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Sample records for polarization force microscopy

  1. Humidity effects on scanning polarization force microscopy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yue, E-mail: shenyue@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhou, Yuan, E-mail: zhouy@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Lijuan [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Ying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • The humidity dramatically affects the contrast of scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) imaging on mica surface. • This influence roots in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the humidity change. • A strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM is proposed. - Abstract: Scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) is a useful surface characterization technique to visually characterize and distinguish nanomaterial with different local dielectric properties at nanometer scale. In this paper, taking the individual one-atom-thick graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets on mica as examples, we described the influences of environmental humidity on SPFM imaging. We found that the apparent heights (AHs) or contrast of SPFM imaging was influenced significantly by relative humidity (RH) at a response time of a few seconds. And this influence rooted in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the RH change. While dielectric properties of GO and rGO sheets were almost immune to the humidity change. In addition, we gave the method to determine the critical humidity at which the contrast conversion happened under different conditions. And this is important to the contrast control and repeatable imaging of SPFM through RH adjusting. These findings suggest a strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM, which is critically important for further distinguishment, manipulation, electronic applications, etc.

  2. Polarization contrast in photon scanning tunnelling microscopy combined with atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Propstra, K.; Propstra, K.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Photon scanning tunnelling microscopy combined with atomic force microscopy allows simultaneous acquisition and direct comparison of optical and topographical images, both with a lateral resolution of about 30 nm, far beyond the optical diffraction limit. The probe consists of a modified

  3. Light-free magnetic resonance force microscopy for studies of electron spin polarized systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelekhov, Denis V.; Selcu, Camelia; Banerjee, Palash; Chung Fong, Kin; Chris Hammel, P.; Bhaskaran, Harish; Schwab, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy is a scanned probe technique capable of three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. Its excellent sensitivity opens the possibility for magnetic resonance studies of spin accumulation resulting from the injection of spin polarized currents into a para-magnetic collector. The method is based on mechanical detection of magnetic resonance which requires low noise detection of cantilever displacement; so far, this has been accomplished using optical interferometry. This is undesirable for experiments on doped silicon, where the presence of light is known to enhance spin relaxation rates. We report a non-optical displacement detection scheme based on sensitive microwave capacitive readout

  4. Modelling and experimental verification of tip-induced polarization in Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements on dielectric surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis Achton; Popok, Vladimir; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy is a widely used technique for measuring surface potential distributions on the micro- and nanometer scale. The data are, however, often analyzed qualitatively, especially for dielectrics. In many cases, the phenomenon of polarization and its influence on the measured...... signals is disregarded leading to misinterpretation of the results. In this work, we present a model that allows prediction of the surface potential on a metal/polymer heterostructure as measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy by including the tip-induced polarization of the dielectric that arises...

  5. Chiral Nematic Structure of Cellulose Nanocrystal Suspensions and Films; Polarized Light and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek G. Gray

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulosic liquid crystalline solutions and suspensions form chiral nematic phases that show a rich variety of optical textures in the liquid crystalline state. These ordered structures may be preserved in solid films prepared by evaporation of solvent or suspending medium. Film formation from aqueous suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC was investigated by polarized light microscopy, optical profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM. An attempt is made to interpret qualitatively the observed textures in terms of the orientation of the cellulose nanocrystals in the suspensions and films, and the changes in orientation caused by the evaporative process. Mass transfer within the evaporating droplet resulted in the formation of raised rings whose magnitude depended on the degree of pinning of the receding contact line. AFM of dry films at short length scales showed a radial orientation of the CNC at the free surface of the film, along with a radial height variation with a period of approximately P/2, ascribed to the anisotropic shrinkage of the chiral nematic structure.

  6. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  7. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  8. Investigation of the electronic transport in polarization-induced nanowires using conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcu, Camelia; Carnevale, Santino C.; Kent, Thomas F.; Akyol, Fatih; Phillips, Patrick J.; Mills, Michael J.; Rajan, Siddharth; Pelz, Jonathan P.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2013-03-01

    In the search to improve short wavelength light emitting diodes (LED's), where the dislocations limit their performance and hole doping (Mg) is a fundamental challenge, the III-Nitride polarization-induced nanowire LED provides a promising system to address these problems. The new type of pn diode, polarization-induced nanowire LED (PINLED), was developed by linearly grading AlGaN composition of the nanowires (from GaN to AlN and back to GaN) from 0% to 100% and back to 0% Al (Carnevale et al, Nano Lett., 12, 915 (2012)). In III-Nitrides (Ga,Al/N), the effects of polarization are commonly observed at the surfaces and interfaces. Thus, in the case of the polarization-induced nanowire LEDs, taking advantage of the bound polarization charge, due to the grading of the AlGaN, the pn diodes are formed. The polarity of the nanowires determines the carrier type in each graded region, and therefore the diode orientation (n/p vs p/n). We used conductive AFM to investigate polarity of the PINLED's as well as hole conductivity in PINLED's made of AlGaN with and without acceptor doping. The results reveal that most of the wires are n-top/p-bottom (N-face), but some are p-top/n-bottom (Ga-face). Also, we found that the current density is 3 orders of magnitude larger in the case of the doped nanowires than the nanowires with no impurity doping.

  9. Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelmann, Leon

    Principle of MFM In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the magnetic stray field above a very flat specimen, or sample, is detected by placing a small magnetic element, the tip, mounted on a cantilever spring very close to the surface of the sample (Figure 1). Typical dimensions are a cantilever length

  10. Simulation and Verification of Tip-Induced Polarization During Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy Measurements on Film Capacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis Achton; Popok, Vladimir; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is widely used as characterization tool on functional heterostructures and components but it often suffers from measurement artifacts on such structures because the presence of the biased cantilever tip transforms the actual surface potential. In this work we...

  11. Electrochemical force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam F.; Rodriguez, Brian J.

    2017-01-10

    A system and method for electrochemical force microscopy are provided. The system and method are based on a multidimensional detection scheme that is sensitive to forces experienced by a biased electrode in a solution. The multidimensional approach allows separation of fast processes, such as double layer charging, and charge relaxation, and slow processes, such as diffusion and faradaic reactions, as well as capturing the bias dependence of the response. The time-resolved and bias measurements can also allow probing both linear (small bias range) and non-linear (large bias range) electrochemical regimes and potentially the de-convolution of charge dynamics and diffusion processes from steric effects and electrochemical reactivity.

  12. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, M Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid-liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid-liquid interface.

  13. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Collins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid–gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe–sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present. Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM, a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids, KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions. EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  14. Chromosome elasticity and mitotic polar ejection force measured in living Drosophila embryos by four-dimensional microscopy-based motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, W F; Marko, J F; Agard, D A; Sedat, J W

    2001-04-17

    Mitosis involves the interaction of many different components, including chromatin, microtubules, and motor proteins. Dissecting the mechanics of mitosis requires methods of studying not just each component in isolation, but also the entire ensemble of components in its full complexity in genetically tractable model organisms. We have developed a mathematical framework for analyzing motion in four-dimensional microscopy data sets that allows us to measure elasticity, viscosity, and forces by tracking the conformational movements of mitotic chromosomes. We have used this approach to measure, for the first time, the basic biophysical parameters of mitosis in wild-type Drosophila melanogaster embryos. We found that Drosophila embryo chromosomes are significantly less rigid than the much larger chromosomes of vertebrates. Anaphase kinetochore force and nucleoplasmic viscosity were comparable with previous estimates in other species. Motion analysis also allowed us to measure the magnitude of the polar ejection force exerted on chromosome arms during metaphase by individual microtubules. We find the magnitude of this force to be approximately 1 pN, a number consistent with force generation either by collision of growing microtubules with chromosomes or by single kinesin motors. Motion analysis allows noninvasive mechanical measurements to be made in complex systems. This approach should allow the functional effects of Drosophila mitotic mutants on chromosome condensation, kinetochore forces, and the polar ejection force to be determined.

  15. Hydrodynamic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Elaine Schmid

    Microfluidic networks and microporous materials have long been of interest in areas such as hydrology, petroleum engineering, chemical and electrochemical engineering, medicine and biochemical engineering. With the emergence of new processes in gas separation, cell sorting, ultrafiltration, and advanced materials synthesis, the importance of building a better qualitative and quantitative understanding of these key technologies has become apparent. However, microfluidic measurement and theory is still relatively underdeveloped, presenting a significant obstacle to the systematic design of microfluidic devices and materials. Theoretical challenges arise from the breakdown of classical viscous flow models as the flow dimensions approach the mean free path of individual molecules. Experimental challenges arise from the lack of flow profilometry techniques at sub-micron length scales. Here we present an extension of scanning probe microscopy techniques, which we have termed Hydrodynamic Force Microscopy (HFM). HFM exploits fluid drag to profile microflows and to map the permeability of microporous materials. In this technique, an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is scanned close to a microporous sample surface. The hydrodynamic interactions arising from a pressure-driven flow through the sample are then detected by mapping the deflection of an AFM cantilever. For gas flows at atmospheric pressure, HFM has been shown to achieve a velocity sensitivity of 1 cm/s with a spatial resolution of ˜ 10 nm. This compares very favorably to established techniques such as hot-wire and laser Doppler anemometry, whose spatial resolutions typically exceed 1 mum and which may rely on the use of tracer particles or flow markers1. We demonstrate that HFM can successfully profile Poiseuille flows inside pores as small as 100 nm and can distinguish Poiseuille flow from uniform flow for short entry lengths. HFM detection of fluid jets escaping from porous samples can also reveal a

  16. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  17. Introduction to the IEEE International Symposium on Applications of Ferroelectrics and International Symposium on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Nanoscale Phenomena in Polar Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zuo-Guang; Tan, Xiaoli; Bokov, Alexei A

    2012-09-01

    The 20th IEEE International Symposium on Applications of Ferroelectrics (ISAF) was held on July 24-27, 2011, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, jointly with the International Symposium on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Nanoscale Phenomena in Polar Materials (PFM). Over a period of four days, approximately 400 scientists, engineers, and students from around the world presented their work and discussed the latest developments in the field of ferroelectrics, related materials, and their applications. It is particularly encouraging to see that a large number of students (115) were attracted to the joint conference and presented high-quality research works. This trend is not only important to this conference series, but more importantly, it is vital to the future of the ferroelectrics field.

  18. Interfacial force measurements using atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, L.

    2018-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can not only image the topography of surfaces at atomic resolution, but can also measure accurately the different interaction forces, like repulsive, adhesive and lateral existing between an AFM tip and the sample surface. Based on AFM, various extended techniques have

  19. Correlative STED and Atomic Force Microscopy on Live Astrocytes Reveals Plasticity of Cytoskeletal Structure and Membrane Physical Properties during Polarized Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Rouach

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The plasticity of the cytoskeleton architecture and membrane properties is important for the establishment of cell polarity, adhesion and migration. Here, we present a method which combines stimulated emission depletion (STED super-resolution imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM to correlate cytoskeletal structural information with membrane physical properties in live astrocytes. Using STED compatible dyes for live cell imaging of the cytoskeleton, and simultaneously mapping the cell surface topology with AFM, we obtain unprecedented detail of highly organized networks of actin and microtubules in astrocytes. Combining mechanical data from AFM with optical imaging of actin and tubulin further reveals links between cytoskeleton organization and membrane properties. Using this methodology we illustrate that scratch-induced migration induces cytoskeleton remodeling. The latter is caused by a polarization of actin and microtubule elements within astroglial cell processes, which correlates strongly with changes in cell stiffness. The method opens new avenues for the dynamic probing of the membrane structural and functional plasticity of living brain cells. It is a powerful tool for providing new insights into mechanisms of cell structural remodeling during physiological or pathological processes, such as brain development or tumorigenesis.

  20. Direct measurements of intermolecular forces by chemical force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezenov, Dmitri Vitalievich

    1999-12-01

    Detailed description of intermolecular forces is key to understanding a wide range of phenomena from molecular recognition to materials failure. The unique features of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to make point contact force measurements with ultra high sensitivity and to generate spatial maps of surface topography and forces have been extended to include measurements between well-defined organic molecular groups. Chemical modification of AFM probes with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was used to make them sensitive to specific molecular interactions. This novel chemical force microscopy (CFM) technique was used to probe forces between different molecular groups in a range of environments (vacuum, organic liquids and aqueous solutions); measure surface energetics on a nanometer scale; determine pK values of the surface acid and base groups; measure forces to stretch and unbind a short synthetic DNA duplex and map the spatial distribution of specific functional groups and their ionization state. Studies of adhesion forces demonstrated the important contribution of hydrogen bonding to interactions between simple organic functionalities. The chemical identity of the tip and substrate surfaces as well as the medium had a dramatic effect on adhesion between model monolayers. A direct correlation between surface free energy and adhesion forces was established. The adhesion between epoxy polymer and model mixed SAMs varied with the amount of hydrogen bonding component in the monolayers. A consistent interpretation of CFM measurements in polar solvents was provided by contact mechanics models and intermolecular force components theory. Forces between tips and surfaces functionalized with SAMs terminating in acid or base groups depended on their ionization state. A novel method of force titration was introduced for highly local characterization of the pK's of surface functional groups. The pH-dependent changes in friction forces were exploited to map spatially the

  1. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  2. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director ...

  3. Magnetic force microscopy : Quantitative issues in biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passeri, D.; Dong, C.; Reggente, M.; Angeloni, L.; Barteri, M.; Scaramuzzo, F.A.; De Angelis, F.; Marinelli, F.; Antonelli, F.; Rinaldi, F.; Marianecci, C.; Carafa, M.; Sorbo, A.; Sordi, D.; Arends, I.W.C.E.; Rossi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples

  4. Sample preparation method for scanning force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Jankov, I R; Szente, R N; Carreno, M N P; Swart, J W; Landers, R

    2001-01-01

    We present a method of sample preparation for studies of ion implantation on metal surfaces. The method, employing a mechanical mask, is specially adapted for samples analysed by Scanning Force Microscopy. It was successfully tested on polycrystalline copper substrates implanted with phosphorus ions at an acceleration voltage of 39 keV. The changes of the electrical properties of the surface were measured by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy and the surface composition was analysed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy.

  5. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  6. Chiral discrimination by chemical force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendry, Rachel; Theoclitou, Maria-Elena; Rayment, Trevor; Abell, Chris

    1998-02-01

    Chirality is a fundamental aspect of chemical biology, and is of central importance in pharmacology. Consequently there is great interest in techniques for distinguishing between different chiral forms of a compound. Chemical force microscopy is a technique that combines chemical discrimination with atomic force microscopy by chemical derivatization of the scanning probe tip. It has been applied to the study of hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, the binding between biotin and streptavidin, and between DNA bases. Here we report on the use of chemical force microscopy to discriminate between chiral molecules. Using chiral molecules attached to the probe tip, we can distinguish the two enantiomers of mandelic acid arrayed on a surface, through differences in both the adhesion forces and the frictional forces measured by the probe.

  7. Force modulation for improved conductive-mode atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, W.W.; Sebastian, Abu; Despont, Michel; Pozidis, Haris

    We present an improved conductive-mode atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) method by modulating the applied loading force on the tip. Unreliable electrical contact and tip wear are the primary challenges for electrical characterization at the nanometer scale. The experiments show that force modulation

  8. Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenhorn, Albrecht Ludwig

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) was invented by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber in 1986 as an offspring of the very successful scanning tunneling microscope (STM), which Binnig and Rohrer invented in 1982 and for which they shared the Nobel prize. While the STM can only image conducting surfaces, the AFM has overcome this limitation. An AFM creates a three-dimensional image of the sample surface by raster scanning this surface under a sharp tip that is attached to a cantilever. The tip moves the cantilever up and down while going over "hills" and through "valleys" of the surface. The vertical motion of the cantilever deflects a laser beam that is reflected off the back of the cantilever toward a two-segment photodiode. The difference of the intensity of the two segments is used as the deflection signal. A feedback loop is used to keep the deflection signal constant by moving the sample surface up and down accordingly. This vertical motion gives a direct measurement of the surface height. The forces involved in the imaging process have been studied in air and water. Due to adsorbed layers on tip and sample surface when scanning in air (capillary condensation) the imaging forces are >10 ^{-7} N. If the tip and sample surface are immersed in water the forces can be reduced to {~}10^{ -9} N. An AFM with a large scanner can image up to tens of micrometers like an optical microscope. Zooming in allows one to get resolution of a few nanometers, which makes the AFM a natural continuation of the optical microscope towards higher magnification. Integrated circuit chips, photographic film, bacteria, red and white blood cells, purple membrane, polymerized Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films, and stoma have been imaged at low and high magnification. The AFM has shown its power by imaging "hard" and "soft" surfaces with atomic and (sub)molecular resolution respectively. The "hard" crystalline surfaces of mica, graphite, RuCl_3, Ge(111), Bi(111), and zeolites (clinoptilolite (010

  9. Calcite biomineralization in coccoliths: Evidence from atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Karen; Stipp, S.L.S.

