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Sample records for polarization pattern formed

  1. Polar patterns of driven filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Volker; Weber, Christoph; Semmrich, Christine; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R

    2010-09-02

    The emergence of collective motion exhibited by systems ranging from flocks of animals to self-propelled microorganisms to the cytoskeleton is a ubiquitous and fascinating self-organization phenomenon. Similarities between these systems, such as the inherent polarity of the constituents, a density-dependent transition to ordered phases or the existence of very large density fluctuations, suggest universal principles underlying pattern formation. This idea is followed by theoretical models at all levels of description: micro- or mesoscopic models directly map local forces and interactions using only a few, preferably simple, interaction rules, and more macroscopic approaches in the hydrodynamic limit rely on the systems' generic symmetries. All these models characteristically have a broad parameter space with a manifold of possible patterns, most of which have not yet been experimentally verified. The complexity of interactions and the limited parameter control of existing experimental systems are major obstacles to our understanding of the underlying ordering principles. Here we demonstrate the emergence of collective motion in a high-density motility assay that consists of highly concentrated actin filaments propelled by immobilized molecular motors in a planar geometry. Above a critical density, the filaments self-organize to form coherently moving structures with persistent density modulations, such as clusters, swirls and interconnected bands. These polar nematic structures are long lived and can span length scales orders of magnitudes larger than their constituents. Our experimental approach, which offers control of all relevant system parameters, complemented by agent-based simulations, allows backtracking of the assembly and disassembly pathways to the underlying local interactions. We identify weak and local alignment interactions to be essential for the observed formation of patterns and their dynamics. The presented minimal polar-pattern-forming system

  2. Method of forming oriented block copolymer line patterns, block copolymer line patterns formed thereby, and their use to form patterned articles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Thomas P.; Hong, Sung Woo; Lee, Dong Hyun; Park, Soojin; Xu, Ting

    2017-08-01

    A block copolymer film having a line pattern with a high degree of long-range order is formed by a method that includes forming a block copolymer film on a substrate surface with parallel facets, and annealing the block copolymer film to form an annealed block copolymer film having linear microdomains parallel to the substrate surface and orthogonal to the parallel facets of the substrate. The line-patterned block copolymer films are useful for the fabrication of magnetic storage media, polarizing devices, and arrays of nanowires.

  3. Do Identical Polar Diatomic Molecules Form Stacked or Linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 8. Do Identical Polar Diatomic Molecules Form Stacked or Linear Dimers?: Hydrogen Bonding is Not Just Dipole-Dipole Interactions. C W Williams Richard N Zare E Arunan. General Article Volume 19 Issue 8 August 2014 pp 704-712 ...

  4. Colloidosomes formed by nonpolar/polar/nonpolar nanoball amphiphiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hung-Yu; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tu, Sheng-Hung; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-01-01

    Fullerene-based amphiphiles are able to form bilayer vesicles in aqueous solution. In this study, the self-assembly behavior of polymer-tethered nanoballs (NBs) with nonpolar/polar/nonpolar (n-p-n ′ ) motif in a selective solvent is investigated by dissipative particle dynamics. A model NB bears two hydrophobic polymeric arms (n ′ -part) tethered on an extremely hydrophobic NB (n-part) with hydrophilic patch (p-part) patterned on its surface. Dependent on the hydrophobicity and length of tethered arms, three types of aggregates are exhibited, including NB vesicle, core-shell micelle, and segmented-worm. NB vesicles are developed for a wide range of hydrophobic arm lengths. The presence of tethered arms perturbs the bilayer structure formed by NBs. The structural properties including the order parameter, membrane thickness, and area density of the inner leaflet decrease with increasing the arm length. These results indicate that for NBs with longer arms, the extent of interdigitation in the membrane rises so that the overcrowded arms in the inner corona are relaxed. The transport and mechanical properties are evaluated as well. As the arm length grows, the permeability increases significantly because the steric bulk of tethered arms loosens the packing of NBs. By contrast, the membrane tension decreases owing to the reduction of NB/solvent contacts by the polymer corona. Although fusion can reduce membrane tension, NB vesicles show strong resistance to fusion. Moreover, the size-dependent behavior observed in small liposomes is not significant for NB vesicles due to isotropic geometry of NB. Our simulation results are consistent with the experimental findings

  5. Colloidosomes formed by nonpolar/polar/nonpolar nanoball amphiphiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hung-Yu; Sheng, Yu-Jane, E-mail: yjsheng@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: hktsao@cc.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tu, Sheng-Hung [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong, E-mail: yjsheng@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: hktsao@cc.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering and Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-07

    Fullerene-based amphiphiles are able to form bilayer vesicles in aqueous solution. In this study, the self-assembly behavior of polymer-tethered nanoballs (NBs) with nonpolar/polar/nonpolar (n-p-n{sup ′}) motif in a selective solvent is investigated by dissipative particle dynamics. A model NB bears two hydrophobic polymeric arms (n{sup ′}-part) tethered on an extremely hydrophobic NB (n-part) with hydrophilic patch (p-part) patterned on its surface. Dependent on the hydrophobicity and length of tethered arms, three types of aggregates are exhibited, including NB vesicle, core-shell micelle, and segmented-worm. NB vesicles are developed for a wide range of hydrophobic arm lengths. The presence of tethered arms perturbs the bilayer structure formed by NBs. The structural properties including the order parameter, membrane thickness, and area density of the inner leaflet decrease with increasing the arm length. These results indicate that for NBs with longer arms, the extent of interdigitation in the membrane rises so that the overcrowded arms in the inner corona are relaxed. The transport and mechanical properties are evaluated as well. As the arm length grows, the permeability increases significantly because the steric bulk of tethered arms loosens the packing of NBs. By contrast, the membrane tension decreases owing to the reduction of NB/solvent contacts by the polymer corona. Although fusion can reduce membrane tension, NB vesicles show strong resistance to fusion. Moreover, the size-dependent behavior observed in small liposomes is not significant for NB vesicles due to isotropic geometry of NB. Our simulation results are consistent with the experimental findings.

  6. Vector wave diffraction pattern of slits masked by polarizing devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This calls for a systematic study of diffraction properties of different apertures using polarization-sensitive devices. In the present paper, we have studied the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of slits masked by different kinds of polarizing devices which introduce a phase difference between the two orthogonal components of the ...

  7. Prediction Center (CPC) Polar Eurasia Teleconnection Pattern Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly tabulated index of the Polar-Eurasia teleconnection pattern. The data spans the period 1950 to present. The index is derived from a rotated principal...

  8. Compact LCOS–SLM Based Polarization Pattern Beam Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Xuejie; Lizana Tutusaus, Ángel; Peinado, Alba; Ramírez, Claudio; Martínez, Jose L.; Márquez, Andrés; Moreno Soriano, Ignacio; Campos Coloma, Juan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a compact optical system for generating arbitrary spatial light polarization patterns is demonstrated. The system uses a single high-resolution liquid crystal (LC) on silicon (LCOS) spatial light modulator. A specialized optical mount is designed and fabricated using a 3D printer, in order to build a compact dual optical architecture, where two different phase patterns are encoded on two adjacent halves of the LCOS screen, with a polarization transformation in between. The fina...

  9. Flexoelectricity and the polarity of complex ferroelastic twin patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salje, Ekhard K. H.; Li, Suzhi; Stengel, Massimiliano; Gumbsch, Peter; Ding, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    We study, by means of an atomistic toy model, the interplay of ferroelastic twin patterns and electrical polarization. Our molecular dynamics simulations reproduce polarity in straight twin walls as observed experimentally. We show, by making contact with continuum theory, that the effect is governed by linear flexoelectricity. Complex twin patterns, with very high densities of kinks and/or junctions, produce winding structures in the dipolar field, which are reminiscent of polarization vortices. By means of a "cold shearing" technique, we produce patches with high vortex densities; these unexpectedly show a net macroscopic polarization even if neither the original sample nor the applied mechanical perturbation breaks inversion symmetry by itself. These results may explain some puzzling experimental observations of "parasitic" polarity in the paraelectric phase of BaTi O3 and LaAl O3 .

  10. Structure of polarization-resolved conoscopic patterns of planar oriented liquid crystal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, A. D.; Vovk, R. G.

    2010-05-01

    The geometry of distributions of the polarization of light in conoscopic patterns of planar oriented nematic and cholesteric liquid crystal (LC) cells is described in terms of the polarization singularities including C-points (points of circular polarization) and L lines (lines of linear polarization). Conditions for the formation of polarization singularities ( C-points) in an ensemble of conoscopic patterns parametrized by the polarization azimuth and ellipticity of the incident light wave have been studied. A characteristic feature of these conditions is selectivity with respect to the polarization parameters of the incident light wave. The polarization azimuth and ellipticity are determining parameters for nematic and cholesteric LC cells, respectively.

  11. Optical polarization maps of star-forming regions in Perseus, Taurus, and Ophiuchus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, A.A.; Bastien, P.; Menard, F.; Myers, P.C.

    1990-01-01

    New optical linear polarization maps are presented of the star-forming regions near L1506 in Taurus, L1755 in Ophiuchus, and the complex of dark cloud which extends from L1448 in B5 in Perseus. The former two show a well-defined peak magnetic field direction in the plane of the sky with a finite dispersion about that peak which is smaller than would be expected for a random distribution of field distributions. The dispersion in the position angle of filamentary clouds within these complexes implies that clouds which appear elongated on the plane of the sky are not all associated with a pattern of polarization vectors particularly parallel or perpendicular to their geometry. Instead, clouds tend to be oriented at the angle formed by their axis and the mean direction of the local large-scale field. For the dark cloud complex, a bimodal distribution of the polarization vector angle is taken to result from at least two distributions of gas along the line of sight which appear as a complex in projection. 55 refs

  12. Do Identical Polar Diatomic Molecules Form Stacked or Linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ias

    The interaction of two identical polar neutral molecules is modeled by two equal but oppositely charged point particles at a fixed distance of sep- aration. The total Coulomb potential energy of this system is calculated as a function of this dis- tance, x, and the distance, y, between their cen- ters of mass. We find that when the ...

  13. Topological sparse learning of dynamic form patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthier, T; Willert, V; Eggert, J

    2015-01-01

    Motion is a crucial source of information for a variety of tasks in social interactions. The process of how humans recognize complex articulated movements such as gestures or face expressions remains largely unclear. There is an ongoing discussion if and how explicit low-level motion information, such as optical flow, is involved in the recognition process. Motivated by this discussion, we introduce a computational model that classifies the spatial configuration of gradient and optical flow patterns. The patterns are learned with an unsupervised learning algorithm based on translation-invariant nonnegative sparse coding called VNMF that extracts prototypical optical flow patterns shaped, for example, as moving heads or limb parts. A key element of the proposed system is a lateral inhibition term that suppresses activations of competing patterns in the learning process, leading to a low number of dominant and topological sparse activations. We analyze the classification performance of the gradient and optical flow patterns on three real-world human action recognition and one face expression recognition data set. The results indicate that the recognition of human actions can be achieved by gradient patterns alone, but adding optical flow patterns increases the classification performance. The combined patterns outperform other biological-inspired models and are competitive with current computer vision approaches.

  14. Climate Comics: polar research in a cartoon form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Z.; Carbaugh, S.; Defrancis, G.; Donegan, R.; Brown, C.; Perovich, D. K.; Richter-Menge, J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate Comics is a collaborative outreach effort between the Montshire Museum of Science, in Norwich, VT, the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) research staff, and freelance artist and recent graduate of the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, VT, Sam Carbaugh. The project involves the cartoonist, the education staff from the museum, and researchers from CRREL creating a series of comic books with polar science and research themes, including sea ice monitoring, sea ice albedo, ice cores, extreme microbial activity, and stories and the process of fieldwork. The aim of the comic series is to provide meaningful science information in a comic-format that is both informative and fun, while highlighting current polar research work done at the lab. The education staff at the Montshire Museum develops and provides a series of hands-on, inquiry-based activity descriptions to complement each comic book, and CRREL researchers provide science background information and reiterative feedback about the comic books as they are being developed. Here, we present the motivation for using the comic-book medium to present polar research topics, the process involved in creating the comics, some unique features of the series, and the finished comic books themselves. Cartoon illustrating ways snow pack can be used to determine past climate information.

  15. Pattern recognition analysis of polar clouds during summer and winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Elizabeth E.

    1992-01-01

    A pattern recognition algorithm is demonstrated which classifies eighteen surface and cloud types in high-latitude AVHRR imagery based on several spectral and textural features, then estimates the cloud properties (fractional coverage, albedo, and brightness temperature) using a hybrid histogram and spatial coherence technique. The summertime version of the algorithm uses both visible and infrared data (AVHRR channels 1-4), while the wintertime version uses only infrared data (AVHRR channels 3-5). Three days of low-resolution AVHRR imagery from the Arctic and Antarctic during January and July 1984 were analyzed for cloud type and fractional coverage. The analysis showed significant amounts of high cloudiness in the Arctic during one day in winter. The Antarctic summer scene was characterized by heavy cloud cover in the southern ocean and relatively clear conditions in the continental interior. A large region of extremely low brightness temperatures in East Antarctica during winter suggests the presence of polar stratospheric cloud.

  16. Polarization-resolved angular patterns of nematic liquid crystal cells: Topological events driven by incident light polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Vovk, Roman G.; Egorov, Roman I.; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2008-09-01

    We study the angular structure of polarization of light transmitted through a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell by analyzing the polarization state as a function of the incidence angles and the polarization of the incident wave. The polarization-resolved angular (conoscopic) patterns emerging after the NLC cell illuminated by the convergent light beam are described in terms of the polarization singularities such as C points (points of circular polarization) and L lines (lines of linear polarization). For the homeotropically aligned cell, the Stokes polarimetry technique is used to measure the polarization resolved conoscopic patterns at different values of the ellipticity of the incident light, γell(inc) , impinging onto the cell. Using the exact analytical expressions for the transfer matrix we show that variations of the ellipticity, γell(inc) , induce transformations of the angular pattern exhibiting the effect of avoided L -line crossings and characterized by topological events such as creation and annihilation of the C points. The predictions of the theory are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Ricardo; Sauer, Michael; Vanneste, Steffen; Palacios-Gomez, Miriam; Li, Hongjiang; Heilmann, Mareike; van Wijk, Ringo; Vermeer, Joop E M; Heilmann, Ingo; Munnik, Teun; Friml, Jiří

    2014-05-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the importance of cell polarity, its underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown, including the definition and distinctiveness of the polar domains within the PM. Here, we show in Arabidopsis thaliana that the signaling membrane components, the phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P 2 ] as well as PtdIns4P 5-kinases mediating their interconversion, are specifically enriched at apical and basal polar plasma membrane domains. The PtdIns4P 5-kinases PIP5K1 and PIP5K2 are redundantly required for polar localization of specifically apical and basal cargoes, such as PIN-FORMED transporters for the plant hormone auxin. As a consequence of the polarity defects, instructive auxin gradients as well as embryonic and postembryonic patterning are severely compromised. Furthermore, auxin itself regulates PIP5K transcription and PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P 2 levels, in particular their association with polar PM domains. Our results provide insight into the polar domain-delineating mechanisms in plant cells that depend on apical and basal distribution of membrane lipids and are essential for embryonic and postembryonic patterning. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Arabidopsis AIP1-2 restricted by WER-mediated patterning modulates planar polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Christian S; Claes, Andrea R; Nzayisenga, Jean-Claude; Pietra, Stefano; Stanislas, Thomas; Hüser, Anke; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Grebe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) is crucial for the development of diverse multicellular organisms. Small Rac/Rho-family GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton contribute to planar polarity formation at sites of polarity establishment in animals and plants. Yet, upstream pathways coordinating planar polarity differ strikingly between kingdoms. In the root of Arabidopsis thaliana, a concentration gradient of the phytohormone auxin coordinates polar recruitment of Rho-of-plant (ROP) to sites of polar epidermal hair initiation. However, little is known about cytoskeletal components and interactions that contribute to this planar polarity or about their relation to the patterning machinery. Here, we show that ACTIN7 (ACT7) represents a main actin isoform required for planar polarity of root hair positioning, interacting with the negative modulator ACTIN-INTERACTING PROTEIN1-2 (AIP1-2). ACT7, AIP1-2 and their genetic interaction are required for coordinated planar polarity of ROP downstream of ethylene signalling. Strikingly, AIP1-2 displays hair cell file-enriched expression, restricted by WEREWOLF (WER)-dependent patterning and modified by ethylene and auxin action. Hence, our findings reveal AIP1-2, expressed under control of the WER-dependent patterning machinery and the ethylene signalling pathway, as a modulator of actin-mediated planar polarity. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Exploring Form and Pattern: Pinecone, Fern, and Tafoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxerman, J.; Kudritzki, P.; Tanner, K.

    2005-12-01

    During the 2004-20005 school year, two classes of sixth-grade earth scientists from Aptos Middle School in San Francisco explored forms and patterns of various natural objects. This classroom was unique in that there was a partner geoscientist working with the teacher and students several days a week throughout the school year as part of the SFSU GK-12 Partnership Program. This lesson on form and pattern was inspired by the challenge to create a hands-on investigative activity about forms and patterns in Nature that could compliment the partner geoscientist's Masters research project on the tafoni rock weathering pattern. In this fun, engaging, and distinct hands-on earth science activity, students actively investigated forms and patterns using tools such as rulers and hand lenses. The lesson objectives were to teach students about form and pattern and to help students recognize forms and patterns through careful investigation of natural objects. The natural objects were pre-selected for their well-defined forms and patterns and included: a pinecone, a fern branch, a foliated sandstone, a pineapple, a succulent limb, a cross-section from a redwood tree, a spiraling shell, and a section of sandstone undergoing tafoni weathering. To assess student learning, students were asked to define both form and pattern before and after the activity. A positive shift in student responses occurred, and students learned how to identify a form and interpret how a form can repeat spatially to create a pattern. Sketches and observation notes students made demonstrate that they had become more sophisticated observers of forms and patterns in natural objects. This activity was very successful and all students actively participated. Fruitful class discussions suggested that most students were well prepared by this activity to understand the essence of the partner geoscientist's research on tafoni. Emphasizing form and pattern to explain a complex and esoteric geologic phenomenon made

  20. Topological events in polarization resolved angular patterns of nematic liquid crystal cells at varying ellipticity of incident wave

    OpenAIRE

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Vovk, Roman G.

    2008-01-01

    We study the angular structure of polarization of light transmitted through a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell by analyzing the polarization state as a function of the incidence angles and the polarization of the incident wave. The polarization resolved angular patterns emerging after the NLC cell illuminated by the convergent light beam are described in terms of the polarization singularities such as C-points (points of circular polarization) and L-lines (lines of linear polarization). For ...

  1. Method for forming permanent magnets with different polarities for use in microelectromechanical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W [Tijeras, NM; Christenson, Todd R [Albuquerque, NM

    2007-04-24

    Methods are provided for forming a plurality of permanent magnets with two different north-south magnetic pole alignments for use in microelectromechanical (MEM) devices. These methods are based on initially magnetizing the permanent magnets all in the same direction, and then utilizing a combination of heating and a magnetic field to switch the polarity of a portion of the permanent magnets while not switching the remaining permanent magnets. The permanent magnets, in some instances, can all have the same rare-earth composition (e.g. NdFeB) or can be formed of two different rare-earth materials (e.g. NdFeB and SmCo). The methods can be used to form a plurality of permanent magnets side-by-side on or within a substrate with an alternating polarity, or to form a two-dimensional array of permanent magnets in which the polarity of every other row of the array is alternated.

  2. Single-Spin Polarization Effects and the Determination of Timelike Proton Form Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S

    2003-10-24

    We show that measurements of the proton's polarization in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} strongly discriminate between analytic forms of models which fit the proton form factors in the spacelike region. In particular, the single-spin asymmetry normal to the scattering plane measures the relative phase difference between the timelike G{sub E} and G{sub M} form factors. The expected proton polarization in the timelike region is large, of order of several tens of percent.

  3. Biomimicry of Palm Tree Leaves Form and Pattern on Building Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Salim N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a study on biomimicry of palm tree towards a building form. It is to find a suitable form and pattern that can be applied to building shell to ease building maintenance operation beside to enhance the aesthetic value of a building architecture. The research has been carried out by observation and modeling on some various species of palm tree’s patterns and forms. The result expectation can be found at the end of this research by producing the best pattern of palm tree that can be adapted to building envelop as the whole form of a building.

  4. Coupling Mechanical Deformations and Planar Cell Polarity to Create Regular Patterns in the Zebrafish Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbreux, Guillaume; Barthel, Linda K.; Raymond, Pamela A.; Lubensky, David K.

    2012-01-01

    The orderly packing and precise arrangement of epithelial cells is essential to the functioning of many tissues, and refinement of this packing during development is a central theme in animal morphogenesis. The mechanisms that determine epithelial cell shape and position, however, remain incompletely understood. Here, we investigate these mechanisms in a striking example of planar order in a vertebrate epithelium: The periodic, almost crystalline distribution of cone photoreceptors in the adult teleost fish retina. Based on observations of the emergence of photoreceptor packing near the retinal margin, we propose a mathematical model in which ordered columns of cells form as a result of coupling between planar cell polarity (PCP) and anisotropic tissue-scale mechanical stresses. This model recapitulates many observed features of cone photoreceptor organization during retinal growth and regeneration. Consistent with the model's predictions, we report a planar-polarized distribution of Crumbs2a protein in cone photoreceptors in both unperturbed and regenerated tissue. We further show that the pattern perturbations predicted by the model to occur if the imposed stresses become isotropic closely resemble defects in the cone pattern in zebrafish lrp2 mutants, in which intraocular pressure is increased, resulting in altered mechanical stress and ocular enlargement. Evidence of interactions linking PCP, cell shape, and mechanical stresses has recently emerged in a number of systems, several of which show signs of columnar cell packing akin to that described here. Our results may hence have broader relevance for the organization of cells in epithelia. Whereas earlier models have allowed only for unidirectional influences between PCP and cell mechanics, the simple, phenomenological framework that we introduce here can encompass a broad range of bidirectional feedback interactions among planar polarity, shape, and stresses; our model thus represents a conceptual framework

  5. Polarization resolved conoscopic patterns in nematic cells: effects induced by the incident light ellipticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buinyi, Igor O.; Soskin, Marat S.; Vovk, Roman G.

    2008-05-01

    Topological structure of the polarization resolved conoscopic patterns, calculated theoretically and measured experimentally for nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells, is described in terms of polarization singularities, saddle points and bifurcation lines. The parametric dynamics of the topological network, induced by the variation of the incident light ellipticity, is analyzed for the nematic cells with uniform and non-uniform director configuration. Different stages of similar dynamics are observed for homeotropically oriented NLC cell. Non-uniform director configuration within the cell results in broken central symmentry in the arrangement of the topological network. Main features of the experimentally obtained polarization resolved conoscopic patterns are the same to the theoretically predicted ones.

  6. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Ricardo; Sauer, Michael; Vanneste, Steffen; Palacios-Gomez, Miriam; Li, Hongjiang; Heilmann, Mareike; van Wijk, Ringo; Vermeer, Joop E.M.; Heilmann, Ingo; Munnik, Teun; Friml, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the importance of cell polarity, its underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown, including the definition and distinctiveness of the polar domains within the PM. Here, we show in Arabidopsis thaliana that the signaling membrane components, the phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] as well as PtdIns4P 5-kinases mediating their interconversion, are specifically enriched at apical and basal polar plasma membrane domains. The PtdIns4P 5-kinases PIP5K1 and PIP5K2 are redundantly required for polar localization of specifically apical and basal cargoes, such as PIN-FORMED transporters for the plant hormone auxin. As a consequence of the polarity defects, instructive auxin gradients as well as embryonic and postembryonic patterning are severely compromised. Furthermore, auxin itself regulates PIP5K transcription and PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels, in particular their association with polar PM domains. Our results provide insight into the polar domain–delineating mechanisms in plant cells that depend on apical and basal distribution of membrane lipids and are essential for embryonic and postembryonic patterning. PMID:24876254

  7. Optics of short-pitch deformed-helix ferroelectric liquid crystals: Symmetries, exceptional points, and polarization-resolved angular patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2014-10-01

    In order to explore electric-field-induced transformations of polarization singularities in the polarization-resolved angular (conoscopic) patterns emerging after deformed-helix ferroelectric liquid crystal (DHFLC) cells with subwavelength helix pitch, we combine the transfer matrix formalism with the results for the effective dielectric tensor of biaxial FLCs evaluated using an improved technique of averaging over distorted helical structures. Within the framework of the transfer matrix method, we deduce a number of symmetry relations and show that the symmetry axis of L lines (curves of linear polarization) is directed along the major in-plane optical axis which rotates under the action of the electric field. When the angle between this axis and the polarization plane of incident linearly polarized light is above its critical value, the C points (points of circular polarization) appear in the form of symmetrically arranged chains of densely packed star-monstar pairs. We also emphasize the role of phase singularities of a different kind and discuss the enhanced electro-optic response of DHFLCs near the exceptional point where the condition of zero-field isotropy is fulfilled.

  8. Statistical Image Recovery From Laser Speckle Patterns With Polarization Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    old estimate of the polarization ratio, pold , for calculating onew. Strong successfully used this substitution with reasonable results but produced an...Step. For the Expectation Step (E-Step), the conditional expectation of the complete log-likelihood is taken: Q(o, p) =E[LCD| dk(x), o = oold, p = pold ...dk(x), o = oold, p = pold ] = Eold[LCD] = K∑ k=1 K∑ l=1 ∑ x ∑ y { Eold[d̃ (1) k (y,x)] log[op1(y)op1(y + x)] + Eold[d̃ (2) l (y,x)] log[op2(y)op2(y

  9. Average thermospheric wind patterns over the polar regions, as observed by CHAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lühr

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the CHAMP accelerometer are utilized to investigate the average thermospheric wind distribution in the polar regions at altitudes around 400 km. This study puts special emphasis on the seasonal differences in the wind patterns. For this purpose 131 days centered on the June solstice of 2003 are considered. Within that period CHAMP's orbit is precessing once through all local times. The cross-track wind estimates of all 2030 passes are used to construct mean wind vectors for 918 equal-area cells. These bin averages are presented in corrected geomagnetic coordinates. Both hemispheres are considered simultaneously providing summer and winter responses for the same prevailing geophysical conditions. The period under study is characterized by high magnetic activity (Kp=4− but moderate solar flux level (F10.7=124. Our analysis reveals clear wind features in the summer (Northern Hemisphere. Over the polar cap there is a fast day-to-night flow with mean speeds surpassing 600 m/s in the dawn sector. At auroral latitudes we find strong westward zonal winds on the dawn side. On the dusk side, however, an anti-cyclonic vortex is forming. The dawn/dusk asymmetry is attributed to the combined action of Coriolis and centrifugal forces. Along the auroral oval the sunward streaming plasma causes a stagnation of the day-to-night wind. This effect is particularly clear on the dusk side. On the dawn side it is evident only from midnight to 06:00 MLT. The winter (Southern Hemisphere reveals similar wind features, but they are less well ordered. The mean day-to-night wind over the polar cap is weaker by about 35%. Otherwise, the seasonal differences are mainly confined to the dayside (06:00–18:00 MLT. In addition, the larger offset between geographic and geomagnetic pole in the south also causes hemispheric differences of the thermospheric wind distribution.

  10. Average thermospheric wind patterns over the polar regions, as observed by CHAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lühr

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the CHAMP accelerometer are utilized to investigate the average thermospheric wind distribution in the polar regions at altitudes around 400 km. This study puts special emphasis on the seasonal differences in the wind patterns. For this purpose 131 days centered on the June solstice of 2003 are considered. Within that period CHAMP's orbit is precessing once through all local times. The cross-track wind estimates of all 2030 passes are used to construct mean wind vectors for 918 equal-area cells. These bin averages are presented in corrected geomagnetic coordinates. Both hemispheres are considered simultaneously providing summer and winter responses for the same prevailing geophysical conditions. The period under study is characterized by high magnetic activity (Kp=4− but moderate solar flux level (F10.7=124. Our analysis reveals clear wind features in the summer (Northern Hemisphere. Over the polar cap there is a fast day-to-night flow with mean speeds surpassing 600 m/s in the dawn sector. At auroral latitudes we find strong westward zonal winds on the dawn side. On the dusk side, however, an anti-cyclonic vortex is forming. The dawn/dusk asymmetry is attributed to the combined action of Coriolis and centrifugal forces. Along the auroral oval the sunward streaming plasma causes a stagnation of the day-to-night wind. This effect is particularly clear on the dusk side. On the dawn side it is evident only from midnight to 06:00 MLT. The winter (Southern Hemisphere reveals similar wind features, but they are less well ordered. The mean day-to-night wind over the polar cap is weaker by about 35%. Otherwise, the seasonal differences are mainly confined to the dayside (06:00–18:00 MLT. In addition, the larger offset between geographic and geomagnetic pole in the south also causes hemispheric differences of the thermospheric wind distribution.

  11. Sharper focal spot formed by higher-order radially polarized laser beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Yuichi; Sato, Shunichi

    2007-06-01

    The intensity distributions near the focal point for radially polarized laser beams including higher-order transverse modes are calculated based on vector diffraction theory. For higher-order radially polarized mode beams as well as a fundamental mode (R-TEM01*) beam, the strong longitudinal component forms a sharper spot at the focal point under a high-NA focusing condition. In particular, double-ring-shaped radially polarized mode (R-TEM11*) beams can effectively reduce the focal spot size because of destructive interference between the inner and the outer rings with pi phase shift. Compared with an R-TEM01* beam focusing in a limit of NA=1, the full width at half-maximum values of the focal spot for an R-TEM11* beam are decreased by 13.6% for the longitudinal component and 25.8% for the total intensity.

  12. Dune field pattern formation and recent transporting winds in the Olympia Undae Dune Field, north polar region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Ryan C.; Peyret, Aymeric-Pierre B.; Kocurek, Gary; Bourke, Mary

    2010-08-01

    High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery of the central Olympia Undae Dune Field in the north polar region of Mars shows a reticulate dune pattern consisting of two sets of nearly orthogonal dune crestlines, with apparent slipfaces on the primary crests, ubiquitous wind ripples, areas of coarse-grained wind ripples, and deflated interdune areas. Geomorphic evidence and dune field pattern analysis of dune crest length, spacing, defect density, and orientation indicates that the pattern is complex, representing two constructional generations of dunes. The oldest and best-organized generation forms the primary crestlines and is transverse to circumpolar easterly winds. Gross bed form-normal analysis of the younger pattern of crestlines indicates that it emerged with both circumpolar easterly winds and NE winds and is reworking the older pattern. Mapping of secondary flow fields over the dunes indicates that the most recent transporting winds were from the NE. The younger pattern appears to represent an influx of sediment to the dune field associated with the development of the Olympia Cavi reentrant, with NE katabatic winds channeling through the reentrant. A model of the pattern reformation based upon the reconstructed primary winds and resulting secondary flow fields shows that the development of the secondary pattern is controlled by the boundary condition of the older dune topography.

  13. Growth and characterization of semi-polar (11-22) GaN on patterned (113) Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J; Yu, X; Gong, Y; Hou, Y N; Zhang, Y; Wang, T

    2015-01-01

    Patterned (113) Si substrates have been fabricated for the growth of (11-22) semi-polar GaN, which completely eliminates one of the great issues in the growth of semi-polar GaN on silicon substrates, ‘Ga melting-back’. Furthermore, unlike any other mask patterning approaches which normally lead to parallel grooves along a particular orientation, our approach is to form periodic square window patterns. As a result, crack-free semi-polar (11-22) GaN with a significant improvement in crystal quality has been achieved, in particular, basal stacking faults (BSFs) have been significantly reduced. The mechanism for the defect suppression has been investigated based on detailed transmission electron microscopy measurements. It has been found that the BSFs can be impeded effectively at an early growth stage due to the priority growth along the 〈0001〉 direction. The additional 〈1-100〉 lateral growth above the masks results in a further reduction in dislocation density. The significant reduction in BSFs has been confirmed by low temperature photoluminescence measurements. (paper)

  14. Polarization switching and patterning in self-assembled peptide tubular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bdikin, Igor; Bystrov, Vladimir; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Gracio, José; Kopyl, Svitlana; Wojtas, Maciej; Mishina, Elena; Sigov, Alexander; Kholkin, Andrei L.

    2012-04-01

    Self-assembled peptide nanotubes are unique nanoscale objects that have great potential for a multitude of applications, including biosensors, nanotemplates, tissue engineering, biosurfactants, etc. The discovery of strong piezoactivity and polar properties in aromatic dipeptides [A. Kholkin, N. Amdursky, I. Bdikin, E. Gazit, and G. Rosenman, ACS Nano 4, 610 (2010)] opened up a new perspective for their use as biocompatible nanoactuators, nanomotors, and molecular machines. Another, as yet unexplored functional property is the ability to switch polarization and create artificial polarization patterns useful in various electronic and optical applications. In this work, we demonstrate that diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes are indeed electrically switchable if annealed at a temperature of about 150 °C. The new orthorhombic antipolar structure that appears after annealing allows for the existence of a radial polarization component, which is directly probed by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements. Observation of the relatively stable polarization patterns and hysteresis loops via PFM testifies to the local reorientation of molecular dipoles in the radial direction. The experimental results are complemented with rigorous molecular calculations and create a solid background of electric-field induced deformation of aromatic rings and corresponding polarization switching in this emergent material.

  15. The Proton Coulomb Form Factor from Polarized Inclusive e-p Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Christopher Matthew [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2001-05-01

    The proton form factors provide information on the fundamental properties of the proton and provide a test for models based on QCD. In 1998 at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) in Newport News, VA, experiment E93026 measured the inclusive e-p scattering cross section from a polarized ammonia (15NH3) target at a four momentum transfer squared of Q2 = 0.5 (GeV/c)2. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered from the polarized target and the scattered electron was detected. Data has been analyzed to obtain the asymmetry from elastically scattered electrons from hydrogen in 15NH3. The asymmetry, Ap, has been used to determine the proton elastic form factor GEp. The result is consistent with the dipole model and data from previous experiments. However, due to the choice of kinematics, the uncertainty in the measurement is large.

  16. A new method to reconstruct the ionospheric convection patterns in the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Israelevich

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method to reconstruct the instantaneous convection pattern in the Earth's polar ionosphere is suggested. Plasma convection in the polar cap ionosphere is described as a hydrodynamic incompressible flow. This description is valid in the region where the electric currents are field aligned (and hence, the Lorentz body force vanishes. The problem becomes two-dimensional, and may be described by means of stream function. The flow pattern may be found as a solution of the boundary value problem for stream function. Boundary conditions should be provided by measurements of the electric field or plasma velocity vectors along the satellite orbits. It is shown that the convection pattern may be reconstructed with a reasonable accuracy by means of this method, by using only the minimum number of satellite crossings of the polar cap. The method enables us to obtain a reasonable estimate of the convection pattern without knowledge of the ionospheric conductivity.Key words. Ionosphere (modelling and forecasting; plasma convection; polar ionosphere

  17. A new method to reconstruct the ionospheric convection patterns in the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Israelevich

    Full Text Available A new method to reconstruct the instantaneous convection pattern in the Earth's polar ionosphere is suggested. Plasma convection in the polar cap ionosphere is described as a hydrodynamic incompressible flow. This description is valid in the region where the electric currents are field aligned (and hence, the Lorentz body force vanishes. The problem becomes two-dimensional, and may be described by means of stream function. The flow pattern may be found as a solution of the boundary value problem for stream function. Boundary conditions should be provided by measurements of the electric field or plasma velocity vectors along the satellite orbits. It is shown that the convection pattern may be reconstructed with a reasonable accuracy by means of this method, by using only the minimum number of satellite crossings of the polar cap. The method enables us to obtain a reasonable estimate of the convection pattern without knowledge of the ionospheric conductivity.

    Key words. Ionosphere (modelling and forecasting; plasma convection; polar ionosphere

  18. Identifying polar bear resource selection patterns to inform offshore development in a dynamic and changing Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ryan R.; Horne, Jon S.; Rode, Karyn D.; Regehr, Eric V.; Durner, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Although sea ice loss is the primary threat to polar bears (Ursus maritimus), little can be done to mitigate its effects without global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Other factors, however, could exacerbate the impacts of sea ice loss on polar bears, such as exposure to increased industrial activity. The Arctic Ocean has enormous oil and gas potential, and its development is expected to increase in the coming decades. Estimates of polar bear resource selection will inform managers how bears use areas slated for oil development and to help guide conservation planning. We estimated temporally-varying resource selection patterns for non-denning adult female polar bears in the Chukchi Sea population (2008–2012) at two scales (i.e., home range and weekly steps) to identify factors predictive of polar bear use throughout the year, before any offshore development. From the best models at each scale, we estimated scale-integrated resource selection functions to predict polar bear space use across the population's range and determined when bears were most likely to use the region where offshore oil and gas development in the United States is slated to occur. Polar bears exhibited significant intra-annual variation in selection patterns at both scales but the strength and annual patterns of selection differed between scales for most variables. Bears were most likely to use the offshore oil and gas planning area during ice retreat and growth with the highest predicted use occurring in the southern portion of the planning area. The average proportion of predicted high-value habitat in the planning area was >15% of the total high-value habitat for the population during sea ice retreat and growth and reached a high of 50% during November 2010. Our results provide a baseline on which to judge future changes to non-denning adult female polar bear resource selection in the Chukchi Sea and help guide offshore development in the region. Lastly, our study provides a

  19. Implications of tristability in pattern-forming ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelnik, Yuval R.; Gandhi, Punit; Knobloch, Edgar; Meron, Ehud

    2018-03-01

    Many ecosystems show both self-organized spatial patterns and multistability of possible states. The combination of these two phenomena in different forms has a significant impact on the behavior of ecosystems in changing environments. One notable case is connected to tristability of two distinct uniform states together with patterned states, which has recently been found in model studies of dryland ecosystems. Using a simple model, we determine the extent of tristability in parameter space, explore its effects on the system dynamics, and consider its implications for state transitions or regime shifts. We analyze the bifurcation structure of model solutions that describe uniform states, periodic patterns, and hybrid states between the former two. We map out the parameter space where these states exist, and note how the different states interact with each other. We further focus on two special implications with ecological significance, breakdown of the snaking range and complex fronts. We find that the organization of the hybrid states within a homoclinic snaking structure breaks down as it meets a Maxwell point where simple fronts are stationary. We also discover a new series of complex fronts between the uniform states, each with its own velocity. We conclude with a brief discussion of the significance of these findings for the dynamics of regime shifts and their potential control.

  20. Vapor Sensor Realized in an Ultracompact Polarization Interferometer Built of a Freestanding Porous-Silicon Form Birefringent Film

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O, Beom-Hoan; Liu, Rong; Li, Yang Y; Sailor, Michael J; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2005-01-01

    .... The simulation accurately predicts the polarization interference signal, which is used to estimate the effective refractive indexes characterizing the form birefringence of a porous-silicon film with 0.001 accuracy...

  1. Polarized Uniform Linear Array System: Beam Radiation Pattern, Beamforming Diversity Order, and Channel Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been many studies regarding antenna polarization; however, there have been few publications on the analysis of the channel capacity for polarized antenna systems using the beamforming technique. According to Chung et al., the channel capacity is determined by the density of scatterers and the transmission power, which is obtained based on the assumption that scatterers are uniformly distributed on a 3D spherical scattering model. However, it contradicts the practical scenario, where scatterers may not be uniformly distributed under outdoor environment, and lacks the consideration of fading channel gain. In this study, we derive the channel capacity of polarized uniform linear array (PULA systems using the beamforming technique in a practical scattering environment. The results show that, for PULA systems, the channel capacity, which is boosted by beamforming diversity, can be determined using the channel gain, beam radiation pattern, and beamforming diversity order (BDO, where the BDO is dependent on the antenna characteristics and array configurations.

  2. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendy, Robert F., E-mail: rfmelendy@liberty.edu [School of Engineering and Computational Sciences, Liberty University, Lynchburg, Virginia 24515 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  3. Path Independent Polar Effective Plastic Strain (PEPS) Diagram for Sheet Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Whan; Stoughton, Thomas B.

    This paper reviews a pre-strain effect on necking limit of sheet metal, and discusses the importance of this phenomenon to industrial applications. The paper also discusses a solution to this challenge including adaption of the stress diagram. A new type of forming limit diagram, based on a Polar plot of the Effective Plastic Strain (PEPS) is proposed that appears to be an effective solution to the problem of nonlinear effects, with advantages of the familiar strain-based diagram for linear loading, and without the strain-hardening limitations of the stress diagram, or non-intuitive aspects of the alternate Cartesian diagrams based on effective plastic strain. The benefits and limitations of each method are discussed.

  4. Polarization Characteristics of Zebra Patterns in Type IV Solar Radio Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneda, K.; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Obara, T. [Planetary Plasma and Atmospheric Research Center, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Iwai, K. [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1, Nukui-Kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan); Katoh, Y. [Department of Geophysics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Masuda, S., E-mail: k.kaneda@pparc.gp.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Space—Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)

    2017-06-10

    The polarization characteristics of zebra patterns (ZPs) in type IV solar bursts were studied. We analyzed 21 ZP events observed by the Assembly of Metric-band Aperture Telescope and Real-time Analysis System between 2010 and 2015 and identified the following characteristics: a degree of circular polarization (DCP) in the range of 0%–70%, a temporal delay of 0–70 ms between the two circularly polarized components (i.e., the right- and left-handed components), and dominant ordinary-mode emission in about 81% of the events. For most events, the relation between the dominant and delayed components could be interpreted in the framework of fundamental plasma emission and depolarization during propagation, though the values of DCP and delay were distributed across wide ranges. Furthermore, it was found that the DCP and delay were positively correlated (rank correlation coefficient R = 0.62). As a possible interpretation of this relationship, we considered a model based on depolarization due to reflections at sharp density boundaries assuming fundamental plasma emission. The model calculations of depolarization including multiple reflections and group delay during propagation in the inhomogeneous corona showed that the DCP and delay decreased as the number of reflections increased, which is consistent with the observational results. The dispersive polarization characteristics could be explained by the different numbers of reflections causing depolarization.

  5. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tejos, R.; Sauer, M.; Vanneste, S.; Palacios-Gomez, M.; Li, H.; Heilmann, M.; van Wijk, R.; Vermeer, J.E.M.; Heilmann, I.; Munnik, T.; Friml, J.

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the

  6. Polarization and Radiation Pattern Reconfigurability of a Planar Monopole-Fed Loop Antenna for GPS Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Fakharian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a reconfigurable loop antenna with monopole-fed using embedded RF PIN switches based shorted parasitic elements for GPS applications. The antenna can independently reconfiguring multiple polarizations with switchable radiation pattern. Four switched metallic patches are used as parasitic elements to provide a reconfiguration capability to antenna acting as a driven monopole-fed loop. The edge of the parasitic elements is shorted by posts. The parasitic patches are connected/disconnected by using switching, therewith changing the configuration of monopole, to turn changes the current distribution over the loop surface. The antenna is designed to work on the GPS L1 frequency band. The antenna simultaneously changes the radiation beam in E- and H-planes, and switches among three polarizations (LP, LHCP, and RHCP in the various modes. The antenna maximum gain among the different modes is tuned between 1.5 and 4.2 dBi.

  7. Dietary composition and spatial patterns of polar bear foraging on land in western Hudson Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormezano, Linda J; Rockwell, Robert F

    2013-12-21

    Flexible foraging strategies, such as prey switching, omnivory and food mixing, are key to surviving in a labile and changing environment. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in western Hudson Bay are versatile predators that use all of these strategies as they seasonally exploit resources across trophic levels. Climate warming is reducing availability of their ice habitat, especially in spring when polar bears gain most of their annual fat reserves by consuming seal pups before coming ashore in summer. How polar bears combine these flexible foraging strategies to obtain and utilize terrestrial food will become increasingly important in compensating for energy deficits from lost seal hunting opportunities. We evaluated patterns in the composition of foods in scat to characterize the foraging behaviors that underpin the diet mixing and omnivory observed in polar bears on land in western Hudson Bay. Specifically, we measured diet richness, proportions of plant and animal foods, patterns in co-occurrence of foods, spatial composition and an index of temporal composition. Scats contained between 1 and 6 foods, with an average of 2.11 (SE = 0.04). Most scats (84.9%) contained at least one type of plant, but animals (35.4% of scats) and both plants and animals occurring together (34.4% of scats) were also common. Certain foods, such as Lyme grass seed heads (Leymus arenarius), berries and marine algae, were consumed in relatively higher proportions, sometimes to the exclusion of others, both where and when they occurred most abundantly. The predominance of localized vegetation in scats suggests little movement among habitat types between feeding sessions. Unlike the case for plants, no spatial patterns were found for animal remains, likely due the animals' more vagile and ubiquitous distribution. Our results suggest that polar bears are foraging opportunistically in a manner consistent with maximizing intake while minimizing energy expenditure associated with movement. The

  8. CHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF MUELLER MATRIX PATTERNS FOR POLARIZATION SCATTERING MODEL OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E DU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a model to describe polarized photon scattering in biological tissues. In this model, tissues are simplified to a mixture of scatterers and surrounding medium. There are two types of scatterers in the model: solid spheres and infinitely long solid cylinders. Variables related to the scatterers include: the densities and sizes of the spheres and cylinders, the orientation and angular distribution of cylinders. Variables related to the surrounding medium include: the refractive index, absorption coefficient and birefringence. In this paper, as a development we introduce an optical activity effect to the model. By comparing experiments and Monte Carlo simulations, we analyze the backscattering Mueller matrix patterns of several tissue-like media, and summarize the different effects coming from anisotropic scattering and optical properties. In addition, we propose a possible method to extract the optical activity values for tissues. Both the experimental and simulated results show that, by analyzing the Mueller matrix patterns, the microstructure and optical properties of the medium can be obtained. The characteristic features of Mueller matrix patterns are potentially powerful tools for studying the contrast mechanisms of polarization imaging for medical diagnosis.

  9. Molecular reorientation in cross polarization gratings formed in thin photoreactive-polymer-liquid-crystal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Hiroshi [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)], E-mail: onoh@nagaokaut.ac.jp; Hatayama, Akira; Emoto, Akira [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro [Department of Materials Science and Chemistry, Himeji Institute of Technology, 2167 Shosha, Himeji 671-2201 (Japan)

    2008-04-30

    We present the results from some experimental and theoretical studies aimed at revealing the mechanism leading to the diffraction properties of two-dimensional cross polarization gratings in photocrosslinkable polymer liquid crystals. Although the polarization gratings are overwritten at the same place, each polarization grating works independently in our material system. The above-mentioned characteristic of our cross polarization gratings originates in the grating formation mechanism in the photocrosslinkable polymer liquid crystals, in which the molecules in the solid-state polymeric materials are not reoriented during exposure and reorientation is generated during the annealing process after multiple exposure.

  10. The analysis of polar clouds from AVHRR satellite data using pattern recognition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William L.; Ebert, Elizabeth

    1990-01-01

    The cloud cover in a set of summertime and wintertime AVHRR data from the Arctic and Antarctic regions was analyzed using a pattern recognition algorithm. The data were collected by the NOAA-7 satellite on 6 to 13 Jan. and 1 to 7 Jul. 1984 between 60 deg and 90 deg north and south latitude in 5 spectral channels, at the Global Area Coverage (GAC) resolution of approximately 4 km. This data embodied a Polar Cloud Pilot Data Set which was analyzed by a number of research groups as part of a polar cloud algorithm intercomparison study. This study was intended to determine whether the additional information contained in the AVHRR channels (beyond the standard visible and infrared bands on geostationary satellites) could be effectively utilized in cloud algorithms to resolve some of the cloud detection problems caused by low visible and thermal contrasts in the polar regions. The analysis described makes use of a pattern recognition algorithm which estimates the surface and cloud classification, cloud fraction, and surface and cloudy visible (channel 1) albedo and infrared (channel 4) brightness temperatures on a 2.5 x 2.5 deg latitude-longitude grid. In each grid box several spectral and textural features were computed from the calibrated pixel values in the multispectral imagery, then used to classify the region into one of eighteen surface and/or cloud types using the maximum likelihood decision rule. A slightly different version of the algorithm was used for each season and hemisphere because of differences in categories and because of the lack of visible imagery during winter. The classification of the scene is used to specify the optimal AVHRR channel for separating clear and cloudy pixels using a hybrid histogram-spatial coherence method. This method estimates values for cloud fraction, clear and cloudy albedos and brightness temperatures in each grid box. The choice of a class-dependent AVHRR channel allows for better separation of clear and cloudy pixels than

  11. Effects of feed forms on growth pattern, behavioural responses and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth pattern, faecal microbial load and behavioural activities (eating, drinking, physical pen interaction and frequency of visiting the drinking troughs) were assessed in 49 days. Pigs fed dry mash without probiotics (T1) had the highest daily feed intake among the experimental animals (1.10kg) while pigs on ...

  12. TADPOL: A 1.3 mm SURVEY OF DUST POLARIZATION IN STAR-FORMING CORES AND REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Heiles, Carl [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Kwon, Woojin [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Carpenter, John M.; Lamb, James W.; Pillai, Thushara [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Crutcher, Richard M.; Hakobian, Nicholas S.; Looney, Leslie W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Fiege, Jason D.; Franzmann, Erica [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Houde, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hughes, A. Meredith [Van Vleck Observatory, Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Marrone, Daniel P. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Matthews, Brenda C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Rd., Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada); Pound, Marc W. [Astronomy Department and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Rahman, Nurur [Physics Department, University of Johannesburg, C1-Lab 140, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Sandell, Göran, E-mail: chat@astro.berkeley.edu [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    We present λ 1.3 mm Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy observations of dust polarization toward 30 star-forming cores and eight star-forming regions from the TADPOL survey. We show maps of all sources, and compare the ∼2.''5 resolution TADPOL maps with ∼20'' resolution polarization maps from single-dish submillimeter telescopes. Here we do not attempt to interpret the detailed B-field morphology of each object. Rather, we use average B-field orientations to derive conclusions in a statistical sense from the ensemble of sources, bearing in mind that these average orientations can be quite uncertain. We discuss three main findings. (1) A subset of the sources have consistent magnetic field (B-field) orientations between large (∼20'') and small (∼2.''5) scales. Those same sources also tend to have higher fractional polarizations than the sources with inconsistent large-to-small-scale fields. We interpret this to mean that in at least some cases B-fields play a role in regulating the infall of material all the way down to the ∼1000 AU scales of protostellar envelopes. (2) Outflows appear to be randomly aligned with B-fields; although, in sources with low polarization fractions there is a hint that outflows are preferentially perpendicular to small-scale B-fields, which suggests that in these sources the fields have been wrapped up by envelope rotation. (3) Finally, even at ∼2.''5 resolution we see the so-called polarization hole effect, where the fractional polarization drops significantly near the total intensity peak. All data are publicly available in the electronic edition of this article.

  13. TADPOL: A 1.3 mm SURVEY OF DUST POLARIZATION IN STAR-FORMING CORES AND REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Heiles, Carl; Kwon, Woojin; Carpenter, John M.; Lamb, James W.; Pillai, Thushara; Crutcher, Richard M.; Hakobian, Nicholas S.; Looney, Leslie W.; Fiege, Jason D.; Franzmann, Erica; Houde, Martin; Hughes, A. Meredith; Marrone, Daniel P.; Matthews, Brenda C.; Pound, Marc W.; Rahman, Nurur; Sandell, Göran

    2014-01-01

    We present λ 1.3 mm Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy observations of dust polarization toward 30 star-forming cores and eight star-forming regions from the TADPOL survey. We show maps of all sources, and compare the ∼2.''5 resolution TADPOL maps with ∼20'' resolution polarization maps from single-dish submillimeter telescopes. Here we do not attempt to interpret the detailed B-field morphology of each object. Rather, we use average B-field orientations to derive conclusions in a statistical sense from the ensemble of sources, bearing in mind that these average orientations can be quite uncertain. We discuss three main findings. (1) A subset of the sources have consistent magnetic field (B-field) orientations between large (∼20'') and small (∼2.''5) scales. Those same sources also tend to have higher fractional polarizations than the sources with inconsistent large-to-small-scale fields. We interpret this to mean that in at least some cases B-fields play a role in regulating the infall of material all the way down to the ∼1000 AU scales of protostellar envelopes. (2) Outflows appear to be randomly aligned with B-fields; although, in sources with low polarization fractions there is a hint that outflows are preferentially perpendicular to small-scale B-fields, which suggests that in these sources the fields have been wrapped up by envelope rotation. (3) Finally, even at ∼2.''5 resolution we see the so-called polarization hole effect, where the fractional polarization drops significantly near the total intensity peak. All data are publicly available in the electronic edition of this article

  14. Influence of time and pressure of forming a pattern on mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pacyniak

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the technology of forming patterns on a research station equipped with an autoclave A-600 of Polish company GROM is presented. This study was conducted to determine the influence of pressure and time of forming a pattern on the bending strength. Analysis of the results confirmed that bending strength increases with increasing the pressure. The time of forming a pattern has a similar effect.

