; Zhou, Dan; Sun, Yan; Ma, Lei; Zhu, Changliang; Shen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The wide use of pyrethroids has resulted in the emergence and spread of resistance in mosquito populations, which represent a major obstacle in the struggle against vector-borne diseases. Resistance to pyrethroids is a complex genetic phenomenon attributed by polygenetic inheritance. We previously have sequenced and analyzed the miRNA profiles of Culex pipiens pallens. MiR-92a was found to be overexpressed in a deltamethrin-resistant (DR) strain. The association of miR-92a with pyrethroid-resistance was investigated by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Expression levels of miR-92a were 2.72-fold higher in the DR strain than in the deltamethrin-susceptible (DS) strain. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that CpCPR4, a mosquito cuticle gene, is the target of miR-92a. Dual luciferase reporter assays further confirmed that CpCPR4 is modulated by miR-92a through binding to a specific target site in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). Microinjection of the miR-92a inhibitor upregulated CpCPR4 expression levels, leading to an increase in the susceptibility of the DR strain in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) bottle bioassay (a surveillance tool for detecting resistance to insecticides in vector populations). Taken together, our findings indicate that miR-92a regulates pyrethroid-resistance through its interaction with CpCPR4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Abstract 20854: A Tale of Self-Fulfilling Prophecies in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Emergency Medical Technicians Deliberately Perform Substandard CPR When Anticipating Poor Prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtker, Henrik; Klausen, Troels M; Lauridsen, Kasper G

    2017-01-01

    Background: Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) play a crucial role in resuscitating patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Perception of prognosis may affect level and quality of treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate if EMTs delay start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR...... and resuscitation attempt characteristics.Author Disclosures: H. Bødtker: None. T.M. Klausen: None. K.G. Lauridsen: None. A. Jæger: None. M.B. Mortensen: None. B. Løfgren: None....

  5. Targeted simulation and education to improve cardiac arrest recognition and telephone assisted CPR in an emergency medical communication centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Camilla; Skåre, Christiane; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Birkenes, Tonje S; Myklebust, Helge; Hansen, Andreas E; Sunde, Kjetil; Olasveengen, Theresa M

    2017-05-01

    Recognition of cardiac arrest and prompt activation time by emergency medical dispatch are key process measures that have been associated with improved survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The aim of this study is to improve recognition of OHCA and time to initiation of telephone assisted chest compressions in an emergency medical communication centre (EMCC). A prospective, interventional study implementing targeted interventions in an EMCC. Interventions included: (1) lectures focusing on agonal breathing and interrogation strategy (2) simulation training (3) structured dispatcher feedback (4) web-based telephone assisted CPR training program. All ambulance-confirmed OHCA calls in the study period were assessed and relevant process and result measures were recorded pre- and post-intervention. Cardiac arrest was reported as (1) recognised, (2) not recognised or (3) delayed recognition. We included 331 and 230 calls pre- and post-intervention, respectively. Recognition of cardiac arrest improved significantly after intervention (89 vs. 95%, p=0.024). Delayed recognition was significantly reduced (21 vs. 6%, p>0.001), as was misinterpretation of agonal breathing (25 vs. 10%, pquality metrics can facilitate development of targeted education and training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reduced hands-off-time and time to first shock in CPR according to the ERC Guidelines 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, B; Fleischhackl, R; Losert, H; Arrich, J; Mittlboeck, M; Domanovits, H; Hoerauf, K

    2009-01-01

    Chest compressions and early defibrillation are crucial in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The Guidelines 2005 brought major changes to the basic life support and automated external defibrillator (BLS-AED) algorithm. We compared the European Resuscitation Council's Guidelines 2000 (group '00) and 2005 (group '05) on hands-off-time (HOT) and time to first shock (TTFS) in an experimental model. In a randomised, cross-over design, volunteers were assessed in performing BLS-AED over a period of 5min on a manikin in a simulated ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest situation. Ten minutes of standardised teaching and 10min of training including corrective feedback were allocated for each of the guidelines before evaluation. HOT was chosen as the primary and TTFS as the secondary outcome parameter. Forty participants were enrolled; one participant dropped out after group allocation. During the 5-min evaluation period of adult BLS-AED, HOT was significantly (p<0.001) longer in group '00 [273+/-3s (mean+/-standard error)] than in group '05 (188+/-3s). The TTFS was significantly (p<0.001) longer in group '00 (91+/-3s) than in group '05 (71+/-3s). In this manikin setting, HOT and TTFS improved with BLS-AED performed according to Guidelines 2005.

  7. Numerical simulation of magneto-acoustic Wave Phase Conjugation with the DG method in the CPR framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarreszadeh, Seyedamirreza; Timofeev, Evgeny; Merlen, Alain; Matar, Olivier Bou; Pernod, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    The present paper is concerned with the numerical modeling of magneto-acoustic Wave Phase Conjugation (WPC) phenomena. Since ultrasonic waves in the WPC applications have short wavelengths relative to the traveling distances, high-order numerical methods in both space and time domains are required. The numerical scheme chosen for the current research is the Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) method incorporated into the Correction Procedure via Reconstruction (CPR) framework. In order to avoid non-physical oscillations near high-gradient regions, a Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) limiter is used to reconstruct the solutions in the affected cells. After being assured that the numerical scheme has appropriate accuracy and performance, the WPC process is modeled in both linear and non-linear regimes. The results in the linear regime are in acceptable agreement with the analytical solution. The only significant deviation between the linear and non-linear results is at the sensor within the passive zone, where the mean pressure starts to grow gradually in the non-linear regime due to overtaking of the low-velocity pressure waves by the high-velocity ones.

  8. Hybrid fluorescent layer emitting polarized light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadimasoudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanorods have anisotropic absorption and emission properties. In this work a hybrid luminescent layer is produced based on a mixture of CdSe/CdS nanorods dispersed in a liquid crystal that is aligned by an electric field and polymerized by UV illumination. The film emits light with polarization ratio 0.6 (polarization contrast 4:1. Clusters of nanorods in liquid crystal can be avoided by applying an AC electric field with sufficient amplitude. This method can be made compatible with large-scale processing on flexible transparent substrates. Thin polarized light emitters can be used in LCD backlights or solar concentrators to increase the efficiency.

  9. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  10. Long-term retrospective analysis of mackerel spawning in the North Sea: a new time series and modeling approach to CPR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Teunis; Kristensen, Kasper; Payne, Mark; Edwards, Martin; Schrum, Corinna; Pitois, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    We present a unique view of mackerel (Scomber scombrus) in the North Sea based on a new time series of larvae caught by the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey from 1948-2005, covering the period both before and after the collapse of the North Sea stock. Hydrographic backtrack modelling suggested that the effect of advection is very limited between spawning and larvae capture in the CPR survey. Using a statistical technique not previously applied to CPR data, we then generated a larval index that accounts for both catchability as well as spatial and temporal autocorrelation. The resulting time series documents the significant decrease of spawning from before 1970 to recent depleted levels. Spatial distributions of the larvae, and thus the spawning area, showed a shift from early to recent decades, suggesting that the central North Sea is no longer as important as the areas further west and south. These results provide a consistent and unique perspective on the dynamics of mackerel in this region and can potentially resolve many of the unresolved questions about this stock.

  11. Long-term retrospective analysis of mackerel spawning in the North Sea: a new time series and modeling approach to CPR data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teunis Jansen

    Full Text Available We present a unique view of mackerel (Scomber scombrus in the North Sea based on a new time series of larvae caught by the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR survey from 1948-2005, covering the period both before and after the collapse of the North Sea stock. Hydrographic backtrack modelling suggested that the effect of advection is very limited between spawning and larvae capture in the CPR survey. Using a statistical technique not previously applied to CPR data, we then generated a larval index that accounts for both catchability as well as spatial and temporal autocorrelation. The resulting time series documents the significant decrease of spawning from before 1970 to recent depleted levels. Spatial distributions of the larvae, and thus the spawning area, showed a shift from early to recent decades, suggesting that the central North Sea is no longer as important as the areas further west and south. These results provide a consistent and unique perspective on the dynamics of mackerel in this region and can potentially resolve many of the unresolved questions about this stock.

  12. A comparison between the two methods of chest compression in infant and neonatal resuscitation. A review according to 2010 CPR guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvanas, Alexandros; Koulouglioti, Christina; Kalafati, Maria

    2018-03-01

    The quality of chest compression (CC) delivered during neonatal and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is identified as the most important factor to achieve the increase of survival rate without major neurological deficit to the patients. The objective of the study was to systematically review all the available studies that have compared the two different techniques of hand placement on infants and neonatal resuscitation, from 2010 to 2015 and to highlight which method is more effective. A review of the literature using a variety of medical databases, including Cochrane, MEDLINE, and SCOPUS electronic databases. The following MeSH terms were used in the search: infant, neonatal, CPR, CC, two-thumb (TT) technique/method, two-finger (TF) technique/method, rescuer fatigue, thumb/finger position/placement, as well as combinations of these. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria; nine observational studies and a randomized controlled trial. All providers performed either continuous TF or TT technique CCs and the majority of CPR performance was taken place in infant trainer manikin. The majority of the studies suggest the TT method as the more useful for infants and neonatal resuscitation than the TF.

  13. Mobile phone technology identifies and recruits trained citizens to perform CPR on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims prior to ambulance arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringh, Mattias; Fredman, David; Nordberg, Per; Stark, Tomas; Hollenberg, Jacob

    2011-12-01

    In a two-parted study, evaluate a new concept were mobile phone technology is used to dispatch lay responders to nearby out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). Mobile phone positioning systems (MPS) can geographically locate selected mobile phone users at any given moment. A mobile phone service using MPS was developed and named Mobile Life Saver (MLS). Simulation study: 25 volunteers named mobile responders (MRs) were connected to MLS. Ambulance time intervals from 22 consecutive OHCAs in 2005 were used as controls. The MRs randomly moved in Stockholm city centre and were dispatched to simulated OHCAs (identical to controls) if they were within a 350 m distance. Real life study: during 25 weeks 1271-1801 MRs trained in CPR were connected to MLS. MLS was activated at the dispatch centre in parallel with ambulance dispatch when an OHCA was suspected. The MRs were dispatched if they were within 500 m from the suspected OHCA. Simulation study: mean response time for the MRs compared to historical ambulance time intervals was reduced by 2 min 20s (44%), pMobile phone technology can be used to identify and recruit nearby CPR-trained citizens to OHCAs for bystander CPR prior to ambulance arrival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  15. A novel orthogonally linearly polarized Nd:YVO4 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing-Peng, Yan; Qiang, Liu; Hai-Long, Chen; Xing, Fu; Ma-Li, Gong; Dong-Sheng, Wang

    2010-01-01

    We presented a novel orthogonally linearly polarized Nd:YVO 4 laser. Two pieces of α-cut grown-together composite YVO 4 /Nd:YVO 4 crystals were placed in the resonant cavity with the c-axis of the two crystals orthogonally. The polarization and power performance of the orthogonally polarized laser were investigated. A 26.2-W orthogonally linearly polarized laser was obtained. The power ratio between the two orthogonally polarized lasers was varied with the pump power caused by the polarized mode coupling. The longitudinal modes competition and the corresponding variable optical beats were also observed from the orthogonally polarized laser. We also adjusted the crystals with their c-axis parallele to each other, and a 40.7-W linearly polarized TEM 00 laser was obtained, and the beam quality factors were M x 2 = 1.37 and M y 2 = 1.25. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  16. Compact electrically controlled broadband liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber polarizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2009-01-01

    An electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic-bandgap fiber polarizer is experimentally demonstrated. A maximum 21.3dB electrically tunable polarization extinction ratio is achieved with 45° rotatable transmission axis as well as switched on and off in 1300nm–1600nm.......An electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic-bandgap fiber polarizer is experimentally demonstrated. A maximum 21.3dB electrically tunable polarization extinction ratio is achieved with 45° rotatable transmission axis as well as switched on and off in 1300nm–1600nm....

  17. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  18. Project desk evaluation of a model project CPR/5/009 industrial scale irradiation of rice and other foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The project CPR/5/009 was approved in 1993 as a model project. The project objective was to build an industrial food irradiation facility for high quality rice and other foodstuffs, with a processing capacity of 5000-9000 tonnes per year. This capacity is large compared to many other facilities of the same type elsewhere. The success of the project waste to be measured against the full utilization of the facility with an acceptable availability factor. Disbursements on Agency inputs up to the end of June 1996 were $294,716 and consisted of one 100 kCi Co-60 source, quality control equipment, bag heat sealers, one expert mission and 13.5 months of training abroad. The current budget is $323,870, following two programme changes. The total cost of the project was estimated at $1,331,300 with the Chinese Government providing the balance. The major conclusions of this evaluation are as follows: Initially, the Agency overestimated the project and business management experience of the counterpart, and consequently underestimated the extent of support required. Providing support to counterparts in facing the key challenges of project management and business operation must be considered by the Agency in future projects of this type. The counterpart institution is also encouraged to emphasize these management issues in order to maximize sustainable and cost-effective utilization of such facilities. A new operational plan has been prepared by the counterpart for 1996 through 1998 which identifies seven customers requiring treatment of a total of 1000 tonnes per year of cereal grains and 1500 tonnes per year of other foodstuffs. This plan reflects a change in overall emphasis from supporting food supply security to ensuring the safety of foodstuffs. It is not clear whether this plan will support operation of the facility at full capacity. The team in place to operate the facility also needs further strengthening. (author). Figs, tabs

  19. Effect of spray on performance of the hydrogen mitigation system during LB-LOCA for CPR1000 NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, X.G.; Yang, Y.H.; Cheng, X.; Al-Hawshabi, N.H.A.; Casey, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper presents the spray effect on HMS during LB-LOCA by using GASFLOW. → The positive and negative effects of spray are summarized. → And the combination of DIS and PAR system is suggested as reasonable countermeasures. → This research is an important work aimed at the study of spray and hydrogen mitigation. → The contents of this paper should become a required part of the safety analysis of Chinese NPPs. - Abstract: During the course of the hypothetical large break loss-of-coolant accident (LB-LOCA) in a nuclear power plant (NPP), hydrogen is generated by a reaction between steam and the fuel-cladding inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). It is then ejected from the break into the containment along with a large amount of steam. Management of hydrogen safety and prevention of over-pressurization could be implemented through a hydrogen mitigation system (HMS) and spray system in CPR1000 NPP. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code GASFLOW is utilized in this study to analyze the spray effect on the performance of HMS during LB-LOCA. Results show that as a kind of HMS, deliberate igniter system (DIS) could initiate hydrogen combustion immediately after the flammability limit of the gas mixture has been reached. However, it will increase the temperature and pressure drastically. Operating the DIS under spray condition could result in hydrogen combustion being suppressed by suspended droplets inside the containment. Furthermore, the droplets could also mitigate local the temperature rise. Operation of a PAR system, another kind of HMS, consumes hydrogen steadily with a lower recombination rate which is not affected noticeably by the spray system. Numerical results indicate that the dual concept, namely the integrated application of DIS and PAR systems, is a constructive improvement for hydrogen safety under spray condition during LB-LOCA.

  20. Polarization extinction ratio and polarization dependent intensity noise in long-pulse supercontinuum generation (Conference Presentation)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Catherine; Engelsholm, Rasmus Dybbro; Moselund, Peter Morten

    2017-01-01

    to 2200 nm, and fast photo detectors, to record 800 consecutive pulses. Peaks from these pulses are first extracted, then distribution of their pulse height histogram (PHH) is constructed. Analysis using higher-order moments about the mean (variance, skewness and kurtosis) showed that: (1) around the pump...... wavelength of 1064nm, the PD-RIN is lowest, PHH exhibits a Gaussian distribution, and higher order moments are zero, (2) further away from pump, PD-RIN increases in parabolic fashion, PHH follows a left-skewed long-tailed Gamma distribution, and higher-order moments increase. Spectrally, the difference...

  1. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  2. Mercury biomagnification in polar bears ( Ursus maritimus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, T. W.; Blum, J. D.; Xie, Z.; Hren, M.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury biomagnification occurs in a variety of ecosystems resulting in greater potential for toxicological effects in higher-level trophic feeders. However, Hg transport pathways through different foodweb channels are not well known, particularly in high-latitude systems affected by atmospheric Hg deposition associated with snow and ice. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios and Hg concentrations determined for 26 late 19th and early 20th century polar bear hair specimens collected from cataloged museum collections elucidate relationships between high latitude marine foodweb structure and Hg transport pathways. Nitrogen and carbon isotopic compositions suggest that polar bears derive nutrition from both open water (pelagic) and ice associated (sympagic) foodweb channels. Correlation between Hg concentrations and nitrogen isotope compositions indicate mercury biomagnification occurred in most of the polar bears investigated. Interpretation of stable isotope based foodweb structure in concert with Hg concentrations further suggests that Hg biomagnification occurred to a greater degree in polar bears participating in pelagic foodweb channels.

  3. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  4. Polarization in Sagittarius A*

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the current state of polarization observations of Sagittarius A*, the compact radio source and supermassive black hole candidate in the Galactic Center. These observations are providing new tools for understanding accretion disks, jets and their environments. Linear polarization observations have shown that Sgr A* is unpolarized at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. However, recent single-dish observations indicate that Sgr A* may have strong linear polarization at frequencies higher...

  5. Dynamic polarization of 19F in a fluorinated alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.; Kasprzyk, T.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttilae, S.; Krumpolc, M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Purcell, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied microwave dynamic cooling of 19 F and 1 H nuclei in mixtures of 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and water, doped with Cr(V) complex. Equal spin temperatures of the two nuclei are produced, and the highest spin polarizations (/approximately/80%) are found in mixtures near the eutectic ratio. The high fluorine content and polarization make this a suitable material for polarized nuclear scattering experiments. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, James, Jr.; Dabney, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Instrument measures polarization characteristics of Earth at three wavelengths. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor (ALPS) measures optical polarization characteristics of land surface. Designed to be flown at altitudes of approximately 300 m to minimize any polarizing or depolarizing effects of intervening atmosphere and to look along nadir to minimize any effects depending on look angle. Data from measurements used in conjunction with data from ground surveys and aircraft-mounted video recorders to refine mathematical models used in interpretation of higher-altitude polarimetric measurements of reflected sunlight.

  7. Polarization at SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs

  8. Backscattering and negative polarization of agglomerate particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubko, Evgenij; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Hart, Matthew; Eversole, Jay; Videen, Gorden

    2003-09-01

    We used the discrete dipole approximation to study the backscattering of agglomerate particles consisting of oblong monomers. We varied the aspect ratio of the monomers from approximately 1 (sphere) to 4, while we kept the total particle volume equivalent to that of an x = 10 sphere for m = 1.59 + i0 and 1.50 + i0 and considered two values of agglomerate packing density: rho = 0.25 and rho = 0.1. We found that these particles do not display a prominent brightness opposition effect but do produce significant negative polarization over a range of near-backscattering angles. Increasing the monomers' aspect ratio can make the negative polarization much more prominent. We have noted also that decreasing m and p can reduce the amplitude of the negative polarization for these particles.

  9. Performance comparison of polarized white light emitting diodes using wire-grid polarizers with polymeric and glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jung-Chieh; Chou, Shih-Chieh

    2018-03-01

    Polarized white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) packaged with reflective metal wire-grid polarizer of polymeric and glass substrates were investigated. The performance comparison of polymeric wire-grid polarizer film (WGF) and nano wire-grid polarizer (NWGP) with glass substrate was evaluated. The transverse electric field (TE) polarization transmittance of WGF is less than that of NWGP due to its smaller grid parameters. Despite of the higher duty cycle of WGF, the angular-dependent extinction ratio (ER) of the polarized WLEDs (PWLEDs) with WGF is higher than that of with NWGP. Regarding increasing drive currents, the PWLEDs with NWGP had better color stability than that with WGF due to better substrate thermal stability. In summary, linewidth, period and substrate material are the crucial factors for the PWLED packaging using wire grid polarizer.

  10. Study of polarization and relaxation phenomena of polyblend films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thermally stimulated discharge current (TSDC) studies were carried out on pure poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl chloride) and polyblends (of various weight ratios, 100:0, 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30) as a function of polarizing fields at constant temperature, to study the polarization and relaxation phenomena in them.

  11. Study of polarization and relaxation phenomena of polyblend films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Thermally stimulated discharge current (TSDC) studies were carried out on pure poly(methyl methacry- late), poly(vinyl chloride) and polyblends (of various weight ratios, 100:0, 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30) as a function of polarizing fields at constant temperature, to study the polarization and relaxation phenomena in ...

  12. Use of a checklist during observation of a simulated cardiac arrest scenario does not improve time to CPR and defibrillation over observation alone for subsequent scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Stuart J; Weiland, Tracey J; O'Brien, Robert; Cunningham, Neil J; Van Dijk, Julian E; Mahoney, Rosie M; Williams, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Immersive simulation is a common mode of education for medical students. Observation of clinical simulations prior to participation is believed to be beneficial, though this is often a passive process. Active observation may be more beneficial. The hypothesis tested in this study was that the active use of a simple checklist during observation of an immersive simulation would result in better participant performance in a subsequent scenario compared with passive observation alone. Medical students were randomized to either passive or active (with checklist) observation of an immersive simulation involving cardiac arrest prior to participating in their own simulation. Performance measures included time to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and time to defibrillation and were compared between first and second scenarios as well as between passive and active observers. Seventy-nine simulations involving 232 students were conducted. Mean time to CPR was 18 seconds (SD = 11.6) for those using the checklist and 24 seconds (SD = 15.8) for those who observed passively (M difference = 6 seconds), t(35) = 1.46, p =.153. Time to defibrillation was 94 seconds (SD = 26.4) for those using the checklist and 92 seconds (SD = 23.8) for those who observed passively (M difference = -2 seconds), t(38) =.21, p =.837. Time to CPR was 24 seconds (SD = 15.8) for passive observers and 31 seconds (SD = 21.0; M difference = 7 seconds), t(35) = 1.13, p =.265, for their first scenario counterparts. Time to CPR was 18 seconds (SD = 11.6) for active observers and 36 seconds (SD = 26.2; M difference = 18 seconds), t(24) = 2.81, p =.010, for their first scenario counterparts. Time to defibrillation was 92 seconds (SD = 23.8) for passive observers and 125 seconds (SD = 32.2; M difference = 33 seconds), t(33) = 3.63, p =.001, for their first scenario counterparts. Time to defibrillation was 94 seconds (SD = 26.4) for the active observers and 132 seconds (SD = 52.9; M difference = 38 seconds), t(28

  13. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP 4 . A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  14. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  15. Preliminary Analysis of Chinese GF-3 SAR Quad-Polarization Measurements to Extract Winds in Each Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ren

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the noise equivalent sigma zero (NESZ and ocean wind sensitivity for Chinese C-band Gaofen-3 (GF-3 quad-polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR measurements to facilitate further operational wind extraction from GF-3 data. Data from the GF-3 quad-polarization SAR and collocated winds from both NOAA/NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS atmospheric model and National Data Buoy Center (NDBC buoys were used in the analysis. For NESZ, the co-polarization was slightly higher compared to the cross-polarization. Regarding co-polarization and cross-polarization, NESZ was close to RadarSAT-2 and Sentinel-1 A. Wind sensitivity was analyzed by evaluating the dependence on winds in terms of normalized radar cross-sections (NRCS and polarization combinations. The closest geophysical model function (GMF and the polarization ratio (PR model to GF-3 data were determined by comparing data and the model results. The dependence of co-polarized NRCS on wind speed and azimuth angle was consistent with the proposed GMF models. The combination of CMOD5 and CMOD5.N was considered to be the closest GMF in co-polarization. The cross-polarized NRCS exhibited a strong linear relationship with moderate wind speeds higher than 4 m·s−1, but a weak correlation with the azimuth angle. The proposed model was considered as the closest GMF in cross-polarization. For polarization combinations, PR and polarization difference (PD were considered. PR increased only with the incidence angle, whereas PD increased with wind speed and varied with azimuth angle. There were three very close PR models and each can be considered as the closest. Preliminary results indicate that GF-3 quad-polarization data are valid and have the ability to extract winds in each polarization.

  16. ORCA: the versatile CPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Ginneken (Astrid); H. Stam (Hendrik); E.M. van Mulligen (Erik); M. de Wilde (Marcel); J.H. van Bemmel (Jan); R. van Mastrigt (Robbert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe introduction of computer-based patient records (CPRs) that fully replace paper records proves especially difficult in specialized care, despite the potential advantages of CPRs for patient care and research. Improved data legibility, availability, sharing of records, and decision

  17. Our Polar Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  18. Terahertz polarization imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Valk, N.C.J.; Van der Marel, W.A.M.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the polarization state of a terahertz pulse by using a modified electrooptic sampling setup. To illustrate the power of this method, we show two examples in which the knowledge of the polarization of the terahertz pulse is essential for interpreting the results:

  19. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  20. Polar Science Is Cool!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  1. Polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The author discusses a number of interrelated hadronic spin effects which test fundamental features of perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. For example, the anomalous magnetic moment of the proton and the axial coupling g{sub A} on the nucleon are shown to be related to each other for fixed proton radius, independent of the form of the underlying three-quark relativistic quark wavefunction. The renormalization scale and scheme ambiguities for the radiative corrections to the Bjorken sum rule for the polarized structure functions can be eliminated by using commensurate scale relations with other observables. Other examples include (a) new constraints on the shape and normalization of the polarized quark and gluon structure functions of the proton at large and small x{sub bj}; (b) consequences of the principle of hadron retention in high x{sub F} inclusive reactions; (c) applications of hadron helicity conservation to high momentum transfer exclusive reactions; and (d) the dependence of nuclear structure functions and shadowing on virtual photon polarization. The author also discusses the implications of a number of measurements which are in striking conflict with leading-twist perturbative QCD predictions, such as the extraordinarily large spin correlation A{sub NN} observed in large angle proton-proton scattering, the anomalously large {rho}{pi} branching ratio of the J/{psi}, and the rapidly changing polarization dependence of both J/{psi} and continuum lepton pair hadroproduction observed at large x{sub F}. The azimuthal angular dependence of the Drell-Yan process is shown to be highly sensitive to the projectile distribution amplitude, the fundamental valence light-cone wavefunction of the hadron.