    2002-01-01

    geochemistry, crystal orientation, coccolith function, biomineralization, biological calcite, atomic force microscopy......geochemistry, crystal orientation, coccolith function, biomineralization, biological calcite, atomic force microscopy...

  10. CLAFEM: Correlative light atomic force electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janel, Sébastien; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Bongiovanni, Antonino; Lafont, Frank; Barois, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is becoming increasingly used in the biology field. It can give highly accurate topography and biomechanical quantitative data, such as adhesion, elasticity, and viscosity, on living samples. Nowadays, correlative light electron microscopy is a must-have tool in the biology field that combines different microscopy techniques to spatially and temporally analyze the structure and function of a single sample. Here, we describe the combination of AFM with superresolution light microscopy and electron microscopy. We named this technique correlative light atomic force electron microscopy (CLAFEM) in which AFM can be used on fixed and living cells in association with superresolution light microscopy and further processed for transmission or scanning electron microscopy. We herein illustrate this approach to observe cellular bacterial infection and cytoskeleton. We show that CLAFEM brings complementary information at the cellular level, from on the one hand protein distribution and topography at the nanometer scale and on the other hand elasticity at the piconewton scales to fine ultrastructural details. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Probing charges on the atomic scale by means of atomic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Albrecht, F.; Repp, J.; Fleischmann, M.; Scheer, M.; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 7 (2015), "076101-1"-"076101-5" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC14-16963J Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Kelvin probe force microscopy * atomic force microscopy * bond polarity * surface dipole * adsorbates on surfaces Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.645, year: 2015

  12. Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetard, L; Passian, A; Farahi, R H; Kalluri, U C; Davison, B H; Thundat, T

    2010-05-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass and Populus. These features may be attributable to the lignocellulosic cell wall composition, as the collected images exhibit the characteristic macromolecular globule structures attributable to the lignocellulosic systems. Using both AFM and a single case of mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) to characterize Populus, we obtained images that clearly show the cell wall structure. The results are of importance in providing a better understanding of the characteristic features of both mature cells as well as developing plant cells. In addition, we present spectroscopic investigation of the same samples.

  13. Atomic force microscopy on liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Christian; Schulz, Benjamin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the atomic force microscopy (AFM) on thermotropic liquid crystals. We first give a general introduction to the technique of AFM and then describe the special requirements that have to be met for the imaging of liquid-crystalline surfaces. We also discuss the relation between the quality or reliability of the imaging results and various parameters of the scanning conditions. We briey review the existing work on AFM on liquid crystals and finally describe applications beyond the imaging, such as molecular force spectroscopy or manipulation of surface structures.

  14. Photoinduced force microscopy: A technique for hyperspectral nanochemical mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdick, Ryan A.; Morrison, William; Nowak, Derek; Albrecht, Thomas R.; Jahng, Junghoon; Park, Sung

    2017-08-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have intensified the need for tools that can characterize newly synthesized nanomaterials. A variety of techniques has recently been shown which combines atomic force microscopy (AFM) with optical illumination including tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (sSNOM), and photothermal induced resonance microscopy (PTIR). To varying degrees, these existing techniques enable optical spectroscopy with the nanoscale spatial resolution inherent to AFM, thereby providing nanochemical interrogation of a specimen. Here we discuss photoinduced force microscopy (PiFM), a recently developed technique for nanoscale optical spectroscopy that exploits image forces acting between an AFM tip and sample to detect wavelength-dependent polarization within the sample to generate absorption spectra. This approach enables ∼10 nm spatial resolution with spectra that show correlation with macroscopic optical absorption spectra. Unlike other techniques, PiFM achieves this high resolution with virtually no constraints on sample or substrate properties. The applicability of PiFM to a variety of archetypal systems is reported here, highlighting the potential of PiFM as a useful tool for a wide variety of industrial and academic investigations, including semiconducting nanoparticles, nanocellulose, block copolymers, and low dimensional systems, as well as chemical and morphological mixing at interfaces.

  15. Anisotropic structures of some microorganisms studied by polarization microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 5 (2014), s. 363-368 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Polarization microscopy * microorganism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  16. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagi, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr; Scheuring, Simon, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr [U1006 INSERM, Université Aix-Marseille, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13009 Marseille (France)

    2016-05-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed.

  17. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cholesterics, polarization of both ordinary and extraordinary waves follows the local director (the so-called Mauguin regime) [28]. This effect must be taken into account while interpreting the FCPM images for samples with twist deformations, especially when the twist scale is supra-micron and light propagates along the twist ...

  18. Conductive atomic force microscopy on carbon nanowalls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vetushka, Aliaksi; Itoh, T.; Nakanishi, Y.; Fejfar, Antonín; Nonomura, S.; Ledinský, Martin; Kočka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 358, č. 17 (2012), s. 2545-2547 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040; GA MŠk(CZ) MEB061012; GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA MŠk 7E10061 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 240826 - PolySiMode Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : carbon nanowalls * conductive atomic force microscopy * torsion resonance mode * nanostructures Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.597, year: 2012

  19. Fast spiral-scan atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, I A; Reza Moheimani, S O

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new scanning technique for fast atomic force microscopy. In this method, the sample is scanned in a spiral pattern instead of the well established raster pattern. A spiral scan can be produced by applying single frequency cosine and sine signals with slowly varying amplitudes to the x-axis and y-axis of an atomic force microscope (AFM) scanner respectively. The use of the single tone input signals allows the scanner to move at high speeds without exciting the mechanical resonance of the device and with relatively small control efforts. Experimental results obtained by implementing this technique on a commercial AFM indicate that high-quality images can be generated at scan frequencies well beyond the raster scans.

  20. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  1. High-frequency multimodal atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian P. Nievergelt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multifrequency atomic force microscopy imaging has been recently demonstrated as a powerful technique for quickly obtaining information about the mechanical properties of a sample. Combining this development with recent gains in imaging speed through small cantilevers holds the promise of a convenient, high-speed method for obtaining nanoscale topography as well as mechanical properties. Nevertheless, instrument bandwidth limitations on cantilever excitation and readout have restricted the ability of multifrequency techniques to fully benefit from small cantilevers. We present an approach for cantilever excitation and deflection readout with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, enabling multifrequency techniques extended beyond 2 MHz for obtaining materials contrast in liquid and air, as well as soft imaging of delicate biological samples.

  2. Characterization of nanoparticles using Atomic Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, A; Schoenenberger, M; Gnecco, E; Glatzel, Th; Meyer, E; Braendlin, D; Scandella, L

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles are becoming increasingly important in many areas, including catalysis, biomedical applications, and information storage. Their unique size-dependent properties make these materials superior. Using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), individual particles and groups of particles can be resolved and unlike other microscopy techniques, the AFM offers visualization and analysis in three dimensions. We prepared titanium oxide, zirconium oxide and alumina nanoparticles and/or agglomerates on different surfaces and characterized them by AFM in the dynamic mode. The goal was to determine the shape, size and/or size distribution of nanoparticles. Different dilutions of nanoparticles were applied on various substrates e.g. clean silicon, mica and chemically treated silicon and imaged at ambient conditions. Nanoparticles deposited on mica appeared to be coagulated as compared to those on silicon. Whereas, on a chemically treated surface the density of the nanoparticles was very low because of the increased hydrophobicity of the surface

  3. Atomic force microscopy of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandat, Sandrine; Azouzi, Slim; Beauvais, Estelle; Mastouri, Amira; El Kirat, Karim

    2013-02-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are biomimetic model systems that are now widely used to address the biophysical and biochemical properties of biological membranes. Two main methods are usually employed to form SLBs: the transfer of two successive monolayers by Langmuir-Blodgett or Langmuir-Schaefer techniques, and the fusion of preformed lipid vesicles. The transfer of lipid films on flat solid substrates offers the possibility to apply a wide range of surface analytical techniques that are very sensitive. Among them, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened new opportunities for determining the nanoscale organization of SLBs under physiological conditions. In this review, we first focus on the different protocols generally employed to prepare SLBs. Then, we describe AFM studies on the nanoscale lateral organization and mechanical properties of SLBs. Lastly, we survey recent developments in the AFM monitoring of bilayer alteration, remodeling, or digestion, by incubation with exogenous agents such as drugs, proteins, peptides, and nanoparticles.

  4. Atomic force microscopy analysis of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisse, P; Rago, I; Ulloa Severino, L; Perissinotto, F; Ambrosetti, E; Paoletti, P; Ricci, M; Beltrami, A P; Cesselli, D; Casalis, L

    2017-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small vesicles ensuring transport of molecules between cells and throughout the body. EVs contain cell type-specific signatures and have been proposed as biomarkers in a variety of diseases. Their small size (vesicles exert their functions is still unknown and represents a great biomedical challenge. Moreover, because of their small dimensions, the quantification, size distribution and biophysical characterization of these particles are challenging and still subject to controversy. Here, we address the advantage of atomic force microscopy (AFM), for the characterization of isolated EVs. We review AFM imaging of EVs immobilized on different substrates (mica, glass) to identify the influence of isolation and deposition methods on the size distribution, morphology and mechanical properties of EVs.

  5. Mathematical framework for traction force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the Traction Force Microscopy (TFM problem. It consists in obtaining stresses by solving an inverse problem in an elastic medium, from known experimentally measured displacements. In this article, the application is the determination of the stresses exerted by a living cell at the surface of an elastic gel. We propose an abstract framework which formulates this inverse problem as a constrained minimization one. The mathematical constraints express the biomechanical conditions that the stress field must satisfy. From this framework, two methods currently used can be derived, the adjoint method (AM and the Fourier Transform Traction Cytometry (FTTC method. An improvement of the FTTC method is also derived using this framework. The numerical results are compared and show the advantage of the AM, in particular its ability to capture details more accurately. Cet article est consacré au problème de la Microscopie à Force de Traction (TFM. Ce problème consiste à déterminer les contraintes exercées par une cellule lors de sa migration sur un substrat élastique à partir d’une mesure expérimentale des déplacements induits dans ce substrat. Mathématiquement, il s’agit de résoudre un problème inverse pour lequel nous proposons une formulation abstraite de type optimisation sous contraintes. Les contraintes mathématiques expriment les constraintes biomécaniques que doit satisfaire le champ de contraintes exercé par la cellule. Ce cadre abstrait permet de retrouver deux des méthodes de résolution utilisées en pratique, à savoir la méthode adjointe (AM et la méthode de Cytométrie de Traction par Transformée de Fourier (FTTC. Il permet aussi d’ameliorer la méthode FTTC. Les résultats numériques obtenus sont ensuite comparés et démontrent l’avantage de la méthode adjointe, en particulier par sa capacité à capturer des détails avec une meilleure précision.

  6. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy-magnetic force microscopy combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria; Asenjo, Agustina

    2011-01-01

    The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25-50 nm such that the long range tip-sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip-sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample.

  7. Investigating bioconjugation by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnological applications increasingly exploit the selectivity and processivity of biological molecules. Integration of biomolecules such as proteins or DNA into nano-systems typically requires their conjugation to surfaces, for example of carbon-nanotubes or fluorescent quantum dots. The bioconjugated nanostructures exploit the unique strengths of both their biological and nanoparticle components and are used in diverse, future oriented research areas ranging from nanoelectronics to biosensing and nanomedicine. Atomic force microscopy imaging provides valuable, direct insight for the evaluation of different conjugation approaches at the level of the individual molecules. Recent technical advances have enabled high speed imaging by AFM supporting time resolutions sufficient to follow conformational changes of intricately assembled nanostructures in solution. In addition, integration of AFM with different spectroscopic and imaging approaches provides an enhanced level of information on the investigated sample. Furthermore, the AFM itself can serve as an active tool for the assembly of nanostructures based on bioconjugation. AFM is hence a major workhorse in nanotechnology; it is a powerful tool for the structural investigation of bioconjugation and bioconjugation-induced effects as well as the simultaneous active assembly and analysis of bioconjugation-based nanostructures. PMID:23855448

  8. Single molecule atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocun, Marta; Grandbois, Michel; Cuccia, Louis A

    2011-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based force spectroscopy was used to study the desorption of individual chitosan polymer chains from substrates with varying chemical composition. AFM images of chitosan adsorbed onto a flat mica substrate show elongated single strands or aggregated bundles. The aggregated state of the polymer is consistent with the high level of flexibility and mobility expected for a highly positively charged polymer strand. Conversely, the visualization of elongated strands indicated the presence of stabilizing interactions with the substrate. Surfaces with varying chemical composition (glass, self-assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid/decanethiol and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) were probed with chitosan modified AFM tips and the corresponding desorption energies, calculated from plateau-like features, were attributed to the desorption of individual polymer strands. Desorption energies of 2.0±0.3×10(-20)J, 1.8±0.3×10(-20)J and 3.5±0.3×10(-20)J were obtained for glass, SAM of mercaptoundecanoic/dodecanethiol and PTFE, respectively. These single molecule level results can be used as a basis for investigating chitosan and chitosan-based materials for biomaterial applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative measurements of shear displacement using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Wu, Weida; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    We report a method to quantitatively measure local shear deformation with high sensitivity using atomic force microscopy. The key point is to simultaneously detect both torsional and buckling motions of atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers induced by the lateral piezoelectric response of the sample. This requires the quantitative calibration of torsional and buckling response of AFM. This method is validated by measuring the angular dependence of the in-plane piezoelectric response of a piece of piezoelectric α-quartz. The accurate determination of the amplitude and orientation of the in-plane piezoelectric response, without rotation, would greatly enhance the efficiency of lateral piezoelectric force microscopy.

  10. Nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy measurements on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    CSEM Instruments) and an integrated optical (Nikon)/ atomic force microscope ... The results reported herein represent averages of the group. For each loading/ unloading cycle, the load was plotted against the dis- placement of the indenter.

  11. Role of attractive forces in tapping tip force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    We present experimental and numerical results demonstrating the drastic influence of attractive forces on the behaviour of the atomic force microscope when operated in the resonant tapping tip mode in an ambient environment. It is often assumed that tapping is related to repulsive interaction....... In contrast, we find that in general the attractive forces are the most dominant interaction in this mode of operation. We show that attractive forces in combination with the repulsive elastic type of forces cause points of instability in the parameter space constituted by: the cantilever swing amplitude...

  12. Piezoelectric properties of PbTiO(3) thin films characterized with piezoresponse force and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morelli, A.; Venkatesan, Sriram; Kooi, B. J.; Palasantzas, G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the piezoelectric properties of PbTiO(3) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition with piezoresponse force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The as-grown films exhibit an upward polarization, inhomogeneous distribution of piezoelectric characteristics

  13. Light Microscopy and Polarized Microscopy: A Dermatological Tool to Diagnose Gray Hair Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandravathi, P L; Karani, Hetal Deepak; Siddaiahgari, Sirisha Rani; Lingappa, Lokesh

    2017-01-01

    Gray hair syndromes are rare syndromes which have an autosomal recessive inheritance and are characterized by pigmentary dilution of skin and hair, defects in immunological function, and nervous system defects. They comprise three disorders namely Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), Griscelli syndrome (GPS), and Elejalde syndrome. Clinically, it is difficult to distinguish these disorders as their clinical features may overlap. Hence, to make a correct diagnosis and differentiate between CHS and GPS light microscopic examination of skin and hair shafts as well as peripheral blood smear evaluations should be done. In cases where the diagnosis is not possible chromosomal analysis for specific mutations can be done. In resource-poor settings where chromosomal analysis is not possible, and light microscopy findings are inconclusive, polarized microscopy can serve as a useful tool to distinguish between CHS and GPS. We report three cases with gray hair syndromes where the diagnosis on light microscopy and polarized microscopy of hair shaft correlated with the bone marrow examination findings and chromosomal analysis, thus emphasizing the importance of a noninvasive, cost-effective, and time-saving alternative in the diagnosis of these syndromes.

  14. Ferritin protein imaging and detection by magnetic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Zheng, Bin; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2010-03-14

    Magnetic force microscopy was used to image and detect ferritin proteins and the strength of the magnetic signal is discussed, revealing a large workable lift height between the magnetic tip and the ferritin sample.