  15. A novel iris patterns matching algorithm of weighted polar frequency correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weijie; Jiang, Linhua

    2014-11-01

    Iris recognition is recognized as one of the most accurate techniques for biometric authentication. In this paper, we present a novel correlation method - Weighted Polar Frequency Correlation(WPFC) - to match and evaluate two iris images, actually it can also be used for evaluating the similarity of any two images. The WPFC method is a novel matching and evaluating method for iris image matching, which is complete different from the conventional methods. For instance, the classical John Daugman's method of iris recognition uses 2D Gabor wavelets to extract features of iris image into a compact bit stream, and then matching two bit streams with hamming distance. Our new method is based on the correlation in the polar coordinate system in frequency domain with regulated weights. The new method is motivated by the observation that the pattern of iris that contains far more information for recognition is fine structure at high frequency other than the gross shapes of iris images. Therefore, we transform iris images into frequency domain and set different weights to frequencies. Then calculate the correlation of two iris images in frequency domain. We evaluate the iris images by summing the discrete correlation values with regulated weights, comparing the value with preset threshold to tell whether these two iris images are captured from the same person or not. Experiments are carried out on both CASIA database and self-obtained images. The results show that our method is functional and reliable. Our method provides a new prospect for iris recognition system.

  16. Tissue-specific concentrations and patterns of perfluoroalkyl carboxylates and sulfonates in East Greenland polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Alana K; Letcher, Robert J; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Born, Erik W

    2012-11-06

    Several perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) and perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs) of varying chain length are bioaccumulative in biota. However, wildlife reports have focused on liver and with very little examination of other tissues, and thus there is a limited understanding of their distribution and potential effects in the mammalian body. In the present study, the comparative accumulation of C(6) to C(15) PFCAs, C(4), C(6), C(8) and C(10) PFSAs, and select precursors were examined in the liver, blood, muscle, adipose, and brain of 20 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Scoresby Sound, Central East Greenland. Overall, PFSA and PFCA concentrations were highest in liver followed by blood > brain > muscle ≈ adipose. Liver and blood samples contained proportionally more of the shorter/medium chain length (C(6) to C(11)) PFCAs, whereas adipose and brain samples were dominated by longer chain (C(13) to C(15)) PFCAs. PFCAs with lower lipophilicities accumulated more in the liver, whereas the brain accumulated PFCAs with higher lipophilicities. The concentration ratios (±SE) between perfluorooctane sulfonate and its precursor perfluorooctane sulfonamide varied among tissues from 9 (±1):1 (muscle) to 36 (±7):1 (liver). PFCA and PFSA patterns in polar bears indicate that the pharmacokinetics of these compounds are to some extent tissue-specific, and are the result of several factors that may include differing protein interactions throughout the body.

  17. Modeling self-organized spatio-temporal patterns of PIP₃ and PTEN during spontaneous cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Fabian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2014-08-01

    During spontaneous cell polarization of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphoshpate (PIP3) and PTEN (phosphatase tensin homolog) have been identified as key signaling molecules which govern the process of polarization in a self-organized manner. Recent experiments have quantified the spatio-temporal dynamics of these signaling components. Surprisingly, it was found that membrane-bound PTEN can be either in a high or low state, that PIP3 waves were initiated in areas lacking PTEN through an excitable mechanism, and that PIP3 was degraded even though the PTEN concentration remained low. Here we develop a reaction-diffusion model that aims to explain these experimental findings. Our model contains bistable dynamics for PTEN, excitable dynamics for PIP3, and postulates the existence of two species of PTEN with different dephosphorylation rates. We show that our model is able to produce results that are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments, suggesting that our reaction-diffusion model underlies the self-organized spatio-temporal patterns observed in experiments.

  18. Strike-Slip Fault Patterns on Europa: Obliquity or Polar Wander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A.; Manga, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Variations in diurnal tidal stress due to Europa's eccentric orbit have been considered as the driver of strike-slip motion along pre-existing faults, but obliquity and physical libration have not been taken into account. The first objective of this work is to examine the effects of obliquity on the predicted global pattern of fault slip directions based on a tidal-tectonic formation model. Our second objective is to test the hypothesis that incorporating obliquity can reconcile theory and observations without requiring polar wander, which was previously invoked to explain the mismatch found between the slip directions of 192 faults on Europa and the global pattern predicted using the eccentricity-only model. We compute predictions for individual, observed faults at their current latitude, longitude, and azimuth with four different tidal models: eccentricity only, eccentricity plus obliquity, eccentricity plus physical libration, and a combination of all three effects. We then determine whether longitude migration, presumably due to non-synchronous rotation, is indicated in observed faults by repeating the comparisons with and without obliquity, this time also allowing longitude translation. We find that a tidal model including an obliquity of 1.2?, along with longitude migration, can predict the slip directions of all observed features in the survey. However, all but four faults can be fit with only 1? of obliquity so the value we find may represent the maximum departure from a lower time-averaged obliquity value. Adding physical libration to the obliquity model improves the accuracy of predictions at the current locations of the faults, but fails to predict the slip directions of six faults and requires additional degrees of freedom. The obliquity model with longitude migration is therefore our preferred model. Although the polar wander interpretation cannot be ruled out from these results alone, the obliquity model accounts for all observations with a value

  19. Polarized Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy and ab Initio Calculation of Palmitic and Stearic Acids in the Bm and C Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L da Silva, L F; Andrade-Filho, T; Freire, P T C; Filho, J Mendes; da Silva Filho, J G; Saraiva, G D; Moreira, S G C; de Sousa, F F

    2017-06-29

    A complete experimental study on the vibrational properties of palmitic and stearic acids crystallized in the B m and C forms, both belonging to the monoclinic system with the P2 1 /a (C 2h 5 ) space group, through polarized Raman and infrared spectroscopy, is reported in this paper. Density functional theory calculations were also performed to assign the normal modes and to help in the interpretation of the experimental data. The different polarizations were compared and their influence on the spectral profiles, in both the lattice and the internal mode regions, was discussed. In general, the Raman and infrared spectra exhibit accentuated differences among the polymorphic forms, which are associated with the different molecular modifications, defined as gauche and all-trans conformations. Insights about interaction among different groups are also furnished.

  20. Low-Gain Circularly Polarized Antenna with Torus-Shaped Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Luis R.; Kruid, Ronald C.; Vacchione, Joseph D.; Prata, Aluizio

    2012-01-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter requires an antenna with a torus-shaped antenna pattern with approximately 6 dBic gain and circular polarization over the Deep Space Network (DSN) 7-GHz transmit frequency and the 8-GHz receive frequency. Given the large distances that accumulate en-route to Jupiter and the limited power afforded by the solar-powered vehicle, this toroidal low-gain antenna requires as much gain as possible while maintaining a beam width that could facilitate a +/-10deg edge of coverage. The natural antenna that produces a toroidal antenna pattern is the dipole, but the limited approx. = 2.2 dB peak gain would be insufficient. Here a shaped variation of the standard bicone antenna is proposed that could achieve the required gains and bandwidths while maintaining a size that was not excessive. The final geometry that was settled on consisted of a corrugated, shaped bicone, which is fed by a WR112 waveguide-to-coaxial- waveguide transition. This toroidal low-gain antenna (TLGA) geometry produced the requisite gain, moderate sidelobes, and the torus-shaped antenna pattern while maintaining a very good match over the entire required frequency range. Its "horn" geometry is also low-loss and capable of handling higher powers with large margins against multipactor breakdown. The final requirement for the antenna was to link with the DSN with circular polarization. A four-layer meander-line array polarizer was implemented; an approach that was fairly well suited to the TLGA geometry. The principal development of this work was to adapt the standard linear bicone such that its aperture could be increased in order to increase the available gain of the antenna. As one increases the aperture of a standard bicone, the phase variation across the aperture begins to increase, so the larger the aperture becomes, the greater the phase variation. In order to maximize the gain from any aperture antenna, the phase should be kept as uniform as possible. Thus, as the standard

  1. Segment polarity gene expression in a myriapod reveals conserved and diverged aspects of early head patterning in arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ralf

    2012-09-01

    Arthropods show two kinds of developmental mode. In the so-called long germ developmental mode (as exemplified by the fly Drosophila), all segments are formed almost simultaneously from a preexisting field of cells. In contrast, in the so-called short germ developmental mode (as exemplified by the vast majority of arthropods), only the anterior segments are patterned similarly as in Drosophila, and posterior segments are added in a single or double segmental periodicity from a posterior segment addition zone (SAZ). The addition of segments from the SAZ is controlled by dynamic waves of gene activity. Recent studies on a spider have revealed that a similar dynamic process, involving expression of the segment polarity gene (SPG) hedgehog (hh), is involved in the formation of the anterior head segments. The present study shows that in the myriapod Glomeris marginata the early expression of hh is also in a broad anterior domain, but this domain corresponds only to the ocular and antennal segment. It does not, like in spiders, represent expression in the posterior adjacent segment. In contrast, the anterior hh pattern is conserved in Glomeris and insects. All investigated myriapod SPGs and associated factors are expressed with delay in the premandibular (tritocerebral) segment. This delay is exclusively found in insects and myriapods, but not in chelicerates, crustaceans and onychophorans. Therefore, it may represent a synapomorphy uniting insects and myriapods (Atelocerata hypothesis), contradicting the leading opinion that suggests a sister relationship of crustaceans and insects (Pancrustacea hypothesis). In Glomeris embryos, the SPG engrailed is first expressed in the mandibular segment. This feature is conserved in representatives of all arthropod classes suggesting that the mandibular segment may have a special function in anterior patterning.

  2. Global Pattern of The Evolutions of the Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, F.; Zhang, X.; Wang, W.; Wan, W.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the spatial and temporal limitations of the in-situ measurements from the low altitude polar orbiting satellites or the ionospheric scan by incoherent scatter radars, the global configuration and evolution of SAPS are still not very clear. Here, we present multi-satellite observations of the evolution of subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) during the main phase of a server geomagnetic storm occurred on 31 March 2001. DMSP F12 to F15 observations indicate that the SAPS were first generated in the dusk sector at the beginning of the main phase. Then the SAPS channel expanded towards the midnight and moved to lower latitudes as the main phase went on. The peak velocity, latitudinal width, latitudinal alignment, and longitudinal span of the SAPS channels were highly dynamic during the storm main phase. The global evolution of the SAPS corresponds well with that of the region-2 field-aligned currents, which are mainly determined by the azimuthal pressure gradient of the ring current. Further studies on 37 storms and 30 isolated substorms indicate that the lifetime of the SAPS channel was proportional to the period of time for southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The SAPS channel disappeared after northward turning of the IMF. During the recovery phase, if the IMF kept northward, no SAPS channel was generated, if the IMF turned to southward again, however, SAPS channel will be generated again with lifetime proportional to the duration of the southward IMF. During isolated substorms, the SAPS channel was also controlled by IMF. The SAPS channel was generated after substorm onset and the peak drift velocity of the SAPS channel achieved its maximum during the recovery phase of the substorm. It is suggested that, SAPS channel were mainly controlled by IMF, more works should be done with observations or simulations of investigate the global patterns of the SAPS and the magnetosphere-ionosphere couplings.

  3. Dune field pattern formation and recent transporting winds in the Olympia Undae Dune Field, north polar region of Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Ewing, Ryan C.; Peyret, Aymeric-Pierre B.; Kocurek, Gary; Bourke, Mary

    2010-01-01

    High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery of the central Olympia Undae Dune Field in the north polar region of Mars shows a reticulate dune pattern consisting of two sets of nearly orthogonal dune crestlines, with apparent slipfaces on the primary crests, ubiquitous wind ripples, areas of coarse-grained wind ripples, and deflated interdune areas. Geomorphic evidence and dune field pattern analysis of dune crest length, spacing, defect density, and orientation indicates that ...

  4. A birefringent polarization modulator: Application to phase measurement in conoscopic interference patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiras, F. E.; Garea, M. T.; Perez, L. I.

    2016-04-01

    Conoscopic interferometry for crystal characterization is a very well-known technique with increasing applications in different fields of technology. The advantage of the scheme proposed here is the introduction of a polarization modulator that allows the recovery of the phase information contained in conoscopic interferograms. This represents a real advantage since the most relevant physical information of the sample under study is usually contained in the phase of the fringe pattern. Moreover, this technique works successfully even when there are no visible fringes. The setup employed is a simple conoscopic interferometer where the elements under study correspond to two birefringent crystal slabs and a commercial mica wave plate. It allows the crystals to be characterized and the wave plate retardance to be measured as a function of the angle of incidence. The modulator itself consists of a single tiltable crystal plate which, by means of phase shifting techniques, permits the recovery of a phase map for each sample. It is inexpensive and it can be easily calibrated, so it works with a wide range of phase shifting interferometry algorithms. We show that our scheme is easily adaptable to algorithms that require either a low or high amount of interferograms.

  5. Deuteron form factors and e-d polarization observables for the Paris and Graz-II potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, K.; Plessas, W.; Mathelitsch, L.

    1983-01-01

    Elastic e-d scattering is studied employing the meson-theoretical Paris potential and the non-local separable Graz-II potential. Electric and magnetic form factors are calculated with inclusion of meson-exchange currents and compared to existing experimental data. Deuteron vector and tensor polarizations are predicted and discussed in relation to the deuteron wave functions of the potential models considered. Thereby the off-shell behaviour of the Graz-II interaction is found to be close to that one of the Paris potential over the most important domain of low and moderate off-shell moments. (Author)

  6. Polarization observables in the process d + p → d+ X and electromagnetic form factors of N → N* transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekalo, M.P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the properties of the inclusive d + p-reactions, with particular interest in the domain of nucleonic resonances excitation. The calculated cross section and polarization observables show that it is possible to disentangle the different reaction mechanisms (ω-,σ-, n- exchange) and bring new information about the electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron as well as of the nucleonic resonances excitation. Existing data on the tensor analyzing power are in agreement with the predictions based on the ω-exchange model. (authors)

  7. Polarization observables in the process d + p {yields} d+ X and electromagnetic form factors of N {yields} N* transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekalo, M.P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.

    1996-12-31

    We analyze the properties of the inclusive d + p-reactions, with particular interest in the domain of nucleonic resonances excitation. The calculated cross section and polarization observables show that it is possible to disentangle the different reaction mechanisms ({omega}-,{sigma}-, n- exchange) and bring new information about the electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron as well as of the nucleonic resonances excitation. Existing data on the tensor analyzing power are in agreement with the predictions based on the {omega}-exchange model. (authors). 18 refs.

  8. Topological structure in polarization resolved conoscopic patterns for nematic liquid crystal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buinyi, Igor O.; Denisenko, Vladimir G.; Soskin, Marat S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the polarization structure of coherent light, produced by a convergent light beam transmitted through nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells with different director configurations. Employing solutions to the transmission problem for the case when plane wave propagates through an anisotropic layer, we analyze the arrangement of the topological elements, such as polarization singularities (C points with circular polarization and L lines with linear polarization), saddle points and extrema of polarization azimuth. We observe transformations of the topological structure under the variation of the incident light ellipticity and represent it by corresponding trajectories of topological elements in three-dimensional space. For the cells with uniform and non-uniform director configuration we describe the processes of creation/annihilation of C point pairs, which can be controlled precisely in the case of the cell with non-uniform director. Our experimental measurements for the homeotropically oriented NLC cells are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  9. Patterns of parasite transmission in polar seas: Daily rhythms of cercarial emergence from intertidal snails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofiev, Vladimir V.; Galaktionov, Kirill V.; Levakin, Ivan A.

    2016-07-01

    Trematodes are common parasites in intertidal ecosystems. Cercariae, their dispersive larvae, ensure transmission of infection from the first intermediate molluscan host to the second intermediate (invertebrates and fishes) or the final (fishes, marine birds and mammals) host. Trematode transmission in polar seas, while interesting in many respects, is poorly studied. This study aimed to elucidate the patterns of cercarial emergence from intertidal snails at the White Sea and Barents Sea. The study, involving cercariae of 12 species, has provided the most extensive material obtained so far in high latitude seas (66-69° N). The experiments were conducted in situ. Multichannel singular spectral analysis (MSSA) used for processing primary data made it possible to estimate the relative contribution of different oscillations into the analysed time series and to separate the daily component from the other oscillatory components and the noise. Cercarial emergence had pronounced daily rhythms, which did not depend on the daily tidal schedule but were regulated by thermo- and photoperiod. Daily emergence maximums coincided with periods favourable for infecting the second intermediate hosts. Cercarial daily emergence rhythms differed in species using the same molluscan hosts which can be explained by cercarial host searching behaviour. Daily cercarial output (DCO) correlated negatively with larval volume and positively with that of the molluscan host except in cercariae using ambuscade behaviour. In the Barents Sea cercariae emerged from their molluscan hosts at lower temperatures than in the warmer White Sea but the daily emergence period was prolonged. Thus, DCO of related species were similar in these two seas and comparable with DCO values reported for boreal seas. Local temperature adaptations in cercarial emergence suggests that in case of Arctic climate warming trematode transmission in coastal ecosystems is likely to be intensified not because of the increased

  10. Daple coordinates organ-wide and cell-intrinsic polarity to pattern inner-ear hair bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siletti, Kimberly; Tarchini, Basile; Hudspeth, A J

    2017-12-26

    The establishment of planar polarization by mammalian cells necessitates the integration of diverse signaling pathways. In the inner ear, at least two systems regulate the planar polarity of sensory hair bundles. The core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins coordinate the orientations of hair cells across the epithelial plane. The cell-intrinsic patterning of hair bundles is implemented independently by the G protein complex classically known for orienting the mitotic spindle. Although the primary cilium also participates in each of these pathways, its role and the integration of the two systems are poorly understood. We show that Dishevelled-associating protein with a high frequency of leucine residues (Daple) interacts with PCP and cell-intrinsic signals. Regulated by the cell-intrinsic pathway, Daple is required to maintain the polarized distribution of the core PCP protein Dishevelled and to position the primary cilium at the abneural edge of the apical surface. Our results suggest that the primary cilium or an associated structure influences the domain of cell-intrinsic signals that shape the hair bundle. Daple is therefore essential to orient and pattern sensory hair bundles. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  11. Self-spreading method for forming lipid bilayer on a patterned agarose gel: Toward precise lipid bilayer patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimba, Kenta; Shoji, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Yagi, Tohru

    2017-07-01

    Forming artificial cell membranes is a suitable strategy for studying drug responses of membrane proteins. In order to form lipid bilayer with both mechanical stability and membrane protein functions, hydrogel supported bilayer has attracted attentions. Combinational use of self-extraction method for lipid bilayer formation and agarose gel patterning should realize hydrogel-supported bilayer with any shape and large area. In this study, we aimed to form a lipid bilayer on a patterned agarose gel and to characterize the membrane. First, lipid mixture was attached on an agarose gel, and lipid layers spread on the gel surface. With fluorescent observation, it is suggested that thin lipid layer was formed on the agarose gel, and their distance-dependent changes in spreading velocity was consistent with that in lipid bilayer. Next, the lipid layer was characterized with fluorescence recovery after photo breaching experiment. As a result, it is indicated that lipid molecules in the lipid layer on the agarose showed lateral diffusion, a typical characteristic of lipid bilayer. Taken together, we confirmed that lipid bilayer can be formed on the patterned agarose gel with self-spreading method. The hydrogel-supported bilayer will be a suitable tool for drug discovery.

  12. Low-frequency (0.7-7.4 mHz geomagnetic field fluctuations at high latitude: frequency dependence of the polarization pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cafarella

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of the polarization pattern of low-frequency geomagnetic field fluctuations (0.7-7.4 mHz covering the entire 24-h interval was performed at the Antarctic station Terra Nova Bay (80.0°S geomagnetic latitude throughout 1997 and 1998. The results show that the polarization pattern exhibits a frequency dependence, as can be expected from the frequency dependence of the latitude where the coupling between the magnetospheric compressional mode and the field line resonance takes place. The polarization analysis of single pulsation events shows that wave packets with different polarization sense, depending on frequency, can be simultaneously observed.

  13. All-fiber maskless lithographic technology to form microcircular interference pattern on Azo polymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junki; Jung, Yongmin; Oh, Kyunghwan; Chun, Chaemin; Hong, Jeachul; Kim, Dongyu

    2005-03-01

    We report a novel all-fiber, maskless lithograpic technology to form various concentric grating patterns for micro zone plate on azo polymer film. The proposed technology is based on the interference pattern out of the cleaved end of a coreless silica fiber (CSF)-single mode fiber (SMF) composite. The light guided along SMF expands into the CSF segment to generate various circular interference patterns depending on the length of CSF. Interference patterns are experimentally observed when the CSF length is over a certain length and the finer spacing between the concentric rings are obtained for a longer CSF. By using beam propagation method (BPM) package, we could further investigated the concentric interference patterns in terms of intensity distribution and fringe spacing as a function of CSF length. These intereference patterns are directly projected over azo polymer film and their intensity distrubution formed surface relief grating (SRG) patterns. Compared to photoresist films azo polymer layers produce surface relief grating (SRG), where the actual mass of layer is modulated rather than refractive index. The geometric parameters of the CSF length as well as diameter and the spacing between the cleaved end of a CSF and azo polymer film, were found to play a major role to generate various concentric structures. With the demonstration of the circular SRG patterns, we confirmed that the proposed technique do have an ample potential to fabricate micro fresnel zone plate, that could find applications in lens arrays for optical beam formings as well as compact photonic devices.

  14. Externally controlled anisotropy in pattern-forming reaction-diffusion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, Dario M; Guiu-Souto, Jacobo; Muñuzuri, Alberto P

    2015-06-01

    The effect of centrifugal forces is analyzed in a pattern-forming reaction-diffusion system. Numerical simulations conducted on the appropriate extension of the Oregonator model for the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction show a great variety of dynamical behaviors in such a system. In general, the system exhibits an anisotropy that results in new types of patterns or in a global displacement of the previous one. We consider the effect of both constant and periodically modulated centrifugal forces on the different types of patterns that the system may exhibit. A detailed analysis of the patterns and behaviors observed for the different parameter values considered is presented here.

  15. Learning alters the tuning of functional magnetic resonance imaging patterns for visual forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Meeson, Alan; Welchman, Andrew E; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2010-10-20

    Learning is thought to facilitate the recognition of objects by optimizing the tuning of visual neurons to behaviorally relevant features. However, the learning mechanisms that shape neural selectivity for visual forms in the human brain remain essentially unknown. Here, we combine behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements to test the mechanisms that mediate enhanced behavioral sensitivity in the discrimination of visual forms after training. In particular, we used high-resolution fMRI and multivoxel pattern classification methods to investigate fine learning-dependent changes in neural preference for global forms. We measured the observers' choices when discriminating between concentric and radial patterns presented in noise before and after training. Similarly, we measured the choices of a pattern classifier when predicting each stimulus from fMRI activity. Comparing the performance of human observers and classifiers demonstrated that learning alters the observers' sensitivity to visual forms and the tuning of fMRI activation patterns in visual areas selective for task-relevant features. In particular, training on low-signal stimuli enhanced the amplitude but reduced the width of pattern-based tuning functions in higher dorsal and ventral visual areas. Thus, our findings suggest that learning of visual patterns is implemented by enhancing the response to the preferred stimulus category and reducing the response to nonpreferred stimuli in higher extrastriate visual cortex.

  16. Probing non polar interstellar molecules through their protonated form: Detection of protonated cyanogen (NCCNH+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agúndez, M; Cernicharo, J; de Vicente, P; Marcelino, N; Roueff, E; Fuente, A; Gerin, M; Guélin, M; Albo, C; Barcia, A; Barbas, L; Bolaño, R; Colomer, F; Diez, M C; Gallego, J D; Gómez-González, J; López-Fernández, I; López-Fernández, J A; López-Pérez, J A; Malo, I; Serna, J M; Tercero, F

    2015-07-01

    Cyanogen (NCCN) is the simplest member of the series of dicyanopolyynes. It has been hypothesized that this family of molecules can be important constituents of interstellar and circumstellar media, although the lack of a permanent electric dipole moment prevents its detection through radioastronomical techniques. Here we present the first solid evidence of the presence of cyanogen in interstellar clouds through the detection of its protonated form toward the cold dark clouds TMC-1 and L483. Protonated cyanogen (NCCNH + ) has been identified through the J = 5 - 4 and J = 10 - 9 rotational transitions using the 40m radiotelescope of Yebes and the IRAM 30m telescope. We derive beam averaged column densities for NCCNH + of (8.6 ± 4.4) × 10 10 cm -2 in TMC-1 and (3.9 ± 1.8) × 10 10 cm -2 in L483, which translate to fairly low fractional abundances relative to H 2 , in the range (1-10) × 10 -12 . The chemistry of protonated molecules in dark clouds is discussed, and it is found that, in general terms, the abundance ratio between the protonated and non protonated forms of a molecule increases with increasing proton affinity. Our chemical model predicts an abundance ratio NCCNH + /NCCN of ~ 10 -4 , which implies that the abundance of cyanogen in dark clouds could be as high as (1-10) × 10 -8 relative to H 2 , i.e., comparable to that of other abundant nitriles such as HCN, HNC, and HC 3 N.

  17. Enhanced bipolar resistive switching behavior in polar Cr-doped barium titanate thin films without electro-forming process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Thakre

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An enhanced, repeatable and robust resistive switching phenomenon was observed in Cr substituted BaTiO3 polar ferroelectric thin films; fabricated and deposited by the sol-gel approach and spin coating technique, respectively. An enhanced bistable bipolar resistive switching (BRS phenomenon without electro-forming process, low switching voltage (∼ 2 V and moderate retention characteristics of 104 s along with a high Roff/Ron resistance ratio ∼103 was achieved. The current conduction analysis showed that the space charge limited conduction (SCLC and Schottky emission conduction dominate in the high voltage range, while thermally active charge carriers (ohmic in the lower voltage range. The impedance spectroscopy study indicates the formation of current conducting path and rupturing of oxygen vacancies during SET and RESET process.

  18. Enhanced bipolar resistive switching behavior in polar Cr-doped barium titanate thin films without electro-forming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakre, Atul; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-12-01

    An enhanced, repeatable and robust resistive switching phenomenon was observed in Cr substituted BaTiO3 polar ferroelectric thin films; fabricated and deposited by the sol-gel approach and spin coating technique, respectively. An enhanced bistable bipolar resistive switching (BRS) phenomenon without electro-forming process, low switching voltage (˜ 2 V) and moderate retention characteristics of 104 s along with a high Roff/Ron resistance ratio ˜103 was achieved. The current conduction analysis showed that the space charge limited conduction (SCLC) and Schottky emission conduction dominate in the high voltage range, while thermally active charge carriers (ohmic) in the lower voltage range. The impedance spectroscopy study indicates the formation of current conducting path and rupturing of oxygen vacancies during SET and RESET process.

  19. Hippocampal Offline Reactivation Consolidates Recently Formed Cell Assembly Patterns during Sharp Wave-Ripples

    OpenAIRE

    van de Ven, Gido M.; Trouche, Stéphanie; McNamara, Colin G.; Allen, Kevin; Dupret, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to reinstate neuronal assemblies representing mnemonic information is thought to require their consolidation through offline reactivation during sleep/rest. To test this, we detected cell assembly patterns formed by repeated neuronal co-activations in the mouse hippocampus during exploration of spatial environments. We found that the reinstatement of assembly patterns representing a novel, but not a familiar, environment correlated with their offline reactivation and was i...

  20. Extended high circular polarization in the Orion massive star forming region: implications for the origin of homochirality in the solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukue, Tsubasa; Tamura, Motohide; Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hough, James H; Bailey, Jeremy; Whittet, Douglas C B; Lucas, Philip W; Nakajima, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Jun

    2010-06-01

    We present a wide-field (approximately 6' x 6') and deep near-infrared (K(s) band: 2.14 mum) circular polarization image in the Orion nebula, where massive stars and many low-mass stars are forming. Our results reveal that a high circular polarization region is spatially extended (approximately 0.4 pc) around the massive star-forming region, the BN/KL nebula. However, other regions, including the linearly polarized Orion bar, show no significant circular polarization. Most of the low-mass young stars do not show detectable extended structure in either linear or circular polarization, in contrast to the BN/KL nebula. If our solar system formed in a massive star-forming region and was irradiated by net circularly polarized radiation, then enantiomeric excesses could have been induced, through asymmetric photochemistry, in the parent bodies of the meteorites and subsequently delivered to Earth. These could then have played a role in the development of biological homochirality on Earth.

  1. Simulation of AZ-PN100 resist pattern fluctuation in X-ray lithography, including synchrotron beam polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheckler, E.W.; Ogawa, Taro; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Takeda, Eiji; Oizumi, Hiroaki.

    1993-01-01

    A new simulation model for nanometer-scale pattern fluctuation in X-ray lithography is presented and applied to a study of AZ-PN100 negative chemical amplification resist. The exposure simulation considers polarized photons from a synchrotron radiation (SR) source. Monte Carlo simulation of Auger and photoelectron generation is followed by electron scattering simulation to determine the deposited energy distribution at the nanometer scale, including beam polarization effects. An acid-catalyst random walk model simulates the post-exposure bake (PEB) step. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and developed resist thickness measurements are used to fit PEB and rate models for AZ-PN100. A polymer removal model for development simulation predicts the macroscopic resist shape and pattern roughness. The simulated 3σ linewidth variation is in excess of 24 nm. Simulation also shows a detrimental effect if the beam polarization is perpendicular to the line. Simulation assuming a theoretical ideal exposure yields a 50 nm minimum line for standard process conditions. (author)

  2. Controversies Surrounding Segments and Parasegments in Onychophora: Insights from the Expression Patterns of Four “Segment Polarity Genes” in the Peripatopsid Euperipatoides rowelli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Franziska Anni; Mayer, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Arthropods typically show two types of segmentation: the embryonic parasegments and the adult segments that lie out of register with each other. Such a dual nature of body segmentation has not been described from Onychophora, one of the closest arthropod relatives. Hence, it is unclear whether onychophorans have segments, parasegments, or both, and which of these features was present in the last common ancestor of Onychophora and Arthropoda. To address this issue, we analysed the expression patterns of the “segment polarity genes” engrailed, cubitus interruptus, wingless and hedgehog in embryos of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli. Our data revealed that these genes are expressed in repeated sets with a specific anterior-to-posterior order along the body in embryos of E. rowelli. In contrast to arthropods, the expression occurs after the segmental boundaries have formed. Moreover, the initial segmental furrow retains its position within the engrailed domain throughout development, whereas no new furrow is formed posterior to this domain. This suggests that no re-segmentation of the embryo occurs in E. rowelli. Irrespective of whether or not there is a morphological or genetic manifestation of parasegments in Onychophora, our data clearly show that parasegments, even if present, cannot be regarded as the initial metameric units of the onychophoran embryo, because the expression of key genes that define the parasegmental boundaries in arthropods occurs after the segmental boundaries have formed. This is in contrast to arthropods, in which parasegments rather than segments are the initial metameric units of the embryo. Our data further revealed that the expression patterns of “segment polarity genes” correspond to organogenesis rather than segment formation. This is in line with the concept of segmentation as a result of concerted evolution of individual periodic structures rather than with the interpretation of ‘segments’ as holistic units. PMID

  3. Self-organized pattern formation upon femtosecond laser ablation by circularly polarized light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlamova, Olga; Costache, Florenta; Reif, Juergen; Bestehorn, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Surface ripples generation upon femtosecond laser ablation is attributed to self-organized structure formation from instability. We report that linear arrangements are observed not only for linearly polarized light but also for ablation with circularly polarized light. Long ordered chains of spherical nanoparticles, reminding of bead-strings are almost parallel but exhibit typical non-linear dynamics features such as bifurcations. In a first attempt to understand the self-assembly, we rely on models recently developed for the description of similar structures upon ion beam erosion and for the simulation of instabilities in thin liquid films. Our picture describes an unstable surface layer, non-uniformly eroded through Coulomb repulsion between individual positive charges

  4. Sorted bed forms as self-organized patterns: 2. complex forcing scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, Giovanni; Murray, A. Brad; Green, Malcom O.; Thieler, E. Robert; Hume, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    We employ a numerical model to study the development of sorted bed forms under a variety of hydrodynamic and sedimentary conditions. Results indicate that increased variability in wave height decreases the growth rate of the features and can potentially give rise to complicated, a priori unpredictable, behavior. This happens because the system responds to a change in wave characteristics by attempting to self-organize into a patterned seabed of different geometry and spacing. The new wavelength might not have enough time to emerge before a new change in wave characteristics occurs, leading to less regular seabed configurations. The new seabed configuration is also highly dependent on the preexisting morphology, which further limits the possibility of predicting future behavior. For the same reasons, variability in the mean current magnitude and direction slows down the growth of features and causes patterns to develop that differ from classical sorted bed forms. Spatial variability in grain size distribution and different types of net sediment aggradation/degradation can also result in the development of sorted bed forms characterized by a less regular shape. Numerical simulations qualitatively agree with observed geometry (spacing and height) of sorted bed forms. Also in agreement with observations is that at shallower depths, sorted bed forms are more likely to be affected by changes in the forcing conditions, which might also explain why, in shallow waters, sorted bed forms are described as ephemeral features. Finally, simulations indicate that the different sorted bed form shapes and patterns observed in the field might not necessarily be related to diverse physical mechanisms. Instead, variations in sorted bed form characteristics may result from variations in local hydrodynamic and/or sedimentary conditions.

  5. Self-organized spatiotemporal patterns of PIP3 and PTEN during spontaneous cell polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Fabian; Tarantola, Marco; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    During spontaneous cell polarization of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, PIP3 (phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphoshpate) and PTEN (phosphatase tensin homolog) have been identified as key signaling molecules, which govern the process of polarization in a self-organized manner. Gerisch et al. have shown that randomly triggered excitable PIP3 waves regulate the anti-correlated PTEN concentration. Here we show that this requires a switch-like dynamics of the overall membrane bound PTEN concentration in combination with two species of PTEN differing in their dephosphorylation rates. A quantitative modeling with a coupled reaction-diffusion system shows excellent agreement with experimental results and predicts a ratio σ of dephosphorylation rates acting on PIP3 of σ ~ 80 - 100. Our quantitative analysis suggests that surface-attached cell membrane spanning PIP3 waves are necessary for resetting the global actin network. This is evidenced by the experimentally observed delay between polarization-cycles also quantitatively captured by our analysis. Max Planck Society and Center for Theoretical Biological Physics.

  6. Differences in polar-map patterns using the novel technologies for myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccarato, Orazio; Marcassa, Claudio; Lizio, Domenico; Leva, Lucia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Savi, Annarita; Scabbio, Camilla; Matheoud, Roberta; Lecchi, Michela; Brambilla, Marco

    2017-10-01

    New technologies are available in MPI. Our aim was to evaluate their impact on the uniformity of normal myocardial uptake in the polar-map representation, over different count statistics, with and without the attenuation (AC) and scatter corrections (SC). A phantom study was performed using 5 Anger gamma cameras with filtered back projection or iterative reconstruction with resolution recovery (IRR), with or without SCAC; a D530c, with or without AC; and a D-SPECT. Count statistics ranged up to a quarter of the reference for the conventional gamma cameras and up to one half for the advanced scanners. Using polar maps, the segmental uptakes and their uncertainties, the 'global uniformity' of polar maps expressed as the coefficient of variation (COV) among the segmental uptakes and the anterior/inferior (ANT/INF) ratio were calculated. Both segmental uptakes and their uncertainties did not depend on the count statistics in the range studied. An increase in the segmental uptakes was found from IRR to IRR + SCAC (78.0% ± 13.5% vs 86.1% ± 9.4%; P adoption of specific normality databases, developed for each system and reconstruction method employed.

  7. Determination of the K/sub L/0 → π-μ+ν/sub μ/ form factor xi(q2) by muon polarization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, G.

    1975-09-01

    The polarization of the muon in the decay K 0 /sub L/ → π - μ + ν/sub μ/ was measured as a function of q 2 , the four-momentum transferred to the lepton pair. The kinematic information was used to compute the polarization expected on the basis of various assumed values of the form factor xi(q 2 ). By comparing the interpolated curve of the polarization as a function of xi(q 2 ) to the experimentally measured polarization, one has determined xi(q 2 ) as a function of q 2 . If one parameterizes the q 2 dependence of xi by xi(q 2 ) = xi(0) + Λ q 2 /m 2 /sub π/, then xi(0) = 0.178 +- 0.105 - 3.80 Λ

  8. Polarization phenomena in the e-vector d-vector → enp process. Neutron electric form fa>ctor and deuteron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekalo, M.N.; Gakh, G.I.; Rekalo, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Polarization effects in the e - d→e - np process with longitudinally polarized electrons and vector polarized deuterons have been studied in the relativistic impulse approximation (which takes into account the t-, u-, s-channel pole and contact diagrams). The polarization observables which are most sensitive to the neutron electric form factor G En value have been determined. When calculating both the relativistic Buck-Gross deuteron wave function (DWF) and DWF for the Paris and Reid soft-core potentials are used. In the region of the quasielastic peak (at the nucleon emission angle Θ p =0 deg or 180 deg in c.m.s. of the np-system) the investigated asymmetries are practically independent of the DWF choice. The calculation shows that the asymmetries which are caused by the deuteron spin orientation perpendicular to the momentum transfer are most suitable for the G En determination

  9. Comparing Urban Form Correlations of the Travel Patterns of Older and Younger Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, Maria Josefina; Nielsen, Thomas Sick; Siren, Anu Kristiina

    2014-01-01

    Using disaggregated data from the Danish National Travel Survey conducted between 2006–2011, this study compares the travel patterns of older (65–84 years of age) and younger (18–64 years of age) adults regarding land use, socio-economic conditions and urban structures. The results highlight...... significant differences between travel patterns and their urban form correlates for the older and younger adult populations. Spatial variables such as density and regional accessibility have different and potentially reverse associations with travel among older adults. The car use of older adults...

  10. Comparing urban form correlations of the travel patterns of older and younger adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meza, Maria Josefina Figueroa; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick; Siren, Anu Kristiina

    2014-01-01

    Using disaggregated data from the Danish National Travel Survey conducted between 2006 - 2011, this study compares the travel patterns of older (65 – 84 years of age) and younger (18 – 64 years of age) adults regarding land use, socio-economic conditions and urban structures. The results highlight...... significant differences between travel patterns and their urban form correlates for the older and younger adult populations. Spatial variables such as density and regional accessibility have different and potentially reverse associations with travel among older adults. The car use of older adults...

  11. Central pattern generators in the turtle spinal cord: selection among the forms of motor behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul S G

    2018-02-01

    Neuronal networks in the turtle spinal cord have considerable computational complexity even in the absence of connections with supraspinal structures. These networks contain central pattern generators (CPGs) for each of several behaviors, including three forms of scratch, two forms of swim, and one form of flexion reflex. Each behavior is activated by a specific set of cutaneous or electrical stimuli. The process of selection among behaviors within the spinal cord has multisecond memories of specific motor patterns. Some spinal cord interneurons are partially shared among several CPGs, whereas other interneurons are active during only one type of behavior. Partial sharing is a proposed mechanism that contributes to the ability of the spinal cord to generate motor pattern blends with characteristics of multiple behaviors. Variations of motor patterns, termed deletions, assist in characterization of the organization of the pattern-generating components of CPGs. Single-neuron recordings during both normal and deletion motor patterns provide support for a CPG organizational structure with unit burst generators (UBGs) whose members serve a direction of a specific degree of freedom of the hindlimb, e.g., the hip-flexor UBG, the hip-extensor UBG, the knee-flexor UBG, the knee-extensor UBG, etc. The classic half-center hypothesis that includes all the hindlimb flexors in a single flexor half-center and all the hindlimb extensors in a single extensor half-center lacks the organizational complexity to account for the motor patterns produced by turtle spinal CPGs. Thus the turtle spinal cord is a valuable model system for studies of mechanisms responsible for selection and generation of motor behaviors. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The concept of the central pattern generator (CPG) is a major tenet in motor neuroethology that has influenced the design and interpretations of experiments for over a half century. This review concentrates on the turtle spinal cord and describes studies from

  12. Patterns of faunal extinction and paleoclimatic change from mid-Holocene mammoth and polar bear remains, Pribilof Islands, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltre, Douglas W.; Yesner, David R.; Crossen, Kristine J.; Graham, Russell W.; Coltrain, Joan B.

    2008-07-01

    Qagnaxˆ Cave, a lava tube cave on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, has recently produced a mid-Holocene vertebrate faunal assemblage including woolly mammoth, polar bear, caribou, and Arctic fox. Several dates on the mammoth remains converge on 5700 14C yr BP. These dates, ~ 2300 yr younger than mammoth dates previously published from the Pribilof Islands, make these the youngest remains of proboscideans, and of non-extinct Quaternary megafauna, recovered from North America. Persistence of mammoths on the Pribilofs is most parsimoniously explained by the isolation of the Pribilofs and the lack of human presence in pre-Russian contact times, but an additional factor may have been the local existence of high-quality forage in the form of grasses enriched by nutrients derived from local Holocene tephras. This interpretation is reinforced by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values obtained from the mammoth remains. The endpoint of mammoth survival in the Pribilofs is unknown, but maybe coterminous with the arrival of polar bears whose remains in the cave date to the Neoglacial cold period of ~ 4500 to 3500 14C yr BP. The polar bear record corroborates a widespread cooling of the Bering Sea region at that time.

  13. Polarization-dependent Imaging Contrast (PIC) mapping reveals nanocrystal orientation patterns in carbonate biominerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Pupa U.P.A., E-mail: pupa@physics.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocrystal orientation shown by Polarization-dependent Imaging Contrast (PIC) maps. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIC-mapping of carbonate biominerals reveals their ultrastructure at the nanoscale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation mechanisms of biominerals is discovered by PIC-mapping using PEEM. -- Abstract: Carbonate biominerals are one of the most interesting systems a physicist can study. They play a major role in the CO{sub 2} cycle, they master templation, self-assembly, nanofabrication, phase transitions, space filling, crystal nucleation and growth mechanisms. A new imaging modality was introduced in the last 5 years that enables direct observation of the orientation of carbonate single crystals, at the nano- and micro-scale. This is Polarization-dependent Imaging Contrast (PIC) mapping, which is based on X-ray linear dichroism, and uses PhotoElectron Emission spectroMicroscopy (PEEM). Here we present PIC-mapping results from biominerals, including the nacre and prismatic layers of mollusk shells, and sea urchin teeth. We describe various PIC-mapping approaches, and show that these lead to fundamental discoveries on the formation mechanisms of biominerals.

  14. Cutting blade dentitions in squaliform sharks form by modification of inherited alternate tooth ordering patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Underwood, Charlie J.; Johanson, Z.; Smith, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    The squaliform sharks represent one of the most speciose shark clades. Many adult squaliforms have blade-like teeth, either on both jaws or restricted to the lower jaw, forming a continuous, serrated blade along the jaw margin. These teeth are replaced as a single unit and successor teeth lack the alternate arrangement present in other elasmobranchs. Micro-CT scans of embryos of squaliforms and a related outgroup (Pristiophoridae) revealed that the squaliform dentition pattern represents a hi...

  15. Higher education corruption in the world media: Prevalence, patterns, and forms

    OpenAIRE

    Osipian, Ararat

    2007-01-01

    Corruption in higher education is a newly emerging topic in the field of education research. There is a phenomenal growth in the number of media reports on corruption in higher education over the last decade. However, the rigorous systematic research on education corruption is virtually nonexistent. This paper considers corruption in higher education as reflected in the world media, including such aspects of corruption as its prevalence, patterns, and dominating forms. It follows publications...

  16. The effect of preceding wintertime Arctic polar vortex on springtime NDVI patterns in boreal Eurasia, 1982-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Fan, Ke; Xu, Jianjun; Powell, Alfred M.; Kogan, Felix

    2017-07-01

    The polar vortex is implicated in certain cold events in boreal Eurasia and has a further influence on land surface properties (e.g., vegetation and snow) during spring. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) can be used as a proxy of land surface responses to climate changes to a certain degree. In this study, we demonstrate the significant correlation between preceding wintertime Arctic polar vortex intensity (WAPVI) and springtime NDVI (SNDVI) over a 34-year period (1982-2015) in boreal Eurasia (50°-75°N, 0°-150°E). Results show that a positive phase of WAPVI tends to increase the SNDVI in Europe and Lake Baikal, but causes a significant decrease in Siberia; the physical mechanisms involved in this relationship are then investigated. A positive phase of WAPVI leads to anomalies in surface air temperature and rainfall over Eurasia, which then induces a significant decrease in snow cover and snow depth in Europe and Lake Baikal and an increase of snow depth in Siberia. The colder ground temperature in Siberia during spring is considered responsible for the stronger snow depth and weaker vegetation growth in this region. The weaker and thinner snow cover in Europe and Baikal produces a decrease in albedo and an increase in heat. Thin snow melts fast in the following spring and land releases more heat to the atmosphere; consequently, warm and moist land surface facilitates vegetation growth in Europe and the Baikal regions during positive WAPVI years. In addition, WAPVI can induce sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the North Atlantic, which displays a tripole pattern similar to that of the empirical mode pattern in winter. Furthermore, the SST anomalous pattern persisting from winter to spring can trigger a stationary wave-train propagating from west to east in boreal Eurasia, with "negative-positive-negative-positive" geopotential height anomalies, which further exerts an impact on vegetation growth through modulation of the heat balance.

  17. Analysis of the Origin of Atypical Scanning Laser Polarimetry Patterns by Polarization-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Baumann, Bernhard; Hirn, Cornelia; Vass, Clemens; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the physical origin of atypical scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) patterns. To compare polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) scans to SLP images. To present a method to obtain pseudo-SLP images by PS-OCT that are free of atypical artifacts. Methods Forty-one eyes of healthy subjects, subjects with suspected glaucoma, and patients with glaucoma were imaged by SLP (GDx VCC) and a prototype spectral domain PS-OCT system. The PS-OCT system acquires three-dimensional (3D) datasets of intensity, retardation, and optic axis orientation simultaneously within 3 seconds. B-scans of intensity and retardation and en face maps of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) retardation were derived from the 3D PS-OCT datasets. Results were compared with those obtained by SLP. Results Twenty-two eyes showed atypical retardation patterns, and 19 eyes showed normal patterns. From the 22 atypical eyes, 15 showed atypical patterns in both imaging modalities, five were atypical only in SLP images, and two were atypical only in PS-OCT images. In most (15 of 22) atypical cases, an increased penetration of the probing beam into the birefringent sclera was identified as the source of atypical patterns. In such cases, the artifacts could be eliminated in PS-OCT images by depth segmentation and exclusion of scleral signals. Conclusions PS-OCT provides deeper insight into the contribution of different fundus layers to SLP images. Increased light penetration into the sclera can distort SLP retardation patterns of the RNFL. PMID:19036999

  18. Characterization of self-assembled silver pattern forming in argon and ammonia mixed atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Naoya; Blanquet, Ella; Hiraoka, Yu; Sakai, Osamu

    2015-09-01

    Self-assembly fractal-like silver pattern was observed when the silver nitrate solution was dried with the gas flow of argon and ammonia mixed atmospheric plasma. This process can generate hydrazine, which is a powerful reductive agent, and silver particles are deposited from silver nitrate self-assembly and form fractal-like pattern in sub- μm order. This pattern shows abnormal optical response, so our self-assembly plasma process will be likely to bring a good method to make optical metamaterials because of its simplicity. In addition, we proposed that this process is applicable for widely sensitive metamaterials process, since we made sub- μm and several ten micrometers mingled microstructure through the plasma process with the use of micro particles. We diagnosed the characteristics of this typical pattern by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and numerical simulation, and confirmed that the pattern was widely sensitive from mid-infrared to far-infrared region. We aim at controlling the typical response phenomena and making widely sensitive optical metamaterials with changing deposition condition.

  19. Correlation properties of dual polarized antennas with finite pattern orthogonality in mobile fading channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Armbrecht

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from planar broadband log.-per. antenna design, offering the possibility of dual-polarized reception properties, in this article a generalized mathematical approach for rapidly estimating the resulting signal correlation coefficient in a stochastically modeled propagation environment solely based on measured or simulated radiation characteristics of one single antenna element is presented. The obtained results are marking an upper limit and are describing the worst-case scenario according to the signal correlation at the antenna feeding points in terms of line-of-sight (LOS reception in main beam direction. The knowledge of the derived relationship may be helpful especially for antenna designers to combine antenna performance values with the significant communication system performance parameters, as e.g. in case of Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO and diversity configurations.

  20. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  1. Modeling self-organized spatio-temporal patterns of PIP3 and PTEN during spontaneous cell polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoch, Fabian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2014-01-01

    During spontaneous cell polarization of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphoshpate (PIP 3 ) and PTEN (phosphatase tensin homolog) have been identified as key signaling molecules which govern the process of polarization in a self-organized manner. Recent experiments have quantified the spatio-temporal dynamics of these signaling components. Surprisingly, it was found that membrane-bound PTEN can be either in a high or low state, that PIP 3 waves were initiated in areas lacking PTEN through an excitable mechanism, and that PIP 3 was degraded even though the PTEN concentration remained low. Here we develop a reaction-diffusion model that aims to explain these experimental findings. Our model contains bistable dynamics for PTEN, excitable dynamics for PIP 3 , and postulates the existence of two species of PTEN with different dephosphorylation rates. We show that our model is able to produce results that are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments, suggesting that our reaction-diffusion model underlies the self-organized spatio-temporal patterns observed in experiments. (paper)

  2. Modeling self-organized spatio-temporal patterns of PIP3 and PTEN during spontaneous cell polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Fabian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2014-08-01

    During spontaneous cell polarization of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphoshpate (PIP3) and PTEN (phosphatase tensin homolog) have been identified as key signaling molecules which govern the process of polarization in a self-organized manner. Recent experiments have quantified the spatio-temporal dynamics of these signaling components. Surprisingly, it was found that membrane-bound PTEN can be either in a high or low state, that PIP3 waves were initiated in areas lacking PTEN through an excitable mechanism, and that PIP3 was degraded even though the PTEN concentration remained low. Here we develop a reaction-diffusion model that aims to explain these experimental findings. Our model contains bistable dynamics for PTEN, excitable dynamics for PIP3, and postulates the existence of two species of PTEN with different dephosphorylation rates. We show that our model is able to produce results that are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments, suggesting that our reaction-diffusion model underlies the self-organized spatio-temporal patterns observed in experiments.

  3. Numerical and Experimental Study on the Formation and Dispersion Patterns of Multiple Explosively Formed Penetrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Feng Liu

    Full Text Available Abstract Three-dimensional numerical simulations and experiments were performed to examine the formation and spatial dispersion patterns of integral multiple explosively formed penetrators (MEFP warhead with seven hemispherical liners. Numerical results had successfully described the formation process and distribution pattern of MEFP. A group of penetrators consisting of a central penetrator surrounded by 6 penetrators is formed during the formation process of MEFP and moves in the direction of aiming position. The maximum divergence angle of the surrounding penetrator group was 7.8°, and the damage area could reach 0.16 m2 at 1.2 m. The laws of perforation dispersion patterns of MEFP were also obtained through a nonlinear fitting of the perforation information on the target at different standoffs. The terminal effects of the MEFP warhead were performed on three #45 steel targets with a dimension of 160cm ( 160cm ( 1.5cm at various standoffs (60, 80, and 120 cm. The simulation results were validated through penetration experiments at different standoffs. It has shown excellent agreement between simulation and experiment results.

  4. Cutting blade dentitions in squaliform sharks form by modification of inherited alternate tooth ordering patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Charlie; Johanson, Zerina; Smith, Moya Meredith

    2016-11-01

    The squaliform sharks represent one of the most speciose shark clades. Many adult squaliforms have blade-like teeth, either on both jaws or restricted to the lower jaw, forming a continuous, serrated blade along the jaw margin. These teeth are replaced as a single unit and successor teeth lack the alternate arrangement present in other elasmobranchs. Micro-CT scans of embryos of squaliforms and a related outgroup (Pristiophoridae) revealed that the squaliform dentition pattern represents a highly modified version of tooth replacement seen in other clades. Teeth of Squalus embryos are arranged in an alternate pattern, with successive tooth rows containing additional teeth added proximally. Asynchronous timing of tooth production along the jaw and tooth loss prior to birth cause teeth to align in oblique sets containing teeth from subsequent rows; these become parallel to the jaw margin during ontogeny, so that adult Squalus has functional tooth rows comprising obliquely stacked teeth of consecutive developmental rows. In more strongly heterodont squaliforms, initial embryonic lower teeth develop into the oblique functional sets seen in adult Squalus, with no requirement to form, and subsequently lose, teeth arranged in an initial alternate pattern.

  5. Dissipative neurodynamics in perception forms cortical patterns that are stabilized by vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Walter J.; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2009-06-01

    In the engagement of the brain with its environment, large-scale neural interactions in brain dynamics create a mesoscopic order parameter, which is evaluated by measuring brain waves (electrocorticogram, ECoG). Such large-scale interactions emerge from the background activity of the brain that is sustained by mutual excitation in cortical populations and manifest in spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity. Band pass filtering reveals beats in ECoG power that recur at theta rates (3-7 Hz) as null spikes in log10 power. The order parameter transiently approaches zero, and the microscopic activity is both disordered and symmetric. As the null spikes terminate, the order parameter resurges and imposes a mesoscopic spatial pattern of ECoG amplitude modulation that then governs the microscopic gamma activity and retrieves the memory of a stimulus. The brain waves reveal a spatial pattern of phase modulation in the form of a cone. The dissipative many-body model of brain dynamics describes these phase cones as vortices, which are initiated by the null spikes, and which stabilize the amplitude modulated patterns embedded in the turbulent neural noise from which they emerge.