  2. Precision Polarization of Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elise; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Couture, Aaron; Crawford, Christopher; Chupp, Tim; Danagoulian, Areg; Estes, Mary; Hona, Binita; Jones, Gordon; Klein, Andi; Penttila, Seppo; Sharma, Monisha; Wilburn, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Determining polarization of a cold neutron beam to high precision is required for the next generation neutron decay correlation experiments at the SNS, such as the proposed abBA and PANDA experiments. Precision polarimetry measurements were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goal of determining the beam polarization to the level of 10-3 or better. The cold neutrons from FP12 were polarized using optically polarized ^3He gas as a spin filter, which has a highly spin-dependent absorption cross section. A second ^ 3He spin filter was used to analyze the neutron polarization after passing through a resonant RF spin rotator. A discussion of the experiment and results will be given.

  3. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements. PMID:29503479

  4. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements.

  5. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-17

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  6. Interferometric crosstalk suppression using polarization multiplexing technique and an SOA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fenghai; Xueyan, Zheng; Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud

    2000-01-01

    Interferometric crosstalk can be greatly suppressed at 10Gb/s and 20Gb/s by using a gain saturated SOA and a polarization multiplexing technique that eliminates impairments like waveform and extinction ratio degradation from the SOA.......Interferometric crosstalk can be greatly suppressed at 10Gb/s and 20Gb/s by using a gain saturated SOA and a polarization multiplexing technique that eliminates impairments like waveform and extinction ratio degradation from the SOA....

  7. Studying Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence with Synchrotron Polarization Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Lazarian, Alex; Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, Jungyeon

    2016-07-01

    We test a new technique for studying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence suggested by Lazarian & Pogosyan, using synthetic observations of synchrotron polarization. This paper focuses on a one-point statistics, which is termed polarization frequency analysis, that is characterized by the variance of polarized emission as a function of the square of the wavelength along a single line of sight. We adopt the ratio η of the standard deviation of the line-of-sight turbulent magnetic field to the line-of-sight mean magnetic field to depict the level of turbulence. When this ratio is large (η \\gg 1), which characterizes a region dominated by turbulent field, or small (η ≲ 0.2), which characterizes a region dominated by the mean field, we obtain the polarization variance \\propto {λ }-2 or \\propto {λ }-2-2m, respectively. At small η, I.e., in the region dominated by the mean field, we successfully recover the turbulent spectral index from the polarization variance. We find that our simulations agree well with the theoretical prediction of Lazarian & Pogosyan. With existing and upcoming data cubes from the Low-Frequency Array for Radio Astronomy (LOFAR) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), this new technique can be applied to study the magnetic turbulence in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  8. Reference centiles for the middle cerebral artery and umbilical artery pulsatility index and cerebro-placental ratio from a low-risk population - a Generalised Additive Model for Location, Shape and Scale (GAMLSS) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatley, Christopher; Kumar, Sailesh; Greer, Ristan M

    2018-02-06

    The primary aim of this study was to create reference ranges for the fetal Middle Cerebral artery Pulsatility Index (MCA PI), Umbilical Artery Pulsatility Index (UA PI) and the Cerebro-Placental Ratio (CPR) in a clearly defined low-risk cohort using the Generalised Additive Model for Location, Shape and Scale (GAMLSS) method. Prospectively collected cross-sectional biometry and Doppler data from low-risk women attending the Mater Mother's Hospital, Maternal and Fetal Medicine Department in Brisbane, Australia between January 2010 and April 2017 were used to derive gestation specific centiles for the MCA PI, UA PI and CPR. All ultrasound scans were performed between 18 + 0 and 41 + 6 weeks gestation with recorded data for the MCA PI and/or UA PI. The GAMLSS method was used for the calculation of gestational age-adjusted centiles. Distributions and additive terms were assessed and the final model was chosen on the basis of the Global Deviance, Akaike information criterion (AIC) and Schwartz bayesian criterion (SBC), along with the results of the model and residual diagnostics as well as visual assessment of the centiles themselves. Over the study period 6013 women met the inclusion criteria. The MCA PI was recorded in 4473 fetuses, the UA PI in 6008 fetuses and the CPR was able to be calculated in 4464 cases. The centiles for the MCA PI used a fractional polynomial additive term and Box-Cox t (BCT) distribution. Centiles for the UA PI used a cubic spline additive term with BCT distribution and the CPR used a fractional polynomial additive term and a BCT distribution. We have created gestational centile reference ranges for the MCA PI, UA PI and CPR from a large low-risk cohort that supports their applicability and generalisability.

  9. Experimental asymmetric phase-covariant quantum cloning of polarization qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubusta, Jan; Bartůšková, Lucie; Černoch, Antonín; Dušek, Miloslav; Fiurášek, Jaromír

    2008-11-01

    We report on two optical realizations of the 1→2 asymmetric phase-covariant cloning machines for polarization states of single photons. The experimental setups combine two-photon interference and tunable polarization filtering, which enables us to control the asymmetry of the cloners. The first scheme involves a special unbalanced bulk beam splitter exhibiting different splitting ratios for vertical and horizontal polarizations, respectively. The second implemented scheme consists of a balanced fiber coupler where photon bunching occurs, followed by a free-space part with polarization filters. With this latter approach we were able to demonstrate very high cloning fidelities which are above the universal cloning limit.

  10. Financial Key Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Tănase Alin-Eliodor

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on computing techniques starting from trial balance data regarding financial key ratios. There are presented activity, liquidity, solvency and profitability financial key ratios. It is presented a computing methodology in three steps based on a trial balance.

  11. Molecular cloning, expression of CPR gene from Rhizopus oryzae into Rhizopus nigericans and its application in the 11α-hydroxylation of 16α, 17-epoxy-progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Luo, Xinrong; Cao, Feifei; Zhu, Tingheng; Fan, Yongxian; Jia, Xiaoqing; Shen, Yinchu

    2014-11-01

    The hydroxylations of the steroid skeleton structure are catalyzed by a family of enzymes, the cytochromes P450 (CYPs). In this study, the pCB1004-PgpdA plasmid was used for cloning the cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) gene from Rhizopus oryzae into Rhizopus nigericans to strengthen the expression of CPR gene in R. nigericans with REMI (Restriction Enzyme Mediate Integration) mediated protoplast transformation. The conditions for the protoplast production of R. nigericans were optimized as follows: 75 μg/mL yatalase, 50 μg/mL lywallzyme, fungus age of 12h, digestion time of 3 h and digestion temperature of 30°C. REMI mediated protoplast transformation with plasmid pCB1004-PgpdA into R. nigericans was performed to construct the transformants. More than 30 transformants were successfully selected from the hygromycin B-resistant plates and 6 transformants had the abilities to improve the biotransformation of 16α, 17-epoxyprogesterone. The highest biotransformation rate of the transformants was 65.38%, which was 7.06% higher than that of the original strain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intercomparison of Vertical Structure of Storms Revealed by Ground-Based (NMQ and Spaceborne Radars (CloudSat-CPR and TRMM-PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica M. Fall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spaceborne radars provide great opportunities to investigate the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. Two typical spaceborne radars for such a study are the W-band Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR and Ku-band Precipitation Radar (PR, which are onboard NASA’s CloudSat and TRMM satellites, respectively. Compared to S-band ground-based radars, they have distinct scattering characteristics for different hydrometeors in clouds and precipitation. The combination of spaceborne and ground-based radar observations can help in the identification of hydrometeors and improve the radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE. This study analyzes the vertical structure of the 18 January, 2009 storm using data from the CloudSat CPR, TRMM PR, and a NEXRAD-based National Mosaic and Multisensor QPE (NMQ system. Microphysics above, within, and below the melting layer are studied through an intercomparison of multifrequency measurements. Hydrometeors’ type and their radar scattering characteristics are analyzed. Additionally, the study of the vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR reveals the brightband properties in the cold-season precipitation and its effect on the radar-based QPE. In all, the joint analysis of spaceborne and ground-based radar data increases the understanding of the vertical structure of storm systems and provides a good insight into the microphysical modeling for weather forecasts.

  13. Polarization at the SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z/sup 0/ mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  14. An analysis of the efficacy of bag-valve-mask ventilation and chest compression during different compression-ventilation ratios in manikin-simulated paediatric resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, S B; Tibballs, J

    2000-01-01

    The ideal chest compression and ventilation ratio for children during performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has not been determined. The efficacy of chest compression and ventilation during compression ventilation ratios of 5:1, 10:2 and 15:2 was examined. Eighteen nurses, working in pairs, were instructed to provide chest compression and bag-valve-mask ventilation for 1 min with each ratio in random on a child-sized manikin. The subjects had been previously taught paediatric CPR within the last 3 or 5 months. The efficacy of ventilation was assessed by measurement of the expired tidal volume and the number of breaths provided. The rate of chest compression was guided by a metronome set at 100/min. The efficacy of chest compressions was assessed by measurement of the rate and depth of compression. There was no significant difference in the mean tidal volume or the percentage of effective chest compressions delivered for each compression-ventilation ratio. The number of breaths delivered was greatest with the ratio of 5:1. The percentage of effective chest compressions was equal with all three methods but the number of effective chest compressions was greatest with a ratio of 5:1. This study supports the use of a compression-ventilation ratio of 5:1 during two-rescuer paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  15. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  16. Polarized scintillator targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2000-05-01

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as "live" polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  17. Polarized scintillator targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B. van den E-mail: vandenbrandt@psi.ch; Bunyatova, E.I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S

    2000-05-21

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as 'live' polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  18. Heidelberg polarized alkali source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.; Steffens, E.; Jaensch, H.; Philipps Universitaet, Marburg, Germany)

    1984-01-01

    A new atomic beam type polarized alkali ion source has been installed at Heidelberg. In order to improve the beam polarization considerably optical pumping is applied in combination with an adiabatic medium field transition which results in beams in single hyperfine sublevels. The m state population is determined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Highly polarized beams (P/sub s/ > 0.9, s = z, zz) with intensities of 30 to 130 μA can be extracted for Li + and Na + , respectively

  19. Polarization measurement in the COMPASS polarized target

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, K; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Doshita, N; Gautheron, F; Görtz, S; Hasegawa, T; Horikawa, N; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kisselev, Yu V; Koivuniemi, J H; Le Goff, J M; Magnon, A; Meyer, W; Reicherz, G; Matsuda, T

    2004-01-01

    Continuous wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to determine the target polarization in the COMPASS experiment. The system is made of the so-called Liverpool Q-meters, Yale-cards, and VME modules for data taking and system controlling. In 2001 the NMR coils were embedded in the target material, while in 2002 and 2003 the coils were mounted on the outer surface of the target cells to increase the packing factor of the material. Though the error of the measurement became larger with the outer coils than with the inner coils, we have performed stable measurements throughout the COMPASS run time for 3 years. The maximum polarization was +57% and -53% as the average in the target cells.

  20. A variable partially polarizing beam splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Jefferson; Carlson, Nathan J.; Nacke, Codey H.; Giner, Lambert; Lundeen, Jeff S.

    2018-02-01

    We present designs for variably polarizing beam splitters. These are beam splitters allowing the complete and independent control of the horizontal and vertical polarization splitting ratios. They have quantum optics and quantum information applications, such as quantum logic gates for quantum computing and non-local measurements for quantum state estimation. At the heart of each design is an interferometer. We experimentally demonstrate one particular implementation, a displaced Sagnac interferometer configuration, that provides an inherent instability to air currents and vibrations. Furthermore, this design does not require any custom-made optics but only common components which can be easily found in an optics laboratory.

  1. Magnetoresistance through spin-polarized p states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2003-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the ballistic magnetoresistance in Ni contacts using first-principles, atomistic, electronic structure calculations. In particular we investigate the role of defects in the contact region with the aim of explaining the recently observed spectacular magnetoresistance ratio. Our results predict that the possible presence of spin-polarized oxygen in the contact region could explain conductance changes by an order of magnitude. Electronic transport essentially occurs through spin-polarized oxygen p states, and this mechanism gives a much higher magnetoresistance than that obtained assuming clean atomically sharp domain walls alone

  2. Analysis of Circular Polarization of Cylindrically Bent Microstrip Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiiti Kellomäki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When circularly polarized (CP microstrip antennas are bent, the polarization becomes elliptical. We present a simple model that describes the phenomenon. The two linear modes present in a CP patch are modeled separately and added together to produce CP. Bending distorts the almost-spherical equiphase surface of a linearly polarized patch, which leads to phase imbalance in the far-field of a CP patch. The model predicts both the frequency shifting of the axial ratio band as well as the narrowing of the axial ratio beam. Uncontrolled bending is a problem associated especially with flexible textile antennas, and wearable antennas should therefore be designed somewhat conformal.

  3. Measurement of deuteron beam polarization before and after acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ramazani Moghaddam Arani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Beam polarization measurement in scattering experiments with a high accuracy and the lowest possible cost is an important issue. In this regard, deuteron beam polarization was measured in the low-energy beam line easily with a relatively low cost procedure and in a very short time by Lamb Shift Polarimeter (LSP. Also, the beam polarization has been measured in high-energy beam line with BINA. In low-energy line, a polarized beam of deuterons delivered by POLIS was decelerated and focused on LSP detection system. Three resonances between 52mT and 63mT show the distribution of different spin states of polarized deuteron beam. In high-energy beam line, polarization can be measured employing BINA via the H(d,dp reaction. The asymmetry ratio, was obtained as a function of azimuthal angle, φ, for several polar scattering angles. Knowing values of the analyzing powers, the ratio has been used to extract the polarization results. The obtained results show that polarization of deuteron beam that is accelerated up to the energy of 130 MeV is almost the same before and after acceleration

  4. Ratio of νe/νμ in atmospheric neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, S.; Gaisser, T.K.; Tilav, S.

    1988-01-01

    When the effect of muon polarization is included, the calculated ratio ν e /ν μ for atmospheric neutrinos with energies above ≅ 200 MeV is increased by 10-20% compared to the result when polarization is neglected. We give an analytic derivation of this ratio for the artificial case of a power law differential spectrum of parent pions propagating in an atmosphere in which all pions and muons decay. This is sufficient to estimate the effect on the calculated ratio of electron-like to muon-like events induced by neutrino interactions in large underground detectors. (orig.)

  5. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  6. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function......%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has been implemented in a 1D...

  7. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  8. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Horimoto, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Sukegawa, Kouta; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasma can be anisotropic in laser-produced plasmas. We have developed a new technique to evaluate the polarization degree of the emission lines in the extreme vacuum ultra violet wavelength region. The polarization of the emission lines and the continuums from the lithium-like nitrogen and from helium- and hydrogen-like carbon in recombining plasma is evaluated. Particle simulation in the velocity space gives the time scale for relaxation of anisotropic EVDFs. (author)

  9. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  10. Hsp Polarization Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, Robert

    1991-07-01

    This proposal defines the procedure for determining the instrumental polarization of the polarimetric IDT (IDT#1, POL) on the HSP. 1 of 2 unpolarized standard stars wil be observed using various filter-polarizer combinations. These observations will permit the instrumental polarization to be calibrated. The instrumental polarization must be determined to a high precision in order to vectoriallly remove it from HSP polarization observations to determine the actual astronomical polarization. Final run of proposal will look at one of 2 possible stars previously observed to get another look at the throughput. Revision History: Mark H. Slovak 8/30/88 Translated to V2 proposal instructions (RPSS V6.2) S. Laurent 1/20/89 Updated: Sally Laurent 2/24/89, 3/20/89, 4/13/89, 5/12/89 Modified: P. Stanley 1/15/90 - change to use CTA selected targets only; Fixes for aberration problem - SALM 7/30/90; Based on SV/HSP 1386. New submission changed targets and revised scheduling strategy. Revised: 26 Aug 92 J. Dolan, L. Walter, P. Reppert want to re-run the proposal (3985) one last time to bring down errors.

  11. Super-resolution longitudinally polarized light needle achieved by tightly focusing radially polarized beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chang-kun; Nie, Zhong-quan; Tian, Yan-ting; Liu, Chao; Zhao, Yong-chuang; Jia, Bao-hua

    2018-01-01

    Based on the vector diffraction theory, a super-resolution longitudinally polarized optical needle with ultra-long depth of focus ( DOF) is generated by tightly focusing a radially polarized beam that is modulated by a self-designed ternary hybrid (phase/amplitude) filter (THF). Both the phase and the amplitude patterns of THF are judiciously optimized by the versatile particle swarm optimization (PSO) searching algorithm. For the focusing configuration with a combination of a high numerical aperture ( NA) and the optimized sine-shaped THFs, an optical needle with the full width at half maximum ( FWHM) of 0.414λ and the DOF of 7.58λ is accessed, which corresponds to an aspect ratio of 18.3. The demonstrated longitudinally polarized super-resolution light needle with high aspect ratio opens up broad applications in high-density optical data storage, nano-photolithography, super-resolution imaging and high-efficiency particle trapping.

  12. Molecular hydrogen polarization images of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Michael G.; Minchin, N. R.; Hough, J. H.; Aspin, C.; Axon, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    An image of the polarization of the shocked H2 v = 1-0 S(1) line emission in the core of OMC-1 has been obtained. Along the molecular outflow of the source, the line is dichroically polarized by a medium of aligned grains located between the earth and the shock fronts. The polarization pattern traces the magnetic field direction, which is parallel to the outflow axis and to the large-scale field direction determined from far-IR continuum measurements. Close to the IR source IRc2, the likely source of the outflow, the aligned vectors twist, indicating that the magnetic field direction changes. Modeling the line ratios of scattered H2 lines in the reflection nebula, it is concluded that the size distribution of grains there is typical of the small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. By contrast, the scattered continuum radiation from the core region suggests that the grains there are larger than this.

  13. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  14. A tale of two cities: The role of neighborhood socioeconomic status in spatial clustering of bystander CPR in Austin and Houston☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Elisabeth Dowling; Gonzales, Louis; Persse, David E.; Hinchey, Paul R.; McNally, Bryan; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite evidence to suggest significant spatial variation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR) rates, geographic information systems (GIS) and spatial analysis have not been widely used to understand the reasons behind this variation. This study employs spatial statistics to identify the location and extent of clusters of bystander CPR in Houston and Travis County, TX. Methods Data were extracted from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival for two U.S. sites –Austin-Travis County EMS and the Houston Fire Department – between October 1, 2006 and December 31, 2009. Hierarchical logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship between income and racial/ethnic composition of a neighborhood and BCPR for OHCA and to adjust expected counts of BCPR for spatial cluster analysis. The spatial scan statistic was used to find the geographic extent of clusters of high and low BCPR. Results Results indicate spatial clusters of lower than expected BCPR rates in Houston. Compared to BCPR rates in the rest of the community, there was a circular area of 4.2 km radius where BCPR rates were lower than expected (RR = 0.62; p < 0.0001 and RR = 0.55; p = 0.037) which persist when adjusted for individual-level patient characteristics (RR = 0.34; p = 0.027) and neighborhood-level race (RR = 0.34; p = 0.034) and household income (RR = 0.34; p = 0.046). We also find a spatial cluster of higher than expected BCPR in Austin. Compared to the rest of the community, there was a 23.8 km radius area where BCPR rates were higher than expected (RR = 1.75; p = 0.07) which disappears after controlling for individual-level characteristics. Conclusions A geographically targeted CPR training strategy which is tailored to individual and neighborhood population characteristics may be effective in reducing existing disparities in the provision of bystander CPR for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:23318916

  15. The evolution of tensor polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Lee, S.Y.; Ratner, L.

    1993-01-01

    By using the equation of motion for the vector polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization is derived. The evolution equation for the tensor polarization is studied in the presence of an isolate spin resonance and in the presence of a spin rotor, or snake

  16. Polarized Electrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1997-12-31

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously.initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented.

  17. Polarized electrons at Jefferson laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously. Initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented

  18. Polar low monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobylev, Leonid; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta; Mitnik, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale atmospheric low pressure weather systems, developing poleward of the main baroclinic zone and associated with high surface wind speeds. Small size and short lifetime, sparse in-situ observations in the regions of their development complicate polar low study. Our knowledge of polar lows and mesocyclones has come almost entirely during the period of satellite remote sensing since, by virtue of their small horizontal scale, it was rarely possible to analyse these lows on conventional weather charts using only the data from the synoptic observing network. However, the effects of intense polar lows have been felt by coastal communities and seafarers since the earliest times. These weather systems are thought to be responsible for the loss of many small vessels over the centuries, although the nature of the storms was not understood and their arrival could not be predicted. The actuality of the polar low research is stipulated by their high destructive power: they are a threat to such businesses as oil and gas exploration, fisheries and shipping. They could worsen because of global warming: a shrinking of sea ice around the North Pole, which thawed to its record minimum in the summer of 2007, is likely to give rise to more powerful storms that form only over open water and can cause hurricane-strength winds. Therefore, study of polar lows, their timely detection, tracking and forecasting represents a challenge for today meteorology. Satellite passive microwave data, starting from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite, remain invaluable source of regularly available remotely sensed data to study polar lows. The sounding in this spectral range has several advantages in comparison with observations in visible and infrared ranges and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data: independence on day time and clouds, regularity and high temporal resolution in Polar Regions. Satellite

  19. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  20. The Bochum Polarized Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reicherz, G.; Goertz, S.; Harmsen, J.; Heckmann, J.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Bochum 'Polarized Target' group develops the target material 6 LiD for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. Several different materials like alcohols, alcanes and ammonia are under investigation. Solid State Targets are polarized in magnetic fields higher than B=2.5T and at temperatures below T=1K. For the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization process, paramagnetic centers are induced chemically or by irradiation with ionizing beams. The radical density is a critical factor for optimization of polarization and relaxation times at adequate magnetic fields and temperatures. In a high sensitive EPR--apparatus, an evaporator and a dilution cryostat with a continuous wave NMR--system, the materials are investigated and optimized. To improve the polarization measurement, the Liverpool NMR-box is modified by exchanging the fixed capacitor for a varicap diode which not only makes the tuning very easy but also provides a continuously tuned circuit. The dependence of the signal area upon the circuit current is measured and it is shown that it follows a linear function

  1. In-line Fiber Polarizer

    OpenAIRE

    Perumalsamy, Priya

    1998-01-01

    Polarizers and polarization devices are important components in fiber optic communication and sensor systems. There is a growing need for efficient low loss components that are compatible with optical fibers. An all fiber in-line polarizer is a more desirable alternative that could be placed at appropriate intervals along communication links. An in-line fiber polarizer was fabricated and tested. The in-line fiber polarizer operates by coupling optical energy propagatin...

  2. Political Competition and Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    This paper considers political competition and the consequences of political polarization when parties are better informed about how the economy functions than voters are. Specifically, parties know the cost producing a public good, voters do not. An incumbent's choice of policy acts like a signa...... for costs before an upcoming election. It is shown that the more polarized the political parties the more distorted the incumbent's policy choice.......This paper considers political competition and the consequences of political polarization when parties are better informed about how the economy functions than voters are. Specifically, parties know the cost producing a public good, voters do not. An incumbent's choice of policy acts like a signal...

  3. Physics of polarized targets

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    For developing, building and operating solid polarized targets we need to understand several fields of physics that have seen sub stantial advances during the last 50 years. W e shall briefly review a selection of those that are important today. These are: 1) quantum statistical methods to describe saturation and relaxation in magnetic resonance; 2) equal spin temperature model for dy namic nuclear polarization; 3 ) weak saturation during NMR polarization measurement; 4 ) refrigeration using the quantum fluid properties of helium isotopes. These, combined with superconducting magnet technologies, permit today to reach nearly complete pola rization of almost any nuclear spins. Targets can be operated in frozen spin mode in rather low and inhomogeneous field of any orientation, and in DNP mode in beams of high intensity. Beyond such experiments of nuclear and particle physics, applications a re also emerging in macromolecular chemistry and in magnetic resonance imaging. This talk is a tribute to Michel Borghini...

  4. No More Polarization, Please!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mia Reinholt

    The organizational science literature on motivation has for long been polarized into two main positions; the organizational economic position focusing on extrinsic motivation and the organizational behavior position emphasizing intrinsic motivation. With the rise of the knowledge economy...... and the increasing levels of complexities it entails, such polarization is not fruitful in the attempt to explain motivation of organizational members. This paper claims that a more nuanced perspective on motivation, acknowledging the co-existence of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, the possible interaction...... between the two as well as different types of motivations filling in the gap between the two polar types, is urgently needed in the organizational science literature. By drawing on the research on intrinsic and extrinsic motivation conducted in social psychology and combining this with contributions from...