  15. Polarization force-induced changes in the dust sheath formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayout, Saliha; Bentabet, Karima; Tribeche, Mouloud [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, BP 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2015-09-15

    The modifications arising in the dusty plasma sheath structure due to the presence of polarization forces acting on the dust grains are investigated. The corresponding appropriate Bohm criterion for sheath formation is obtained. It is found that the critical Mach number, beyond which the dusty plasma electrostatic sheath sets in, decreases whenever the polarization effects become important. In addition, when the polarization force dominates over the electrical one, the dust plasma sheath cannot set in. This happens whenever the dust grain size exceeds a critical threshold. Moreover, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient becomes abruptly steep, and the sheath thickness becomes broader as the polarization force effects strengthen.

  16. Nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy measurements on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    substrate temperature to ~ 130°C during the deposition. The growth rate for TiN coatings was ~ 0⋅82 µm/h. The nanoindentation measurements were performed with an instrument consisting of a nanohardness tester. (CSEM Instruments) and an integrated optical (Nikon)/ atomic force microscope (surface imaging systems).

  17. Nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy measurements on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The films were deposited on silicon (111) substrates at various process conditions, e.g. substrate bias voltage (B) and nitrogen partial pressure. Mechanical properties of the coatings were investigated by a nanoindentation technique. Force vs displacement curves generated during loading and unloading of a Berkovich ...

  18. Pyramidal nanowire tip for atomic force microscopy and thermal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burouni, N.; Sarajlic, Edin; Siekman, Martin Herman; Abelmann, Leon; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel 3D nanowire pyramid as scanning microscopy probe for thermal imaging and atomic force microscopy. This probe is fabricated by standard micromachining and conventional optical contact lithography. The probe features an AFM-type cantilever with a sharp pyramidal tip composed of four

  19. Intermittent contact atomic force microscopy in electrochemical environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, P.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegenthaler, H. [Bern Univ., Bern (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    In situ measurements with Atomic Force Microscopy may cause surface modifications due to the tip-surface interactions. As an alternative and less destructive method, Intermittent Contact Atomic Force Microscopy (ICAFM) has been tested in an electrolytic environment. In the ICAFM mode the tip is not constantly in contact with the surface under investigation but is tapping onto the surface with a certain frequency. A commercial Park Scientific Instruments Microscopy has been modified to enable in situ experiment with ICAFM. It was possible to image iridium oxide films with ICAFM in the electrolytic environment without any noticeable surface modifications. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  20. Surface chemical reactions probed with scanning force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werts, M.P L; van der Vegte, E.W.; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    In this letter we report the study of surface chemical reactions with scanning force microscopy (SFM) with chemical specificity. Using chemically modified SFM probes, we can determine the local surface reaction conversion during a chemical surface modification. The adhesion forces between a

  1. Atomic Force Microscopy of Biochemically Tagged DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Matthew N.; Hansma, Helen G.; Bezanilla, Magdalena; Sano, Takeshi; Ogletree, D. Frank; Kolbe, William; Smith, Casandra L.; Cantor, Charles R.; Spengler, Sylvia; Hansma, Paul K.; Salmeron, Miquel

    1993-05-01

    Small fragments of DNA of known length were made with the polymerase chain reaction. These fragments had biotin molecules covalently attached at their ends. They were subsequently labeled with a chimeric protein fusion between streptavidin and two immunoglobulin G-binding domains of staphyloccocal protein A. This tetrameric species was expected to bind up to four DNA molecules via their attached biotin moieties. The DNA-protein complex was deposited on mica and imaged with an atomic force microscope. The images revealed the protein chimera at the expected location at the ends of the strands of DNA as well as the expected dimers, trimers, and tetramers of DNA bound to a single protein.

  2. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  3. Influence of Oxygen Pressure on the Domain Dynamics and Local Electrical Properties of BiFe0.95Mn0.05O3 Thin Films Studied by Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunyu Zhao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied the microstructures, nanodomains, polarization preservation behaviors, and electrical properties of BiFe0.95Mn0.05O3 (BFMO multiferroic thin films, which have been epitaxially created on the substrates of SrRuO3, SrTiO3, and TiN-buffered (001-oriented Si at different oxygen pressures via piezoresponse force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy. We found that the pure phase state, inhomogeneous piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM response, low leakage current with unidirectional diode-like properties, and orientation-dependent polarization reversal properties were found in BFMO thin films deposited at low oxygen pressure. Meanwhile, these films under high oxygen pressures resulted in impurities in the secondary phase in BFMO films, which caused a greater leakage that hindered the polarization preservation capability. Thus, this shows the important impact of the oxygen pressure on modulating the physical effects of BFMO films.

  4. Imaging and force probing RNA by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schön, Peter Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In the past 30 years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become a true enabling platform in the life sciences opening entire novel avenues for structural and dynamic studies of biological systems. It enables visualization, probing and manipulation across the length scales, from single molecules

  5. Analysis of Septin Reorganization at Cytokinesis Using Polarized Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly McQuilken

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Septins are conserved filament-forming proteins that act in diverse cellular processes. They closely associate with membranes and, in some systems, components of the cytoskeleton. It is not well understood how filaments assemble into higher-order structures in vivo or how they are remodeled throughout the cell cycle. In the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, septins are found through most of the cell cycle in an hourglass organization at the mother-bud neck until cytokinesis when the collar splits into two rings that disassemble prior to the next cell cycle. Experiments using polarized fluorescence microscopy have suggested that septins are arranged in ordered, paired filaments in the hourglass and undergo a coordinated 90° reorientation during splitting at cytokinesis. This apparent reorganization could be due to two orthogonal populations of filaments disassembling and reassembling or being preferentially retained at cytokinesis. In support of this idea, we report a decrease in septin concentration at the mother-bud neck during cytokinesis consistent with other reports and the timing of the decrease depends on known septin regulators including the Gin4 kinase. We took a candidate-based approach to examine what factors control reorientation during splitting and used polarized fluorescence microscopy to screen mutant yeast strains deficient in septin interacting proteins. Using this method, we have linked known septin regulators to different aspects of the assembly, stability, and reorganization of septin assemblies. The data support that ring splitting requires Gin4 activity and an anillin-like protein Bud4, and normal accumulation of septins at the ring requires phosphorylation of Shs1. We found distinct regulatory requirements for septin organization in the hourglass compared to split rings. We propose that septin subpopulations can vary in their localization and assembly/disassembly behavior in a cell-cycle dependent manner at cytokinesis.

  6. Quantitative polarized light microscopy of unstained mammalian cochlear sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalwani, Neil M.; Ong, Cheng Ai; Lysaght, Andrew C.; Haward, Simon J.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2013-02-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in the world, and most frequently it originates in the inner ear. Yet, the inner ear has been difficult to access for diagnosis because of its small size, delicate nature, complex three-dimensional anatomy, and encasement in the densest bone in the body. Evolving optical methods are promising to afford cellular diagnosis of pathologic changes in the inner ear. To appropriately interpret results from these emerging technologies, it is important to characterize optical properties of cochlear tissues. Here, we focus on that characterization using quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM) applied to unstained cochlear sections of the mouse, a common animal model of human hearing loss. We find that the most birefringent cochlear materials are collagen fibrils and myelin. Retardance of the otic capsule, the spiral ligament, and the basilar membrane are substantially higher than that of other cochlear structures. Retardance of the spiral ligament and the basilar membrane decrease from the cochlear base to the apex, compared with the more uniform retardance of other structures. The intricate structural details revealed by qPLM of unstained cochlear sections ex vivo strongly motivate future application of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography to human cochlea in vivo.

  7. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy: breakthroughs and highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The principle of scanning tunneling microscopy, an imaging method with atomic resolution capability invented by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982, can be adapted for surface magnetism studies by using magnetic probe tips. The contrast mechanism of this so-called spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy, or SP-STM, relies on the tunneling magneto-resistance effect, i.e. the tip-sample distance as well as the differential conductance depend on the relative magnetic orientation of tip and sample. To illustrate the working principle and the unique capabilities of SP-STM, this compilation presents some key experiments which have been performed on various magnetic surfaces, such as the topological antiferromagnet Cr(001), a double-layer of Fe which exhibits a stripe- domain pattern with about 50 nm periodicity, and the Mn monolayer on W(110), where the combination of experiment and theory reveal an antiferromagnetic spin cycloid. Recent experimental results also demonstrate the suitability of SP-STM for studies of dynamic properties, such as the spin relaxation time of single magnetic nanostructures.

  8. Piezoresponse force microscopy of ferroelectric relaxors =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Dmitry

    esta provisoriamente (wrong Word) atribuida a natureza relaxor de PZN-PT, onde pequenos grupos polares podem formar-se em coindicoes de zero-field-cooling (ZFC). Estes nanodominios sao considerados como os nucleos do estado de polarizacao oposta e podem ser responsaveis pelo menor campo coercitivo para este corte de cristal em particular. No entanto, a histerese local piezoeletrica realizada pelo PFM a escala nanometrica indica uma mudanca de comportamento de PZN-PT semelhante para ambas as orientacoes cristalograficas investigadas. A evolucao das estruturas de dominio com polimento abaixo da superficie do cristal foi investigada. O dominio de ramificacoes e os efeitos de polarizacao de triagem apos o polimento e as medicoes de temperatura tem sido estudados pela PFM e pela analise SEM. Alem disso, verificou-se que a intensidade do sinal piezoelectrico a partir das estruturas de nanodominio diminui com o aumento da temperatura, acabando por desaparecer aos 430 K (orientacao ) e 470 K (orientacao ). Esta diferenca de temperatura nas transicoes de fase local em cristais de diferentes orientacoes e explicada pelo forte efeito de superficie na transicao da fase ferroeletrica em relaxors. A comutacao da polarizacao em relaxor ergodico e nas fases ferroelectricas do sistema PMN-PT foram realizadas pela combinacao de tres metodos, Microscopia de Forca Piezoelectrica, medicao de um unico ponto de relaxamento eletromecânico e por ultimo mapeamento de espectroscopia de tensao. A dependencia do comportamento do relaxamento na amplitude e tempo da tensao de pulso foi encontrada para seguir um comportamento logaritmico universal com uma inclinacao quase constante. Este comportamento e indicativo da progressiva populacao dos estados de relaxamento lento, ao contrario de uma relaxacao linear na presenca de uma ampla distribuicao do tempo de relaxamento. O papel do comportamento de relaxamento, da nao-linearidade ferroelectrica e da heterogeneidade espacial do campo na ponta da sonda

  9. Investigation of magnetorheological elastomer surface properties by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacobescu, G.E.; Balasoiu, M.; Bica, I.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers consist of a natural or synthetic rubber matrix interspersed with micron-sized ferromagnetic particles. The magnetoelastic properties of such a composite are not merely a sum of elasticity of the polymer and stiffness and magnetic properties of the filler, but also the result of a complex synergy of several effects, relevant at different length scales and detectable by different techniques. In the present work we investigate the microstructures, the surface magnetic properties and the elastic properties of new isotropic and anisotropic magnetorheological elastomer prepared using silicone rubber and soft magnetic carbonyl iron microspheres. The measurements were performed by atomic force microscopy in the following modes: standard imaging-non-contact atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy and nanoindentation. A comparative study for the samples with different particle concentrations and strength of magnetic field applied during the polymerization process is developed

  10. Friction of ice measured using lateral force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Inoue, Takahito; Salmeron, Miquel

    2000-01-01

    The friction of nanometer thin ice films grown on mica substrates is investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Friction was found to be of similar magnitude as the static friction of ice reported in macroscopic experiments. The possible existence of a lubricating film of water due to pressure melting, frictional heating, and surface premelting is discussed based on the experimental results using noncontact, contact, and lateral force microscopy. We conclude that AFM measures the dry friction of ice due to the low scan speed and the squeezing out of the water layer between the sharp AFM tip and the ice surface. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  11. Atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy on the cytoskeleton of permeabilised and embedded cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, Karl; Theiss, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    We describe a technical method of cell permeabilisation and embedding to study the organisation and distribution of intracellular proteins with aid of atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in identical areas. While confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for the identification of certain proteins subsequent labelling with markers or antibodies, atomic force microscopy allows the observation of macromolecular structures in fixed and living cells. To demonstrate the field of application of this preparatory technique, cells were permeabilised, fixed, and the actin cytoskeleton was stained with phalloidin-rhodamine. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to show the organisation of these microfilaments, e.g. geodesic dome structures. Thereafter, cells were embedded in Durcupan water-soluble resin, followed by UV-polymerisation of resin at 4 o C. This procedure allowed intracellular visualisation of the cell nucleus or cytoskeletal elements by atomic force microscopy, for instance to analyse the globular organisation of actin filaments. Therefore, this method offers a great potential to combine both microscopy techniques in order to understand and interpret intracellular protein relations, for example, the biochemical and morphological interaction of the cytoskeleton

  12. High spatial resolution Kelvin probe force microscopy with coaxial probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M; Satzinger, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a widely used technique to measure the local contact potential difference (CPD) between an AFM probe and the sample surface via the electrostatic force. The spatial resolution of KPFM is intrinsically limited by the long range of the electrostatic interaction, which includes contributions from the macroscopic cantilever and the conical tip. Here, we present coaxial AFM probes in which the cantilever and cone are shielded by a conducting shell, confining the tip–sample electrostatic interaction to a small region near the end of the tip. We have developed a technique to measure the true CPD despite the presence of the shell electrode. We find that the behavior of these probes agrees with an electrostatic model of the force, and we observe a factor of five improvement in spatial resolution relative to unshielded probes. Our discussion centers on KPFM, but the field confinement offered by these probes may improve any variant of electrostatic force microscopy. (paper)

  13. Nanoparticle sizing: a comparative study using atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacava, L.M.; Lacava, B.M.; Azevedo, R.B.; Lacava, Z.G.M.; Buske, N.; Tronconi, A.L.; Morais, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) were used to unfold the nanoparticle size of a ferrofluid sample. Compared to TEM, the AFM method showed a nanoparticle diameter (D m ) reduction of 20% and standard deviation (σ) increase of 15%. The differences in D m and σ were associated with the AFM tip and the nanoparticle concentration on the substrate

  14. Detection of Percolating Paths in PMMA/CB Segregated Network Composites Using Electrostatic Force Microscopy and Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, J. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ou, R. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gupta, S. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Parker, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gerhardt, Dr. Rosario [Georgia Institute of Technology; Seal, Katyayani [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Composite specimens possessing polyhedral segregated network microstructures require a very small amount of nanosize filler, <1 vol %, to reach percolation because percolation occurs by accumulation of the fillers along the edges of the deformed polymer matrix particles. In this paper, electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) were used to confirm the location of the nanosize fillers and the corresponding percolating paths in polymethyl methacrylate/carbon black composites. The EFM and C-AFM images revealed that the polyhedral polymer particles were coated with filler, primarily on the edges as predicted by the geometric models provided.

  15. Chaos : The speed limiting phenomenon in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyvani Janbahan, A.; Alijani, F.; Sadeghian, Hamed; Maturova, Klara; Goosen, J.F.L.; van Keulen, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the closed-loop dynamics of the Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy using a new mathematical model based on the averaging method in Cartesian coordinates. Experimental and numerical observations show that the emergence of chaos in conventional tapping mode AFM strictly

  16. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniel; Calogero, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Delta f(z) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene...

  17. Imaging and manipulation of single viruses by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baclayon, M.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Roos, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    The recent developments in virus research and the application of functional viral particles in nanotechnology and medicine rely on sophisticated imaging and manipulation techniques at nanometre resolution in liquid, air and vacuum. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a tool that combines these

  18. Atomic force microscopy of torus-bearing pit membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland R. Dute; Thomas Elder

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to compare the structures of dried, torus-bearing pit membranes from four woody species, three angiosperms and one gymnosperm. Tori of Osmanthus armatus are bipartite consisting of a pustular zone overlying parallel sets of microfibrils that form a peripheral corona. Microfibrils of the corona form radial spokes as they traverse the...

  19. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Joseph L; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N

    2015-06-03

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  20. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.; Martins, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate

  1. Charge erasure analysis on the nanoscale using Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-quan; Shao, Tian-min

    2017-07-01

    The charge pattern produced by atomic force microscopy on an insulating surface can be detected on the nanoscale using Kelvin probe force microscopy. Recent applications of charge patterns include data storage, nano-xerography, and charge writing. At present, ongoing development of this technology is being restricted by a poor understanding of the charge modification and erasure mechanisms. In this study, modification and erasure of charge patterns are achieved by applying oppositely polarized pulses to an insulating surface. The effects of the oppositely polarized pulse height and width on the charge erasure behavior are examined, and the charge injection and erasure processes are compared. Hence, it is demonstrated that the charges on the patterned surface can be neutralized by adjusting the height and width of the oppositely polarized pulse appropriately. In addition, charge injection and erasure mechanisms are proposed. It is suggested that application of an oppositely polarized pulse to the insulating surface causes injection of opposite charges into the surface and removal of the initial charges, both of which occur simultaneously. The findings of this work provide a means of achieving data re-storage or data modification, for which charge spot erasure is essential. In addition, the findings may have general implications for the development of nano-xerography, charge writing, nano-lithography, etc.