  6. Fluorine-containing composition for forming anti-reflection film on resist surface and pattern formation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Mineo; Makishima, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    A composition for forming anti-reflection film on resist surface which comprises an aqueous solution of a water soluble fluorine compound, and a pattern formation method which comprises the steps of coating a photoresist composition on a substrate; coating the above-mentioned composition for forming anti-reflection film; exposing the coated film to form a specific pattern; and developing the photoresist, are provided. Since the composition for forming anti-reflection film can be coated on the photoresist in the form of an aqueous solution, not only the anti-reflection film can be formed easily, but also, the film can be removed easily by rinsing with water or alkali development. Therefore, by the pattern formation method according to the present invention, it is possible to form a pattern easily with a high dimensional accuracy.

  7. The emergence of sarcomeric, graded-polarity and spindle-like patterns in bundles of short cytoskeletal polymers and two opposite molecular motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, E M; Dey, S; Mogilner, A

    2011-01-01

    We use linear stability analysis and numerical solutions of partial differential equations to investigate pattern formation in the one-dimensional system of short dynamic polymers and one (plus-end directed) or two (one is plus-end, another minus-end directed) molecular motors. If polymer sliding and motor gliding rates are slow and/or the polymer turnover rate is fast, then the polymer-motor bundle has mixed polarity and homogeneous motor distribution. However, if motor gliding is fast, a sarcomeric pattern with periodic bands of alternating polymer polarity separated by motor aggregates evolves. On the other hand, if polymer sliding is fast, a graded-polarity bundle with motors at the center emerges. In the presence of the second, minus-end directed motor, the sarcomeric pattern is more ubiquitous, while the graded-polarity pattern is destabilized. However, if the minus-end motor is weaker than the plus-end directed one, and/or polymer nucleation is autocatalytic, and/or long polymers are present in the bundle, then a spindle-like architecture with a sorted-out polarity emerges with the plus-end motors at the center and minus-end motors at the edges. We discuss modeling implications for actin-myosin fibers and in vitro and meiotic spindles.

  8. A polarized digital shearing speckle pattern interferometry system based on temporal wavelet transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ziang; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Wang, Shengjia; Yang, Dong; Yuan, Hao; Qin, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Digital shearing speckle pattern interferometry (DSSPI) has been recognized as a practical tool in testing strain. The DSSPI system which is based on temporal analysis is attractive because of its ability to measure strain dynamically. In this paper, such a DSSPI system with Wollaston prism has been built. The principles and system arrangement are described and the preliminary experimental result of the displacement-derivative test of an aluminum plate is shown with the wavelet transformation method and the Fourier transformation method. The simulations have been conducted with the finite element method. The comparison of the results shows that quantitative measurement of displacement-derivative has been realized.

  9. Experimental study of structure-forming deformations in ultra-slow spreading Arctic and Polar Atlantic ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Grokholsky, A. L.; Kokhan, A. V.

    2010-05-01

    unstable relation of slip and extension components. Experimental setting was the following. We emplaced three weak zones according to natural geometry of spreading modeling three neighboring ridges: Knipovich, Mohns, Gakkel. Short spreading segments orthogonal to direction of extension formed in area of Knipovich model zone. They were connected by long slip segments subparallel to extension direction. Under increase of angle between extension direction and trend of "Knipovich" weak zone the length of slip segments gradually decreased and reached minimum under the angle of 50°. The Gakkel ridge is the slowest in all the system of spreading ridges. Spreading velocity is less than 13 mm/year. Spreading is orthogonal here. Areas of volcanism are separated by 100 km long segments with minimal volcanic activity. This volcanic centers form orthogonal rises which has been stable for the last 30 Myr. Also the ridge has practically no discontinuities except the smallest with amplitude less than 13 km. Experiments were held in conditions of orthogonal extension with the smallest velocity. Formation of fractures had a linear pattern. Perpendicular to the ridge lineaments were the basic feature of structure forming. They were inherited from the primary discontinuities of fracture patterns. Thus, experiments let to distinguish key peculiarities of structure-forming in rifting zones of these ridges. For Reikjanes ridge this is a system of s-shaped fractures which are used as channels for eruption and subsequent formation of AVRs. For Knipovich ridge this is an unstable system of pull-aparts. For Gakkel ridge this is a system of linear fractures and stable lineaments perpendicular to the ridge.

  10. Linear and branched perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) isomer patterns differ among several tissues and blood of polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Alana K; Letcher, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a globally distributed persistent organic pollutant that has been found to bioaccumulate and biomagnify in aquatic food webs. Although principally in its linear isomeric configuration, 21-35% of the PFOS manufactured via electrochemical fluorination is produced as a branched structural isomer. PFOS isomer patterns were investigated in multiple tissues of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from East Greenland. The liver (n = 9), blood (n = 19), brain (n = 16), muscle (n = 5), and adipose (n = 5) were analyzed for linear PFOS (n-PFOS), as well as multiple mono- and di-trifluoromethyl-substituted branched isomers. n-PFOS accounted for 93.0 ± 0.5% of Σ-PFOS isomer concentrations in the liver, whereas the proportion was significantly lower (pblood (85.4 ± 0.5%). Branched isomers were quantifiable in the liver and blood, but not in the brain, muscle, or adipose. In both the liver and blood, 6-perfluoromethylheptane sulfonate (P6MHpS) was the dominant branched isomer (2.61 ± 0.10%, and 3.26 ± 0.13% of Σ-PFOS concentrations, respectively). No di-trifluoromethyl-substituted isomers were detectable in any of the tissues analyzed. These tissue-specific isomer patterns suggest isomer-specific pharmacokinetics, perhaps due to differences in protein affinities, and thus differences in protein interactions, as well transport, absorption, and/or metabolism in the body. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of Fracture Pattern of Pulverized Quartz Formed by Stick Slip Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Muto, Jun; Otsuki, Kenshiro; Kano, Harumasa; Sasaki, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    In order to clarify how wall rocks of faults are damaged, fracture pattern analysis was performed imaging experimentally pulverized rocks by a micro-focus X-ray CT. Analyzed samples are core (diameter of 2cm) of single crystals of synthetic quartz and natural quartzites, which were pre-cut 50° to the core axis and mirror-polished. Experiments were conducted with axial strain rate of 10-3/s under the confining pressure of 180 MPa and room temperature using gas apparatus. Intense fracturing of the core occurred during the stick-slip with very large stress drop. Although thin melt layer is formed on the slip plane, the core is pulverized overall by tensile fracturing characterized by apparent lack of shear deformation. X-ray CT images demonstrate the fracture pattern being strongly controlled by slip direction and shear sense. Cracks are exponentially increased toward the slip plane and concentrated in the central portion rather than outer margin of core. Cracks tend to develop parallel to core axis and at high to moderate angles (90° ~ ±50°) with the plane including both core axis and slip direction, and lean to be higher angle to the surface near the slip plane. Due to this fracture pattern, the pulverized fragments show polygonal column or needle in shape with sharp and curving edges irrespective of their sizes, and the intensely fractured slip surface exhibit distinct rugged topography of an array of ridges developed perpendicular to slip direction. Mode and distribution pattern of fractures indicate that the stress concentration at the rupture front during dynamic rupture propagation or the constructive interference of reflected seismic waves focused at the center of core are possible mechanisms of pulverization.

  12. Patterns of fire activity over Indonesia and Malaysia from polar and geostationary satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Edward J.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Prins, Elaine M.; Hoffman, Jay P.; Schmidt, Christopher C.; Miettinen, Jukka I.; Giglio, Louis

    2013-03-01

    Biomass burning patterns over the Maritime Continent of Southeast Asia are examined using a new active fire detection product based on application of the Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA) to data from the imagers on the MTSAT geostationary satellites operated by the Japanese space agency JAXA. Data from MTSAT-1R and MTSAT-2 covering 34 months from September 2008 to July 2011 are examined for a study region consisting of Indonesia, Malaysia, and nearby environs. The spatial and temporal distributions of fires detected in the MTSAT WF_ABBA product are described and compared with active fire observations from MODIS MOD14 data. Land cover distributions for the two instruments are examined using a new 250 m land cover product from the National University of Singapore. The two products show broadly similar patterns of fire activity, land cover distribution of fires, and pixel fire radiative power (FRP). However, the MTSAT WF_ABBA data differ from MOD14 in important ways. Relative to MODIS, the MTSAT WF_ABBA product has lower overall detection efficiency, but more fires detected due to more frequent looks, a greater relative fraction of fires in forest and a lower relative fraction of fires in open areas, and significantly higher single-pixel retrieved FRP. The differences in land cover distribution and FRP between the MTSAT and MODIS products are shown to be qualitatively consistent with expectations based on pixel size and diurnal sampling. The MTSAT WF_ABBA data are used to calculate coverage-corrected diurnal cycles of fire for different regions within the study area. These diurnal cycles are preliminary but demonstrate that the fraction of diurnal fire activity sampled by the two MODIS sensors varies significantly by region and vegetation type. Based on the results from comparison of the two fire products, a series of steps is outlined to account for some of the systematic biases in each of these satellite products in order to produce a

  13. The temporal and geographical mercury patterns in polar bears and birds of prey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietz, R.; Riget, F.; Olsen, M.T.

    2004-01-01

    , the pelagic food chain and the transfer to higher trophic levels. Large uncertainties on the inter-compartment fluxes still exist and future activities should be organised as joint campaigns having a more holistic approach with focus on periods and target areas with AMDEs. Based on the obtained knowledge......: emission – atmospheric transport – atmospheric deposition – transport to seawater (– reemission – transport to seawater) – uptake in plankton – transfer to higher trophic levels are at present insufficiently known. The complexity of the problem stresses the need of contributions from many disciplines...... is anthropogenic, Preliminary results in seawater indicate that 80% of total mercury is found in dissolved form or associated with particles food web. Significant increase in mercury content is found in predators such as crabs, fish, birds...

  14. Silica Crack Pattern Resembling Ballen Formed in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler: Is Shock Necessary to form Ballen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittarello, L.; Habler, G.; Chanmuang, C.; Abart, R.

    2017-07-01

    "Synthetic" ballen silica formed in the boiler of a biomass power plant. Cracks are localized in cristobalite, which surrounds relic quartz fragments. Pressure and temperature conditions in the boiler allow a new discussion of ballen silica formation.

  15. Polarization effects in the reaction e++e-→ρ++ρ- and determination of the ρ-meson form factors in the time-like region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamuscin, C.; Gakh, G. I.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.

    2007-01-01

    The electron positron annihilation reaction into four-pion production has been studied, through the channel e + +e - →ρ+ρ. The differential (and total) cross sections and various polarization observables for this reaction have been calculated in terms of the electromagnetic form factors of the corresponding γ*ρρ current. The elements of the spin-density matrix of the ρ meson were also calculated. Numerical estimations have been done, with the help of phenomenological form factors obtained in the spacelike region of the momentum transfer squared and analytically extended to the timelike region

  16. Patterns of Leaf Biochemical and Structural Properties of Cerrado Life Forms: Implications for Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Aaron; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Portillo-Quintero, Carlos; Rivard, Benoit; Castro-Contreras, Saulo; Fernandes, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Aim The general goal of this study is to investigate and analyze patterns of ecophysiological leaf traits and spectral response among life forms (trees, shrubs and lianas) in the Cerrado ecosystem. In this study, we first tested whether life forms are discriminated through leaf level functional traits. We then explored the correlation between leaf-level plant functional traits and spectral reflectance. Location Serra do Cipo National Park, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methods Six ecophysiological leaf traits were selected to best characterize differences between life forms in the woody plant community of the Cerrado. Results were compared to spectral vegetation indices to determine if plant groups provide means to separate leaf spectral responses. Results Values obtained from leaf traits were similar to results reported from other tropical dry sites. Trees and shrubs significantly differed from lianas in terms of the percentage of leaf water content and Specific Leaf Area. Spectral indices were insufficient to capture the differences of these key traits between groups, though indices were still adequately correlated to overall trait variation. Conclusion The importance of life forms as biochemical and structurally distinctive groups is a significant finding for future remote sensing studies of vegetation, especially in arid and semi-arid environments. The traits we found as indicative of these groups (SLA and water content) are good candidates for spectral characterization. Future studies need to use the full wavelength (400 nm–2500 nm) in order to capture the potential response of these traits. The ecological linkage to water balance and life strategies encourages these traits as starting points for modeling plant communities using hyperspectral remote sensing. PMID:25692675

  17. Space-variant filtering for correction of wavefront curvature effects in spotlight-mode SAR imagery formed via polar formatting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Thompson, Paul A.; Doren, Neall E.

    1997-07-01

    Wavefront curvature defocus effects can occur in spotlight- mode SAR imagery when reconstructed via the well-known polar formatting algorithm under certain scenarios that include imaging at close range, use of very low center frequency, and/or imaging of very large scenes. The range migration algorithm, also known as seismic migration, was developed to accommodate these wavefront curvature effects. However, the along-track upsampling of the phase history data required of the original version of range migration can in certain instances represent a major computational burden. A more recent version of migration processing, the frequency domain replication and downsampling (FReD) algorithm, obviates the need to upsample, and is accordingly more efficient. In this paper we demonstrate that the combination of traditional polar formatting with appropriate space-variant post- filtering for refocus can be as efficient or even more efficient than FReD under some imaging conditions, as demonstrated by the computer-simulated results in this paper. The post-filter can be pre-calculated from a theoretical derivation of the curvature effect. The conclusion is that the new polar formatting with post filtering algorithm should be considered as a viable candidate for a spotight-mode image formation processor when curvature effects are present.

  18. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  19. A Measurement of the neutron electric form factor at very large momentum transfer using polaried electrions scattering from a polarized helium-3 target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelleher, Aidan [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge of the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the nucleon is essential for an understanding of nucleon structure. Of the form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron has been measured over the smallest range in Q2 and with the lowest precision. Jefferson Lab experiment 02-013 used a novel new polarized 3 He target to nearly double the range of momentum transfer in which the neutron form factor has been studied and to measure it with much higher precision. Polarized electrons were scattered off this target, and both the scattered electron and neutron were detected. Gn E was measured to be 0.0242 ± 0.0020(stat) ± 0.0061(sys) and 0.0247 ± 0.0029(stat) ± 0.0031(sys) at Q2 = 1.7 and 2.5 GeV2 , respectively.

  20. Elevational plant species richness patterns and their drivers across non-endemics, endemics and growth forms in the Eastern Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manish, Kumar; Pandit, Maharaj K; Telwala, Yasmeen; Nautiyal, Dinesh C; Koh, Lian Pin; Tiwari, Sudha

    2017-09-01

    Despite decades of research, ecologists continue to debate how spatial patterns of species richness arise across elevational gradients on the Earth. The equivocal results of these studies could emanate from variations in study design, sampling effort and data analysis. In this study, we demonstrate that the richness patterns of 2,781 (2,197 non-endemic and 584 endemic) angiosperm species along an elevational gradient of 300-5,300 m in the Eastern Himalaya are hump-shaped, spatial scale of extent (the proportion of elevational gradient studied) dependent and growth form specific. Endemics peaked at higher elevations than non-endemics across all growth forms (trees, shrubs, climbers, and herbs). Richness patterns were influenced by the proportional representation of the largest physiognomic group (herbs). We show that with increasing spatial scale of extent, the richness patterns change from a monotonic to a hump-shaped pattern and richness maxima shift toward higher elevations across all growth forms. Our investigations revealed that the combination of ambient energy (air temperature, solar radiation, and potential evapo-transpiration) and water availability (soil water content and precipitation) were the main drivers of elevational plant species richness patterns in the Himalaya. This study highlights the importance of factoring in endemism, growth forms, and spatial scale when investigating elevational gradients of plant species distributions and advances our understanding of how macroecological patterns arise.

  1. Mastery in Goal Scoring, T-Pattern Detection, and Polar Coordinate Analysis of Motor Skills Used by Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañer, Marta; Barreira, Daniel; Camerino, Oleguer; Anguera, M Teresa; Fernandes, Tiago; Hileno, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    Research in soccer has traditionally given more weight to players' technical and tactical skills, but few studies have analyzed the motor skills that underpin specific motor actions. The objective of this study was to investigate the style of play of the world's top soccer players, Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi, and how they use their motor skills in attacking actions that result in a goal. We used and improved the easy-to-use observation instrument (OSMOS-soccer player) with 9 criteria, each one expanded to build 50 categories. Associations between these categories were investigated by T-pattern detection and polar coordinate analysis. T-pattern analysis detects temporal structures of complex behavioral sequences composed of simpler or directly distinguishable events within specified observation periods (time point series). Polar coordinate analysis involves the application of a complex procedure to provide a vector map of interrelated behaviors obtained from prospective and retrospective sequential analysis. The T-patterns showed that for both players the combined criteria were mainly between the different aspects of motor skills, namely the use of lower limbs, contact with the ball using the outside of the foot, locomotion, body orientation with respect to the opponent goal line, and the criteria of technical actions and the right midfield. Polar coordinate analysis detected significant associations between the same criteria included in the T-patterns as well as the criteria of turning the body, numerical equality with no pressure, and relative numerical superiority.

  2. Mastery in Goal Scoring, T-Pattern Detection, and Polar Coordinate Analysis of Motor Skills Used by Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Castañer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Research in soccer has traditionally given more weight to players' technical and tactical skills, but few studies have analyzed the motor skills that underpin specific motor actions. The objective of this study was to investigate the style of play of the world's top soccer players, Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi, and how they use their motor skills in attacking actions that result in a goal. We used and improved the easy-to-use observation instrument (OSMOS-soccer player with 9 criteria, each one expanded to build 50 categories. Associations between these categories were investigated by T-pattern detection and polar coordinate analysis. T-pattern analysis detects temporal structures of complex behavioral sequences composed of simpler or directly distinguishable events within specified observation periods (time point series. Polar coordinate analysis involves the application of a complex procedure to provide a vector map of interrelated behaviors obtained from prospective and retrospective sequential analysis. The T-patterns showed that for both players the combined criteria were mainly between the different aspects of motor skills, namely the use of lower limbs, contact with the ball using the outside of the foot, locomotion, body orientation with respect to the opponent goal line, and the criteria of technical actions and the right midfield. Polar coordinate analysis detected significant associations between the same criteria included in the T-patterns as well as the criteria of turning the body, numerical equality with no pressure, and relative numerical superiority.

  3. CHROMOSPHERIC POLARIZATION IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC SOLAR OXYGEN INFRARED TRIPLET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Pino Alemán, Tanausú; Trujillo Bueno, Javier [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-07-20

    We present multilevel radiative transfer modeling of the scattering polarization observed in the solar O i infrared triplet around 777 nm. We demonstrate that the scattering polarization pattern observed on the solar disk forms in the chromosphere, far above the photospheric region where the bulk of the emergent intensity profiles originate. We investigate the sensitivity of the polarization pattern to the thermal structure of the solar atmosphere and to the presence of weak magnetic fields (10{sup −2}–100 G) through the Hanle effect, showing that the scattering polarization signals of the oxygen infrared triplet encode information on the magnetism of the solar chromosphere.

  4. Grapho-epitaxial sub-10nm line and space patterning using lamellar-forming Si-containing block copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hironobu; Kasahara, Yusuke; Kihara, Naoko; Seino, Yuriko; Miyagi, Ken; Minegishi, Shinya; Kubota, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Kanai, Hideki; Kodera, Katsuyoshi; Kawamonzen, Yoshiaki; Shiraishi, Masayuki; Yamano, Hitoshi; Nomura, Satoshi; Azuma, Tsukasa; Hayakawa, Teruaki

    2016-04-01

    Si-rich poly((polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane) methacrylate)-b-poly(trifluoroethyl methacrylate) (PMAPOSS-b- PTFEMA) was used to form 8-nm half-pitch line and space (L/S) pattern via grapho-epitaxy. Vertical alignment of the lamellae was achieved without using either a neutral layer or top-coating material. Because PMAPOSS-b-PTFEMA forms vertical lamellae on a variety of substrates, we used two types of physical guide structures for grapho-epitaxy; one was a substrate guide and the other was a guide with an embedded under layer. On the substrate guide structure, a fine L/S pattern was obtained with trench widths equal to 3-7 periods of the lamella spacing of the block copolymer, Lo. However, on the embedded under layer guide structure, L/S pattern was observed only with 3 Lo and 4 Lo in trench width. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscope images revealed that a thick PMAPOSS layer was formed under the PMAPOSS-b-PTFEMA L/S pattern. Pattern transfer of the PMAPOSS-b-PTFEMA L/S pattern was prevented by a thick PMAPOSS layer. To achieve pattern transfer to the under layer, optimization of the surface properties is necessary.

  5. EVN observations of 6.7 GHz methanol maser polarization in massive star-forming regions. III. The flux-limited sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surcis, G.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Hutawarakorn Kramer, B.; Bartkiewicz, A.; Blasi, M. G.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Theoretical simulations and observations at different angular resolutions have shown that magnetic fields have a central role in massive star formation. Like in low-mass star formation, the magnetic field in massive young stellar objects can either be oriented along the outflow axis or randomly. Aims: Measuring the magnetic field at milliarcsecond resolution (10-100 au) around a substantial number of massive young stellar objects permits determining with a high statistical significance whether the direction of the magnetic field is correlated with the orientation of the outflow axis or not. Methods: In late 2012, we started a large VLBI campaign with the European VLBI Network to measure the linearly and circularly polarized emission of 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers around a sample of massive star-forming regions. This paper focuses on the first seven observed sources, G24.78+0.08, G25.65+1.05, G29.86-0.04, G35.03+0.35, G37.43+1.51, G174.20-0.08, and G213.70-12.6. For all these sources, molecular outflows have been detected in the past. Results: We detected a total of 176 CH3OH masing cloudlets toward the seven massive star-forming regions, 19% of which show linearly polarized emission. The CH3OH masers around the massive young stellar object MM1 in G174.20-0.08 show neither linearly nor circularly polarized emission. The linear polarization vectors are well ordered in all the other massive young stellar objects. We measured significant Zeeman splitting toward both A1 and A2 in G24.78+0.08, and toward G29.86-0.04 and G213.70-12.6. Conclusions: By considering all the 19 massive young stellar objects reported in the literature for which both the orientation of the magnetic field at milliarcsecond resolution and the orientation of outflow axes are known, we find evidence that the magnetic field (on scales 10-100 au) is preferentially oriented along the outflow axes. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Pattern and polarity in the development and evolution of the gnathostome jaw: both conservation and heterotopy in the branchial arches of the shark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Debiais-Thibaud, Melanie; Coolen, Marion; Fish, Jennifer; Griffin, John N; Bertocchini, Federica; Minoux, Maryline; Rijli, Filippo M; Borday-Birraux, Véronique; Casane, Didier; Mazan, Sylvie; Depew, Michael J

    2013-05-15

    The acquisition of jaws constitutes a landmark event in vertebrate evolution, one that in large part potentiated their success and diversification. Jaw development and patterning involves an intricate spatiotemporal series of reciprocal inductive and responsive interactions between the cephalic epithelia and the cranial neural crest (CNC) and cephalic mesodermal mesenchyme. The coordinated regulation of these interactions is critical for both the ontogenetic registration of the jaws and the evolutionary elaboration of variable jaw morphologies and designs. Current models of jaw development and evolution have been built on molecular and cellular evidence gathered mostly in amniotes such as mice, chicks and humans, and augmented by a much smaller body of work on the zebrafish. These have been partnered by essential work attempting to understand the origins of jaws that has focused on the jawless lamprey. Chondrichthyans (cartilaginous fish) are the most distant group to amniotes within extant gnathostomes, and comprise the crucial clade uniting amniotes and agnathans; yet despite their critical phylogenetic position, evidence of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of jaw development in chondrichthyans is still lacking. Recent advances in genome and molecular developmental biology of the lesser spotted dogfish shark, Scyliorhinus canicula, make it ideal for the molecular study of chondrichthyan jaw development. Here, following the 'Hinge and Caps' model of jaw development, we have investigated evidence of heterotopic (relative changes in position) and heterochronic (relative changes in timing) shifts in gene expression, relative to amniotes, in the jaw primordia of S. canicula embryos. We demonstrate the presence of clear proximo-distal polarity in gene expression patterns in the shark embryo, thus establishing a baseline molecular baüplan for branchial arch-derived jaw development and further validating the utility of the 'Hinge and Caps' model in comparative

  7. Polarization and bonding of the intrinsic characteristic contours of hydrogen and fluorine atoms of forming a hydrogen fluoride molecule based on an ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Zhi; Zhao, Dong-Xia; Wu, Yang

    2004-08-01

    The spatial changing feature of the shapes and sizes of the system consisted of one hydrogen atom and one fluorine atom of forming a hydrogen fluoride molecule is investigated. We give formalism of the potential acting on an electron in a molecule and derive its concrete expression in Hartree-Fock self-consistent molecular orbital theory including configuration interaction. The program of calculating the potential acting on an electron in a molecule is programmed and compiled in the framework of the MELD program package. We formulate briefly the approach of the molecular intrinsic characteristic contour (MICC) which is defined in terms of the classical turning points of electronic motion. The MICC for a molecular system is intrinsic and can be calculated by means of an ab initio CI method. Then, the polarization and bonding features of the intrinsic characteristic contours of hydrogen and fluorine atoms forming a hydrogen fluoride molecule are presented and discussed from ab initio calculations. Furthermore, electron density distribution as an added dimension has been demonstrated on the changing MICC and thus the vivid polarization and bonding features for a chemical process have been shown. It seems that at the early stage (internuclear distance Ind=5.0-20.0 a.u.) the fluorine atom gives more enthusiastic with the sensitive and expanded polarization to welcome coupling with the hydrogen atom while the latter has little response even "shy" with shrinking a bit its size at the beginning of putting the two atoms into a system and it is only around the critical point, the contact point (Ind=4.73 a.u.), that both of them stretch their hands and arms to meet and then fuse together.

  8. Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Form Dysfunctional Immune Synapses with B Cells Characterized by Non-Polarized Lytic Granule Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kabanova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of the cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response has been proposed as one mechanism for immune evasion in cancer. In this study, we have explored the underlying basis for CTL suppression in the context of B cell malignancies. We document that human B cells have an intrinsic ability to resist killing by freshly isolated cytotoxic T cells (CTLs, but are susceptible to lysis by IL-2 activated CTL blasts and CTLs isolated from immunotherapy-treated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Impaired killing was associated with the formation of dysfunctional non-lytic immune synapses characterized by the presence of defective linker for activation of T cells (LAT signaling and non-polarized release of the lytic granules transported by ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 8 (Arl8. We propose that non-lytic degranulation of CTLs are a key regulatory mechanism of evasion through which B cells may interfere with the formation of functional immune synapses by CTLs.

  9. LC-ESI-MS/MS identification of polar lipids of two thermophilic Anoxybacillus bacteria containing a unique lipid pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanka, Tomáš; Kambourova, Margarita; Derekova, Anna; Kolouchová, Irena; Sigler, Karel

    2012-07-01

    Phospholipids and glycolipids from two recently described species belonging to the thermophilic genus Anoxybacillus were analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS). Analysis of total lipids from the facultatively anaerobic A. bogrovensis on a HILIC (Hydrophilic Interaction LIquid Chromatography) column succeeded in separating diacyl- and plasmalogen phospholipids. The LC/ESI-MS/MS analysis of the strict aerobe A. rupiensis revealed the presence of different unique polar lipids, predominantly alanyl-, lysyl-, and glucosyl-phosphatidylglycerols and cardiolipins. Each of the classes of polar lipids was then analyzed by means of the ESI-MS/MS and more than 140 molecular species of six lipid classes from A. bogrovensis and nearly 200 molecular species of nine classes of polar lipids from A. rupiensis were identified. Five classes of unidentified polar lipids were detected in both strains. Plasmalogens were thus determined for the first time in a facultatively anaerobic bacterium, i.e. A. bogrovensis.

  10. Political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K.; Weibull, Jörgen W.

    2007-01-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  11. Political polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avinash K; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2007-05-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  12. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live......In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  13. Tagging: Changing Visual Patterns and the Rhetorical Implications of a New Form of Graffiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Daniel D.; Gross, Timothy D.

    1993-01-01

    Investigates the changes in the nonverbal forms of written language, with specific attention to the art form of graffiti. Provides and analyzes data from a study of collected graffiti. Describes three phases of visible form in the historical development of graffiti. (HB)

  14. Compositional sorting dynamics in coexisting lipid bilayer phases with variations in underlying e-beam formed curvature pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunyankin, Maria O; Longo, Marjorie L

    2013-07-07

    Nanometer-scale curvature patterns of an underlying substrate are imposed on lipid multibilayers with each pattern imparting distinctly different sorting dynamics to a metastable pixelation pattern of coexisting liquid ordered (Lo)-liquid disordered (Ld) lipid phases. Therefore, this work provides pathways toward mechanical energy-based separations for analysis of biomembrane-associate species. The central design concept of the patterned sections of the silica substrate is a square lattice pattern of 100 nm projected radius poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) hemispherical features formed by electron beam lithography which pixelates the coexisting phases in order to balance membrane bending and line energy. In one variation, we surround this pattern with three PMMA walls/fences 100 nm in height which substantially slows the loss of the high line energy pixelated Lo phase by altering the balance of two competing mechanism (Ostwald ripening vs. vesiculation). In another walled variation, we form a gradient of the spacing of the 100 nm features which forces partitioning of the Lo phase toward the end of the gradient with the most open (400 nm spacing) lattice pattern where a single vesicle could grow from the Lo phase. We show that two other variations distinctly impact the dynamics, demonstrating locally slowed loss of the high line energy pixelated Lo phase and spontaneous switching of the pixel location on the unit cell, respectively. Moreover, we show that the pixelation patterns can be regenerated and sharpened by a heating and cooling cycle. We argue that localized variations in the underlying curvature pattern have rather complex consequences because of the coupling and/or competition of dynamic processes to optimize mechanical energy such as lipid diffusion, vesiculation and growth, and phase/compositional partitioning.

  15. Histopathological Image Classification With Color Pattern Random Binary Hashing-Based PCANet and Matrix-Form Classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Wu, Jinjie; Li, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Ying, Shihui

    2017-09-01

    The computer-aided diagnosis for histopathological images has attracted considerable attention. Principal component analysis network (PCANet) is a novel deep learning algorithm for feature learning with the simple network architecture and parameters. In this study, a color pattern random binary hashing-based PCANet (C-RBH-PCANet) algorithm is proposed to learn an effective feature representation from color histopathological images. The color norm pattern and angular pattern are extracted from the principal component images of R, G, and B color channels after cascaded PCA networks. The random binary encoding is then performed on both color norm pattern images and angular pattern images to generate multiple binary images. Moreover, we rearrange the pooled local histogram features by spatial pyramid pooling to a matrix-form for reducing the dimension of feature and preserving spatial information. Therefore, a C-RBH-PCANet and matrix-form classifier-based feature learning and classification framework is proposed for diagnosis of color histopathological images. The experimental results on three color histopathological image datasets show that the proposed C-RBH-PCANet algorithm is superior to the original PCANet and other conventional unsupervised deep learning algorithms, while the best performance is achieved by the proposed feature learning and classification framework that combines C-RBH-PCANet and matrix-form classifier.

  16. Optimization of control bars patterns and fuel recharges of coupled form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia S, D.M.; Ortiz S, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this work a system coupled for the optimization of fuel recharges and control bars patterns in boiling water reactors (BWR by its initials in English) is presented. It was used a multi state recurrent neural net like optimization technique. This type of neural net has been used in the solution of diverse problems, in particular the design of patterns of control bars and the design of the fuel recharge. However, these problems have been resolved in an independent way with different optimization techniques. The system was developed in FORTRAN 77 language, it calls OCORN (Optimization of Cycles of Operation using Neural Nets) and it solves both problems of combinatory optimization in a coupled way. OCORN begins creating a seed recharge by means of an optimization through the Haling principle. Later on a pattern of control bars for this recharge seed is proposed. Then a new fuel recharge is designed using the control bars patterns previously found. By this way an iterative process begins among the optimization of control bars patterns and the fuel recharge until a stop criteria it is completed. The stop criteria is completed when the fuel recharges and the control bars patterns don't vary in several successive iterations. The final result is an optimal fuel recharge and its respective control bars pattern. In this work the obtained results by this system for a cycle of balance of 18 months divided in 12 steps of burnt are presented. The obtained results are very encouraging, since the fuel recharge and the control bars pattern, its fulfill with the restrictions imposed in each one of the problems. (Author)

  17. Urban expansion and transportation : the impact of urban form on commuting patterns on the city fringe of Beijing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Pengjun; Lue, Bin; de Roo, Gert

    2010-01-01

    A key issue in the development of China's growing megacities in the transport-related environmental costs due to rapid urban expansion. In light of this issue, the authors examine the impact of urban form on commuting patterns on the city fringe of Beijing. Based on household-survey data, the

  18. Grid cell hexagonal patterns formed by fast self-organized learning within entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhatre, Himanshu; Gorchetchnikov, Anatoli; Grossberg, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Grid cells in the dorsal segment of the medial entorhinal cortex (dMEC) show remarkable hexagonal activity patterns, at multiple spatial scales, during spatial navigation. It has previously been shown how a self-organizing map can convert firing patterns across entorhinal grid cells into hippocampal place cells that are capable of representing much larger spatial scales. Can grid cell firing fields also arise during navigation through learning within a self-organizing map? This article describes a simple and general mathematical property of the trigonometry of spatial navigation which favors hexagonal patterns. The article also develops a neural model that can learn to exploit this trigonometric relationship. This GRIDSmap self-organizing map model converts path integration signals into hexagonal grid cell patterns of multiple scales. GRIDSmap creates only grid cell firing patterns with the observed hexagonal structure, predicts how these hexagonal patterns can be learned from experience, and can process biologically plausible neural input and output signals during navigation. These results support an emerging unified computational framework based on a hierarchy of self-organizing maps for explaining how entorhinal-hippocampal interactions support spatial navigation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Patterned microstructures formed with MeV Au implantation in Si(1 0 0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, Bibhudutta; Greco, Richard R.; Zachry, Daniel P.; Dymnikov, Alexander D.; Glass, Gary A.

    2006-01-01

    Energetic (MeV) Au implantation in Si(1 0 0) (n-type) through masked micropatterns has been used to create layers resistant to KOH wet etching. Microscale patterns were produced in PMMA and SU(8) resist coatings on the silicon substrates using P-beam writing and developed. The silicon substrates were subsequently exposed using 1.5 MeV Au 3+ ions with fluences as high as 1 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 and additional patterns were exposed using copper scanning electron microscope calibration grids as masks on the silicon substrates. When wet etched with KOH microstructures were created in the silicon due to the resistance to KOH etching cause by the Au implantation. The process of combining the fabrication of masked patterns with P-beam writing with broad beam Au implantation through the masks can be a promising, cost-effective process for nanostructure engineering with Si

  20. Computational applications of the thermodynamic local potential: The case of pattern forming systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, J.Z.

    1986-09-01

    Using the thermodynamic local potential Φ a single variational principle may be formulated for a broad class of pattern formation phenomena (this class contains patterns which are: macroscopic, possess steady states, are degenerate at least with respect to one parameter, approach the steady state via fluctuations in the coarsely grained (macroscopic) phase space and so have no memory of the initial conditions). When a steady state is reached Φ assumes its minimum value with respect to distribution function and a maximum with respect to the actually assumed values of free parameters. (author)

  1. The use of decision trees in the classification of beach forms/patterns on IKONOS-2 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, A. C.; Ferreira, D.; Gonçalves, H.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluation of beach hydromorphological behaviour and its classification is highly complex. The available beach morphologic and classification models are mainly based on wave, tidal and sediment parameters. Since these parameters are usually unavailable for some regions - such as in the Portuguese coastal zone - a morphologic analysis using remotely sensed data seems to be a valid alternative. Data mining for spatial pattern recognition is the process of discovering useful information, such as patterns/forms, changes and significant structures from large amounts of data. This study focuses on the application of data mining techniques, particularly Decision Trees (DT), to an IKONOS-2 image in order to classify beach features/patterns, in a stretch of the northwest coast of Portugal. Based on the knowledge of the coastal features, five classes were defined: Sea, Suspended-Sediments, Breaking-Zone, Beachface and Beach. The dataset was randomly divided into training and validation subsets. Based on the analysis of several DT algorithms, the CART algorithm was found to be the most adequate and was thus applied. The performance of the DT algorithm was evaluated by the confusion matrix, overall accuracy, and Kappa coefficient. In the classification of beach features/patterns, the algorithm presented an overall accuracy of 98.2% and a kappa coefficient of 0.97. The DTs were compared with a neural network algorithm, and the results were in agreement. The methodology presented in this paper provides promising results and should be considered in further applications of beach forms/patterns classification.

  2. Feeding patterns of molestus and pipiens forms of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) in a region of high hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Bruno; Sousa, Carla A; Vicente, José L; Pinho, Leonor; Calderón, Isabel; Arez, Eliane; Almeida, António Pg; Donnelly, Martin J; Pinto, João

    2013-04-11

    Two biological forms of the mosquito Culex pipiens s.s., denoted pipiens and molestus, display behavioural differences that may affect their role as vectors of arboviruses. In this study, the feeding patterns of molestus and pipiens forms were investigated in Comporta (Portugal), where high levels of inter-form admixture have been recorded. Indoor and outdoor mosquito collections were performed in the summer of 2010. Collected Cx. pipiens s.l. females were molecularly identified to species and form by PCR and genotyped for six microsatellites. The source of the blood meal in post-fed females was determined by ELISA and mitochondrial DNA sequencing. The distribution of the forms differed according to the collection method. The molestus form was present only in indoor collections, whereas pipiens and admixed individuals were sampled both indoors and outdoors. In both forms, over 90% of blood meals were made on avian hosts. These included blood meals taken from Passeriformes (Passer domesticus and Turdus merula) by females caught resting inside domestic shelters. Genetic structure and blood meal analyses suggest the presence of a bird biting molestus population in the study area. Both forms were found to rest indoors, mainly in avian shelters, but at least a proportion of females of the pipiens form may bite outdoors in sylvan habitats and then search for anthropogenic resting sites to complete their gonotrophic cycle. This behaviour may potentiate the accidental transmission of arboviruses to humans in the region.

  3. Re-evaluating the impact of urban form on travel patterns in Europe and North America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coevering, P. van de; Schwanen, T.

    2006-01-01

    The work by Newman, Kenworthy and colleagues on the link between land use, transportation systems and travel patterns and energy use has been received enthusiastically but also criticised strongly. In this paper concerns are expressed about the role accorded to individual travellers and the wider

  4. Learning Patterns as Criterion for Forming Work Groups in 3D Simulation Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Cela-Ranilla, Jose; Molías, Luis Marqués; Cervera, Mercè Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationship between the use of learning patterns as a grouping criterion to develop learning activities in the 3D simulation environment at University. Participants included 72 Spanish students from the Education and Marketing disciplines. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were conducted. The process was…

  5. Elementary Visual Hallucinations and Their Relationships to Neural Pattern-Forming Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billock, Vincent A.; Tsou, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    An extraordinary variety of experimental (e.g., flicker, magnetic fields) and clinical (epilepsy, migraine) conditions give rise to a surprisingly common set of elementary hallucinations, including spots, geometric patterns, and jagged lines, some of which also have color, depth, motion, and texture. Many of these simple hallucinations fall into a…

  6. Shape measurement system for single point incremental forming (SPIF) manufacts by using trinocular vision and random pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setti, Francesco; Bini, Ruggero; Lunardelli, Massimo; Bosetti, Paolo; Bruschi, Stefania; De Cecco, Mariolino

    2012-01-01

    Many contemporary works show the interest of the scientific community in measuring the shape of artefacts made by single point incremental forming. In this paper, we will present an algorithm able to detect feature points with a random pattern, check the compatibility of associations exploiting multi-stereo constraints and reject outliers and perform a 3D reconstruction by dense random patterns. The algorithm is suitable for a real-time application, in fact it needs just three images and a synchronous relatively fast processing. The proposed method has been tested on a simple geometry and results have been compared with a coordinate measurement machine acquisition. (paper)

  7. Synthesis of freeform refractive surfaces forming various radiation patterns using interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Mazur, Iana; Krizskiy, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    Optical freeform surfaces are very popular today in such fields as lighting systems, sensors, photovoltaic concentrators, and others. The application of such surfaces allows to obtain systems with a new quality with a reduced number of optical components to ensure high consumer characteristics: small size, weight, high optical transmittance. This article presents the methods of synthesis of refractive surface for a given source and the radiation pattern of various shapes using a computer simulation cubic spline interpolation.

  8. Optimizing front metallization patterns: Efficiency with aesthetics in free-form solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, D.K.; Langelaar, M.; Barink, M.; Keulen, F. van

    2016-01-01

    Free-form solar cells are cells of unconventional shapes (e.g. hexagonal, leaf-shaped etc). Their flexible shape adds to the aesthetics of the surroundings as well as allows to place them over objects where conventional solar cells might not fit. Evidently, these cells need to be efficient as well,

  9. Mandibulary dental arch form differences between level four polynomial method and pentamorphic pattern for normal occlusion sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yuliana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of an orthodontic treatment is to achieve aesthetic, dental health and the surrounding tissues, occlusal functional relationship, and stability. The success of an orthodontic treatment is influenced by many factors, such as diagnosis and treatment plan. In order to do a diagnosis and a treatment plan, medical record, clinical examination, radiographic examination, extra oral and intra oral photos, as well as study model analysis are needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in dental arch form between level four polynomial and pentamorphic arch form and to determine which one is best suitable for normal occlusion sample. This analytic comparative study was conducted at Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran on 13 models by comparing the dental arch form using the level four polynomial method based on mathematical calculations, the pattern of the pentamorphic arch and mandibular normal occlusion as a control. The results obtained were tested using statistical analysis T student test. The results indicate a significant difference both in the form of level four polynomial method and pentamorphic arch form when compared with mandibular normal occlusion dental arch form. Level four polynomial fits better, compare to pentamorphic arch form.

  10. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  11. Changes to urban form and commuting patterns: trends in two Danish city regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares indicators of polycentricity in a monocentric (MUR) and a polycentric urban region (PUR) in Denmark at two points in time (1982 and 2002). It describes how population, jobs and commuting indicators of polycentricity develop and interact over time. Both the MUR and the PUR tend...... towards more balanced development. The increasing size of the main node in the PUR is the only deviation from the general trend. The general tendency towards a more polycentric regional structure was most marked in changing interaction and commuting patterns. Inter-urban commuting increased, while intra-urban...... commuting decreased, leading to dispersion of commuters and a rapid increase in commuting across the region. Commuting distances were shortest in the polycentric region, but it also had the highest growth rates. In both regions, the balancing trend leads to a dispersal of commuting demand over...

  12. Brain region distribution and patterns of bioaccumulative perfluoroalkyl carboxylates and sulfonates in east greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Alana K; Letcher, Robert J; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigated the comparative accumulation of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in eight brain regions of polar bears (Ursus maritimus, n = 19) collected in 2006 from Scoresby Sound, East Greenland. The PFAAs studied were perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs, C(6) -C(15) chain lengths) and sulfonates (C(4) , C(6) , C(8) , and C(10) chain lengths) as well as selected precursors including perfluorooctane sulfonamide. On a wet-weight basis, blood-brain barrier transport of PFAAs occurred for all brain regions, although inner regions of the brain closer to incoming blood flow (pons/medulla, thalamus, and hypothalamus) contained consistently higher PFAA concentrations compared to outer brain regions (cerebellum, striatum, and frontal, occipital, and temporal cortices). For pons/medulla, thalamus, and hypothalamus, the most concentrated PFAAs were perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), ranging from 47 to 58 ng/g wet weight, and perfluorotridecanoic acid, ranging from 43 to 49 ng/g wet weight. However, PFOS and the longer-chain PFCAs (C(10) -C(15) ) were significantly (p  0.05) different among brain regions. The burden of the sum of PFCAs, perfluoroalkyl sulfonates, and perfluorooctane sulfonamide in the brain (average mass, 392 g) was estimated to be 46 µg. The present study demonstrates that both PFCAs and perfluoroalkyl sulfonates cross the blood-brain barrier in polar bears and that wet-weight concentrations are brain region-specific. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  13. Proton elastic form factor ratios to Q{sup 2} = 3.5 GeV{sup 2} by polarization transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Punjabi; C.F. Perdrisat; et al

    2005-01-01

    The ratio of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors, G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}}, was obtained by measuring P{sub t} and P{sub {ell}}, the transverse and longitudinal recoil proton polarization components, respectively, for the elastic {rvec e}p {yields} e{rvec p} reaction in the four-momentum transfer squared range of 0.5 to 3.5 GeV{sup 2}. In the single-photon exchange approximation, the ratio G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} is directly proportional to the ratio P{sub t}/P{sub {ell}}. The simultaneous measurement of P{sub t} and P{sub {ell}} in a polarimeter reduces systematic uncertainties. The results for the ratio G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} show a systematic decrease with increasing Q{sup 2}, indicating for the first time a definite difference in the distribution of charge and magnetization in the proton. The data have been re-analyzed and systematic uncertainties have become significantly smaller than previously published results.

  14. Generalized form of boundary value problems method for material modeled as micro-polar media subjecting to the thermo-mechanical interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Long; Chu, Zhongxiang; Peng, Song

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the periodic structure material is modeled as the continuum homogeneous micro-polar media subjecting to thermo-mechanical interaction. Meanwhile, a series of equivalent quantities such as the equivalent stress, couple stress, displacement gradient and torsion tensor were defined by the integral forms of the boundary values of the external surface force, moment, displacement and the angular displacement, and were proved to satisfy the equivalence conditions of virtual work. Based on above works, the displacement boundary value problem was established to deduce the equivalent constitutive equation. Assume the representative volume element is composed of the spatial cross-framework, and applying the boundary value problem of displacement on frame structures, the equivalent elastic coefficients, temperature coefficients of equivalent stress and the temperature gradient coefficients of equivalent couple stress are deduced. In addition, themethod can also be extended to the stress boundary value problem to deduce the equivalent constitutive equation. The calculations indicate that the equivalent result can be obtained from the two kinds of boundary value problems.

  15. Phylogeography of competing sexual and parthenogenetic forms of a freshwater flatworm: patterns and explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongratz, Norbert; Storhas, Martin; Carranza, Salvador; Michiels, Nicolaas K

    2003-01-01

    Background Models of the maintenance of sex predict that one reproductive strategy, sexual or parthenogenetic, should outcompete the other. Distribution patterns may reflect the outcome of this competition as well as the effect of chance and historical events. We review the distribution data of sexual and parthenogenetic biotypes of the planarian Schmidtea polychroa. Results S. polychroa lives in allopatry or sympatry across Europe except for Central and North-Western Europe, where sexual individuals have never been reported. A phylogenetic relationship between 36 populations based on a 385 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene revealed that haplotypes were often similar over large geographic distances. In North Italian lakes, however, diversity was extreme, with sequence differences of up to 5% within the same lake in both sexuals and parthenogens. Mixed populations showed "endemic" parthenogenetic lineages that presumably originated from coexisting sexuals, and distantly related ones that probably result from colonization by parthenogens independent from sexuals. Conclusions Parthenogens originated repeatedly from sexuals, mainly in Italy, but the same may apply to other Mediterranean regions (Spain, Greece). The degree of divergence between populations suggests that S. polychroa survived the ice ages in separate ice-free areas in Central, Eastern and Southern Europe and re-colonised Europe after the retreat of the major glaciers. Combining these results with those based on nuclear markers, the data suggest that repeated hybridisation between sexuals and parthenogenetic lineages in mixed populations maintains high levels of genetic diversity in parthenogens. This can explain why parthenogens persist in populations that were originally sexual. Exclusive parthenogenesis in central and western populations suggests better colonisation capacity, possibly because of inbreeding costs as well as hybridisation of sexuals with parthenogens. PMID

  16. Overlapping patterns of neural activity for different forms of novelty in fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Shaun Hawco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available When stimuli are presented multiple times, the neural response to repeated stimuli is reduced relative to novel stimuli (repetition suppression. Responses to different types of novelty were examined. Stimulus novelty was examined by contrasting first vs. second presentation of triads of objects during memory encoding. Semantic novelty was contrasted by comparing unrelated (semantically novel triads of objects to triads in which all three objects were related (e.g. all objects were tools. In recognition, associative novelty was examined by contrasting rearranged triads (previously seen objects in a new association with intact triads. Activity was observed in posterior regions (occipital and fusiform, with the largest extent of activity for stimulus novelty and smallest for associational novelty. Frontal activity was also observed in stimulus and semantic novelty. Additional analysis indicated that the hemodynamic response in voxels identified in the stimulus and semantic novelty contrasts was modulated by reaction time on a trial-by-trial basis. That is, the duration of the hemodynamic response was driven by reaction time. This was not the case for associative novelty. The high level of overlap across different forms of novelty suggests a similar mechanism for reduced neural activity, which may be related to reduced visual processing time. This is consistent with a facilitation model of repetition suppression, which posits a reduced peak and duration of neuronal firing for repeated stimuli.

  17. Within-twig leaf distribution patterns differ among plant life-forms in a subtropical Chinese forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fengqun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Dongmei; Niklas, Karl J; Sun, Shucun

    2013-07-01

    Amax) had more even leaf distribution patterns than evergreen species (which had low LCP, LSP and Amax); shade-adapted evergreen species had more even leaf distribution patterns than sun-adapted evergreen species. We propose that the leaf distribution pattern (i.e., 'evenness' CV, which is an easily measured functional trait) can be used to distinguish among life-forms in communities similar to the one examined in this study.

  18. Selective adhesion of intestinal epithelial cells on patterned films with amine functionalities formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Seop; Choi, Changrok; Kim, Soo Heon; Choi, Kun oh [Department of Physics, Brain Korea 21 Physics Research Division and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Min [Department of Molecular Biology and Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, BK21 Graduate Program for RNA Biology, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Ja [Department of Internal Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan 330-715 (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Sanghak [R and D Center, ELBIO Incorporation, 426-5 Gasan-dong Geumchun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heonyong [Department of Molecular Biology and Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, BK21 Graduate Program for RNA Biology, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Donggeun, E-mail: djung@skku.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Brain Korea 21 Physics Research Division and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-01

    Control of cell adhesion to surfaces is important to develop analytical tools in the areas of biomedical engineering. To control cell adhesiveness of the surface, we constructed a variety of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) thin films deposited at the plasma power range of 10-100 W by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PPHMDSO film that was formed at 10 W was revealed to be resistant to cell adhesion. The resistance to cell adhesion is closely related to physicochemical properties of the film. Atomic force microscopic data show an increase in surface roughness from 0.52 nm to 0.74 nm with increasing plasma power. From Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy data, it was also determined that the methyl (-CH{sub 3}) peak intensity increases with increasing plasma power, whereas the hydroxyl (-OH) peak decreases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reveal an increase in C-O bonding with increasing plasma power. These results suggest that C-O bonding and hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH{sub 3}) functional groups play a critical part in cell adhesion. Furthermore, to enhance a diversity of film surface, we accumulated the patterned plasma polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) thin film on the top of the PPHMDSO thin film. The PPEDA film is established to be strongly cell-adherent. This patterned two-layer film stacking method can be used to form the selectively limited cell-adhesive PPEDA spots over the adhesion-resistant surface.

  19. Micro-patterns of Au-SiO{sub 2} core-shell nanoparticles formed by electrostatic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi Youli [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubricate, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen Miao [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubricate, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: miaochen99@yahoo.com; Liang Shan [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubricate, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang Wu [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Zhao Jing [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubricate, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-01-15

    In this paper, silica-coated Au nanoparticles (Au-SiO{sub 2}) were prepared by the technique of vortex mixing. Subsequently, these monodisperse Au-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were functionalized by the silane reagents 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) and 3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane (MPTS) respectively. Then, these NH{sub 2}-terminated and SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}-terminated Au-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were respectively assembled onto the substrates, which have been patterned with different self-assembly monolayers (SAMs), to form close-packed two-dimensional Au-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticle arrays by electrostatic interactions. The morphologies and the optical properties of Au-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with different silica-shell thicknesses were characterized by TEM and UV-vis. The compositions and zeta potentials of the functionalized Au-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The morphologies of the patterns formed on different templates were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM)

  20. N-polar GaN/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistor formed on sapphire substrate with minimal step bunching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasertsuk, Kiattiwut; Tanikawa, Tomoyuki; Kimura, Takeshi; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Suemitsu, Tetsuya; Matsuoka, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    The metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) gate N-polar GaN/AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) on a (0001) sapphire substrate, which can be expected to operate with lower on-resistance and more easily work on the pinch-off operation than an N-polar AlGaN/GaN HEMT, was fabricated. For suppressing the step bunching and hillocks peculiar in the N-polar growth, a sapphire substrate with an off-cut angle as small as 0.8° was introduced and an N-polar GaN/AlGaN/GaN HEMT without the step bunching was firstly obtained by optimizing the growth conditions. The previously reported anisotropy of transconductance related to the step was eliminated. The pinch-off operation was also realized. These results indicate that this device is promising.