  5. Polarized source upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, T.B.; Rummel, R.L.; Carter, E.P.; Westerfeldt, C.R.; Lovette, A.W.; Edwards, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    The decision was made this past year to move the Lamb-shift polarized ion source which was first installed in the laboratory in 1970. The motivation was the need to improve the flexibility of spin-axis orientation by installing the ion source with a new Wien-filter spin precessor which is capable of rotating physically about the beam axis. The move of the polarized source was accomplished in approximately two months, with the accelerator being turned off for experiments during approximately four weeks of this time. The occasion of the move provided the opportunity to rewire completely the entire polarized ion source frame and to rebuild approximately half of the electronic chassis on the source. The result is an ion source which is now logically wired and carefully documented. Beams obtained from the source are much more stable than those previously available

  6. A lunar polar expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Tomas

    1992-09-01

    Advanced exploration and development in harsh environments require mastery of basic human survival skill. Expeditions into the lethal climates of Earth's polar regions offer useful lessons for tommorrow's lunar pioneers. In Arctic and Antarctic exploration, 'wintering over' was a crucial milestone. The ability to establish a supply base and survive months of polar cold and darkness made extensive travel and exploration possible. Because of the possibility of near-constant solar illumination, the lunar polar regions, unlike Earth's may offer the most hospitable site for habitation. The World Space Foundation is examining a scenario for establishing a five-person expeditionary team on the lunar north pole for one year. This paper is a status report on a point design addressing site selection, transportation, power, and life support requirements.

  7. The design of instructional tools affects secondary school students' learning of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in reciprocal peer learning: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserbyt, Peter; Byra, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Research investigating design effects of instructional tools for learning Basic Life Support (BLS) is almost non-existent. To demonstrate the design of instructional tools matter. The effect of spatial contiguity, a design principle stating that people learn more deeply when words and corresponding pictures are placed close (i.e., integrated) rather than far from each other on a page was investigated on task cards for learning Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) during reciprocal peer learning. A randomized controlled trial. A total of 111 students (mean age: 13 years) constituting six intact classes learned BLS through reciprocal learning with task cards. Task cards combine a picture of the skill with written instructions about how to perform it. In each class, students were randomly assigned to the experimental group or the control. In the control, written instructions were placed under the picture on the task cards. In the experimental group, written instructions were placed close to the corresponding part of the picture on the task cards reflecting application of the spatial contiguity principle. One-way analysis of variance found significantly better performances in the experimental group for ventilation volumes (P=.03, ηp2=.10) and flow rates (P=.02, ηp2=.10). For chest compression depth, compression frequency, compressions with correct hand placement, and duty cycles no significant differences were found. This study shows that the design of instructional tools (i.e., task cards) affects student learning. Research-based design of learning tools can enhance BLS and CPR education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dark Polar Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  9. Imaging with Polarized Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their zero charge, neutrons are able to pass through thick layers of matter (typically several centimeters while being sensitive to magnetic fields due to their intrinsic magnetic moment. Therefore, in addition to the conventional attenuation contrast image, the magnetic field inside and around a sample can be visualized by detecting changes of polarization in a transmitted beam. The method is based on the spatially resolved measurement of the cumulative precession angles of a collimated, polarized, monochromatic neutron beam that traverses a magnetic field or sample.

  10. The polar mesosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Ray; Murphy, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The mesosphere region, which lies at the edge of space, contains the coldest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, with summer temperatures as low as minus 130 °C. In this extreme environment ice aerosol layers have appeared since the dawn of industrialization—whose existence may arguably be linked to human influence—on yet another layer of the Earth's fragile atmosphere. Ground-based and space-based experiments conducted in the Arctic and Antarctic during the International Polar Year (IPY) aim to address limitations in our knowledge and to advance our understanding of thermal and dynamical processes at play in the polar mesosphere

  11. Internal polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, E.R.; Coulter, K.; Gilman, R.; Holt, R.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Napolitano, J.; Potterveld, D.H.; Young, L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Mishnev, S.I.; Nikolenko, D.M.; Popov, S.G.; Rachek, I.A.; Temnykh, A.B.; Toporkov, D.K.; Tsentalovich, E.P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B. (AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (USSR). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1989-01-01

    Internal polarized targets offer a number of advantages over external targets. After a brief review of the basic motivation and principles behind internal polarized targets, the technical aspects of the atomic storage cell will be discussed in particular. Sources of depolarization and the means by which their effects can be ameliorated will be described, especially depolarization by the intense magnetic fields arising from the circulating particle beam. The experience of the Argonne Novosibirsk collaboration with the use of a storage cell in a 2 GeV electron storage ring will be the focus of this technical discussion. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  12. AGS polarized H- source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kponou, A.; Alessi, J.G.; Sluyters, T.

    1985-01-01

    The AGS polarized H - source is now operational. During a month-long experimental physics run in July 1984, pulses equivalent to 15 μA x 300 μs (approx. 3 x 10 10 protons) were injected into the RFQ preaccelerator. Beam polarization, measured at 200 MeV, was approx. 75%. After the run, a program to increase the H - yield of the source was begun and significant progress has been made. The H - current is now frequently 20 to 30 μA. A description of the source and some details of our operating experience are given. We also briefly describe the improvement program

  13. The physics of polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    This course is intended to give a description of the basic physical concepts which underlie the study and the interpretation of polarization phenomena. Apart from a brief historical introduction (Sect. 1), the course is organized in three parts. A first part (Sects. 2 - 6) covers the most relevant facts about the polarization phenomena that are typically encountered in laboratory applications and in everyday life. In Sect. 2, the modern description of polarization in terms of the Stokes parameters is recalled, whereas Sect. 3 is devoted to introduce the basic tools of laboratory polarimetry, such as the Jones calculus and the Mueller matrices. The polarization phenomena which are met in the reflection and refraction of a beam of radiation at the separation surface between two dielectrics, or between a dielectric and a metal, are recalled in Sect. 4. Finally, Sect. 5 gives an introduction to the phenomena of dichroism and of anomalous dispersion and Sect. 6 summarizes the polarization phenomena that are commonly encountered in everyday life. The second part of this course (Sects. 7-14) deals with the description, within the formalism of classical physics, of the spectro-polarimetric properties of the radiation emitted by accelerated charges. Such properties are derived by taking as starting point the Liénard and Wiechert equations that are recalled and discussed in Sect. 7 both in the general case and in the non-relativistic approximation. The results are developed to find the percentage polarization, the radiation diagram, the cross-section and the spectral characteristics of the radiation emitted in different phenomena particularly relevant from the astrophysical point of view. The emission of a linear antenna is derived in Sect. 8. The other Sections are devoted to Thomson scattering (Sect. 9), Rayleigh scattering (Sect. 10), Mie scattering (Sect. 11), bremsstrahlung radiation (Sect. 12), cyclotron radiation (Sect. 13), and synchrotron radiation (Sect. 14

  14. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  15. Difference and ratio plots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Holmskov, U; Bro, Peter

    1995-01-01

    hitherto unnoted differences between controls and patients with either rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. For this we use simple, but unconventional, graphic representations of the data, based on difference plots and ratio plots. Differences between patients with Burkitt's lymphoma...... and systemic lupus erythematosus from another previously published study (Macanovic, M. and Lachmann, P.J. (1979) Clin. Exp. Immunol. 38, 274) are also represented using ratio plots. Our observations indicate that analysis by regression analysis may often be misleading....

  16. Lobbying and political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Ursprung, Heinrich W.

    2002-01-01

    Standard spatial models of political competition give rise to equilibria in which the competing political parties or candidates converge to a common position. In this paper I show how political polarization can be generated in models that focus on the nexus between pre-election interest group lobbying and electoral competition.

  17. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  18. Polarization of Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.

    1957-01-01

    The numerical results for the polarization of Bremsstrahlung are presented. The multiple scattering of electrons in the target is taken into account. The angular-and photon energy dependences are seen on the curves for an incident 25 MeV electron energy. (Author) [fr

  19. DESY: HERA polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The new HERA electron-proton collider at DESY in Hamburg achieved the first luminosity for electron-proton collisions on 19 October last year. Only one month later, on 20 November, HERA passed another important milestone with the observation of transverse electron polarization

  20. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  1. Graphics of polar figure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this work, is that starting from a data file coming from a spectra that has been softened, and of the one that have been generated its coordinates to project it in stereographic form, to create the corresponding polar figure making use of the Cyber computer of the ININ by means of the GRAPHOS package. This work only requires a Beta, Fi and Intensity (I) enter data file. It starts of the existence of a softened spectra of which have been generated already with these data, making use of some language that in this case was FORTRAN for the Cyber computer, a program is generated supported in the Graphos package that allows starting of a reading of the Beta, Fi, I file, to generate the points in a stereographic projection and that it culminates with the graph of the corresponding polar figure. The program will request the pertinent information that is wanted to capture in the polar figure just as: date, name of the enter file, indexes of the polar figure, number of levels, radio of the stereographic projection (cms.), crystalline system to which belongs the sample, name the neuter graph file by create and to add the own general data. (Author)

  2. Detailed analysis of evolution of the state of polarization in all-fiber polarization transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiushan; Jain, Ravinder K

    2006-10-30

    We present a detailed analysis of key attributes and performance characteristics of controllably-spun birefringent-fiber-based all-fiber waveplates or "all fiber polarization transformers" (AFPTs), first proposed and demonstrated by Huang [11]; these AFPTs consist essentially of a long carefully-designed "spin-twisted" high-birefringence fiber, fabricated by slowly varying the spin rate of a birefringent fiber preform (either from very fast to very slow or vice versa) while the fiber is being drawn. The evolution of the eigenstate from a linear polarization state to a circular polarization state, induced by slow variation of the intrinsic structure from linear anisotropy at the unspun end to circular anisotropy at the fast-spun end, enables the AFPT to behave like an all-fiber quarter-wave plate independent of the wavelength of operation. Power coupling between local eigenstates causes unique evolution of the polarization state along the fiber, and has been studied to gain insight into - as well as to understand detailed characteristics of -- the polarization transformation behavior. This has been graphically illustrated via plots of the relative power in these local eigenstates as a function of distance along the length of the fiber and plots of the extinction ratio of the output state of polarization (SOP) as a function of distance and the normalized spin rate. Deeper understanding of such polarization transformers has been further elucidated by quantitative calculations related to two crucial requirements for fabricating practical AFPT devices. Our calculations have also indicated that the polarization mode dispersion behaviour of the AFPT is much smaller than that of the original birefringent fiber. Finally, a specific AFPT was experimentally investigated at two widely-separated wavelengths (1310 nm and 1550 nm) of interest in telecommunications systems applications, further demonstrating and elucidating the broadband character of such AFPTs.

  3. The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazear, Justin Scott; Ade, Peter A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Bennett, Charles L.; Chuss, David T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Eimer, Joseph R.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Halpern, Mark; Hinderks, James; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization ExploreR (Piper) is a balloon-borne cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeter designed to search for evidence of inflation by measuring the large-angular scale CMB polarization signal. Bicep2 recently reported a detection of B-mode power corresponding to the tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.2 on approximately 2 degree scales. If the Bicep2 signal is caused by inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs), then there should be a corresponding increase in B-mode power on angular scales larger than 18 degrees. Piper is currently the only suborbital instrument capable of fully testing and extending the Bicep2 results by measuring the B-mode power spectrum on angular scales theta ? = approximately 0.6 deg to 90 deg, covering both the reionization bump and recombination peak, with sensitivity to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio down to r = 0.007, and four frequency bands to distinguish foregrounds. Piper will accomplish this by mapping 85% of the sky in four frequency bands (200, 270, 350, 600 GHz) over a series of 8 conventional balloon flights from the northern and southern hemispheres. The instrument has background-limited sensitivity provided by fully cryogenic (1.5 K) optics focusing the sky signal onto four 32×40-pixel arrays of time-domain multiplexed Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers held at 140 milli-Kelvin. Polarization sensitivity and systematic control are provided by front-end Variabledelay Polarization Modulators (VPMs), which rapidly modulate only the polarized sky signal at 3 Hz and allow Piper to instantaneously measure the full Stokes vector (I,Q,U,0V) for each pointing. We describe the Piper instrument and progress towards its first flight.

  4. Characteristics of volume polarization holography with linear polarization light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Jinliang; Wu, An'an; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jue; Lin, Xiao; Tan, Xiaodi; Shimura, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Volume polarization holographic recording in phenanthrenequinone-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PQ-PMMA) photopolymer with linear polarized light is obtained. The characteristics of the volume polarization hologram are experimentally investigated. It is found that beyond the paraxial approximation the polarization states of the holographic reconstruction light are generally different from the signal light. Based on vector wave theoretical analyses and material properties, the special exposure condition for correctly holographic reconstruction is obtained and experimentally demonstrated.

  5. Polarization-Insensitive Surface Plasmon Polarization Electro-Absorption Modulator Based on Epsilon-Near-Zero Indium Tin Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lin; Wen, Long; Liang, Li; Chen, Qin; Sun, Yunfei

    2018-02-03

    CMOS-compatible plasmonic modulators operating at the telecom wavelength are significant for a variety of on-chip applications. Relying on the manipulation of the transverse magnetic (TM) mode excited on the metal-dielectric interface, most of the previous demonstrations are designed to response only for specific polarization state. In this case, it will lead to a high polarization dependent loss, when the polarization-sensitive modulator integrates to a fiber with random polarization state. Herein, we propose a plasmonic modulator utilizing a metal-oxide indium tin oxide (ITO) wrapped around the silicon waveguide and investigate its optical modulation ability for both the vertical and horizontal polarized guiding light by tuning electro-absorption of ITO with the field-induced carrier injection. The electrically biased modulator with electron accumulated at the ITO/oxide interface allows for epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) mode to be excited at the top or lateral portion of the interface depending on the polarization state of the guiding light. Because of the high localized feature of ENZ mode, efficient electro-absorption can be achieved under the "OFF" state of the device, thus leading to large extinction ratio (ER) for both polarizations in our proposed modulator. Further, the polarization-insensitive modulation is realized by properly tailoring the thickness of oxide in two different stacking directions and therefore matching the ER values for device operating at vertical and horizontal polarized modes. For the optimized geometry configuration, the difference between the ER values of two polarization modes, i.e., the ΔER, as small as 0.01 dB/μm is demonstrated and, simultaneously with coupling efficiency above 74%, is obtained for both polarizations at a wavelength of 1.55 μm. The proposed plasmonic-combined modulator has a potential application in guiding and processing of light from a fiber with a random polarization state.

  6. Polarization-Insensitive Surface Plasmon Polarization Electro-Absorption Modulator Based on Epsilon-Near-Zero Indium Tin Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lin; Wen, Long; Liang, Li; Chen, Qin; Sun, Yunfei

    2018-02-01

    CMOS-compatible plasmonic modulators operating at the telecom wavelength are significant for a variety of on-chip applications. Relying on the manipulation of the transverse magnetic (TM) mode excited on the metal-dielectric interface, most of the previous demonstrations are designed to response only for specific polarization state. In this case, it will lead to a high polarization dependent loss, when the polarization-sensitive modulator integrates to a fiber with random polarization state. Herein, we propose a plasmonic modulator utilizing a metal-oxide indium tin oxide (ITO) wrapped around the silicon waveguide and investigate its optical modulation ability for both the vertical and horizontal polarized guiding light by tuning electro-absorption of ITO with the field-induced carrier injection. The electrically biased modulator with electron accumulated at the ITO/oxide interface allows for epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) mode to be excited at the top or lateral portion of the interface depending on the polarization state of the guiding light. Because of the high localized feature of ENZ mode, efficient electro-absorption can be achieved under the "OFF" state of the device, thus leading to large extinction ratio (ER) for both polarizations in our proposed modulator. Further, the polarization-insensitive modulation is realized by properly tailoring the thickness of oxide in two different stacking directions and therefore matching the ER values for device operating at vertical and horizontal polarized modes. For the optimized geometry configuration, the difference between the ER values of two polarization modes, i.e., the ΔER, as small as 0.01 dB/μm is demonstrated and, simultaneously with coupling efficiency above 74%, is obtained for both polarizations at a wavelength of 1.55 μm. The proposed plasmonic-combined modulator has a potential application in guiding and processing of light from a fiber with a random polarization state.

  7. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and polarized antiproton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the π degree production at high p perpendicular and in the Λ (Σ degree), π ± , π degree production at large x F , and Δσ L (pp, bar pp) measurements. 18 refs

  8. NUCLEON POLARIZATION IN 3-BODY MODELS OF POLARIZED LI-6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHELLINGERHOUT, NW; KOK, LP; COON, SA; ADAM, RM

    1993-01-01

    Just as He-3 --> can be approximately characterized as a polarized neutron target, polarized Li-6D has been advocated as a good isoscalar nuclear target for the extraction of the polarized gluon content of the nucleon. The original argument rests upon a presumed ''alpha + deuteron'' picture of Li-6,

  9. Geomagnetic polarity transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ronald T.; McFadden, Phillip L.

    1999-05-01

    The top of Earth's liquid outer core is nearly 2900 km beneath Earth's surface, so we will never be able to observe it directly. This hot, dense, molten iron-rich body is continuously in motion and is the source of Earth's magnetic field. One of the most dynamic manifestations at Earth's surface of this fluid body is, perhaps, a reversal of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately, the most recent polarity transition occurred at about 780 ka, so we have never observed a transition directly. It seems that a polarity transition spans many human lifetimes, so no human will ever witness the phenomenon in its entirety. Thus we are left with the tantalizing prospect that paleomagnetic records of polarity transitions may betray some of the secrets of the deep Earth. Certainly, if there are systematics in the reversal process and they can be documented, then this will reveal substantial information about the nature of the lowermost mantle and of the outer core. Despite their slowness on a human timescale, polarity transitions occur almost instantaneously on a geological timescale. This rapidity, together with limitations in the paleomagnetic recording process, prohibits a comprehensive description of any reversal transition both now and into the foreseeable future, which limits the questions that may at this stage be sensibly asked. The natural model for the geomagnetic field is a set of spherical harmonic components, and we are not able to obtain a reliable model for even the first few harmonic terms during a transition. Nevertheless, it is possible, in principle, to make statements about the harmonic character of a geomagnetic polarity transition without having a rigorous spherical harmonic description of one. For example, harmonic descriptions of recent geomagnetic polarity transitions that are purely zonal can be ruled out (a zonal harmonic does not change along a line of latitude). Gleaning information about transitions has proven to be difficult, but it does seem

  10. Inverse design engineering of all-silicon polarization beam splitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Sigmund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the inverse design engineering method of topology optimization, we have realized high-performing all-silicon ultra-compact polarization beam splitters. We show that the device footprint of the polarization beam splitter can be as compact as similar to 2 µm2 while performing experimentally...... with a polarization splitting loss lower than similar to 0.82 dB and an extinction ratio larger than similar to 15 dB in the C-band. We investigate the device performance as a function of the device length and find a lower length above which the performance only increases incrementally. Imposing a minimum feature...

  11. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e+e- collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point

  12. Analytical polarization calculations beyond SLIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison is made between the theories of Bell and Leinaas and of Derbenev and Kondratenko for the spin polarization in electron storage rings. A calculation of polarization in HERA using the program SMILE of Mane is presented

  13. Potential support ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Søren; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    , the prospective potential support ratio usually focuses on the current mortality schedule, or period life expectancy. Instead, in this paper we look at the actual mortality experienced by cohorts in a population, using cohort life tables. We analyse differences between the two perspectives using mortality models......, historical data, and forecasted data. Cohort life expectancy takes future mortality improvements into account, unlike period life expectancy, leading to a higher prospective potential support ratio. Our results indicate that using cohort instead of period life expectancy returns around 0.5 extra younger...

  14. 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    This publication presents the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of the pediatric patient and the 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics/AHA guidelines for CPR and ECC of the neonate. The guidelines are based on the evidence evaluation from the 2005 International Consensus Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations, hosted by the American Heart Association in Dallas, Texas, January 23-30, 2005. The "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" contain recommendations designed to improve survival from sudden cardiac arrest and acute life-threatening cardiopulmonary problems. The evidence evaluation process that was the basis for these guidelines was accomplished in collaboration with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). The ILCOR process is described in more detail in the "International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations." The recommendations in the "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" confirm the safety and effectiveness of many approaches, acknowledge that other approaches may not be optimal, and recommend new treatments that have undergone evidence evaluation. These new recommendations do not imply that care involving the use of earlier guidelines is unsafe. In addition, it is important to note that these guidelines will not apply to all rescuers and all victims in all situations. The leader of a resuscitation attempt may need to adapt application of the guidelines to unique circumstances. The following are the major pediatric advanced life support changes in the 2005 guidelines: There is further caution about the use of endotracheal tubes. Laryngeal mask airways are acceptable when used by experienced

  15. On Determinants of Political Polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Grechyna, Daryna

    2015-01-01

    Political polarization has been shown to significantly influence a country's economic performance. However, little is known about the drivers of political polarization. In this article, we aim to identify the main determinants of political polarization using Bayesian Model Averaging to overcome the problem of model uncertainty. We find that the level of trust within a country and the degree of income inequality are the most robust determinants of political polarization.

  16. Enhanced polarization of (11–22) semi-polar InGaN nanorod array structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athanasiou, M.; Smith, R. M.; Hou, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Gong, Y.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    By means of a cost effective nanosphere lithography technique, an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure grown on (11–22) semipolar GaN has been fabricated into two dimensional nanorod arrays which form a photonic crystal (PhC) structure. Such a PhC structure demonstrates not only significantly increased emission intensity, but also an enhanced polarization ratio of the emission. This is due to an effective inhibition of the emission in slab modes and then redistribution to the vertical direction, thus minimizing the light scattering processes that lead to randomizing of the optical polarization. The PhC structure is designed based on a standard finite-difference-time-domain simulation, and then optically confirmed by detailed time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. The results presented pave the way for the fabrication of semipolar InGaN/GaN based emitters with both high efficiency and highly polarized emission.

  17. Enhanced polarization of (11–22) semi-polar InGaN nanorod array structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athanasiou, M.; Smith, R. M.; Hou, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Gong, Y.; Wang, T.

    2015-01-01

    By means of a cost effective nanosphere lithography technique, an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure grown on (11–22) semipolar GaN has been fabricated into two dimensional nanorod arrays which form a photonic crystal (PhC) structure. Such a PhC structure demonstrates not only significantly increased emission intensity, but also an enhanced polarization ratio of the emission. This is due to an effective inhibition of the emission in slab modes and then redistribution to the vertical direction, thus minimizing the light scattering processes that lead to randomizing of the optical polarization. The PhC structure is designed based on a standard finite-difference-time-domain simulation, and then optically confirmed by detailed time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. The results presented pave the way for the fabrication of semipolar InGaN/GaN based emitters with both high efficiency and highly polarized emission

  18. The rectilinear Steiner ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PO de Wet

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The rectilinear Steiner ratio was shown to be 3/2 by Hwang [Hwang FK, 1976, On Steiner minimal trees with rectilinear distance, SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, 30, pp. 104– 114.]. We use continuity and introduce restricted point sets to obtain an alternative, short and self-contained proof of this result.

  19. The Reference Return Ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Faber Frandsen, Tove

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new journal impact measure called The Reference Return Ratio (3R). Unlike the traditional Journal Impact Factor (JIF), which is based on calculations of publications and citations, the new measure is based on calculations of bibliographic investments (references) and returns...

  20. Geomagnetic excursions reflect an aborted polarity state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Plenier, Guillaume; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2008-10-01

    Geomagnetic excursions represent short episodes of a few thousand years at most during which the field considerably exceeds its normal range of variability during a polarity state. Paleomagnetic records have now been obtained with extremely high temporal resolution which have improved our knowledge of these short events. We have compiled the most detailed records of excursions that had occurred during the Brunhes and Matuyama chrons. We show that virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) of at least one record of each event are able to reach the opposite polarity. In the next step, we have computed different simulations of excursions during which the dipole progressively vanishes before growing back without reversing. This scenario produces very few reversed directions which are only visible at some latitudes. We infer that it is impossible to reach the ratio of reversed to intermediate VGPs present in the paleomagnetic records if the excursions were not associated with a short period of reversed dipole field. Therefore, excursions should be regarded as two successive reversals bracketing an aborted polarity interval. We propose that the same underlying mechanisms prevail in both situations (excursions or reversals) and that below a certain strength the field reaches an unstable position which preludes either the achievement of a reversal or its return to the former polarity.

  1. Polarized electrogowdy spacetimes censored

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nungesser, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.nungesser@aei.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2010-05-01

    A sketch of the proof of strong cosmic censorship is presented for a class of solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations, those with polarized Gowdy symmetry. A key element of the argument is the observation that by means of a suitable choice of variables the central equations in this problem can be written in a form where they are identical to the central equations for general (i.e. non-polarized) vacuum Gowdy spacetimes. Using this it is seen that the results of Ringstroem on strong cosmic censorship in the vacuum case have implications for the Einstein-Maxwell case. Working out the geometrical meaning of these analytical results leads to the main conclusion.

  2. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); et al.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  3. Polarization induced doped transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  4. Polar bears, Ursus maritimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D.; Stirling, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Polar bears are the largest of the eight species of bears found worldwide and are covered in a pigment-free fur giving them the appearance of being white. They are the most carnivorous of bear species consuming a high-fat diet, primarily of ice-associated seals and other marine mammals. They range throughout the circumpolar Arctic to the southernmost extent of seasonal pack ice.