  2. Nanoscale electrowetting effects observed by using friction force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Reynier; Guan, Li; Zhu, Xiao-Yang; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2011-06-21

    We report the study of electrowetting (EW) effects under strong electric field on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surface by using friction force microscopy (FFM). The friction force dependence on the electric field at nanometer scale can be closely related to electrowetting process based on the fact that at this scale frictional behavior is highly affected by capillary phenomena. By measuring the frictional signal between a conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and the PMMA surface, the ideal EW region (Young-Lippmann equation) and the EW saturation were identified. The change in the interfacial contact between the tip and the PMMA surface with the electric field strength is closely associated with the transition from the ideal EW region to the EW saturation. In addition, a reduction of the friction coefficient was observed when increasing the applied electric field in the ideal EW region. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. FEATURES OF MEASURING IN LIQUID MEDIA BY ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Zhukov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper presents results of experimental study of measurement features in liquids by atomic force microscope to identify the best modes and buffered media as well as to find possible image artifacts and ways of their elimination. Method. The atomic force microscope Ntegra Aura (NT-MDT, Russia with standard prism probe holder and liquid cell was used to carry out measurements in liquids. The calibration lattice TGQ1 (NT-MDT, Russia was chosen as investigated structure with a fixed shape and height. Main Results. The research of probe functioning in specific pH liquids (distilled water, PBS - sodium phosphate buffer, Na2HPO4 - borate buffer, NaOH 0.1 M, NaOH 0.5 M was carried out in contact and semi-contact modes. The optimal operating conditions and the best media for the liquid measurements were found. Comparison of atomic force microscopy data with the results of lattice study by scanning electron microscopy was performed. The features of the feedback system response in the «probe-surface» interaction were considered by the approach/retraction curves in the different environments. An artifact of image inversion was analyzed and recommendation for its elimination was provided. Practical Relevance. These studies reveal the possibility of fine alignment of research method for objects of organic and inorganic nature by atomic force microscopy in liquid media.

  4. Atomic force microscopy investigation of electrochemically produced carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklosi, J.; Poczik, P.; Papp, K.; Nagy, P.; Kalman, E. [Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Sytchev, I.; Kaptay, G. [Miskolci Egyetem, Miskolc (Hungary)

    2001-04-01

    Carbon nanostructures have been synthesized in NaCl-MgCl{sub 2} and in NaCl-CaCl{sub 2} salt melts and the extracted material was investigated by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM) and scanning electron microscopy. Some interesting new nanostructures were found and investigated as torus-shaped carbon structures with a ring diameter of 300-400 nm and 10-15 nm height. These tori are closely related to the wrapped SWNT rings described recently. They are probably formed during the electrolysis. A chain-like structure was also revealed. (orig.)

  5. Surface microstructure of bitumen characterized by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaokong; Burnham, Nancy A; Tao, Mingjiang

    2015-04-01

    Bitumen, also called asphalt binder, plays important roles in many industrial applications. It is used as the primary binding agent in asphalt concrete, as a key component in damping systems such as rubber, and as an indispensable additive in paint and ink. Consisting of a large number of hydrocarbons of different sizes and polarities, together with heteroatoms and traces of metals, bitumen displays rich surface microstructures that affect its rheological properties. This paper reviews the current understanding of bitumen's surface microstructures characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microstructures of bitumen develop to different forms depending on crude oil source, thermal history, and sample preparation method. While some bitumens display surface microstructures with fine domains, flake-like domains, and dendrite structuring, 'bee-structures' with wavy patterns several micrometers in diameter and tens of nanometers in height are commonly seen in other binders. Controversy exists regarding the chemical origin of the 'bee-structures', which has been related to the asphaltene fraction, the metal content, or the crystallizing waxes in bitumen. The rich chemistry of bitumen can result in complicated intermolecular associations such as coprecipitation of wax and metalloporphyrins in asphaltenes. Therefore, it is the molecular interactions among the different chemical components in bitumen, rather than a single chemical fraction, that are responsible for the evolution of bitumen's diverse microstructures, including the 'bee-structures'. Mechanisms such as curvature elasticity and surface wrinkling that explain the rippled structures observed in polymer crystals might be responsible for the formation of 'bee-structures' in bitumen. Despite the progress made on morphological characterization of bitumen using AFM, the fundamental question whether the microstructures observed on bitumen surfaces represent its bulk structure remains to be addressed. In addition

  6. Adhesive properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis probed by atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    2011-01-01

    Mapping of the surface properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis and of biofilm forming bacteria in general is a key to understand their functions, particularly their adhesive properties. To gain a comprehensive view of the structural and chemical properties of S. epidermidis, four different strains...... (biofilm positive and biofilm negative strains) were analyzed using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Force measurements performed using bare hydrophilic silicon nitride tips disclosed similar adhesive properties for each strain. However, use of hydrophobic tips showed that hydrophobic forces...... are not the driving forces for adhesion of the four strains. Rather, the observation of sawtooth force–distance patterns on the surface of biofilm positive strains documents the presence of modular proteins such as Aap that may mediate cell adhesion. Treatment of two biofilm positive strains with two chemical...

  7. The effects of atomic force microscopy upon nominated living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hagan, Barry Michael Gerard; Doyle, Peter; Allen, James M.; Sutton, Kerry; McKerr, George

    2004-01-01

    This work describes a system for precise re-location of cells within a monolayer after atomic force imaging. As we know little about probe interaction with soft biological surfaces any corroborative evidence is of great importance. For example, it is of paramount importance in living cell force microscopy that interrogated cells can be re-located and imaged by other corroborative technologies. Methodologies expressed here have shown that non-invasive force parameters can be established for specific cell types. Additionally, we show that the same sample can be transferred reliably to an SEM. Results here indicate that further work with live cells should initially establish appropriate prevailing force parameters and that cell damage should be checked for before and after an imaging experiment

  8. Individually grown cobalt nanowires as magnetic force microscopy probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Shuaa; Samba, Joshua; Pokharel, Sabin; Lan, Yucheng; Uradu, Kelechi; Afolabi, Ayodeji; Unlu, Ilyas; Basnet, Gobind; Aslan, Kadir; Flanders, Bret N; Lisfi, Abdellah; Ozturk, Birol

    2018-02-26

    AC electric fields were utilized in the growth of individual high-aspect ratio cobalt nanowires from simple salt solutions using the Directed Electrochemical Nanowire Assembly method. Nanowire diameters were tuned from the submicron scale to 40 nm by adjusting the AC voltage frequency and the growth solution concentration. The structural properties of the nanowires, including shape and crystallinity, were identified using electron microscopy. Hysteresis loops obtained along different directions of an individual nanowire using vibrating sample magnetometry showed that the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy has the same order of magnitude as the shape anisotropy energy. Additionally, the saturation magnetization of an individual cobalt nanowire was estimated to be close to the bulk single crystal value. A small cobalt nanowire segment was grown from a conductive atomic force microscope cantilever tip that was utilized in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging. The fabricated MFM tip provided moderate quality magnetic images of an iron-cobalt thin-film sample.

  9. Cautions to predicate multiferroic by atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available With the ever-increasing research activities in multiferroic driven by its profound physics and enormous potential for application, magnetic force microscopy (MFM, as a variety of atomic force microscope (AFM, has been brought to investigate the magnetic properties and the voltage controlled magnetism, especially in thin films and heterostructures. Here by taking a representative multiferroic system BiFeO3/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 heterostructure and a ferroelectric PMN-PT single crystal for examples, we demonstrated that the MFM image is prone to be seriously interfered by the electrostatic interaction between the tip and sample surface, and misleads the predication of multiferroic. Assisted by the scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM, the origin and mechanism were discussed and an effective solution was proposed.

  10. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiaobin [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Shi, Xuetao, E-mail: mrshixuetao@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Ostrovidov, Serge [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Wu, Hongkai, E-mail: chhkwu@ust.hk [Department of Chemistry & Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Nakajima, Ken [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation. • The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. • AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring stem cell differentiation in a non-invasive manner. - Abstract: A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  11. Atomic force microscopy in biomedical research - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pier Carlo Braga and Davide Ricci are old friends not only for those researchers familiar with Atomic force microscopy (AFM but also for those beginners (like the undersigned that already enthusiastically welcomed their 2004 edition (for the same Humana press printing types of Atomic force microscopy: Biomedical methods and applications, eventhough I never had used the AFM. That book was much intended to overview the possible AFM applications for a wide range of readers so that they can be in some way stimulated toward the AFM use. In fact, the great majority of scientists is afraid both of the technology behind AFM (that is naturally thought highly demanding in term of concepts not so familiar to biologists and physicians and of the financial costs: both these two factors are conceived unapproachable by the medium range granted scientist usually not educated in terms of biophysics and electronic background....

  12. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation. • The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. • AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring stem cell differentiation in a non-invasive manner. - Abstract: A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  13. Polarization-resolved SHG microscopy in cardiac hypertrophy study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhonghai; Yuan, Cai; Shao, Yonghong; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Borg, Thomas K.; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, a process initiated by mechanical alterations, is hypothesized to cause long-term molecular-level alteration in the sarcomere lattice, which is the main force-generating component in the heart muscle. This molecular-level alteration is beyond the resolving capacity of common light microscopy. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has unique capability for visualizing ordered molecular structures in biological tissues without labeling. Combined with polarization imaging technique, SHG microscopy is able to extract structural details of myosin at the molecular level so as to reveal molecular-level alterations that occur during hypertrophy. The myosin filaments are believed to possess C6 symmetry; thus, the nonlinear polarization response relationship between generated second harmonic light I^2ωand incident fundamental light I^ω is determined by nonlinear coefficients, χ_15, χ_31 and χ_33. χ_31/χ_15 is believed to be an indicator of the molecular symmetry of myosin filament, whileχ_33/χ_15represents the intramyosin orientation angle of the double helix. By changing the polarization of the incident light and evaluating the corresponding SHG signals, the molecular structure of the myosin, reflected by the χ coefficients, can be revealed. With this method, we studied the structural properties of heart tissues in different conditions, including those in normal, physiologically hypertrophic (heart tissue from postpartum female rats), and pathologically hypertrophic (heart tissue from transverse-aorta constricted rats) conditions. We found that ratios of χ_31/χ_15 showed no significant difference between heart tissues from different conditions; their values were all close to 1, which demonstrated that Kleinman symmetry held for all conditions. Ratios of χ_33/χ_15 from physiologically or pathologically hypertrophic heart tissues were raised and showed significant difference from those from normal heart tissues, which indicated that

  14. Electrostatic Force Microscopy of Self Assembled Peptide Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Dimaki, Maria; Pantagos, Spyros P.

    2011-01-01

    In this report electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is used to study different peptide self-assembled structures, such as tubes and particles. It is shown that not only geometrical information can be obtained using EFM, but also information about the composition of different structures. In partic...... compared to the radius of the AFM tip used. Finally, an agreement between the detected signal and the structure of the hollow peptide tubes is demonstrated....

  15. Minimizing tip-sample forces in jumping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega-Esteban, A. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-3, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Horcas, I. [Nanotec Electronica S.L., Centro Empresarial Euronova 3, Ronda de Poniente 12, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Hernando-Perez, M. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-3, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ares, P. [Nanotec Electronica S.L., Centro Empresarial Euronova 3, Ronda de Poniente 12, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Perez-Berna, A.J.; San Martin, C.; Carrascosa, J.L. [Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia (CNB-CSIC), Darwin 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pablo, P.J. de [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-3, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Herrero, J., E-mail: julio.gomez@uam.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-3, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Control and minimization of tip-sample interaction forces are imperative tasks to maximize the performance of atomic force microscopy. In particular, when imaging soft biological matter in liquids, the cantilever dragging force prevents identification of the tip-sample mechanical contact, resulting in deleterious interaction with the specimen. In this work we present an improved jumping mode procedure that allows detecting the tip-sample contact with high accuracy, thus minimizing the scanning forces ({approx}100 pN) during the approach cycles. To illustrate this method we report images of human adenovirus and T7 bacteriophage particles which are prone to uncontrolled modifications when using conventional jumping mode. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improvement in atomic force microscopy in buffer solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak force detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subtracting the cantilever dragging force. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Forces in the 100 pN range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imaging of delicate viruses with atomic force microscopy.

  16. Use of atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy for correlative studies of bacterial capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukalov, Oleg; Korenevsky, Anton; Beveridge, Terry J; Dutcher, John R

    2008-09-01

    Bacteria can possess an outermost assembly of polysaccharide molecules, a capsule, which is attached to their cell wall. We have used two complementary, high-resolution microscopy techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to study bacterial capsules of four different gram-negative bacterial strains: Escherichia coli K30, Pseudomonas aeruginosa FRD1, Shewanella oneidensis MR-4, and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. TEM analysis of bacterial cells using different preparative techniques (whole-cell mounts, conventional embeddings, and freeze-substitution) revealed capsules for some but not all of the strains. In contrast, the use of AFM allowed the unambiguous identification of the presence of capsules on all strains used in the present study, including those that were shown by TEM to be not encapsulated. In addition, the use of AFM phase imaging allowed the visualization of the bacterial cell within the capsule, with a depth sensitivity that decreased with increasing tapping frequency.

  17. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Salgado, J. [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Eje Central Norte Lázaro Cárdenas, No. 152, 07730 D.F., México (Mexico); Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A., E-mail: madoming@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Eje Central Norte Lázaro Cárdenas, No. 152, 07730 D.F., México (Mexico); Castro-Domínguez, B. [University of Tokyo, Department of Chemical System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Bldg. 5, 7F 722, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–8656 (Japan); Hernández-Hernández, P. [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Eje Central Norte Lázaro Cárdenas, No. 152, 07730 D.F., México (Mexico); Newman, R.C. [University of Toronto, Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, 200 College Street, Toronto M5S 3E5 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  18. Atomic force microscopy characterization of the surface wettability of natural fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietak, Alexis; Korte, Sandra; Tan, Emelyn; Downard, Alison; Staiger, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Natural fibres represent a readily available source of ecologically friendly and inexpensive reinforcement in composites with degradable thermoplastics, however chemical treatments of fibres are required to prepare feasible composites. It is desirable to characterize the surface wettability of fibres after chemical treatment as the polarity of cellulose-based fibres influences compatibility with a polymer matrix. Assessment of the surface wettability of natural fibres using conventional methods presents a challenge as the surfaces are morphologically and chemically heterogeneous, rough, and can be strongly wicking. In this work it is shown that under atmospheric conditions the adhesion force between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and the fibre surface can estimate the water contact angle and surface wettability of the fibre. AFM adhesion force measurements are suitable for the more difficult surfaces of natural fibres and in addition allow for correlations between microstructural features and surface wettability characteristics

  19. Concomitant use of polarization and positive phase contrast microscopy for the study of microbial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk; Gabriel, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2015), s. 545-550 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : polarization microscopy * microbial cells * positive phase contrast Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.335, year: 2015

  20. Force gradient sensitive detection in lift-mode Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, Dominik; Stemmer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate frequency modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy operated in lift-mode under ambient conditions. Frequency modulation detection is sensitive to force gradients rather than forces as in the commonly used amplitude modulation technique. As a result there is less influence from electric fields originating from the tip's cone and cantilever, and the recorded surface potential does not suffer from the large lateral averaging observed in amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. The frequency modulation technique further shows a reduced dependence on the lift-height and the frequency shift can be used to map the second order derivative of the tip-sample capacitance which gives high resolution material contrast of dielectric sample properties. The sequential nature of the lift-mode technique overcomes various problems of single-scan techniques, where crosstalk between the Kelvin probe and topography feedbacks often impair the correct interpretation of the recorded data in terms of quantitative electric surface potentials.

  1. Chemical Force Microscopy of Chemical and Biological Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noy, A

    2006-01-02

    Interactions between chemical functionalities define outcomes of the vast majority of important events in chemistry, biology and materials science. Chemical Force Microscopy (CFM)--a technique that uses direct chemical functionalization of AFM probes with specific functionalities--allows researchers to investigate these important interactions directly. We review the basic principles of CFM, some examples of its application, and theoretical models that provide the basis for understanding the experimental results. We also emphasize application of modern kinetic theory of non-covalent interactions strength to the analysis of CFM data.