  1. The role of diet on long-term concentration and pattern trends of brominated and chlorinated contaminants in western Hudson Bay polar bears, 1991-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, Melissa A.; Stirling, Ian; Lunn, Nick J.; Peacock, Elizabeth; Letcher, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Adipose tissue was sampled from the western Hudson Bay (WHB) subpopulation of polar bears at intervals from 1991 to 2007 to examine temporal trends of PCB and OCP levels both on an individual and sum-(Σ-)contaminant basis. We also determined levels and temporal trends of emerging polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and other current-use brominated flame retardants. Over the 17-year period, Σ DDT (and p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT) decreased (-8.4%/year); α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH) decreased (-11%/year); β-HCH increased (+ 8.3%/year); and Σ PCB and Σ chlordane (CHL), both contaminants at highest concentrations in all years (> 1 ppm), showed no distinct trends even when compared to previous data for this subpopulation dating back to 1968. Some of the less persistent PCB congeners decreased significantly (-1.6%/year to -6.3%/year), whereas CB153 levels tended to increase (+ 3.3%/year). Parent CHLs (c-nonachlor, t-nonachlor) declined, whereas non-monotonic trends were detected for metabolites (heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane). Σ chlorobenzene, octachlorostyrene, Σ mirex, Σ MeSO 2 -PCB and dieldrin did not significantly change. Increasing Σ PBDE levels (+ 13%/year) matched increases in the four consistently detected congeners, BDE47, BDE99, BDE100 and BDE153. Although no trend was observed, total-(α)-HBCD was only detected post-2000. Levels of the highest concentration brominated contaminant, BB153, showed no temporal change. As long-term ecosystem changes affecting contaminant levels may also affect contaminant patterns, we examined the influence of year (i.e., aging or 'weathering' of the contaminant pattern), dietary tracers (carbon stable isotope ratios, fatty acid patterns) and biological (age/sex) group on congener/metabolite profiles. Patterns of PCBs, CHLs and PBDEs were correlated with dietary tracers and biological group, but only PCB and CHL patterns were correlated with year

  2. Statistical Patterns of Ionospheric Convection Derived From Mid-Latitude, High-Latitude, and Polar SuperDARN HF Radar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E. G.; Shepherd, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Global patterns of ionospheric convection have been widely studied in terms of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude and orientation in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres using observations from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). The dynamic range of driving conditions under which existing SuperDARN statistical models are valid is currently limited to periods when the high-latitude convection pattern remains above about 60° geomagnetic latitude. Cousins and Shepherd [2010] found this to correspond to intervals when the solar wind electric field Esw 0) the high-latitude radars often experience difficulties in measuring convection above about 85° geomagnetic latitude. In this presentation, we introduce a new statistical model of ionospheric convection which is valid for much more dominant IMF Bz conditions than was previously possible by including velocity measurements from the newly constructed tiers of radars in the Northern Hemisphere at midlatitudes and in the polar cap. This new model (TS17) is compared to previous statistical models derived from high-latitude SuperDARN observations (RG96, PSR10, CS10) and its impact on instantaneous Map Potential solutions is examined.

  3. Spin-polarized semiconductors: tuning the electronic structure of graphene by introducing a regular pattern of sp3 carbons on the graphene plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Long; Huang, Ping; Zhu, Huarui; Gao, Xueyun

    2013-01-28

    First-principles calculations (generalized gradient approximation, density functional therory (DFT) with dispersion corrections, and DFT plus local atomic potential) are carried out on the stability and electronic structures of superlattice configurations of nitrophenyl diazonium functionalized graphene with different coverage. In the calculations, the stabilities of these structures are strengthened significantly since van der Waals interactions between nitrophenyl groups are taken into account. Furthermore, spin-polarized and wider-bandgap electronic structures are obtained when the nitrophenyl groups break the sublattice symmetry of the graphene. The unpaired quasi-localized p electrons are responsible for this itinerant magnetism. The results provide a novel approach to tune graphene's electronic structures as well as to form ferromagnetic semiconductive graphene. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Polar Science Is Cool!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  5. Effect of long-term irrigation patterns on phosphorus forms and distribution in the brown soil zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Dang, Xiuli; Mayes, Melanie A; Chen, Leilei; Zhang, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    Continuous application of P fertilizers under different irrigation patterns can change soil phosphorus (P) chemical behavior and increase soil P levels that are of environmental concern. To assess the effect of long-term different irrigation patterns on soil P fractions and availability, this study examined sequential changes in soil organic P and inorganic P from furrow irrigation (FI), surface drip irrigation (SUR), and subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in the brown soil zone (0-60 cm) during 1998 to 2011. Analyses of soil P behavior showed that the levels of total P are frequently high on top soil layers. The total P (TP) contents of the entire soil profiles under three irrigation treatments were 830.2-3180.1 mg/kg. The contents of available P (AP) were 72.6-319.3 mg P/kg soil through soil profiles. The greatest TP and AP contents were obtained within the upper soil layers in FI. Results of Hedley's P fractionation indicate that HCl-P is a dominant form and the proportion to TP ranges from 29% to 43% in all three methods. The contents of various fractions of P were positively correlated with the levels of total carbon (TC), total inorganic carbon (TIC), and calcium (Ca), whereas the P fractions had negative correlation with pH in all soil samples. Regression models proved that NaHCO3-Po was an important factor in determining the amount of AP in FI. H2O-Po, NaHCO3-Po, and NaOH-Pi were related to available P values in SUR. NaHCO3-Po and NaOH-Po played important roles in SDI. The tomato yield under SUR was higher than SDI and FI. The difference of P availability was also controlled by the physicochemical soil properties under different irrigation schedule. SUR was a reasonable irrigation pattern to improve the utilization efficiency of water and fertilizer.

  6. Discrimination among populations of sockeye salmon fry with Fourier analysis of otolith banding patterns formed during incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, James E.; Burger, Carl V.; Holland-Bartels, Leslie E.

    1997-01-01

    We used otolith banding patterns formed during incubation to discriminate among hatchery- and wild-incubated fry of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka from Tustumena Lake, Alaska. Fourier analysis of otolith luminance profiles was used to describe banding patterns: the amplitudes of individual Fourier harmonics were discriminant variables. Correct classification of otoliths to either hatchery or wild origin was 83.1% (cross-validation) and 72.7% (test data) with the use of quadratic discriminant function analysts on 10 Fourier amplitudes. Overall classification rates among the six test groups (one hatchery and five wild groups) were 46.5% (cross-validation) and 39.3% (test data) with the use of linear discriminant function analysis on 16 Fourier amplitudes. Although classification rates for wild-incubated fry from any one site never exceeded 67% (cross-validation) or 60% (test data), location-specific information was evident for all groups because the probability of classifying an individual to its true incubation location was significantly greater than chance. Results indicate phenotypic differences in otolith microstructure among incubation sites separated by less than 10 km. Analysis of otolith luminance profiles is a potentially useful technique for discriminating among and between various populations of hatchery and wild fish.

  7. DNA methylation patterns of genes related to immune response in the different clinical forms of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Aline Fernanda; de Resende, Renata Gonçalves; de Lacerda, Júlio César Tanos; Pereira, Núbia Braga; Melo, Leonardo Augusto; Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2018-01-01

    The oral lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease. Although its aetiology is not well understood, the role of T lymphocytes in its inflammatory events is recognised. Identifying the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this immune-mediated condition is fundamental for understanding the inflammatory reaction that occurs in the disease. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the methylation pattern of 21 immune response-related genes in the different clinical forms of oral lichen planus. A cross-sectional study was performed to analyse the DNA methylation patterns in three distinct groups of oral lichen planus: (i) reticular/plaque lesions; (ii) erosive lesions; (iii) normal oral mucosa (control group). After DNA extraction from biopsies, the samples were submitted to digestions by methylation-sensitive and methylation-dependent enzymes and double digestion. The relative percentage of methylated DNA for each gene was provided using real-time polymerase chain reaction arrays. Hypermethylation of the STAT5A gene was observed only in the control group (59.0%). A higher hypermethylation of the ELANE gene was found in reticular/plaque lesions (72.1%) compared to the erosive lesions (50.0%). Our results show variations in the methylation profile of immune response-related genes, according to the clinical type of oral lichen planus after comparing with the normal oral mucosa. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings using gene expression analysis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Verum focus and polar questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Giurgea

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We argue that some word order phenomena in Romanian and Sardinian are the result of a checking operation in the left periphery involving verum focus (i.e. focus on the polarity component of the sentence. In particular, this operation accounts for some word order patterns found in polar questions. In Romanian, polarity fronting is realized as head-movement of (V+T to a higher peripheral head which bears a Focus-probe. This licenses VS orders for predications in which VS is not allowed as a neutral order (i-level predicates, iteratives, generics. In Sardinian, an entire phrase headed by the lexical predicate (verbal non-finite form or non-verbal predicate is fronted before the auxiliary. We argue that this order is obtained by two movement operations, head-raising of Aux to Foc and movement of the predicate phrase to SpecFoc. We also present the semantics of polarity focus, distinguishing several types of focus (informational, emphatic, contrastive.

  9. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  10. Dorsal stress fibers, transverse actin arcs, and perinuclear actin fibers form an interconnected network that induces nuclear movement in polarizing fibroblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maninová, Miloslava; Vomastek, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 283, č. 20 (2016), s. 3676-3693 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06405S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : actin dorsal fibers * cell polarity * nuclear reorientation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2016

  11. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains form Biofilm on Abiotic Surfaces Regardless of Their Adherence Pattern on Cultured Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert F. Culler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the capacity of biofilm formation of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces. Ninety-one aEPEC strains, isolated from feces of children with diarrhea, were analyzed by the crystal violet (CV assay on an abiotic surface after 24 h of incubation. aEPEC strains representing each HEp-2 cell type of adherence were analyzed after 24 h and 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation at 37°C on abiotic and cell surfaces by CFU/cm2 counting and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces occurred in 55 (60.4% of the aEPEC strains. There was no significant difference in biofilm biomass formation on an abiotic versus prefixed cell surface. The biofilms could be visualized by CLSM at various developmental stages. aEPEC strains are able to form biofilm on an abiotic surface with no association with their adherence pattern on HEp-2 cells with the exception of the strains expressing UND (undetermined adherence. This study revealed the capacity of adhesion and biofilm formation by aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces, possibly playing a role in pathogenesis, mainly in cases of persistent diarrhea.

  12. Ducks in space: from nonlinear absolute instability to noise-sustained structures in a pattern-forming system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitabile, D.; Desroches, M.; Knobloch, E.; Krupa, M.

    2017-11-01

    A subcritical pattern-forming system with nonlinear advection in a bounded domain is recast as a slow-fast system in space and studied using a combination of geometric singular perturbation theory and numerical continuation. Two types of solutions describing the possible location of stationary fronts are identified, whose origin is traced to the onset of convective and absolute instability when the system is unbounded. The former are present only for non-zero upstream boundary conditions and provide a quantitative understanding of noise-sustained structures in systems of this type. The latter correspond to the onset of a global mode and are present even with zero upstream boundary conditions. The role of canard trajectories in the nonlinear transition between these states is clarified and the stability properties of the resulting spatial structures are determined. Front location in the convective regime is highly sensitive to the upstream boundary condition, and its dependence on this boundary condition is studied using a combination of numerical continuation and Monte Carlo simulations of the partial differential equation. Statistical properties of the system subjected to random or stochastic boundary conditions at the inlet are interpreted using the deterministic slow-fast spatial dynamical system.

  13. THE USE OF INFINITIVE AND SUBJUNCTIVE FORMS IN MODAL PATTERNS OF INDIRECT SPEECH IN RUSSIAN CHRONICLES OF THE XI—XVI CENTURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A. Vlasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the use of infinitives and subjunctive forms as modal patterns of indirect speech attested in Russian Chronicles of the XI—XVI centuries. In early texts, an infinitive in a subordinate clause describes either a speech act that must be put into practice or a situation destined to happen. Subjunctive forms are used only in citations containing requests. The illocutionary power of reported speech is regularly marked with an illocutionary verb. In later chronicles, infinitive clauses and subjunctive forms begin to alternate in modal patterns of indirect speech containing official orders. However, the modal patterns are not yet attested as a substitute of imperative mood in subordinate clauses.

  14. Six-frame picosecond radiation camera based on hydrated electron photoabsorption phenomena. [Laser opacity pattern in acidic aqueous cell formed by pulsed irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutts, G.W.; Olk, L.B.; Gates, H.A.; St. Leger-Barter, G.

    1977-01-15

    To obtain picosecond photographs of nanosecond radiation sources, a six-frame ultra-high speed radiation camera based on hydrated electron absorption phenomena has been developed. A time-dependent opacity pattern is formed in an acidic aqueous cell by a pulsed radiation source. Six time-resolved picosecond images of this changing opacity pattern are transferred to photographic film with the use of a mode-locked dye laser and six electronically gated microchannel plate image intensifiers. Because the lifetime of the hydrated electron absorption centers can be reduced to picoseconds, the opacity patterns represent time-space pulse profile images.

  15. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  16. Topology and robustness in the Drosophila segment polarity network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas T Ingolia

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A complex hierarchy of genetic interactions converts a single-celled Drosophila melanogaster egg into a multicellular embryo with 14 segments. Previously, von Dassow et al. reported that a mathematical model of the genetic interactions that defined the polarity of segments (the segment polarity network was robust (von Dassow et al. 2000. As quantitative information about the system was unavailable, parameters were sampled randomly. A surprisingly large fraction of these parameter sets allowed the model to maintain and elaborate on the segment polarity pattern. This robustness is due to the positive feedback of gene products on their own expression, which induces individual cells in a model segment to adopt different stable expression states (bistability corresponding to different cell types in the segment polarity pattern. A positive feedback loop will only yield multiple stable states when the parameters that describe it satisfy a particular inequality. By testing which random parameter sets satisfy these inequalities, I show that bistability is necessary to form the segment polarity pattern and serves as a strong predictor of which parameter sets will succeed in forming the pattern. Although the original model was robust to parameter variation, it could not reproduce the observed effects of cell division on the pattern of gene expression. I present a modified version that incorporates recent experimental evidence and does successfully mimic the consequences of cell division. The behavior of this modified model can also be understood in terms of bistability in positive feedback of gene expression. I discuss how this topological property of networks provides robust pattern formation and how large changes in parameters can change the specific pattern produced by a network.

  17. Similar patterns of rDNA evolution in synthetic and recently formed natural populations of Tragopogon (Asteraceae allotetraploids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltis Pamela S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tragopogon mirus and T. miscellus are allotetraploids (2n = 24 that formed repeatedly during the past 80 years in eastern Washington and adjacent Idaho (USA following the introduction of the diploids T. dubius, T. porrifolius, and T. pratensis (2n = 12 from Europe. In most natural populations of T. mirus and T. miscellus, there are far fewer 35S rRNA genes (rDNA of T. dubius than there are of the other diploid parent (T. porrifolius or T. pratensis. We studied the inheritance of parental rDNA loci in allotetraploids resynthesized from diploid accessions. We investigate the dynamics and directionality of these rDNA losses, as well as the contribution of gene copy number variation in the parental diploids to rDNA variation in the derived tetraploids. Results Using Southern blot hybridization and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, we analyzed copy numbers and distribution of these highly reiterated genes in seven lines of synthetic T. mirus (110 individuals and four lines of synthetic T. miscellus (71 individuals. Variation among diploid parents accounted for most of the observed gene imbalances detected in F1 hybrids but cannot explain frequent deviations from repeat additivity seen in the allotetraploid lines. Polyploid lineages involving the same diploid parents differed in rDNA genotype, indicating that conditions immediately following genome doubling are crucial for rDNA changes. About 19% of the resynthesized allotetraploid individuals had equal rDNA contributions from the diploid parents, 74% were skewed towards either T. porrifolius or T. pratensis-type units, and only 7% had more rDNA copies of T. dubius-origin compared to the other two parents. Similar genotype frequencies were observed among natural populations. Despite directional reduction of units, the additivity of 35S rDNA locus number is maintained in 82% of the synthetic lines and in all natural allotetraploids. Conclusions Uniparental reductions of

  18. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form-factor ratio G(En) / G(Mn) via the H-2(polarized-e, e-prime,polarized-n)H-1 reaction to Q**2 = 1.45-(GeV/c)**2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley Plaster; A.Yu. Semenov; A. Aghalaryan; Erick Crouse; Glen MacLachlan; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Hartmuth Arenhovel; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Alan Baldwin; David Barkhuff; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Michael Christy; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; T. Eden; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Ashot Gasparian; Kenneth Garrow; Paul Gueye; Calvin Howell; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; Richard Madey; D. Manley; Pete Markowitz; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Allena Opper; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Brian Raue; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Nikolai Savvinov; Irina Semenova; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Stepan Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Shawn Taylor; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; John Watson; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

    2006-02-01

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G{sub En}/G{sub Mn}, deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic {sup 2}H({rvec e}, e{prime}{rvec n}) {sup 1}H reaction, at three Q{sup 2} values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The data at Q{sup 2} = 1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2} are the first direct experimental measurements of GEn employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} region and stand as the most precise determinations of GEn for all values of Q{sup 2}.

  19. Species diversity and life-form patterns in steppe vegetation along a 3000 m altitudinal gradient in the Alborz Mountains, Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahdavi, Parastoo; Akhani, Hossein; Van der Maarel, Eddy

    Biodiversity pattern and life-form spectra were studied along a 3,000 m altitudinal gradient from a semi-desert area to the alpine peak of Tochal Mountain. The gradient is located on the southern slopes of Central Alborz with a Mediterranean continental climate. DCA ordination was applied to 1,069

  20. MODELING OF PATTERN FORMING PROCESS OF AUTOMATIC RADIO DIRECTION FINDER OF PHASE VHF IN THE DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT OF LabVIEW APPLIED PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Aslanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article is developed the model demonstrating the forming process of pattern of antenna system of aerodrome quasidopler automatic radiodirection-finder station in the development environment of LabVIEW applied programs of National Instrument company. 

  1. Level and pattern of overstory retention influence rates and forms of tree mortality in mature, coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauren S. Urgenson; Charles B. Halpern; Paul D. Anderson

    2013-01-01

    Mortality of retained trees can compromise the ecological objectives of variable-retention harvest. We used a large-scale experiment replicated at six locations in western Washington and Oregon to examine the influences of retention level (40% vs. 15% of original basal area) and its spatial pattern (aggregated vs.dispersed) on the rate and form of tree mortality for 11...

  2. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  3. Copepods in ice-covered seas—Distribution, adaptations to seasonally limited food, metabolism, growth patterns and life cycle strategies in polar seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, R. J.; Huntley, M.

    1991-07-01

    While a seasonal ice cover limits light penetration into both polar seas for up to ten months a year, its presence is not entirely negative. The mixed layer under sea ice will generally be shallower than in open water at the same latitude and season. Ice forms a substrate on which primary production can be concentrated, a condition which contrasts with the generally dilute nutritional conditions which prevail in the remaining ocean. The combination of a shallow, generally stable mixed layer with a close proximity to abundant food make the under-ice zone a suitable nursery for both pelagic and benthic species, an upside-down benthos for opportunistic substrate browsers, and a rich feeding environment for species often considered to be neritic in temperate environments. Where the ice cover is not continuous there may be a retreating ice edge that facilitates the seasonal production of phytoplankton primarily through increased stability from the melt water. Ice edge blooms similarly encourage secondary production by pelagic animals. Pseudocalanus acuspes, which may be the most abundant and productive copepod in north polar latitudes, initiates growth at the start of the "spring bloom" of epontic algae, reaching sexual maturity at breakup or slightly before. In the Southern Hemisphere, the small neritic copepod Paralabidocera antarctica and adult krill have been observed to utilize ice algae. Calanus hyperboreus breeds in the dark season at depth and its buoyant eggs, slowly developing on the ascent, reach the under-ice layer in April as nauplii ready to benefit from the primary production there. On the other hand, C. glacialis may initiate ontogenetic migrations and reproduction in response to increased erosion of ice algae due to solar warming and melting at the ice-water interface. While the same species in a phytoplankton bloom near the ice edge reproduces actively, those under still-consolidated ice nearby can have immature gonads. Diel migration and diel feeding

  4. Self-assembled Ag nano-patterns forming in downflow of ammonia-Ar atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Naoya; Blanquet, Ella; Sakai, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    Fractal-like Ag nano-patterns were observed after drying silver nitrate solution in downflow of ammonia-Ar atmospheric pressure microplasmas. These atmospheric-pressure microplasmas generated hydrazine, and this hydrazine density in their downflow region was in the order of 1015 cm-3. As hydrazine is a very strong reducing agent, Ag nano-particles were extracted from the silver nitrate solution. The Ag nano-structures were fractal-like patterns, with fractal dimension range of 1.6--1.9. The network structures in these patterns with several mm diameter showed good electric conductivity and extraordinary optical responses, which will be favorable for future low-cost optical metamaterials.

  5. Characterization of HDEHP-lanthanide complexes formed in a non-polar organic phase using 31P NMR and ESI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Cécile; Hiscox, Bill; Nash, Kenneth L

    2012-01-21

    HDEHP (di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid) is one of the extractant molecules most intensively used in liquid-liquid extraction systems. Of particular interest in this investigation is its application in the TALSPEAK process, which is among the methods currently considered to be ready for technological deployment for the separation of trivalent actinides (Am(III) and Cm(III)) from lanthanide (Ln(III)) cations. However, several fundamental features of the chemistry of this separation system are not well understood. It has become clear that the lactic acid (LacH), which is employed as a buffer in the aqueous phase, plays a very complex role in the biphasic chemistry of the system. In this study, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((31)P NMR) was used to investigate the rate of HDEHP (AH) exchange occurring in the binary complexes Ln(AHA)(3) (Ln = La and Sm), which are usually considered to be the predominant species present in a non-polar organic phase (1,3-diisopropylbenzene). The rate data indicate considerably faster ligand exchange kinetics for La(AHA)(3) than is seen for Sm(AHA)(3), with a corresponding shift from a dissociative interchange to an associative process. With the introduction of lactic acid (LacH) and higher concentrations of lanthanides into the system, ternary complexes (Ln(3+)-HDEHP-lactate) become dominant, as demonstrated using (31)P NMR and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS). Lactate partitioning experiments indicate that the amount of lactate extracted is correlated with the concentration of Ln(3+). The terminal ternary complex species appears to have the general stoichiometry 1 : 2 : 1 (Ln(3+) : HDEHP : lactate). The detection of bimetallic ternary complexes (by ESI-MS) with La(3+) and the observation of multiple phosphorus environments (by NMR) suggest the presence of polymetallic complexes with the general formula (LaA(2)Lac)(n). A model is proposed in which DEHP(-) molecules bridge two metal ions.

  6. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  7. The Dominance of Spatial Memory over Color or Form in 3- to 5-Year-Olds' Pattern Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocking, Rodney R.

    The relative importance of spatial-position as a memory aid in a block pattern reproduction task was investigated by analyzing the object-selection and object-placement strategies of 69 nursery school children. Subjects were given a task modeled on Piaget's assessment of Static Reproductive Images and Action that had been modified into a…

  8. Polar localization of plasma membrane Ca2+/Mg2+ ATPase correlates with the pattern of steady ionic currents in eggs of Lymnaea stagnalis and Bithynia tentaculata (Mollusca)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Zivkovic (Dana); R. Créton (Robbert); G. Zwaan (Gideon); W.C. de Bruijn (Wim); M.R. Dohmen (M.René)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractDuring extrusion of the first polar body in eggs of Lymnaea stagnalis and Bithynia tentaculata a localized Ca2+ /Mg2+ ATPase activity was detected, using Ando's enzyme-cytochemical method for electron microscopy [Ando et al. (1981) Acta Histochem Cytochem 14:705-726]. The enzyme activity

  9. Development of a supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the identification of highly polar compounds in secondary organic aerosols formed from biogenic hydrocarbons in smog chamber experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappini, L; Perraudin, E; Durand-Jolibois, R; Doussin, J F

    2006-11-01

    A new one-step method for the analysis of highly polar components of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. This method should lead to a better understanding of SOA formation and evolution since it enables the compounds responsible for SOA formation to be identified. Since it is based on supercritical fluid extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, it minimizes the analysis time and significantly enhances sensitivity, which makes it suitable for trace-level compounds, which are constituents of SOA. One of the key features of this method is the in situ derivatisation step: an online silylation allowing the measurement of highly polar, polyfunctional compounds, which is a prerequisite for the elucidation of chemical mechanisms. This paper presents the development of this analytical method and highlights its ability to address this major atmospheric issue through the analysis of SOA formed from the ozonolysis of a biogenic hydrocarbon (sabinene). Ozonolysis of sabinene was performed in a 6 m3 Teflon chamber. The aerosol components were derivatised in situ. More than thirty products, such as sabinaketone, sabinic acid and other multifunctional compounds including dicarboxylic acids and oxoacids, were measured. Nine of them were identified and quantified. The sensitivity and the linearity (0.91

  10. Mass-forming intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: Enhancement patterns in the arterial phase of dynamic hepatic CT - Correlation with clinicopathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Nobuhiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Nishie, Akihiro; Ishigami, Kousei; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Daisuke; Moirta, Koichiro; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Takayama, Yukihisa [Kyushu University, Department of Radiology Informatics and Network, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Shirabe, Ken [Kyushu University, Department of Surgery and Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Aishima, Shinichi [Saga University Hospital, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga City, Saga (Japan); Wang, Huanlin; Oda, Yoshinao [Kyushu University, Department of Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    To evaluate the relationship between the enhancement pattern of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICCs) in the hepatic arterial phase (HAP) of dynamic hepatic CT and the clinicopathological findings with special reference to the perihilar type and the peripheral type. Forty-seven patients with pathologically proven ICCs were enrolled. Based on the enhancement pattern in the HAP, the lesions were classified into three groups: a hypovascular group (n=13), rim-enhancement group (n=18), and hypervascular group (n=16). The clinicopathological findings were compared among the three groups. Perihilar-type ICCs were significantly more frequently observed in the hypovascular group than in the rim-enhancement and hypervascular groups (p=0.006 and p <0.001, respectively). Lymphatic invasion, perineural invasion, and biliary invasion were significantly more frequent in the hypovascular group than the rim- enhancement group (p=0.001, p=0.025 and p=0.029, respectively) or hypervascular group (p <0.001, p <0.001 and p=0.025, respectively). Patients with hypovascular lesions showed significantly poorer disease-free survival than patients with rim-enhancing or hypervascular lesions (p=0.001 and p=0.001, respectively). Hypovascularity was an independent preoperative prognostic factor for disease-free survival (p<0.001). Hypovascular ICCs in the HAP tend to be of perihilar type and to have more malignant potential than other ICCs. (orig.)

  11. Novel Compound-Forming Technology Using Bioprinting and Electrospinning for Patterning a 3D Scaffold Construct with Multiscale Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanshao Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenges for tissue engineering is to efficiently provide oxygen and nutrients to cells on a three-dimensional (3D engineered scaffold structure. Thus, achieving sufficient vascularization of the structure is a critical problem in tissue engineering. This facilitates the need to develop novel methods to enhance vascularization. Use of patterned hydrogel structures with multiscale channels can be used to achieve the required vascularization. Patterned structures need to be biocompatible and biodegradable. In this study, gelatin was used as the main part of a hydrogel to prepare a biological structure with 3D multiscale channels using bioprinting combined with selection of suitable materials and electrostatic spinning. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were then used to confirm efficacy of the structure, inferred from cell viability on different engineered construct designs. HUVECs were seeded on the surface of channels and cultured in vitro. HUVECs showed high viability and diffusion within the construct. This method can be used as a practical platform for the fabrication of engineered construct for vascularization.

  12. Rates and patterns in the evolution of snake-like body form in squamate reptiles: evidence for repeated re-evolution of lost digits and long-term persistence of intermediate body forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandley, Matthew C; Huelsenbeck, John P; Wiens, John J

    2008-08-01

    An important challenge in evolutionary biology is to understand how major changes in body form arise. The dramatic transition from a lizard-like to snake-like body form in squamate reptiles offers an exciting system for such research because this change is replicated dozens of times. Here, we use morphometric data for 258 species and a time-calibrated phylogeny to explore rates and patterns of body-form evolution across squamates. We also demonstrate how time-calibrated phylogenies may be used to make inferences about the time frame over which major morphological transitions occur. Using the morphometric data, we find that the transition from lizard-like to snake-like body form involves concerted evolution of limb reduction, digit loss, and body elongation. These correlations are similar across squamate clades, despite very different ecologies and >180 million years (My) of divergence. Using the time-calibrated phylogeny and ancestral reconstructions, we find that the dramatic transition between these body forms can occur in 20 My or less, but that seemingly intermediate morphologies can also persist for tens of millions of years. Finally, although loss of digits is common, we find statistically significant support for at least six examples of the re-evolution of lost digits in the forelimb and hind limb.

  13. The crystal structures of new forms of AlF3 as determined from their synchrotron powder-diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harlow, R.L.; Herron, N.; Thorn, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Aluminum fluoride phases are established catalysts in many classes of fluorocarbon transformations, particularly important at this time because they are key to the production of CFC alternatives. Much of what has been known about the various phases of AlF 3 , however, is open-quotes folkloreclose quotes and many of the reported phases appear to be spurious. Of the two well-characterized phases, the open-framework beta-AlF 3 has been found to be much more active than the condensed form, alpha-AlF 3 . In an effort to find new, more reliable synthetic routes to beta-AlF 3 , the pyrolysis of a variety of organic-[AlF 4 ] salts was attempted. This technique not only produced the beta-form but also a variety of new forms now designated as eta, theta, and kappa. Since these new phases were produced only in a microcrystalline state, it was not possible to characterize their structures by conventional single-crystal diffraction techniques. As a result, ab initio structural studies using synchrotron powder data were used to characterize these phases. All of the new phases consist of corner-shared AlF 6 octahedra and all contain channels. The paper details the synthesis of these new phases, the value of powder diffraction as a structural tool, and the structural relationships among the various AlF 3 phases

  14. Polarization of concave domains by traveling wave pinning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Bialecki

    Full Text Available Pattern formation is one of the most fundamental yet puzzling phenomena in physics and biology. We propose that traveling front pinning into concave portions of the boundary of 3-dimensional domains can serve as a generic gradient-maintaining mechanism. Such a mechanism of domain polarization arises even for scalar bistable reaction-diffusion equations, and, depending on geometry, a number of stationary fronts may be formed leading to complex spatial patterns. The main advantage of the pinning mechanism, with respect to the Turing bifurcation, is that it allows for maintaining gradients in the specific regions of the domain. By linking the instant domain shape with the spatial pattern, the mechanism can be responsible for cellular polarization and differentiation.

  15. Collar temperature sensor data reveal long-term patterns in southern Beaufort Sea polar bear den distribution on pack ice and land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jay W; Rode, Karyn D.; Eggett, Dennis L.; Smith, T.S.; Wilson, R. R.; Durner, George M.; Fischbach, Anthony; Atwood, Todd C.; Douglas, David

    2017-01-01

    In response to a changing climate, many species alter habitat use. Polar bears Ursus maritimus in the southern Beaufort Sea have increasingly used land for maternal denning. To aid in detecting denning behavior, we developed an objective method to identify polar bear denning events using temperature sensor data collected by satellite-linked transmitters deployed on adult females between 1985 and 2013. We then applied this method to determine whether southern Beaufort Sea polar bears have continued to increase land denning with recent sea-ice loss and examined whether sea-ice conditions affect the distribution of dens between pack-ice and coastal substrates. Because land use in summer and autumn has also increased, we examined potential associations between summering substrate and denning substrate. Statistical process control methods applied to temperature-sensor data identified denning events with 94.5% accuracy in comparison to direct observations (n = 73) and 95.7% accuracy relative to subjective classifications based on temperature, location, and activity sensor data (n = 116). We found an increase in land-based denning during the study period. The frequency of land denning was directly related to the distance that sea ice retreated from the coast. Among females that denned, all 14 that summered on land subsequently denned there, whereas 29% of the 69 bears summering on ice denned on land. These results suggest that denning on land may continue to increase with further loss of sea ice. While the effects that den substrate have on nutrition, energetics, and reproduction are unclear, more polar bears denning onshore will likely increase human-bear interactions.

  16. The Accuracy of Fit of Crowns Made From Wax Patterns Produced Conventionally (Hand Formed) and Via CAD/CAM Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Hawa M; Al-Masoody, Azal H; El-Ghezawi, Narjes; Johnson, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the marginal and internal fit accuracy of crowns constructed using three different wax production methods; conventional, milled, and 3D printed and utilizing three different cement gap thicknesses. 15 identical stone dies were made for each method. Wax patterns were produced and then cast into metal crowns, which were assessed for differences in accuracy of both marginal and internal fit. Measurement points were 4 points per crown; occlusal, axial, marginal gap, and marginal discrepancy points. A silicone impression technique and conventional cementation technique were employed to facilitate the measurements. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in accuracy between the digitally and manually produced crowns, with the 3D printed crowns being slightly more accurate. Whereas, statistically significant differences were noticed between the conventional versus printed groups, in occlusal and marginal gap points (p crowns is as accurate as the conventional hand carved production in terms of internal and marginal fit. The manufacturer recommended offset/die-spacer of 30 μm produced the most accurate internal and marginal fits.

  17. Brain activation patterns resulting from learning letter forms through active self-production and passive observation in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa J Kersey

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Although previous literature suggests that writing practice facilitates neural specialization for letters, it is unclear if this facilitation is driven by the perceptual feedback from the act of writing or the actual execution of the motor act. The present study addresses this issue by measuring the change in BOLD signal in response to hand-printed letters, unlearned cursive letters, and cursive letters that 7 year-old children learned actively, by writing, and passively, by observing an experimenter write. Brain activation was assessed using fMRI while perceiving letters – in both cursive and manuscript forms. Results showed that active training led to increased recruitment of the sensori-motor network associated with letter perception as well as the insula and claustrum, but passive observation did not. This suggests that perceptual networks for newly learned cursive letters are driven by motor execution rather than by perceptual feedback.

  18. Influence of urban form on landscape pattern and connectivity in metropolitan regions: a comparative case study of Phoenix, AZ, USA, and Izmir, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sohyun; Hepcan, Çiğdem C; Hepcan, Şerif; Cook, Edward A

    2014-10-01

    Although ecological connectivity conservation in urban areas has recently been recognized as an important issue, less is known about its relationship to urban form and landscape pattern. This study investigates how urban morphology influences regional ecosystem pattern and landscape connectivity. Two metropolitan landscapes, Phoenix, AZ, USA, and Izmir, Turkey, were compared, both of which are fast-growing regions in their national context. A wide range of variables were considered for identifying natural and urban properties. The natural characteristics include typology of urban ecosystems, urban to natural cover ratio, dominant habitat type, urban biodiversity, landscape context, and connectivity conservation efforts. Urban parameters examine urban form, urban extent, urban cover proportion, growth rate, populations, urban gradient, major drivers of urbanization, urban density, and mode/approach of urban development. Twelve landscape metrics were measured and compared across the natural patches. Results show that there is little difference in landscape connectivity in the rural zones of Phoenix and Izmir, although Phoenix has slightly higher connectivity values. The connectivity variance in urbanized areas, however, is significantly dependent on the region. For example, Phoenix urban zones have substantially lower connectivity than either urban or suburban zones in Izmir. Findings demonstrate that small and compact urban settlements with more dense populations are more likely to conserve landscape connectivity compared to multiple-concentric but amalgamated urban form spreading all over the landscape (aka urban sprawl).

  19. DNA sequencing, anatomy, and calcification patterns support a monophyletic, subarctic, carbonate reef-forming Clathromorphum (Hapalidiaceae, Corallinales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adey, Walter H; Hernandez-Kantun, Jazmin J; Johnson, Gabriel; Gabrielson, Paul W

    2015-02-01

    For the first time, morpho-anatomical characters that were congruent with DNA sequence data were used to characterize several genera in Hapalidiaceae-the major eco-engineers of Subarctic carbonate ecosystems. DNA sequencing of three genes (SSU, rbcL, ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit gene and psbA, photosystem II D1 protein gene), along with patterns of cell division, cell elongation, and calcification supported a monophyletic Clathromorphum. Two characters were diagnostic for this genus: (i) cell division, elongation, and primary calcification occurred only in intercalary meristematic cells and in a narrow vertical band (1-2 μm wide) resulting in a "meristem split" and (ii) a secondary calcification of interfilament crystals was also produced. Neopolyporolithon was resurrected for N. reclinatum, the generitype, and Clathromorphum loculosum was transferred to this genus. Like Clathromorphum, cell division, elongation, and calcification occurred only in intercalary meristematic cells, but in a wider vertical band (over 10-20 μm), and a "meristem split" was absent. Callilithophytum gen. nov. was proposed to accommodate Clathromorphum parcum, the obligate epiphyte of the northeast Pacific endemic geniculate coralline, Calliarthron. Diagnostic for this genus were epithallial cells terminating all cell filaments (no dorsi-ventrality was present), and a distinct "foot" was embedded in the host. Leptophytum, based on its generitype, L. laeve, was shown to be a distinct genus more closely related to Clathromorphum than to Phymatolithon. All names of treated species were applied unequivocally by linking partial rbcL sequences from holotype, isotype, or epitype specimens with field-collected material. Variation in rbcL and psbA sequences suggested that multiple species may be passing under each currently recognized species of Clathromorphum and Neopolyporolithon. © 2014 Phycological Society of America.

  20. Diffuse nitrogen loss simulation and impact assessment of stereoscopic agriculture pattern by integrated water system model and consideration of multiple existence forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Gao, Yang; Yu, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    Agricultural nitrogen loss becomes an increasingly important source of water quality deterioration and eutrophication, even threatens water safety for humanity. Nitrogen dynamic mechanism is still too complicated to be well captured at watershed scale due to its multiple existence forms and instability, disturbance of agricultural management practices. Stereoscopic agriculture is a novel agricultural planting pattern to efficiently use local natural resources (e.g., water, land, sunshine, heat and fertilizer). It is widely promoted as a high yield system and can obtain considerable economic benefits, particularly in China. However, its environmental quality implication is not clear. In our study, Qianyanzhou station is famous for its stereoscopic agriculture pattern of Southern China, and an experimental watershed was selected as our study area. Regional characteristics of runoff and nitrogen losses were simulated by an integrated water system model (HEQM) with multi-objective calibration, and multiple agriculture practices were assessed to find the effective approach for the reduction of diffuse nitrogen losses. Results showed that daily variations of runoff and nitrogen forms were well reproduced throughout watershed, i.e., satisfactory performances for ammonium and nitrate nitrogen (NH4-N and NO3-N) loads, good performances for runoff and organic nitrogen (ON) load, and very good performance for total nitrogen (TN) load. The average loss coefficient was 62.74 kg/ha for NH4-N, 0.98 kg/ha for NO3-N, 0.0004 kg/ha for ON and 63.80 kg/ha for TN. The dominating form of nitrogen losses was NH4-N due to the applied fertilizers, and the most dramatic zones aggregated in the middle and downstream regions covered by paddy and orange orchard. In order to control diffuse nitrogen losses, the most effective practices for Qianyanzhou stereoscopic agriculture pattern were to reduce farmland planting scale in the valley by afforestation, particularly for orchard in the

  1. On the use of polar coordinate system in the projective graphic drawings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivashchenko Andrey Viktorovich

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Projective graphics is a polyhedra simulation method, which is based on the use of trace diagrams of initial polyhedron. Previously developed computer software allows using Cartesian coordinates. In some cases it is advisable to use polar coordinate system for description of projective graphics drawings. Using the example of icosahedron the authors analyzed the advantages of using projective graphics drawings in the polar coordinate system. The transition to the polar coordinate system is a tool that allows using certain patterns of projective graphics drawings in the process of calculation. When using polar coordinate system the search of Polar correspondence for the directs is simplified. In order to analyze the two lines in the polar coordinate system it is enough to compare the corresponding coefficients of the equations of these lines. The authors consider a diagram of the icosahedron in polar coordinates, and a corresponding fragment of calculation program in the Mathematica system. Some examples of forming based on icosahedrons are offered. Optimization of computer programs using polar coordinate system will simplifies the calculations of projective graphics drawings, accelerates the process of constructing three-dimensional models, which expand the possibilities of selecting original solutions. Finally, the authors conclude that it is appropriate to use the polar coordinate system only in the construction of projective graphics diagrams of the planes system having rich symmetry. All Platonic and Archimedean solids, Catalan solid possess this property.

  2. Relationships between congener distribution patterns of PCDDs, PCDFs, PCNs, PCBs, PCBzs and PCPhs formed during flue gas cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Stina, E-mail: stina.jansson@chem.umu.se [Department of Chemistry, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden); Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry, SE-901 83 Umea (Sweden); Andersson, Patrik L., E-mail: patrik.andersson@chem.umu.se [Department of Chemistry, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden)

    2012-02-01

    The congener patterns of mono- to octa-chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PC{sub 1-8}DD), dibenzofurans (PC{sub 1-8}DF), naphthalenes (PC{sub 1-8}N), mono- to deca-chlorinated biphenyls (PC{sub 1-10}B), di- to hexa-chlorinated benzenes (PC{sub 2-6}Bz) and mono- to penta-chlorinated phenols (PC{sub 1-5}Ph) in flue gas samples collected simultaneously at 450 Degree-Sign C, 300 Degree-Sign C and 200 Degree-Sign C in the post-combustion zone during waste incineration in a laboratory-scale reactor in a previous study, were in this study evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA). To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive chemical and multivariate analysis to date of the thermal formation of dioxins. The PCA indicated that different formation pathways occur in the temperature regions 450-300 Degree-Sign C and 300-200 Degree-Sign C, and reflected a chlorination effect of PCDF and PCDD between 450 Degree-Sign C and 200 Degree-Sign C which could not be discerned or was less pronounced for the other compound groups. Toxic equivalents (TEQs) of PCDDs, PCDFs and PCBs, as well as total TEQ values (TEQ{sub Total}) were also calculated, and correlations between changes in levels of specific congeners and the TEQs were explored in the PCA. Levels of four HxCDF congeners and 1,2,3,4,8-, 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDF and 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF showed the strongest correlations with TEQ{sub Total} (R{sup 2} {>=} 0.9). In addition, levels of 1,2,4-TriCBz correlated strongly with TEQ{sub Total} (R{sup 2} > 0.7), supporting previous reports that it may be a potential indicator of the TEQ. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different pathways dominating between 450-300 Degree-Sign C and 300-200 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorination of PCDD/Fs between 450 Degree-Sign C and 200 Degree-Sign C but not for the other chloroaromatics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Best TEQ{sub Total} correlations for four HxCDFs, and 1,2,3,4,8-/1,2,3,7,8- and 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF. Black

  3. PolarHub: A Global Hub for Polar Data Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the outcome of a NSF project in developing a large-scale web crawler PolarHub to discover automatically the distributed polar dataset in the format of OGC web services (OWS) in the cyberspace. PolarHub is a machine robot; its goal is to visit as many webpages as possible to find those containing information about polar OWS, extract this information and store it into the backend data repository. This is a very challenging task given huge data volume of webpages on the Web. Three unique features was introduced in PolarHub to make it distinctive from earlier crawler solutions: (1) a multi-task, multi-user, multi-thread support to the crawling tasks; (2) an extensive use of thread pool and Data Access Object (DAO) design patterns to separate persistent data storage and business logic to achieve high extendibility of the crawler tool; (3) a pattern-matching based customizable crawling algorithm to support discovery of multi-type geospatial web services; and (4) a universal and portable client-server communication mechanism combining a server-push and client pull strategies for enhanced asynchronous processing. A series of experiments were conducted to identify the impact of crawling parameters to the overall system performance. The geographical distribution pattern of all PolarHub identified services is also demonstrated. We expect this work to make a major contribution to the field of geospatial information retrieval and geospatial interoperability, to bridge the gap between data provider and data consumer, and to accelerate polar science by enhancing the accessibility and reusability of adequate polar data.

  4. Polar low monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobylev, Leonid; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta; Mitnik, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale atmospheric low pressure weather systems, developing poleward of the main baroclinic zone and associated with high surface wind speeds. Small size and short lifetime, sparse in-situ observations in the regions of their development complicate polar low study. Our knowledge of polar lows and mesocyclones has come almost entirely during the period of satellite remote sensing since, by virtue of their small horizontal scale, it was rarely possible to analyse these lows on conventional weather charts using only the data from the synoptic observing network. However, the effects of intense polar lows have been felt by coastal communities and seafarers since the earliest times. These weather systems are thought to be responsible for the loss of many small vessels over the centuries, although the nature of the storms was not understood and their arrival could not be predicted. The actuality of the polar low research is stipulated by their high destructive power: they are a threat to such businesses as oil and gas exploration, fisheries and shipping. They could worsen because of global warming: a shrinking of sea ice around the North Pole, which thawed to its record minimum in the summer of 2007, is likely to give rise to more powerful storms that form only over open water and can cause hurricane-strength winds. Therefore, study of polar lows, their timely detection, tracking and forecasting represents a challenge for today meteorology. Satellite passive microwave data, starting from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite, remain invaluable source of regularly available remotely sensed data to study polar lows. The sounding in this spectral range has several advantages in comparison with observations in visible and infrared ranges and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data: independence on day time and clouds, regularity and high temporal resolution in Polar Regions. Satellite

  5. Short communication: Effect of the feed presentation form on the intake pattern, productive traits and rumen pH of beef cattle fed high concentrate diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gimeno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional disorders like ruminal acidosis are common in Spanish beef production system, in which animals are fed diets with a high content in starch. This experiment studied the effect of feed presentation form (concentrate and straw offered separately, CD, or mixed in form of briquettes, BR on the pattern of intake, growth and rumen pH of beef cattle fed high concentrate diets. The experiment was performed with 40 Holstein male calves, 32 of them for determining feed intake pattern and productive rates, and the remaining 8, which were previously provided with a ruminal cannula, to monitor rumen pH in two 21-day consecutive periods following a change-over design. Animals fed BR reduced feed intake rate during the first hour after feeding (18.6 vs. 24.0% of daily intake p<0.001, but this diet promoted a lower rumen pH at all sampling times compared with CD (daily average of 5.98 vs. 6.33; p<0.001 and tended to promote a lower total feed intake (7.08 vs. 9.77 kg DM/d; p<0.001 and daily weight gain (1.43 vs. 1.76 kg/d; p=0.056. Offering the concentrate and the straw mixed in form of briquettes is not useful to prevent ruminal acidosis and improve growth, probably due to both a reduced particle size of straw and avoided self-regulation of straw intake along the day.

  6. Patterns of reproductive isolation in a haplodiploid - strong post-mating, prezygotic barriers among three forms of a social spider mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yukie; Sakamoto, Hironori; Gotoh, Tetsuo; Saito, Yutaka; Chao, Jung-Tai; Egas, Martijn; Mochizuki, Atsushi

    2018-03-22

    In speciation research, much attention is paid to the evolution of reproductive barriers, preventing diverging groups from hybridizing back into one gene pool. The prevalent view is that reproductive barriers evolve gradually as a by-product of genetic changes accumulated by natural selection and genetic drift in groups that are segregated spatially and/or temporally. Reproductive barriers, however, can also be reinforced by natural selection against maladaptive hybridization. These mutually compatible theories are both empirically supported by studies, analysing relationships between intensity of reproductive isolation and genetic distance in sympatric taxa and allopatric taxa. Here, we present the - to our knowledge - first comparative study in a haplodiploid organism, the social spider mite Stigmaeopsis miscanthi, by measuring premating and post-mating, pre- and post-zygotic components of reproductive isolation, using three recently diverged forms of the mite that partly overlap in home range. We carried out cross-experiments and measured genetic distances (mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA) among parapatric and allopatric populations of the three forms. Our results show that the three forms are reproductively isolated, despite the absence of premating barriers, and that the post-mating, prezygotic component contributes most to reproductive isolation. As expected, the strength of post-mating reproductive barriers positively correlated with genetic distance. We did not find a clear pattern of prezygotic barriers evolving faster in parapatry than in allopatry, although one form did show a trend in line with the ecological and behavioural relationships between the forms. Our study advocates the versatility of haplodiploid animals for investigating the evolution of reproductive barriers. © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  7. Research on generating various polarization-modes in polarized illumination system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinping; Lin, Wumei; Fan, Zhenjie

    2013-08-01

    With the increase of the numerical aperture (NA), the polarization of light affects the imaging quality of projection lens more significantly. On the contrary, according to the mask pattern, the resolution of projection lens can be improved by using the polarized illumination. That is to say, using the corresponding polarized beam (or polarization-mode) along with the off-axis illumination will improve the resolution and the imaging quality of the of projection lens. Therefore, the research on the generation of various polarization modes and its conversion methods become more and more important. In order to realize various polarization modes in polarized illumination system, after read a lot of references, we provide a way that fitting for the illumination system with the wavelength of 193nm.Six polarization-modes and a depolarized mode are probably considered. Wave-plate stack is used to generate linearly polarization-mode, which have a higher degree polarization. In order to generate X-Y and Y-X polarization mode, the equipment consisting of four sectors of λ/2 wave plate was used. We combined 16 sectors of λ/2 wave plate which have different orientations of the "slow" axis to generate radial and azimuthal polarization. Finally, a multi-polarization control device was designed. Using the kind of multi-polarization control device which applying this method could help to choose the polarization modes conveniently and flexibility for the illumination system.

  8. Graphics of polar figure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this work, is that starting from a data file coming from a spectra that has been softened, and of the one that have been generated its coordinates to project it in stereographic form, to create the corresponding polar figure making use of the Cyber computer of the ININ by means of the GRAPHOS package. This work only requires a Beta, Fi and Intensity (I) enter data file. It starts of the existence of a softened spectra of which have been generated already with these data, making use of some language that in this case was FORTRAN for the Cyber computer, a program is generated supported in the Graphos package that allows starting of a reading of the Beta, Fi, I file, to generate the points in a stereographic projection and that it culminates with the graph of the corresponding polar figure. The program will request the pertinent information that is wanted to capture in the polar figure just as: date, name of the enter file, indexes of the polar figure, number of levels, radio of the stereographic projection (cms.), crystalline system to which belongs the sample, name the neuter graph file by create and to add the own general data. (Author)

  9. Imaging differential polarization microscope with electronic readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickols, W.; Tinoco, I.; Katz, J.E.; Maestre, M.F.; Bustamante, C.

    1985-01-01

    A differential polarization microscope forms two images: one of the transmitted intensity and the other due to the change in intensity between images formed when different polarizations of light are used. The interpretation of these images for linear dichroism and circular dichroism are described. The design constraints on the data acquisition systems and the polarization modulation are described. The advantage of imaging several biological systems which contain optically anisotropic structures are described

  10. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Investigation of R-Factor for steel moment frame combined with cold-formed steel structures under different load patterns using pushover analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Sadeghi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of Lightweight Steel Frames (LSF has grown considerably in recent years all over the world due to its unique advantages such as being cost-effective and light-weight, easy and quick installment. Another application is to use them in order to increase the number of new floors on the existing buildings. But since the behavior of the combined structure is not clear, there is no possibility of increasing new floors with Lightweight Steel Frames. Therefore, through selecting and modeling three buildings of three, five and seven floors with steel moment frames in SAP2000 software and adding one or two new floors using Lightweight Steel Frames (LSF and conducting a non-linear static analysis with three different lateral load pattern, we dealt with the seismic behavior and determined the behavior coefficient of each of the combined structures. The results indicated that the use of cold-formed structures in order to add story do not have a significant impact on R-factor. In addition, R-factor depends on the type of the side loading pattern.

  12. Constraining axion by polarized prompt emission from gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, André

    2008-01-01

    A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of invisible axion. The axionic induced dichroism of gamma rays at different energies should cause a misalignment of the polarization plane for higher energy events relative to that one for lower energies events resulting in the loss of statistics needed to form a pattern of the polarization signal to be recognized in a detector. According to this, any evidence of polarized gamma rays coming from an object with extended magnetic field could be interpreted as a constraint on the existence of the invisible axion for a certain parameter range. Based on reports of polarized MeV emission detected in several GRBs we derive a constraint on the axion-photon coupling. This constraint $\\g_{a\\gamma\\gamma}\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the axion mass $m_a=10^{-3} {\\rm eV}$ is competitive with the sensitivi...

  13. Polarized electrogowdy spacetimes censored

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nungesser, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.nungesser@aei.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2010-05-01

    A sketch of the proof of strong cosmic censorship is presented for a class of solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations, those with polarized Gowdy symmetry. A key element of the argument is the observation that by means of a suitable choice of variables the central equations in this problem can be written in a form where they are identical to the central equations for general (i.e. non-polarized) vacuum Gowdy spacetimes. Using this it is seen that the results of Ringstroem on strong cosmic censorship in the vacuum case have implications for the Einstein-Maxwell case. Working out the geometrical meaning of these analytical results leads to the main conclusion.

  14. Polarization sensitivity of light diffraction for periodic array of anisotropic gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Ming-shan; Liu, Tung-kai; Tsen, Chun-yu; Ting, Chen-ching

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to analyze the first order diffraction intensity of the incident polarized light which is diffracted by the gold nanoparticles array in terms of the surface plasmon effect. The inspected gold nanoparticles array films are built in grating pattern with stripe thickness of 4 μm and diameters of gold nanoparticles ca. 10–56 nm, which are formed by annealing at temperatures of 400, 450, 500, and 550 °C, respectively. The probing light is linearly polarized with wavelengths of 450–800 nm and counterclockwise turns its polarization direction from 0° to 90° during measurements. The results show that the diffraction intensity depends on the anisotropic configuration samples which gold nanoparticles are orientated by analyzing the scanning electron microscope images. It results that the localized surface plasmon effect induced by incident field depends on orientation and causes the sample polarization-sensitive

  15. Assessment of tissue viability by polarization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, G.; Anderson, C.; Henricson, J.; Leahy, M.; O'Doherty, J.; Sjöberg, F.