  5. Polarized advanced fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The d- 3 He reaction has the same spin dependence as the d-t reaction. It produces no neutrons, so that if the d-d reactivity could be reduced, it would lead to a neutron-lean reactor. The current understanding of the possible suppression of the d-d reactivity by spin polarization is discussed. The question as to whether a suppression is possible is still unresolved. Other advanced fuel reactions are briefly discussed. 11 refs

  6. On polarization in biomembranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zecchi, Karis Amata

    close to physiological conditions, making these effects biologically relevant. In this work, we consider the case of asymmetric membranes which can display spontaneous polarization in the absence of a field. Close to the phase transition, we find that the membrane displays piezoelectric, flexoelectric...... on different geometries point in the direction of a flexoelectric mechanism behind current rectification in lipid bilayers. Finally, we suggest that our updated equivalent circuit should be included in the interpretation of elctrophysiological data....

  7. Multifrequency Behaviour of Polars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Reinsch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataclysmic variables emit over a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper I will review observations of polars in relevant passbands obtained during the last decade and will discuss their diagnostical potential to access the physics of the main components within the binary systems. This will include a discussion of intrinsic source variability and the quest for simultaneous multi-frequency observations.

  8. Polar Business Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Caisse

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polar business design aims to enable entrepreneurs, managers, consultants, researchers, and business students to better tackle model-based analysis, creation, and transformation of businesses, ventures, and, more generically, collective endeavors of any size and purpose. It is based on a systems-thinking approach that builds on a few interrelated core concepts to create holistic visual frameworks. These core concepts act as poles linked by meaningful dyads, flows, and faces arranged in geometric shapes. The article presents two such polar frameworks as key findings in an ongoing analytic autoethnography: the three-pole Value−Activity−Stakeholder (VAS triquetra and the four-pole Offer−Creation−Character−Stakeholder (OCCS tetrahedron. The VAS triquetra is a more aggregated model of collective endeavors. The OCCS tetrahedron makes a trade-off between a steeper learning curve and deeper, richer representation potential. This article discusses how to use these two frameworks as well as their limits, and explores the potential that polar business design offers for future research.

  9. Polarization-Directed Surface Plasmon Polariton Launching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2017-01-05

    The relative intensities of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) simultaneously launched from opposing edges of a symmetric trench structure etched into a silver thin film may be controllably varied by tuning the linear polarization of the driving field. This is demonstrated through transient multiphoton photoemission electron microscopy measurements performed using a pair of spatially separated phase-locked femtosecond pulses. Our measurements are rationalized using finite-difference time domain simulations, which reveal that the coupling efficiency into the PSP modes is inversely proportional to the magnitude of the localized surface plasmon fields excited at the trench edges. Additional experiments on single step edges also show asymmetric PSP launching with respect to polarization, analogous to the trench results. Our combined experimental and computational results allude to the interplay between localized and propagating surface plasmon modes in the trench; strong coupling to the localized modes at the edges correlates to weak coupling to the PSP modes. Simultaneous excitation of the electric fields localized at both edges of the trench results in complex interactions between the right- and left-side PSP modes with Fabry-Perot and cylindrical modes. This results in a trench width-dependent PSP intensity ratio using otherwise identical driving fields. A systematic exploration of polarization directed PSP launching from a series of trench structures reveals an optimal PSP contrast ratio of 4.2 using a 500 nm-wide trench.

  10. A New Kind of Circular Polarization Leaky-Wave Antenna Based on Substrate Integrated Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new kind of circular polarization leaky-wave antenna with N-shaped slots cut in the upper side of substrate integrated waveguide (SIW is investigated and presented. The radiation pattern and polarization axial ratio of the leaky-wave antenna are studied. The results show that the width of N-shaped slots has significant effect on the circular polarization property of the antenna. By properly choosing structural parameters, the SIW based leaky-wave antenna can realize circular polarization with excellent axial ratio in 8 GHz satellite band.

  11. The E2/M1 ratio in {Delta} photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoblit, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.]|[Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Blanpied, G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Physics; Blecher, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Physics Dept.] [and others; LEGS Collaboration

    1997-10-01

    New high-precision measurements of p({rvec {gamma}}, {pi}) and p({rvec {gamma}}, {gamma}) cross sections and beam asymmetries have been combined with other polarization ratios in a simultaneous analysis of both reactions. The E2/M1 mixing ratio for the n {r_arrow} {Delta} transition extracted from this analysis is EMR = {minus}3.0% {+-} 0.3 (stat+sys) {+-} 0.2 (model).

  12. Polar representation of centrifugal pump homologous curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo Antonio; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de

    2008-01-01

    Essential for any mathematical model designed to simulate flow transient events caused by pump operations is the pump performance data. The performance of a centrifugal pump is characterized by four basic parameters: the rotational speed, the volumetric flow rate, the dynamic head, and the hydraulic torque. Any one of these quantities can be expressed as a function of any two others. The curves showing the relationships between these four variables are called the pump characteristic curves, also referred to as four-quadrant curves. The characteristic curves are empirically developed by the pump manufacturer and uniquely describe head and torque as functions of volumetric flow rate and rotation speed. Because of comprising a large amount of points, the four-quadrant configuration is not suitable for computational purposes. However, it can be converted to a simpler form by the development of the homologous curves, in which dynamic head and hydraulic torque ratios are expressed as functions of volumetric flow and rotation speed ratios. The numerical use of the complete set of homologous curves requires specification of sixteen partial curves, being eight for the dynamic head and eight for the hydraulic torque. As a consequence, the handling of homologous curves is still somewhat complicated. In solving flow transient problems that require the pump characteristic data for all the operation zones, the polar form appears as the simplest way to represent the homologous curves. In the polar method, the complete characteristics of a pump can be described by only two closed curves, one for the dynamic head and other for the hydraulic torque, both in function of a single angular coordinate defined adequately in terms of the quotient between volumetric flow ratio and rotation speed ratio. The usefulness and advantages of this alternative method are demonstrated through a practical example in which the homologous curves for a pump of the type used in the main coolant loops of a

  13. Controlling the branching ratio of photodissociation using aligned molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J.J.; Wendt-Larsen, I.; Stapelfeldt, H.

    1999-01-01

    Using a sample of iodine molecules, aligned by a strong, linearly polarized laser pulse, we control the branching ratio of the I+I and I+I* photodissociation channels by a factor of 26. The control relies on selective photoexcitation of two potential curves that each correlate adiabatically...

  14. Robust reflective ghost imaging against different partially polarized thermal light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Guo; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rui-Xue; Zhang, De-Jian; Liu, Hong-Chao; Li, Zong-Guo; Xiong, Jun

    2018-03-01

    We theoretically study the influence of degree of polarization (DOP) of thermal light on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the reflective ghost imaging (RGI), which is a novel and indirect imaging modality. An expression for the CNR of RGI with partially polarized thermal light is carefully derived, which suggests a weak dependence of CNR on the DOP, especially when the ratio of the object size to the speckle size of thermal light has a large value. Different from conventional imaging approaches, our work reveals that RGI is much more robust against the DOP of the light source, which thereby has advantages in practical applications, such as remote sensing.

  15. Adiabatic/diabatic polarization beam splitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRose, Christopher; Cai, Hong

    2017-09-12

    The various presented herein relate to an on-chip polarization beam splitter (PBS), which is adiabatic for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode and diabatic for the transverse electric (TE) mode. The PBS comprises a through waveguide and a cross waveguide, wherein an electromagnetic beam comprising TE mode and TM mode components is applied to an input port of the through waveguide. The PBS can be utilized to separate the TE mode component from the TM mode component, wherein the TE mode component exits the PBS via an output port of the through waveguide, and the TM mode component exits the PBS via an output port of the cross waveguide. The PBS has a structure that is tolerant to manufacturing variations and exhibits high polarization extinction ratios over a wide bandwidth.

  16. Circularly polarized antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Steven; Zhu, Fuguo

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive insight into the design techniques for different types of CP antenna elements and arrays In this book, the authors address a broad range of topics on circularly polarized (CP) antennas. Firstly, it introduces to the reader basic principles, design techniques and characteristics of various types of CP antennas, such as CP patch antennas, CP helix antennas, quadrifilar helix antennas (QHA), printed quadrifilar helix antennas (PQHA), spiral antenna, CP slot antennas, CP dielectric resonator antennas, loop antennas, crossed dipoles, monopoles and CP horns. Adva

  17. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamae, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy (PPS) is now becoming a standard diagnostic technique for working with laboratory plasmas. This new area needs a comprehensive framework, both experimental and theoretical. This book reviews the historical development of PPS, develops a general theoretical formulation to deal with this phenomenon, along with an overview of relevant cross sections, and reports on laboratory experiments so far performed. It also includes various facets that are interesting from this standpoint, e.g. X-ray lasers and effects of microwave irradiation. It also offers a timely discussion of instrumentation that is quite important in a practical PPS experiment.

  18. Directional gear ratio transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafever, A. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Epicyclic gear transmissions which transmit output at a gear ratio dependent only upon the input's direction are considered. A transmission housing envelops two epicyclic gear assemblies, and has shafts extending from it. One shaft is attached to a sun gear within the first epicyclic gear assembly. Planet gears are held symmetrically about the sun gear by a planet gear carrier and are in mesh with both the sun gear and a ring gear. Two unidirectional clutches restrict rotation of the first planet gear carrier and ring gear to one direction. A connecting shaft drives a second sun gear at the same speed and direction as the first planet gear carrier while a connecting portion drives a second planet gear carrier at the same speed and direction as the first ring gear. The transmission's output is then transmitted by the second ring gear to the second shaft. Input is transmitted at a higher gear ratio and lower speed for all inputs in the first direction than in the opposite direction.

  19. Tau hadronic branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    From 64492 selected \\tau-pair events, produced at the Z^0 resonance, the measurement of the tau decays into hadrons from a global analysis using 1991, 1992 and 1993 ALEPH data is presented. Special emphasis is given to the reconstruction of photons and \\pi^0's, and the removal of fake photons. A detailed study of the systematics entering the \\pi^0 reconstruction is also given. A complete and consistent set of tau hadronic branching ratios is presented for 18 exclusive modes. Most measurements are more precise than the present world average. The new level of precision reached allows a stringent test of \\tau-\\mu universality in hadronic decays, g_\\tau/g_\\mu \\ = \\ 1.0013 \\ \\pm \\ 0.0095, and the first measurement of the vector and axial-vector contributions to the non-strange hadronic \\tau decay width: R_{\\tau ,V} \\ = \\ 1.788 \\ \\pm \\ 0.025 and R_{\\tau ,A} \\ = \\ 1.694 \\ \\pm \\ 0.027. The ratio (R_{\\tau ,V} - R_{\\tau ,A}) / (R_{\\tau ,V} + R_{\\tau ,A}), equal to (2.7 \\pm 1.3) \\ \\%, is a measure of the importance of Q...

  20. Polar drive on OMEGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha P.B.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High-convergence polar-drive experiments are being conducted on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commum. 133, 495 (1997] using triple-picket laser pulses. The goal of OMEGA experiments is to validate modeling of oblique laser deposition, heat conduction in the presence of nonradial thermal gradients in the corona, and implosion energetics in the presence of laser–plasma interactions such as crossed-beam energy transfer. Simulated shock velocities near the equator, where the beams are obliquely incident, are within 5% of experimentally inferred values in warm plastic shells, well within the required accuracy for ignition. High, near-one-dimensional areal density is obtained in warm-plastic-shell implosions. Simulated backlit images of the compressing core are in good agreement with measured images. Outstanding questions that will be addressed in the future relate to the role of cross-beam transfer in polar drive irradiation and increasing the energy coupled into the target by decreasing beam obliquity.

  1. Ultra-compact polarization rotation in integrated silicon photonics using digital metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Apratim; Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-08-21

    Polarization controlling devices such as polarization splitters and rotators are critical elements in integrated-photonic circuits that function via polarization-diversity schemes. Here, we present the design of an ultra-compact nanophotonic-polarization rotator (NPR) that rotates the polarization state from TE to TM with a simulated extinction ratio of 23dB over a coupling length of 5µm and an operating bandwidth of 40nm. This all-silicon device can be fabricated in a single lithography step and we have fabricated and characterized a preliminary device exhibiting 9dB extinction ratio. To emphasize the generality of our methodology, we also designed a NPR that can rotate the polarization state from TM to TE as well. A small device footprint is enabled by the evanescent coupling of guided modes enabled by computationally designed digital metamaterials.

  2. Statistics of polarization and Stokes parameters of stochastic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, M. J.; Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2004-09-01

    Several theories now exist to describe the probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the electric field strength, intensity, and power of signals. In this work, a model is developed for the PDFs of the polarization properties of the superposition of multiple transverse wave populations. The polarization of each transverse wave population is described by a polarization ellipse with fixed axial ratio and polarization angle, and PDFs for the field strength and phase. Wave populations are vectorially added, and expressions found for the Stokes parameters I , U , Q , and V , as well as the degrees of linear and circular polarization, and integral expressions for their statistics. In this work, lognormal distributions are chosen for the electric field, corresponding to stochastic growth, and polarization PDFs are numerically calculated for the superposition of orthonormal mode populations, which might represent the natural modes emitted by a source. Examples are provided of the superposition of linear, circular, and elliptically polarized wave populations in cases where the component field strength PDFs are the same, and where one field strength PDF is dominant.

  3. Polarized absorption in determination of impurities in olive oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, A. N.; Zabidi, Z. M.; Yaacob, Y.; Amir, I. S.; Alshurdin, S. H. N.; Aini, N. A.

    2017-08-01

    The effect of impurities in olive oil blending with palm oil was characterized using polarized absorption method. Polarized absorption was based on the absorption of light which vibrating in a particular plane to pass through the sample. This polarized light allowed the molecule to absorb at the specific orientation. There were four samples have been prepared that were 100:0, 70:30, 50:50 and 0:100 with volume ratio of the olives to palm oil. Two linear polarizers were mounting between the samples in order to get linearly polarized. This specific orientation was affected the absorption spectra of the sample. The results have shown that the analyzing polarizer with angle 00 has bell shape spectra. All the orientation of analyzing polarizer had shown the maximum current output at 100% olive oil. Whereas 100% palm oil has shown the minimum current output. The changing in absorption spectra indicates that the anisotropic properties of each sample were different due to the present of impurities.

  4. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  5. Spin exchange in polarized deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przewoski, B. von; Meyer, H.O.; Balewski, J.; Doskow, J.; Ibald, R.; Pollock, R.E.; Rinckel, T.; Wellinghausen, A.; Whitaker, T.J.; Daehnick, W.W.; Haeberli, W.; Schwartz, B.; Wise, T.; Lorentz, B.; Rathmann, F.; Pancella, P.V.; Saha, Swapan K.; Thoerngren-Engblom, P.

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the vector and tensor polarization of an atomic deuterium target as a function of the target density. The polarized deuterium was produced in an atomic beam source and injected into a storage cell. For this experiment, the atomic beam source was operated without rf transitions, in order to avoid complications from the unknown efficiency of these transitions. In this mode, the atomic beam is vector and tensor polarized and both polarizations can be measured simultaneously. We used a 1.2-cm-diam and 27-cm-long storage cell, which yielded an average target density between 3 and 9x10 11 at/cm 3 . We find that the tensor polarization decreases with increasing target density while the vector polarization remains constant. The data are in quantitative agreement with the calculated effect of spin exchange between deuterium atoms at low field

  6. CMB polarization from secondary vector and tensor modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollerach, Silvia; Harari, Diego; Matarrese, Sabino

    2004-01-01

    We consider a novel contribution to the polarization of the cosmic microwave background induced by vector and tensor modes generated by the nonlinear evolution of primordial scalar perturbations. Our calculation is based on relativistic second-order perturbation theory and allows us to estimate the effects of these secondary modes on the polarization angular power spectra. We show that a nonvanishing B-mode polarization unavoidably arises from pure scalar initial perturbations, thus limiting our ability to detect the signature of primordial gravitational waves generated during inflation. This secondary effect dominates over that of primordial tensors for an inflationary tensor-to-scalar ratio r -6 . The magnitude of the effect is smaller than the contamination produced by the conversion of polarization of type E into type B, by weak gravitational lensing. However, the lensing signal can be cleaned, making the secondary modes discussed here the actual background limiting the detection of small amplitude primordial gravitational waves

  7. Polarized Raman spectroscopy of chemically vapour deposited diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Weiser, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    Polarized micro-Raman spectra of chemically vapour deposited diamond films are presented. It is shown that important parameters often extracted from the Raman spectra such as the ratio of the diamond to non-diamond component of the films and the estimation of the level of residual stress depend on the orientation of the diamond crystallites with respect to the polarization of the incident laser beam. The dependence originates from the fact that the Raman scattering from the non-diamond components in the films is almost completely depolarized whilst the scattering from the diamond components is strongly polarized. The results demonstrate the importance of taking polarization into account when attempting to use Raman spectroscopy in even a semi-quantitative fashion for the assessment of the purity, perfection and stress in CVD diamond films. 8 refs., 1 tab. 2 figs

  8. Peak power ratio generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  9. Linear polarization of BY Draconis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.H.; Pfeiffer, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Linear polarization measurements are reported in four bandpasses for the flare star BY Dra. The red polarization is intrinsically variable at a confidence level greater than 99 percent. On a time scale of many months, the variability is not phase-locked to either a rotational or a Keplerian ephemeris. The observations of the three other bandpasses are useful principally to indicate a polarization spectrum rising toward shorter wavelengths

  10. Polarity in Mammalian Epithelial Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roignot, Julie; Peng, Xiao; Mostov, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarity is fundamental for the architecture and function of epithelial tissues. Epithelial polarization requires the intervention of several fundamental cell processes, whose integration in space and time is only starting to be elucidated. To understand what governs the building of epithelial tissues during development, it is essential to consider the polarization process in the context of the whole tissue. To this end, the development of three-dimensional organotypic cell culture model...

  11. Cylindrically polarized Bessel–Gauss beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhi, Daena; Aiello, Andrea; Ornigotti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of radially and azimuthally polarized Bessel–Gauss (BG) beams in both the paraxial and nonparaxial regime. We discuss the validity of the paraxial approximation and the form of the nonparaxial corrections for BG beams. We show that independently on the ratio between the Bessel aperture cone angle ϑ 0 and the Gaussian beam divergence θ 0 , the nonparaxial corrections are alway very small and therefore negligible. The explicit expressions for the nonparaxial vector electric field components are also reported. (paper)

  12. New physics effects in Λb→Λl+l- decay with lepton polarizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, T.M.; Savci, M.; Oezpineci, A.

    2002-01-01

    We study lepton polarization asymmetries in the Λ b →Λl + l - decay using the most general model independent effective Hamiltonian. The dependence of the lepton polarizations and their combinations on the new Wilson coefficients are studied in detail. It is observed that there is a region for the new Wilson coefficients for which the branching ratio coincides with the standard model prediction, while lepton polarizations show considerable departure from the standard model

  13. Model independent analysis of Λ baryon polarizations in Λb→Λl+l- decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, T.M.; Oezpineci, A.; Savci, M.

    2003-01-01

    We present a model independent analysis of Λ baryon polarizations in the Λ b →Λl + l - decay. The sensitivity of the averaged Λ polarizations to the new Wilson coefficients is studied. It is observed that there exist certain regions of the new Wilson coefficients where the branching ratio coincides with the standard model prediction, while the Λ baryon polarizations deviate from the standard model results remarkably

  14. In-line Typed High-Precision Polarization Lidar for Disaster Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Shiina, Tatsuo

    2010-01-01

    Lidars for local weather prediction for prevention of disasters such as heavy rain and lightning strike were developed. As in-line optics were adopted to the in-line MPL and the high precision polarization lidar, the near range measurement could be accomplished with the narrow FOV. Optical circulators were also developed originally not to only separate echoes from the transmitting beam, but also to detect the orthogonal polarization echoes. The polarization extinction ratio between p- and s-p...

  15. A polarized alkali ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettger, R.; Tungate, G.; Bauer, B.; Egelhof, P.; Moebius, K.H.; Steffens, E.

    1978-01-01

    The beam foil technique has been applied to detect nuclear vector polarization of a 10 keV 23 Na + beam. The result was about 70% of the atomic beam polarization thus limiting the depolarization by the surface ionizer to at most 30%. In a Coulomb excitation experiment with a tensor polarized 42 MeV 23 Na 7+ beam an effect of 0.011 +- 0.003 was measured yielding a value of t 20 approx. 0.04 for the beam polarization. The depolarization during the acceleration process can be estimated to be about 0.8. (orig.) [de

  16. The SLAC polarized electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.; Frisch, J.

    1995-06-01

    The SLAC polarized electron source employs a photocathode DC high voltage gun with a loadlock and a YAG pumped Ti:sapphire laser system for colliding beam experiments or a flash lamp pumped Ti:sapphire laser for fixed target experiments. It uses a thin, strained GaAs(100) photocathode, and is capable of producing a pulsed beam with a polarization of ≥80% and a peak current exceeding 10 A. Its operating efficiency has reached 99%. The physics and technology of producing high polarization electron beams from a GaAs photocathode will be reviewed. The prospects of realizing a polarized electron source for future linear colliders will also be discussed

  17. Analysis of CMOS Compatible Cu-Based TM-Pass Optical Polarizer

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Tien Khee

    2012-02-10

    A transverse-magnetic-pass (TM-pass) optical polarizer based on Cu complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology platform is proposed and analyzed using the 2-D method-of-lines numerical model. In designing the optimum configuration for the polarizer, it was found that the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) polarizer structure is superior compared to the insulator-metal-insulator polarizer structure due to its higher polarization extinction ratio (PER) and low insertion loss. An optimized MIM TM-pass polarizer exhibits simulated long wavelength pass filter characteristics of > ?1.2 ?m, with fundamental TM 0 and TE 0 mode transmissivity of >70% and <5%, respectively, and with PER ?11.5 dB in the wavelength range of 1.2-1.6 ?m. The subwavelength and submicrometer features of this TM-polarizer are potentially suitable for compact and low power photonics integrated circuit implementation on silicon-based substrates. © 1989-2012 IEEE.

  18. Inkjet printed circularly polarized antennas for GPS applications

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2014-07-01

    Two novel, inkjet printed circularly polarized antenna designs are presented for GPS applications. First antenna design comprises a planar monopole which has been made circularly polarized by the introduction of an L-shaped slit. The antenna shows a gain of 0.2 dBi at 1.575 GHz with 3-dB axial ratio bandwidth of 3.8%. The second antenna design comprises a modified monopole in the form of an inverted L and has been termed as circularly polarized inverted L antenna (CILA). The antenna shows a gain of -2 dBi at 1.575 GHz with 3-dB axial ratio bandwidth of 4.1%. Both the antenna designs are attractive for mobile applications.

  19. Broadband tunable terahertz polarization converter based on graphene metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shiwen; Li, Bin; Yu, Anlan; Gao, Jun; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2018-04-01

    We design and numerically investigate a broadband tunable terahertz polarization converter based on graphene metamaterial. The converter presents a broad conversion band with high polarization conversion ratio (>0.95) in terahertz frequency over a bandwidth which is 25.8% of the central frequency. The converter can be dynamically tuned by varying the Fermi Energy of the graphene without changing the geometric structure. The converter shows high conversion ratio for a wide range of incident angles from 0 to 40°. By the scaling of the proposed structure, the broadband properties of the converter can be easily spread to other frequency. The proposed metamaterial offers an approach in the manipulation of the light polarization and has potential applications in imaging, sensing and communications.

  20. Linearly polarized intracavity passive Q-switched Yb-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-14

    YAG crystal as a saturable absorber. An average output power of 9.4 W with pulse duration of 64 ns and pulse repetition rate of 57.4 kHz with a slope efficiency of 52% was achieved. Measured polarization extinction ratio (PER) ...

  1. Comparison of chest compression quality between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to grasp difference in quality of chest compression accuracy between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method. Participants were progressed 64 people except 6 absentees among 70 people who agreed to participation with completing the CPR curriculum. In the classification of group in participants, the modified chest compression method was called as smartphone group (33 people). The standardized chest compression method was called as traditional group (31 people). The common equipments in both groups were used Manikin for practice and Manikin for evaluation. In the meantime, the smartphone group for application was utilized Android and iOS Operating System (OS) of 2 smartphone products (G, i). The measurement period was conducted from September 25th to 26th, 2012. Data analysis was used SPSS WIN 12.0 program. As a result of research, the proper compression depth (mm) was shown the proper compression depth (p< 0.01) in traditional group (53.77 mm) compared to smartphone group (48.35 mm). Even the proper chest compression (%) was formed suitably (p< 0.05) in traditional group (73.96%) more than smartphone group (60.51%). As for the awareness of chest compression accuracy, the traditional group (3.83 points) had the higher awareness of chest compression accuracy (p< 0.001) than the smartphone group (2.32 points). In the questionnaire that was additionally carried out 1 question only in smartphone group, the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone had the high negative reason in rescuer for occurrence of hand back pain (48.5%) and unstable posture (21.2%).

  2. Magnetostatics of the uniformly polarized torus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; De Graef, Marc; Millev, Yonko

    2009-01-01

    We provide an exhaustive description of the magnetostatics of the uniformly polarized torus and its derivative self-intersecting (spindle) shapes. In the process, two complementary approaches have been implemented, position-space analysis of the Laplace equation with inhomogeneous boundary...... conditions and a Fourier-space analysis, starting from the determination of the shape amplitude of this topologically non-trivial body. The stray field and the demagnetization tensor have been determined as rapidly converging series of toroidal functions. The single independent demagnetization......-tensor eigenvalue has been determined as a function of the unique aspect ratio α of the torus. Throughout the range of values of the ratio, corresponding to a multiply connected torus proper, the axial demagnetization factor Nz remains close to one half. There is no breach of smoothness of Nz(α) at the topological...