  2. Distinguishing ferritin from apoferritin using magnetic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocera, Tanya M; Zeng, Yuzhi; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the amount of iron-replete ferritin versus iron-deficient apoferritin proteins is important in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This work introduces a simple and novel approach to quantify ferritin by using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We demonstrate how high magnetic moment probes enhance the magnitude of MFM signal, thus enabling accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin/apoferritin mixtures in vitro. We envisage MFM could be adapted to accurately determine ferritin content in protein mixtures or in small aliquots of clinical samples. (fast track communication)

  3. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Gandee, Leah; Zimmern, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model. (paper)

  4. Distinguishing ferritin from apoferritin using magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Tanya M.; Zeng, Yuzhi; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2014-11-01

    Estimating the amount of iron-replete ferritin versus iron-deficient apoferritin proteins is important in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This work introduces a simple and novel approach to quantify ferritin by using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We demonstrate how high magnetic moment probes enhance the magnitude of MFM signal, thus enabling accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin/apoferritin mixtures in vitro. We envisage MFM could be adapted to accurately determine ferritin content in protein mixtures or in small aliquots of clinical samples.

  5. Capillary force between wetted nanometric contacts and its application to atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crassous, Jérôme; Ciccotti, Matteo; Charlaix, Elisabeth

    2011-04-05

    We extend to the case of perfect wetting the exact calculation of Orr et al. (J. Fluid. Mech. 1975, 67, 723) for a pendular ring connecting two dry surfaces. We derive an approximate analytical expression for the capillary force between two highly curved surfaces covered by a wetting liquid film. The domain of validity of this expression is assessed and extended by a custom-made numerical simulation based on the full exact mathematical description. In the case of attractive liquid-solid van der Waals interactions, the capillary force increases monotonically with decreasing vapor pressure up to several times its saturation value. This accurate description of the capillary force makes it possible to estimate the adhesion force between wet nanoparticles; it can also be used to quantitatively interpret pull-off forces measured by atomic force microscopy.

  6. Mechanical characterization of cellulose single nanofiber by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lindong; Kim, Jeong Woong; Lee, Jiyun; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-04-01

    Cellulose fibers are strong natural fibers and they are renewable, biodegradable and the most abundant biopolymer in the world. So to develop new cellulose fibers based products, the mechanical properties of cellulose nanofibers would be a key. The atomic microscope is used to measure the mechanical properties of cellulose nanofibers based on 3-points bending of cellulose nanofiber. The cellulose nanofibers were generated for an aqueous counter collision system. The cellulose microfibers were nanosized under 200 MPa high pressure. The cellulose nanofiber suspension was diluted with DI water and sprayed on the silicon groove substrate. By performing a nanoscale 3-points bending test using the atomic force microscopy, a known force was applied on the center of the fiber. The elastic modulus of the single nanofiber is obtained by calculating the fiber deflection and several parameters. The elastic modulus values were obtained from different resources of cellulose such as hardwood, softwood and cotton.

  7. Modeling noncontact atomic force microscopy resolution on corrugated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Burson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Key developments in NC-AFM have generally involved atomically flat crystalline surfaces. However, many surfaces of technological interest are not atomically flat. We discuss the experimental difficulties in obtaining high-resolution images of rough surfaces, with amorphous SiO2 as a specific case. We develop a quasi-1-D minimal model for noncontact atomic force microscopy, based on van der Waals interactions between a spherical tip and the surface, explicitly accounting for the corrugated substrate (modeled as a sinusoid. The model results show an attenuation of the topographic contours by ~30% for tip distances within 5 Å of the surface. Results also indicate a deviation from the Hamaker force law for a sphere interacting with a flat surface.

  8. Surface potential modeling and reconstruction in Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Wu, Yangqing; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun

    2017-09-08

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurement has been extensively applied in metallic, semiconductor and organic electronic or photovoltaic devices, to characterize the local contact potential difference or surface potential of the samples at the nanoscale. Here, a comprehensive modeling of surface potential in KPFM is established, from the well-known single capacitance model to a precise electrodynamic model, considering the long range property of the electrostatic force in KPFM. The limitations and relations of different models are also discussed. Besides, the feedback condition of the KPFM system is reconsidered and modified, showing that the influence of the cantilever has been overestimated by about 20% in previous reports. Afterwards, the surface potential of charged Si-nanocrystals is reconstructed based on the electrodynamic model, and the calculated surface charge density is very consistent with the macroscopic capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement. A deep understanding and correct reconstruction of surface potential is crucial to the quantitative analysis of KPFM results.

  9. Bacterial biofilms investigated by atomic force microscopy and electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan

    thesis, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and electrochemistry have been applied to investigate three pathogenic medically important bacterial biofilms, i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (cystic fibrosis pneumonia), Staphylococcus epidermidis (contamination of surgical catheters and indwelling equipment......) and Streptococcus mutans (dental caries). AFM was used to investigate the adhesion force on single live cell surfaces. Four different strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis in liquid aqueous environments were adressed. These strains were selected because of their special surface proteins related with the initial...... pattern of Streptococcus mutans biofilms. Five redox probes were chosen for cyclic voltammetry, i.e. positively, [Ru(NH3)6]3+/2+, [Co(phen)3]3+/2+ and [Co(terpy)2]3+/2+ (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; terpy = 2,2’,2”-terpyridine) and negatively charged, [Fe(CN)6]3-/4-. [IrCl6]3-/4-. The inhibition...

  10. Nanomechanical characterization of living mammary tissues by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plodinec, Marija; Lim, Roderick Y H

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of living cells and tissues are important for a variety of functional processes in vivo, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation. Changes in mechano-cellular phenotype, for instance, are associated with cancer progression. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an enabling technique that topographically maps and quantifies the mechanical properties of complex biological matter in physiological aqueous environments at the nanometer length scale. Recently we applied AFM to spatially resolve the distribution of nanomechanical stiffness across human breast cancer biopsies in comparison to healthy tissue and benign tumors. This led to the finding that AFM provides quantitative mechano-markers that may have translational significance for the clinical diagnosis of cancer. Here, we provide a comprehensive description of sample preparation methodology, instrumentation, data acquisition and analysis that allows for the quantitative nanomechanical profiling of unadulterated tissue at submicron spatial resolution and nano-Newton (nN) force sensitivity in physiological conditions.

  11. Simple test system for single molecule recognition force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riener, Christian K.; Stroh, Cordula M.; Ebner, Andreas; Klampfl, Christian; Gall, Alex A.; Romanin, Christoph; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J.

    2003-01-01

    We have established an easy-to-use test system for detecting receptor-ligand interactions on the single molecule level using atomic force microscopy (AFM). For this, avidin-biotin, probably the best characterized receptor-ligand pair, was chosen. AFM sensors were prepared containing tethered biotin molecules at sufficiently low surface concentrations appropriate for single molecule studies. A biotin tether, consisting of a 6 nm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain and a functional succinimide group at the other end, was newly synthesized and covalently coupled to amine-functionalized AFM tips. In particular, PEG 800 diamine was glutarylated, the mono-adduct NH 2 -PEG-COOH was isolated by ion exchange chromatography and reacted with biotin succinimidylester to give biotin-PEG-COOH which was then activated as N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester to give the biotin-PEG-NHS conjugate which was coupled to the aminofunctionalized AFM tip. The motional freedom provided by PEG allows for free rotation of the biotin molecule on the AFM sensor and for specific binding to avidin which had been adsorbed to mica surfaces via electrostatic interactions. Specific avidin-biotin recognition events were discriminated from nonspecific tip-mica adhesion by their typical unbinding force (∼40 pN at 1.4 nN/s loading rate), unbinding length (<13 nm), the characteristic nonlinear force-distance relation of the PEG linker, and by specific block with excess of free d-biotin. The convenience of the test system allowed to evaluate, and compare, different methods and conditions of tip aminofunctionalization with respect to specific binding and nonspecific adhesion. It is concluded that this system is well suited as calibration or start-up kit for single molecule recognition force microscopy

  12. Spatially resolved frequency-dependent elasticity measured with pulsed force microscopy and nanoindentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweers, Kim K M; van der Werf, Kees O; Bennink, Martin L; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    Recently several atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based surface property mapping techniques like pulsed force microscopy (PFM), harmonic force microscopy or Peakforce QNM® have been introduced to measure the nano- and micro-mechanical properties of materials. These modes all work at different operating

  13. Studying the Adhesion Force and Glass Transition of Thin Polystyrene Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Hua; Qian, Xiaoqin; Guan, Li

    2018-01-01

    microscopy (AFM)-based forcedistance curve to study the relaxation dynamics and the film thickness dependence of glass transition temperature (T-g) for normal thin polystyrene (PS) films supported on silicon substrate. The adhesion force (F-ad) between AFM tip and normal thin PS film surfaces...

  14. Taking Nanomedicine Teaching into Practice with Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic…

  15. Effects of nonlinear forces on dynamic mode atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Soma; Sreeram, P A; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the effects of nonlinear tip-sample forces on dynamic mode atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy. The jumps and hysteresis observed in the vibration amplitude (A) versus tip-sample distance (h) curves have been traced to bistability in the resonance curve. A numerical analysis of the basic dynamic equation was used to explain the hysteresis in the experimental curve. It has been found that the location of the hysteresis in the A-h curve depends on the frequency of the forced oscillation relative to the natural frequency of the cantilever.

  16. Multifarious applications of atomic force microscopy in forensic science investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gaurav; Tharmavaram, Maithri; Rawtani, Deepak; Kumar, Sumit; Agrawal, Y

    2017-04-01

    Forensic science is a wide field comprising of several subspecialties and uses methods derived from natural sciences for finding criminals and other evidence valid in a legal court. A relatively new area; Nano-forensics brings a new era of investigation in forensic science in which instantaneous results can be produced that determine various agents such as explosive gasses, biological agents and residues in different crime scenes and terrorist activity investigations. This can be achieved by applying Nanotechnology and its associated characterization techniques in forensic sciences. Several characterization techniques exist in Nanotechnology and nano-analysis is one such technique that is used in forensic science which includes Electron microscopes (EM) like Transmission (TEM) and Scanning (SEM), Raman microscopy (Micro -Raman) and Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs) like Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Atomic force microscopy enables surface characterization of different materials by examining their morphology and mechanical properties. Materials that are immeasurable such as hair, body fluids, textile fibers, documents, polymers, pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs), etc. are often encountered during forensic investigations. This review article will mainly focus on the use of AFM in the examination of different evidence such as blood stains, forged documents, human hair samples, ammunitions, explosives, and other such applications in the field of Forensic Science. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimization of s-Polarization Sensitivity in Apertureless Near-Field Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuika Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a general belief in apertureless near-field microscopy that the so-called p-polarization configuration, where the incident light is polarized parallel to the axis of the probe, is advantageous to its counterpart, the s-polarization configuration, where the incident light is polarized perpendicular to the probe axis. While this is true for most samples under common near-field experimental conditions, there are samples which respond better to the s-polarization configuration due to their orientations. Indeed, there have been several reports that have discussed such samples. This leads us to an important requirement that the near-field experimental setup should be equipped with proper sensitivity for measurements with s-polarization configuration. This requires not only creation of effective s-polarized illumination at the near-field probe, but also proper enhancement of s-polarized light by the probe. In this paper, we have examined the s-polarization enhancement sensitivity of near-field probes by measuring and evaluating the near-field Rayleigh scattering images constructed by a variety of probes. We found that the s-polarization enhancement sensitivity strongly depends on the sharpness of the apex of near-field probes. We have discussed the efficient value of probe sharpness by considering a balance between the enhancement and the spatial resolution, both of which are essential requirements of apertureless near-field microscopy.

  18. Controlling Force in Polarization-Maintaining Fiber Fused Biconical Tapering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fused biconical tapering (FBT is an important method of manufacturing polarization-maintaining fiber (PMF couplers. However, the tension on the ends of the fibers can affect the performance of the coupler. In this paper, a computer-based method of controlling the drawing force was presented. The system includes a drawing mechanism, rotary position encoders, and a control circuit. A three-dimensional model of a permanent magnet and a coil is constructed, and the relationship among the coil current, rotation angle of the clamp, and electromagnetic force is determined using finite element simulations. Electromagnetic force control based on these simulations can be realized. The method is verified experimentally, and it is shown that a drawing force of 0–1.8 gf can be achieved with an error of within 3.04%. This result can be used in the FBT-based manufacture of fiber components such as fiber couplers and gratings.

  19. Investigation of graphite composite anodes surfaces by atomic force microscopy and related techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasawa, Karen Akemi; Nishioka, Keiko; Sato, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Shoji; Mori, Shoichiro [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Tsukuba Research Center, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    The surface of a synthetic graphite (KS-44) and polyvinylidene difluoride binder (PVDF) anode for lithium-ion secondary batteries is imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and several related scanning probe microscope (SPM) instruments including: dynamic force microscopy (DFM), friction force microscopy (FFM), laterally-modulated friction force microscopy (LM-FFM), visco-elasticity atomic force microscopy (VE-AFM), and AFM/simultaneous current measurement mode (SCM). DFM is found to be an exceptional mode for topographic imaging while FFM results in the clearest contrast distinction between PVDF binder and KS-44 graphite regions. (orig.)

  20. Subharmonic Oscillations and Chaos in Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of dynamic atomic force microscopy (d-AFM) for nanoscale materials characterization calls for a deeper understanding of the cantilever dynamics influencing scan stability, predictability, and image quality. Model development is critical to such understanding. Renormalization of the equations governing d- AFM provides a simple interpretation of cantilever dynamics as a single spring and mass system with frequency dependent cantilever stiffness and damping parameters. The renormalized model is sufficiently robust to predict the experimentally observed splitting of the free-space cantilever resonance into multiple resonances upon cantilever-sample contact. Central to the model is the representation of the cantilever sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients F(sub ij) (i,j = 0, 1, 2) that account for the effective interaction stiffness parameter, the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Application of the Melnikov method to the model equation is shown to predict a homoclinic bifurcation of the Smale horseshoe type leading to a cascade of period doublings with increasing drive displacement amplitude culminating in chaos and loss of image quality. The threshold value of the drive displacement amplitude necessary to initiate subharmonic generation depends on the acoustic drive frequency, the effective damping coefficient, and the nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force. For parameter values leading to displacement amplitudes below threshold for homoclinic bifurcation other bifurcation scenarios can occur, some of which lead to chaos.

  1. Atomic force microscopy-based shape analysis of heart mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become an important medical and biological tool for the noninvasive imaging of cells and biomaterials in medical, biological, and biophysical research. The major advantages of AFM over conventional optical and electron microscopes for bio-imaging include the facts that no special coating is required and that imaging can be done in all environments-air, vacuum, or aqueous conditions. In addition, it can also precisely determine pico-nano Newton force interactions between the probe tip and the sample surface from force-distance curve measurements.It is widely known that mitochondrial swelling is one of the most important indicators of the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. As mitochondrial swelling is an ultrastructural change, quantitative analysis of this change requires high-resolution microscopic methods such as AFM. Here, we describe the use of AFM-based shape analysis for the characterization of nanostructural changes in heart mitochondria resulting from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  2. Forces due to surface water measured by force microscopy. Consequences for anchoring biological cells to surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilcher, K.

    1997-05-01

    Interaction forces in 'Scanning Force Microscopy' (SFM). Force curves revealed exponentially decaying, attractive forces between silicon tip and silicon sample in aqueous media. Replacing the silicon sample by a sheet of mica, the interaction forces had both, an attractive and a repulsive component. Addition of salts generally reduced the forces. At 500 mM salt concentration, the attractive force became quantized with a residual force value of 23 pN. The attractive force is attributed to the gain in energy of water molecules which are released from surface water into free water during tip-sample approach. This conclusion is supported by a statistical model. The repulsive force contribution in the case of mica, is caused by hydration forces due to the spatial organization of crystalline water on the mica surface. Anchoring of biological cells. Molecular resolution of cell surfaces by SFM requires cell anchoring without interference with cell physiology. For this a novel strategy, 'hydrophobic anchoring' was designed. It avoids strong attractive forces between cell and by using a flexible spacer molecule. It establishes anchoring by a lipid (bound to the spacer), which weakly interacts with the hydrophobic core of the cell membrane. The method was subjected to tests using RBL-2H3, CH0 αβ and HEK-293 cells. The strength of cell anchoring was assayed by shear forces. In all cases 'hydrophobic anchoring' via a spacer caused elective anchoring much beyond controls. Such cell anchoring was employed for the imaging of RBL-2H3 cells by SFM. Images showed considerable finer details than images of loosely adsorbed cells. With about 50 rim resolution, SFM succeeded in imaging microvilli, filopodia, single cytoskeletal fibers (microtubules, microfilaments) and vesicles. In addition, as a consequence of cell stimulation upon ionomycin treatment, lamellae formation and the appearance of secretory granules on top of them were observed which indicates the viability of anchored

  3. Polarization digital holographic microscopy using low-cost liquid crystal polarization rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovhaliuk, Rostyslav Yu

    2018-02-01

    Polarization imaging methods are actively used to study anisotropic objects. A number of methods and systems, such as imaging polarimeters, were proposed to measure the state of polarization of light that passed through the object. Digital holographic and interferometric approaches can be used to quantitatively measure both amplitude and phase of a wavefront. Using polarization modulation optics, the measurement capabilities of such interference-based systems can be extended to measure polarization-dependent parameters, such as phase retardation. Different kinds of polarization rotators can be used to alternate the polarization of a reference beam. Liquid crystals are used in a rapidly increasing number of different optoelectronic devices. Twisted nematic liquid crystals are widely used as amplitude modulators in electronic displays and light valves or shutter glass. Such devices are of particular interest for polarization imaging, as they can be used as polarization rotators, and due to large-scale manufacturing have relatively low cost. A simple Mach-Zehnder polarized holographic setup that uses modified shutter glass as a polarization rotator is demonstrated. The suggested approach is experimentally validated by measuring retardation of quarter-wave film.