    2008-09-01

    A new and versatile method for tissue viability imaging based on polarization spectroscopy of blood in superficial tissue structures such as the skin is presented in this paper. Linearly polarized light in the visible wavelength region is partly reflected directly by the skin surface and partly diffusely backscattered from the dermal tissue matrix. Most of the directly reflected light preserves its polarization state while the light returning from the deeper tissue layers is depolarized. By the use of a polarization filter positioned in front of a sensitive CCD-array, the light directly reflected from the tissue surface is blocked, while the depolarized light returning from the deeper tissue layers reaches the detector array. By separating the colour planes of the detected image, spectroscopic information about the amount of red blood cells (RBCs) in the microvascular network of the tissue under investigation can be derived. A theory that utilizes the differences in light absorption of RBCs and bloodless tissue in the red and green wavelength region forms the basis of an algorithm for displaying a colour coded map of the RBC distribution in a tissue. Using a fluid model, a linear relationship (cc. = 0.99) between RBC concentration and the output signal was demonstrated within the physiological range 0-4%. In-vivo evaluation using transepidermal application of acetylcholine by the way of iontophoresis displayed the heterogeneity pattern of the vasodilatation produced by the vasoactive agent. Applications of this novel technology are likely to be found in drug and skin care product development as well as in the assessment of skin irritation and tissue repair processes and even ultimately in a clinic case situation.

  16. Polarization and Myelination in Myelinating Glia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Myelinating glia, oligodendrocytes in central nervous system and Schwann cells in peripheral nervous system, form myelin sheath, a multilayered membrane system around axons enabling salutatory nerve impulse conduction and maintaining axonal integrity. Myelin sheath is a polarized structure localized in the axonal side and therefore is supposed to be formed based on the preceding polarization of myelinating glia. Thus, myelination process is closely associated with polarization of myelinating glia. However, cell polarization has been less extensively studied in myelinating glia than other cell types such as epithelial cells. The ultimate goal of this paper is to provide insights for the field of myelination research by applying the information obtained in polarity study in other cell types, especially epithelial cells, to cell polarization of myelinating glia. Thus, in this paper, the main aspects of cell polarization study in general are summarized. Then, they will be compared with polarization in oligodendrocytes. Finally, the achievements obtained in polarization study for epithelial cells, oligodendrocytes, and other types of cells will be translated into polarization/myelination process by Schwann cells. Then, based on this model, the perspectives in the study of Schwann cell polarization/myelination will be discussed. PMID:23326681

  17. Precessing deuteron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the acceleration in the Nuclotron of deuterons polarized in the horizontal plane is considered. This horizontal polarization is named precessing polarization. The effects of the main magnetic field and synchrotron oscillations are included. The precessing polarization is supposed to be used in studying the polarization parameters of the elastic dp back-scattering and other experiments

  18. Nanoscale silicon substrate patterns from self-assembly of cylinder forming poly(styrene)-block-poly(dimethylsiloxane) block copolymer on silane functionalized surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Dipu; Cummins, Cian; Rasappa, Sozaraj; Watson, Scott M D; Pike, Andrew R; Horrocks, Benjamin R; Fulton, David A; Houlton, Andrew; Liontos, George; Ntetsikas, Konstantinos; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Morris, Michael A

    2017-01-27

    Poly(styrene)-block-poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PS-b-PDMS) is an excellent block copolymer (BCP) system for self-assembly and inorganic template fabrication because of its high Flory-Huggins parameter (χ ∼ 0.26) at room temperature in comparison to other BCPs, and high selective etch contrast between PS and PDMS block for nanopatterning. In this work, self-assembly in PS-b-PDMS BCP is achieved by combining hydroxyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS-OH) brush surfaces with solvent vapor annealing. As an alternative to standard brush chemistry, we report a simple method based on the use of surfaces functionalized with silane-based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). A solution-based approach to SAM formation was adopted in this investigation. The influence of the SAM-modified surfaces upon BCP films was compared with polymer brush-based surfaces. The cylinder forming PS-b-PDMS BCP and PDMS-OH polymer brush were synthesized by sequential living anionic polymerization. It was observed that silane SAMs provided the appropriate surface chemistry which, when combined with solvent annealing, led to microphase segregation in the BCP. It was also demonstrated that orientation of the PDMS cylinders may be controlled by judicious choice of the appropriate silane. The PDMS patterns were successfully used as an on-chip etch mask to transfer the BCP pattern to underlying silicon substrate with sub-25 nm silicon nanoscale features. This alternative SAM/BCP approach to nanopattern formation shows promising results, pertinent in the field of nanotechnology, and with much potential for application, such as in the fabrication of nanoimprint lithography stamps, nanofluidic devices or in narrow and multilevel interconnected lines.

  19. Polare maskuliniteter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Anne Hauan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper my aim is to read and understand the journal of Gerrit de Veer from the last journey of William Barents to the Arctic Regions in 1596 and the journal of captain Junge on his hunting trip from Tromsø to Svalbard in 1834.It is nearly 240 years between this to voyages. The first journal is known as the earliest report from the arctic era. Gerrit de Veer adds instructive copper engravings to his text and give us insight in the crews meeting with this new land. Captain Junges journal is found together with his dead crew in a house in a fjord nearby Ny-Ålesund and has no drawings, but word. Both of these journals may be read as sources of the knowledge and understanding of the polar region. They might also unveil the ideas of how to deal with and survive under the challenges that is given. In addition one can ask if the sources can tell us more about how men describe their challenges. Can the way they expressed themselves in the journals give us an understanding of masculinity? And not least help us to create good questions of the change in the ideas of masculinities which is said to follow the change in understanding of the wilderness.

  20. Architectures and assessment of next-generation CMB polarization instruments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cosmological inflation predicts a background of gravitational waves that imprint a characteristic polarized pattern on the CMB. This signal is degraded by...

  1. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...... and concepts from real designs by studying form in abstract contexts. The challenge for the first approach is how to support students in decoupling form from the work as a whole. The challenge for the second approach is how to translate general form into real design. Hence, choosing between the two approaches...

  2. Floristic patterns and disturbance history in karri ( Eucalyptus diversicolor: Myrtaceae) forest, south-western Australia: 2. Origin, growth form and fire response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell-Johnson, Grant W.; Williams, M. R.; Mellican, A. E.; Annells, A.

    2007-03-01

    We examined the influence of disturbance history on the floristic composition of a single community type in karri forest, south-western Australia. Cover-abundance of 224 plant species and six disturbance and site-based environmental variables were recorded in 91, 20 m × 20 m quadrats. Numerical taxonomic and correlation approaches were used to relate these and 10 plant species-group variables based on origin, growth form and fire response. Ordination revealed no discernable pattern of sites based on floristic composition. However, all 10 species-group variables were significantly correlated with the ordination axes. Species richness within these groups varied with category and with respect to many of the disturbance and site variables. We encountered low diversity of vascular plants at the community level and limited diversity of growth forms. Thus most species were herbs (62.1%) or shrubs (30.3%), and there were no epiphytes and few species of trees or climbers. Although many introduced species were recorded (18.3% of all taxa), virtually all (83%) were herbs that demonstrated little persistence in the community, and there was limited evidence of transformer species. Time-since-fire (and other disturbance) influenced species richness more than the number of recent past fires because of a high proportion of ephemerals associated with the immediate post-fire period. Long-lived shrubs with soil stored seed dominate numerically, and in understorey biomass in comparison with neighboring vegetation types because of their greater flexibility of response following irregular, but intense disturbance events. However, interactions between nutrient status, regeneration mechanisms and community composition may be worthy of further investigation.

  3. The GRAS gene family in pine: transcript expression patterns associated with the maturation-related decline of competence to form adventitious roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarca, Dolores; Pizarro, Alberto; Hernández, Inmaculada; Sánchez, Conchi; Solana, Silvia P; Del Amo, Alicia; Carneros, Elena; Díaz-Sala, Carmen

    2014-12-30

    Adventitious rooting is an organogenic process by which roots are induced from differentiated cells other than those specified to develop roots. In forest tree species, age and maturation are barriers to adventitious root formation by stem cuttings. The mechanisms behind the respecification of fully differentiated progenitor cells, which underlies adventitious root formation, are unknown. Here, the GRAS gene family in pine is characterized and the expression of a subset of these genes during adventitious rooting is reported. Comparative analyses of protein structures showed that pine GRAS members are conserved compared with their relatives in angiosperms. Relatively high GRAS mRNA levels were measured in non-differentiated proliferating embryogenic cultures and during embryo development. The mRNA levels of putative GRAS family transcription factors, including Pinus radiata's SCARECROW (SCR), PrSCR, and SCARECROW-LIKE (SCL) 6, PrSCL6, were significantly reduced or non-existent in adult tissues that no longer had the capacity to form adventitious roots, but were maintained or induced after the reprogramming of adult cells in rooting-competent tissues. A subset of genes, SHORT-ROOT (PrSHR), PrSCL1, PrSCL2, PrSCL10 and PrSCL12, was also expressed in an auxin-, age- or developmental-dependent manner during adventitious root formation. The GRAS family of pine has been characterized by analyzing protein structures, phylogenetic relationships, conserved motifs and gene expression patterns. Individual genes within each group have acquired different and specialized functions, some of which could be related to the competence and reprogramming of adult cells to form adventitious roots.

  4. The accumulation pattern of ferruginol in the heartwood-forming Cryptomeria japonica xylem as determined by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and quantity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Katsushi; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Hashida, Koh; Imai, Takanori; Kushi, Masayoshi; Saito, Kaori; Fukushima, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Heartwood formation is a unique phenomenon of tree species. Although the accumulation of heartwood substances is a well-known feature of the process, the accumulation mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the accumulation process of ferruginol, a predominant heartwood substance of Cryptomeria japonica, in heartwood-forming xylem. Methods The radial accumulation pattern of ferruginol was examined from sapwood and through the intermediate wood to the heartwood by direct mapping using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The data were compared with quantitative results obtained from a novel method of gas chromatography analysis using laser microdissection sampling and with water distribution obtained from cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Key Results Ferruginol initially accumulated in the middle of the intermediate wood, in the earlywood near the annual ring boundary. It accumulated throughout the entire earlywood in the inner intermediate wood, and in both the earlywood and the latewood in the heartwood. The process of ferruginol accumulation continued for more than eight annual rings. Ferruginol concentration peaked at the border between the intermediate wood and heartwood, while the concentration was less in the latewood compared wiht the earlywood in each annual ring. Ferruginol tended to accumulate around the ray parenchyma cells. In addition, at the border between the intermediate wood and heartwood, the accumulation was higher in areas without water than in areas with water. Conclusions TOF-SIMS clearly revealed ferruginol distribution at the cellular level. Ferruginol accumulation begins in the middle of intermediate wood, initially in the earlywood near the annual ring boundary, then throughout the entire earlywood, and finally across to the whole annual ring in the heartwood. The heterogeneous timing of ferruginol accumulation could be related to the distribution of ray parenchyma cells

  5. Polarization-induced interference within electromagnetically induced transparency for atoms of double-V linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Liu, Chang; Chen, Ping-Xing; Liu, Liang

    2018-02-01

    People have been paying attention to the role of atoms' complex internal level structures in the research of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for a long time, where the various degenerate Zeeman levels usually generate complex linkage patterns for the atomic transitions. It turns out, with special choices of the atomic states and the atomic transitions' linkage structure, clear signatures of quantum interference induced by the probe and coupling light's polarizations can emerge from a typical EIT phenomena. We propose to study a four-state system with double-V linkage pattern for the transitions and analyze the polarization-induced interference under the EIT condition. We show that such interference arises naturally under mild conditions on the optical field and atom manipulation techniques. Moreover, we construct a variation form of double-M linkage pattern where the polarization-induced interference enables polarization-dependent cross modulation between incident weak lights that can be effective even at the few-photon level. The theme is to gain more insight into the essential question: how can we build a nontrivial optical medium where incident lights experience polarization-dependent nonlinear optical interactions, valid for a wide range of incidence intensities down to the few-photon level?

  6. Oocyte Polarization Is Coupled to the Chromosomal Bouquet, a Conserved Polarized Nuclear Configuration in Meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv M Elkouby

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The source of symmetry breaking in vertebrate oocytes is unknown. Animal-vegetal oocyte polarity is established by the Balbiani body (Bb, a conserved structure found in all animals examined that contains an aggregate of specific mRNAs, proteins, and organelles. The Bb specifies the oocyte vegetal pole, which is key to forming the embryonic body axes as well as the germline in most vertebrates. How Bb formation is regulated and how its asymmetric position is established are unknown. Using quantitative image analysis, we trace oocyte symmetry breaking in zebrafish to a nuclear asymmetry at the onset of meiosis called the chromosomal bouquet. The bouquet is a universal feature of meiosis where all telomeres cluster to one pole on the nuclear envelope, facilitating chromosomal pairing and meiotic recombination. We show that Bb precursor components first localize with the centrosome to the cytoplasm adjacent to the telomere cluster of the bouquet. They then aggregate around the centrosome in a specialized nuclear cleft that we identified, assembling the early Bb. We show that the bouquet nuclear events and the cytoplasmic Bb precursor localization are mechanistically coordinated by microtubules. Thus the animal-vegetal axis of the oocyte is aligned to the nuclear axis of the bouquet. We further show that the symmetry breaking events lay upstream to the only known regulator of Bb formation, the Bucky ball protein. Our findings link two universal features of oogenesis, the Bb and the chromosomal bouquet, to oocyte polarization. We propose that a meiotic-vegetal center couples meiosis and oocyte patterning. Our findings reveal a novel mode of cellular polarization in meiotic cells whereby cellular and nuclear polarity are aligned. We further reveal that in zygotene nests, intercellular cytoplasmic bridges remain between oocytes and that the position of the cytoplasmic bridge coincides with the location of the centrosome meiotic-vegetal organizing center

  7. Oocyte Polarization Is Coupled to the Chromosomal Bouquet, a Conserved Polarized Nuclear Configuration in Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkouby, Yaniv M; Jamieson-Lucy, Allison; Mullins, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    The source of symmetry breaking in vertebrate oocytes is unknown. Animal-vegetal oocyte polarity is established by the Balbiani body (Bb), a conserved structure found in all animals examined that contains an aggregate of specific mRNAs, proteins, and organelles. The Bb specifies the oocyte vegetal pole, which is key to forming the embryonic body axes as well as the germline in most vertebrates. How Bb formation is regulated and how its asymmetric position is established are unknown. Using quantitative image analysis, we trace oocyte symmetry breaking in zebrafish to a nuclear asymmetry at the onset of meiosis called the chromosomal bouquet. The bouquet is a universal feature of meiosis where all telomeres cluster to one pole on the nuclear envelope, facilitating chromosomal pairing and meiotic recombination. We show that Bb precursor components first localize with the centrosome to the cytoplasm adjacent to the telomere cluster of the bouquet. They then aggregate around the centrosome in a specialized nuclear cleft that we identified, assembling the early Bb. We show that the bouquet nuclear events and the cytoplasmic Bb precursor localization are mechanistically coordinated by microtubules. Thus the animal-vegetal axis of the oocyte is aligned to the nuclear axis of the bouquet. We further show that the symmetry breaking events lay upstream to the only known regulator of Bb formation, the Bucky ball protein. Our findings link two universal features of oogenesis, the Bb and the chromosomal bouquet, to oocyte polarization. We propose that a meiotic-vegetal center couples meiosis and oocyte patterning. Our findings reveal a novel mode of cellular polarization in meiotic cells whereby cellular and nuclear polarity are aligned. We further reveal that in zygotene nests, intercellular cytoplasmic bridges remain between oocytes and that the position of the cytoplasmic bridge coincides with the location of the centrosome meiotic-vegetal organizing center. These results

  8. Users Polarization on Facebook and Youtube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessi, Alessandro; Zollo, Fabiana; Del Vicario, Michela; Puliga, Michelangelo; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Uzzi, Brian; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Users online tend to select information that support and adhere their beliefs, and to form polarized groups sharing the same view—e.g. echo chambers. Algorithms for content promotion may favour this phenomenon, by accounting for users preferences and thus limiting the exposure to unsolicited contents. To shade light on this question, we perform a comparative study on how same contents (videos) are consumed on different online social media—i.e. Facebook and YouTube—over a sample of 12M of users. Our findings show that content drives the emergence of echo chambers on both platforms. Moreover, we show that the users’ commenting patterns are accurate predictors for the formation of echo-chambers. PMID:27551783

  9. Users Polarization on Facebook and Youtube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessi, Alessandro; Zollo, Fabiana; Del Vicario, Michela; Puliga, Michelangelo; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Uzzi, Brian; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Users online tend to select information that support and adhere their beliefs, and to form polarized groups sharing the same view-e.g. echo chambers. Algorithms for content promotion may favour this phenomenon, by accounting for users preferences and thus limiting the exposure to unsolicited contents. To shade light on this question, we perform a comparative study on how same contents (videos) are consumed on different online social media-i.e. Facebook and YouTube-over a sample of 12M of users. Our findings show that content drives the emergence of echo chambers on both platforms. Moreover, we show that the users' commenting patterns are accurate predictors for the formation of echo-chambers.

  10. Users Polarization on Facebook and Youtube.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bessi

    Full Text Available Users online tend to select information that support and adhere their beliefs, and to form polarized groups sharing the same view-e.g. echo chambers. Algorithms for content promotion may favour this phenomenon, by accounting for users preferences and thus limiting the exposure to unsolicited contents. To shade light on this question, we perform a comparative study on how same contents (videos are consumed on different online social media-i.e. Facebook and YouTube-over a sample of 12M of users. Our findings show that content drives the emergence of echo chambers on both platforms. Moreover, we show that the users' commenting patterns are accurate predictors for the formation of echo-chambers.

  11. A Fast DOA Estimation Algorithm Based on Polarization MUSIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A fast DOA estimation algorithm developed from MUSIC, which also benefits from the processing of the signals' polarization information, is presented. Besides performance enhancement in precision and resolution, the proposed algorithm can be exerted on various forms of polarization sensitive arrays, without specific requirement on the array's pattern. Depending on the continuity property of the space spectrum, a huge amount of computation incurred in the calculation of 4-D space spectrum is averted. Performance and computation complexity analysis of the proposed algorithm is discussed and the simulation results are presented. Compared with conventional MUSIC, it is indicated that the proposed algorithm has considerable advantage in aspects of precision and resolution, with a low computation complexity proportional to a conventional 2-D MUSIC.

  12. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  13. Genetic control of organ shape and tissue polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia A Green

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which genes control organ shape are poorly understood. In principle, genes may control shape by modifying local rates and/or orientations of deformation. Distinguishing between these possibilities has been difficult because of interactions between patterns, orientations, and mechanical constraints during growth. Here we show how a combination of growth analysis, molecular genetics, and modelling can be used to dissect the factors contributing to shape. Using the Snapdragon (Antirrhinum flower as an example, we show how shape development reflects local rates and orientations of tissue growth that vary spatially and temporally to form a dynamic growth field. This growth field is under the control of several dorsoventral genes that influence flower shape. The action of these genes can be modelled by assuming they modulate specified growth rates parallel or perpendicular to local orientations, established by a few key organisers of tissue polarity. Models in which dorsoventral genes only influence specified growth rates do not fully account for the observed growth fields and shapes. However, the data can be readily explained by a model in which dorsoventral genes also modify organisers of tissue polarity. In particular, genetic control of tissue polarity organisers at ventral petal junctions and distal boundaries allows both the shape and growth field of the flower to be accounted for in wild type and mutants. The results suggest that genetic control of tissue polarity organisers has played a key role in the development and evolution of shape.

  14. Use of the Polarized Radiance Distribution Camera System in the RADYO Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    polarizer’s (Melles Griot , 03 FPG 019). Polarizer’s are orientated at 0 deg, 60 deg, and 120 deg (angles relative to the first polarizer). The combination...combination of a broadband mica quarter wave plate (Melles Griot , 02 WRM001) and a polarizer to form a circular polarization analyzer. The combination of the

  15. Sources of polarized negative ions: progress and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, W.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of recent progress in the art of producing beams of polarized ions is given. In all sources of polarized ions, one first produces (or selects) neutral atoms which are polarized in electron spin. Those types of sources which use a beam of thermal polarized hydrogen atoms are discussed. Progress made in the preparation of the atomic beam and the methods used to convert the neutral atoms to polarized ions is summarized. The second type of source discussed is based on fast (keV) polarized hydrogen atoms. Conversion to negative ions is very simple because one only needs to pass the fast atoms through a suitable charge exchange medium (gas or vapor). However, the production of the polarized atoms is more difficult in this case. The proposal to employ polarized alkali vapor to form a beam of polarized fast H atoms, where the polarized alkali atoms are produced either by an atomic beam apparatus or by optical pumping is discussed

  16. Polarized light in optics and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kliger, David S

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive introduction to polarized light provides students and researchers with the background and the specialized knowledge needed to fully utilize polarized light. It provides a basic introduction to the interaction of light with matter for those unfamiliar with photochemistry and photophysics. An in-depth discussion of polarizing optics is also given. Different analytical techniques are introduced and compared and introductions to the use of polarized light in various forms of spectroscopy are provided.Key Features* Starts at a basic level and develops tools for resear

  17. Polar metals by geometric design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T. H.; Puggioni, D.; Yuan, Y.; Xie, L.; Zhou, H.; Campbell, N.; Ryan, P. J.; Choi, Y.; Kim, J.-W.; Patzner, J. R.; Ryu, S.; Podkaminer, J. P.; Irwin, J.; Ma, Y.; Fennie, C. J.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Pan, X. Q.; Gopalan, V.; Rondinelli, J. M.; Eom, C. B.

    2016-05-01

    Gauss’s law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions. Quantum physics supports this view, demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals—it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases. Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO3 perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements. We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedra—the structural signatures of perovskites—owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported, non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties.

  18. Polarization speckle imaging as a potential technique for in vivo skin cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Lui, Harvey; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lee, Tim K.

    2013-06-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the Western world. In order to accurately detect the disease, especially malignant melanoma-the most fatal form of skin cancer-at an early stage when the prognosis is excellent, there is an urgent need to develop noninvasive early detection methods. We believe that polarization speckle patterns, defined as a spatial distribution of depolarization ratio of traditional speckle patterns, can be an important tool for skin cancer detection. To demonstrate our technique, we conduct a large in vivo clinical study of 214 skin lesions, and show that statistical moments of the polarization speckle pattern could differentiate different types of skin lesions, including three common types of skin cancers, malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and two benign lesions, melanocytic nevus and seborrheic keratoses. In particular, the fourth order moment achieves better or similar sensitivity and specificity than many well-known and accepted optical techniques used to differentiate melanoma and seborrheic keratosis.

  19. Wnt signaling and polarity in freshwater sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor Reid, Pamela J; Matveev, Eugueni; McClymont, Alexandra; Posfai, Dora; Hill, April L; Leys, Sally P

    2018-02-02

    The Wnt signaling pathway is uniquely metazoan and used in many processes during development, including the formation of polarity and body axes. In sponges, one of the earliest diverging animal groups, Wnt pathway genes have diverse expression patterns in different groups including along the anterior-posterior axis of two sponge larvae, and in the osculum and ostia of others. We studied the function of Wnt signaling and body polarity formation through expression, knockdown, and larval manipulation in several freshwater sponge species. Sponge Wnts fall into sponge-specific and sponge-class specific subfamilies of Wnt proteins. Notably Wnt genes were not found in transcriptomes of the glass sponge Aphrocallistes vastus. Wnt and its signaling genes were expressed in archaeocytes of the mesohyl throughout developing freshwater sponges. Osculum formation was enhanced by GSK3 knockdown, and Wnt antagonists inhibited both osculum development and regeneration. Using dye tracking we found that the posterior poles of freshwater sponge larvae give rise to tissue that will form the osculum following metamorphosis. Together the data indicate that while components of canonical Wnt signaling may be used in development and maintenance of osculum tissue, it is likely that Wnt signaling itself occurs between individual cells rather than whole tissues or structures in freshwater sponges.

  20. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  1. Coherence and Polarization of Polarization Speckle Generated by Depolarizers and Their Changes through Complex ABCD Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ning; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Lee, Tim K.

    2015-01-01

    Recent research work on speckle patterns indicates a variation of the polarization state during propagation and its nonuniformly spatial distribution. The preliminary step for the investigation of this polarization speckle is the generation of the corresponding field. In this paper, a kind of spe...... of coherence (DoC). and degree of polarization (DoP) P. The changes of the coherence and polarization when the speckle field propagates through any optical system are analysed within the framework of the complex ABCD-matrix theory....

  2. Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization and Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) offer a means to explore the universe at a very early epoch. Specifically, if the universe went through a brief period of exponential expansion called inflation as current data suggest, gravitational waves from this period would polarize the CMB in a specific pattern. At GSFC, we are currently working towards two experiments that work in concert to measure this polarization pattern in search of evidence for inflation. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization at frequencies between 40 and 150 GHz from the Atacama Desert in Chile. The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a balloon-borne experiment that will make similar measurements at frequencies between 200 and 600 GHz.

  3. Optimization of control bars patterns and fuel recharges of coupled form; Optimizacion de patrones de barras de control y recargas de combustible de forma acoplada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia S, D.M.; Ortiz S, J.J. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: dulcema6715@hotmail.com

    2006-07-01

    In this work a system coupled for the optimization of fuel recharges and control bars patterns in boiling water reactors (BWR by its initials in English) is presented. It was used a multi state recurrent neural net like optimization technique. This type of neural net has been used in the solution of diverse problems, in particular the design of patterns of control bars and the design of the fuel recharge. However, these problems have been resolved in an independent way with different optimization techniques. The system was developed in FORTRAN 77 language, it calls OCORN (Optimization of Cycles of Operation using Neural Nets) and it solves both problems of combinatory optimization in a coupled way. OCORN begins creating a seed recharge by means of an optimization through the Haling principle. Later on a pattern of control bars for this recharge seed is proposed. Then a new fuel recharge is designed using the control bars patterns previously found. By this way an iterative process begins among the optimization of control bars patterns and the fuel recharge until a stop criteria it is completed. The stop criteria is completed when the fuel recharges and the control bars patterns don't vary in several successive iterations. The final result is an optimal fuel recharge and its respective control bars pattern. In this work the obtained results by this system for a cycle of balance of 18 months divided in 12 steps of burnt are presented. The obtained results are very encouraging, since the fuel recharge and the control bars pattern, its fulfill with the restrictions imposed in each one of the problems. (Author)

  4. Correction: The stability and generation pattern of thermally formed isocyanic acid (ICA) in air - potential and limitations of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for real-time workroom atmosphere measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Mikolaj Jan; Olsen, Raymond; Thomassen, Yngvar; Molander, Paal

    2018-02-21

    Correction for 'The stability and generation pattern of thermally formed isocyanic acid (ICA) in air - potential and limitations of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for real-time workroom atmosphere measurements' by Mikolaj Jan Jankowski et al., Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2016, 18, 810-818.

  5. Light-matter interactions in a polarization standing wave

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, X.; MacDonald, K.F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the application of polarization standing waves (PSW) to the coherent control of light-matter interactions in planar photonic nanostructures. Such waves, formed by counter-propagating (linear or circular) orthogonally polarized beams can uniquely detect polarization conversion, planar chirality and related asymmetric transmission effects.

  6. Dynamic nuclear polarization of irradiated target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polarized nucleon targets used in high energy physics experiments usually employ the method of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to polarize the protons or deuterons in an alcohol. DNP requires the presence of paramagnetic centers, which are customarily provided by a chemical dopant. These chemically doped targets have a relatively low polarizable nucleon content and suffer from loss of polarization when subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation. If the paramagnetic centers formed when the target is irradiated can be used in the DNP process, it becomes possible to produce targets using materials which have a relatively high polarizable nucleon content, but which are not easily doped by chemical means. Furthermore, the polarization of such targets may be much more radiation resistant. Dynamic nuclear polarization in ammonia, deuterated ammonia, ammonium hydroxide, methylamine, borane ammonia, butonal, ethane and lithium borohydride has been studied. These studies were conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center using the Yale-SLAC polarized target system. Results indicate that the use of ammonia and deuterated ammonia as polarized target materials would make significant increases in polarized target performance possible

  7. Differentiation of mass-forming focal pancreatitis from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: value of characterizing dynamic enhancement patterns on contrast-enhanced MR images by adding signal intensity color mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mimi [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hanyang Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Kyung Mi [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Hun; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young Kon; Cha, Dong Ik [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyunga [Samsung Medical Center, Biostatics and Clinical Epidemiology Center, Research Institute for Future Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the value of dynamic enhancement patterns on contrast-enhanced MR images by adding signal intensity colour mapping (SICM) to differentiate mass-forming focal pancreatitis (MFFP) from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Forty-one clinicopathologically proven MFFPs and 144 surgically confirmed PDACs were enrolled. Laboratory and MR imaging parameters were used to differentiate MFFP from PDAC. In particular, enhancement patterns on MR images adding SICM were evaluated. By using classification tree analysis (CTA), we determined the predictors for the differentiation of MFFP from PDAC. In the CTA, with all parameters except enhancement pattern on SICM images, ductal obstruction grade and T1 hypointensity grade of the pancreatic lesion were the first and second splitting predictor for differentiation of MFFP from PDAC, in order. By adding an enhancement pattern on the SICM images to CTA, the enhancement pattern was the only splitting predictor to differentiate MFFP from PDAC. The CTA model including enhancement pattern on SICM images has sensitivity of 78.0 %, specificity of 99.3 %, and accuracy of 94.6 % for differentiating MFFP from PDAC. The characterization of enhancement pattern for pancreatic lesions on contrast-enhanced MR images adding SICM would be helpful to differentiate MFFP from PDAC. (orig.)

  8. Using satellite telemetry to define spatial population structure in polar bears in the Norwegian and western Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritzen, Mette; Derocher, Andrew E.; Wiig, Øystein; Belikov, Stanislav; Boltunov, Andrei N.; Garner, Gerald W.

    2002-01-01

    1. Animal populations, defined by geographical areas within a species’ distribution where population dynamics are largely regulated by births and deaths rather than by migration from surrounding areas, may be the correct unit for wildlife management. However, in heterogeneous landscapes varying habitat quality may yield subpopulations with distinct patterns in resource use and demography significant to the dynamics of populations.2. To define the spatial population structure of polar bears Ursus maritimus in the Norwegian and western Russian Arctic, and to assess the existence of a shared population between the two countries, we analysed satellite telemetry data obtained from 105 female polar bears over 12 years.3. Using both cluster analyses and home-range estimation methods, we identified five population units inhabiting areas with different sea-ice characteristics and prey availability.4. The continuous distribution of polar bear positions indicated that the different subpopulations formed one continuous polar bear population in the Norwegian and western Russian Arctic. Hence, Norway and Russia have a shared management responsibility.5. The spatial population structure identified will provide a guide for evaluating geographical patterns in polar bear ecology, the dynamics of polar bear–seal relationships and the effects of habitat alteration due to climate change. The work illustrates the importance of defining population borders and subpopulation structure in understanding the dynamics and management of larger animals.

  9. Switching the response of metasurfaces in polarization standing waves

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, X.; MacDonald, K.F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that standing waves of polarization, as opposed to intensity, can be engaged to coherently control light-matter interactions in planar photonic nanostructures, presenting unique opportunities for all-optical data processing and polarization-dependent molecular spectroscopy. Such waves, formed by counter-propagating (linear or circular) orthogonally polarized beams can, for example, uniquely detect polarization conversion, planar chirality and related asymmetric t...

  10. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  11. Verum focus and polar questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Giurgea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We argue that some word order phenomena in Romanian and Sardinian are the result of a checkingoperation in the left periphery involving verum focus (i.e. focus on the polarity component of the sentence.In particular, this operation accounts for some word order patterns found in polar questions. In Romanian,polarity fronting is realized as head-movement of (V+T to a higher peripheral head which bears a Focusprobe.This licenses VS orders for predications in which VS is not allowed as a neutral order (i-levelpredicates, iteratives, generics. In Sardinian, an entire phrase headed by the lexical predicate (verbal nonfiniteform or non-verbal predicate is fronted before the auxiliary. We argue that this order is obtained bytwo movement operations, head-raising of Aux to Foc and movement of the predicate phrase to SpecFoc. Wealso present the semantics of polarity focus, distinguishing several types of focus (informational, emphatic,contrastive.

  12. Interlocked chiral/polar domain walls and large optical rotation in Ni3TeO6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyun Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chirality, i.e., handedness, pervades much of modern science from elementary particles, DNA-based biology to molecular chemistry; however, most of the chirality-relevant materials have been based on complex molecules. Here, we report inorganic single-crystalline Ni3TeO6, forming in a corundum-related R3 structure with both chirality and polarity. These chiral Ni3TeO6 single crystals exhibit a large optical specific rotation (α—1355° dm−1 cm3 g−1. We demonstrate, for the first time, that in Ni3TeO6, chiral and polar domains form an intriguing domain pattern, resembling a radiation warning sign, which stems from interlocked chiral and polar domain walls through lowering of the wall energy.

  13. Potentiometric titration with polarized electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikryzova, E.G.

    1977-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the works carried out during 1911-75 consideration is given to the present state of the method of potentiometric titration with polarized electrodes. The material is generalized in the tabular form indicating the elments of interest, titration conditions and the objects to be analyzed. The list and classification of the potentiometric titration methods intended for determining organic and inorganic substances are presented

  14. Graphics of polar figure; Graficado de figura polar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias B, L.R

    1991-11-15

    The objective of this work, is that starting from a data file coming from a spectra that has been softened, and of the one that have been generated its coordinates to project it in stereographic form, to create the corresponding polar figure making use of the Cyber computer of the ININ by means of the GRAPHOS package. This work only requires a Beta, Fi and Intensity (I) enter data file. It starts of the existence of a softened spectra of which have been generated already with these data, making use of some language that in this case was FORTRAN for the Cyber computer, a program is generated supported in the Graphos package that allows starting of a reading of the Beta, Fi, I file, to generate the points in a stereographic projection and that it culminates with the graph of the corresponding polar figure. The program will request the pertinent information that is wanted to capture in the polar figure just as: date, name of the enter file, indexes of the polar figure, number of levels, radio of the stereographic projection (cms.), crystalline system to which belongs the sample, name the neuter graph file by create and to add the own general data. (Author)

  15. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  16. Polar transport in plants mediated by membrane transporters: focus on mechanisms of polar auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naramoto, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    Directional cell-to-cell transport of functional molecules, called polar transport, enables plants to sense and respond to developmental and environmental signals. Transporters that localize to plasma membranes (PMs) in a polar manner are key components of these systems. PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers, which are the most studied polar-localized PM proteins, are implicated in the polar transport of auxin that in turn regulates plant development and tropic growth. In this review, the regulatory mechanisms underlying polar localization of PINs, control of auxin efflux activity, and PIN abundance at PMs are considered. Up to date information on polar-localized nutrient transporters that regulate directional nutrient movement from soil into the root vasculature is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ring-shaped spatial pattern of exciton luminescence formed due to the hot carrier transport in a locally photoexcited electron-hole bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevov, A. V.

    2012-06-01

    A consistent explanation of the formation of a ring-shaped pattern of exciton luminescence in GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum wells is suggested. The pattern consists of two concentric rings around the laser excitation spot. It is shown that the luminescence rings appear due to the in-layer transport of hot charge carriers at high photoexcitation intensity. Interestingly, one of two causes of this transport might involve self-organized criticality (SOC) that would be the first case of the SOC observation in semiconductor physics. We test this cause in a many-body numerical model by performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The results show good agreement with experiments. Moreover, the simulations have enabled us to identify the particular kinetic processes underlying the formation of each of these two luminescence rings.

  18. Foam patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  19. Pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Theodoridis, Sergios

    2003-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a scientific discipline that is becoming increasingly important in the age of automation and information handling and retrieval. Patter Recognition, 2e covers the entire spectrum of pattern recognition applications, from image analysis to speech recognition and communications. This book presents cutting-edge material on neural networks, - a set of linked microprocessors that can form associations and uses pattern recognition to ""learn"" -and enhances student motivation by approaching pattern recognition from the designer's point of view. A direct result of more than 10

  20. Polar heating in Saturn's thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. A. Smith

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D numerical global circulation model of the Kronian thermosphere has been used to investigate the influence of polar heating. The distributions of temperature and winds resulting from a general heat source in the polar regions are described. We show that both the total energy input and its vertical distribution are important to the resulting thermal structure. We find that the form of the topside heating profile is particularly important in determining exospheric temperatures. We compare our results to exospheric temperatures from Voyager occultation measurements (Smith et al., 1983; Festou and Atreya, 1982 and auroral H3+ temperatures from ground-based spectroscopic observations (e.g. Miller et al., 2000. We find that a polar heat source is consistent with both the Smith et al. determination of T∞~400 K at ~30° N and auroral temperatures. The required heat source is also consistent with recent estimates of the Joule heating rate at Saturn (Cowley et al., 2004. However, our results show that a polar heat source can probably not explain the Festou and Atreya determination of T∞~800 K at ~4° N and the auroral temperatures simultaneously. Keywords. Ionosphere (Planetary ionosphere – Magnetospherica physics (Planetary magnetospheres – Meterology and atmospheric dynamics (Thermospheric dynamics

  1. Polarized proton target with horizontal spin orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyatova, Eh.I.; Kiselev, Yu.F.; Kozlenko, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    Proton target, the polarization vector of which may be arbitrary oriented in horizontal plane relatively to the beam, is developed and tested. 70% value of polarization is obtained. 0.6 K temperature is acquired through 3 He pumping out continuous cycle. 1.2-propylene glycol - Cr(V) was used as working medium. Magnetic system is made in the form of Helmholtz sperconducting coils with working curren close to critical one. Target polarization is measured by NMR technique using original system of proton signal processing

  2. Polarization and Conflict: Theoretical and Empirical Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban, Joan; Schneider, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Recent formal and statistical research in political science and economics strongly indicates that various forms of political and social polarization increase the risk of violent conflict within and between nation states. The articles collected for this issue explore this crucial relationship and provide answers to a variety of topics: First, contributors address how institutions and other contingent factors mediate the conflict potential in polarized societies. Second, this special issue comp...

  3. Method of manufacturing a display device including forming electric connections on a substrate, conductor patterns on a second substrate and coupling the connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lifka, H.; Roozeboom, F.; Elfrink, R.J.G.; Johnson, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    ICs (20) are nearly separated from the semiconductor substrate (10) on/in which they are formed. Subsequently, the substrate is positioned upside down on a substrate (carrier) (3) which is provided with glue (21) at the location of a crystal. After attachment of the crystal to the carrier, the

  4. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  5. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  6. Polarization in Sagittarius A*

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the current state of polarization observations of Sagittarius A*, the compact radio source and supermassive black hole candidate in the Galactic Center. These observations are providing new tools for understanding accretion disks, jets and their environments. Linear polarization observations have shown that Sgr A* is unpolarized at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. However, recent single-dish observations indicate that Sgr A* may have strong linear polarization at frequencies higher...

  7. Circularly Polarized Antenna Array Fed by Air-Bridge Free CPW-Slotline Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilin Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel design of 1×2 and 2×2 circularly polarized (CP microstrip patch antenna arrays is presented in this paper. The two CP antenna arrays are fed by sequentially rotated coplanar waveguide (CPW to slotline networks and are processed on 1 mm thick single-layer FR4 substrates. Both of the two arrays are low-profile and lightweight. An air-bridge free CPW-slotline power splitter is appropriately designed to form the feeding networks and realize the two CP antenna arrays. The mechanism of circular polarization in this design is explained. The simulated and measured impedance bandwidths as well as the 3 dB axial ratio bandwidths and the radiation patterns of the two proposed antenna arrays are presented. This proposed design can be easily extended to form a larger plane array with good performance owing to its simple structure.

  8. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, James, Jr.; Dabney, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Instrument measures polarization characteristics of Earth at three wavelengths. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor (ALPS) measures optical polarization characteristics of land surface. Designed to be flown at altitudes of approximately 300 m to minimize any polarizing or depolarizing effects of intervening atmosphere and to look along nadir to minimize any effects depending on look angle. Data from measurements used in conjunction with data from ground surveys and aircraft-mounted video recorders to refine mathematical models used in interpretation of higher-altitude polarimetric measurements of reflected sunlight.

  9. Polarization at SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs

  10. The invasion history, distribution and colour pattern forms of the harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pall.) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) in Slovakia, Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigaj, Lubomír; Zach, Peter; Honěk, Alois; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Kulfan, Ján; Martinková, Zdenka; Selyemová, Diana; Viglášová, Sandra; Roy, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) has invaded and established in Slovakia. Following unintentional introduction in 2008, the spread of the alien coccinellid was very fast. By the end of 2009, it was recorded across the whole country, and by the end of 2012 it was widely distributed and common in various habitats, particularly gardens, orchards and urban areas, where it was most frequent on trees. The rate of eastward spread was approximately 200 km year(-1), similar to the overall rate of spread in Europe. Between 2008 and 2012, the coccinellid was recorded in a total of 153 localities, in altitudes ranging from 98 to 1,250 m. Most records of this species were made in lowlands, hilly areas and valleys separating mountain ridges. However, it was only rarely documented in areas above 700 m a.s.l. The non-melanic colour form (f. succinea) was dominant along a longitudinal transect including eight urban areas across Slovakia, with the frequency of melanic forms (f. spectabilis and f. conspicua together) between 6.3 and 19.2% and a median equal to 10.5%. The invasion history and distribution of H. axyridis in Slovakia are discussed with regard to the time sequence of records, rate of spread, altitudinal distribution, anthropogenic dispersal, effective recording, proportion of melanic forms and other relevant aspects associated with the spread of this successful invader.

  11. The invasion history, distribution and colour pattern forms of the harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pall. (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae in Slovakia, Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomír Panigaj

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae has invaded and established in Slovakia. Following unintentional introduction in 2008, the spread of the alien coccinellid was very fast. By the end of 2009, it was recorded across the whole country, and by the end of 2012 it was widely distributed and common in various habitats, particularly gardens, orchards and urban areas, where it was most frequent on trees. The rate of eastward spread was approximately 200 km year-1, similar to the overall rate of spread in Europe. Between 2008 and 2012, the coccinellid was recorded in a total of 153 localities, in altitudes ranging from 98 to 1,250 m. Most records of this species were made in lowlands, hilly areas and valleys separating mountain ridges. However, it was only rarely documented in areas above 700 m a.s.l. The non-melanic colour form (f. succinea was dominant along alongitudinal transect including eight urban areas across Slovakia, with the frequency of melanic forms (f. spectabilis and f. conspicua together between 6.3 and 19.2% and a median equal to 10.5%. The invasion history and distribution of H. axyridis in Slovakia are discussed with regard to the time sequence of records, rate of spread, altitudinal distribution, anthropogenic dispersal, effective recording, proportion of melanic forms and other relevant aspects associated with the spread of this successful invader.

  12. Broadband asymmetric transmission of linearly polarized electromagnetic waves based on chiral metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Lincy; Yogesh, N.; Subramanian, V.

    2018-01-01

    The giant optical activity of chiral metamaterials (CMMs) holds great potential for tailoring the polarization state of an electromagnetic (EM) wave. In controlling the polarization state, the aspect of asymmetric transmission (AT), where a medium allows the EM radiation to pass through in one direction while restricting it in the opposite direction, adds additional degrees of freedom such as one-way channelling functionality. In this work, a CMM formed by a pair of mutually twisted slanted complementary metal strips is realized for broadband AT accompanied with cross-polarization (CP) conversion for linearly polarized EM waves. Numerically, the proposed ultra-thin (˜λ/42) CMM shows broadband AT from 8.58 GHz to 9.73 GHz (bandwidth of 1.15 GHz) accompanied with CP transmission magnitude greater than 0.9. The transmission and reflection spectra reveal the origin of the asymmetric transmission as the direction sensitive cross polarization conversion and anisotropic electric coupling occurring in the structure which is then elaborated with the surface current analysis and electric field distribution within the structure. An experiment is carried out to verify the broadband AT based CP conversion of the proposed CMM at microwave frequencies, and a reliable agreement between numerical and experimental results is obtained. Being ultra-thin, the reported broadband AT based CP conversion of the proposed CMM is useful for controlling radiation patterns in non-reciprocal EM devices and communication networks.

  13. On the polarization of fermion in an intermediate state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloshin, A. E.; Lomov, V. P.

    2017-06-01

    We show that calculation of a final fermion polarization (for a pure initial state) is equivalent to the problem of looking for complete polarization axis of bispinor. This gives the method for calculation of polarization applicable both for final and intermediate state fermions. We suggest to use fermion propagator (bare or dressed) in form of spectral representation, which gives the orthogonal off-shell energy projectors. This representation leads to covariant separation of particle and antiparticle contributions and gives a natural definition for polarization of intermediate state fermion. The most evident application is related with consistent description of t-quark polarization.

  14. Observation of weak coupling effects in Ba0.6 K0.4 Fe2 As2 junctions patterned across a naturally formed grain boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sung-Hak; Lee, Soon-Gul; Lee, Nam Hoon; Kang, Won Nam

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated intergrain nanobridge junctions from a Ba 0.6 K 0.4 Fe 2 As 2 film and observed their weak coupling effects. We prepared the junction by patterning a nanobridge across a natural grain boundary by using a focused ion beam etching technique and studied their superconducting transition properties. The resistive transition showed three steps: the transitions of the bulk, the microbridge, and the junction grain boundary. Current–voltage curves showed typical Josephson junction characteristics, well-matched with the model of a resistively shunted junction incorporated with thermal fluctuations. Fitting data to theory revealed much larger current fluctuations than expected from the Johnson–Nyquist theorem. The junction showed a linear temperature dependence of the critical current and a constant normal-state resistance, indicating that the grain boundary played a role as a tunnel barrier with a very poor conductance. (paper)

  15. First report of nonpsychotic self-cannibalism (autophagy), tongue splitting, and scar patterns (scarification) as an extreme form of cultural body modification in a western civilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benecke, M

    1999-09-01

    As part of her current lifestyle, a 28-year-old Caucasian woman routinely injures and allows subsequent healing of her skin and other tissues. Her body modifications include a "split tongue" (a tongue split to the base), which does not interfere with speaking and eating. Other modifications include large scarification patterns produced by branding and cutting. This woman has been known to eat parts of her skin that were previously cut out of her body. She also performs "needle play" by allowing medical syringe needles to be lodged temporarily under her skin. The patient had a normal childhood, is currently employed full-time as an office manager, and is psychologically stable. Although one other case of self-induced penoscrotal hypospadias is known, this is the only report of extensive, nonpsychotic, autodestructive behavior. However, this may not be the case in the future as an increasing number of young individuals have become interested in body modifications.

  16. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director ...

  17. Do cephalopods communicate using polarized light reflections from their skin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Shashar, Nadav; Hanlon, Roger T

    2009-07-01

    Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopus) are probably best known for their ability to change color and pattern for camouflage and communication. This is made possible by their complex skin, which contains pigmented chromatophore organs and structural light reflectors (iridophores and leucophores). Iridophores create colorful and linearly polarized reflective patterns. Equally interesting, the photoreceptors of cephalopod eyes are arranged in a way to give these animals the ability to detect the linear polarization of incoming light. The capacity to detect polarized light may have a variety of functions, such as prey detection, navigation, orientation and contrast enhancement. Because the skin of cephalopods can produce polarized reflective patterns, it has been postulated that cephalopods could communicate intraspecifically through this visual system. The term 'hidden' or 'private' communication channel has been given to this concept because many cephalopod predators may not be able to see their polarized reflective patterns. We review the evidence for polarization vision as well as polarization signaling in some cephalopod species and provide examples that tend to support the notion--currently unproven--that some cephalopods communicate using polarized light signals.

  18. Correction of polarization error in scanned array weather radar antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pang, C.; Hoogeboom, P.; Russchenberg, H.; Wang, T.; Dong, J.; Wang, X.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the polarization error correction of dual-polarized planar scanned array weather radar in alternately transmitting and simultaneously receiving (ATSR) mode is analyzed. A method based on point correction and a method taking the complete array patterns into account are discussed. To

  19. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP 4 . A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  20. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  1. Common ways Americans are incorporating fruits and vegetables into their diet: intake patterns by meal, source and form, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Latetia V; Hamner, Heather C; Kim, Sonia A; Dalenius, Karen

    2016-10-01

    We explored how Americans aged ≥2 years who consumed the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables on a given day incorporated fruits and vegetables into their diet compared with those who did not consume recommended amounts. We used 1 d of dietary recall data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2010 to examine cross-sectional differences in mean intakes of fruits and vegetables in cup-equivalents by meal, source and form between the two groups. USA. NHANES 2007-2010 participants aged ≥2 years (n 17 571) with 1 d of reliable 24 h recall data. On a given day, the proportions of fruits and vegetables consumed at different meals were similar between those who consumed recommended amounts and those who did not. Among adults, 59-64 % of their intake of fruits was consumed at breakfast or as a snack and almost 90 % came from retail outlets regardless of whether they consumed the recommended amount or not. Adults who consumed the recommended amount of fruits ate more fruits in raw form and with no additions than those who did not. Among children and adults, 52-57 % of vegetables were consumed at dinner by both groups. Retail outlets were the main source of vegetables consumed (60-68 %). Our findings indicate that habits of when, where and how consumers eat fruits and vegetables might not need to change but increasing the amount consumed would help those not currently meeting the recommendation.

  2. Our Polar Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  3. Terahertz polarization imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Valk, N.C.J.; Van der Marel, W.A.M.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the polarization state of a terahertz pulse by using a modified electrooptic sampling setup. To illustrate the power of this method, we show two examples in which the knowledge of the polarization of the terahertz pulse is essential for interpreting the results:

  4. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  5. Precision Polarization of Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elise; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Couture, Aaron; Crawford, Christopher; Chupp, Tim; Danagoulian, Areg; Estes, Mary; Hona, Binita; Jones, Gordon; Klein, Andi; Penttila, Seppo; Sharma, Monisha; Wilburn, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Determining polarization of a cold neutron beam to high precision is required for the next generation neutron decay correlation experiments at the SNS, such as the proposed abBA and PANDA experiments. Precision polarimetry measurements were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goal of determining the beam polarization to the level of 10-3 or better. The cold neutrons from FP12 were polarized using optically polarized ^3He gas as a spin filter, which has a highly spin-dependent absorption cross section. A second ^ 3He spin filter was used to analyze the neutron polarization after passing through a resonant RF spin rotator. A discussion of the experiment and results will be given.

  6. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements. PMID:29503479

  7. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements.

  8. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-17

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  9. Electrochemical regulation of budding yeast polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Haupt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells are naturally surrounded by organized electrical signals in the form of local ion fluxes, membrane potential, and electric fields (EFs at their surface. Although the contribution of electrochemical elements to cell polarity and migration is beginning to be appreciated, underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we show that an exogenous EF can orient cell polarization in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, directing the growth of mating projections towards sites of hyperpolarized membrane potential, while directing bud emergence in the opposite direction, towards sites of depolarized potential. Using an optogenetic approach, we demonstrate that a local change in membrane potential triggered by light is sufficient to direct cell polarization. Screens for mutants with altered EF responses identify genes involved in transducing electrochemical signals to the polarity machinery. Membrane potential, which is regulated by the potassium transporter Trk1p, is required for polarity orientation during mating and EF response. Membrane potential may regulate membrane charges through negatively charged phosphatidylserines (PSs, which act to position the Cdc42p-based polarity machinery. These studies thus define an electrochemical pathway that directs the orientation of cell polarization.

  10. Physics with polarized electrons and targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    With the advent of electron stretcher or storage rings electron scattering from polarized targets becomes a general new tool for nuclear structure studies. Without such facilities it is necessary to have very dense polarized targets for use with the typical (less or approximately equal 50 μA) electron beams available and very few measurements of this type have been attempted. On the other hand, with electron rings the effective circulating current can be greatly increased. In this case much thinner internal targets may be used while still maintaining the same luminosity as in external beam experiments. In ancticipation of such new experimental capabilities we have re-developed the theoretical basis for discussions of electron scattering from polarized targets using either unpolarized or polarized electron beams. This work takes the formalism of unpolarized (e,e') and extends it in a straightforward way to include general polarizations of electrons, target nuclei, recoil nuclei or any combinations of these polarizations. In the present context it is only possible to provide a brief summary of the general form of the cross section and to present a few illustrative examples of the nuclear structure information that may be extracted from such polarization measurements

  11. Angular structure of light polarization and singularities in transmittance of nematic liquid crystal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Vovk, Roman G.; Buinyi, Igor O.; Soskin, Marat S.

    2007-06-01

    We study the angular structure of polarization of light transmitted through a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell by analyzing the polarization state as a function of the incidence angles. Our theoretical results are obtained by evaluating the Stokes parameters that characterize the polarization state of plane waves propagating through the NLC layer at varying direction of incidence. Using the Stokes polarimetry technique we carried out the measurements of the polarization resolved conoscopic patterns emerging after the homeotropically aligned NLC cell illuminated by the convergent light beam. The resulting polarization resolved angular patterns are described both theoretically and experimentally in terms of the polarization singularities such as C-points (points of circular polarization) and L-lines (lines of linear polarization). When the ellipticity of the incident light varies, the angular patterns are found to undergo transformations involving the processes of creation and annihilation of the C-points.