  3. Production of polarized vector mesons off nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Nemchik, J.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Using the light-cone QCD dipole formalism we investigate manifestations of color transparency (CT) and coherence length (CL) effects in electroproduction of longitudinally (L) and transversally (T) polarized vector mesons. Motivated by forthcoming data from the HERMES experiment we predict both the A and Q 2 dependence of the L/T ratios for ρ 0 mesons produced coherently and incoherently off nuclei. For an incoherent reaction the CT and CL effects add up and result in a monotonic A dependence of the L/T ratio at different values of Q 2 . In contrast, for a coherent process the contraction of the CL with Q 2 causes an effect opposite to that of CT and we expect quite a nontrivial A dependence

  4. Polar Biomedical Research - An Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    to grow more crops in subpolar Alaska. The severity of the polar conditions in Antarctica allow no practical method for providing volumes of plant food...for an expanded population. Any experiments in polar regions in food production involving geothermal heat, solar energy, hydroponics , or aquaculture

  5. Create a Polarized Light Show.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson that introduces students to polarized light using a problem-solving approach. After illustrating the concept using a slinky and poster board with a vertical slot, students solve the problem of creating a polarized light show using Polya's problem-solving methods. (MDH)

  6. Polarization-preserving holey fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Mogilevtsev, Dmitri; Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2001-01-01

    In this work we suggest and discuss a microstructure of air capillaries with elliptical cross-section in a tread of glass that gives opportunity for Creation of polarization-preserving fiber with very small beat length between the fundamental modes of different polarization...

  7. Polarized Scintillating Targets at Psi

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2001-02-01

    Scintillating polarized targets are now routinely available: blocks of 18×18×5 mm scintillating organic polymer, doped with TEMPO, polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. A 19 mm diameter plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat.

  8. UV Coatings, Polarization, and Coronagraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Quijada, Manuel; West, Garrett; Balasubramanian, Bala; Krist, John; Martin, Stefan; Sabatke, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Presenation for the Large UltraViolet Optical Infrared (LUVOIR) and Habitable Exoplanet Imager (HabEx) Science and Technology Definition Teams (STDT) on technical considerations regarding ultraviolet coatings, polarization, and coronagraphy. The presentations review the state-of-the-art in ultraviolet coatings, how those coatings generate polarization aberrations, and recent study results from both the LUVOIR and HabEx teams.

  9. Polarization Imaging and Insect Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Adam S.; Ohmann, Paul R.; Leininger, Nick E.; Kavanaugh, James A.

    2010-01-01

    For several years we have included discussions about insect vision in the optics units of our introductory physics courses. This topic is a natural extension of demonstrations involving Brewster's reflection and Rayleigh scattering of polarized light because many insects heavily rely on optical polarization for navigation and communication.…

  10. Climate Drives Polar Bear Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    In their provocative analysis of northern bears (“Nuclear genomic sequences reveal that polar bears are an old and distinct bear lineage,” Reports, 20 April, p. 344), F. Hailer et al. use independent nuclear loci to show that polar bears originated during the middle Pleistocene, rather than during t...

  11. Energy Profit Ratio Compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    We need more oil energy to take out oil under the ground. Limit resources make us consider other candidates of energy source instead of oil. Electricity shall be the main role more and more like electric vehicles and air conditioners so we should consider electricity generation ways. When we consider what kind of electric power generation is the best or suitable, we should not only power generation plant but whole process from mining to power generation. It is good way to use EPR, Energy Profit Ratio, to analysis which type is more efficient and which part is to do research and development when you see the input breakdown analysis. Electricity by the light water nuclear power plant, the hydrogen power plant and the geothermal power plant are better candidates from EPR analysis. Forecasting the world primly energy supply in 2050, it is said that the demand will be double of the demand in 2000 and the supply will not be able to satisfy the demand in 2050. We should save 30% of the demand and increase nuclear power plants 3.5 times more and recyclable energy like hydropower plants 3 times more. When the nuclear power plants are 3.5 times more then uranium peak will come and we will need breed uranium. I will analysis the EPR of FBR. Conclusion: A) the EPR of NPS in Japan is 17.4 and it is the best of all. B) Many countries will introduce new nuclear power plants rapidly may be 3.5 times in 2050. C) Uranium peak will happen around 2050. (author)

  12. Integrins and epithelial cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica L; Streuli, Charles H

    2014-08-01

    Cell polarity is characterised by differences in structure, composition and function between at least two poles of a cell. In epithelial cells, these spatial differences allow for the formation of defined apical and basal membranes. It has been increasingly recognised that cell-matrix interactions and integrins play an essential role in creating epithelial cell polarity, although key gaps in our knowledge remain. This Commentary will discuss the mounting evidence for the role of integrins in polarising epithelial cells. We build a model in which both inside-out signals to polarise basement membrane assembly at the basal surface, and outside-in signals to control microtubule apical-basal orientation and vesicular trafficking are required for establishing and maintaining the orientation of epithelial cell polarity. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the basal integrin polarity axis to cancer. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Hyperon polarization: An experimental overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lach, J.

    1992-12-01

    The fact that inclusively produced hyperons are produced with significant polarization was first discovered at Fermilab about seventeen years ago. This and subsequent experiments showed that Λ degree were produced polarized while bar Λ degree had no polarization in the same kinematical region. This set the stage for many experiments which showed that most hyperons are produced polarized. Recent Fermilab experiments have showed that this phenomena is even more complex than previously thought and theoretical understanding is still lacking. Nevertheless polarized hyperon beams have been an extremely useful experimental tool in measuring hyperon magnetic moments and hyperon β-decay. Recently, hyperon radiative decays have been studied and magnetic moment precession of channeled particles in bent crystals has been observed

  14. A review of polarized ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmor, P.W.

    1995-06-01

    The two main types of polarized ion sources in use on accelerators today are the Atomic Beam Polarized Ion Source (ABIS) source and the Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source (OPPIS). Both types can provide beams of nuclearly polarized light ions which are either positively or negatively charged. Heavy ion polarized ion sources for accelerators are being developed. (author). 35 refs., 1 tab

  15. Promoting Diversity Through Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (Polar ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, J. D.; Hotaling, L. A.; Garza, C.; Van Dyk, P. B.; Hunter-thomson, K. I.; Middendorf, J.; Daniel, A.; Matsumoto, G. I.; Schofield, O.

    2017-12-01

    Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) is an education and outreach program designed to provide public access to the Antarctic and Arctic regions through polar data and interactions with the scientists. The program provides multi-faceted science communication training for early career scientists that consist of a face-to face workshop and opportunities to apply these skills. The key components of the scientist training workshop include cultural competency training, deconstructing/decoding science for non-expert audiences, the art of telling science stories, and networking with members of the education and outreach community and reflecting on communication skills. Scientists partner with educators to provide professional development for K-12 educators and support for student research symposia. Polar ICE has initiated a Polar Literacy initiative that provides both a grounding in big ideas in polar science and science communication training designed to underscore the importance of the Polar Regions to the public while promoting interdisciplinary collaborations between scientists and educators. Our ultimate objective is to promote STEM identity through professional development of scientists and educators while developing career awareness of STEM pathways in Polar science.

  16. 16-QAM Field-Quadrature Decomposition using Polarization-Assisted Phase Sensitive Amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Niels-Kristian; Piels, Molly; Da Ros, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous I and Q extraction for 16-QAM is experimentally demonstrated through field-quadrature decomposition using a polarization-assisted phase sensitive amplifier. The quadrature components are successfully received and performance is evaluated through bit-error-ratio testing.......Simultaneous I and Q extraction for 16-QAM is experimentally demonstrated through field-quadrature decomposition using a polarization-assisted phase sensitive amplifier. The quadrature components are successfully received and performance is evaluated through bit-error-ratio testing....

  17. Optimal Chest Compression Rate and Compression to Ventilation Ratio in Delivery Room Resuscitation: Evidence from Newborn Piglets and Neonatal Manikins

    OpenAIRE

    Solev?g, Anne Lee; Schm?lzer, Georg M.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) influences survival and neurologic outcomes after delivery room (DR) CPR. High quality chest compressions (CC) improve cerebral and myocardial perfusion. Improved myocardial perfusion increases the likelihood of a faster ROSC. Thus, optimizing CC quality may improve outcomes both by preserving cerebral blood flow during CPR and by reducing the recovery time. CC quality is determined by rate, CC to vent...

  18. POLARIZED LIGHT IN PHYSIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Tondiy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The data on polarized light (PS - a new promising treatment, rehabilitation and prevention, which took its deserved place among the known therapeutic physical factors and may even compete with laser radiation of low and LED therapy. It is reflected the significant contribution of domestic scientists in the study of aircraft action on the body, its introduction in the treatment, rehabilitation and prevention of grippe, ARI. These action's mechanisms of the aircraft on the electro-physiological processes in the body that have the leading role in the regulation of its life. The new moment in the study of aircraft on the body is the evidence of its positive impact on the mechanisms of self body - its different units: the disease's banning - a revitalization of the stress-protective, stress-limiting system antioxidial, detoxification and other protection systems, the formation by the body antiviral and antimicrobial specific substances (interferon and lysozyme, activation of the immune system, phagocytosis, protective functions of skin. The protective and mobilizing role of the second link is studied: which is triggered in case of occurrence of disease or preexisting diseases: PL mobilized processes of restitution, reparations, compensation, immunity and microcirculation. The authors studied the possibility of aircraft's using to enhance performance, reduce side effects of physical factors, which are often used in the treatment (electric methods, treatment by sound, fresh and mineral water, etc..

  19. Deriving aerosol scattering ratio using range-resolved lidar ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-13

    Feb 13, 2014 ... Contributed Papers Volume 82 Issue 2 February 2014 pp 391-395 ... Abstract. The study on the optical characteristics of aerosol is carried out using the dual polarization lidar observations from the tropical inland station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) for the period of observation during the year 2010.

  20. Direct Probing of Polarization Charge at Nanoscale Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Owoong [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering; Seol, Daehee [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering; Lee, Dongkyu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Han, Hee [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (South Korea); Lindfors-Vrejoiu, Ionela [Univ. of Cologne (Germany). Physics Inst.; Lee, Woo [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (South Korea); Jesse, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Lee, Ho Nyung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Alexe, Marin [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kim, Yunseok [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering

    2017-11-14

    Ferroelectric materials possess spontaneous polarization that can be used for multiple applications. Owing to a long-term development of reducing the sizes of devices, the preparation of ferroelectric materials and devices is entering the nanometer-scale regime. In order to evaluate the ferroelectricity, there is a need to investigate the polarization charge at the nanoscale. Nonetheless, it is generally accepted that the detection of polarization charges using a conventional conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) without a top electrode is not feasible because the nanometer-scale radius of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip yields a very low signal-to-noise ratio. But, the detection is unrelated to the radius of an AFM tip and, in fact, a matter of the switched area. In this work, the direct probing of the polarization charge at the nanoscale is demonstrated using the positive-up-negative-down method based on the conventional CAFM approach without additional corrections or circuits to reduce the parasitic capacitance. The polarization charge densities of 73.7 and 119.0 µC cm-2 are successfully probed in ferroelectric nanocapacitors and thin films, respectively. The results we obtained show the feasibility of the evaluation of polarization charge at the nanoscale and provide a new guideline for evaluating the ferroelectricity at the nanoscale.

  1. Nuclear physics with polarized particles

    CERN Document Server

    Paetz gen Schieck, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of spin-polarization observables in reactions of nuclei and particles is of great utility and advantage when the effects of single-spin sub-states are to be investigated. Indeed, the unpolarized differential cross-section encompasses the averaging over the spin states of the particles, and thus loses details of the interaction process. This introductory text combines, in a single volume, course-based lecture notes on spin physics and on polarized-ion sources with the aim of providing a concise yet self-contained starting point for newcomers to the field, as well as for lecturers in search of suitable material for their courses and seminars. A significant part of the book is devoted to introducing the formal theory-a description of polarization and of nuclear reactions with polarized particles. The remainder of the text describes the physical basis of methods and devices necessary to perform experiments with polarized particles and to measure polarization and polarization effects in nuclear rea...

  2. What makes single-helical metamaterials generate "pure" circularly polarized light?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Yang, ZhenYu; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Peng; Lu, ZeQing; Yu, Yang; Li, ShengXi; Yuan, XiuHua

    2012-01-16

    Circular polarizers with left-handed helical metamaterials can transmit right-handed circularly polarized (RCP) light with few losses. But a certain amount of left-handed circularly polarized (LCP) light will occur in the transmitted light, which is the noise of the circular polarizer. Therefore, we defined the ratio of the RCP light intensity to the LCP light intensity as the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. In our previous work, it's found that circular polarizers with multi-helical metamaterials have two orders higher S/N ratios than that of single-helical metamaterials. However, it has been a great challenge to fabricate such multi-helical structures with micron or sub-micron feature sizes. Is it possible for the single-helical metamaterials to obtain equally high S/N ratios as the multi-helical ones? To answer this question, we systematically investigated the influences of structure parameters of single-helical metamaterials on the S/N ratios using the finite-different time-domain (FDTD) method. It was found that the single-helical metamaterials can also reach about 30dB S/N ratios, which are equal to the multi-helical ones. Furthermore, we explained the phenomenon by the antenna theory and optimized the performances of the single-helical circular polarizers.

  3. Few-body experiments with polarized beams and polarized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is presented concerning recent polarization experiments in the elastic p-d, p- 3 He, and p- 4 He systems. Mention is made of selected neutron experiments. The nominal energy range is 10 to 1000 MeV. Recent results and interpretations of the p-d system near 10 MeV are discussed. New experiments on the energy dependence of back angle p-d tensor polarization are discussed with respect to resolution of discrepancies and difficulty of theoretical interpretation. Progress is noted concerning multiple scattering interpretation of forward p-d deuteron polarization. Some new results are presented concerning the p- 3 He system and higher energy p- 4 He polarization experiments. 52 references

  4. Elite Polarization and Public Opinion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robison, Joshua; Mullinix, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Elite polarization has reshaped American politics and is an increasingly salient aspect of news coverage within the United States. As a consequence, a burgeoning body of research attempts to unravel the effects of elite polarization on the mass public. However, we know very little about how...... attitudes. In our first study, we show that criticism of polarization leads partisans to more positively evaluate the argument offered by their non-preferred party, increases support for bi-partisanship, but ultimately does not change the extent to which partisans follow their party’s policy endorsements...

  5. Acceleration of polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1998-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. Full Siberian snakes are being developed for RHIC to make the acceleration of polarized protons to 250 GeV possible. A similar scheme is being studied for the 800 GeV HERA proton accelerator

  6. Polarimetry with azimuthally polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sande, Juan Carlos González; Piquero, Gemma; Santarsiero, Massimo

    2018-03-01

    Nonuniformly polarized light can be used for Mueller polarimetry of homogeneous linear samples. In this work, a set up based on using azimuthally polarized input light and a modified commercial light polarimeter is proposed and developed. With this set up, a Mueller submatrix of a sample can be obtained by measuring the Stokes parameters at only three different positions across the output beam section. Symmetry constraints for linear deterministic samples allow the complete Mueller matrix to be deduced for this kind of specimens. The experimental results obtained for phase plates and for a linear polarizer confirm the validity of the proposed method.

  7. Polarized deuteron elastic scattering from a polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, R.; Kuiper, H.; Schoeberl, M.; Berber, S.; Hilmert, H.; Koeppel, R.; Pferdmenges, R.; Zankel, H.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements are reported of the spin correlation parameter Cy,y for the elastic scattering of 10.0 MeV vector polarized deuterons from a polarized proton target at five CM angles (76 0 ,85 0 ,98 0 ,115 0 ,132 0 ). The experimental results are compared with different predictions. A Faddeev type calculation on the basis of local potentials also including approximate Coulomb distortion is favoured by our experimental results. (orig.)

  8. PolarHub: A Global Hub for Polar Data Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the outcome of a NSF project in developing a large-scale web crawler PolarHub to discover automatically the distributed polar dataset in the format of OGC web services (OWS) in the cyberspace. PolarHub is a machine robot; its goal is to visit as many webpages as possible to find those containing information about polar OWS, extract this information and store it into the backend data repository. This is a very challenging task given huge data volume of webpages on the Web. Three unique features was introduced in PolarHub to make it distinctive from earlier crawler solutions: (1) a multi-task, multi-user, multi-thread support to the crawling tasks; (2) an extensive use of thread pool and Data Access Object (DAO) design patterns to separate persistent data storage and business logic to achieve high extendibility of the crawler tool; (3) a pattern-matching based customizable crawling algorithm to support discovery of multi-type geospatial web services; and (4) a universal and portable client-server communication mechanism combining a server-push and client pull strategies for enhanced asynchronous processing. A series of experiments were conducted to identify the impact of crawling parameters to the overall system performance. The geographical distribution pattern of all PolarHub identified services is also demonstrated. We expect this work to make a major contribution to the field of geospatial information retrieval and geospatial interoperability, to bridge the gap between data provider and data consumer, and to accelerate polar science by enhancing the accessibility and reusability of adequate polar data.

  9. Marine diatoms in polar and sub-polar environments and their application to Late Pleistocene paleoclimate reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosta, Xavier, E-mail: x.crosta@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [UMR-CNRS 5805 EPOC, Universite Bordeaux 1, Avenue des Facultes, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2011-05-15

    Diatoms are one of the major phytoplankton groups in polar and sub-polar marine environments along with green algae and chrysophytes. Diatoms are composed of two components, a two-valve test made of amorphous silica and an organic cell encapsulated into the test. Mucilage covering the test and proteins embedded in the silica lattice of the test completes the organic pool of the diatoms. The preservation of these two components into deep-sea sediments allows for a large set of diatom-based proxies to infer past oceanographic and climatic changes in polar and sub-polar marine environments. Most diatom species in polar and sub-polar marine environments exhibit a narrow range of ecological preferences, especially in terms of sea-surface temperature and sea ice conditions. Preserved diatom assemblages in deep-sea sediments mirror the diatom assemblages in the phytoplankton. It is subsequently possible to extrapolate the relationships between diatom assemblages in surface sediments and modern parameters to down-core fossil assemblages to document past changes in sea-surface temperatures and sea ice conditions. Congruent analysis of biogenic silica and organic carbon and stable isotope ratios (O, Si in the silica matrix and C, N in the diatom-intrinsic organic matter) provides information on siliceous productivity, nutrient cycling and water mass circulation. Measurements of diatom biomarkers give complementary information on sea ice conditions and siliceous productivity.

  10. Marine diatoms in polar and sub-polar environments and their application to Late Pleistocene paleoclimate reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosta, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are one of the major phytoplankton groups in polar and sub-polar marine environments along with green algae and chrysophytes. Diatoms are composed of two components, a two-valve test made of amorphous silica and an organic cell encapsulated into the test. Mucilage covering the test and proteins embedded in the silica lattice of the test completes the organic pool of the diatoms. The preservation of these two components into deep-sea sediments allows for a large set of diatom-based proxies to infer past oceanographic and climatic changes in polar and sub-polar marine environments. Most diatom species in polar and sub-polar marine environments exhibit a narrow range of ecological preferences, especially in terms of sea-surface temperature and sea ice conditions. Preserved diatom assemblages in deep-sea sediments mirror the diatom assemblages in the phytoplankton. It is subsequently possible to extrapolate the relationships between diatom assemblages in surface sediments and modern parameters to down-core fossil assemblages to document past changes in sea-surface temperatures and sea ice conditions. Congruent analysis of biogenic silica and organic carbon and stable isotope ratios (O, Si in the silica matrix and C, N in the diatom-intrinsic organic matter) provides information on siliceous productivity, nutrient cycling and water mass circulation. Measurements of diatom biomarkers give complementary information on sea ice conditions and siliceous productivity.

  11. Comparison of Different Compression to Ventilation Ratios (2: 1, 3: 1, and 4: 1) during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Porcine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquin, Matteo P; Cheung, Po-Yin; Patel, Sparsh; Lu, Min; Lee, Tze-Fun; Wagner, Michael; O'Reilly, Megan; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2018-04-12

    High-quality chest compression is essential during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the optimal compression to ventilation ratio (C:V) that should be used during neonatal CPR to optimize coronary and cerebral perfusion while providing adequate ventilation remains unknown. We hypothesized that different C:V ratios (e.g., 2: 1 or 4: 1) will reduce the time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in severely asphyxiated piglets. Thirty-one newborn piglets (1-4 days old) were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 50-min normocapnic hypoxia followed by asphyxia. Piglets were randomized into 4 groups: 2: 1 (n = 8), 3: 1 (n = 8), 4: 1 (n = 8) C:V ratio, or a sham group (n = 7). Cardiac function, carotid blood flow, cerebral oxygenation, and respiratory parameters were continuously recorded throughout the experiment. Thirty-one piglets were included in the study, and there was no difference in the duration of asphyxia or the degree of asphyxiation (as indicated by pH, PaCO2, and lactate) among the different groups. The median (IQR) time to ROSC was similar between the groups with 127 (82-210), 96 (88-126), and 119 (83-256) s in the 2: 1, 3: 1, and 4: 1 C:V ratio groups, respectively (p = 0.67 between groups). Similarly, there was no difference in 100% oxygen requirement or epinephrine administration between the experimental groups. Different C:V ratios resulted in similar ROSC, mortality, oxygen, and epinephrine administration during resuscitation in a porcine model of neonatal asphyxia. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Polar source analysis : technical memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    The following technical memorandum describes the development, testing and analysis of various polar source data sets. The memorandum also includes recommendation for potential inclusion in future releases of AEDT. This memorandum is the final deliver...

  13. Anodic Concentration Polarization in SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williford, Rick E.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Maupin, Gary D.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Wachsman, ED, et al

    2003-08-01

    Concentration polarization is important because it determines the maximum power output of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) at high fuel utilization. Anodic concentration polarization occurs when the demand for reactants exceeds the capacity of the porous ceramic anode to supply them by gas diffusion mechanisms. High tortuosities (bulk diffusion resistances) are often assumed to explain this behavior. However, recent experiments show that anodic concentration polarization originates in the immediate vicinity of the reactive triple phase boundary (TPB) sites near the anode/electrolyte interface. A model is proposed to describe how concentration polarization is controlled by two localized phenomena: competitive adsorption of reactants in areas adjacent to the reactive TPB sites, followed by relatively slow surface diffusion to the reactive sites. Results suggest that future SOFC design improvements should focus on optimization of the reactive area, adsorption, and surface diffusion at the anode/electrolyte interface.

  14. The definition of cross polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, Arthur

    1973-01-01

    There are at least three different definitions of cross polarization used in the literature. The alternative definitions are discussed with respect to several applications, and the definition which corresponds to one standard measurement practice is proposed as the best choice....

  15. Dynamic elections and ideological polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunnari, S.; Zápal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2017), s. 505-534 ISSN 1047-1987 Institutional support: Progres-Q24 Keywords : elections * political polarization Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Economic Theory Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  16. Dynamic elections and ideological polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunnari, S.; Zápal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2017), s. 505-534 ISSN 1047-1987 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : elections * political polarization Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Economic Theory Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  17. Polarization at LEP. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, G.; Altarelli, G.; Blondel, A.; Coignet, G.; Keil, E.; Plane, D.E.; Treille, D.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains a collection of papers covering the most important part of studies carried out by five study groups in view of a programme of experiments with polarized beams at LEP, the Large Electron-Positron collider under construction at CERN. The emphasis is on precision measurements at the Z peak. Such measurements are shown to be of considerable theoretical interest as well as very clean from the point of view of theoretical and experimental uncertainties. The measurement of the beam polarization can certainly be performed with sufficient accuracy, thanks to the availability of both e + and e - beam polarization. The normalization of the data taken with different beam helicities poses certain constraints that are described. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the possibility of providing longitudinally polarized beams in the LEP machine: The design of new wigglers and spin rotators, the study of correction procedures and results of numerical simulations are presented. (orig.)

  18. Mechanical writing of ferroelectric polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H; Bark, C-W; Esque de los Ojos, D; Alcala, J; Eom, C B; Catalan, G; Gruverman, A

    2012-04-06

    Ferroelectric materials are characterized by a permanent electric dipole that can be reversed through the application of an external voltage, but a strong intrinsic coupling between polarization and deformation also causes all ferroelectrics to be piezoelectric, leading to applications in sensors and high-displacement actuators. A less explored property is flexoelectricity, the coupling between polarization and a strain gradient. We demonstrate that the stress gradient generated by the tip of an atomic force microscope can mechanically switch the polarization in the nanoscale volume of a ferroelectric film. Pure mechanical force can therefore be used as a dynamic tool for polarization control and may enable applications in which memory bits are written mechanically and read electrically.

  19. Mechanical Writing of Ferroelectric Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Bark, C.-W.; Esque de los Ojos, D.; Alcala, J.; Eom, C. B.; Catalan, G.; Gruverman, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ferroelectric materials are characterized by a permanent electric dipole that can be reversed through the application of an external voltage, but a strong intrinsic coupling between polarization and deformation also causes all ferroelectrics to be piezoelectric, leading to applications in sensors and high-displacement actuators. A less explored property is flexoelectricity, the coupling between polarization and a strain gradient. We demonstrate that the stress gradient generated by the tip of an atomic force microscope can mechanically switch the polarization in the nanoscale volume of a ferroelectric film. Pure mechanical force can therefore be used as a dynamic tool for polarization control and may enable applications in which memory bits are written mechanically and read electrically.