  4. Atomic force microscopy for the examination of single cell rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Takaharu

    2012-11-01

    Rheological properties of living cells play important roles in regulating their various biological functions. Therefore, measuring cell rheology is crucial for not only elucidating the relationship between the cell mechanics and functions, but also mechanical diagnosis of single cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is becoming a useful technique for single cell diagnosis because it allows us to measure the rheological properties of adherent cells at any region on the surface without any modifications. In this review, we summarize AFM techniques for examining single cell rheology in frequency and time domains. Recent applications of AFM for investigating the statistical analysis of single cell rheology in comparison to other micro-rheological techniques are reviewed, and we discuss what specificity and universality of cell rheology are extracted using AFM.

  5. Calibrated work function mapping by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Garrillo, Pablo A.; Grévin, Benjamin; Chevalier, Nicolas; Borowik, Łukasz

    2018-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate the implementation of an alternative work function tip calibration procedure for Kelvin probe force microscopy under ultrahigh vacuum, using monocrystalline metallic materials with known crystallographic orientation as reference samples, instead of the often used highly oriented pyrolytic graphite calibration sample. The implementation of this protocol allows the acquisition of absolute and reproducible work function values, with an improved uncertainty with respect to unprepared highly oriented pyrolytic graphite-based protocols. The developed protocol allows the local investigation of absolute work function values over nanostructured samples and can be implemented in electronic structures and devices characterization as demonstrated over a nanostructured semiconductor sample presenting Al0.7Ga0.3As and GaAs layers with variable thickness. Additionally, using our protocol we find that the work function of annealed highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is equal to 4.6 ± 0.03 eV.

  6. Photocatalytic degradation of bacteriophages evidenced by atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrecan Soylemez

    Full Text Available Methods to supply fresh water are becoming increasingly critical as the world population continues to grow. Small-diameter hazardous microbes such as viruses (20-100 nm diameter can be filtered by size exclusion, but in this approach the filters are fouled. Thus, in our research, we are investigating an approach in which filters will be reusable. When exposed to ultraviolet (UV illumination, titanate materials photocatalytically evolve (•OH and O2(•- radicals, which attack biological materials. In the proposed approach, titanate nanosheets are deposited on a substrate. Viruses adsorb on these nanosheets and degrade when exposed to UV light. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM, we image adsorbed viruses and demonstrate that they are removed by UV illumination in the presence of the nanosheets, but not in their absence.

  7. Unlocking higher harmonics in atomic force microscopy with gentle interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sergio; Barcons, Victor; Font, Josep; Verdaguer, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In dynamic atomic force microscopy, nanoscale properties are encoded in the higher harmonics. Nevertheless, when gentle interactions and minimal invasiveness are required, these harmonics are typically undetectable. Here, we propose to externally drive an arbitrary number of exact higher harmonics above the noise level. In this way, multiple contrast channels that are sensitive to compositional variations are made accessible. Numerical integration of the equation of motion shows that the external introduction of exact harmonic frequencies does not compromise the fundamental frequency. Thermal fluctuations are also considered within the detection bandwidth of interest and discussed in terms of higher-harmonic phase contrast in the presence and absence of an external excitation of higher harmonics. Higher harmonic phase shifts further provide the means to directly decouple the true topography from that induced by compositional heterogeneity.

  8. Surface structure investigations using noncontact atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodziej, J.J.; Such, B.; Goryl, M.; Krok, F.; Piatkowski, P.; Szymonski, M.

    2006-01-01

    Surfaces of several A III B V compound semiconductors (InSb, GaAs, InP, InAs) of the (0 0 1) orientation have been studied with noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). Obtained atomically resolved patterns have been compared with structural models available in the literature. It is shown that NC-AFM is an efficient tool for imaging complex surface structures in real space. It is also demonstrated that the recent structural models of III-V compound surfaces provide a sound base for interpretation of majority of features present in recorded patterns. However, there are also many new findings revealed by the NC-AFM method that is still new experimental technique in the context of surface structure determination

  9. Shear force microscopy using piezoresistive cantilevers in surface metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotszalk, Teodor; Kopiec, Daniel; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Janus, Paweł; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-09-01

    In this article we describe application of piezoresistive cantilevers in surface investigations carried out with the use of shear force microscopy (ShFM). The novel piezoresistive cantilevers integrate a Wheatstone piezoresistive bridge was used to detect the cantilever deflection, thermal deflection detector and planar tip protruding out of the spring beam. Because the planar tip deflection can be detected and controlled electronically the described technology is very flexible and can be applied in many surface investigations. In this article we will present operation theory of the described solution, experimental setup, methods for calibration of the tip deflection detection and actuation The analysis will be illustrated with example results of topography measurements performed using the described technology.

  10. Polarization Effects in Graded AlGaN Nanolayers Revealed by Current-Sensing and Kelvin Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytvyn, Petro M; Kuchuk, Andrian V; Mazur, Yuriy I; Li, Chen; Ware, Morgan E; Wang, Zhiming M; Kladko, Vasyl P; Belyaev, Alexander E; Salamo, Gregory J

    2018-02-21

    We experimentally demonstrate that the conductivity of graded Al x Ga 1-x N increases as a function of the magnitude of the Al concentration gradient (%Al/nm) due to polarization doping effects, without the use of impurity dopants. Using three up/down-graded Al x Ga 1-x N nanolayers with Al gradients ranging from ∼0.16 to ∼0.28%Al/nm combined in one structure, the effects of polarization engineering for localized electric fields and current transport were investigated. Cross-sectional Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy were used to directly probe the electrical properties of the films with spatial resolution along the thickness of the growth. The experimental profiles of the built-in electric fields and the spreading current found in the graded layers are shown to be consistent with simulations of the field distribution as well as of the electron and hole densities. Finally, it was directly observed that for gradients less than 0.28%Al/nm the native n-type donors still limit polarization-induced hole doping, making p-type conductivity still a challenge due to background impurities and defects.

  11. Nanoscale imaging of Bacillus thuringiensis flagella using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Annika; Dupres, Vincent; Delestrait, Guillaume; Mahillon, Jacques; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2012-02-01

    Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in cell surface appendages.Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in

  12. Permanent magnet domain structures from magnetic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folks, L.; Woodward, R.C.; Bradbury, D.L.; Humphrey, K.; Street, R.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) offers the ability to image domain structures of permanent magnet materials in the form of bulk samples not suitable for electron microscopy, and at scales which are not possible using optical techniques. Recent developments, such as the use of very low coercivity tips and resonant phase detection MFM systems, have made this technique yet more useful. However, as with any new technique, interpretation of images should be approached with some caution. We have performed studies on bulk samples of sintered and melt-spun Nd Fe B - type materials, comparing images collected by Kerr microscopy with those from MFM. It has been possible to image the same areas of the samples using the two techniques and thereby compare and contrast the details arising from the same magnetic structures in each. From this work it is clear that it is often possible to make straight-forward interpretations of the MFM stray field maps regarding the underlying domain structure (although, of course, there may not be a unique interpretation). In addition we have used tips with different types of magnetic coatings to image the same areas of a sample, and showed that quit different image characteristics result. Of concern was the propensity for the tip coatings to partially re-magnetize in the stray fields from the samples, introducing artifacts into the images and making interpretation more difficult. With these results it has been possible to interpret high resolution MFM images of bulk permanent magnets with increased confidence, and examples of observed structures in thermally demagnetized two-phase nanocrystalline materials are interpreted in terms of interaction domains. (author)

  13. Sub-Angstrom oscillation amplitude non-contact atomic force microscopy for lateral force gradient measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atabak, Mehrdad; Unverdi, Ozhan; Ozer, H. Ozguer; Oral, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    We report the first results from novel sub-Angstrom oscillation amplitude non-contact atomic force microscopy developed for lateral force gradient measurements. Quantitative lateral force gradients between a tungsten tip and Si(1 1 1)-(7 x 7) surface can be measured using this microscope. Simultaneous lateral force gradient and scanning tunnelling microscope images of single and multi atomic steps are obtained. In our measurement, tunnel current is used as feedback. The lateral stiffness contrast has been observed to be 2.5 N/m at single atomic step, in contrast to 13 N/m at multi atomic step on Si(1 1 1) surface. We also carried out a series of lateral stiffness-distance spectroscopy. We observed lateral stiffness-distance curves exhibit sharp increase in the stiffness as the sample is approached towards the surface. We usually observed positive stiffness and sometimes going into slightly negative region.

  14. Single Protein Molecule Mapping with Magnetic Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, Andriy V.; Yarova, Polina L.; Gordeev, Sergey N.; Smirnov, Sergey V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Understanding the structural organization and distribution of proteins in biological cells is of fundamental importance in biomedical research. The use of conventional fluorescent microscopy for this purpose is limited due to its relatively low spatial resolution compared to the size of a single protein molecule. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), on the other hand, allows one to achieve single-protein resolution by scanning the cell surface using a specialized ligand-coated AFM tip. However, because this method relies on short-range interactions, it is limited to the detection of binding sites that are directly accessible to the AFM tip. We developed a method based on magnetic (long-range) interactions and applied it to investigate the structural organization and distribution of endothelin receptors on the surface of smooth muscle cells. Endothelin receptors were labeled with 50-nm superparamagnetic microbeads and then imaged with magnetic AFM. Considering its high spatial resolution and ability to “see” magnetically labeled proteins at a distance of up to 150 nm, this approach may become an important tool for investigating the dynamics of individual proteins both on the cell membrane and in the submembrane space. PMID:20141762

  15. Room temperature surface piezoelectricity in SrTiO.sub.3./sub. ceramics via piezoresponse force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kholkin, A.; Bdikin, I.; Ostapchuk, Tetyana; Petzelt, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 22 (2008), 222905/1-222905/3 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP202/06/P219 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : strontium titanate ceramics * piezoresponse force microscopy * flexoelectric effect * polar grain boundaries Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.726, year: 2008

  16. Compensating electrostatic forces by single-scan Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, Dominik; Rychen, Joerg; Naujoks, Nicola; Stemmer, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel method of single-scan Kelvin probe force microscopy, operating simultaneously with amplitude-modulation distance control in ambient air. A separate Kelvin probe feedback control loop compensates for potential differences between tip and sample by minimizing electrostatic forces. As a result, electrostatically induced height errors in topography are automatically cancelled. To prevent crosstalk from topography or errors in distance control, the Kelvin probe feedback employs phase information resulting from a combination of mechanical and electrical excitation of the cantilever at its second flexural eigenmode. The feedback for amplitude-modulation distance control operates as usual close to the first eigenfrequency

  17. Atomic force microscopy-based characterization and design of biointerfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsteens, David; Gaub, Hermann E.; Newton, Richard; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.

    2017-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based methods have matured into a powerful nanoscopic platform, enabling the characterization of a wide range of biological and synthetic biointerfaces ranging from tissues, cells, membranes, proteins, nucleic acids and functional materials. Although the unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio of AFM enables the imaging of biological interfaces from the cellular to the molecular scale, AFM-based force spectroscopy allows their mechanical, chemical, conductive or electrostatic, and biological properties to be probed. The combination of AFM-based imaging and spectroscopy structurally maps these properties and allows their 3D manipulation with molecular precision. In this Review, we survey basic and advanced AFM-related approaches and evaluate their unique advantages and limitations in imaging, sensing, parameterizing and designing biointerfaces. It is anticipated that in the next decade these AFM-related techniques will have a profound influence on the way researchers view, characterize and construct biointerfaces, thereby helping to solve and address fundamental challenges that cannot be addressed with other techniques.

  18. Isoelectric point of fluorite by direct force measurements using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assemi, Shoeleh; Nalaskowski, Jakub; Miller, Jan D; Johnson, William P

    2006-02-14

    Interaction forces between a fluorite (CaF2) surface and colloidal silica were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in 1 x 10(-3) M NaNO3 at different pH values. Forces between the silica colloid and fluorite flat were measured at a range of pH values above the isoelectric point (IEP) of silica so that the forces were mainly controlled by the fluorite surface charge. In this way, the IEP of the fluorite surface was deduced from AFM force curves at pH approximately 9.2. Experimental force versus separation distance curves were in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on long-range electrostatic interactions, allowing the potential of the fluorite surface to be estimated from the experimental force curves. AFM-deduced surface potentials were generally lower than the published zeta potentials obtained from electrokinetic methods for powdered samples. Differences in methodology, orientation of the fluorite, surface carbonation, and equilibration time all could have contributed to this difference.

  19. Diameter measurements of polystyrene particles with atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnaes, J.

    2011-09-01

    The size of (nano) particles is a key parameter used in controlling their function. The particle size is also important in order to understand their physical and chemical properties and regulate their number in health and safety issues. In this work, the geometric diameters of polystyrene spheres of nominal diameter 100 nm are measured using atomic force microscopy. The measurements are based on the apex height and on the average distance between neighbouring spheres when they form a close-packed monolayer on a flat mica substrate. The most important influence parameters for the determination of the geometric diameter are the lateral air gaps and deformation of the spheres. The lateral air gaps are caused by significant size variations of the individual spheres, and a correction is calculated based on the simulation of packing of spheres. The deformation of the spheres is caused mainly by capillary forces acting when they are in contact with each other or with the mica substrate. Based on calculated capillary forces and the literature values of the elastic properties of the polystyrene and mica, the deformation is estimated to be 2 nm with a standard uncertainty of 2 nm. The geometric diameter of the polystyrene spheres was measured with a combined standard uncertainty of ≈3 nm. The measured vertical diameter of 92.3 nm and the certified mobility equivalent diameter measured by differential mobility analysis (DMA) are marginally consistent at a confidence level of 95%. However, the measured lateral geometric diameter was 98.9 nm and is in good agreement with DMA.

  20. Force spectroscopy of hyaluronan by atomic force microscopy: from hydrogen-bonded networks toward single-chain behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Marina I; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Vancso, G Julius

    2007-09-01

    The conformational behavior of hyaluronan (HA) polysaccharide chains in aqueous NaCl solution was characterized directly at the single-molecule level. This communication reports on one of the first single-chain atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed at variable temperatures, investigating the influence of the temperature on the stability of the HA single-chain conformation. Through AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy, the temperature destabilization of a local structure was proven. This structure involved a hydrogen-bonded network along the polymeric chain, with hydrogen bonds between the polar groups of HA and possibly water, and a change from a nonrandom coil to a random coil behavior was observed when increasing the temperature from 29 +/- 1 to 46 +/- 1 degrees C. As a result of the applied force, this superstructure was found to break progressively at room temperature. The use of a hydrogen-bonding breaker solvent demonstrated the hydrogen-bonded water-bridged nature of the network structure of HA single chains in aqueous NaCl solution.

  1. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy–magnetic force microscopy combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Jaafar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25–50 nm such that the long range tip–sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip–sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample.