  12. Bed and width oscillations form coherent patterns in a partially confined, regulated gravel-cobble-bedded river adjusting to anthropogenic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rocko A.; Pasternack, Gregory B.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the spatial organization of river systems in light of natural and anthropogenic change is extremely important because it can provide information to assess, manage, and restore them to ameliorate worldwide freshwater fauna declines. For gravel- and cobble-bedded alluvial rivers studies spanning analytical, empirical and numerical domains suggest that at channel-forming flows there is a tendency towards covarying bankfull bed and width undulations amongst morphologic units such as pools and riffles, whereby relatively wide areas have relatively higher minimum bed elevations and relatively narrow areas have relatively lower minimum bed elevations. The goal of this study was to determine whether minimum bed elevation and flow-dependent channel top width are organized in a partially confined, incising gravel-cobbled bed river with multiple spatial scales of anthropogenic and natural landform heterogeneity across a range of discharges. A key result is that the test river exhibited covarying oscillations of minimum bed elevation and channel top width across all flows analyzed. These covarying oscillations were found to be quasiperiodic at channel-forming flows, scaling with the length scales of bars, pools and riffles. Thus, it appears that alluvial rivers organize their topography to have quasiperiodic, shallow and wide or narrow and deep cross section geometry, even despite ongoing, centennial-scale incision. Presumably these covarying oscillations are linked to hydrogeomorphic mechanisms associated with alluvial river channel maintenance. The biggest conclusion from this study is that alluvial rivers are defined more so by variability in topography and flow than mean conditions. Broader impacts of this study are that the methods provide a framework for characterizing longitudinal and flow-dependent variability in rivers for assessing geomorphic structure and aquatic habitat in space, and if repeated, through time.

  13. Polarization of submillimetre lines from interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heshou; Yan, Huirong

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic fields play important roles in many astrophysical processes. However, there is no universal diagnostic for the magnetic fields in the interstellar medium (ISM) and each magnetic tracer has its limitation. Any new detection method is thus valuable. Theoretical studies have shown that submillimetre fine-structure lines are polarized due to atomic alignment by ultraviolet photon-excitation, which opens up a new avenue to probe interstellar magnetic fields. We will, for the first time, perform synthetic observations on the simulated three-dimensional ISM to demonstrate the measurability of the polarization of submillimetre atomic lines. The maximum polarization for different absorption and emission lines expected from various sources, including star-forming regions are provided. Our results demonstrate that the polarization of submillimetre atomic lines is a powerful magnetic tracer and add great value to the observational studies of the submilimetre astronomy.

  14. Auxin transport in the evolution of branching forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C Jill

    2017-07-01

    Contents 545 I. 545 II. 546 III. 546 IV. 548 V. 548 VI. 549 VII. 549 Acknowledgements 549 References 549 SUMMARY: Branching is one of the most striking aspects of land plant architecture, affecting resource acquisition and yield. Polar auxin transport by PIN proteins is a primary determinant of flowering plant branching patterns regulating both branch initiation and branch outgrowth. Several lines of experimental evidence suggest that PIN-mediated polar auxin transport is a conserved regulator of branching in vascular plant sporophytes. However, the mechanisms of branching and auxin transport and relationships between the two are not well known outside the flowering plants, and the paradigm for PIN-regulated branching in flowering plants does not fit bryophyte gametophytes. The evidence reviewed here suggests that divergent auxin transport routes contributed to the diversification of branching forms in distinct land plant lineages. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Complex patterns of speciation in cosmopolitan "rock posy" lichens--discovering and delimiting cryptic fungal species in the lichen-forming Rhizoplaca melanophthalma species-complex (Lecanoraceae, Ascomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Steven D; Fankhauser, Johnathon D; Leavitt, Dean H; Porter, Lyndon D; Johnson, Leigh A; St Clair, Larry L

    2011-06-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that in some cases morphology-based species circumscription of lichenized fungi misrepresents the number of existing species. The cosmopolitan "rock posy" lichen (Rhizoplaca melanophthalma) species-complex includes a number of morphologically distinct species that are both geographically and ecologically widespread, providing a model system to evaluate speciation in lichen-forming ascomycetes. In this study, we assembled multiple lines of evidence from nuclear DNA sequence data, morphology, and biochemistry for species delimitation in the R. melanophthalma species-complex. We identify a total of ten candidate species in this study, four of which were previously recognized as distinct taxa and six previously unrecognized lineages found within what has been thus far considered a single species. Candidate species are supported using inferences from multiple empirical operational criteria. Multiple instances of sympatry support the view that these lineages merit recognition as distinct taxa. Generally, we found little corroboration between morphological and chemical characters, and previously unidentified lineages were morphologically polymorphic. However, secondary metabolite data supported one cryptic saxicolous lineage, characterized by orsellinic-derived gyrophoric and lecanoric acids, which we consider to be taxonomically significant. Our study of the R. melanophthalma species-complex indicates that the genus Rhizoplaca, as presently circumscribed, is more diverse in western North American than originally perceived, and we present our analyses as a working example of species delimitation in morphologically cryptic and recently diverged lichenized fungi. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Life cycle and hydrologic modeling of rainwater harvesting in urban neighborhoods: Implications of urban form and water demand patterns in the US and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit-Boix, Anna; Devkota, Jay; Phillips, Robert; Vargas-Parra, María Violeta; Josa, Alejandro; Gabarrell, Xavier; Rieradevall, Joan; Apul, Defne

    2018-04-15

    Water management plays a major role in any city, but applying alternative strategies might be more or less feasible depending on the urban form and water demand. This paper aims to compare the environmental performance of implementing rainwater harvesting (RWH) systems in American and European cities. To do so, two neighborhoods with a water-stressed Mediterranean climate were selected in contrasting cities, i.e., Calafell (Catalonia, Spain) and Ukiah (California, US). Calafell is a high-density, tourist city, whereas Ukiah is a typical sprawled area. We studied the life cycle impacts of RWH in urban contexts by using runoff modeling before (i.e. business as usual) and after the implementation of this system. In general, cisterns were able to supply >75% of the rainwater demand for laundry and toilet flushing. The exception were multi-story buildings with roofs smaller than 200m 2 , where the catchment area was insufficient to meet demand. The implementation of RWH was environmentally beneficial with respect to the business-as-usual scenario, especially because of reduced runoff treatment needs. Along with soil features, roof area and water demand were major parameters that affected this reduction. RWH systems are more attractive in Calafell, which had 60% lower impacts than in Ukiah. Therefore, high-density areas can potentially benefit more from RWH than sprawled cities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of adaptive and non-adaptive mechanisms forming complex patterns of genome size variation in six cytotypes of polyploid Allium oleraceum (Amaryllidaceae) on a continental scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchoslav, Martin; Šafářová, Lenka; Jandová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Although the large variation in genome size among different species is widely acknowledged, the occurrence and extent of variation below the species level are still controversial and have not yet been satisfactorily analysed. The aim of this study was to assess genome size variation in six ploidy levels (2n = 3x–8x) of the polyploid Allium oleraceum over a large geographical gradient and to search for potential interpretations of the size variation. Methods The genome sizes of 407 individuals of A. oleraceum collected from 114 populations across Europe were determined by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. The genome size variation was correlated with spatial, climatic and habitat variables. Key Results The mean holoploid genome size (2C DNA) was 42·49, 52·14, 63·34, 71·94, 85·51 and 92·12 pg at the tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, hepta- and octoploid levels, respectively. Genome size varied from a minimum of 2·3 % in the octoploids to a maximum of 18·3 % in the tetraploids. Spatial structuring of genome size was observed within the tetra- and pentaploids, where 2C DNA significantly increased with both latitude and longitude, and correlated with several climatic variables, suggesting a gradient of continentality. Genome size in hexaploids showed low variation, weak correlation with climatic variables and no spatial structuring. Downsizing in monoploid genome size was observed between all cytotypes except for heptaploids. Splitting populations into western and eastern European groups resulted in strong differences in monoploid genome size between groups in tetra- and pentaploids but not in hexaploids. The monoploid genome sizes of the cytotypes were similar in the western group but diverged in the eastern group. Conclusions Complex patterns of holoploid and monoploid genome size variation found both within and between A. oleraceum cytotypes are most likely the result of several interacting factors, including different

  18. [Fluorescence polarization immunoassay of ractopamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvereva, E A; Shpakova, N A; Zherdev, A V; Kiu, L; Xu, C; Eremin, S A; Dzantiev, B B

    2016-01-01

    A technique was developed for fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) of ractopamine, a toxic low molecular weight nonsteroidal growth regulator belonging to the most controlled contaminants of food products of animal origin. The assay is based on the competition between a sample containing ractopamine and ractopamine–fluorophore conjugate for binding to antibodies. The competition is monitored via changes in the degree of fluorescence polarization for plane-polarized excitation light, which differs for the free and antibody-bound forms of the conjugate. The optimal assay conditions were established, ensuring a high accuracy and minimal detection limit. The developed assay demonstrated a detection limit of 1 ng/mL and a range of detectable concentrations of 2.3–50 ng/mL, which met the requirements of sanitary control. The duration of the analysis was 10 min. The possible application of the developed FPIA was demonstrated with testing of turkey meat. The speed and simplicity of the proposed assay define its efficiency as a screening tool for safety of foods.

  19. Polarization at the SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z/sup 0/ mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  1. Polarized scintillator targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2000-05-01

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as "live" polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  2. Polarized scintillator targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B. van den E-mail: vandenbrandt@psi.ch; Bunyatova, E.I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S

    2000-05-21

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as 'live' polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  3. Heidelberg polarized alkali source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.; Steffens, E.; Jaensch, H.; Philipps Universitaet, Marburg, Germany)

    1984-01-01

    A new atomic beam type polarized alkali ion source has been installed at Heidelberg. In order to improve the beam polarization considerably optical pumping is applied in combination with an adiabatic medium field transition which results in beams in single hyperfine sublevels. The m state population is determined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Highly polarized beams (P/sub s/ > 0.9, s = z, zz) with intensities of 30 to 130 μA can be extracted for Li + and Na + , respectively

  4. Polarization measurement in the COMPASS polarized target

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, K; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Doshita, N; Gautheron, F; Görtz, S; Hasegawa, T; Horikawa, N; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kisselev, Yu V; Koivuniemi, J H; Le Goff, J M; Magnon, A; Meyer, W; Reicherz, G; Matsuda, T

    2004-01-01

    Continuous wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to determine the target polarization in the COMPASS experiment. The system is made of the so-called Liverpool Q-meters, Yale-cards, and VME modules for data taking and system controlling. In 2001 the NMR coils were embedded in the target material, while in 2002 and 2003 the coils were mounted on the outer surface of the target cells to increase the packing factor of the material. Though the error of the measurement became larger with the outer coils than with the inner coils, we have performed stable measurements throughout the COMPASS run time for 3 years. The maximum polarization was +57% and -53% as the average in the target cells.

  5. Bringing Society to a Changing Polar Ocean: Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, O.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental changes in the Arctic and Antarctic appear to be accelerating and scientists are trying to understand both the patterns and the impacts of change. These changes will have profound impact on humanity and create a need for public education about these critical habitats. We have focused on a two-pronged strategy to increase public awareness as well as enable educators to discuss comfortably the implications of climate change. Our first focus is on entraining public support through the development of science documentaries about the science and people who conduct it. Antarctic Edge is a feature length award-winning documentary about climate change that has been released in May 2015 and has garnered interest in movie theatres and on social media stores (NetFlix, ITunes). This broad outreach is coupled with our group's interest assisting educators formally. The majority of current polar education is focused on direct educator engagement through personal research experiences that have impact on the participating educators' classrooms. Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) proposes to improve educator and student engagement in polar sciences through exposure to scientists and polar data. Through professional development and the creation of data tools, Polar ICE will reduce the logistical costs of bringing polar science to students in grades 6-16. We will provide opportunities to: 1) build capacity of polar scientists in communicating and engaging with diverse audiences; 2) create scalable, in-person and virtual opportunities for educators and students to engage with polar scientists and their research through data visualizations, data activities, educator workshops, webinars, and student research symposia; and 3) evaluate the outcomes of Polar ICE and contribute to our understanding of science education practices. We will use a blended learning approach to promote partnerships and cross-disciplinary sharing. This combined multi-pronged approach

  6. Polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The author discusses a number of interrelated hadronic spin effects which test fundamental features of perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. For example, the anomalous magnetic moment of the proton and the axial coupling g{sub A} on the nucleon are shown to be related to each other for fixed proton radius, independent of the form of the underlying three-quark relativistic quark wavefunction. The renormalization scale and scheme ambiguities for the radiative corrections to the Bjorken sum rule for the polarized structure functions can be eliminated by using commensurate scale relations with other observables. Other examples include (a) new constraints on the shape and normalization of the polarized quark and gluon structure functions of the proton at large and small x{sub bj}; (b) consequences of the principle of hadron retention in high x{sub F} inclusive reactions; (c) applications of hadron helicity conservation to high momentum transfer exclusive reactions; and (d) the dependence of nuclear structure functions and shadowing on virtual photon polarization. The author also discusses the implications of a number of measurements which are in striking conflict with leading-twist perturbative QCD predictions, such as the extraordinarily large spin correlation A{sub NN} observed in large angle proton-proton scattering, the anomalously large {rho}{pi} branching ratio of the J/{psi}, and the rapidly changing polarization dependence of both J/{psi} and continuum lepton pair hadroproduction observed at large x{sub F}. The azimuthal angular dependence of the Drell-Yan process is shown to be highly sensitive to the projectile distribution amplitude, the fundamental valence light-cone wavefunction of the hadron.

  7. Vertically Polarized Omnidirectional Printed Slot Loop Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren H.; Thaysen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    A novel vertically polarized omnidirectional printed slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform and in-phase fields in the slot in order to obtain an omnidirectional radiation...... pattern. The antenna is designed for the 2.45 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band. Applications of the antenna are many. One is for on-body applications since it is ideal for launching a creeping waves due to the polarization....

  8. Explaining polarization reversals in STEREO wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, Breneman et al. (2011) reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (L plane transverse to the magnetic field showed that the transmitter waves underwent periodic polarization reversals. Specifically, their polarization would cycle through a pattern of right-hand to linear to left-hand polarization at a rate of roughly 200 Hz. The lightning whistlers were observed to be left-hand polarized at frequencies greater than the lower hybrid frequency and less than the transmitter frequency (21.4 kHz) and right-hand polarized otherwise. Only right-hand polarized waves in the inner radiation belt should exist in the frequency range of the whistler mode and these reversals were not explained in the previous paper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by ±200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo (1984) whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by ˜200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al. (2008).

  9. Polarization vision in cuttlefish in a concealed communication channel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashar; Rutledge; Cronin

    1996-01-01

    Polarization sensitivity is well documented in marine animals, but its function is not yet well understood. Of the cephalopods, squid and octopus are known to be sensitive to the orientation of polarization of incoming light. This sensitivity arises from the orthogonal orientation of neighboring photoreceptors. Electron microscopical examination of the retina of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis L. revealed the same orthogonal structure, suggesting that cuttlefish are also sensitive to linearly polarized light. Viewing cuttlefish through an imaging polarized light analyzer revealed a prominent polarization pattern on the arms, around the eyes and on the forehead of the animals. The polarization pattern disappeared when individuals lay camouflaged on the bottom and also during extreme aggression display, attacks on prey, copulation and egg-laying behavior in females. In behavioral experiments, the responses of cuttlefish to their images reflected from a mirror changed when the polarization patterns of the reflected images were distorted. These results suggest that cuttlefish use polarization vision and display for intraspecific recognition and communication.

  10. For an interactive reading of the territory and the city spaces, relationships, urban morphology, cultural patterns and forms of economic and political power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Serena Sanseviero

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In  this paper we emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to support the urban and territorial research;  it can contribute to the knowledge of the area and city with the aim of direct transformations and future development. Therefore, we need to acquire sophisticated tools and talk simpler language and insightful in order to respond to the social demand for local knowledge. We have to study a new paradigm to understand social phenomena; the old perspectives of urban sociology, but also planning and analysis of territorial systems, is today replaced by an integrated view in which we do not evaluate and not only analyze the more specific objects of the individual disciplines but a number of variables and components in synergy.   Per una lettura interattiva del territorio e della città: spazi, relazioni, morfologia urbana, modelli culturali e forme di potere economico e politico In questo lavoro si sottolinea la necessità di un approccio multidisciplinare integrato in grado di supportare la ricerca in campo urbano e territoriale e che possa concorrere alla conoscenza del territorio e della città per orientarne trasformazioni e sviluppo  futuro. Si palesa attraverso le molteplici riflessioni la necessità di dover acquisire strumenti sofisticati e parlare, sia pure ciascuno per le proprie competenze, linguaggi più semplici e penetranti al fine di poter rispondere alla domanda sociale di conoscenza del territorio. La verifica quindi di un nuovo paradigma conoscitivo ed interpretativo dei fenomeni sociali si pone con forza, dacché alle vecchie prospettive della sociologia urbana, ma anche dell'urbanistica e dell'analisi dei sistemi territoriali, si va oggi sostituendo una visione integrata, nella quale non si valutano e non si analizzano più soltanto gli oggetti più specifici delle singole discipline ma una serie di variabili e componenti in sinergia. Parole Chiave: Città; territorio; rappresentazione e modelli; relazioni

  11. Unpolarized nucleon structure studies utilizing polarized electromagnetic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrington, J.

    2009-01-01

    By the mid-1980s, measurements of the nucleon form factors had reached a stage where only slow, incremental progress was possible using unpolarized electron scattering. The development of high quality polarized beams, polarized targets, and recoil polarimeters led to a renaissance in the experimental program. I provide an overview of the changes in the field in the last ten years, which were driven by the dramatically improved data made possible by a new family of tools to measure polarization observables

  12. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  13. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function......%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has been implemented in a 1D...

  14. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  15. Phenomenology of the deuteron electromagnetic form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Abbott; Abdellah Ahmidouch; H. Anklin; J. Arvieux; James P. Ball; Shelton Beedoe; Elizabeth Beise; Louis Bimbot; Werner Boeglin; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Nicholas Chant; Samuel Danagoulian; K. Dow; Jean-Eric Ducret; Jim Dunne; Lars Ewell; L. Eyraud; C. Furget; Michel Garcon; Ron Gilman; Charles Glashausser; Paul Gueye; Kenneth Gustafsson; Kawtar Hafidi; A. Honegger; J. Jourdan; Serge Kox; Gerfried Kumbartzki; L. Lu; Allison Lung; Pete Markowitz; Justin McIntyre; David Meekins; F. Merchez; Joseph Mitchell; R. Mohring; S. Mtingwa; H. Mrktchyan; D. Pitz; Liming Qin; Ronald Ransome; J.-S. R'eal; Philip Roos; Paul Rutt; Reyad Sawafta; Stepan Stepanyan; Raphael Tieulent; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson; William Turchinetz; K. Vansyoc; J. Volmer; E. Voutier; Claude Williamson; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Jianguo Zhao; W. Zhao

    2000-01-01

    A rigorous extraction of the deuteron charge form factors from tensor polarization data in elastic electron-deuteron scattering, at given values of the 4-momentum transfer, is presented. Then the world data for elastic electron-deuteron scattering is used to parameterize, in three different ways, the three electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron in the 4-momentum transfer range 0-7 fm. This procedure is made possible with the advent of recent polarization measurements. The parameterizations allow a phenomenological characterization of the deuteron electromagnetic structure. They can be used to remove ambiguities in the form factors extraction from future polarization data

  16. Non-coherent continuum scattering as a line polarization mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.; Trujillo Bueno, J., E-mail: tanausu@iac.es, E-mail: rsainz@iac.es, E-mail: jtb@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-03-20

    Line scattering polarization can be strongly affected by Rayleigh scattering at neutral hydrogen and Thomson scattering at free electrons. Often a depolarization of the continuum results, but the Doppler redistribution produced by the continuum scatterers, which are light (hence, fast), induces more complex interactions between the polarization in spectral lines and in the continuum. Here we formulate and solve the radiative transfer problem of scattering line polarization with non-coherent continuum scattering consistently. The problem is formulated within the spherical tensor representation of atomic and light polarization. The numerical method of solution is a generalization of the Accelerated Lambda Iteration that is applied to both the atomic system and the radiation field. We show that the redistribution of the spectral line radiation due to the non-coherence of the continuum scattering may modify the shape of the emergent fractional linear polarization patterns significantly, even yielding polarization signals above the continuum level in intrinsically unpolarizable lines.

  17. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Horimoto, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Sukegawa, Kouta; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasma can be anisotropic in laser-produced plasmas. We have developed a new technique to evaluate the polarization degree of the emission lines in the extreme vacuum ultra violet wavelength region. The polarization of the emission lines and the continuums from the lithium-like nitrogen and from helium- and hydrogen-like carbon in recombining plasma is evaluated. Particle simulation in the velocity space gives the time scale for relaxation of anisotropic EVDFs. (author)

  18. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  19. Hsp Polarization Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, Robert

    1991-07-01

    This proposal defines the procedure for determining the instrumental polarization of the polarimetric IDT (IDT#1, POL) on the HSP. 1 of 2 unpolarized standard stars wil be observed using various filter-polarizer combinations. These observations will permit the instrumental polarization to be calibrated. The instrumental polarization must be determined to a high precision in order to vectoriallly remove it from HSP polarization observations to determine the actual astronomical polarization. Final run of proposal will look at one of 2 possible stars previously observed to get another look at the throughput. Revision History: Mark H. Slovak 8/30/88 Translated to V2 proposal instructions (RPSS V6.2) S. Laurent 1/20/89 Updated: Sally Laurent 2/24/89, 3/20/89, 4/13/89, 5/12/89 Modified: P. Stanley 1/15/90 - change to use CTA selected targets only; Fixes for aberration problem - SALM 7/30/90; Based on SV/HSP 1386. New submission changed targets and revised scheduling strategy. Revised: 26 Aug 92 J. Dolan, L. Walter, P. Reppert want to re-run the proposal (3985) one last time to bring down errors.

  20. Measuring polarization dependent dispersion of non-polarizing beam splitter cubes with spectrally resolved white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csonti, K.; Hanyecz, V.; Mészáros, G.; Kovács, A. P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work we have measured the group-delay dispersion of an empty Michelson interferometer for s- and p-polarized light beams applying two different non-polarizing beam splitter cubes. The interference pattern appearing at the output of the interferometer was resolved with two different spectrometers. It was found that the group-delay dispersion of the empty interferometer depended on the polarization directions in case of both beam splitter cubes. The results were checked by inserting a glass plate in the sample arm of the interferometer and similar difference was obtained for the two polarization directions. These results show that to reach high precision, linearly polarized white light beam should be used and the residual dispersion of the empty interferometer should be measured at both polarization directions.

  1. Molecular hydrogen polarization images of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Michael G.; Minchin, N. R.; Hough, J. H.; Aspin, C.; Axon, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    An image of the polarization of the shocked H2 v = 1-0 S(1) line emission in the core of OMC-1 has been obtained. Along the molecular outflow of the source, the line is dichroically polarized by a medium of aligned grains located between the earth and the shock fronts. The polarization pattern traces the magnetic field direction, which is parallel to the outflow axis and to the large-scale field direction determined from far-IR continuum measurements. Close to the IR source IRc2, the likely source of the outflow, the aligned vectors twist, indicating that the magnetic field direction changes. Modeling the line ratios of scattered H2 lines in the reflection nebula, it is concluded that the size distribution of grains there is typical of the small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. By contrast, the scattered continuum radiation from the core region suggests that the grains there are larger than this.

  2. Vertically Polarized Omnidirectional Printed Slot Loop Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren H.; Thaysen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    A novel vertically polarized omnidirectional printed slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform and in-phase fields in the slot in order to obtain an omnidirectional radiation...... pattern. The antenna is designed for the 2.45 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band. Applications of the antenna are many. One is for on-body applications since it is ideal for launching a creeping waves due to the polarization.......A novel vertically polarized omnidirectional printed slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform and in-phase fields in the slot in order to obtain an omnidirectional radiation...

  3. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  4. Hybrid Streamers for Polar Seismic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, C. M.; Agah, A.; Tsoflias, G. P.

    2006-12-01

    We propose a new hybrid streamer seismic approach for polar regions that incorporates insertion of spiked geophones, the land streamer method of transportation, and mobile robotics. Current land streamers do not plant the geophone spike at each node location on the streamer(s) nor use robotic control. This approach combines the two methods, and is therefore termed "Hybrid Streamers". Land seismic 3D surveying is costly and time consuming due to manual handling of geophones and cables. Multiple streamers make this process simpler by allowing efficient deployment of large numbers of geophones. Hybrid streamers go further to robotically insert the geophone spike at each node location to achieve higher frequency and better resolution seismic images. For deployment and retrieval, the geophone spikes are drilled into the ground, or inserted using heat. This can be accomplished by modifying the geophone spike to be similar to a threaded screw or similar to a soldering iron for polar environments. Heat could help melt the ice during deployment, which would refreeze around the geophone for firm coupling. Heat could also be used to make polar geophone retrieval easier. By ensuring that the towing robots are robust and effective, the problem of single point of failure can be less of an issue. Polar rovers have proven useful in harsh environments, and could be utilized in polar seismic applications. Towing geophone nodes in a tethered fashion not only provides all nodes with power to operate the onboard equipment, but also gives them a medium to transfer data to the towing rover. Hybrid streamers could be used in several ways. One or more hybrid streamers could be tethered and towed by a single robot. Several robots could be used to form a single grid, working in conjunction to image larger areas in three dimensions. Such an approach could speed up entire missions and make efficient use of seismic source ignitions. The reduction of human involvement by use of mobile robots

  5. The evolution of tensor polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Lee, S.Y.; Ratner, L.

    1993-01-01

    By using the equation of motion for the vector polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization is derived. The evolution equation for the tensor polarization is studied in the presence of an isolate spin resonance and in the presence of a spin rotor, or snake

  6. Polarized Electrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1997-12-31

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously.initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented.

  7. Polarized electrons at Jefferson laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously. Initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented

  8. Polar Wavelet Transform and the Associated Uncertainty Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Firdous A.; Tantary, Azhar Y.

    2018-02-01

    The polar wavelet transform- a generalized form of the classical wavelet transform has been extensively used in science and engineering for finding directional representations of signals in higher dimensions. The aim of this paper is to establish new uncertainty principles associated with the polar wavelet transforms in L2(R2). Firstly, we study some basic properties of the polar wavelet transform and then derive the associated generalized version of Heisenberg-Pauli-Weyl inequality. Finally, following the idea of Beckner (Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 123, 1897-1905 1995), we drive the logarithmic version of uncertainty principle for the polar wavelet transforms in L2(R2).

  9. Expanding signaling-molecule wavefront model of cell polarization in the Drosophila wing primordium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortman, Juliana C; Nahmad, Marcos; Zhang, Peng Cheng; Lander, Arthur D; Yu, Clare C

    2017-07-01

    In developing tissues, cell polarization and proliferation are regulated by morphogens and signaling pathways. Cells throughout the Drosophila wing primordium typically show subcellular localization of the unconventional myosin Dachs on the distal side of cells (nearest the center of the disc). Dachs localization depends on the spatial distribution of bonds between the protocadherins Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds), which form heterodimers between adjacent cells; and the Golgi kinase Four-jointed (Fj), which affects the binding affinities of Ft and Ds. The Fj concentration forms a linear gradient while the Ds concentration is roughly uniform throughout most of the wing pouch with a steep transition region that propagates from the center to the edge of the pouch during the third larval instar. Although the Fj gradient is an important cue for polarization, it is unclear how the polarization is affected by cell division and the expanding Ds transition region, both of which can alter the distribution of Ft-Ds heterodimers around the cell periphery. We have developed a computational model to address these questions. In our model, the binding affinity of Ft and Ds depends on phosphorylation by Fj. We assume that the asymmetry of the Ft-Ds bond distribution around the cell periphery defines the polarization, with greater asymmetry promoting cell proliferation. Our model predicts that this asymmetry is greatest in the radially-expanding transition region that leaves polarized cells in its wake. These cells naturally retain their bond distribution asymmetry after division by rapidly replenishing Ft-Ds bonds at new cell-cell interfaces. Thus we predict that the distal localization of Dachs in cells throughout the pouch requires the movement of the Ds transition region and the simple presence, rather than any specific spatial pattern, of Fj.

  10. Polarization-resolved optical response of plasmonic particle-on-film nanocavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Li, G.-C.; Lo, T. W.; Lei, D. Y.

    2018-02-01

    Placing a metal nanoparticle atop a metal film forms a plasmonic particle-on-film nanocavity. Such a nanocavity supports strong plasmonic coupling that results in rich hybridized plasmon modes, rendering the cavity a versatile platform for exploiting a wide range of plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy applications. In this paper, we fully address the polarization-resolved, orientation-dependent far-field optical responses of plasmonic monomer- and dimer-on-film nanocavities by numerical simulations and experiments. With polarization-resolved dark-field spectroscopy, the distinct plasmon resonances of these nanocavities are clearly determined from their scattering spectra. Moreover, the radiation patterns of respective plasmon modes, which are often mixed together in common dark-field imaging, can be unambiguously resolved with our proposed quasi-multispectral imaging method. Explicitly, the radiation pattern of the monomer-on-film nanocavity gradually transitions from a solid spot in the green imaging channel to a doughnut ring in the red channel when tuning the excitation polarization from parallel to perpendicular to the sample surface. This observation holds true for the plasmonic dimer-on-film nanocavity with the dimer axis aligned in the incidence plane; when the dimer axis is normal to the incidence plane, the pattern transitions from a solid spot to a doughnut ring both in the red channel. These studies not only demonstrate a flexible polarization control over the optical responses of plasmonic particle-on-film nanostructures but also enrich the optical tool kit for far-field imaging and spectroscopy characterization of various plasmonic nanostructures.

  11. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  12. The Bochum Polarized Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reicherz, G.; Goertz, S.; Harmsen, J.; Heckmann, J.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Bochum 'Polarized Target' group develops the target material 6 LiD for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. Several different materials like alcohols, alcanes and ammonia are under investigation. Solid State Targets are polarized in magnetic fields higher than B=2.5T and at temperatures below T=1K. For the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization process, paramagnetic centers are induced chemically or by irradiation with ionizing beams. The radical density is a critical factor for optimization of polarization and relaxation times at adequate magnetic fields and temperatures. In a high sensitive EPR--apparatus, an evaporator and a dilution cryostat with a continuous wave NMR--system, the materials are investigated and optimized. To improve the polarization measurement, the Liverpool NMR-box is modified by exchanging the fixed capacitor for a varicap diode which not only makes the tuning very easy but also provides a continuously tuned circuit. The dependence of the signal area upon the circuit current is measured and it is shown that it follows a linear function

  13. In-line Fiber Polarizer

    OpenAIRE

    Perumalsamy, Priya

    1998-01-01

    Polarizers and polarization devices are important components in fiber optic communication and sensor systems. There is a growing need for efficient low loss components that are compatible with optical fibers. An all fiber in-line polarizer is a more desirable alternative that could be placed at appropriate intervals along communication links. An in-line fiber polarizer was fabricated and tested. The in-line fiber polarizer operates by coupling optical energy propagatin...

  14. Modular forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edixhoven, B.; van der Geer, G.; Moonen, B.; Edixhoven, B.; van der Geer, G.; Moonen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Modular forms are functions with an enormous amount of symmetry that play a central role in number theory, connecting it with analysis and geometry. They have played a prominent role in mathematics since the 19th century and their study continues to flourish today. Modular forms formed the

  15. A programmable metasurface with dynamic polarization, scattering and focusing control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huanhuan; Cao, Xiangyu; Yang, Fan; Gao, Jun; Xu, Shenheng; Li, Maokun; Chen, Xibi; Zhao, Yi; Zheng, Yuejun; Li, Sijia

    2016-10-01

    Diverse electromagnetic (EM) responses of a programmable metasurface with a relatively large scale have been investigated, where multiple functionalities are obtained on the same surface. The unit cell in the metasurface is integrated with one PIN diode, and thus a binary coded phase is realized for a single polarization. Exploiting this anisotropic characteristic, reconfigurable polarization conversion is presented first. Then the dynamic scattering performance for two kinds of sources, i.e. a plane wave and a point source, is carefully elaborated. To tailor the scattering properties, genetic algorithm, normally based on binary coding, is coupled with the scattering pattern analysis to optimize the coding matrix. Besides, inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) technique is also introduced to expedite the optimization process of a large metasurface. Since the coding control of each unit cell allows a local and direct modulation of EM wave, various EM phenomena including anomalous reflection, diffusion, beam steering and beam forming are successfully demonstrated by both simulations and experiments. It is worthwhile to point out that a real-time switch among these functionalities is also achieved by using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). All the results suggest that the proposed programmable metasurface has great potentials for future applications.

  16. RKKY interaction for the spin-polarized electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Mohammad M.; Satpathy, Sashi

    2015-11-01

    We extend the original work of Ruderman, Kittel, Kasuya and Yosida (RKKY) on the interaction between two magnetic moments embedded in an electron gas to the case where the electron gas is spin-polarized. The broken symmetry of a host material introduces the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya (DM) vector and tensor interaction terms, in addition to the standard RKKY term, so that the net interaction energy has the form ℋ = JS1 ṡS2 + D ṡS1 ×S2 + S1 ṡΓ ↔ṡS2. We find that for the spin-polarized electron gas, a nonzero tensor interaction Γ ↔ is present in addition to the scalar RKKY interaction J, while D is zero due to the presence of inversion symmetry. Explicit expressions for these are derived for the electron gas both in 2D and 3D and we show that the net magnetic interaction can be expressed as a sum of Heisenberg and Ising like terms. The RKKY interaction exhibits a beating pattern, caused by the presence of the two Fermi momenta kF↑ and kF↓, while the R-3 distance dependence of the original RKKY result for the 3D electron gas is retained. This model serves as a simple example of the magnetic interaction in systems with broken symmetry, which goes beyond the RKKY interaction.

  17. Collective motion of active Brownian particles with polar alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gómez, Aitor; Levis, Demian; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2018-04-04

    We present a comprehensive computational study of the collective behavior emerging from the competition between self-propulsion, excluded volume interactions and velocity-alignment in a two-dimensional model of active particles. We consider an extension of the active brownian particles model where the self-propulsion direction of the particles aligns with the one of their neighbors. We analyze the onset of collective motion (flocking) in a low-density regime (10% surface area) and show that it is mainly controlled by the strength of velocity-alignment interactions: the competition between self-propulsion and crowding effects plays a minor role in the emergence of flocking. However, above the flocking threshold, the system presents a richer pattern formation scenario than analogous models without alignment interactions (active brownian particles) or excluded volume effects (Vicsek-like models). Depending on the parameter regime, the structure of the system is characterized by either a broad distribution of finite-sized polar clusters or the presence of an amorphous, highly fluctuating, large-scale traveling structure which can take a lane-like or band-like form (and usually a hybrid structure which is halfway in between both). We establish a phase diagram that summarizes collective behavior of polar active brownian particles and propose a generic mechanism to describe the complexity of the large-scale structures observed in systems of repulsive self-propelled particles.

  18. Nonlinear waves in viscoelastic magnetized complex astroplasmas with polarized dust-charge variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papari Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonextensive nonthermal magnetized viscoelastic astrofluid, compositionally containing nonthermal electrons and ions together with massive polarized dust micro-spherical grains of variable electric charge, is allowed to endure weakly nonlinear perturbation around its equilibrium. The nonextensivity originating from the large-scale non-local effects is included via the Tsallis thermo-statistical distribution laws describing the lighter species. Assuming the equilibrium as a homogeneous hydrostatic one, the dust polarization effects are incorporated via the conventional homogeneous polarization force law. The perturbed fluid model evolves as a unique conjugate pair of coupled extended Korteweg-de Vries (e-KdV equations. A constructed numerical tapestry shows the collective excitations of a new pair of distinct classes of nonlinear mode structures in new parametric space. The first family indicates periodic electrostatic compressive eigenmodes in the form of soliton-chains. Likewise, the second one reveals gravitational rarefactive solitary patterns. Their microphysical multi-parametric dependencies of the eigen-patterns are illustratively analyzed and bolstered. The paper ends up with some promising implications and applications in the astro-cosmo-plasmic context of wave-induced accretive triggering processes responsible for gravitationally bounded (gravito-condensed astro-structure formation, such as stellesimals, planetsimals, etc.

  19. Nonlinear waves in viscoelastic magnetized complex astroplasmas with polarized dust-charge variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Papari; Karmakar, Pralay Kumar

    2018-01-01

    A nonextensive nonthermal magnetized viscoelastic astrofluid, compositionally containing nonthermal electrons and ions together with massive polarized dust micro-spherical grains of variable electric charge, is allowed to endure weakly nonlinear perturbation around its equilibrium. The nonextensivity originating from the large-scale non-local effects is included via the Tsallis thermo-statistical distribution laws describing the lighter species. Assuming the equilibrium as a homogeneous hydrostatic one, the dust polarization effects are incorporated via the conventional homogeneous polarization force law. The perturbed fluid model evolves as a unique conjugate pair of coupled extended Korteweg-de Vries (e-KdV) equations. A constructed numerical tapestry shows the collective excitations of a new pair of distinct classes of nonlinear mode structures in new parametric space. The first family indicates periodic electrostatic compressive eigenmodes in the form of soliton-chains. Likewise, the second one reveals gravitational rarefactive solitary patterns. Their microphysical multi-parametric dependencies of the eigen-patterns are illustratively analyzed and bolstered. The paper ends up with some promising implications and applications in the astro-cosmo-plasmic context of wave-induced accretive triggering processes responsible for gravitationally bounded (gravito-condensed) astro-structure formation, such as stellesimals, planetsimals, etc.

  20. Political Competition and Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    This paper considers political competition and the consequences of political polarization when parties are better informed about how the economy functions than voters are. Specifically, parties know the cost producing a public good, voters do not. An incumbent's choice of policy acts like a signa...... for costs before an upcoming election. It is shown that the more polarized the political parties the more distorted the incumbent's policy choice.......This paper considers political competition and the consequences of political polarization when parties are better informed about how the economy functions than voters are. Specifically, parties know the cost producing a public good, voters do not. An incumbent's choice of policy acts like a signal...

  1. Physics of polarized targets

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    For developing, building and operating solid polarized targets we need to understand several fields of physics that have seen sub stantial advances during the last 50 years. W e shall briefly review a selection of those that are important today. These are: 1) quantum statistical methods to describe saturation and relaxation in magnetic resonance; 2) equal spin temperature model for dy namic nuclear polarization; 3 ) weak saturation during NMR polarization measurement; 4 ) refrigeration using the quantum fluid properties of helium isotopes. These, combined with superconducting magnet technologies, permit today to reach nearly complete pola rization of almost any nuclear spins. Targets can be operated in frozen spin mode in rather low and inhomogeneous field of any orientation, and in DNP mode in beams of high intensity. Beyond such experiments of nuclear and particle physics, applications a re also emerging in macromolecular chemistry and in magnetic resonance imaging. This talk is a tribute to Michel Borghini...

  2. No More Polarization, Please!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mia Reinholt

    The organizational science literature on motivation has for long been polarized into two main positions; the organizational economic position focusing on extrinsic motivation and the organizational behavior position emphasizing intrinsic motivation. With the rise of the knowledge economy...... and the increasing levels of complexities it entails, such polarization is not fruitful in the attempt to explain motivation of organizational members. This paper claims that a more nuanced perspective on motivation, acknowledging the co-existence of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, the possible interaction...... between the two as well as different types of motivations filling in the gap between the two polar types, is urgently needed in the organizational science literature. By drawing on the research on intrinsic and extrinsic motivation conducted in social psychology and combining this with contributions from...

  3. Polarized source upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, T.B.; Rummel, R.L.; Carter, E.P.; Westerfeldt, C.R.; Lovette, A.W.; Edwards, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    The decision was made this past year to move the Lamb-shift polarized ion source which was first installed in the laboratory in 1970. The motivation was the need to improve the flexibility of spin-axis orientation by installing the ion source with a new Wien-filter spin precessor which is capable of rotating physically about the beam axis. The move of the polarized source was accomplished in approximately two months, with the accelerator being turned off for experiments during approximately four weeks of this time. The occasion of the move provided the opportunity to rewire completely the entire polarized ion source frame and to rebuild approximately half of the electronic chassis on the source. The result is an ion source which is now logically wired and carefully documented. Beams obtained from the source are much more stable than those previously available

  4. A lunar polar expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Tomas

    1992-09-01

    Advanced exploration and development in harsh environments require mastery of basic human survival skill. Expeditions into the lethal climates of Earth's polar regions offer useful lessons for tommorrow's lunar pioneers. In Arctic and Antarctic exploration, 'wintering over' was a crucial milestone. The ability to establish a supply base and survive months of polar cold and darkness made extensive travel and exploration possible. Because of the possibility of near-constant solar illumination, the lunar polar regions, unlike Earth's may offer the most hospitable site for habitation. The World Space Foundation is examining a scenario for establishing a five-person expeditionary team on the lunar north pole for one year. This paper is a status report on a point design addressing site selection, transportation, power, and life support requirements.

  5. Infrastructure Mega projects and Spatial Polarization in Rio de Janeiro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Victor; Ribeiro, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    patterns of segregation and polarization on these levels. Beyond the fact that such patterns follow urban development tendencies under the impact of globalization which also have been documented elsewhere, we are interested here in looking at how the Guanabara Bay Clean-up Programme has contributed...

  6. Study on the thermal structure of the Venusian polar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, M.; Taguchi, M.; Fukuhara, T.; Kouyama, T.; Imamura, T.; Sato, T. M.; Futaguchi, M.; Yamada, T.; Nakamura, M.; Iwagami, N.; Suzuki, M.; Ueno, M.; Sato, M.; Hashimoto, G. L.; Takagi, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Venus atmosphere exhibits characteristic thermal features called `polar dipoles' and `polar collars' in both polar regions. The polar dipole which locates around the center of the polar region is warmer than mid-latitudes and the polar collar surrounding the polar dipole is colder than the other regions at the same altitude. These features were revealed by infrared observations of Venus by the previous missions. The previous observations showed that shapes of the polar dipoles can be characterized by three patterns which are the zonal wave numbers of 0-2, and that they change with time. The rotation periods of polar dipoles were determined to be 2.5 and 2.8-3.2 Earth days for the southern and northern polar regions, respectively. It has not been clear that the difference and variability in the rotation period is due to just a temporal variation, influence of solar activity, or other reasons. Sato et al. compared the appearances of both polar hot regions by a ground-based observation, rotation of the hot regions is synchronized between the northern and southern hemispheres. However, rotation periods of the northern and southern polar dipoles have not yet been directly compared. The Japanese Venus orbiter Akatsuki is a planetary meteorological satellite aiming at understanding the atmosphere dynamics of Venus. The Longwave Infrared Camera (LIR), observes thermal emission from the cloud top ( 65km). Akatsuki is in an equatorial orbit, which is suitable for simultaneous observations of both northern and southern polar regions. Rotation periods of polar vortices were derived using the LIR data by tracking a zonal position of maximum temperature. The rotation periods of polar vortices of southern and northern hemispheres are determined to be 3.0 - 8.2 and 1.6 - 5.5 Earth days, respectively (Fig.1). These rotation periods of southern polar vortex are longer than the values observed in the past. As a next step, we will derive rotation periods of the polar vortices for

  7. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  8. Quasi interference of perpendicularly polarized guided modes observed with a photon scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balistreri, M.L.M.; Driessen, A.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2000-01-01

    The simultaneous detection of TE- as well as TM-polarized light with a photon scanning tunneling microscope leads to a quasi- interference pattern of these mutually perpendicular polarized fields. This interference pattern has been observed in the optical field distribution as a function of both

  9. Dark Polar Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  10. Imaging with Polarized Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their zero charge, neutrons are able to pass through thick layers of matter (typically several centimeters while being sensitive to magnetic fields due to their intrinsic magnetic moment. Therefore, in addition to the conventional attenuation contrast image, the magnetic field inside and around a sample can be visualized by detecting changes of polarization in a transmitted beam. The method is based on the spatially resolved measurement of the cumulative precession angles of a collimated, polarized, monochromatic neutron beam that traverses a magnetic field or sample.

  11. The polar mesosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Ray; Murphy, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The mesosphere region, which lies at the edge of space, contains the coldest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, with summer temperatures as low as minus 130 °C. In this extreme environment ice aerosol layers have appeared since the dawn of industrialization—whose existence may arguably be linked to human influence—on yet another layer of the Earth's fragile atmosphere. Ground-based and space-based experiments conducted in the Arctic and Antarctic during the International Polar Year (IPY) aim to address limitations in our knowledge and to advance our understanding of thermal and dynamical processes at play in the polar mesosphere

  12. Internal polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, E.R.; Coulter, K.; Gilman, R.; Holt, R.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Napolitano, J.; Potterveld, D.H.; Young, L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Mishnev, S.I.; Nikolenko, D.M.; Popov, S.G.; Rachek, I.A.; Temnykh, A.B.; Toporkov, D.K.; Tsentalovich, E.P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B. (AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (USSR). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1989-01-01

    Internal polarized targets offer a number of advantages over external targets. After a brief review of the basic motivation and principles behind internal polarized targets, the technical aspects of the atomic storage cell will be discussed in particular. Sources of depolarization and the means by which their effects can be ameliorated will be described, especially depolarization by the intense magnetic fields arising from the circulating particle beam. The experience of the Argonne Novosibirsk collaboration with the use of a storage cell in a 2 GeV electron storage ring will be the focus of this technical discussion. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  13. AGS polarized H- source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kponou, A.; Alessi, J.G.; Sluyters, T.

    1985-01-01

    The AGS polarized H - source is now operational. During a month-long experimental physics run in July 1984, pulses equivalent to 15 μA x 300 μs (approx. 3 x 10 10 protons) were injected into the RFQ preaccelerator. Beam polarization, measured at 200 MeV, was approx. 75%. After the run, a program to increase the H - yield of the source was begun and significant progress has been made. The H - current is now frequently 20 to 30 μA. A description of the source and some details of our operating experience are given. We also briefly describe the improvement program

  14. The physics of polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    This course is intended to give a description of the basic physical concepts which underlie the study and the interpretation of polarization phenomena. Apart from a brief historical introduction (Sect. 1), the course is organized in three parts. A first part (Sects. 2 - 6) covers the most relevant facts about the polarization phenomena that are typically encountered in laboratory applications and in everyday life. In Sect. 2, the modern description of polarization in terms of the Stokes parameters is recalled, whereas Sect. 3 is devoted to introduce the basic tools of laboratory polarimetry, such as the Jones calculus and the Mueller matrices. The polarization phenomena which are met in the reflection and refraction of a beam of radiation at the separation surface between two dielectrics, or between a dielectric and a metal, are recalled in Sect. 4. Finally, Sect. 5 gives an introduction to the phenomena of dichroism and of anomalous dispersion and Sect. 6 summarizes the polarization phenomena that are commonly encountered in everyday life. The second part of this course (Sects. 7-14) deals with the description, within the formalism of classical physics, of the spectro-polarimetric properties of the radiation emitted by accelerated charges. Such properties are derived by taking as starting point the Liénard and Wiechert equations that are recalled and discussed in Sect. 7 both in the general case and in the non-relativistic approximation. The results are developed to find the percentage polarization, the radiation diagram, the cross-section and the spectral characteristics of the radiation emitted in different phenomena particularly relevant from the astrophysical point of view. The emission of a linear antenna is derived in Sect. 8. The other Sections are devoted to Thomson scattering (Sect. 9), Rayleigh scattering (Sect. 10), Mie scattering (Sect. 11), bremsstrahlung radiation (Sect. 12), cyclotron radiation (Sect. 13), and synchrotron radiation (Sect. 14

  15. Science on form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, Shozo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Takaki, Ryuji; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Symposium was to discuss interdisciplinal science aspects of form. 'Form' depends on the material and the changes. But, it is the form that appears evident at once and endures. Form is absorbed from every field as media of information. One part of the work covers the description of non-periodic phenomena, morphogenesis or evolution. Irreducible stubborn facts as diseases or social problems, or whatever else that could not be analyzed are integrally challenged to be systematized by computer simulation. The other part covers the finding of laws for determining how systems behave. Attention should be paid to pattern recognition, image processing and pattern formation. The Symposium proceeded with no parallel sessions, and participants from various fields made exciting discussions in an interdisciplinal atmosphere. (Auth.)

  16. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  17. A Logarithmic-Amplitude Polar Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trond Andresen

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available A polar diagram where the amplitude of the transfer function is on a logarithmic scale, is presented. This gives a one-size-fits-all diagram with no need for zooming in and out, and no need for additional reasoning about infinite-radius encirclements when there are poles on the imaginary axis - as opposed to what is usually neccessary with the standard polar (Nyquist- diagram. All properties needed for stability considerations are upheld, such as encirclements, gain and phase margins. The path for s in the loop transfer function is carefully chosen with regard to possible poles on the imaginary axis. Small excursions into the right half plane in the form of arcs of different-sized logarithmic spirals result in corresponding large but finite arcs that do not overlap in the logarithmic polar plots.

  18. In silico study of amphiphilic nanotubes based on cyclic peptides in polar and non-polar solvent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Vinodhkumar; Vijayaraj, Ramadoss; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2016-01-01

    The stability of cyclic peptide assemblies (CPs) forming a macromolecular nanotube structure was investigated in solvents of different polarity using computational methods. The stability and structure of the complexes were studied using traditional molecular dynamics (MD). Energy of dissociation ...

  19. The JLab polarization transfer measurements of proton elastic form ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The difficulties associated with the calculations of the charge and magnetization distributions in the laboratory have been discussed recently by Kelly [4]. ..... particle and nuclear physics (Quebec City, 2000), p. 302, and private communication (2001). [35] R Schiavilla and I Sick, nucl-ex/0107004 (2001). [36] A Lung et al, ...

  20. Do Identical Polar Diatomic Molecules Form Stacked or Linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ias

    and Physical Chemistry. Department at the Indian. Institute of Science,. Bangalore. ... In a pre- sentation on this topic by E Arunan to the Chemistry. Department of Stanford University, a question arose con- ... There are four analytical solutions to this equation, all of which are extremely messy, as often is the case for.

  1. The JLab polarization transfer measurements of proton elastic form ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A W Hammer, U G Meissner and D Drechsel, Phys. Lett. B385, 343 (1996). [23] P L Chung and F Coester, Phys. Rev. D44, 229 (191). [24] M R Frank, B K Jennings and G A Miller, Phys. Rev. C54, 920 (1996). [25] A V Radyushkin, Acta Phys. Polnica B15, 40 (1984). [26] G Holzwarth, Z. Phys. A356, 339 (1996). [27] E Lomon ...

  2. Lobbying and political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Ursprung, Heinrich W.

    2002-01-01

    Standard spatial models of political competition give rise to equilibria in which the competing political parties or candidates converge to a common position. In this paper I show how political polarization can be generated in models that focus on the nexus between pre-election interest group lobbying and electoral competition.

  3. Polarization of Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.

    1957-01-01

    The numerical results for the polarization of Bremsstrahlung are presented. The multiple scattering of electrons in the target is taken into account. The angular-and photon energy dependences are seen on the curves for an incident 25 MeV electron energy. (Author) [fr

  4. DESY: HERA polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The new HERA electron-proton collider at DESY in Hamburg achieved the first luminosity for electron-proton collisions on 19 October last year. Only one month later, on 20 November, HERA passed another important milestone with the observation of transverse electron polarization

  5. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  6. A Bionic Polarization Navigation Sensor and Its Calibration Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huijie; Xu, Wujian

    2016-08-03

    The polarization patterns of skylight which arise due to the scattering of sunlight in the atmosphere can be used by many insects for deriving compass information. Inspired by insects' polarized light compass, scientists have developed a new kind of navigation method. One of the key techniques in this method is the polarimetric sensor which is used to acquire direction information from skylight. In this paper, a polarization navigation sensor is proposed which imitates the working principles of the polarization vision systems of insects. We introduce the optical design and mathematical model of the sensor. In addition, a calibration method based on variable substitution and non-linear curve fitting is proposed. The results obtained from the outdoor experiments provide support for the feasibility and precision of the sensor. The sensor's signal processing can be well described using our mathematical model. A relatively high degree of accuracy in polarization measurement can be obtained without any error compensation.

  7. Defect-Induced Hedgehog Polarization States in Multiferroics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linze; Cheng, Xiaoxing; Jokisaari, Jacob R.; Gao, Peng; Britson, Jason; Adamo, Carolina; Heikes, Colin; Schlom, Darrell G.; Chen, Long-Qing; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2018-03-01

    Continuous developments in nanotechnology require new approaches to materials synthesis that can produce novel functional structures. Here, we show that nanoscale defects, such as nonstoichiometric nanoregions (NSNRs), can act as nano-building blocks for creating complex electrical polarization structures in the prototypical multiferroic BiFeO3 . An array of charged NSNRs are produced in BiFeO3 thin films by tuning the substrate temperature during film growth. Atomic-scale scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging reveals exotic polarization rotation patterns around these NSNRs. These polarization patterns resemble hedgehog or vortex topologies and can cause local changes in lattice symmetries leading to mixed-phase structures resembling the morphotropic phase boundary with high piezoelectricity. Phase-field simulations indicate that the observed polarization configurations are mainly induced by charged states at the NSNRs. Engineering defects thus may provide a new route for developing ferroelectric- or multiferroic-based nanodevices.