  20. Polarization Beam Splitter Based on a Self-Collimation Michelson Interferometer in a Silicon Photonic Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xi-Yao; Lin Gui-Min; Li Jun-Jun; Xu Xiao-Fu; Jiang Jun-Zhen; Qiang Ze-Xuan; Qiu Yi-Shen; Li Hui

    2012-01-01

    A polarization beam splitter based on a self-collimation Michelson interferometer (SMI) in a hole-type silicon photonic crystal is proposed and numerically demonstrated. Utilizing the polarization dependence of the transmission spectra of the SMI and polarization peak matching method, the SMI can work as a polarization beam splitter (PBS) by selecting an appropriate path length difference in the structure. Based on its novel polarization beam splitting mechanics, the polarization extinction ratios (PERs) for TM and TE modes are as high as 18.4 dB and 24.3 dB, respectively. Since its dimensions are only several operating wavelengths, the PBS may have practical applications in photonic integrated circuits. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  1. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. IV. Polarization timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Goosmann, R. W.; Marin, F.; Savić, D.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Optical observations cannot resolve the structure of active galactic nuclei (AGN), and a unified model for AGN was inferred mostly from indirect methods, such as spectroscopy and variability studies. Optical reverberation mapping allowed us to constrain the spatial dimension of the broad emission line region and thereby to measure the mass of supermassive black holes. Recently, reverberation was also applied to the polarized signal emerging from different AGN components. In principle, this should allow us to measure the spatial dimensions of the sub-parsec reprocessing media. Aim. We conduct numerical modeling of polarization reverberation and provide theoretical predictions for the polarization time lag induced by different AGN components. The model parameters are adjusted to the observational appearance of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. Methods: We modeled scattering-induced polarization and tested different geometries for the circumnuclear dust component. Our tests included the effects of clumpiness and different dust prescriptions. To further extend the model, we also explored the effects of additional ionized winds stretched along the polar direction, and of an equatorial scattering ring that is responsible for the polarization angle observed in pole-on AGN. The simulations were run using a time-dependent version of the STOKES code. Results: Our modeling confirms the previously found polarization characteristics as a function of the observer`s viewing angle. When the dust adopts a flared-disk geometry, the lags reveal a clear difference between type 1 and type 2 AGN. This distinction is less clear for a torus geometry where the time lag is more sensitive to the geometry and optical depth of the inner surface layers of the funnel. The presence of a scattering equatorial ring and ionized outflows increased the recorded polarization time lags, and the polar outflows smooths out dependence on viewing angle, especially for the higher optical depth of the

  2. Ratio of Pediatric ICU versus Ward Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Events is Increasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert A.; Sutton, Robert M.; Holubkov, Richard; Nicholson, Carol E.; Dean, J. Michael; Harrison, Rick; Heidemann, Sabrina; Meert, Kathleen; Newth, Christopher; Moler, Frank; Pollack, Murray; Dalton, Heidi; Doctor, Allan; Wessel, David; Berger, John; Shanley, Thomas; Carcillo, Joseph; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative frequency of pediatric in-hospital CPR events occurring in intensive care units (ICUs) compared to general wards. We hypothesized that the proportion of pediatric CPR provided in ICUs versus general wards has increased over the past decade and this shift is associated with improved resuscitation outcomes. Design Prospective, observational study. Setting Total of 315 hospitals in the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GTWG-R) database. Patients Total of 5,870 pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) events between January 1, 2000 and September 14, 2010. CPR events were defined as external chest compressions >1minute. Measurements and Results The primary outcome was proportion of total ICU versus general ward CPR events over time evaluated by chi square test for trend. Secondary outcome included return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) following the CPR event. Among 5870 pediatric CPR events, 5477 (93.3%) occurred in ICUs compared to 393 (6.7%) on inpatient wards. Over time, significantly more of these CPR events occurred in the ICU compared to the wards (test for trend: p<0.01), with a prominent shift noted between 2003 and 2004 (2000-2003: 87 - 91% vs. 2004-2010: 94 - 96%). In a multivariable model controlling for within center variability and other potential confounders, ROSC increased in 2004-2010 compared with 2000-2003 (RR 1.08, 95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.13). Conclusions In-hospital pediatric CPR is much more commonly provided in ICUs vs. Wards and the proportion has increased significantly over the past decade with concomitant increases in return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23921270

  3. Solid Polarized Targets and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabb, D. G.

    2008-01-01

    Examples are given of dynamically polarized targets in use today and how the subsystems have changed to meet the needs of todays experiments. Particular emphasis is placed on target materials such as ammonia and lithium deuteride. Recent polarization studies of irradiated materials such as butanol, deuterated butanol, polyethylene, and deuterated polyethylene are presented. The operation of two non-DNP target systems as well as applications of traditional DNP targets are briefly discussed

  4. Artificial anisotropy and polarizing filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, François; Escoubas, Ludovic; Lazaridès, Basile

    2002-06-01

    The calculated spectral transmittance of a multilayer laser mirror is used to determine the effective index of the single layer equivalent to the multilayer stack. We measure the artificial anisotropy of photoresist thin films whose structure is a one-dimensional, subwavelength grating obtained from interference fringes. The limitation of the theory of the first-order effective index homogenization is discussed. We designed normal-incidence, polarizing coating and a polarization rotator by embedding anisotropic films in simple multilayer structures.

  5. Polarization bremsstrahlung in α decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Zon, B. A.; Kretinin, I. Yu.

    2007-01-01

    A mechanism of formation of electromagnetic radiation that accompanies α decay and is associated with the emission of photons by electrons of atomic shells due to the scattering of α particles by these atoms (polarization bremsstrahlung) is proposed. It is shown that, when the photon energy is no higher than the energy of K electrons of an atom, polarization bremsstrahlung makes a significant contribution to the bremsstrahlung in α decay

  6. Coherent states with elliptical polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Colavita, E.; Hacyan, S.

    2004-01-01

    Coherent states of the two dimensional harmonic oscillator are constructed as superpositions of energy and angular momentum eigenstates. It is shown that these states are Gaussian wave-packets moving along a classical trajectory, with a well defined elliptical polarization. They are coherent correlated states with respect to the usual cartesian position and momentum operators. A set of creation and annihilation operators is defined in polar coordinates, and it is shown that these same states ...

  7. Studying aerosol light scattering based on aspect ratio distribution observed by fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Zheng, Xu; Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Zhanhua; Dubovik, Oleg; Chen, Xingfeng; Wendisch, Manfred

    2017-08-07

    Particle shape is crucial to the properties of light scattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. A method of fluorescence microscopy direct observation was introduced to determine the aspect ratio distribution of aerosol particles. The result is comparable with that of the electron microscopic analysis. The measured aspect ratio distribution has been successfully applied in modeling light scattering and further in simulation of polarization measurements of the sun/sky radiometer. These efforts are expected to improve shape retrieval from skylight polarization by using directly measured aspect ratio distribution.

  8. Polarization of Coronal Forbidden Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hao; Qu, Zhongquan [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Landi Degl’Innocenti, Egidio, E-mail: sayahoro@ynao.ac.cn [Dipartimento di Astronomia e Scienza dello Spazio, Università di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2017-03-20

    Since the magnetic field is responsible for most manifestations of solar activity, one of the most challenging problems in solar physics is the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields, particularly in the outer atmosphere. To this end, it is important to develop rigorous diagnostic tools to interpret polarimetric observations in suitable spectral lines. This paper is devoted to analyzing the diagnostic content of linear polarization imaging observations in coronal forbidden lines. Although this technique is restricted to off-limb observations, it represents a significant tool to diagnose the magnetic field structure in the solar corona, where the magnetic field is intrinsically weak and still poorly known. We adopt the quantum theory of polarized line formation developed in the framework of the density matrix formalism, and synthesize images of the emergent linear polarization signal in coronal forbidden lines using potential-field source-surface magnetic field models. The influence of electronic collisions, active regions, and Thomson scattering on the linear polarization of coronal forbidden lines is also examined. It is found that active regions and Thomson scattering are capable of conspicuously influencing the orientation of the linear polarization. These effects have to be carefully taken into account to increase the accuracy of the field diagnostics. We also found that linear polarization observation in suitable lines can give valuable information on the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the solar corona.

  9. Polarization in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  10. Measure your septa release ratios: pheromone release ratio variability affected by rubber septa and solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenen, L P S; Siegel, Joel P

    2015-03-01

    The type of solvent and the volume used to load pheromone components onto rubber septa had significant effects on pheromone release ratios, the variability of those release ratios, and the recoverability of the volatile components during subsequent extraction with hexane. Volatile release ratios of synthetic Oriental fruit moth (OFM) pheromone and additional volatile compounds were determined using a gas chromatograph column as a volatile trap for rapid (≤1 hr) analysis from individual rubber septa. Volatile compound solutions were prepared in hexane, pentane, CH2Cl2, and methyl tert-butyl ether, and a 10, 33, or 100 μl aliquot of each solution was applied to rubber septa. Septa loaded with 100 μl of CH2Cl2 emitted significantly (P < 0.05) higher alcohol: acetate (OH:Ac) ratios than septa loaded with the other solvents, which were all similar. Release ratios of the alcohol and acetate components of the OFM pheromone components were assessed over a 3 week period using septa loaded with each solvent. Regardless of loading solvent, the OFM OH:Ac ratios declined logarithmically over 3 weeks; however, the decay slope from septa loaded with CH2Cl2 solutions was different from those of the other three solvents, which were nearly all the same. A high variability in OH:Ac release ratios was measured overall, regardless of the solvent used or the volume it was applied in. Four compounds of near-equal mass: 1-dodecanol, 1-dodecanal, methyl decanoate, and tridecane emitted different release ratios dependent on the solvent, hexane or CH2Cl2, with which a septum was loaded. The more polar and the greater the mass of the test compound, the slower it was emitted from a septum regardless of solvent. These combined results plus comparisons to earlier reports, suggest that researchers should empirically assess the release ratios from septa to be used in bioassays rather than just reporting the type of septum, ratios of compounds applied and solvent used to prepare them.

  11. Slotted Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna for RFID Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A single layer coaxial fed rectangular microstrip slotted antenna for circular polarization (CP is proposed for radio frequency identification (RFID application. Two triangular shaped slots and one rectangular slot along the diagonal axis of a square patch have been embedded. Due to slotted structure along the diagonal axis and less surface area, good quality of circular polarization has been obtained with the reduction in the size of microstrip antenna by 4.04 %. Circular polarization radiation performance has been studied by size and angle variation of diagonally slotted structures. The experimental result found for 10-dB return loss is 44 MHz with 10MHz of 3dB Axial Ratio (AR bandwidth respectively at the resonant frequency 910 MHz. The overall proposed antenna size including the ground plane is 80 mm x 80 mm x 4.572 mm.

  12. X-Parameter Based Modelling of Polar Modulated Power Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yelin; Nielsen, Troels Studsgaard; Sira, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    X-parameters are developed as an extension of S-parameters capable of modelling non-linear devices driven by large signals. They are suitable for devices having only radio frequency (RF) and DC ports. In a polar power amplifier (PA), phase and envelope of the input modulated signal are applied...... at separate ports and the envelope port is neither an RF nor a DC port. As a result, X-parameters may fail to characterise the effect of the envelope port excitation and consequently the polar PA. This study introduces a solution to the problem for a commercial polar PA. In this solution, the RF-phase path...... PA for simulations. The simulated error vector magnitude (EVM) and adjacent channel power ratio (ACPR) were compared with the measured data to validate the model. The maximum differences between the simulated and measured EVM and ACPR are less than 2% point and 3 dB, respectively....

  13. Room Temperature Memory for Few Photon Polarization Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupchak, Connor; Mittiga, Thomas; Jordan, Bertus; Nazami, Mehdi; Nolleke, Christian; Figueroa, Eden

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a room temperature quantum memory device based on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency capable of reliably storing and retrieving polarization qubits on the few photon level. Our system is realized in a vapor of 87Rb atoms utilizing a Λ-type energy level scheme. We create a dual-rail storage scheme mediated by an intense control field to allow storage and retrieval of any arbitrary polarization state. Upon retrieval, we employ a filtering system to sufficiently remove the strong pump field, and subject retrieved light states to polarization tomography. To date, our system has produced signal-to-noise ratios near unity with a memory fidelity of >80 % using coherent state qubits containing four photons on average. Our results thus demonstrate the feasibility of room temperature systems for the storage of single-photon-level photonic qubits. Such room temperature systems will be attractive for future long distance quantum communication schemes.

  14. Planck intermediate results. XXI. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust at 353 GHz with interstellar polarization in the visible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J.F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.

    2015-01-01

    ) in the visible with that in the submillimetre. For those lines of sight through the diffuse interstellar medium with comparable values of the estimated column density and polarization directions close to orthogonal, we correlate properties in the submillimetre and visible to find two ratios, RS/V = (PS......The Planck survey provides unprecedented full-sky coverage of the submillimetre polarized emission from Galactic dust. In addition to the information on the direction of the Galactic magnetic field, this also brings new constraints on the properties of dust. The dust grains that emit the radiation...... seen by Planck in the submillimetre also extinguish and polarize starlight in the visible. Comparison of the polarization of the emission and of the interstellar polarization on selected lines of sight probed by stars provides unique new diagnostics of the emission and light scattering properties...

  15. Superconducting polarizing magnet for a movable polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anishchenko, N.G.; Bartenev, V.D.; Blinov, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    The superconducting polarizing magnet was constructed for the JINR (Dubna) movable polarized target (MPT) with working volume 200 mm long and 30 mm in diameter. The magnet provides a polarizing magnetic field up to 6 T in the centre with the uniformity of 4.5 x 10 -4 in the working volume of the target. The magnet contains a main solenoidal winding 558 mm long and 206/144 mm in diameters, and compensating and correcting winding placed at its ends. The windings are made of a NbTi wire, impregnated with the epoxy resin and placed in the horizontal cryostat. The diameter of the 'warm' aperture of the magnet cryostat is 96 mm. The design and technology of the magnet winding are described. Results of the magnetic field map measurements, using a NMR-magnetometer are given. A similar magnet constructed at DAPNIA, CEA/Saclay (France), represented a model for the present development. The MPT array is installed in the beam line of polarized neutrons produced by break-up of polarized deuterons extracted from the synchrophasotron of the Laboratory of High Energies (LHE), JINR (Dubna)

  16. Achieving highly efficient and broad-angle polarization beam filtering using epsilon-near-zero metamaterials mimicked by metal-dielectric multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng

    2018-03-01

    We report a highly efficient and broad-angle polarization beam filter at visible wavelengths using an anisotropic epsilon-near-zero metamaterial mimicked by a multilayer composed of alternative subwavelength magnesium fluoride and silver layers. The underlying physics can be explained by the dramatic difference between two orthogonal polarizations' iso-frequency curves of anisotropic epsilon-near-zero metamaterials. Transmittance for two orthogonal polarization waves and the polarization extinction ratio are calculated via the transfer matrix method to assess the comprehensive performance of the proposed polarization beam filter. From the simulation results, the proposed polarization beam filter is highly efficient (the polarization extinction ratio is far larger than two orders of magnitude) and has a broad operating angle range (ranging from 30° to 75°). Finally, we show that the proper tailoring of the periodic number enables us to obtain high comprehensive performance of the proposed polarization beam filter.

  17. Recovery of Large Angular Scale CMB Polarization for Instruments Employing Variable-Delay Polarization Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, N. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Marriage, T. A.; Wollack, E. J.; Appel, J. W.; Bennett, C. L.; Eimer, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Fixsen, D. J.; Harrington, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs) are currently being implemented in experiments designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background on large angular scales because of their capability for providing rapid, front-end polarization modulation and control over systematic errors. Despite the advantages provided by the VPM, it is important to identify and mitigate any time-varying effects that leak into the synchronously modulated component of the signal. In this paper, the effect of emission from a 300 K VPM on the system performance is considered and addressed. Though instrument design can greatly reduce the influence of modulated VPM emission, some residual modulated signal is expected. VPM emission is treated in the presence of rotational misalignments and temperature variation. Simulations of time-ordered data are used to evaluate the effect of these residual errors on the power spectrum. The analysis and modeling in this paper guides experimentalists on the critical aspects of observations using VPMs as front-end modulators. By implementing the characterizations and controls as described, front-end VPM modulation can be very powerful for mitigating 1/ f noise in large angular scale polarimetric surveys. None of the systematic errors studied fundamentally limit the detection and characterization of B-modes on large scales for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r= 0.01. Indeed, r less than 0.01 is achievable with commensurately improved characterizations and controls.

  18. RECOVERY OF LARGE ANGULAR SCALE CMB POLARIZATION FOR INSTRUMENTS EMPLOYING VARIABLE-DELAY POLARIZATION MODULATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N. J.; Marriage, T. A.; Appel, J. W.; Bennett, C. L.; Eimer, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Harrington, K.; Rostem, K.; Watts, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chuss, D. T. [Department of Physics, Villanova University, 800 E Lancaster, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Wollack, E. J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Switzer, E. R., E-mail: Nathan.J.Miller@nasa.gov [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs) are currently being implemented in experiments designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background on large angular scales because of their capability for providing rapid, front-end polarization modulation and control over systematic errors. Despite the advantages provided by the VPM, it is important to identify and mitigate any time-varying effects that leak into the synchronously modulated component of the signal. In this paper, the effect of emission from a 300 K VPM on the system performance is considered and addressed. Though instrument design can greatly reduce the influence of modulated VPM emission, some residual modulated signal is expected. VPM emission is treated in the presence of rotational misalignments and temperature variation. Simulations of time-ordered data are used to evaluate the effect of these residual errors on the power spectrum. The analysis and modeling in this paper guides experimentalists on the critical aspects of observations using VPMs as front-end modulators. By implementing the characterizations and controls as described, front-end VPM modulation can be very powerful for mitigating 1/f noise in large angular scale polarimetric surveys. None of the systematic errors studied fundamentally limit the detection and characterization of B-modes on large scales for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r = 0.01. Indeed, r < 0.01 is achievable with commensurately improved characterizations and controls.

  19. Polarization fluctuations in stationary light beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, A.; Setaelae, T.; Kaivola, M.; Friberg, A.T.; Royal Institute of Technology , Department of Microelectronics and Applied Physics; Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    For stationary beams the degree of polarization contains only limited information on time dependent polarization. Two approaches towards assessing a beams polarization dynamics, one based on Poincare and the other on Jones vector formalism, are described leading to the notion of polarization time. Specific examples of partially temporally coherent electromagnetic beams are discussed. (Author)

  20. FIRST POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROSER, T.; AHRENS, L.; ALESSI, J.; BAI, M.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BROWN, K.A.; BUNCE, G.; CAMERON, P.; COURANT, E.D.; DREES, A.; FISCHER, W.; FLILLER, R. III; GLENN, W.; HUANG, H.; LUCCIO, A.U.; MACKAY, W.W.; MAKDISI, Y.; MONTAG, C.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; SATOGATA, T.

    2002-01-01

    We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180 o about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV

  1. Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Apico-basal polarity is a cardinal molecular feature of adult eukaryotic epithelial cells and appears to be involved in several key cellular processes including polarized cell migration and maintenance of tissue architecture. Epithelial cell polarity is maintained by three well-conserved polarity complexes, namely, PAR, Crumbs ...

  2. Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1980-06-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated the potential for producing a viable longburn tokamak reactor by enhancing the volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer through the use of high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were assessed in the context of extended burn operation. Using a one-dimensional transport code plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the startup and shutdown portions of the tokamak cycle. A representative large aspect ratio tokamak with an aspect ratio of 8 was found to achieve a burn time of 3.5 h at capital cost only approx. 25% greater than that of a moderate aspect ratio design tokamak

  3. High Performance Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondyopadhyay, Probir K. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A microstrip antenna for radiating circularly polarized electromagnetic waves comprising a cluster array of at least four microstrip radiator elements, each of which is provided with dual orthogonal coplanar feeds in phase quadrature relation achieved by connection to an asymmetric T-junction power divider impedance notched at resonance. The dual fed circularly polarized reference element is positioned with its axis at a 45 deg angle with respect to the unit cell axis. The other three dual fed elements in the unit cell are positioned and fed with a coplanar feed structure with sequential rotation and phasing to enhance the axial ratio and impedance matching performance over a wide bandwidth. The centers of the radiator elements are disposed at the corners of a square with each side of a length d in the range of 0.7 to 0.9 times the free space wavelength of the antenna radiation and the radiator elements reside in a square unit cell area of sides equal to 2d and thereby permit the array to be used as a phased array antenna for electronic scanning and is realizable in a high temperature superconducting thin film material for high efficiency.

  4. Inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, J.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics]|[Universidad de Granada (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna]|[Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Lab. for Nuclear Science]|[Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Caballero, J.A. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia]|[Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear; Donnelly, T.W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics]|[Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Lab. for Nuclear Science]|[Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Moya de Guerra, E. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia

    1996-12-23

    The inclusive quasielastic response functions that appear in the scattering of polarized electrons from polarized nuclei are computed and analyzed for several closed-shell-minus-one nuclei with special attention paid to {sup 39}K. Results are presented using two models for the ejected nucleon - when described by a distorted wave in the continuum shell model or by a plane wave in PWIA with on- and off-shell nucleons. Relativistic effects in kinematics and in the electromagnetic current have been incorporated throughout. Specifically, the recently obtained expansion of the electromagnetic current in powers only of the struck nucleon`s momentum is employed for the on-shell current and the effects of the first-order terms (spin-orbit and convection) are compared with the zeroth-order (charge and magnetization) contributions. The use of polarized inclusive quasielastic electron scattering as a tool for determining near-valence nucleon momentum distributions is discussed. (orig.).

  5. System for measuring of proton polarization in polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derkach, A.Ya.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kuz'menko, V.S.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Trotsenko, V.I.; Chechetenko, V.F.

    1981-01-01

    Measurement system of proton polarization in the target, which uses the method of nuclear magnetic resonance is described. To record the signal of NMR-absorption a parallel Q-meter of voltage with analogous subtraction of resonance characteristics of measurement circuit is used. To obtain gradual sensitivity of the system to polarization state in the whole volume of the target the measurement coils is made of tape conductor. The analysis and mathematical modelling of Q-meter are carried out. Corrections for nonlinearity and dispersion are calculated. Key diagrams of the main electron blocks of Q-meter are presented. The system described operates on line with the M6000 computer. Total error of measurement of polarization value of free protons in the target does not exceed 6% [ru

  6. System of measurement of proton polarization in a polarized target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnaukov, I.M.; Chechetenko, V.F.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Telegin, Y.N.; Trotsenko, V.I.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer with high sensitivity. The signal of NMR absorption is recorded by a Q-meter with a series circuit and a circuit for compensation of the resonance characteristic of the measuring circuit. In order to ensure uniform sensitivity of the system to the state of polarization throughout the volume of the target and to enhance the S/N ration the measuring coil is made of a flat conductor. The polarization-measuring system works on-line with an M-6000 computer. The total error of measurement of the polarization of free protons in a target with allowance for the error due to local depolarization of free protons in a target with allowance for the error due to local depolarization of the working substance under irradiation with an intense photon beam is less than or equal to 6%.

  7. Integrated polymer polarization rotator based on tilted laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulopoulos, Giannis; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Missinne, Jeroen; Bosman, Erwin; Van Steenberge, Geert; Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios; Avramopoulos, Hercules

    2017-02-01

    The ubiquitous need for compact, low-cost and mass production photonic devices, for next generation photonic enabled applications, necessitates the development of integrated components exhibiting functionalities that are, to date, carried out by free space elements or standard fiber equipment. The polarization rotator is a typical example of such tendency, as it is a crucial part of the PBS operation of future transceiver modules that leverage polarization multiplexing schemes for increasing the optical network capacity. Up to now, a variety of integrated polarization rotating concepts has been proposed and reported, relying, mainly, on special waveguide crossection configurations for achieving the rotation. Nevertheless, most of those concepts employ SiPh or III-V integration platforms, significantly increasing the fabrication complexity required for customizing the waveguide crossection, which in turn leads to either prohibitively increased cost or compromised quality and performance. In this manuscript we demonstrate the extensive design of a low-cost integrated polymer polarization rotator employing a right-trapezoidal waveguide interfaced to standard square polymer waveguides. First the crossection of the waveguide is defined by calculating and analyzing the components of the hybrid modes excited in the waveguide structure, using a Finite Difference mode solver. Mode overlaps between the fundamental polymer mode and each hybrid mode reveal the optimum lateral offset between the square polymer and the trapezoidal waveguide that ensures both minimum interface loss and maximized polarization rotation performance. The required trapezoidal waveguide length is obtained through EigenMode Expansion (EME) propagation simulations, while more than 95% maximum theoretical conversion efficiency is reported over the entire C-band, resulting to more than 13dB polarization extinction ratio. The polarization rotator design relies on the development of angled polymer waveguide

  8. Excess B-modes extracted from the Planck polarization maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.

    2016-06-01

    One of the main obstacles for extracting the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from mm/submm observations is the pollution from the main Galactic components: synchrotron, free-free and thermal dust emission. The feasibility of using simple neural networks to extract CMB has been demonstrated on both temperature and polarization data obtained by the WMAP satellite. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of neural networks for extracting the CMB signal from the Planck polarization data with high precision. Both auto-correlation and cross-correlation power spectra within a mask covering about 63 % of the sky have been used together with a ``high pass filter'' in order to minimize the influence of the remaining systematic errors in the Planck Q and U maps. Using the Planck 2015 released polarization maps, a BB power spectrum have been extracted by Multilayer Perceptron neural networks. This spectrum contains a bright feature with signal to noise ratios ≃ 4.5 within 200 ≤ l ≤ 250. The spectrum is significantly brighter than the BICEP2 2015 spectrum, with a spectral behaviour quite different from the ``canonical'' models (weak lensing plus B-modes spectra with different tensor to scalar ratios). The feasibility of the neural network to remove the residual systematics from the available Planck polarization data to a high level has been demonstrated.