  2. Nanonet force microscopy for measuring forces in single smooth muscle cells of the human aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alexander; Chan, Patrick; Sheets, Kevin; Apperson, Matthew; Delaughter, Christopher; Gleason, Thomas G; Phillippi, Julie A; Nain, Amrinder

    2017-07-07

    A number of innovative methods exist to measure cell-matrix adhesive forces, but they have yet to accurately describe and quantify the intricate interplay of a cell and its fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM). In cardiovascular pathologies, such as aortic aneurysm, new knowledge on the involvement of cell-matrix forces could lead to elucidation of disease mechanisms. To better understand this dynamics, we measured primary human aortic single smooth muscle cell (SMC) forces using nanonet force microscopy in both inside-out (I-O intrinsic contractility) and outside-in (O-I external perturbation) modes. For SMC populations, we measured the I-O and O-I forces to be 12.9 ± 1.0 and 57.9 ± 2.5 nN, respectively. Exposure of cells to oxidative stress conditions caused a force decrease of 57 and 48% in I-O and O-I modes, respectively, and an increase in migration rate by 2.5-fold. Finally, in O-I mode, we cyclically perturbed cells at constant strain of varying duration to simulate in vivo conditions of the cardiac cycle and found that I-O forces decrease with increasing duration and O-I forces decreased by half at shorter cycle times. Thus our findings highlight the need to study forces exerted and felt by cells simultaneously to comprehensively understand force modulation in cardiovascular disease. © 2017 Hall et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-01-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations

  4. Carrier density distribution in silicon nanowires investigated by scanning thermal microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgoszewski, Grzegorz; Pałetko, Piotr; Tomaszewski, Daniel; Zaborowski, Michał; Jóźwiak, Grzegorz; Kopiec, Daniel; Gotszalk, Teodor; Grabiec, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    The use of scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to investigate silicon nanowires (SiNWs) is presented. SThM allows imaging of temperature distribution at the nanoscale, while KPFM images the potential distribution with AFM-related ultra-high spatial resolution. Both techniques are therefore suitable for imaging the resistance distribution. We show results of experimental examination of dual channel n-type SiNWs with channel width of 100 nm, while the channel was open and current was flowing through the SiNW. To investigate the carrier distribution in the SiNWs we performed SThM and KPFM scans. The SThM results showed non-symmetrical temperature distribution along the SiNWs with temperature maximum shifted towards the contact of higher potential. These results corresponded to those expressed by the distribution of potential gradient along the SiNWs, obtained using the KPFM method. Consequently, non-uniform distribution of resistance was shown, being a result of non-uniform carrier density distribution in the structure and showing the pinch-off effect. Last but not least, the results were also compared with results of finite-element method modeling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Uncertainties in forces extracted from non-contact atomic force microscopy measurements by fitting of long-range background forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Sweetman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In principle, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM now readily allows for the measurement of forces with sub-nanonewton precision on the atomic scale. In practice, however, the extraction of the often desired ‘short-range’ force from the experimental observable (frequency shift is often far from trivial. In most cases there is a significant contribution to the total tip–sample force due to non-site-specific van der Waals and electrostatic forces. Typically, the contribution from these forces must be removed before the results of the experiment can be successfully interpreted, often by comparison to density functional theory calculations. In this paper we compare the ‘on-minus-off’ method for extracting site-specific forces to a commonly used extrapolation method modelling the long-range forces using a simple power law. By examining the behaviour of the fitting method in the case of two radically different interaction potentials we show that significant uncertainties in the final extracted forces may result from use of the extrapolation method.

  6. Differential Polarization Nonlinear Optical Microscopy with Adaptive Optics Controlled Multiplexed Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginijus Barzda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential to become an indispensable tool for structural investigations of ordered biological assemblies and microcrystalline aggregates. Their microscopic organization can be probed through fast and sensitive measurements of nonlinear optical signal anisotropy, which can be achieved with microscopic spatial resolution by using time-multiplexed pulsed laser beams with perpendicular polarization orientations and photon-counting detection electronics for signal demultiplexing. In addition, deformable membrane mirrors can be used to correct for optical aberrations in the microscope and simultaneously optimize beam overlap using a genetic algorithm. The beam overlap can be achieved with better accuracy than diffraction limited point-spread function, which allows to perform polarization-resolved measurements on the pixel-by-pixel basis. We describe a newly developed differential polarization microscope and present applications of the differential microscopy technique for structural studies of collagen and cellulose. Both, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence-detected nonlinear absorption anisotropy are used in these investigations. It is shown that the orientation and structural properties of the fibers in biological tissue can be deduced and that the orientation of fluorescent molecules (Congo Red, which label the fibers, can be determined. Differential polarization microscopy sidesteps common issues such as photobleaching and sample movement. Due to tens of megahertz alternating polarization of excitation pulses fast data acquisition can be conveniently applied to measure changes in the nonlinear signal anisotropy in dynamically changing in vivo structures.

  7. Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy with adaptive optics controlled multiplexed beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samim, Masood; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Tretyakov, Ian; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus

    2013-09-09

    Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential to become an indispensable tool for structural investigations of ordered biological assemblies and microcrystalline aggregates. Their microscopic organization can be probed through fast and sensitive measurements of nonlinear optical signal anisotropy, which can be achieved with microscopic spatial resolution by using time-multiplexed pulsed laser beams with perpendicular polarization orientations and photon-counting detection electronics for signal demultiplexing. In addition, deformable membrane mirrors can be used to correct for optical aberrations in the microscope and simultaneously optimize beam overlap using a genetic algorithm. The beam overlap can be achieved with better accuracy than diffraction limited point-spread function, which allows to perform polarization-resolved measurements on the pixel-by-pixel basis. We describe a newly developed differential polarization microscope and present applications of the differential microscopy technique for structural studies of collagen and cellulose. Both, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence-detected nonlinear absorption anisotropy are used in these investigations. It is shown that the orientation and structural properties of the fibers in biological tissue can be deduced and that the orientation of fluorescent molecules (Congo Red), which label the fibers, can be determined. Differential polarization microscopy sidesteps common issues such as photobleaching and sample movement. Due to tens of megahertz alternating polarization of excitation pulses fast data acquisition can be conveniently applied to measure changes in the nonlinear signal anisotropy in dynamically changing in vivo structures.

  8. Differential Polarization Nonlinear Optical Microscopy with Adaptive Optics Controlled Multiplexed Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samim, Masood; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Tretyakov, Ian; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus

    2013-01-01

    Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential to become an indispensable tool for structural investigations of ordered biological assemblies and microcrystalline aggregates. Their microscopic organization can be probed through fast and sensitive measurements of nonlinear optical signal anisotropy, which can be achieved with microscopic spatial resolution by using time-multiplexed pulsed laser beams with perpendicular polarization orientations and photon-counting detection electronics for signal demultiplexing. In addition, deformable membrane mirrors can be used to correct for optical aberrations in the microscope and simultaneously optimize beam overlap using a genetic algorithm. The beam overlap can be achieved with better accuracy than diffraction limited point-spread function, which allows to perform polarization-resolved measurements on the pixel-by-pixel basis. We describe a newly developed differential polarization microscope and present applications of the differential microscopy technique for structural studies of collagen and cellulose. Both, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence-detected nonlinear absorption anisotropy are used in these investigations. It is shown that the orientation and structural properties of the fibers in biological tissue can be deduced and that the orientation of fluorescent molecules (Congo Red), which label the fibers, can be determined. Differential polarization microscopy sidesteps common issues such as photobleaching and sample movement. Due to tens of megahertz alternating polarization of excitation pulses fast data acquisition can be conveniently applied to measure changes in the nonlinear signal anisotropy in dynamically changing in vivo structures. PMID:24022688

  9. Probing living bacterial adhesion by single cell force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.

    be considered. We have therefore developed a simple and versatile method to make single-cell bacterial probes for measuring single cell adhesion with atomic force microscopy (AFM).[1] A single-cell probe was readily made by picking up a bacterial cell from a glass surface using a tipless AFM cantilever coated...... with a commercial cell adhesive CellTakTM. The method was applied to four different bacterial strains, and single-cell adhesion was measured on three surfaces (fresh glass, hydrophilic glass, mica). Attachment to the cantilever was stable during the 2 h of AFM force measurements, and viability was confirmed by Live....../Dead fluorescence staining at the end of each experiment. The adhesion force and final rupture length were dependent on bacterial strains, surfaces properties, and time of contact. The single-cell probe offers control of the cell immobilization, thus holds advantages over the commonly used multi-cell probes where...

  10. Brown algal morphogenesis: Atomic Force Microscopy as a tool to study the role of mechanical forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit eTesson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, a growing interest has been directed toward the use of macroalgae as a source of energy, food and molecules for the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Besides this, macroalgal development remains poorly understood compared to other multicellular organisms. Brown algae (Phaeophyceae form a monophyletic lineage of usually large multicellular algae which evolved independently from land plants. In their environment, they are subjected to strong mechanical forces (current, waves and tide, in response to which they modify rapidly and reversibly their morphology. Because of their specific cellular features (cell wall composition, cytoskeleton organization, deciphering how they cope with these forces might help discover new control mechanisms of cell wall softening and cellulose synthesis. Despite the current scarcity in knowledge on brown algal cell wall dynamics and protein composition, we will illustrate, in the light of methods adapted to Ectocarpus siliculosus, to what extent atomic force microscopy can contribute to advance this field of investigation.

  11. Brown algal morphogenesis: atomic force microscopy as a tool to study the role of mechanical forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesson, Benoit; Charrier, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, a growing interest has been directed toward the use of macroalgae as a source of energy, food and molecules for the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Besides this, macroalgal development remains poorly understood compared to other multicellular organisms. Brown algae (Phaeophyceae) form a monophyletic lineage of usually large multicellular algae which evolved independently from land plants. In their environment, they are subjected to strong mechanical forces (current, waves, and tide), in response to which they modify rapidly and reversibly their morphology. Because of their specific cellular features (cell wall composition, cytoskeleton organization), deciphering how they cope with these forces might help discover new control mechanisms of cell wall softening and cellulose synthesis. Despite the current scarcity in knowledge on brown algal cell wall dynamics and protein composition, we will illustrate, in the light of methods adapted to Ectocarpus siliculosus, to what extent atomic force microscopy can contribute to advance this field of investigation.

  12. Force interactions between magnetite, silica, and bentonite studied with atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobryden, I.; Potapova, E.; Holmgren, A.; Weber, H.; Hedlund, J.; Almqvist, N.

    2015-04-01

    Iron ore pellets consist of variety of mineral particles and are an important refined product used in steel manufacturing. Production of high-quality pellets requires good understanding of interactions between different constituents, such as magnetite, gangue residues, bentonite, and additives. Much research has been reported on magnetite, silica, and bentonite surface properties and their effect on pellet strength but more scant with a focus on a fundamental particle-particle interaction. To probe such particle interaction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using colloidal probe technique has proven to be a suitable tool. In this work, the measurements were performed between magnetite-magnetite, bentonite-magnetite, silica-bentonite, and silica-magnetite particles in 1 mM CaCl2 solution at various pH values. The interaction character, i.e., repulsion or attraction, was determined by measuring and analyzing AFM force curves. The observed quantitative changes in interaction forces were in good agreement with the measured zeta-potentials for the particles at the same experimental conditions. Particle aggregation was studied by measuring the adhesion force. Absolute values of adhesion forces for different systems could not be compared due to the difference in particle size and contact geometry. Therefore, the relative change of adhesion force between pH 6 and 10 was used for comparison. The adhesion force decreased for the magnetite-magnetite and bentonite-silica systems and slightly increased for the magnetite-bentonite system at pH 10 as compared to pH 6, whereas a pronounced decrease in adhesion force was observed in the magnetite-silica system. Thus, the presence of silica particles on the magnetite surface could have a negative impact on the interaction between magnetite and bentonite in balling due to the reduction of the adhesion force.

  13. Radiative Forcing from Emissivity Response in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C.; Feldman, D.; Huang, X.; Flanner, M.; Chen, X.; Yang, P.; Kuo, C.

    2016-12-01

    A detailed assessment of the radiative balance and its controlling factors in polar regions is a critical prerequisite for understanding and predicting the polar amplification of climate change. Accordingly, we investigate the role of infrared surface emissivity in polar regions as a potential feedback mechanism following Feldman et al, 2014. In this work, we investigate the climatic response of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with spectral emissivity values that are implemented in a physically consistent manner for non-vegetated surfaces. In a control model run where 1850 CO2 volume mixing ratio (vmr) is fixed, the updated spectral emissivity values are imposed for modified surface boundary conditions in the atmospheric model component. Climatic stability in the emergent globally averaged surface temperature is observed on decadal scales for an unforced (control) run. Analytic kernels representing the change in top of the atmosphere OLR given changes in emissivity are calculated on-line during the model runs, incorporating spatially and temporally varied humidity profiles impactful to transmission. Globally averaged kernels of the sensitivity of OLR to surface emissivity calculated for control and ramped CO2 runs exhibit temporal evolution with statistically significant differences in shape. Additionally, kernel and spectrally-averaged emissivity differences between monthly-averaged maps of control and ramped runs demonstrate a seasonal cycle. Similar to the treatment of cryosphere radiative forcing in Flanner et al, 2011, we define emissivity response as the product of the emissivity kernel and the change in month-to-month emissivity. At the end of 20th century, the 10-year emissivity forcing averaged at latitudes > 60°, is found to be negative (positive) in January (July), due to increasing (decreasing) sea-ice. These findings indicate that differences in surface emissivity between frozen and unfrozen surfaces decrease wintertime and increase summertime

  14. Atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy on the assessment of protein folding and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Martins, Ivo C; Santos, Nuno C

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) applied to biological systems can, besides generating high-quality and well-resolved images, be employed to study protein folding via AFM-based force spectroscopy. This approach allowed remarkable advances in the measurement of inter- and intramolecular interaction forces with piconewton resolution. The detection of specific interaction forces between molecules based on the AFM sensitivity and the manipulation of individual molecules greatly advanced the understanding of intra-protein and protein-ligand interactions. Apart from the academic interest in the resolution of basic scientific questions, this technique has also key importance on the clarification of several biological questions of immediate biomedical relevance. Force spectroscopy is an especially appropriate technique for "mechanical proteins" that can provide crucial information on single protein molecules and/or domains. Importantly, it also has the potential of combining in a single experiment spatial and kinetic measurements. Here, the main principles of this methodology are described, after which the ability to measure interactions at the single-molecule level is discussed, in the context of relevant protein-folding examples. We intend to demonstrate the potential of AFM-based force spectroscopy in the study of protein folding, especially since this technique is able to circumvent some of the difficulties typically encountered in classical thermal/chemical denaturation studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characteristic Contrast in Δfmin Maps of Organic Molecules Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J; Hapala, Prokop; Rombouts, Jeroen A; van der Lit, Joost; Smith, Daniël; Mutombo, Pingo; Švec, Martin; Jelinek, Pavel; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy can provide detailed information about the geometric and electronic structure of molecules with submolecular spatial resolution. However, an essential capability to realize the full potential of these techniques for chemical applications is

  16. Quantitative assessment of contact and non-contact lateral force calibration methods for atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Khac, Bien Cuong; Chung, Koo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been widely used for measuring friction force at the nano-scale. However, one of the key challenges faced by AFM researchers is to calibrate an AFM system to interpret a lateral force signal as a quantifiable force. In this study, five rectangular cantilevers were used to quantitatively compare three different lateral force calibration methods to demonstrate the legitimacy and to establish confidence in the quantitative integrity of the proposed methods. The Flat-Wedge method is based on a variation of the lateral output on a surface with flat and changing slopes, the Multi-Load Pivot method is based on taking pivot measurements at several locations along the cantilever length, and the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method is based on determining the optical lever sensitivity from the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode with a known torsional spring constant from the Sader method. The results of the calibration using the Flat-Wedge and Multi-Load Pivot methods were found to be consistent within experimental uncertainties, and the experimental uncertainties of the two methods were found to be less than 15%. However, the lateral force sensitivity determined by the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method was found to be 8–29% smaller than those obtained from the other two methods. This discrepancy decreased to 3–19% when the torsional mode correction factor for an ideal cantilever was used, which suggests that the torsional mode correction should be taken into account to establish confidence in Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method. - Highlights: • Quantitative assessment of three lateral force calibration methods for AFM. • Advantages and disadvantages of three different lateral force calibration method. • Implementation of Multi-Load Pivot method as non-contact calibration technique. • The torsional mode correction for Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method.

  17. Quantitative assessment of contact and non-contact lateral force calibration methods for atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran Khac, Bien Cuong; Chung, Koo-Hyun, E-mail: khchung@ulsan.ac.kr

    2016-02-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been widely used for measuring friction force at the nano-scale. However, one of the key challenges faced by AFM researchers is to calibrate an AFM system to interpret a lateral force signal as a quantifiable force. In this study, five rectangular cantilevers were used to quantitatively compare three different lateral force calibration methods to demonstrate the legitimacy and to establish confidence in the quantitative integrity of the proposed methods. The Flat-Wedge method is based on a variation of the lateral output on a surface with flat and changing slopes, the Multi-Load Pivot method is based on taking pivot measurements at several locations along the cantilever length, and the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method is based on determining the optical lever sensitivity from the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode with a known torsional spring constant from the Sader method. The results of the calibration using the Flat-Wedge and Multi-Load Pivot methods were found to be consistent within experimental uncertainties, and the experimental uncertainties of the two methods were found to be less than 15%. However, the lateral force sensitivity determined by the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method was found to be 8–29% smaller than those obtained from the other two methods. This discrepancy decreased to 3–19% when the torsional mode correction factor for an ideal cantilever was used, which suggests that the torsional mode correction should be taken into account to establish confidence in Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method. - Highlights: • Quantitative assessment of three lateral force calibration methods for AFM. • Advantages and disadvantages of three different lateral force calibration method. • Implementation of Multi-Load Pivot method as non-contact calibration technique. • The torsional mode correction for Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method.