  8. The stability and generation pattern of thermally formed isocyanic acid (ICA) in air - potential and limitations of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for real-time workroom atmosphere measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Mikolaj Jan; Olsen, Raymond; Thomassen, Yngvar; Molander, Paal

    2016-07-13

    Isocyanic acid (ICA) in vapour phase has been reported to be of unstable nature, making the occupational hygienic relevance of ICA questionable. The stability of pure ICA in clean air at different humidity conditions was investigated by Fourier transform-infrared spectrometric (FT-IR) measurements. Furthermore, the stability of ICA in a complex atmosphere representative thermal degradation hot-work procedures were examined by performing parallel measurements by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometric (PTR-MS) instrumentation and off-line denuder air sampling using di-n-butylamine (as a derivatization agent prior to liquid chromatography mass spectrometric (LC-MS) determination). The apparent half-life of ICA in pure ICA atmospheres was 16 to 4 hours at absolute humidity (AH) in the range 4.2 to 14.6 g m(-3), respectively. In a complex atmosphere at an initial AH of 9.6 g m(-3) the apparent half-life of ICA was 8 hours, as measured with the denuder method. Thus, thermally formed ICA is to be considered as a potential occupational hazard with regard to inhalation. The generation pattern of ICA formed during controlled gradient (100-540 °C) thermal decomposition of different polymers in the presence of air was examined by parallel PTR-MS and denuder air sampling. According to measurement by denuder sampling ICA was the dominant aliphatic isocyanate formed during the thermal decomposition of all polymers. The real-time measurements of the decomposed polymers revealed different ICA generation patterns, with initial appearance of thermally released ICA in the temperature range 200-260 °C. The PTR-MS ICA measurements was however affected by mass overlap from other decomposition products at m/z 44, illustrated by a [ICA]Denuder/[ICA]PTR-MS ratio ranging from 0.04 to 0.90. These findings limits the potential use of PTR-MS for real time measurements of thermally released ICA in field, suggesting parallel sampling with short-term sequential off-line methodology.

  9. Characteristics of volume polarization holography with linear polarization light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Jinliang; Wu, An'an; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jue; Lin, Xiao; Tan, Xiaodi; Shimura, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Volume polarization holographic recording in phenanthrenequinone-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PQ-PMMA) photopolymer with linear polarized light is obtained. The characteristics of the volume polarization hologram are experimentally investigated. It is found that beyond the paraxial approximation the polarization states of the holographic reconstruction light are generally different from the signal light. Based on vector wave theoretical analyses and material properties, the special exposure condition for correctly holographic reconstruction is obtained and experimentally demonstrated.

  10. Polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging based on unpolarized light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, K.H.; Park, B. H.; Tu, Y.P.; Hasan, T.; Lee, B.; Li, J.; de Boer, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is an augmented form of OCT, providing 3D images of both tissue structure and polarization properties. We developed a new method of polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI), which is based on a wavelength-swept

  11. Model of polar auxin transport coupled to mechanical forces retrieves robust morphogenesis along the Arabidopsis root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Arias, J. Roberto; Hernández-Hernández, Valeria; Benítez, Mariana; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.; Barrio, Rafael A.

    2017-03-01

    Stem cells are identical in many scales, they share the same molecular composition, DNA, genes, and genetic networks, yet they should acquire different properties to form a functional tissue. Therefore, they must interact and get some external information from their environment, either spatial (dynamical fields) or temporal (lineage). In this paper we test to what extent coupled chemical and physical fields can underlie the cell's positional information during development. We choose the root apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana to model the emergence of cellular patterns. We built a model to study the dynamics and interactions between the cell divisions, the local auxin concentration, and physical elastic fields. Our model recovers important aspects of the self-organized and resilient behavior of the observed cellular patterns in the Arabidopsis root, in particular, the reverse fountain pattern observed in the auxin transport, the PIN-FORMED (protein family of auxin transporters) polarization pattern and the accumulation of auxin near the region of maximum curvature in a bent root. Our model may be extended to predict altered cellular patterns that are expected under various applied auxin treatments or modified physical growth conditions.

  12. A circumpolar monitoring framework for polar bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongraven, Dag; Aars, Jon; Amstrup, Steven C.; Atkinson, Stephen N.; Belikov, Stanislav; Born, Erik W.; DeBruyn, T.D.; Derocher, Andrew E.; Durner, George M.; Gill, Michael J.; Lunn, Nicholas J.; Obbard, Martyn E.; Omelak, Jack; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Peacock, Elizabeth; Richardson, E.E.; Sahanatien, Vicki; Stirling, Ian; Wiig, Øystein

    2012-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) occupy remote regions that are characterized by harsh weather and limited access. Polar bear populations can only persist where temporal and spatial availability of sea ice provides adequate access to their marine mammal prey. Observed declines in sea ice availability will continue as long as greenhouse gas concentrations rise. At the same time, human intrusion and pollution levels in the Arctic are expected to increase. A circumpolar understanding of the cumulative impacts of current and future stressors is lacking, long-term trends are known from only a few subpopulations, and there is no globally coordinated effort to monitor effects of stressors. Here, we describe a framework for an integrated circumpolar monitoring plan to detect ongoing patterns, predict future trends, and identify the most vulnerable polar bear subpopulations. We recommend strategies for monitoring subpopulation abundance and trends, reproduction, survival, ecosystem change, human-caused mortality, human–bear conflict, prey availability, health, stature, distribution, behavioral change, and the effects that monitoring itself may have on polar bears. We assign monitoring intensity for each subpopulation through adaptive assessment of the quality of existing baseline data and research accessibility. A global perspective is achieved by recommending high intensity monitoring for at least one subpopulation in each of four major polar bear ecoregions. Collection of data on harvest, where it occurs, and remote sensing of habitat, should occur with the same intensity for all subpopulations. We outline how local traditional knowledge may most effectively be combined with the best scientific methods to provide comparable and complementary lines of evidence. We also outline how previously collected intensive monitoring data may be sub-sampled to guide future sampling frequencies and develop indirect estimates or indices of subpopulation status. Adoption of this framework

  13. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and polarized antiproton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the π degree production at high p perpendicular and in the Λ (Σ degree), π ± , π degree production at large x F , and Δσ L (pp, bar pp) measurements. 18 refs

  14. NUCLEON POLARIZATION IN 3-BODY MODELS OF POLARIZED LI-6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHELLINGERHOUT, NW; KOK, LP; COON, SA; ADAM, RM

    1993-01-01

    Just as He-3 --> can be approximately characterized as a polarized neutron target, polarized Li-6D has been advocated as a good isoscalar nuclear target for the extraction of the polarized gluon content of the nucleon. The original argument rests upon a presumed ''alpha + deuteron'' picture of Li-6,

  15. Emergence and Dynamics of Polar Order in Developing Epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadifar, Reza

    2011-03-01

    Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) is a conserved process in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues, and is fundamental for the coordination of cell behavior and patterning. A well-studied example is the orientational pattern of hairs in the wing of the adult fruit fly Drosophila, which is an important model organism in biology. The Drosophila wing is an epithelium, i.e., a two-dimensional sheet of cells, which grows from a few cells to thousands of cells during the course of development. In the wing epithelium, planar polarity is established by an anisotropic distribution of PCP proteins within cells. The distribution of these proteins in a given cell affects the polarity of neighboring cells, such that at the end of wing development a large-scale PCP orientational order emerges. Here we present a theoretical study of planar polarity in developing epithelia based on a vertex model, which takes into account cell mechanics, cell adhesion, and cell division, combined with experimental results obtained from time-lapse imaging of the wing development. We show that in experiment, polarity order does not develop de novo at the end of wing development, but rather cells are initially polarized at an angle with respect to their final polarity axis. During wing development, the polarity axes of cells reorient towards their final direction. We identify a basic mechanism to generate such a large-scale initial polarization, based on the growth of a small number of cells with an initially random PCP distribution. Finally, we study the effect of shear and oriented cell division on dynamics of PCP order, showing that these two processes can robustly reorient the polarity axes of cells.

  16. The Great Solar Active Region NOAA 12192: Helicity Transport, Filament Formation, and Impact on the Polar Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Gordon; McMaken, Tyler C.

    2017-08-01

    The solar active region (AR), NOAA 12192, appeared in 2014 October as the largest AR in 24 years. Here we examine the counterintuitive nature of two diffusion-driven processes in the region: the role of helicity buildup in the formation of a major filament, and the relationship between the effects of supergranular diffusion and meridional flow on the AR and on the polar field. Quantitatively, calculations of current helicity and magnetic twist from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms indicate that, though AR 12192 emerged with negative helicity, positive helicity from subsequent flux emergence, consistent with the hemispheric sign-preference of helicity, increased over time within large-scale, weak-field regions such as those near the polarity inversion line (PIL). Morphologically, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of filament barbs, sigmoidal patterns, and bases of Fe xii stalks initially exhibited signatures of negative helicity, and the long filament that subsequently formed had a strong positive helicity consistent with the helicity buildup along the PIL. We find from full-disk HMI magnetograms that AR 12192's leading positive flux was initially closer to the equator but, owing either to the region’s magnetic surroundings or to its asymmetric flux density distribution, was transported poleward more quickly on average than its trailing negative flux, contrary to the canonical pattern of bipole flux transport. This behavior caused the AR to have a smaller effect on the polar fields than expected and enabled the formation of the very long neutral line where the filament formed.

  17. Geomagnetic polarity transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ronald T.; McFadden, Phillip L.

    1999-05-01

    The top of Earth's liquid outer core is nearly 2900 km beneath Earth's surface, so we will never be able to observe it directly. This hot, dense, molten iron-rich body is continuously in motion and is the source of Earth's magnetic field. One of the most dynamic manifestations at Earth's surface of this fluid body is, perhaps, a reversal of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately, the most recent polarity transition occurred at about 780 ka, so we have never observed a transition directly. It seems that a polarity transition spans many human lifetimes, so no human will ever witness the phenomenon in its entirety. Thus we are left with the tantalizing prospect that paleomagnetic records of polarity transitions may betray some of the secrets of the deep Earth. Certainly, if there are systematics in the reversal process and they can be documented, then this will reveal substantial information about the nature of the lowermost mantle and of the outer core. Despite their slowness on a human timescale, polarity transitions occur almost instantaneously on a geological timescale. This rapidity, together with limitations in the paleomagnetic recording process, prohibits a comprehensive description of any reversal transition both now and into the foreseeable future, which limits the questions that may at this stage be sensibly asked. The natural model for the geomagnetic field is a set of spherical harmonic components, and we are not able to obtain a reliable model for even the first few harmonic terms during a transition. Nevertheless, it is possible, in principle, to make statements about the harmonic character of a geomagnetic polarity transition without having a rigorous spherical harmonic description of one. For example, harmonic descriptions of recent geomagnetic polarity transitions that are purely zonal can be ruled out (a zonal harmonic does not change along a line of latitude). Gleaning information about transitions has proven to be difficult, but it does seem

  18. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e+e- collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point

  19. Analytical polarization calculations beyond SLIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison is made between the theories of Bell and Leinaas and of Derbenev and Kondratenko for the spin polarization in electron storage rings. A calculation of polarization in HERA using the program SMILE of Mane is presented

  20. On Determinants of Political Polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Grechyna, Daryna

    2015-01-01

    Political polarization has been shown to significantly influence a country's economic performance. However, little is known about the drivers of political polarization. In this article, we aim to identify the main determinants of political polarization using Bayesian Model Averaging to overcome the problem of model uncertainty. We find that the level of trust within a country and the degree of income inequality are the most robust determinants of political polarization.

  1. Super-resolution longitudinally polarized light needle achieved by tightly focusing radially polarized beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chang-kun; Nie, Zhong-quan; Tian, Yan-ting; Liu, Chao; Zhao, Yong-chuang; Jia, Bao-hua

    2018-01-01

    Based on the vector diffraction theory, a super-resolution longitudinally polarized optical needle with ultra-long depth of focus ( DOF) is generated by tightly focusing a radially polarized beam that is modulated by a self-designed ternary hybrid (phase/amplitude) filter (THF). Both the phase and the amplitude patterns of THF are judiciously optimized by the versatile particle swarm optimization (PSO) searching algorithm. For the focusing configuration with a combination of a high numerical aperture ( NA) and the optimized sine-shaped THFs, an optical needle with the full width at half maximum ( FWHM) of 0.414λ and the DOF of 7.58λ is accessed, which corresponds to an aspect ratio of 18.3. The demonstrated longitudinally polarized super-resolution light needle with high aspect ratio opens up broad applications in high-density optical data storage, nano-photolithography, super-resolution imaging and high-efficiency particle trapping.

  2. Relaxation phenomena of polar non-polar liquid mixtures under low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wjs [4] are employed to obtain τjs. The former method is better in comparison to the existing one as it eliminates polar–polar interaction. The hf µjs in Coulomb metre (C m) when compared with static and reported µs indicate that µss favour the monomer formations which combine to form dimers in the hf electric field.

  3. SEARCH FOR A MAGNETIC FIELD VIA CIRCULAR POLARIZATION IN THE WOLF-RAYET STAR EZ CMa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Chevrotière, A.; St-Louis, N.; Moffat, A. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first deep, direct search for a magnetic field via the circular polarization of Zeeman splitting in a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star. Using the highly efficient ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we observed at three different epochs one of the best W-R candidates in the sky expected to harbor a magnetic field, the bright, highly variable WN4 star EZ CMa = WR6 = HD 50896. We looked for the characteristic circular polarization (Stokes V) pattern in strong emission lines that would arise as a consequence of a global, rotating magnetic field with a split monopole configuration. We also obtained nearly simultaneous linear polarization spectra (Stokes Q and U), which are dominated by electron scattering, most likely from a flattened wind with large-scale corotating structures. As the star rotates with a period of 3.766 days, our view of the wind changes, which in turn affects the value of the linear polarization in lines versus continuum at the ∼0.2% level. Depending on the epoch of observation, our Stokes V data were affected by significant crosstalk from Stokes Q and U to V. We removed this spurious signal from the circular polarization data and experimented with various levels of spectral binning to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of our data. In the end, no magnetic field is unambiguously detected in EZ CMa. Assuming that the star is intrinsically magnetic and harbors a split monopole configuration, we find an upper limit of B ∼ 100 G for the intensity of its field in the line-forming regions of the stellar wind.

  4. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); et al.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  5. Polarization induced doped transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  6. Polar bears, Ursus maritimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D.; Stirling, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Polar bears are the largest of the eight species of bears found worldwide and are covered in a pigment-free fur giving them the appearance of being white. They are the most carnivorous of bear species consuming a high-fat diet, primarily of ice-associated seals and other marine mammals. They range throughout the circumpolar Arctic to the southernmost extent of seasonal pack ice.

  7. Polarized advanced fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The d- 3 He reaction has the same spin dependence as the d-t reaction. It produces no neutrons, so that if the d-d reactivity could be reduced, it would lead to a neutron-lean reactor. The current understanding of the possible suppression of the d-d reactivity by spin polarization is discussed. The question as to whether a suppression is possible is still unresolved. Other advanced fuel reactions are briefly discussed. 11 refs

  8. On polarization in biomembranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zecchi, Karis Amata

    close to physiological conditions, making these effects biologically relevant. In this work, we consider the case of asymmetric membranes which can display spontaneous polarization in the absence of a field. Close to the phase transition, we find that the membrane displays piezoelectric, flexoelectric...... on different geometries point in the direction of a flexoelectric mechanism behind current rectification in lipid bilayers. Finally, we suggest that our updated equivalent circuit should be included in the interpretation of elctrophysiological data....

  9. Multifrequency Behaviour of Polars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Reinsch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataclysmic variables emit over a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper I will review observations of polars in relevant passbands obtained during the last decade and will discuss their diagnostical potential to access the physics of the main components within the binary systems. This will include a discussion of intrinsic source variability and the quest for simultaneous multi-frequency observations.

  10. Alfvénic fluctuations in "newborn"' polar solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The 3-D structure of the solar wind is strongly dependent upon the Sun's activity cycle. At low solar activity a bimodal structure is dominant, with a fast and uniform flow at the high latitudes, and slow and variable flows at low latitudes. Around solar maximum, in sharp contrast, variable flows are observed at all latitudes. This last kind of pattern, however, is a relatively short-lived feature, and quite soon after solar maximum the polar wind tends to regain its role. The plasma parameter distributions for these newborn polar flows appear very similar to those typically observed in polar wind at low solar activity. The point addressed here is about polar wind fluctuations. As is well known, the low-solar-activity polar wind is characterized by a strong flow of Alfvénic fluctuations. Does this hold for the new polar flows too? An answer to this question is given here through a comparative statistical analysis on parameters such as total energy, cross helicity, and residual energy, that are of general use to describe the Alfvénic character of fluctuations. Our results indicate that the main features of the Alfvénic fluctuations observed in low-solar-activity polar wind have been quickly recovered in the new polar flows developed shortly after solar maximum. Keywords. Interplanetary physics (MHD waves and turbulence; Sources of the solar wind – Space plasma physics (Turbulence

  11. Polar Business Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Caisse

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polar business design aims to enable entrepreneurs, managers, consultants, researchers, and business students to better tackle model-based analysis, creation, and transformation of businesses, ventures, and, more generically, collective endeavors of any size and purpose. It is based on a systems-thinking approach that builds on a few interrelated core concepts to create holistic visual frameworks. These core concepts act as poles linked by meaningful dyads, flows, and faces arranged in geometric shapes. The article presents two such polar frameworks as key findings in an ongoing analytic autoethnography: the three-pole Value−Activity−Stakeholder (VAS triquetra and the four-pole Offer−Creation−Character−Stakeholder (OCCS tetrahedron. The VAS triquetra is a more aggregated model of collective endeavors. The OCCS tetrahedron makes a trade-off between a steeper learning curve and deeper, richer representation potential. This article discusses how to use these two frameworks as well as their limits, and explores the potential that polar business design offers for future research.

  12. Representing the vacuum polarization on de Sitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Katie E.; Woodard, Richard P. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Prokopec, Tomislav [Institute of Theoretical Physics (ITP) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Postbus 80195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15

    Previous studies of the vacuum polarization on de Sitter have demonstrated that there is a simple, noncovariant representation of it in which the physics is transparent. There is also a cumbersome, covariant representation in which the physics is obscure. Despite being unwieldy, the latter form has a powerful appeal for those who are concerned about de Sitter invariance. We show that nothing is lost by employing the simple, noncovariant representation because there is a closed form procedure for converting its structure functions to those of the covariant representation. We also present a vastly improved technique for reading off the noncovariant structure functions from the primitive diagrams. And we discuss the issue of representing the vacuum polarization for a general metric background.

  13. Polarized backlight unit using a polarization-preserving light-redirecting film for improving luminance gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeongmin; Lee, Sungrae; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2015-05-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a polarized backlight unit (BLU) configuration with a new light-redirecting film (LRF) to improve the luminance gain and light transmittance in liquid crystal displays. We combined a very low birefringence triacetyl cellulose (TAC) base layer with UV-cured prismatic patterns in a mass-producible process to demonstrate a polarization-preserving LRF. Detailed analyses of the states of polarization (SOP) through the LRF were reported. We also fabricated a 7-in. edge-lit BLU using the new LRF. We found that the light directing capability of the new LRF was equivalent to that of a conventional prism film whose base layer was a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film, and that the new LRF successfully suppressed random polarization changes of the transmitted light. Utilizing these new advantages, we obtained 68% transmittance through the polarizer over the BLU with the new LRF, which was about 1.3-fold that for the BLU with the conventional prism film (54%). We also obtained 127% luminance gain using the new LRF, which was equivalent to that of the conventional prism film. Here, the luminance gain is referred to as the amount of increase in luminance on the surface normal of the light-guiding plate without any film.

  14. Methyl sulfone PCB and DDE metabolites in the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) food chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letcher, R.J. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Norstrom, R.J. [Environment Canada, Hull, Quebec (Canada); Muir, D.C.G. [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    An important Arctic marine food chain is polar bear, ringed seal (Phoca hispida) and Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida). The Arctic is relatively uncontaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs). However, high levels of CHCs are bioaccumulated through the marine food web. Methyl sulfone (MeSO{sub 2})-PCB and -DDE metabolites are major CHCs in polar bear, although the proportion of MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs derived from PCB metabolism and/or MeSO{sub 2}-PCB bioaccumulation from the diet is unknown. For this reason, the structure and concentration of MeSO{sup 2}-PCB and -DDE metabolites, PCBs and DDE were determined in whole body Arctic cod, the liver, adipose, lung and muscle of ringed seal and ten tissues of polar bear from the Resolute Bay area of the Canadian Arctic. Preliminary analysis of the ratios of MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs in bear fat and liver to their parent PCBs in seal blubber suggested that CB-49 and CB-87 result in a higher proportion of metabolites in bear than the other PCB congeners, assuming that the MeSO{sup 2}-PCBs are not themselves accumulated from the diet. Bio-availability of the precursor PCBs for subsequent metabolism may also be a factor. The absence in bears of MeSO{sub 2}-metabolites of other metabolizable PCBs in seal may indicate that some MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs are not formed or that they are formed and further metabolized. The MeSO{sub 2}-PCB and -DDE levels and congener patterns among seal and bear tissues and the difference in tissue distribution between species will also be compared. In polar bear, the s-MeSO{sub 2}-PCB to S-PCB and s-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE to DDE ratios were highest in liver, indicating preferred storage.

  15. Sentiment Polarity Analysis based multi-dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jian; Zhou, Yanquan

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for Chinese online reviews, which identifies sentiment polarity. To determine the sentence is negative or positive, we extracted opinion words and identified their opinion targets by CRFs and establish the absolute emotional dictionary (AbED), the relative emotional dictionary (ReED), the field of emotional dictionary (FiED) and the field of targets and opinion words dictionary (TfED). With those emotional dictionary, negative dictionary and modified dictionary, we achieved an effective algorithm to discriminate sentiment polarity by multi-string pattern matching algorithm. For evaluation, we used car online reviews, hotel online reviews and computer online reviews which annotated positive or negative. Experimental results show that our proposed method has made a higher precision and recall rate.

  16. Polar Domain Discovery with Sparkler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, R.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ottilingam, N. K.; Singh, K.; Lopez, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    The scientific web is vast and ever growing. It encompasses millions of textual, scientific and multimedia documents describing research in a multitude of scientific streams. Most of these documents are hidden behind forms which require user action to retrieve and thus can't be directly accessed by content crawlers. These documents are hosted on web servers across the world, most often on outdated hardware and network infrastructure. Hence it is difficult and time-consuming to aggregate documents from the scientific web, especially those relevant to a specific domain. Thus generating meaningful domain-specific insights is currently difficult. We present an automated discovery system (Figure 1) using Sparkler, an open-source, extensible, horizontally scalable crawler which facilitates high throughput and focused crawling of documents pertinent to a particular domain such as information about polar regions. With this set of highly domain relevant documents, we show that it is possible to answer analytical questions about that domain. Our domain discovery algorithm leverages prior domain knowledge to reach out to commercial/scientific search engines to generate seed URLs. Subject matter experts then annotate these seed URLs manually on a scale from highly relevant to irrelevant. We leverage this annotated dataset to train a machine learning model which predicts the `domain relevance' of a given document. We extend Sparkler with this model to focus crawling on documents relevant to that domain. Sparkler avoids disruption of service by 1) partitioning URLs by hostname such that every node gets a different host to crawl and by 2) inserting delays between subsequent requests. With an NSF-funded supercomputer Wrangler, we scaled our domain discovery pipeline to crawl about 200k polar specific documents from the scientific web, within a day.

  17. Circularly polarized antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Steven; Zhu, Fuguo

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive insight into the design techniques for different types of CP antenna elements and arrays In this book, the authors address a broad range of topics on circularly polarized (CP) antennas. Firstly, it introduces to the reader basic principles, design techniques and characteristics of various types of CP antennas, such as CP patch antennas, CP helix antennas, quadrifilar helix antennas (QHA), printed quadrifilar helix antennas (PQHA), spiral antenna, CP slot antennas, CP dielectric resonator antennas, loop antennas, crossed dipoles, monopoles and CP horns. Adva

  18. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamae, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy (PPS) is now becoming a standard diagnostic technique for working with laboratory plasmas. This new area needs a comprehensive framework, both experimental and theoretical. This book reviews the historical development of PPS, develops a general theoretical formulation to deal with this phenomenon, along with an overview of relevant cross sections, and reports on laboratory experiments so far performed. It also includes various facets that are interesting from this standpoint, e.g. X-ray lasers and effects of microwave irradiation. It also offers a timely discussion of instrumentation that is quite important in a practical PPS experiment.

  19. System for measuring the proton polarization in a polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Trotsenko, V.I.; Chechetenko, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    The system for measuring the proton polarization in a polarized target representing the high-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is described Q-meter with series connection and a circuit for measuring system resonance characteristic is used for NMR-absorption signal recording. Measuring coil is produced of a strip conductor in order to obtain uniform system sensitivity to polarization state in all target volume and improve signal-to-noise ratio. Polarization measuring system operates ion-line with the M-6000 computer. The total measuring error for the value of free proton polarization in target taking into account the error caused by local depolarization of working substance under irradiation by high-intense photon beam is <= 6%. Long-term application of the described system for measuring the proton polarization in the LUEh-20000 accelerator target used in the pion photoproduction experiments has demonstrated its high reliability

  20. Enhanced polarization of (11–22) semi-polar InGaN nanorod array structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athanasiou, M.; Smith, R. M.; Hou, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Gong, Y.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    By means of a cost effective nanosphere lithography technique, an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure grown on (11–22) semipolar GaN has been fabricated into two dimensional nanorod arrays which form a photonic crystal (PhC) structure. Such a PhC structure demonstrates not only significantly increased emission intensity, but also an enhanced polarization ratio of the emission. This is due to an effective inhibition of the emission in slab modes and then redistribution to the vertical direction, thus minimizing the light scattering processes that lead to randomizing of the optical polarization. The PhC structure is designed based on a standard finite-difference-time-domain simulation, and then optically confirmed by detailed time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. The results presented pave the way for the fabrication of semipolar InGaN/GaN based emitters with both high efficiency and highly polarized emission.

  1. Enhanced polarization of (11–22) semi-polar InGaN nanorod array structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athanasiou, M.; Smith, R. M.; Hou, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Gong, Y.; Wang, T.

    2015-01-01

    By means of a cost effective nanosphere lithography technique, an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure grown on (11–22) semipolar GaN has been fabricated into two dimensional nanorod arrays which form a photonic crystal (PhC) structure. Such a PhC structure demonstrates not only significantly increased emission intensity, but also an enhanced polarization ratio of the emission. This is due to an effective inhibition of the emission in slab modes and then redistribution to the vertical direction, thus minimizing the light scattering processes that lead to randomizing of the optical polarization. The PhC structure is designed based on a standard finite-difference-time-domain simulation, and then optically confirmed by detailed time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. The results presented pave the way for the fabrication of semipolar InGaN/GaN based emitters with both high efficiency and highly polarized emission

  2. A Low-Complexity DOA and Polarization Method of Polarization-Sensitive Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Dong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a low-complexity method to estimate the direction of arrival and polarization based on the polarization sensitive array (PSA which is composed of cross-dipoles. We built a half-quaternions model through the Cayley–Dickson form to remove the redundant information. Then, the directions of arrival (DOAs were estimated via the root-MUSIC algorithm. Finally, the polarizations were estimated by generalized eigenvalue method. Unlike some existing searching algorithms, such as multiple signal classification (MUSIC, this method can avoid the peak searching and maintains high estimation accuracy. Moreover, we use the oblique projection operators to filter out the interference signals which are decoys of the target signal. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and favorable performance of the proposed method.

  3. An Internal Polarity Landmark Is Important for Externally Induced Hyphal Behaviors in Candida albicans▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Alexandra; Vacharaksa, Anjalee; Bendel, Catherine; Norton, Jennifer; Haynes, Paula; Henry-Stanley, Michelle; Wells, Carol; Ross, Karen; Gow, Neil A. R.; Gale, Cheryl A.

    2008-01-01

    Directional growth is a function of polarized cells such as neurites, pollen tubes, and fungal hyphae. Correct orientation of the extending cell tip depends on signaling pathways and effectors that mediate asymmetric responses to specific environmental cues. In the hyphal form of the eukaryotic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, these responses include thigmotropism and galvanotropism (hyphal turning in response to changes in substrate topography and imposed electrical fields, respectively) and penetration into semisolid substrates. During vegetative growth in C. albicans, as in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Ras-like GTPase Rsr1 mediates internal cellular cues to position new buds in a prespecified pattern on the mother cell cortex. Here, we demonstrate that Rsr1 is also important for hyphal tip orientation in response to the external environmental cues that induce thigmotropic and galvanotropic growth. In addition, Rsr1 is involved in hyphal interactions with epithelial cells in vitro and its deletion diminishes the hyphal invasion of kidney tissue during systemic infection. Thus, Rsr1, an internal polarity landmark in yeast, is also involved in polarized growth responses to asymmetric environmental signals, a paradigm that is different from that described for the homologous protein in S. cerevisiae. Rsr1 may thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections by influencing hyphal tip responses triggered by interaction with host tissues. PMID:18281602

  4. An internal polarity landmark is important for externally induced hyphal behaviors in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Alexandra; Vacharaksa, Anjalee; Bendel, Catherine; Norton, Jennifer; Haynes, Paula; Henry-Stanley, Michelle; Wells, Carol; Ross, Karen; Gow, Neil A R; Gale, Cheryl A

    2008-04-01

    Directional growth is a function of polarized cells such as neurites, pollen tubes, and fungal hyphae. Correct orientation of the extending cell tip depends on signaling pathways and effectors that mediate asymmetric responses to specific environmental cues. In the hyphal form of the eukaryotic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, these responses include thigmotropism and galvanotropism (hyphal turning in response to changes in substrate topography and imposed electrical fields, respectively) and penetration into semisolid substrates. During vegetative growth in C. albicans, as in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Ras-like GTPase Rsr1 mediates internal cellular cues to position new buds in a prespecified pattern on the mother cell cortex. Here, we demonstrate that Rsr1 is also important for hyphal tip orientation in response to the external environmental cues that induce thigmotropic and galvanotropic growth. In addition, Rsr1 is involved in hyphal interactions with epithelial cells in vitro and its deletion diminishes the hyphal invasion of kidney tissue during systemic infection. Thus, Rsr1, an internal polarity landmark in yeast, is also involved in polarized growth responses to asymmetric environmental signals, a paradigm that is different from that described for the homologous protein in S. cerevisiae. Rsr1 may thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections by influencing hyphal tip responses triggered by interaction with host tissues.

  5. The "polarizing inducer" in hydra: A reexamination of its properties and its origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Werner A; Spindler, Klaus-Dieter

    1971-12-01

    In order to prove the gradient hypothesis an attempt was made to isolate and accumulate the "polarizing inducer" present in homogenates of hydra and assumed to be a neurosecretory product. By means of gel chromatography two fractions were obtained which brought about the development of supernumary apical structures (tentacles and hypostomes) thus exhibiting the symptoms attributed to this polarizing agent: a low molecular fraction with only modest effectiveness and a main fraction with strong animalizing ability. Increasing the concentration affected only the quantity but not the qualitative properties of the structures produced, a result inconsistent with the postulate of the gradient hypothesis. By analysing the chemical and biological nature of the main agent and by applying pure isolated toxins compelling evidence is given that the inducer in question is nothing but a component of the nematocyst toxins. This component, being heat-stable and trypsin-sensitive, elicites its animalizing effect in unspecific means by disturbing the normal pattern of morphallactic events. A side effect with interest in respect of graded tissue properties could be recorded: by the influence of the relevant toxin, growing together of regenerating animals occurs whereby predominantly apical primordia fuse with apical primordia, thus forming stable parabioses. This observation may indicate the significance of surface bound, contact establishing components in polar differentiation.

  6. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  7. On polar daily geomagnetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola De Michelis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate the nature of the daily magnetic field perturbations produced by ionospheric and magnetospheric currents at high latitudes. We analyse the hourly means of the X and Y geomagnetic field components recorded by a meridian chain of permanent geomagnetic observatories in the polar region of the Northern Hemisphere during a period of four years (1995-1998 around the solar minimum. We apply a mathematical method, known as natural orthogonal component (NOC, which is capable of characterizing the dominant modes of the geomagnetic field daily variability through a set of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs. Using the first two modes we reconstruct a two-dimensional equivalent current representation of the ionospheric electric currents, which contribute substantially to the geomagnetic daily variations. The obtained current structures resemble the equivalent current patterns of DP2 and DP1. We characterize these currents by studying their evolution with the geomagnetic activity level and by analysing their dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field. The obtained results support the idea of a coexistence of two main processes during all analysed period although one of them, the directly driven process, represents the dominant component of the geomagnetic daily variation.

  8. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-19

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in [Formula: see text] EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems.

  9. Design and investigations of a microstrip fed open V-shape slot antenna for wideband dual slant polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V.S. Ram Krishna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A dual slant polarized slot antenna is proposed. The antenna is printed on the two sides of a single substrate and has two microstrip feed lines to excite a V-shaped slot formed by the merging of two tilted rectangular step shaped slots. Stepping of the slot sections as well as the feed line improves the impedance matching. A narrow rectangular metallic stub is introduced at the junction of the slot arms to improve the decoupling between the ports. The antenna polarization is +450/−450 with respect to horizontal under alternate excitation and this dual slant polarized nature is demonstrated through aperture electric field plots and far field radiation patterns. The measured return loss bandwidth (S11 < −10 dB of the antenna is from 2.3 GHz and extends beyond 12 GHz while the measured isolation bandwidth (S21 < −20 dB is from 5 GHz onwards. The time domain characterization of the antenna is also done by calculating the fidelity factor. For evaluating the diversity performance, the envelope correlation coefficients are calculated from the simulated and measured S-parameters. The correlation coefficients are well below the acceptable values. With a peak gain varying between 3 and 5 dBi, the antenna is expected to be useful for wideband dual slant polarized applications.

  10. New material equations for electromagnetism with toroid polarizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovik, V.M.; Martsenyuk, M.A.; Saha, B.

    1999-09-01

    With regard to the toroid contributions, a modified system of equations of electrodynamics moving continuous media has been obtained. Alternative formalisms to introduce the toroid moment contributions in the equations of electromagnetism has been worked out. The two four-potential formalism has been developed. Lorentz transformation laws for the toroid polarizations has been given. Covariant form of equations of electrodynamics of continuous media with toroid polarizations has been written. (author)

  11. Polar drive on OMEGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha P.B.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High-convergence polar-drive experiments are being conducted on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commum. 133, 495 (1997] using triple-picket laser pulses. The goal of OMEGA experiments is to validate modeling of oblique laser deposition, heat conduction in the presence of nonradial thermal gradients in the corona, and implosion energetics in the presence of laser–plasma interactions such as crossed-beam energy transfer. Simulated shock velocities near the equator, where the beams are obliquely incident, are within 5% of experimentally inferred values in warm plastic shells, well within the required accuracy for ignition. High, near-one-dimensional areal density is obtained in warm-plastic-shell implosions. Simulated backlit images of the compressing core are in good agreement with measured images. Outstanding questions that will be addressed in the future relate to the role of cross-beam transfer in polar drive irradiation and increasing the energy coupled into the target by decreasing beam obliquity.

  12. A polarity-induced defect mechanism for conductivity and magnetism at polar-nonpolar oxide interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Zunger, Alex

    2014-10-13

    The discovery of conductivity and magnetism at the polar-nonpolar interfaces of insulating nonmagnetic oxides such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 has raised prospects for attaining interfacial functionalities absent in the component materials. Yet, the microscopic origin of such emergent phenomena remains unclear, posing obstacles to design of improved functionalities. Here we present first principles calculations of electronic and defect properties of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces and reveal a unifying mechanism for the origins of both conductivity and magnetism. We demonstrate that the polar discontinuity across the interface triggers thermodynamically the spontaneous formation of certain defects that in turn cancel the polar field induced by the polar discontinuity. The ionization of the spontaneously formed surface oxygen vacancy defects leads to interface conductivity, whereas the unionized Ti-on-Al antisite defects lead to interface magnetism. The proposed mechanism suggests practical design principles for inducing and controlling both conductivity and magnetism at general polar-nonpolar interfaces.

  13. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  14. Spin exchange in polarized deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przewoski, B. von; Meyer, H.O.; Balewski, J.; Doskow, J.; Ibald, R.; Pollock, R.E.; Rinckel, T.; Wellinghausen, A.; Whitaker, T.J.; Daehnick, W.W.; Haeberli, W.; Schwartz, B.; Wise, T.; Lorentz, B.; Rathmann, F.; Pancella, P.V.; Saha, Swapan K.; Thoerngren-Engblom, P.

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the vector and tensor polarization of an atomic deuterium target as a function of the target density. The polarized deuterium was produced in an atomic beam source and injected into a storage cell. For this experiment, the atomic beam source was operated without rf transitions, in order to avoid complications from the unknown efficiency of these transitions. In this mode, the atomic beam is vector and tensor polarized and both polarizations can be measured simultaneously. We used a 1.2-cm-diam and 27-cm-long storage cell, which yielded an average target density between 3 and 9x10 11 at/cm 3 . We find that the tensor polarization decreases with increasing target density while the vector polarization remains constant. The data are in quantitative agreement with the calculated effect of spin exchange between deuterium atoms at low field

  15. Molecular photoelectron holography with circularly polarized laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weifeng; Sheng, Zhihao; Feng, Xingpan; Wu, Miaoli; Chen, Zhangjin; Song, Xiaohong

    2014-02-10

    We investigate the photoelectron momentum distribution of molecular-ion H2+driven by ultrashort intense circularly polarized laser pulses. Both numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) and a quasiclassical model indicate that the photoelectron holography (PH) with circularly polarized pulses can occur in molecule. It is demonstrated that the interference between the direct electron wave and rescattered electron wave from one core to its neighboring core induces the PH. Moreover, the results of the TDSE predict that there is a tilt angle between the interference pattern of the PH and the direction perpendicular to the molecular axis. Furthermore, the tilt angle is sensitively dependent on the wavelength of the driven circularly polarized pulse, which is confirmed by the quasiclassical calculations. The PH induced by circularly polarized laser pulses provides a tool to resolve the electron dynamics and explore the spatial information of molecular structures.

  16. Linear polarization of BY Draconis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.H.; Pfeiffer, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Linear polarization measurements are reported in four bandpasses for the flare star BY Dra. The red polarization is intrinsically variable at a confidence level greater than 99 percent. On a time scale of many months, the variability is not phase-locked to either a rotational or a Keplerian ephemeris. The observations of the three other bandpasses are useful principally to indicate a polarization spectrum rising toward shorter wavelengths

  17. Polarity in Mammalian Epithelial Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roignot, Julie; Peng, Xiao; Mostov, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarity is fundamental for the architecture and function of epithelial tissues. Epithelial polarization requires the intervention of several fundamental cell processes, whose integration in space and time is only starting to be elucidated. To understand what governs the building of epithelial tissues during development, it is essential to consider the polarization process in the context of the whole tissue. To this end, the development of three-dimensional organotypic cell culture model...

  18. A polarized alkali ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettger, R.; Tungate, G.; Bauer, B.; Egelhof, P.; Moebius, K.H.; Steffens, E.

    1978-01-01

    The beam foil technique has been applied to detect nuclear vector polarization of a 10 keV 23 Na + beam. The result was about 70% of the atomic beam polarization thus limiting the depolarization by the surface ionizer to at most 30%. In a Coulomb excitation experiment with a tensor polarized 42 MeV 23 Na 7+ beam an effect of 0.011 +- 0.003 was measured yielding a value of t 20 approx. 0.04 for the beam polarization. The depolarization during the acceleration process can be estimated to be about 0.8. (orig.) [de

  19. The SLAC polarized electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.; Frisch, J.

    1995-06-01

    The SLAC polarized electron source employs a photocathode DC high voltage gun with a loadlock and a YAG pumped Ti:sapphire laser system for colliding beam experiments or a flash lamp pumped Ti:sapphire laser for fixed target experiments. It uses a thin, strained GaAs(100) photocathode, and is capable of producing a pulsed beam with a polarization of ≥80% and a peak current exceeding 10 A. Its operating efficiency has reached 99%. The physics and technology of producing high polarization electron beams from a GaAs photocathode will be reviewed. The prospects of realizing a polarized electron source for future linear colliders will also be discussed

  20. Bio-Inspired Sensing and Imaging of Polarization Information in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-04

    established that honeybees through their perception of polarized light use the Sun as a compass through their perception of the polarization pattern of... Neurobiology of polarization vision,” Trends Neu- rosci. 12, 353–359 (1989). 32. R. Wehner, “‘Matched filters’: neural models of the external world,” J... compass and odometer, Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 12, 707–714 (2002). 48. M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of Optics, 7th ed. (Cambridge U. Press, 2002). 49. W

  1. Electrically controlled phases of partially polarized light and orientational Kerr effect in liquid crystal ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Kesaev, Vladimir V.; Pozhidaev, Evgeny P.

    2017-10-01

    We study the electro-optic properties of subwavelength-pitch deformed-helix ferroelectric liquid crystals illuminated with partially polarized light. In an experimental setup based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, it is found that the interference pattern crucially depends on the degree of polarization of the incident light. We evaluate the electric field dependence of both the Pancharatnam relative phase and the geometric phase for the general case of nonunitarily evolving mixed polarization states.

  2. Slot-dimer babinet metamaterials as polarization shapers for terahertz waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Chigrin, D. N.; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically study optical properties of free-standing metallic membranes patterned with an array of two-slot elements (dimers) comprising two rectangular slots of different dimensions and orientation. It is shown that these structures feature extraordinary optical transmission with strong...... and spectrally selective polarization conversion capabilities. The output polarization is highly dependent on the dimer geometry, which can be used in the design of compact polarization shapers for terahertz waves....

  3. Attosecond polarization control in atomic RABBITT-like experiments assisted by a circularly polarized laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, D. I. R.; Fojón, O. A.

    2017-12-01

    We study theoretically the single ionization of noble gas atoms by the combined action of an attosecond pulse train with linear polarization and an assistant laser field with circular polarization. We employ a non-perturbative model that under certain approximations gives closed-form expressions for the angular distributions of photoelectrons. Interestingly, our model allow us to interpret these angular distributions as two-centre interferences where the orientation and the modulus of the separation vector between the virtual emitters is governed by the assistant laser field. Additionally, we show that such a configuration of light fields is similar to the polarization control technique, where both the attosecond pulse train and the assistant laser field have linear polarizations whose relative orientation may be controlled. Moreover, in order to compare our results with the available experimental data, we obtain analytical expressions for the cross sections integrated over the photoelectron emission angles. By means of these expressions, we define the ‘magic time’ as the delay for which the total cross sections for atomic targets exhibit the same functional form as the one of the monochromatic photoionization of diatomic molecular targets.

  4. Attosecond polarization control in atomic RABBITT-like experiments assisted by a circularly polarized laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boll, D I R; Fojón, O A

    2017-01-01

    We study theoretically the single ionization of noble gas atoms by the combined action of an attosecond pulse train with linear polarization and an assistant laser field with circular polarization. We employ a non-perturbative model that under certain approximations gives closed-form expressions for the angular distributions of photoelectrons. Interestingly, our model allow us to interpret these angular distributions as two-centre interferences where the orientation and the modulus of the separation vector between the virtual emitters is governed by the assistant laser field. Additionally, we show that such a configuration of light fields is similar to the polarization control technique, where both the attosecond pulse train and the assistant laser field have linear polarizations whose relative orientation may be controlled. Moreover, in order to compare our results with the available experimental data, we obtain analytical expressions for the cross sections integrated over the photoelectron emission angles. By means of these expressions, we define the ‘magic time’ as the delay for which the total cross sections for atomic targets exhibit the same functional form as the one of the monochromatic photoionization of diatomic molecular targets. (paper)

  5. Palmar and digital dermatoglyphic patterns in the Ndokwas of Delta State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anibor, E; Igbigbi, P S; Avwioro, O G; Okpor, A

    2011-09-01

    We determined asymmetry, complexity and pattern polarization of dermal ridges and palmar variables of atd angle, a - b ridge count and total finger ridge count of dermal ridges among the Ndokwa people of Nigeria. 400 healthy students who are Ndokwas were studied. Ink prints of their fingers and palms were obtained. Counting and classifying of Palmar and digital ridge pattern configurations of arches, loops and whorls was based on standard techniques. Ulnar loops polarized preferentially to digits III, IV and V and radial loops to digit II. Female subjects had higher counts of radial loops (p < 0.001) than the males. Male subjects had a higher whorl count than the females (p < 0.05). Our findings form useful baseline data for subsequent longitudinal cytogenetic studies on the Ndokwa people.

  6. Collective Behavior of Chiral Active Matter: Pattern Formation and Enhanced Flocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebchen, Benno; Levis, Demian

    2017-08-01

    We generalize the Vicsek model to describe the collective behavior of polar circle swimmers with local alignment interactions. While the phase transition leading to collective motion in 2D (flocking) occurs at the same interaction to noise ratio as for linear swimmers, as we show, circular motion enhances the polarization in the ordered phase (enhanced flocking) and induces secondary instabilities leading to structure formation. Slow rotations promote macroscopic droplets with late time sizes proportional to the system size (indicating phase separation) whereas fast rotations generate patterns consisting of phase synchronized microflocks with a controllable characteristic size proportional to the average single-particle swimming radius. Our results defy the viewpoint that monofrequent rotations form a vapid extension of the Vicsek model and establish a generic route to pattern formation in chiral active matter with possible applications for understanding and designing rotating microflocks.

  7. Graded nanowire ultraviolet LEDs by polarization engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Santino D.; Kent, Thomas F.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; Klie, Robert F.; Rajan, Siddharth; Myers, Roberto C.

    2012-10-01

    Given the large thermal activation energy of acceptors in high %Al AlGaN, a new approach is needed to control p-type conductivity in this material. One promising alternative to using impurity doping with thermal activation is using the intrinsic characteristics of the III-nitrides to activate dopants with polarization-induced charge in graded heterostructures. In this work polarization-induced activation of dopants is used in graded AlGaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy to form ultraviolet light-emitting diodes. Electrical and optical characterization is provided, showing clear diode behavior and electroluminescent emission at 336nm. Variable temperature electrical measurements show little change in device performance at cryogenic temperatures, proving that dopant ionization is polarizationinduced rather than thermally activated.

  8. Hγ Line Spectrum of Intermediate Polars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggi Kim

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Kim & Beuermann (1995, 1996 have developed a model for the propagation of X-rays from the accreting white dwarf through the infalling material and the re-emission of the energy deposited by photo-absorption in the optical (and UV spectral range. By using this model, we calculate the profiles of the Hγ emission-line spectrum of intermediate polars. Photoabsorption of X-rays by the infalling material is the dominant process in forming the observed energy-dependent rotational modulation of the X-ray flux. X-ray and optical modulations are sensitive to model parameters in different ways. In principle, these dependencies allow us to obtain improved insight into the accretion geometry of the intermediate polars. We present results of our calculations and compare them with the Hβ line spectrum (Kim & Beuermann 1996.

  9. Optically enhanced nuclear cross polarization in acridine-doped fluorene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshiro, C.M.

    1982-06-01

    The objective of this work has been to create large polarizations of the dilute /sup 13/C nuclei in the solid state. The idea was to create /sup 1/H polarizations larger than Boltzmann and to use the proton enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy cross polarization technique to then transfer this large polarization to the /sup 13/C spin system. Optical Nuclear Polarization (ONP) of acridine-doped fluorene single crystals was studied. In addition, ONP of powdered samples of the acridine-doped fluorene was studied. In general, many compounds do not crystallize easily or do not form large crystals suitable for NMR experiments. Powdered, amorphous and randomly dispersed samples are generally far more readily available than single crystals. One objective of this work has been to (first) create large /sup 1/H polarizations. Although large optical proton polarizations in single crystals have been reported previously, optically generated polarizations in powdered samples have not been reported. For these reasons, ONP studies of powdered samples of the acridine-doped fluorene were also undertaken. Using ONP in combination with the proton enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy experiment, large /sup 13/C polarizations have been created in fluorene single crystals. These large /sup 13/C polarizations have permitted the determination of the seven incongruent chemical shielding tensors of the fluorene molecule. Part 2 of this thesis describes the proton enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy experiment. Part 3 describes the ONP experiment. Part 4 is a description of the experimental set-up. Part 5 describes the data analysis for the determination of the chemical shielding tensors. Part 6 presents the results of the ONP experiments performed in this work and the chemical shielding tensors determined.

  10. Self-amplified optical pattern recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A self amplifying optical pattern recognizer includes a geometric system configuration similar to that of a Vander Lugt holographic matched filter configuration with a photorefractive crystal specifically oriented with respect to the input beams. An extraordinarily polarized, spherically converging object image beam is formed by laser illumination of an input object image and applied through a photorefractive crystal, such as a barium titanite (BaTiO.sub.3) crystal. A volume or thin-film dif ORIGIN OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein was made in the performance of work under a NASA contract, and is subject to the provisions of Public Law 96-517 (35 USC 202) in which the Contractor has elected to retain title.

  11. Polarization-controlled luminaires utilizing multiple Fresnel reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Caulfield, H. John; Alvarez, Roberto

    2003-11-01

    A novel luminaire utilizes repeated Fresnel reflections by angled surfaces to transform a small collimated input beam into a controlled output pattern with a high degree of polarization, either linear or radial. Applications to backlighting, front-lighting, optical communications and automotive lighting will be discussed.

  12. On Growth and Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maartens, Aidan

    2017-12-01

    D'Arcy Thompson was born in 1860, trained in Edinburgh and Cambridge, and held positions in Dundee and St Andrews, where he worked until his death in 1948. On Growth and Form , his classic work on the mathematical patterns and physical rules underlying biological forms, was first published in 1917. To learn more about the book's context, we met Matthew Jarron, Curator of Museum Services at the University of Dundee, in the University's D'Arcy Thompson Zoology Museum. Surrounded by specimens, many of which were collected by Thompson himself, we discussed the legacy of On Growth and Form and the life of the man behind it. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Study of Collagen Birefringence in Different Grades of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using Picrosirius Red and Polarized Light Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillai Arun Gopinathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The present study was done to evaluate birefringence pattern of collagen fibres in different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma using Picrosirius red stain and polarization microscopy and to determine if there is a change in collagen fibres between different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods. Picrosirius red stained 5 μm thick sections of previously diagnosed different grades of squamous cell carcinoma and normal oral mucosa were studied under polarization microscopy for arrangement as well as birefringence of collagen fibres around tumour islands. Results. It was found that thin collagen fibres increased and thick collagen fibres decreased with dedifferentiation of OSCC (P<0.0001 . It was observed that there was change in polarization colours of thick fibres from yellowish orange to greenish yellow with dedifferentiation of OSCC indicating loosely packed fibres (P<0.0001. Conclusion. There was a gradual change of birefringence of collagen from yellowish orange to greenish yellow from well to poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, indicating that there is a change from mature form of collagen to immature form as tumour progresses. Studying collagen fibres with Picrosirius red for stromal changes around tumour islands along with routine staining may help in predicting the prognosis of tumour.

  14. Polar Biomedical Research - An Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    to grow more crops in subpolar Alaska. The severity of the polar conditions in Antarctica allow no practical method for providing volumes of plant food...for an expanded population. Any experiments in polar regions in food production involving geothermal heat, solar energy, hydroponics , or aquaculture

  15. Create a Polarized Light Show.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson that introduces students to polarized light using a problem-solving approach. After illustrating the concept using a slinky and poster board with a vertical slot, students solve the problem of creating a polarized light show using Polya's problem-solving methods. (MDH)

  16. Carbon nanotube fiber terahertz polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubair, Ahmed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Young, Colin C. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Heimbeck, Martin S. [Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Everitt, Henry O. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Pasquali, Matteo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Kono, Junichiro, E-mail: kono@rice.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Conventional, commercially available terahertz (THz) polarizers are made of uniformly and precisely spaced metallic wires. They are fragile and expensive, with performance characteristics highly reliant on wire diameters and spacings. Here, we report a simple and highly error-tolerant method for fabricating a freestanding THz polarizer with nearly ideal performance, reliant on the intrinsically one-dimensional character of conduction electrons in well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The polarizer was constructed on a mechanical frame over which we manually wound acid-doped CNT fibers with ultrahigh electrical conductivity. We demonstrated that the polarizer has an extinction ratio of ∼−30 dB with a low insertion loss (<0.5 dB) throughout a frequency range of 0.2–1.1 THz. In addition, we used a THz ellipsometer to measure the Müller matrix of the CNT-fiber polarizer and found comparable attenuation to a commercial metallic wire-grid polarizer. Furthermore, based on the classical theory of light transmission through an array of metallic wires, we demonstrated the most striking difference between the CNT-fiber and metallic wire-grid polarizers: the latter fails to work in the zero-spacing limit, where it acts as a simple mirror, while the former continues to work as an excellent polarizer even in that limit due to the one-dimensional conductivity of individual CNTs.