  9. The Primordial Inflation Polarization ExploreR (PIPER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandilo, Natalie; Ade, Peter; Benford, Dominic; Bennett, Charles; Chuss, David; Datta, Rahul; Dotson, Jessie; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fixsen, Dale; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary; Irwin, Kent; Jhabvala, Christine; Kimball, Mark; Kogut, Al; Lowe, Luke; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Timothy; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, Samuel Harvey; Pawlyk, Samuel; Rodriguez, Samelys; Sharp, Elmer; Shirron, Peter; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Sullivan, Dan; Switzer, Eric; Taraschi, Peter; Tucker, Carole; Walts, Alexander; Wollack, Edward

    2018-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization ExploreR (PIPER) is a balloon-borne telescope designed to map the large scale polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background as well as the polarized emission from galactic dust at 200, 270, 350, and 600 GHz, with 21, 15, 14, and 14 arcminutes of angular resolution respectively. PIPER uses twin telescopes with Variable-delay Polarization Modulators to simultaneously map Stokes I, Q, U and V. Cold optics and the lack of a warm window allow the instrument to achieve background limited sensitivity, with mapping speed approximately 10 times faster than a similar instrument with a single ambient-temperature mirror. Over the course of 8 conventional balloon flights from the Northern and Southern hemisphere, PIPER will map 85% of the sky, measuring the B-mode polarization spectrum from the reionization bump to l~300, and placing an upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of rMexico, and the first science flight is planned for June 2018 from Palestine, Texas.

  10. Remotely Interrogated Passive Polarizing Dosimeter (RIPPeD).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Buller, Daniel L.; Dirk, Shawn M.; Boye, Robert R.; Samora, Sally; Washburn, Cody M.; Wheeler, David Roger

    2008-09-01

    Conductive polymers have become an extremely useful class of materials for many optical applications. We have developed an electrochemical growth method for depositing highly conductive ({approx}100 S/cm) polypyrrole. Additionally, we have adapted advanced fabrication methods for use with the polypyrrole resulting in gratings with submicron features. This conductive polymer micro-wire grid provides an optical polarizer with unique properties. When the polymer is exposed to ionizing radiation, its conductivity is affected and the polarization properties of the device, specifically the extinction ratio, change in a corresponding manner. This change in polarization properties can be determined by optically interrogating the device, possibly from a remote location. The result is a passive radiation-sensitive sensor with very low optical visibility. The ability to interrogate the device from a safe standoff distance provides a device useful in potentially dangerous environments. Also, the passive nature of the device make it applicable in applications where external power is not available. We will review the polymer deposition, fabrication methods and device design and modeling. The characterization of the polymer's sensitivity to ionizing radiation and optical testing of infrared polarizers before and after irradiation will also be presented. These experimental results will highlight the usefulness of the conductive infrared polarizer to many security and monitoring applications.

  11. Performance of the SLC polarized electron source with high polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Alley, R.K.; Aoyagi, H.

    1993-04-01

    For the 1992 operating cycle of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), the polarized electron source (PES) during its maiden run successfully met the pulse intensity and overall efficiency requirements of the SLC. However, the polarization of the bulk GaAs cathode was low (∼27%) and the pulse-to-pulse stability was marginal. We have shown that adequate charge for the SLC can be extracted from a strained layer cathode having P e ∼80% even though the quantum efficiency (QE) is - beam stability. The performance of the PES during the 1993 SLC operating cycle with these and other improvements is discussed

  12. PIPER: Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazear, Justin; Benford, D.; Chuss, D.; Fixsen, D.; Hinderks, J.; Hinshaw, G.; Jhabvala, C.; Johnson, B.; Kogut, A.; Mirel, P.; Mosely, H.; Staguhn, J.; Wollack, E.; Weston, A.; Vlahacos, K.; Bennett, C.; Eimer, J.; Halpern, M.; Irwin, K.; Dotson, J.; Ade, P.; Tucker, C.

    2011-05-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a balloon-borne instrument to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background in search of the expected signature of primordial gravity waves excited during an inflationary epoch shortly after the Big Bang. PIPER consists of two co-aligned telescopes, one sensitive to the Q Stokes parameter and the other to U. Sky signals will be detected with 5120 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers distributed in four rectangular close-packed arrays maintained at 100 mK. To maximize the sensitivity of the instrument, both telescopes are mounted within a single open bucket dewar and are maintained at 1.5 K throughout flight, with no ambient-temperature windows between the sky and the detectors. To mitigate the effects of systematic errors, the polarized sky signals will be modulated using a variable-delay polarization modulator. PIPER will observe at frequencies 200, 270, 350, and 600 GHz to separate the CMB from polarized dust emission within the Galaxy. A series of flights alternating between northern and southern hemisphere launch sites will produce nearly full-sky maps in Stokes I, Q, U, and V. I will discuss the current status and potential science returns from the PIPER project.

  13. Polar metals by geometric design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T. H.; Puggioni, D.; Yuan, Y.; Xie, L.; Zhou, H.; Campbell, N.; Ryan, P. J.; Choi, Y.; Kim, J.-W.; Patzner, J. R.; Ryu, S.; Podkaminer, J. P.; Irwin, J.; Ma, Y.; Fennie, C. J.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Pan, X. Q.; Gopalan, V.; Rondinelli, J. M.; Eom, C. B.

    2016-05-01

    Gauss’s law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions. Quantum physics supports this view, demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals—it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases. Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO3 perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements. We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedra—the structural signatures of perovskites—owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported, non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties.

  14. NMR dispersion measurement of dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, K.; Cox, S.F.J.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring dynamic nuclear polarization from the NMR dispersive susceptibility is examined. Two prototype instruments are tested in a polarized proton target using organic target material. The more promising employs a tunnel diode oscillator, inside the target cavity, and should provide a precise polarization measurement working at a frequency far enough from the main resonance for the disturbance of the measured polarization to be negligible. Other existing methods for measuring target polarization are briefly reviewed. (author)

  15. Polarization in electron and proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buon, J.

    1986-03-01

    One first introduces the concept of polarization for spin 1/2 particle beams and discusses properties of spin kinetics in a stationary magnetic field. Then the acceleration of polarized protons in synchrotrons is studied with emphasis on depolarization when resonances are crossed and on the cures for reducing it. Finally, transverse polarization of electrons in storage rings is discussed as an equilibrium between polarizing and depolarizing effects of synchrotron radiation. Means for obtaining longitudinal polarization are also treated

  16. The importance of small polar radiometabolites in molecular neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Annette; Hansen, Hanne D; Svarer, Claus

    2018-01-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36, a 5-HT2A receptor agonist PET radioligand, contains three methoxy groups amenable to [11C]-labeling. In pigs, [11C]Cimbi-36 yields a polar (M1) and a less polar (M2) radiometabolite fraction, while changing the labeling to [11C]Cimbi-36_5 yields only the M1 fraction. We investigate...... substantially decrease the signal-to-background ratio of PET radioligands for neuroimaging. Further, we find that [11C]Cimbi-36 has a better signal-to-background ratio than [11C]Cimbi-36_5, and thus will be more sensitive to changes in 5-HT2A receptor levels in the brain....

  17. Characterization of Carbonates by Spectral Induced Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupfer, Sarah; Halisch, Matthias; Weller, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    tomography, microscopy) were used to create a qualitative image of the carbonate samples and to investigate the pore space, for example the ratio of connected to non-connected pore space. A comparison between SIP data and the petrophysical data of the sample set showed that the phase behavior of carbonates is highly complicated and challenging compared with sandstones. It seems that there is no correlation between polarization effects and any petrophysical parameter. Ongoing investigations and measurements will be conducted to get more insight to the polarization effects of carbonates.

  18. Frequency dependent polarization in blazars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernsson, C.I.

    1984-10-01

    It is argued that the intrinsic frequency dependent polarization in blazars finds its most straightforward explanations in terms of a single rather than a multicomponent sourcemodel. In order to reproduce the observations, under the assumption that the emission mechanism is optically thin synchrotron radiation, both a well ordered magnetic field and an electron distribution with a sharp break or cuttoff are necessary. Non-uniform pitch angle distribution and/or environments where synchrotron losses are important are both conducive to producing strong frequency dependent polarization. Reasons are put forth as to why such conditions ar expected to occur in blazars. Two specific models are discussed in detail and it is shown that they are both able to produce strong frequency dependent polarization, even when the spectral index changes by a small amount only. (orig.)

  19. Report of the polarization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, W.; Kondo, K.; Martin, F.; Manning, G.; Miller, D.; Prescott, C.

    1975-01-01

    The use of longitudinal polarization in the reaction e + e - → μ + μ - was studied. Modifications of the magnetic insertion which could reduce synchrotron radiation by two or more were considered. In addition, a specific design is suggested which incorporates the optimized magnetic configuration; it is assumed that no particle detection is necessary near the interaction vertex and the synchrotron radiation is ''dumped'' up - and downstream. Also considered were vacuum chambers in which the synchrotron radiation is absorbed locally so that shielded regions are provided for detectors near the interaction vertex. A scheme for rotating the polarization outside the experiment areas is detailed; in this way the design of experiments is greatly simplified. Local intense ionization of residual gas in the interaction region due to synchrotron radiation at the insertion was studied. Finally, some general considerations in the production and measurement of beam polarization are summarized. 2 figures

  20. Uses of laser optical pumping to produce polarized ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    Laser optical pumping can be used to produce polarized alkali atom beams or polarized alkali vapor targets. Polarized alkali atom beams can be converted into polarized alkali ion beams, and polarized alkali vapor targets can be used to produce polarized H - or 3 He - ion beams. In this paper the authors discuss how the polarized alkali atom beams and polarized alkali vapor targets are used to produce polarized ion beams with emphasis on the production of polarized negative ion beams

  1. Polarization-Dependent Multi-Functional Metamaterial as Polarization Filter, Transparent Wall and Circular Polarizer using Ring-Cross Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a polarization-dependent multi-functional metamaterial using ring-cross resonator. Based on the analysis of surface current distributions induced by different polarized incidence, we demonstrate that the proposed metamaterial serves as a polarization filter, a transparent wall and a circular polarizer under different polarization normal incidence. Additionally, parameter analyses on the control of resonance are discussed to complementally explain the physical origin. Simulated results show that the proposed metamaterial functions as a polarization filter eliminating the x-polarization wave at 10.1 GHz and y-polarization wave at 14.3 GHz, a transparent wall transmitting both x-polarized and y-polarized incident waves at 12.6 GHz, and a broadband circular polarizer converting the +45° polarized (-45° polarized incident wave to the left (right handed circularly polarized wave from 10.8 to 12.8 GHz, respectively. Measured results agree well with the simulation and validate the performance of the proposed multifunctional metamaterial.

  2. Holes at High Blowing Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip M. Ligrani

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results are presented which describe the development and structure of flow downstream of a single row of holes with compound angle orientations producing film cooling at high blowing ratios. This film cooling configuration is important because similar arrangements are frequently employed on the first stage of rotating blades of operating gas turbine engines. With this configuration, holes are spaced 6d apart in the spanwise direction, with inclination angles of 24 degrees, and angles of orientation of 50.5 degrees. Blowing ratios range from 1.5 to 4.0 and the ratio of injectant to freestream density is near 1.0. Results show that spanwise averaged adiabatic effectiveness, spanwise-averaged iso-energetic Stanton number ratios, surveys of streamwise mean velocity, and surveys of injectant distributions change by important amounts as the blowing ratio increases. This is due to injectant lift-off from the test surface just downstream of the holes.

  3. Polarized electroluminescence from silicon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagraev, Nikolay; Danilovsky, Eduard; Gets, Dmitry; Klyachkin, Leonid; Kudryavtsev, Andrey; Kuzmin, Roman; Malyarenko, Anna [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mashkov, Vladimir [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15

    We present the first findings of the circularly polarized electroluminescence (CPEL) from silicon nanostructures which are the p-type ultra-narrow silicon quantum well (Si-QW) confined by {delta}-barriers heavily doped with boron. The CPEL dependences on the forward current and lateral electric field show the circularly polarized light emission which appears to be caused by the exciton recombination through the negative-U dipole boron centers at the Si-QW-{delta}-barriers interface with the assistance of phosphorus donors. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. All-fiber polarization switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knape, Harald; Margulis, Walter

    2007-03-01

    We report an all-fiber polarization switch made out of silica-based microstructured fiber suitable for Q-switching all-fiber lasers. Nanosecond high-voltage pulses are used to heat and expand an internal electrode to cause λ/2-polarization rotation in less than 10 ns for 1.5 μm light. The 10 cm long component has an experimentally measured optical insertion loss of 0.2 dB and a 0-10 kHz repetition frequency capacity and has been durability tested for more than 109 pulses.

  5. The sensitivity of income polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Azhar

    2009-01-01

    This study looks at polarization and its components' sensitivity to assumptions about equivalence scales, income definition, ethical income distribution parameters, and the income accounting period. A representative sample of Danish individual incomes from 1984 to 2002 is utilised. Results show...... that polarization has increased over time, regardless of the applied measure, when the last part of the period is compared to the first part of the period; primary causes being increased inequality (alienation) and faster income growth among high incomes relative to those in the middle of the distribution...

  6. Graphics of polar figure; Graficado de figura polar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias B, L.R

    1991-11-15

    The objective of this work, is that starting from a data file coming from a spectra that has been softened, and of the one that have been generated its coordinates to project it in stereographic form, to create the corresponding polar figure making use of the Cyber computer of the ININ by means of the GRAPHOS package. This work only requires a Beta, Fi and Intensity (I) enter data file. It starts of the existence of a softened spectra of which have been generated already with these data, making use of some language that in this case was FORTRAN for the Cyber computer, a program is generated supported in the Graphos package that allows starting of a reading of the Beta, Fi, I file, to generate the points in a stereographic projection and that it culminates with the graph of the corresponding polar figure. The program will request the pertinent information that is wanted to capture in the polar figure just as: date, name of the enter file, indexes of the polar figure, number of levels, radio of the stereographic projection (cms.), crystalline system to which belongs the sample, name the neuter graph file by create and to add the own general data. (Author)

  7. RATIO_TOOL - SOFTWARE FOR COMPUTING IMAGE RATIOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    Geological studies analyze spectral data in order to gain information on surface materials. RATIO_TOOL is an interactive program for viewing and analyzing large multispectral image data sets that have been created by an imaging spectrometer. While the standard approach to classification of multispectral data is to match the spectrum for each input pixel against a library of known mineral spectra, RATIO_TOOL uses ratios of spectral bands in order to spot significant areas of interest within a multispectral image. Each image band can be viewed iteratively, or a selected image band of the data set can be requested and displayed. When the image ratios are computed, the result is displayed as a gray scale image. At this point a histogram option helps in viewing the distribution of values. A thresholding option can then be used to segment the ratio image result into two to four classes. The segmented image is then color coded to indicate threshold classes and displayed alongside the gray scale image. RATIO_TOOL is written in C language for Sun series computers running SunOS 4.0 and later. It requires the XView toolkit and the OpenWindows window manager (version 2.0 or 3.0). The XView toolkit is distributed with Open Windows. A color monitor is also required. The standard distribution medium for RATIO_TOOL is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. An electronic copy of the documentation is included on the program media. RATIO_TOOL was developed in 1992 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. Sun, SunOS, and OpenWindows are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories.

  8. Primordial gravitational waves measurements and anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yu Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Searching for the signal of primordial gravitational waves in the B-modes (BB power spectrum is one of the key scientific aims of the cosmic microwave background (CMB polarization experiments. However, this could be easily contaminated by several foreground issues, such as the interstellar dust grains and the galactic cyclotron electrons. In this paper we study another mechanism, the cosmic birefringence, which can be introduced by a CPT-violating interaction between CMB photons and an external scalar field. Such kind of interaction could give rise to the rotation of the linear polarization state of CMB photons, and consequently induce the CMB BB power spectrum, which could mimic the signal of primordial gravitational waves at large scales. With the recently released polarization data of BICEP2 and the joint analysis data of BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck, we perform a global fitting analysis on constraining the tensor-to-scalar ratio r by considering the polarization rotation angle [α(nˆ] which can be separated into a background isotropic part [α¯] and a small anisotropic part [Δα(nˆ]. Since the data of BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments have already been corrected by using the “self-calibration” method, here we mainly focus on the effects from the anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation angle. We find that including Δα(nˆ in the analysis could slightly weaken the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, when using current CMB polarization measurements. We also simulate the mock CMB data with the BICEP3-like sensitivity. Very interestingly, we find that if the effects of the anisotropic polarization rotation angle could not be taken into account properly in the analysis, the constraints on r will be dramatically biased. This implies that we need to break the degeneracy between the anisotropies of the CMB polarization rotation angle and the CMB primordial tensor perturbations, in order to measure the signal of primordial

  9. VIIRS/J1 polarization narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waluschka, Eugene; McCorkel, Joel; McIntire, Jeff; Moyer, David; McAndrew, Brendan; Brown, Steven W.; Lykke, Keith R.; Young, James B.; Fest, Eric; Butler, James; Wang, Tung R.; Monroy, Eslim O.; Turpie, Kevin; Meister, Gerhard; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2015-09-01

    The polarization sensitivity of the Visible/NearIR (VISNIR) bands in the Joint Polar Satellite Sensor 1 (J1) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was measured using a broadband source. While polarization sensitivity for bands M5-M7, I1, and I2 was less than 2.5 %, the maximum polarization sensitivity for bands M1, M2, M3, and M4 was measured to be 6.4 %, 4.4 %, 3.1 %, and 4.3 %, respectively with a polarization characterization uncertainty of less than 0.38%. A detailed polarization model indicated that the large polarization sensitivity observed in the M1 to M4 bands is mainly due to the large polarization sensitivity introduced at the leading and trailing edges of the newly manufactured VISNIR bandpass focal plane filters installed in front of the VISNIR detectors. This was confirmed by polarization measurements of bands M1 and M4 bands using monochromatic light. Discussed are the activities leading up to and including the two polarization tests, some discussion of the polarization model and the model results, the role of the focal plane filters, the polarization testing of the Aft-Optics-Assembly, the testing of the polarizers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Goddard center and at the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) facility and the use of NIST's Traveling Spectral Irradiance and Radiance responsivity Calibrations using Uniform Sources (T-SIRCUS) for polarization testing and associated analyses and results.

  10. VIIRS-J1 Polarization Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waluschka, Eugene; McCorkel, Joel; McIntire, Jeff; Moyer, David; McAndrew, Brendan; Brown, Steven W.; Lykke, Keith; Butler, James; Meister, Gerhard; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2015-01-01

    The VIS/NIR bands polarization sensitivity of Joint Polar Satellite Sensor 1 (JPSS1) Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was measured using a broadband source. While polarization sensitivity for bands M5-M7, I1, and I2 was less than 2.5%, the maximum polarization sensitivity for bands M1, M2, M3, and M4 was measured to be 6.4%, 4.4%, 3.1%, and 4.3%, respectively with a polarization characterization uncertainty of less than 0.3%. A detailed polarization model indicated that the large polarization sensitivity observed in the M1 to M4 bands was mainly due to the large polarization sensitivity introduced at the leading and trailing edges of the newly manufactured VISNIR bandpass focal plane filters installed in front of the VISNIR detectors. This was confirmed by polarization measurements of bands M1 and M4 bands using monochromatic light. Discussed are the activities leading up to and including the instruments two polarization tests, some discussion of the polarization model and the model results, the role of the focal plane filters, the polarization testing of the Aft-Optics-Assembly, the testing of the polarizers at Goddard and NIST and the use of NIST's T-SIRCUS for polarization testing and associated analyses and results.

  11. Implications of polarized DT plasmas for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micklich, B.J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1983-05-01

    Spin polarization of the deuterons and tritons in a reacting plasma can result in an increase in the fusion reactivity and variation of the angular distribution of emission of the fusion neutrons. The increased fusion reactivity relaxes the confinement-temperature conditions for breakeven and ignition. We have determined the effect of varying the angular distribution of the fusion neutrons on the spatial distribution of fusion neturon current and flux at the first wall, on the global tritium breeding ratio, and on the first-wall radiation damage in low-aspect-ratio toroidal geometry

  12. The optical polarization properties of phenanthrenequinone-doped Poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer materials for volume holographic storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Li, Zhenzhen; Zang, Jinliang; Wu, An'an; Wang, Jue; Lin, Xiao; Tan, Xiaodi; Barada, Daisuke; Shimura, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    We present an experimental study on the optical polarization properties of the phenanthrenequinone-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer materials. We discuss the diffraction efficiency with different weight ratios of phenanthrenequinone that was dissolved in the materials. In addition, we observe the diffraction efficiency difference between polarization holography and traditional holography.

  13. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  14. Measurement of inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, C.E.; Beise, E.J.; Belz, J.E.; Carr, R.W.; Filippone, B.W.; Lorenzon, W.B.; McKeown, R.D.; Mueller, B.; O'Neill, T.G.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Farkhondeh, M.; Kowalski, S.; Lee, K.; Makins, N.; Milner, R.; Thompson, A.; Tieger, D.; van den Brand, J.; Young, A.; Yu, X.; Zumbro, J.

    1990-01-01

    We report a measurement of the asymmetry in spin-dependent quasielastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized 3 He gas target. This measurement represents the first demonstration of a new method for studying electromagnetic nuclear structure: the scattering of polarized electrons from a polarized nuclear target. The measured asymmetry is in good agreement with a Faddeev calculation and supports the picture of spin-dependent quasielastic scattering from polarized 3 He as predominantly scattering from a polarized neutron

  15. NMR investigations of surfaces and interfaces using spin-polarized xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaede, Holly Caroline [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-07-01

    129Xe NMR is potentially useful for the investigation of material surfaces, but has been limited to high surface area samples in which sufficient xenon can be loaded to achieve acceptable signal to noise ratios. In Chapter 2 conventional 129Xe NMR is used to study a high surface area polymer, a catalyst, and a confined liquid crystal to determine the topology of these systems. Further information about the spatial proximity of different sites of the catalyst and liquid crystal systems is determined through two dimensional exchange NMR in Chapter 3. Lower surface area systems may be investigated with spin-polarized xenon, which may be achieved through optical pumping and spin exchange. Optically polarized xenon can be up to 105times more sensitive than thermally polarized xenon. In Chapter 4 highly polarized xenon is used to examine the surface of poly(acrylonitrile) and the formation of xenon clathrate hydrates. An attractive use of polarized xenon is as a magnetization source in cross polarization experiments. Cross polarization from adsorbed polarized xenon may allow detection of surface nuclei with drastic enhancements. A non-selective low field thermal mixing technique is used to enhance the 13C signal of CO2 of xenon occluded in solid CO2 by a factor of 200. High-field cross polarization from xenon to proton on the surface of high surface area polymers has enabled signal enhancements of ~1,000. These studies, together with investigations of the efficiency of the cross polarization process from polarized xenon, are discussed in Chapter 5. Another use of polarized xenon is as an imaging contrast agent in systems that are not compatible with traditional contrast agents. The resolution attainable with this method is determined through images of structured phantoms in Chapter 6.

  16. Hyperon polarization: theory and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnin, J.; Simao, F.R.A.

    1996-01-01

    We give a brief review of the experimental situation concerning hyperon polarization. We mention also the current models developed to understand the experimental results and make some comments on some theoretical aspects contained in the Thomas precession model. (author). 8 ref.

  17. Tau physics with polarized beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daoudi, M.

    1995-11-01

    We present the first results on tau physics using polarized beams. These include measurements of the {tau} Michel parameters {xi} and {xi}{delta} and the {tau} neutrino helicity h{sub {nu}}. The measurements were performed using the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC).

  18. Circular polarization observed in bioluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnberg, Hans; Meijer, E.W.; Hummelen, J.C.; Dekkers, H.P.J.M.; Schippers, P.H.; Carlson, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    While investigating circular polarization in luminescence, and having found it in chemiluminescence, we have studied bioluminescence because it is such a widespread and dramatic natural phenomenon. We report here that left and right lanterns of live larvae of the fireflies, Photuris lucicrescens and

  19. Verum focus and polar questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Giurgea

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We argue that some word order phenomena in Romanian and Sardinian are the result of a checking operation in the left periphery involving verum focus (i.e. focus on the polarity component of the sentence. In particular, this operation accounts for some word order patterns found in polar questions. In Romanian, polarity fronting is realized as head-movement of (V+T to a higher peripheral head which bears a Focus-probe. This licenses VS orders for predications in which VS is not allowed as a neutral order (i-level predicates, iteratives, generics. In Sardinian, an entire phrase headed by the lexical predicate (verbal non-finite form or non-verbal predicate is fronted before the auxiliary. We argue that this order is obtained by two movement operations, head-raising of Aux to Foc and movement of the predicate phrase to SpecFoc. We also present the semantics of polarity focus, distinguishing several types of focus (informational, emphatic, contrastive.

  20. Free radicals and polarized targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyatova, E. I.

    2004-06-01

    Many free radicals were added to organic compounds in search of high proton and deuteron polarizations. Few found practical application. A short review is presented, and special attention is given to some stable nitroxyl radicals which have lately been admixed to organic compounds solid at room temperature, in particular to scintillators.