  17. Polarization-preserving holey fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Mogilevtsev, Dmitri; Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2001-01-01

    In this work we suggest and discuss a microstructure of air capillaries with elliptical cross-section in a tread of glass that gives opportunity for Creation of polarization-preserving fiber with very small beat length between the fundamental modes of different polarization...

  18. Polarized Scintillating Targets at Psi

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2001-02-01

    Scintillating polarized targets are now routinely available: blocks of 18×18×5 mm scintillating organic polymer, doped with TEMPO, polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. A 19 mm diameter plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat.

  19. UV Coatings, Polarization, and Coronagraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Quijada, Manuel; West, Garrett; Balasubramanian, Bala; Krist, John; Martin, Stefan; Sabatke, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Presenation for the Large UltraViolet Optical Infrared (LUVOIR) and Habitable Exoplanet Imager (HabEx) Science and Technology Definition Teams (STDT) on technical considerations regarding ultraviolet coatings, polarization, and coronagraphy. The presentations review the state-of-the-art in ultraviolet coatings, how those coatings generate polarization aberrations, and recent study results from both the LUVOIR and HabEx teams.

  20. Polarization Imaging and Insect Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Adam S.; Ohmann, Paul R.; Leininger, Nick E.; Kavanaugh, James A.

    2010-01-01

    For several years we have included discussions about insect vision in the optics units of our introductory physics courses. This topic is a natural extension of demonstrations involving Brewster's reflection and Rayleigh scattering of polarized light because many insects heavily rely on optical polarization for navigation and communication.…

  1. Climate Drives Polar Bear Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    In their provocative analysis of northern bears (“Nuclear genomic sequences reveal that polar bears are an old and distinct bear lineage,” Reports, 20 April, p. 344), F. Hailer et al. use independent nuclear loci to show that polar bears originated during the middle Pleistocene, rather than during t...

  2. Polarized neutron reflectometry of magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toperverg, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Among a number of methods employed to characterize various types of magnetic nano-structures Polarized Neutron Reflectometry (PNR) is shown to be a unique tool providing a scope of quantitative information on magnetization arrangement over relevant scales. Deeply penetrating into materials neutron spins are able to resolve vectorial profile of magnetic induction with accuracy of a fraction of Oersted over a fraction of nano-meters. This property is exploited in measurements of specular PNR which hence constitutes the method of depth resolved vector magnetometry widely used to examine magnetic states in exchange coupled magnetic superlattices, exchange bias systems, spin valves, exchange springs, superconducting/ferromagnetic heterostructure, etc. Off-specular polarized neutron scattering (OS-PNS) measures the in-plane magnetization distribution over scales from hundreds of nanoto hundreds of micrometers providing, in combination with specular PNR, access to lateral long range fluctuations of the magnetization vector and magnetic domains in these systems. OSPNS is especially useful in studies of co-operative magnetization reversal processes in various films and multilayers laterally patterned into periodic arrays of stripes, or islands of various dimentions, shapes, internal structures, etc., representing an interest for e.g. spintronics. Smaller sizes of 10?100 nm are accessed with the method of Polarized Neutrons Grazing Incidence Small Angle Scattering (PN-GISAS), which in a combination with specular PNR and OS-PNS is used to study self-assembling of magnetic nano-particles on flat surfaces, while Polarized Neutron Grazing Incidence Diffraction (PN-GID) complete the scope of magnetic information over wide range of scales in 3D space. The review of recent results obtained employing the methods listed above is preceded by the detailed theoretical consideration and exemplified by new developments addressing with PNR fast magnetic kinetics in nano-systems.

  3. Integrins and epithelial cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica L; Streuli, Charles H

    2014-08-01

    Cell polarity is characterised by differences in structure, composition and function between at least two poles of a cell. In epithelial cells, these spatial differences allow for the formation of defined apical and basal membranes. It has been increasingly recognised that cell-matrix interactions and integrins play an essential role in creating epithelial cell polarity, although key gaps in our knowledge remain. This Commentary will discuss the mounting evidence for the role of integrins in polarising epithelial cells. We build a model in which both inside-out signals to polarise basement membrane assembly at the basal surface, and outside-in signals to control microtubule apical-basal orientation and vesicular trafficking are required for establishing and maintaining the orientation of epithelial cell polarity. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the basal integrin polarity axis to cancer. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Hyperon polarization: An experimental overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lach, J.

    1992-12-01

    The fact that inclusively produced hyperons are produced with significant polarization was first discovered at Fermilab about seventeen years ago. This and subsequent experiments showed that Λ degree were produced polarized while bar Λ degree had no polarization in the same kinematical region. This set the stage for many experiments which showed that most hyperons are produced polarized. Recent Fermilab experiments have showed that this phenomena is even more complex than previously thought and theoretical understanding is still lacking. Nevertheless polarized hyperon beams have been an extremely useful experimental tool in measuring hyperon magnetic moments and hyperon β-decay. Recently, hyperon radiative decays have been studied and magnetic moment precession of channeled particles in bent crystals has been observed

  5. A review of polarized ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmor, P.W.

    1995-06-01

    The two main types of polarized ion sources in use on accelerators today are the Atomic Beam Polarized Ion Source (ABIS) source and the Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source (OPPIS). Both types can provide beams of nuclearly polarized light ions which are either positively or negatively charged. Heavy ion polarized ion sources for accelerators are being developed. (author). 35 refs., 1 tab

  6. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    topics including growth and heteroepitaxy, bulk GaN substrates, theory and modelling, optical properties, laser diodes and LEDs as well as transport properties and electronics. Farrell et al review materials and growth issues for high-performance non- and semipolar light-emitting devices, and Scholz provides an overview of heteroepitaxial growth of semipolar GaN. Okada et al review growth mechanisms of non- and semipolar GaN layers on patterned sapphire substrates, and Vennéguès discusses defect reduction methods for heteroepitaxially grown non- and semipolar III-nitride films. Leung et al explain how kinetic Wulff plots can be used to design and control non-polar and semipolar GaN heteroepitaxy, and a contribution by Sawaki et al explores the impurity incorporation in (1-101) GaN grown on Si substrates. In the area of bulk crystal growth Kucharski et al review non- and semipolar GaN substrates by ammonothermal growth, and Chichibu et al discuss the challenges for epitaxial growth of InGaN on free-standing m-plane GaN substrates. Calculation of semipolar orientations for wurtzitic semiconductor heterostructures and their application to nitrides and oxides are reviewed by Bigenwald et al, and Ito et al present an ab initio approach to reconstruction, adsorption, and incorporation on GaN surfaces. Finally, the theoretical description of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductor quantum-well structures is presented by Ahn et al. In a discussion of the optical properties, Kisin et al discuss the effect of the quantum well population on the optical characteristics of polar, semipolar and non-polar III-nitride light emitters, and Jönen et al investigate the indium incorporation and optical properties of non- and semipolar GaInN QW structures. Wernicke et al explore the emission wavelength of polar, non-polar, and semipolar InGaN quantum wells and the incorporation of indium. In a contribution by Melo et al, the gain in polar and non-polar/semipolar gallium

  7. Promoting Diversity Through Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (Polar ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, J. D.; Hotaling, L. A.; Garza, C.; Van Dyk, P. B.; Hunter-thomson, K. I.; Middendorf, J.; Daniel, A.; Matsumoto, G. I.; Schofield, O.

    2017-12-01

    Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) is an education and outreach program designed to provide public access to the Antarctic and Arctic regions through polar data and interactions with the scientists. The program provides multi-faceted science communication training for early career scientists that consist of a face-to face workshop and opportunities to apply these skills. The key components of the scientist training workshop include cultural competency training, deconstructing/decoding science for non-expert audiences, the art of telling science stories, and networking with members of the education and outreach community and reflecting on communication skills. Scientists partner with educators to provide professional development for K-12 educators and support for student research symposia. Polar ICE has initiated a Polar Literacy initiative that provides both a grounding in big ideas in polar science and science communication training designed to underscore the importance of the Polar Regions to the public while promoting interdisciplinary collaborations between scientists and educators. Our ultimate objective is to promote STEM identity through professional development of scientists and educators while developing career awareness of STEM pathways in Polar science.

  8. Influences of optical elements on the polarization measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, M.; Hayakawa, M.; Atake, M.; Iwamae, A.

    2004-01-01

    An emission line of He I λ 667.8 nm is observed and the Large Helical Device (LHD) with a polarimeter, with which two linearly polarized components if the light from the same line of sight is simultaneously measured. The emission line exhibits splitting due to the normal Zeeman effect and the π and σ lights are respectively observed. The results indicate the polarization state of emission lines is different from our expectation. From two measurements, for the second of which the polarimeter is rotated 45 degrees form the first, the polarization ellipses of all the three polarized lights are determined. Some observations for a reversed magnetic field plasma operation, for different emission lines of different ions, and also for operation with some different magnetic field strengths suggest that the distortion state originates not in the atomic radiation itself or the plasma condition, but in the optical window at the observation port of the vacuum chamber. (author)

  9. Ferroelectric Polarization in Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite Thin Films on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, S. B.; Tofail, S. A. M.; Kholkin, A. L.; Wojtaś, M.; Gregor, M.; Gandhi, A. A.; Wang, Y.; Bauer, S.; Krause, M.; Plecenik, A.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals in natural form are a major component of bone- a known piezoelectric material. Synthetic hydroxyapatite is widely used in bone grafts and prosthetic pyroelectric coatings as it binds strongly with natural bone. Nanocrystalline synthetic hydroxyapatite films have recently been found to exhibit strong piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity. While a spontaneous polarization in hydroxyapatite has been predicted since 2005, the reversibility of this polarization (i.e. ferroelectricity) requires experimental evidence. Here we use piezoresponse force microscopy to demonstrate that nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite indeed exhibits ferroelectricity: a reversal of polarization under an electrical field. This finding will strengthen investigations on the role of electrical polarization in biomineralization and bone-density related diseases. As hydroxyapatite is one of the most common biocompatible materials, our findings will also stimulate systematic exploration of lead and rare-metal free ferroelectric devices for potential applications in areas as diverse as in vivo and ex vivo energy harvesting, biosensing and electronics. PMID:23884324

  10. Ultrastructure of stomatal development in early-divergent angiosperms reveals contrasting patterning and pre-patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudall, Paula J; Knowles, Emma V W

    2013-10-01

    Angiosperm stomata consistently possess a pair of guard cells, but differ between taxa in the patterning and developmental origin of neighbour cells. Developmental studies of phylogenetically pivotal taxa are essential as comparative yardsticks for understanding the evolution of stomatal development. We present a novel ultrastructural study of developing stomata in leaves of Amborella (Amborellales), Nymphaea and Cabomba (Nymphaeales), and Austrobaileya and Schisandra (Austrobaileyales), representing the three earliest-divergent lineages of extant angiosperms (the ANITA-grade). Alternative developmental pathways occur in early-divergent angiosperms, resulting partly from differences in pre-patterning and partly from the presence or absence of highly polarized (asymmetric) mitoses in the stomatal cell lineage. Amplifying divisions are absent from ANITA-grade taxa, indicating that ostensible similarities with the stomatal patterning of Arabidopsis are superficial. In Amborella, 'squared' pre-patterning occurs in intercostal regions, with groups of four protodermal cells typically arranged in a rectangle; most guard-mother cells are formed by asymmetric division of a precursor cell (the mesoperigenous condition) and are typically triangular or trapezoidal. In contrast, water-lily stomata are always perigenous (lacking asymmetric divisions). Austrobaileya has occasional 'giant' stomata. Similar mature stomatal phenotypes can result from contrasting morphogenetic factors, although the results suggest that paracytic stomata are invariably the product of at least one asymmetric division. Loss of asymmetric divisions in stomatal development could be a significant factor in land plant evolution, with implications for the diversity of key structural and physiological pathways.

  11. Visual evoked potentials to double-pulse pattern presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselwhite, M J; Jeffreys, D A

    1983-01-01

    The temporal resolution and summation characteristics of human cortical processes were investigated by recording an individual VEP component, C1, to the double-pulse presentation of pattern pairs of both the same (+ve/+ve; -ve/-ve) and of opposite (+ve/-ve; -ve/+ve) contrast polarity at varying onset-to-onset intervals (SOA). The results show that comparable limiting SOA values of 40-50 msec are needed for the C1 components to the two patterns to separate out to form a double-peaked response and for the stimulus to be seen as two distinct events. Also, the amplitude variations of the single-peaked response obtained at shorter SOAs show evidence of complete precortical response integration for SOA values below 5-10 msec and partial integration for values up to 30-40 msec, which again correspond to the results of related psychophysical studies. These VEPs show no reflection, however, of the inhibition/summation effects reported for subjective responses to pattern pairs of the same/opposite contrast polarity at SOA values between 40 and 70 msec. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  12. Three-dimensional cell manipulation and patterning using dielectrophoresis via a multi-layer scaffold structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, H K; Huan, Z; Mills, J K; Yang, J; Sun, D

    2015-02-07

    Cell manipulation is imperative to the areas of cellular biology and tissue engineering, providing them a useful tool for patterning cells into cellular patterns for different analyses and applications. This paper presents a novel approach to perform three-dimensional (3D) cell manipulation and patterning with a multi-layer engineered scaffold. This scaffold structure employed dielectrophoresis as the non-contact mechanism to manipulate cells in the 3D domain. Through establishing electric fields via this multi-layer structure, the cells in the medium became polarized and were attracted towards the interior part of the structure, forming 3D cellular patterns. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the manipulation and the patterning processes with the proposed structure. Results show that with the presence of a voltage input, this multi-layer structure was capable of manipulating different types of biological cells examined through dielectrophoresis, enabling automatic cell patterning in the time-scale of minutes. The effects of the voltage input on the resultant cellular pattern were examined and discussed. Viability test was performed after the patterning operation and the results confirmed that majority of the cells remained viable. After 7 days of culture, 3D cellular patterns were observed through SEM. The results suggest that this scaffold and its automated dielectrophoresis-based patterning mechanism can be used to construct artificial tissues for various tissue engineering applications.

  13. POLARIZED LIGHT IN PHYSIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Tondiy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The data on polarized light (PS - a new promising treatment, rehabilitation and prevention, which took its deserved place among the known therapeutic physical factors and may even compete with laser radiation of low and LED therapy. It is reflected the significant contribution of domestic scientists in the study of aircraft action on the body, its introduction in the treatment, rehabilitation and prevention of grippe, ARI. These action's mechanisms of the aircraft on the electro-physiological processes in the body that have the leading role in the regulation of its life. The new moment in the study of aircraft on the body is the evidence of its positive impact on the mechanisms of self body - its different units: the disease's banning - a revitalization of the stress-protective, stress-limiting system antioxidial, detoxification and other protection systems, the formation by the body antiviral and antimicrobial specific substances (interferon and lysozyme, activation of the immune system, phagocytosis, protective functions of skin. The protective and mobilizing role of the second link is studied: which is triggered in case of occurrence of disease or preexisting diseases: PL mobilized processes of restitution, reparations, compensation, immunity and microcirculation. The authors studied the possibility of aircraft's using to enhance performance, reduce side effects of physical factors, which are often used in the treatment (electric methods, treatment by sound, fresh and mineral water, etc..

  14. Update of the Polar SWIFT model for polar stratospheric ozone loss (Polar SWIFT version 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2017-07-01

    The Polar SWIFT model is a fast scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion in polar winter. It is intended for use in global climate models (GCMs) and Earth system models (ESMs) to enable the simulation of mutual interactions between the ozone layer and climate. To date, climate models often use prescribed ozone fields, since a full stratospheric chemistry scheme is computationally very expensive. Polar SWIFT is based on a set of coupled differential equations, which simulate the polar vortex-averaged mixing ratios of the key species involved in polar ozone depletion on a given vertical level. These species are O3, chemically active chlorine (ClOx), HCl, ClONO2 and HNO3. The only external input parameters that drive the model are the fraction of the polar vortex in sunlight and the fraction of the polar vortex below the temperatures necessary for the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. Here, we present an update of the Polar SWIFT model introducing several improvements over the original model formulation. In particular, the model is now trained on vortex-averaged reaction rates of the ATLAS Chemistry and Transport Model, which enables a detailed look at individual processes and an independent validation of the different parameterizations contained in the differential equations. The training of the original Polar SWIFT model was based on fitting complete model runs to satellite observations and did not allow for this. A revised formulation of the system of differential equations is developed, which closely fits vortex-averaged reaction rates from ATLAS that represent the main chemical processes influencing ozone. In addition, a parameterization for the HNO3 change by denitrification is included. The rates of change of the concentrations of the chemical species of the Polar SWIFT model are purely chemical rates of change in the new version, whereas in the original Polar SWIFT model, they included a transport effect caused by the

  15. Polar representation of centrifugal pump homologous curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo Antonio; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de

    2008-01-01

    Essential for any mathematical model designed to simulate flow transient events caused by pump operations is the pump performance data. The performance of a centrifugal pump is characterized by four basic parameters: the rotational speed, the volumetric flow rate, the dynamic head, and the hydraulic torque. Any one of these quantities can be expressed as a function of any two others. The curves showing the relationships between these four variables are called the pump characteristic curves, also referred to as four-quadrant curves. The characteristic curves are empirically developed by the pump manufacturer and uniquely describe head and torque as functions of volumetric flow rate and rotation speed. Because of comprising a large amount of points, the four-quadrant configuration is not suitable for computational purposes. However, it can be converted to a simpler form by the development of the homologous curves, in which dynamic head and hydraulic torque ratios are expressed as functions of volumetric flow and rotation speed ratios. The numerical use of the complete set of homologous curves requires specification of sixteen partial curves, being eight for the dynamic head and eight for the hydraulic torque. As a consequence, the handling of homologous curves is still somewhat complicated. In solving flow transient problems that require the pump characteristic data for all the operation zones, the polar form appears as the simplest way to represent the homologous curves. In the polar method, the complete characteristics of a pump can be described by only two closed curves, one for the dynamic head and other for the hydraulic torque, both in function of a single angular coordinate defined adequately in terms of the quotient between volumetric flow ratio and rotation speed ratio. The usefulness and advantages of this alternative method are demonstrated through a practical example in which the homologous curves for a pump of the type used in the main coolant loops of a

  16. Rigorous vectorial modeling for polarized illumination and projection pupil in OPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiaolin; Song, Hua; Lucas, Kevin; Ward, Brian; Shiely, James

    2008-05-01

    High NA and Ultra-High NA (NA>1.0) applications for low k1 imaging strongly demand the adoption of polarized illumination as a resolution enhancement technology since proper illumination polarization configuration can greatly improve the image contrast hence pattern printing fidelity and the effectiveness of optical proximity correction (OPC). However, current OPC/RET modeling software can only model the light source polarization of simple types, such as TE, TM, X, Y, or sector polarization with relatively simple configuration. Realistic polarized light used in scanners is more complex than the aforementioned simple ones. As a result, simulation accuracy and quality of the OPC result will be compromised by the simplification of the light source polarization modeling in the traditional approach. With ever shrinking CD error budget in the manufacturing of IC's at advanced technology nodes, more accurate and comprehensive illumination source modeling for lithography simulations and OPC/RET is needed. On the other hand, for polarized illumination to be fully effective, ideally all the components in the optical lithography system should not alter the polarization state of light during its propagation from illuminator to wafer surface. In current OPC modeling tools, it is typically assumed that the amplitude and polarization state of the light do not change as it passes through the projection lens pupil, i.e. the polarization aberration of projection lens pupil is ignored. However, in reality, the projection lens pupil of the scanner does change the amplitude and the polarization state to some extent, and ignorance of projection pupil induced polarization state and amplitude changes will cause CD errors un-tolerable at the 45nm device generation and beyond. We developed an OPC-deployable modeling approach to model arbitrarily polarized light source and arbitrarily polarized projection lens pupil. Based on polarization state vector descriptions of a general illumination

  17. Sugar-Based Polyamides: Self-Organization in Strong Polar Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, Cornelia; Russo, Paul S; Daly, William H; Cueto, Rafael; Pople, John A; Laine, Roger A; Negulescu, Ioan I

    2015-09-14

    Periodic patterns resembling spirals were observed to form spontaneously upon unassisted cooling of d-glucaric acid- and d-galactaric acid-based polyamide solutions in N-methyl-N-morpholine oxide (NMMO) monohydrate. Similar observations were made in d-galactaric acid-based polyamide/ionic liquid (IL) solutions. The morphologies were investigated by optical, polarized light and confocal microscopy assays to reveal pattern details. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to monitor solution thermal behavior. Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering data reflected the complex and heterogeneous nature of the self-organized patterns. Factors such as concentration and temperature were found to influence spiral dimensions and geometry. The distance between rings followed a first-order exponential decay as a function of polymer concentration. Fourier-Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy analysis of spirals pointed to H-bonding between the solvent and the pendant hydroxyl groups of the glucose units from the polymer backbone. Tests on self-organization into spirals of ketal-protected d-galactaric acid polyamides in NMMO monohydrate confirmed the importance of the monosaccharide's pendant free hydroxyl groups on the formation of these patterns. Rheology performed on d-galactaric-based polyamides at high concentration in NMMO monohydrate solution revealed the optimum conditions necessary to process these materials as fibers by spinning. The self-organization of these sugar-based polyamides mimics certain biological materials.

  18. Left Right Patterning, Evolution and Cardiac Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain M. Dykes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many aspects of heart development are determined by the left right axis and as a result several congenital diseases have their origins in aberrant left-right patterning. Establishment of this axis occurs early in embryogenesis before formation of the linear heart tube yet impacts upon much later morphogenetic events. In this review I discuss the differing mechanisms by which left-right polarity is achieved in the mouse and chick embryos and comment on the evolution of this system. I then discus three major classes of cardiovascular defect associated with aberrant left-right patterning seen in mouse mutants and human disease. I describe phenotypes associated with the determination of atrial identity and venous connections, looping morphogenesis of the heart tube and finally the asymmetric remodelling of the embryonic branchial arch arterial system to form the leftward looped arch of aorta and associated great arteries. Where appropriate, I consider left right patterning defects from an evolutionary perspective, demonstrating how developmental processes have been modified in species over time and illustrating how comparative embryology can aide in our understanding of congenital heart disease.

  19. Tolerance of polar phytoplankton communities to metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeveste, P.; Tovar-Sánchez, A.; Agustí, S.

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of pollutants reach polar regions, particularly the Arctic, impacting their communities. In this study we analyzed the toxic levels of Hg, Cd and Pb to natural phytoplankton communities of the Arctic and Southern Oceans, and compared their sensitivities with those observed on phytoplankton natural communities from temperate areas. Mercury was the most toxic metal for both Arctic and Antarctic communities, while both Cd and Pb were toxic only for the Antarctic phytoplankton. Total cell abundance of the populations forming the Arctic community increased under high Cd and Pb concentrations, probably due to a decrease of the grazing pressure or the increase of the most resistant species, although analysis of individual cells indicated that cell death was already induced at the highest levels. These results suggest that phytoplankton may have acquired adapting mechanisms to face high levels of Pb and Cd in the Arctic Ocean. Highlights: • First study analyzing the toxicity of Hg, Cd or Pb to natural polar phytoplankton. • Arctic Ocean communities highly resistant to Cd and Pb, but not to Hg. • Southern Ocean communities sensitive to Cd, Pb and Hg. • Both communities incorporated Pb at a similar level. • Arctic phytoplankton may have acquired adapting mechanisms against Cd and Pb. -- Polar phytoplankton communities are tolerant to Cd and Pb, specially the Arctic ones, suggesting the acquisition of adapting mechanisms to face metals' toxicity

  20. A New Kind of Circular Polarization Leaky-Wave Antenna Based on Substrate Integrated Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new kind of circular polarization leaky-wave antenna with N-shaped slots cut in the upper side of substrate integrated waveguide (SIW is investigated and presented. The radiation pattern and polarization axial ratio of the leaky-wave antenna are studied. The results show that the width of N-shaped slots has significant effect on the circular polarization property of the antenna. By properly choosing structural parameters, the SIW based leaky-wave antenna can realize circular polarization with excellent axial ratio in 8 GHz satellite band.

  1. Nuclear physics with polarized particles

    CERN Document Server

    Paetz gen Schieck, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of spin-polarization observables in reactions of nuclei and particles is of great utility and advantage when the effects of single-spin sub-states are to be investigated. Indeed, the unpolarized differential cross-section encompasses the averaging over the spin states of the particles, and thus loses details of the interaction process. This introductory text combines, in a single volume, course-based lecture notes on spin physics and on polarized-ion sources with the aim of providing a concise yet self-contained starting point for newcomers to the field, as well as for lecturers in search of suitable material for their courses and seminars. A significant part of the book is devoted to introducing the formal theory-a description of polarization and of nuclear reactions with polarized particles. The remainder of the text describes the physical basis of methods and devices necessary to perform experiments with polarized particles and to measure polarization and polarization effects in nuclear rea...

  2. Polarimetric purity and the concept of degree of polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, José J.; Norrman, Andreas; Friberg, Ari T.; Setälä, Tero

    2018-02-01

    The concept of degree of polarization for electromagnetic waves, in its general three-dimensional version, is revisited in the light of the implications of the recent findings on the structure of polarimetric purity and of the existence of nonregular states of polarization [J. J. Gil et al., Phys Rev. A 95, 053856 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.053856]. From the analysis of the characteristic decomposition of a polarization matrix R into an incoherent convex combination of (1) a pure state Rp, (2) a middle state Rm given by an equiprobable mixture of two eigenstates of R, and (3) a fully unpolarized state Ru -3 D, it is found that, in general, Rm exhibits nonzero circular and linear degrees of polarization. Therefore, the degrees of linear and circular polarization of R cannot always be assigned to the single totally polarized component Rp. It is shown that the parameter P3 D proposed formerly by Samson [J. C. Samson, Geophys. J. R. Astron. Soc. 34, 403 (1973), 10.1111/j.1365-246X.1973.tb02404.x] takes into account, in a proper and objective form, all the contributions to polarimetric purity, namely, the contributions to the linear and circular degrees of polarization of R as well as to the stability of the plane containing its polarization ellipse. Consequently, P3 D constitutes a natural representative of the degree of polarimetric purity. Some implications for the common convention for the concept of two-dimensional degree of polarization are also analyzed and discussed.

  3. A structural study of lamellar phases formed by nucleoside-functionalized lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, D.; Fratini, E.; Baglioni, P. [Department of Chemistry and CSGI, University of Florence, Via G. Capponi 9, 50121 Florence (Italy); Dante, S.; Hauss, T. [Berlin Neutron Scattering Center, Hahn Meitner Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, Wannsee, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    We report a neutron-scattering investigation of lamellar phases formed by novel phospholipids bearing nucleosides at the polar-head-group region. These nucleolipids can interact through stacking and H-bond interactions, following a pattern that resembles base-base coupling in natural nucleic acids (DNA, RNA), i.e. they have similar recognition properties. Bilayer stacks formed of DPP-adenosine, DPP-uridine and their 1:1 mixture were investigated after equilibration in a 98% relative humidity atmosphere. The DPP-adenosine spectrum can be accounted for (in analogy to DPPC) by a lamellar phase with a smectic period of about 60 A. DPP-uridine displays a not so straightforward behavior that we have tentatively ascribed to the coexistence of lamellae with different smectic periods. In the 1:1 mixture the lamellar mesophase of DPP-uridine is retained, suggesting a specific interaction of the uridine polar-head group with the adenosine moiety of DPP-adenosine. It should be stressed that this behavior can be considered as an indication of the recognition process occurring at the polar-head-group region of the mixed phospholiponucleoside membrane. (orig.)

  4. Pattern recognition of clouds and ice in polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, R. M.; Sengupta, S. K.; Sundar, C. A.; Kuo, K. S.; Carsey, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    The study is based on AVHRR imagery and results from Landsat high-spatial-resolution scenes. Among the textual features investigated are the gray level difference vector (GLDV), and sum and difference histogram (SADH) approaches as well as gray level run length, spatial-coherence, and spectral-histogram measures. The traditional stepwise discriminant analysis and neural-network analysis are used for the identification of 20 Arctic surface and cloud classes. A principal-component analysis and hybrid architecture employing a modularized competitive learning layer are utilized. It is pointed out that the cloud-classification accuracy comparable to that of back-propagation could be achieved with a training time two orders of magnitude faster.

  5. Vector wave diffraction pattern of slits masked by polarizing devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (7) where X = πud is the observation plane coordinate. If an analyser P(θ) is placed at the output side whose transmission axis makes an angle θ with the chosen x-axis, the vector wave amplitude obtained at the observation plane is then given by. F(u)WA = P(θ)F(u), where. P(θ) = ∣. ∣. ∣. ∣ cos2 θ sin θ cos θ sin θ cos θ.

  6. Terahertz transmission control using polarization-independent metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Chulki; Jhon, Young Min; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Seo, Minah

    2017-05-15

    We present terahertz (THz) transmission control by several uniquely designed patterns of nano-slot antenna array. Collinearly aligned slot antenna arrays have been usually applied to THz filters with frequency band tunability by their geometry. Normally the amplitude in transmission (reflection) in the collinear alignment case can be varied via rotating the azimuthal angle with a sinusoidal trend, which can limit their utilization and performance only at fixed angle between the alignment of the resonant antennas and incident beam polarization. To pursue a variety of metamaterial uses, here, we present polarization-independent THz filters using variously aligned antenna array (asterisk, chlorophyll, and honeycomb patterns) in such counter-intuitive aspects. Besides, unprecedented multi resonance behaviors were observed in chlorophyll and honeycomb patterns, which can be explained with interferences by adjacent structures. The measured spectra were analyzed by harmonic oscillator model with simplified coupling between slots and their adjacent.

  7. Polar reactions of acyclic conjugated bisallenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Stamm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical behaviour of various alkyl-substituted, acyclic conjugated bisallenes in reactions involving polar intermediates and/or transition states has been investigated on a broad scale for the first time. The reactions studied include lithiation, reaction of the thus formed organolithium salts with various electrophiles (among others, allyl bromide, DMF and acetone, oxidation to cyclopentenones and epoxides, hydrohalogenation (HCl, HBr addition, halogenation (Br2 and I2 addition, and [2 + 2] cycloaddition with chlorosulfonyl isocyanate. The resulting adducts were fully characterized by spectroscopic and analytical methods; they constitute interesting substrates for further organic transformations.

  8. Cylindrically polarized Bessel–Gauss beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhi, Daena; Aiello, Andrea; Ornigotti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of radially and azimuthally polarized Bessel–Gauss (BG) beams in both the paraxial and nonparaxial regime. We discuss the validity of the paraxial approximation and the form of the nonparaxial corrections for BG beams. We show that independently on the ratio between the Bessel aperture cone angle ϑ 0 and the Gaussian beam divergence θ 0 , the nonparaxial corrections are alway very small and therefore negligible. The explicit expressions for the nonparaxial vector electric field components are also reported. (paper)

  9. Few-body experiments with polarized beams and polarized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is presented concerning recent polarization experiments in the elastic p-d, p- 3 He, and p- 4 He systems. Mention is made of selected neutron experiments. The nominal energy range is 10 to 1000 MeV. Recent results and interpretations of the p-d system near 10 MeV are discussed. New experiments on the energy dependence of back angle p-d tensor polarization are discussed with respect to resolution of discrepancies and difficulty of theoretical interpretation. Progress is noted concerning multiple scattering interpretation of forward p-d deuteron polarization. Some new results are presented concerning the p- 3 He system and higher energy p- 4 He polarization experiments. 52 references

  10. Contributors Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2016-06-01

    to produce preprints or reprints and translate into languages other than English for sale or free distribution; and 4 the right to republish the work in a collection of articles in any other mechanical or electronic format. We give the rights to the corresponding author to make necessary changes as per the request of the journal, do the rest of the correspondence on our behalf and he/she will act as the guarantor for the manuscript on our behalf. All persons who have made substantial contributions to the work reported in the manuscript, but who are not contributors, are named in the Acknowledgment and have given me/us their written permission to be named. If I/we do not include an Acknowledgment that means I/we have not received substantial contributions from non-contributors and no contributor has been omitted.S NoAuthors' NamesContribution (IJCME Guidelines{1 substantial contributions to conception and design, acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; 2 drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content; and 3 final approval of the version to be published. Authors should meet conditions 1, 2, and 3}.SignatureDate                              Note: All the authors are required to sign independently in this form in the sequence given above. In case an author has left the institution/country and whose whereabouts are not known, the senior author may sign on his/her behalf taking the responsibility.No addition/deletion/ or any change in the sequence of the authorship will be permissible at a later stage, without valid reasons and permission of the Editor.If the authorship is contested at any stage, the article will be either returned or will not be processed for publication till the issue is solved.Maximum up to 4 authors for short communication and up to 6 authors for original article.

  11. Optical Pattern Recognition With Self-Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1994-01-01

    In optical pattern recognition system with self-amplification, no reference beam used in addressing mode. Polarization of laser beam and orientation of photorefractive crystal chosen to maximize photorefractive effect. Intensity of recognition signal is orders of magnitude greater than other optical correlators. Apparatus regarded as real-time or quasi-real-time optical pattern recognizer with memory and reprogrammability.

  12. A new method for patterning azopolymer thin film surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkhabi, Sh. Golghasemi; Barille, R.; Ahmadi-Kandjani, S.; Zielinska, S.; Ortyl, E.

    2017-04-01

    We present a simple bottom-up approach via an incoherent unpolarized illumination and the choice of a solvent-droplet-induced-dewetting method to photoinduce nano doughnuts on the surface of azopolymer thin films. We demonstrate that doughnut-shaped nanostructures can be formed and tailored with a wide range of typical sizes, thus providing a rich field of applications using surface photo-patterning. Furthermore, due to the presence of highly photoactive azobenzene derivative in the material, illumination of these nanostructures by a polarized laser light shows the possibility of a further growth and reshaping opening the way for fundamental studies of size-dependent scaling laws of optical properties and possible fabrication of nano-reactor or nano-trap patterns.

  13. Elite Polarization and Public Opinion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robison, Joshua; Mullinix, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Elite polarization has reshaped American politics and is an increasingly salient aspect of news coverage within the United States. As a consequence, a burgeoning body of research attempts to unravel the effects of elite polarization on the mass public. However, we know very little about how...... attitudes. In our first study, we show that criticism of polarization leads partisans to more positively evaluate the argument offered by their non-preferred party, increases support for bi-partisanship, but ultimately does not change the extent to which partisans follow their party’s policy endorsements...

  14. Acceleration of polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1998-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. Full Siberian snakes are being developed for RHIC to make the acceleration of polarized protons to 250 GeV possible. A similar scheme is being studied for the 800 GeV HERA proton accelerator

  15. Polarimetry with azimuthally polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sande, Juan Carlos González; Piquero, Gemma; Santarsiero, Massimo

    2018-03-01

    Nonuniformly polarized light can be used for Mueller polarimetry of homogeneous linear samples. In this work, a set up based on using azimuthally polarized input light and a modified commercial light polarimeter is proposed and developed. With this set up, a Mueller submatrix of a sample can be obtained by measuring the Stokes parameters at only three different positions across the output beam section. Symmetry constraints for linear deterministic samples allow the complete Mueller matrix to be deduced for this kind of specimens. The experimental results obtained for phase plates and for a linear polarizer confirm the validity of the proposed method.

  16. Polarized deuteron elastic scattering from a polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, R.; Kuiper, H.; Schoeberl, M.; Berber, S.; Hilmert, H.; Koeppel, R.; Pferdmenges, R.; Zankel, H.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements are reported of the spin correlation parameter Cy,y for the elastic scattering of 10.0 MeV vector polarized deuterons from a polarized proton target at five CM angles (76 0 ,85 0 ,98 0 ,115 0 ,132 0 ). The experimental results are compared with different predictions. A Faddeev type calculation on the basis of local potentials also including approximate Coulomb distortion is favoured by our experimental results. (orig.)

  17. Vorticity and particle polarization in heavy ion collisions (experimental perspective)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshin, Sergei A.

    2018-02-01

    The recent measurements of the global polarization and vector meson spin alignment along the system orbital momentum in heavy ion collisions are briefly reviewed. A possible connection between the global polarization and the chiral anomalous effects is discussed along with possible experimental checks. Future directions, in particular those aimed on the detailed mapping of the vorticity fields, are outlined. The Blast Wave model is used for an estimate of the anisotropic flow effect on the vorticity component along the beam direction. We also point to a possibility of a circular pattern in the vorticity field in asymmetric, e.g. Cu+Au, central collisions.

  18. Vorticity and particle polarization in heavy ion collisions (experimental perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voloshin Sergei A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent measurements of the global polarization and vector meson spin alignment along the system orbital momentum in heavy ion collisions are briefly reviewed. A possible connection between the global polarization and the chiral anomalous effects is discussed along with possible experimental checks. Future directions, in particular those aimed on the detailed mapping of the vorticity fields, are outlined. The Blast Wave model is used for an estimate of the anisotropic flow effect on the vorticity component along the beam direction. We also point to a possibility of a circular pattern in the vorticity field in asymmetric, e.g. Cu+Au, central collisions.

  19. Mechanistic Framework for Establishment, Maintenance, and Alteration of Cell Polarity in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Dhonukshe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell polarity establishment, maintenance, and alteration are central to the developmental and response programs of nearly all organisms and are often implicated in abnormalities ranging from patterning defects to cancer. By residing at the distinct plasma membrane domains polar cargoes mark the identities of those domains, and execute localized functions. Polar cargoes are recruited to the specialized membrane domains by directional secretion and/or directional endocytic recycling. In plants, auxin efflux carrier PIN proteins display polar localizations in various cell types and play major roles in directional cell-to-cell transport of signaling molecule auxin that is vital for plant patterning and response programs. Recent advanced microscopy studies applied to single cells in intact plants reveal subcellular PIN dynamics. They uncover the PIN polarity generation mechanism and identified important roles of AGC kinases for polar PIN localization. AGC kinase family members PINOID, WAG1, and WAG2, belonging to the AGC-3 subclass predominantly influence the polar localization of PINs. The emerging mechanism for AGC-3 kinases action suggests that kinases phosphorylate PINs mainly at the plasma membrane after initial symmetric PIN secretion for eventual PIN internalization and PIN sorting into distinct ARF-GEF-regulated polar recycling pathways. Thus phosphorylation status directs PIN translocation to different cell sides. Based on these findings a mechanistic framework evolves that suggests existence of cell side-specific recycling pathways in plants and implicates AGC3 kinases for differential PIN recruitment among them for eventual PIN polarity establishment, maintenance, and alteration.

  20. Development of high-polarization Fe/Ge neutron polarizing supermirror: Possibility of fine-tuning of scattering length density in ion beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, R.; Yamazaki, D.; Akutsu, K.; Hanashima, T.; Miyata, N.; Aoki, H.; Takeda, M.; Soyama, K.

    2018-04-01

    The multilayer structure of Fe/Si and Fe/Ge systems fabricated by ion beam sputtering (IBS) was investigated using X-ray and polarized neutron reflectivity measurements and scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The obtained result revealed that the incorporation of sputtering gas particles (Ar) in the Ge layer gives rise to a marked reduction in the neutron scattering length density (SLD) and contributes to the SLD contrast between the Fe and Ge layers almost vanishing for spin-down neutrons. Bundesmann et al. (2015) have shown that the implantation of primary Ar ions backscattered at the target is responsible for the incorporation of Ar particles and that the fraction increases with increasing ion incidence angle and increasing polar emission angle. This leads to a possibility of fine-tuning of the SLD for the IBS, which is required to realize a high polarization efficiency of a neutron polarizing supermirror. Fe/Ge polarizing supermirror with m = 5 fabricated under the same condition showed a spin-up reflectivity of 0.70 at the critical momentum transfer. The polarization was higher than 0.985 for the qz range where the correction for the polarization inefficiencies of the beamline works properly. The result of the polarized neutron reflectivity measurement suggests that the "magnetically-dead" layers formed at both sides of the Fe layer, together with the SLD contrast, play a critical role in determining the polarization performance of a polarizing supermirror.

  1. Temperature dependence of the photoluminescence polarization of ordered III-V semiconductor alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prutskij, T.; Makarov, N.; Attolini, G.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the linear polarization of the photoluminescence (PL) emission of atomically ordered GaInAsP and GaInP alloys with different ordering parameters in the temperature range from 10 to 300 K. The epitaxial layers of these alloys were grown on GaAs and Ge (001) substrates by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. The polarization of the PL emission propagating along different crystallographic axes depends on the value of biaxial strain in the layer and changes with temperature. We calculated the PL polarization patterns for different propagation directions as a function of biaxial strain using an existing model developed for ternary atomically ordered III-V alloys. Comparing the calculated PL polarization patterns with those obtained experimentally, we separated the variation of the PL polarization due to change of biaxial strain with temperature.

  2. Exclusive B→ρl+l- decay and polarized lepton pair forward-backward asymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, T.M.; Bashiry, V.; Savci, M.

    2006-01-01

    The polarized lepton pair forward-backward asymmetries in B→ρl + l - decay using a general, model independent form of the four-Fermi interaction is studied. The general expressions for nine double-lepton polarization forward-backward asymmetries are calculated. The study of the forward-backward asymmetries of the doubly polarized lepton pair proves to be a very useful tool in looking for new physics beyond the standard model

  3. Polarized protein transport and lumen formation during epithelial tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasky, Alex J; Mangan, Anthony; Prekeris, Rytis

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges in biology is to explain how complex tissues and organs arise from the collective action of individual polarized cells. The best-studied model of this process is the cross talk between individual epithelial cells during their polarization to form the multicellular epithelial lumen during tissue morphogenesis. Multiple mechanisms of apical lumen formation have been proposed. Some epithelial lumens form from preexisting polarized epithelial structures. However, de novo lumen formation from nonpolarized cells has recently emerged as an important driver of epithelial tissue morphogenesis, especially during the formation of small epithelial tubule networks. In this review, we discuss the latest findings regarding the mechanisms and regulation of de novo lumen formation in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Polar source analysis : technical memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    The following technical memorandum describes the development, testing and analysis of various polar source data sets. The memorandum also includes recommendation for potential inclusion in future releases of AEDT. This memorandum is the final deliver...

  5. Anodic Concentration Polarization in SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williford, Rick E.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Maupin, Gary D.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Wachsman, ED, et al

    2003-08-01

    Concentration polarization is important because it determines the maximum power output of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) at high fuel utilization. Anodic concentration polarization occurs when the demand for reactants exceeds the capacity of the porous ceramic anode to supply them by gas diffusion mechanisms. High tortuosities (bulk diffusion resistances) are often assumed to explain this behavior. However, recent experiments show that anodic concentration polarization originates in the immediate vicinity of the reactive triple phase boundary (TPB) sites near the anode/electrolyte interface. A model is proposed to describe how concentration polarization is controlled by two localized phenomena: competitive adsorption of reactants in areas adjacent to the reactive TPB sites, followed by relatively slow surface diffusion to the reactive sites. Results suggest that future SOFC design improvements should focus on optimization of the reactive area, adsorption, and surface diffusion at the anode/electrolyte interface.

  6. The definition of cross polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, Arthur

    1973-01-01

    There are at least three different definitions of cross polarization used in the literature. The alternative definitions are discussed with respect to several applications, and the definition which corresponds to one standard measurement practice is proposed as the best choice....

  7. Dynamic elections and ideological polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunnari, S.; Zápal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2017), s. 505-534 ISSN 1047-1987 Institutional support: Progres-Q24 Keywords : elections * political polarization Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Economic Theory Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  8. Dynamic elections and ideological polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunnari, S.; Zápal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2017), s. 505-534 ISSN 1047-1987 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : elections * political polarization Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Economic Theory Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  9. Polarization at LEP. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, G.; Altarelli, G.; Blondel, A.; Coignet, G.; Keil, E.; Plane, D.E.; Treille, D.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains a collection of papers covering the most important part of studies carried out by five study groups in view of a programme of experiments with polarized beams at LEP, the Large Electron-Positron collider under construction at CERN. The emphasis is on precision measurements at the Z peak. Such measurements are shown to be of considerable theoretical interest as well as very clean from the point of view of theoretical and experimental uncertainties. The measurement of the beam polarization can certainly be performed with sufficient accuracy, thanks to the availability of both e + and e - beam polarization. The normalization of the data taken with different beam helicities poses certain constraints that are described. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the possibility of providing longitudinally polarized beams in the LEP machine: The design of new wigglers and spin rotators, the study of correction procedures and results of numerical simulations are presented. (orig.)

  10. Mechanical writing of ferroelectric polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H; Bark, C-W; Esque de los Ojos, D; Alcala, J; Eom, C B; Catalan, G; Gruverman, A

    2012-04-06

    Ferroelectric materials are characterized by a permanent electric dipole that can be reversed through the application of an external voltage, but a strong intrinsic coupling between polarization and deformation also causes all ferroelectrics to be piezoelectric, leading to applications in sensors and high-displacement actuators. A less explored property is flexoelectricity, the coupling between polarization and a strain gradient. We demonstrate that the stress gradient generated by the tip of an atomic force microscope can mechanically switch the polarization in the nanoscale volume of a ferroelectric film. Pure mechanical force can therefore be used as a dynamic tool for polarization control and may enable applications in which memory bits are written mechanically and read electrically.

  11. Mechanical Writing of Ferroelectric Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Bark, C.-W.; Esque de los Ojos, D.; Alcala, J.; Eom, C. B.; Catalan, G.; Gruverman, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ferroelectric materials are characterized by a permanent electric dipole that can be reversed through the application of an external voltage, but a strong intrinsic coupling between polarization and deformation also causes all ferroelectrics to be piezoelectric, leading to applications in sensors and high-displacement actuators. A less explored property is flexoelectricity, the coupling between polarization and a strain gradient. We demonstrate that the stress gradient generated by the tip of an atomic force microscope can mechanically switch the polarization in the nanoscale volume of a ferroelectric film. Pure mechanical force can therefore be used as a dynamic tool for polarization control and may enable applications in which memory bits are written mechanically and read electrically.

  12. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. IV. Polarization timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Goosmann, R. W.; Marin, F.; Savić, D.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Optical observations cannot resolve the structure of active galactic nuclei (AGN), and a unified model for AGN was inferred mostly from indirect methods, such as spectroscopy and variability studies. Optical reverberation mapping allowed us to constrain the spatial dimension of the broad emission line region and thereby to measure the mass of supermassive black holes. Recently, reverberation was also applied to the polarized signal emerging from different AGN components. In principle, this should allow us to measure the spatial dimensions of the sub-parsec reprocessing media. Aim. We conduct numerical modeling of polarization reverberation and provide theoretical predictions for the polarization time lag induced by different AGN components. The model parameters are adjusted to the observational appearance of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. Methods: We modeled scattering-induced polarization and tested different geometries for the circumnuclear dust component. Our tests included the effects of clumpiness and different dust prescriptions. To further extend the model, we also explored the effects of additional ionized winds stretched along the polar direction, and of an equatorial scattering ring that is responsible for the polarization angle observed in pole-on AGN. The simulations were run using a time-dependent version of the STOKES code. Results: Our modeling confirms the previously found polarization characteristics as a function of the observer`s viewing angle. When the dust adopts a flared-disk geometry, the lags reveal a clear difference between type 1 and type 2 AGN. This distinction is less clear for a torus geometry where the time lag is more sensitive to the geometry and optical depth of the inner surface layers of the funnel. The presence of a scattering equatorial ring and ionized outflows increased the recorded polarization time lags, and the polar outflows smooths out dependence on viewing angle, especially for the higher optical depth of the

  13. Solid Polarized Targets and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabb, D. G.

    2008-01-01

    Examples are given of dynamically polarized targets in use today and how the subsystems have changed to meet the needs of todays experiments. Particular emphasis is placed on target materials such as ammonia and lithium deuteride. Recent polarization studies of irradiated materials such as butanol, deuterated butanol, polyethylene, and deuterated polyethylene are presented. The operation of two non-DNP target systems as well as applications of traditional DNP targets are briefly discussed

  14. Artificial anisotropy and polarizing filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, François; Escoubas, Ludovic; Lazaridès, Basile

    2002-06-01

    The calculated spectral transmittance of a multilayer laser mirror is used to determine the effective index of the single layer equivalent to the multilayer stack. We measure the artificial anisotropy of photoresist thin films whose structure is a one-dimensional, subwavelength grating obtained from interference fringes. The limitation of the theory of the first-order effective index homogenization is discussed. We designed normal-incidence, polarizing coating and a polarization rotator by embedding anisotropic films in simple multilayer structures.

  15. Polarization bremsstrahlung in α decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Zon, B. A.; Kretinin, I. Yu.

    2007-01-01

    A mechanism of formation of electromagnetic radiation that accompanies α decay and is associated with the emission of photons by electrons of atomic shells due to the scattering of α particles by these atoms (polarization bremsstrahlung) is proposed. It is shown that, when the photon energy is no higher than the energy of K electrons of an atom, polarization bremsstrahlung makes a significant contribution to the bremsstrahlung in α decay

  16. Coherent states with elliptical polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Colavita, E.; Hacyan, S.

    2004-01-01

    Coherent states of the two dimensional harmonic oscillator are constructed as superpositions of energy and angular momentum eigenstates. It is shown that these states are Gaussian wave-packets moving along a classical trajectory, with a well defined elliptical polarization. They are coherent correlated states with respect to the usual cartesian position and momentum operators. A set of creation and annihilation operators is defined in polar coordinates, and it is shown that these same states ...

  17. Polarization of Coronal Forbidden Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hao; Qu, Zhongquan [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Landi Degl’Innocenti, Egidio, E-mail: sayahoro@ynao.ac.cn [Dipartimento di Astronomia e Scienza dello Spazio, Università di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2017-03-20

    Since the magnetic field is responsible for most manifestations of solar activity, one of the most challenging problems in solar physics is the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields, particularly in the outer atmosphere. To this end, it is important to develop rigorous diagnostic tools to interpret polarimetric observations in suitable spectral lines. This paper is devoted to analyzing the diagnostic content of linear polarization imaging observations in coronal forbidden lines. Although this technique is restricted to off-limb observations, it represents a significant tool to diagnose the magnetic field structure in the solar corona, where the magnetic field is intrinsically weak and still poorly known. We adopt the quantum theory of polarized line formation developed in the framework of the density matrix formalism, and synthesize images of the emergent linear polarization signal in coronal forbidden lines using potential-field source-surface magnetic field models. The influence of electronic collisions, active regions, and Thomson scattering on the linear polarization of coronal forbidden lines is also examined. It is found that active regions and Thomson scattering are capable of conspicuously influencing the orientation of the linear polarization. These effects have to be carefully taken into account to increase the accuracy of the field diagnostics. We also found that linear polarization observation in suitable lines can give valuable information on the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the solar corona.

  18. Polarization in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  19. Dayside aurorae and polar arcs under south-east IMF orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sandholt

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We document a characteristic spatial and temporal structure of the aurora in the postnoon sector present during a 10-h-long interval of very steady southeast IMF orientation (clock angle=135° ending in a sharp south-to-north transition. Focus is placed on the detailed morphology of auroral forms/activities corresponding to merging and lobe convection cells obtained from SuperDARN convection data and Greenland magnetograms. The ground optical instruments at Ny Ålesund, Svalbard (76° MLAT recorded different auroral forms/activities as the station moved to higher magnetic local times (MLTs in the 13:00–17:00 MLT sector. Whereas the 13:00–15:00 MLT sector is characterized by classical poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs associated with merging cell transients, the aurora in the 15:00–17:00 MLT sector shows instead a characteristic latitudinal bifurcation consisting of standard oval forms and polar arcs, and a corresponding composite pattern of merging and lobe convection cells. The merging and lobe cells respond to the southward and northward IMF transitions by activation/fading and fading/activation, respectively. A sequence of brightening events is characterized by successive activations progressing in latitude from the merging cell regime to the lobe cell regime. Emphasis is placed on the association between polar arc brightenings and the activation of the channel of enhanced sunward flow in the lobe cell. The observations are discussed in relation to recent work on solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interconnection topology.

  20. Polarity Control in Group-III Nitrides beyond Pragmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Stefan; Stolyarchuk, Natalia; Markurt, Toni; Kirste, Ronny; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Collazo, Ramón; Courville, Aimeric; Di Felice, Rosa; Sitar, Zlatko; Vennéguès, Philippe; Albrecht, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Controlling the polarity of polar semiconductors on nonpolar substrates offers a wealth of device concepts in the form of heteropolar junctions. A key to realize such structures is an appropriate buffer-layer design that, in the past, has been developed by empiricism. GaN or ZnO on sapphire are prominent examples for that. Understanding the basic processes that mediate polarity, however, is still an unsolved problem. In this work, we study the structure of buffer layers for group-III nitrides on sapphire by transmission electron microscopy as an example. We show that it is the conversion of the sapphire surface into a rhombohedral aluminum-oxynitride layer that converts the initial N-polar surface to Al polarity. With the various AlxOyNz phases of the pseudobinary Al2O3 -AlN system and their tolerance against intrinsic defects, typical for oxides, a smooth transition between the octahedrally coordinated Al in the sapphire and the tetrahedrally coordinated Al in AlN becomes feasible. Based on these results, we discuss the consequences for achieving either polarity and shed light on widely applied concepts in the field of group-III nitrides like nitridation and low-temperature buffer layers.