  1. Free radicals and polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunyatova, E.I. E-mail: bunyatel@nusun.jinr.ru

    2004-06-21

    Many free radicals were added to organic compounds in search of high proton and deuteron polarizations. Few found practical application. A short review is presented, and special attention is given to some stable nitroxyl radicals which have lately been admixed to organic compounds solid at room temperature, in particular to scintillators.

  2. History of the polarized beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, E F

    1979-01-01

    In 1973, the first high energy polarized proton beam was developed at the Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS). It operated very successfully and productively until 1979 when the ZGS was shut down permanently. This report describes the development, characteristics, and operations of this facility.

  3. TREC Dynamic Domain: Polar Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-20

    similarity. However, not all teams that submitted web crawls to this dataset applied their jaccard- similarity algorithms . 4.2 Data Format ...analysis. These algorithms were focused then on allowing better answers to the below representative science queries of our Polar data: 1. What...

  4. Bacteriophage in polar inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säwström, Christin; Lisle, John; Anesio, A.M.; Priscu, John C.; Laybourn-Parry, J.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophages are found wherever microbial life is present and play a significant role in aquatic ecosystems. They mediate microbial abundance, production, respiration, diversity, genetic transfer, nutrient cycling and particle size distribution. Most studies of bacteriophage ecology have been undertaken at temperate latitudes. Data on bacteriophages in polar inland waters are scant but the indications are that they play an active and dynamic role in these microbially dominated polar ecosystems. This review summarises what is presently known about polar inland bacteriophages, ranging from subglacial Antarctic lakes to glacial ecosystems in the Arctic. The review examines interactions between bacteriophages and their hosts and the abiotic and biotic variables that influence these interactions in polar inland waters. In addition, we consider the proportion of the bacteria in Arctic and Antarctic lake and glacial waters that are lysogenic and visibly infected with viruses. We assess the relevance of bacteriophages in the microbial loop in the extreme environments of Antarctic and Arctic inland waters with an emphasis on carbon cycling.

  5. High current polarized proton sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Polarized proton sources are now being used more frequently on linacs. In pulsed operation up to 10 mA of /rvec H//sup +/ and 0.4 mA of /rvec H//sup /minus// have been produced. The present status of these sources, and developments to reach even higher intensities, are reviewed. 39 refs., 1 tab.

  6. the effect of surface polarity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An implant material when comes in contact with blood fluids (e.g., blood and lymph), adsorb proteins spontaneously on its surface. Notably, blood coagulation is influenced by many factors, including mainly chemical structure and polarity (charge) of the material. The present study describes the methodology to ...

  7. Verum focus and polar questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Giurgea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We argue that some word order phenomena in Romanian and Sardinian are the result of a checkingoperation in the left periphery involving verum focus (i.e. focus on the polarity component of the sentence.In particular, this operation accounts for some word order patterns found in polar questions. In Romanian,polarity fronting is realized as head-movement of (V+T to a higher peripheral head which bears a Focusprobe.This licenses VS orders for predications in which VS is not allowed as a neutral order (i-levelpredicates, iteratives, generics. In Sardinian, an entire phrase headed by the lexical predicate (verbal nonfiniteform or non-verbal predicate is fronted before the auxiliary. We argue that this order is obtained bytwo movement operations, head-raising of Aux to Foc and movement of the predicate phrase to SpecFoc. Wealso present the semantics of polarity focus, distinguishing several types of focus (informational, emphatic,contrastive.

  8. The SLC polarized electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.

    1990-10-01

    A polarized electron source consisting of a 3-electrode photocathode gun and a flashlamp-pumped dye laser has been designed and built for the SLC and is currently undergoing commissioning. The source is described, and the operating configuration is discussed. The present status of the source and future plans are briefly indicated. 7 refs., 4 figs

  9. Polar heating in Saturn's thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. A. Smith

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D numerical global circulation model of the Kronian thermosphere has been used to investigate the influence of polar heating. The distributions of temperature and winds resulting from a general heat source in the polar regions are described. We show that both the total energy input and its vertical distribution are important to the resulting thermal structure. We find that the form of the topside heating profile is particularly important in determining exospheric temperatures. We compare our results to exospheric temperatures from Voyager occultation measurements (Smith et al., 1983; Festou and Atreya, 1982 and auroral H3+ temperatures from ground-based spectroscopic observations (e.g. Miller et al., 2000. We find that a polar heat source is consistent with both the Smith et al. determination of T∞~400 K at ~30° N and auroral temperatures. The required heat source is also consistent with recent estimates of the Joule heating rate at Saturn (Cowley et al., 2004. However, our results show that a polar heat source can probably not explain the Festou and Atreya determination of T∞~800 K at ~4° N and the auroral temperatures simultaneously. Keywords. Ionosphere (Planetary ionosphere – Magnetospherica physics (Planetary magnetospheres – Meterology and atmospheric dynamics (Thermospheric dynamics

  10. Ratios of helicity amplitudes for exclusive ρ0 electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Exclusive ρ 0 -meson electroproduction is studied in the HERMES experiment, using a 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron/positron beam and unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets in the kinematic region 0.5 GeV 2 2 2 , 3.0 GeV ' 2 . Real and imaginary parts of the ratios of the natural-parity-exchange helicity amplitudes T 11 (γ T * → ρ T ), T 01 (γ T * → ρ L ), T 10 (γ L * → ρ T ), and T 1-1 (γ -T * → ρ T ) to T 00 (γ L * → ρ L ) are extracted from the data. For the unnatural-parity-exchange amplitude U 11 , the ratio vertical stroke U 11 /T 00 vertical stroke is obtained. The Q 2 and t ' dependences of these ratios are presented and compared with perturbative QCD predictions. (orig.)

  11. Updated thinking on positivity ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2013-12-01

    This article presents my response to the article by Brown, Sokal, and Friedman (2013), which critically examined Losada's conceptual and mathematical work (as presented in Losada, 1999; Losada & Heaphy, 2004; and Fredrickson & Losada; 2005) and concluded that mathematical claims for a critical tipping point positivity ratio are unfounded. In the present article, I draw recent empirical evidence together to support the continued value of computing and seeking to elevate positivity ratios. I also underscore the necessity of modeling nonlinear effects of positivity ratios and, more generally, the value of systems science approaches within affective science and positive psychology. Even when scrubbed of Losada's now-questioned mathematical modeling, ample evidence continues to support the conclusion that, within bounds, higher positivity ratios are predictive of flourishing mental health and other beneficial outcomes. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. 3D printed polarizing grids for IR-THz synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Meguya; Linklater, Denver; Hart, William; Balčytis, Armandas; Skliutas, Edvinas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Appadoo, Dominique; Tan, Yaw-Ren Eugene; Ivanova, Elena P.; Morikawa, Junko; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2018-03-01

    Grid polarisers 3D-printed out of commercial acrilic resin were tested for the polariser function and showed spectral regions where the dichroic ratio {D}R> 1 and molecular and/or stress induced anisotropy. Metal-coated 3D-printed THz optical elements can find a range of applications in intensity and polarization control of IR-THz beams. The used 3D printing method allows for fabrication of an arbitrary high aspect ratio grid polarisers. Polarization analysis of synchrotron THz radiation was carried out with a standard stretched polyethylene polariser and revealed that the linearly polarized (horizontal) component contributes up to 22% ± 5% to the circular polarized synchrotron emission extracted by a gold-coated mirror with a horizontal slit inserted near the bending magnet edge. Comparison with theoretical predictions shows a qualitative match with dominance of the edge radiation.

  13. Polarization-interleave-multiplexed discrete multi-tone modulation with direct detection utilizing MIMO equalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xian; Zhong, Kangping; Gao, Yuliang; Sui, Qi; Dong, Zhenghua; Yuan, Jinhui; Wang, Liang; Long, Keping; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Lu, Chao

    2015-04-06

    Discrete multi-tone (DMT) modulation is an attractive modulation format for short-reach applications to achieve the best use of available channel bandwidth and signal noise ratio (SNR). In order to realize polarization-multiplexed DMT modulation with direct detection, we derive an analytical transmission model for dual polarizations with intensity modulation and direct diction (IM-DD) in this paper. Based on the model, we propose a novel polarization-interleave-multiplexed DMT modulation with direct diction (PIM-DMT-DD) transmission system, where the polarization de-multiplexing can be achieved by using a simple multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) equalizer and the transmission performance is optimized over two distinct received polarization states to eliminate the singularity issue of MIMO demultiplexing algorithms. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed PIM-DMT-DD system are investigated via theoretical analyses and simulation studies.

  14. MRI of Heterogeneous Hydrogenation Reactions Using Parahydrogen Polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, Scott Russell [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The power of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is its ability to image the internal structure of optically opaque samples and provide detailed maps of a variety of important parameters, such as density, diffusion, velocity and temperature. However, one of the fundamental limitations of this technique is its inherent low sensitivity. For example, the low signal to noise ratio (SNR) is particularly problematic for imaging gases in porous materials due to the low density of the gas and the large volume occluded by the porous material. This is unfortunate, as many industrially relevant chemical reactions take place at gas-surface interfaces in porous media, such as packed catalyst beds. Because of this severe SNR problem, many techniques have been developed to directly increase the signal strength. These techniques work by manipulating the nuclear spin populations to produce polarized} (i.e., non-equilibrium) states with resulting signal strengths that are orders of magnitude larger than those available at thermal equilibrium. This dissertation is concerned with an extension of a polarization technique based on the properties of parahydrogen. Specifically, I report on the novel use of heterogeneous catalysis to produce parahydrogen induced polarization and applications of this new technique to gas phase MRI and the characterization of micro-reactors. First, I provide an overview of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and how parahydrogen is used to improve the SNR of the NMR signal. I then present experimental results demonstrating that it is possible to use heterogeneous catalysis to produce parahydrogen-induced polarization. These results are extended to imaging void spaces using a parahydrogen polarized gas. In the second half of this dissertation, I demonstrate the use of parahydrogen-polarized gas-phase MRI for characterizing catalytic microreactors. Specifically, I show how the improved SNR allows one to map parameters important for characterizing the heat and mass

  15. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF GAMMA-RAY BURST POLARIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, Kenji; Sakamoto, Takanori; Hill, Joanne E.; Zhang, Bing; McConnell, Mark L.; Bloser, Peter F.; Yamazaki, Ryo; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakamura, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    The emission mechanism and the origin and structure of magnetic fields in gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets are among the most important open questions concerning the nature of the central engine of GRBs. In spite of extensive observational efforts, these questions remain to be answered and are difficult or even impossible to infer with the spectral and light-curve information currently collected. Polarization measurements will lead to unambiguous answers to several of these questions. Recent developments in X-ray and γ-ray polarimetry techniques have demonstrated a significant increase in sensitivity, enabling several new mission concepts, e.g., Polarimeters for Energetic Transients (POET), providing wide field of view and broadband polarimetry measurements. If launched, missions of this kind would finally provide definitive measurements of GRB polarizations. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to derive the distribution of GRB polarizations in three emission models; the synchrotron model with a globally ordered magnetic field (SO model), the synchrotron model with a small-scale random magnetic field (SR model), and the Compton drag model (CD model). The results show that POET, or other polarimeters with similar capabilities, can constrain the GRB emission models by using the statistical properties of GRB polarizations. In particular, the ratio of the number of GRBs for which the polarization degrees can be measured to the number of GRBs that are detected (N m /N d ) and the distributions of the polarization degrees (Π) can be used as the criteria. If N m /N d > 30% and Π is clustered between 0.2 and 0.7, the SO model will be favored. If, instead, N m /N d 0.8 are observed, then the CD model will be favored.

  16. Study of mechanical compression of spin-polarized 3He gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.; Heil, W.; Krug, B.; Leduc, M.; Meyerhoff, M.; Nacher, P.J.; Otten, E.W.; Prokscha, T.; Schearer, L.D.; Surkau, R.

    1994-01-01

    We have piloted mechanical compression of spinpolarized 3He by a titanium piston compressor. Questions of materials and design are discussed, followed by a thorough investigation of relaxation sources in the course of compression. The latter are traced mainly to regions with large surface to volume ratio, through which fast passage is demanded, therefore. We conclude from this feasibility study that polarized 3He may be compressed this way up to many bars without serious polarization losses. ((orig.))

  17. Detection of ULF electromagnetic emissions as a precursor to an earthquake in China with an improved polarization analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ida

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An improved analysis of polarization (as the ratio of vertical magnetic field component to the horizontal one has been developed, and applied to the approximately four years data (from 1 March 2003 to 31 December 2006 observed at Kashi station in China. It is concluded that the polarization ratio has exhibited an apparent increase only just before the earthquake on 1 September 2003 (magnitude = 6.1 and epicentral distance of 116 km.

  18. The polarized platypus polarized neutron reflectometry made possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saerbeck, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The magnetic moment of the neutron, together with it's highly penetrating non destructive manner, make polarized neutron reflectometry an excellent tool to study magnetic phenomena across surfaces and interfaces of thin films. Unlike other magnetometry techniques which ordinarily yield only average magnetization values or, in case of probes with higher spatial resolution (e.g. electron microscopy or scanning tunnelling microscopy), show a high surface sensitivity, PNR together with magnetic x-ray scattering provides the ability to spatially resolve vector magnetization well beneath the surface [1] The ability to obtain vector magnetization profiles across interfaces and surfaces of thin films and multilayers offers the intriguing possibility to study systematically magnetic configurations and magnetic exchange interactions through intervening layers. In this paper we present the performance of the new polarization system installed on the time of flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS at ANSTO's Bragg Institute. The spin state of the neutrons is polarized and analysed by spatial separation of different neutron spin states using polarizing Fe/Si supermirrors before, and after the sample stage. The supermirrors have a large wavelength acceptance bandwidth of 3 A to 12 A. To control the desired spin direction of the incoming and reflected beam from the sample, two sets of RF spin flippers are installed. In the free space between the spin flippers and the sample stage the neutron spin direction is maintained by two sets of magnetic guide field coils. The new sample environment for studies of magnetic samples includes a 1 T electromagnet and a closed cycle refrigerator which gives access to a temperature range from 4K to 3 50 K .

  19. Micromagnetic investigation of the dynamics of magnetization switching induced by a spin polarized current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Jin; Dieny, Bernard

    2006-03-01

    Using micromagnetic modeling, we tested a prediction of single-domain spin-torque theory which switching current density depends only weakly on magnetic cell size. The switching time and current density are strongly affected by the cell size for low spin polarization. Larger samples with a small length-to-width ratio and small spin polarization can exhibit a nonmonotonous dependence of switching time on current. Excitation of incoherent spin waves caused by the circular Oersted field due to the current is responsible for this nonmonotonous dependence. However, the magnetic dynamics recovers a single-domain-like behavior when the spin polarization is high and/or the cell size is small.

  20. Polarization-independent optical circulator for high accuracy Faraday depolarization lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Noguchi, Kazuo; Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    A high precision, polarization-independent optical circulator was developed for high accuracy Faraday depolarization lidar. Glan laser prisms and other novel optics were utilized in the circulator optics, resulting in a high extinction ratio of polarization of >30 dB. High accuracy is needed to detect a small rotation angle in the polarization plane of the propagating beam. It is generated by the Faraday effect due to the lightning discharge. The developed circulator delivered high performance of insertion loss and isolation as laser transmitter and echo receiver in the inline lidar optics. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  1. Polarization splitting phenomenon of photonic crystals constructed by two-fold rotationally symmetric unit-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasa, U. G.; Giden, I. H.; Turduev, M.; Kurt, H.

    2017-09-01

    We present an intrinsic polarization splitting characteristic of low-symmetric photonic crystals (PCs) formed by unit-cells with C 2 rotational symmetry. This behavior emerges from the polarization sensitive self-collimation effect for both transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) modes depending on the rotational orientations of the unit-cell elements. Numerical analyzes are performed in both frequency and time domains for different types of square lattice two-fold rotational symmetric PC structures. At incident wavelength of λ = 1550 nm, high polarization extinction ratios with ˜26 dB (for TE polarization) and ˜22 dB (for TM polarization) are obtained with an operating bandwidth of 59 nm. Moreover, fabrication feasibilities of the designed structure are analyzed to evaluate their robustness in terms of the unit-cell orientation: for the selected PC unit-cell composition, corresponding extinction ratios for both polarizations still remain to be over 18 dB for the unit-cell rotation interval of θ = [40°-55°]. Taking all these advantages, two-fold rotationally symmetric PCs could be considered as an essential component in photonic integrated circuits for polarization control of light.

  2. Polarized few-nucleon targets: new developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1992-09-01

    We discuss recent improvements in producing polarized few-nucleon targets for nuclear and particle physics experiments. The emphasis is on progress with polarized gas targets intended for experiments at electron and proton storage rings. (author) 54 refs., 1 tab

  3. {tau} polarization in SUSY cascade decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S.Y. [Chonbuk Univ., Jeonju (Korea), Dept. of Physics and RIPC]|[Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hagiwara, K. [KEK National High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan); Kim, Y.G. [Sejong Univ., Seoul (Korea). ARCSEC; Mawatari, K. [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul (Korea). School of Physics; Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[KEK National High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    {tau} leptons emitted in cascade decays of supersymmetric particles are polarized. The polarization may be exploited to determine spin and mixing properties of the neutralinos and stau particles involved. (orig.)

  4. Summary of the polarized beam working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienands, U.; Dyck, O. van.

    1989-05-01

    The polarized beam working group reviewed the AGS Bookster and TRIUMF KAON Factory facilities, heard an overview of the subject of siberian snakes, discussed internal polarized gas targets, and made recommendations for further study

  5. Exploring Science Through Polar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Bell, R. E.; Zadoff, L.; Kelsey, R.

    2003-12-01

    Exploring the Poles is a First Year Seminar course taught at Barnard College, Columbia University. First Year Seminars are required of incoming students and are designed to encourage critical analysis in a small class setting with focused discussion. The class links historical polar exploration with current research in order to: introduce non-scientists to the value of environmental science through polar literature; discuss issues related to venturing into the unknown that are of relevance to any discipline: self-reliance, leadership, preparation, decisions under uncertainty; show students the human face of science; change attitudes about science and scientists; use data to engage students in exploring/understanding the environment and help them learn to draw conclusions from data; integrate research and education. These goals are met by bringing analysis of early exploration efforts together with a modern understanding of the polar environment. To date to class has followed the efforts of Nansen in the Fram, Scott and Amundsen in their race to the pole, and Shackleton's Endurance. As students read turn-of-the-century expedition journals, expedition progress is progressively revealed on an interactive map showing the environmental context. To bring the exploration process to life, students are assigned to expedition teams for specific years and the fates of the student "expeditions" are based on their own decisions. For example, in the Arctic, they navigate coastal sea ice and become frozen into the ice north of Siberia, re-creating Nansen's polar drift. Fates of the teams varied tremendously: some safely emerged at Fram Strait in 4 years, while others nearly became hopelessly lost in the Beaufort Gyre. Students thus learn about variability in the current polar environment through first hand experience, enabling them to appreciate the experiences, decisions, and, in some cases, the luck, of polar explorers. Evaluation by the Columbia Center for New Media, Teaching

  6. Statistics of polarization speckle: theory versus experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we reviewed our recent work on the statistical properties of polarization speckle, described by stochastic Stokes parameters fluctuating in space. Based on the Gaussian assumption for the random electric field components and polar-interferometer, we investigated theoretically...... and experimentally the statistics of Stokes parameters of polarization speckle, including probability density function of Stokes parameters with the spatial degree of polarization, autocorrelation of Stokes vector and statistics of spatial derivatives for Stokes parameters....

  7. Some developments in polarized ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witteveen, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    Investigations concerning an atomic beam source are presented and a new polarized ion source of a more universal type is introduced. Polarized and unpolarized beams of positively or negatively charged ions can be produced with this new version and the theoretical limits are a polarized negative hydrogen ion beam with an intensity of about 1 mH and a polarized proton beam with an intensity of 10 mH. (C.F.)

  8. Probing lateral magnetic nanostructures by polarized GISANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kentzinger, E.; Frielinghaus, H.; Ruecker, U.; Ioffe, A.; Richter, D.; Brueckel, Th.

    2007-01-01

    While structural and magnetic lateral correlations in thin film materials can be investigated at the μm length scale by neutron off-specular scattering (OSS) with polarization analysis, they can also be investigated at the nm length scale by grazing incidence small-angle scattering of polarized neutrons (polarized GISANS). We exemplify this issue showing a combined OSS and GISANS study of the lateral correlations in a remanent polarizing supermirror

  9. Probing lateral magnetic nanostructures by polarized GISANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentzinger, E.; Frielinghaus, H.; Rücker, U.; Ioffe, A.; Richter, D.; Brückel, Th.

    2007-07-01

    While structural and magnetic lateral correlations in thin film materials can be investigated at the μm length scale by neutron off-specular scattering (OSS) with polarization analysis, they can also be investigated at the nm length scale by grazing incidence small-angle scattering of polarized neutrons (polarized GISANS). We exemplify this issue showing a combined OSS and GISANS study of the lateral correlations in a remanent polarizing supermirror.

  10. Political Polarization and the Size of Government

    OpenAIRE

    Lindqvist, Erik; Östling, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We study the effect of political polarization on government spending and redistribution using the dispersion of self-reported political preferences as our measure of polarization. Politically polarized countries have lower levels of redistribution and government consumption. The relationship between political polarization and the size of government is stronger in democratic countries, indicating that the effect goes through the political system. The results are robust to a large set of contro...

  11. Baryon spectroscopy with polarization observables from CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Steffen [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Meson photoproduction is an important tool in the study of baryon resonances. The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of polarization observables. The N* program at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) includes experimental studies with linearly and circularly polarized tagged photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized nucleon targets, and recoil polarizations. An overview of these experimental studies and recent results will be given.

  12. Silicon photonic thermometer operating on multiple polarizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaoyan; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2016-01-01

    A silicon photonics optical thermometer simultaneously operating on the multiple polarizations is designed and experimentally demonstrated. Measured sensitivities are 86pm/°C and 48pm/°C for the transverse-electric and transverse-magnetic polarizations, respectively.......A silicon photonics optical thermometer simultaneously operating on the multiple polarizations is designed and experimentally demonstrated. Measured sensitivities are 86pm/°C and 48pm/°C for the transverse-electric and transverse-magnetic polarizations, respectively....

  13. Polarization Measurements in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Noble, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the VUV polarization testing of the NSSTC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) optics. SUMI is being developed for a sounding rocket payload to prove the feasibility of making magnetic field measurements in the transition region. This paper will cover the polarization properties of the VUV calibration polarizers, the instrumental polarization of the VUV chamber, SUMI's toroidal varied-line-space gratings and the SUMI polarimeter.

  14. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montag, C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-01-01

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  15. Polarized Moessbauer transitions in mixed hyperfine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.; Tarina, D.

    1975-01-01

    A contribution to the theory of elliptical polarization in the Moessbauer effect for transitions between mixed nuclear states is reported. A relation between the two-dimensional complex vector parameterization and the photon polarization density matrix was used in describing changes in the polarization of the gamma-ray involved. (A.K.)

  16. Sources of polarized ions and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    In this presentation we discuss methods of producing large quantities of polarized atoms and ions (Stern-Gerlach separation, optical pumping, and spin-exchange) as well as experimental methods of measuring the degree of polarization of atomic systems. The usefulness of polarized atoms in probing the microscopic magnetic surface properties of materials will also be discussed. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Configuration Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Svirida, D.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present our design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. We provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  18. DISCOVERY OF POLARIZATION REVERBERATION IN NGC 4151

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaskell, C. Martin; Shoji, Masatoshi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Goosmann, Rene W. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, 11 rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Merkulova, Nelly I.; Shakhovskoy, Nikolay M., E-mail: martin.gaskell@uv.cl, E-mail: mshoji@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: rene.goosmann@astro.unistra.fr [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, Nauchny, Crimea 98409 (Ukraine)

    2012-04-20

    Observations of the optical polarization of NGC 4151 in 1997-2003 show variations of an order of magnitude in the polarized flux while the polarization position angle remains constant. The amplitude of variability of the polarized flux is comparable to the amplitude of variability of the total U-band flux, except that the polarized flux follows the total flux with a lag of 8 {+-} 3 days. The time lag and the constancy of the position angle strongly favor a scattering origin for the variable polarization rather than a non-thermal synchrotron origin. The orientation of the position angle of the polarized flux (parallel to the radio axis) and the size of the lag imply that the polarization arises from electron scattering in a flattened region within the low-ionization component of the broad-line region. Polarization from dust scattering in the equatorial torus is ruled out as the source of the lag in polarized flux because it would produce a larger lag and, unless the half-opening angle of the torus is >53 Degree-Sign , the polarization would be perpendicular to the radio axis. We note a long-term change in the percentage of polarization at similar total flux levels, and this could be due either to changing non-axisymmetry in the optical continuum emission or a change in the number of scatterers on a timescale of years.

  19. Thin Scintillating Polarized Targets for Spin Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.

    2003-07-01

    At PSI polarized scintillating targets are available since 1996. Proton polarizations of more than 80%, and deuteron polarizations of 25% in polystyrene-based scintillators can be reached under optimum conditions in a vertical dilution refrigerator with optical access, suited for nuclear and particle physics experiments. New preparation procedures allow to provide very thin polarizable scintillating targets and widen the spectrum of conceivable experiments.

  20. CONFIGURATION MANUAL POLARIZED PROTON COLLIDER AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROSER,T.; MACKAY,W.W.; ALEKSEEV,I.; BAI,M.; BROWN,K.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.; ET AL.

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the authors present their design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. They provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.