  18. Formation and disruption of current paths of anodic porous alumina films by conducting atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyoshi, K.; Nigo, S.; Inoue, J.; Sakai, O.; Kitazawa, H.; Kido, G.

    2010-01-01

    Anodic porous alumina (APA) films have a honeycomb cell structure of pores and a voltage-induced bi-stable switching effect. We have applied conducting atomic force microscopy (CAFM) as a method to form and to disrupt current paths in the APA films. A bi-polar switching operation was confirmed. We have firstly observed terminals of current paths as spots or areas typically on the center of the triangle formed by three pores. In addition, though a part of the current path showed repetitive switching, most of them were not observed again at the same position after one cycle of switching operations in the present experiments. This suggests that a part of alumina structure and/or composition along the current paths is modified during the switching operations.

  19. Quantum mechanical force field for water with explicit electronic polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaebeom; Mazack, Michael J M; Zhang, Peng; Truhlar, Donald G; Gao, Jiali

    2013-08-07

    A quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) for water is described. Unlike traditional approaches that use quantum mechanical results and experimental data to parameterize empirical potential energy functions, the present QMFF uses a quantum mechanical framework to represent intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in an entire condensed-phase system. In particular, the internal energy terms used in molecular mechanics are replaced by a quantum mechanical formalism that naturally includes electronic polarization due to intermolecular interactions and its effects on the force constants of the intramolecular force field. As a quantum mechanical force field, both intermolecular interactions and the Hamiltonian describing the individual molecular fragments can be parameterized to strive for accuracy and computational efficiency. In this work, we introduce a polarizable molecular orbital model Hamiltonian for water and for oxygen- and hydrogen-containing compounds, whereas the electrostatic potential responsible for intermolecular interactions in the liquid and in solution is modeled by a three-point charge representation that realistically reproduces the total molecular dipole moment and the local hybridization contributions. The present QMFF for water, which is called the XP3P (explicit polarization with three-point-charge potential) model, is suitable for modeling both gas-phase clusters and liquid water. The paper demonstrates the performance of the XP3P model for water and proton clusters and the properties of the pure liquid from about 900 × 10(6) self-consistent-field calculations on a periodic system consisting of 267 water molecules. The unusual dipole derivative behavior of water, which is incorrectly modeled in molecular mechanics, is naturally reproduced as a result of an electronic structural treatment of chemical bonding by XP3P. We anticipate that the XP3P model will be useful for studying proton transport in solution and solid phases as well as across

  20. Magnetic Force Microscopy Observation of Perpendicular Recording Head Remanence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilekrojanavuti, P.; Saengkaew, K.; Cheowanish, I.; Damrongsak, B.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) was utilized to observe the magnetic write head remanence, which is the remaining out-of-plane magnetic field on magnetic write heads after a write current is turned off. This remnant field can write unwanted tracks or erase written tracks on a magnetic media. The write head remanence can also occur from device and slider fabrication, either by applying current to the write coil during the inspection or biasing the external magnetic field to magnetic recording heads. This remanence can attract magnetic nanoparticles, which is suspended in cleaning water or surrounding air, and cause device contamination. MFM images were used to examine locations of the remnant field on the surface of magnetic recording heads. Experimental results revealed that the remanence occurred mostly on the shield and is dependent on the initial direction of magnetic moments. In addition, we demonstrated a potential use of MFM imaging to investigate effects of different etching gases on the head remanence.

  1. Nanoscale observation of organic thin film by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Shota; Uruma, Takeshi; Satoh, Nobuo; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Soga, Tetsuo

    2017-08-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) fabricated using organic semiconductors and hybrid solar cells (HSCs) based on organic semiconductors/quantum dots (QDs) have been attracting significant attention owing to their potential use in low-cost solar energy-harvesting applications and flexible, light-weight, colorful, large-area devices. In this study, we observed and evaluated the surface of a photoelectric conversion layer (active layer) of the OPVs and HSCs based on phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles. The experiment was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with a frequency modulation detector (FM detector) and a contact potential difference (CPD) detection circuit. We experimentally confirmed the changes in film thickness and surface potential, as affected by the ZnO nanoparticle concentration. From the experimental results, we confirmed that ZnO nanoparticles possibly affect the structures of PCBM and P3HT. Also, we prepared an energy band diagram on the basis of the observation results, and analyzed the energy distribution inside the active layer.

  2. Reconstruction of atomic force microscopy image using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guoqiang; Lin, Bo; Lin, Yuling

    2018-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is one of the most popular and advanced tools for ultra high-resolution imaging and nanomanipulation of nano-scale matter. But AFM imaging typically takes a long time. High-speed and high-precision AFM measurement has attracted wide attention in recent several years. In traditional AFM, simple reduction in the number of measurement points may lose essential sample topography information. To resolve such problems, an AFM image reconstruction method based on Compressed Sensing (CS) theory is applied to reduce image acquisition time without cutting down the image quality. The benefit of using CS approach in AFM is shortening the imaging time, minimizing the interaction with the sample, and finally avoiding sample damage in AFM. Three kinds of testing samples with high and low frequency components were examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and by AFM. An orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) algorithm is employed to reconstruct an AFM image with different sampling rates. Subsequently the reconstruction results of sample topography images are analyzed and evaluated. Using the CS approach in AFM can greatly improve the AFM imaging process. Experimental results show that the obtained reconstructed images have different resolution and quality, depending on the surface morphology of the sample and sampling rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Medical applications of atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Samjin; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Kim, Kyung Sook; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy techniques, which are considered the multi-functional and powerful toolkits for probing the nanostructural, biomechanical and physicochemical properties of biomedical samples in medical science. We introduce briefly the basic principles of AFM and Raman spectroscopy, followed by diagnostic assessments of some selected diseases in biomedical applications using them, including mitochondria isolated from normal and ischemic hearts, hair fibers, individual cells, and human cortical bone. Finally, AFM and Raman spectroscopy applications to investigate the effects of pharmacotherapy, surgery, and medical device therapy in various medicines from cells to soft and hard tissues are discussed, including pharmacotherapy--paclitaxel on Ishikawa and HeLa cells, telmisartan on angiotensin II, mitomycin C on strabismus surgery and eye whitening surgery, and fluoride on primary teeth--and medical device therapy--collagen cross-linking treatment for the management of progressive keratoconus, radiofrequency treatment for skin rejuvenation, physical extracorporeal shockwave therapy for healing of Achilles tendinitis, orthodontic treatment, and toothbrushing time to minimize the loss of teeth after exposure to acidic drinks.

  4. Measurements of electrostatic double layer potentials with atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamberardino, Jason

    The aim of this thesis is to provide a thorough description of the development of theory and experiment pertaining to the electrostatic double layer (EDL) in aqueous electrolytic systems. The EDL is an important physical element of many systems and its behavior has been of interest to scientists for many decades. Because many areas of science and engineering move to test, build, and understand systems at smaller and smaller scales, this work focuses on nanoscopic experimental investigations of the EDL. In that vein, atomic force microscopy (AFM) will be introduced and discussed as a tool for making high spatial resolution measurements of the solid-liquid interface, culminating in a description of the development of a method for completely characterizing the EDL. This thesis first explores, in a semi-historical fashion, the development of the various models and theories that are used to describe the electrostatic double layer. Later, various experimental techniques and ideas are addressed as ways to make measurements of interesting characteristics of the EDL. Finally, a newly developed approach to measuring the EDL system with AFM is introduced. This approach relies on both implementation of existing theoretical models with slight modifications as well as a unique experimental measurement scheme. The model proposed clears up previous ambiguities in definitions of various parameters pertaining to measurements of the EDL and also can be used to fully characterize the system in a way not yet demonstrated.

  5. Atomic force microscopy investigation of the giant mimivirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yuri G.; Xiao Chuan; Sun Siyang; Raoult, Didier; Rossmann, Michael; McPherson, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Mimivirus was investigated by atomic force microscopy in its native state following serial degradation by lysozyme and bromelain. The 750-nm diameter virus is coated with a forest of glycosylated protein fibers of lengths about 140 nm with diameters 1.4 nm. Fibers are capped with distinctive ellipsoidal protein heads of estimated Mr = 25 kDa. The surface fibers are attached to the particle through a layer of protein covering the capsid, which is in turn composed of the major capsid protein (MCP). The latter is organized as an open network of hexagonal rings with central depressions separated by 14 nm. The virion exhibits an elaborate apparatus at a unique vertex, visible as a star shaped depression on native particles, but on defibered virions as five arms of 50 nm width and 250 nm length rising above the capsid by 20 nm. The apparatus is integrated into the capsid and not applied atop the icosahedral lattice. Prior to DNA release, the arms of the star disengage from the virion and it opens by folding back five adjacent triangular faces. A membrane sac containing the DNA emerges from the capsid in preparation for fusion with a membrane of the host cell. Also observed from disrupted virions were masses of distinctive fibers of diameter about 1 nm, and having a 7-nm periodicity. These are probably contained within the capsid along with the DNA bearing sac. The fibers were occasionally observed associated with toroidal protein clusters interpreted as processive enzymes modifying the fibers.

  6. Magnetic Force Microscopy of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Tanya M.

    In recent years, both synthetic as well as naturally occurring superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNs) have become increasingly important in biomedicine. For instance, iron deposits in many pathological tissues are known to contain an accumulation of the superparamagnetic protein, ferritin. Additionally, man-made SPNs have found biomedical applications ranging from cell-tagging in vitro to contrast agents for in vivo diagnostic imaging. Despite the widespread use and occurrence of SPNs, detection and characterization of their magnetic properties, especially at the single-particle level and/or in biological samples, remains a challenge. Magnetic signals arising from SPNs can be complicated by factors such as spatial distribution, magnetic anisotropy, particle aggregation and magnetic dipolar interaction, thereby confounding their analysis. Techniques that can detect SPNs at the single particle level are therefore highly desirable. The goal of this thesis was to develop an analytical microscopy technique, namely magnetic force microscopy (MFM), to detect and spatially localize synthetic and natural SPNs for biomedical applications. We aimed to (1) increase MFM sensitivity to detect SPNs at the single-particle level and (2) quantify and spatially localize iron-ligated proteins (ferritin) in vitro and in biological samples using MFM. Two approaches were employed to improve MFM sensitivity. First, we showed how exploitation of magnetic anisotropy could produce a higher, more uniform MFM signal from single SPNs. Second, we showed how an increase in probe magnetic moment increased both the magnitude and range up to which the MFM signal could be detected from a single SPN. We further showed how MFM could enable accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin-apoferritin mixtures. Finally, we demonstrated how MFM could be used to detect iron/ferritin in serum and animal tissue with spatial resolution and sensitivity surpassing that obtained using

  7. Response of Magnetic Force Microscopy Probes under AC Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungthong, A.; Ruksasakchai, P.; Saengkaew, K.; Cheowanish, I.; Damrongsak, B.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) probes with different coating materials were characterized under AC magnetic field. A perpendicular magnetic write head similar to those used in hard disk drives was employed as the AC magnetic field generator. In order to measure a response of MFM probes to AC magnetic field, a MFM probe under test was scanned, at a scan height of 10 nm, across the surface of the magnetic write head. During MFM imaging, the write head was biased by a sufficient magnitude of AC current, approximately 30 mA. A spectral analysis for a frequency sweep from 1 kHz to 100 MHz was extracted from post-processing MFM images. As expected, a MFM probe coated with hard magnetic alloys, i.e. FePt, has the lowest response to AC magnetic fields. MFM probes coated with soft magnetic alloys, i.e. NiFe and NiCoCr, have a relatively high and flat response across the frequency range. Ni coated MFM probe has the highest response to AC magnetic fields. In addition, CoCr and NiCo coated MFM probes show lower response than NiFe and NiCoCr probes at low frequencies; however, theirs response to AC magnetic field increase for the AC magnetic field with a frequency above 50 kHz. This can be implied that those MFM probes are a good candidate for being used to study the high-frequency performance of perpendicular magnetic write heads. Noting that response of all MFM probes significantly decreased when driven frequencies above 1 MHz due to the limitation of the hardware, i.e. response of quadrant photodiode and op-amp in a pre-amplifier.

  8. Dimensional characterization of extracellular vesicles using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebaihi, N; De Boeck, B; Pétry, J; Yuana, Y; Nieuwland, R

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are small biological entities released from cells into body fluids. EV are recognized as mediators in intercellular communication and influence important physiological processes. It has been shown that the concentration and composition of EV in body fluids may differ from healthy subjects to patients suffering from particular disease. So, EV have gained a strong scientific and clinical interest as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of disease. Due to their small size, accurate detection and characterization of EV remain challenging. The aim of the presented work is to propose a characterization method of erythrocyte-derived EV using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The vesicles are immobilized on anti-CD235a-modified mica and analyzed by AFM under buffer liquid and dry conditions. EV detected under both conditions show very similar sizes namely ∼30 nm high and ∼90 nm wide. The size of these vesicles remains stable over drying time as long as 7 d at room temperature. Since the detected vesicles are not spherical, EV are characterized by their height and diameter, and not only by the height as is usually done for spherical nanoparticles. In order to obtain an accurate measurement of EV diameters, the geometry of the AFM tip was evaluated to account for the lateral broadening artifact inherent to AFM measurements. To do so, spherical polystyrene (PS) nanobeads and EV were concomitantly deposited on the same mica substrate and simultaneously measured by AFM under dry conditions. By applying this procedure, direct calibration of the AFM tip could be performed together with EV characterization under identical experimental conditions minimizing external sources of uncertainty on the shape and size of the tip, thus allowing standardization of EV measurement. (paper)

  9. Immobilization of different biomolecules by atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hölzel Ralph

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Micrometer resolution placement and immobilization of probe molecules is an important step in the preparation of biochips and a wide range of lab-on-chip systems. Most known methods for such a deposition of several different substances are costly and only suitable for a limited number of probes. In this article we present a flexible procedure for simultaneous spatially controlled immobilization of functional biomolecules by molecular ink lithography. Results For the bottom-up fabrication of surface bound nanostructures a universal method is presented that allows the immobilization of different types of biomolecules with micrometer resolution. A supporting surface is biotinylated and streptavidin molecules are deposited with an AFM (atomic force microscope tip at distinct positions. Subsequent incubation with a biotinylated molecule species leads to binding only at these positions. After washing streptavidin is deposited a second time with the same AFM tip and then a second biotinylated molecule species is coupled by incubation. This procedure can be repeated several times. Here we show how to immobilize different types of biomolecules in an arbitrary arrangement whereas most common methods can deposit only one type of molecules. The presented method works on transparent as well as on opaque substrates. The spatial resolution is better than 400 nm and is limited only by the AFM's positional accuracy after repeated z-cycles since all steps are performed in situ without moving the supporting surface. The principle is demonstrated by hybridization to different immobilized DNA oligomers and was validated by fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The immobilization of different types of biomolecules in high-density microarrays is a challenging task for biotechnology. The method presented here not only allows for the deposition of DNA at submicrometer resolution but also for proteins and other molecules of biological relevance that

  10. Dimensional characterization of extracellular vesicles using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaihi, N.; De Boeck, B.; Yuana, Y.; Nieuwland, R.; Pétry, J.

    2017-03-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are small biological entities released from cells into body fluids. EV are recognized as mediators in intercellular communication and influence important physiological processes. It has been shown that the concentration and composition of EV in body fluids may differ from healthy subjects to patients suffering from particular disease. So, EV have gained a strong scientific and clinical interest as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of disease. Due to their small size, accurate detection and characterization of EV remain challenging. The aim of the presented work is to propose a characterization method of erythrocyte-derived EV using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The vesicles are immobilized on anti-CD235a-modified mica and analyzed by AFM under buffer liquid and dry conditions. EV detected under both conditions show very similar sizes namely ~30 nm high and ~90 nm wide. The size of these vesicles remains stable over drying time as long as 7 d at room temperature. Since the detected vesicles are not spherical, EV are characterized by their height and diameter, and not only by the height as is usually done for spherical nanoparticles. In order to obtain an accurate measurement of EV diameters, the geometry of the AFM tip was evaluated to account for the lateral broadening artifact inherent to AFM measurements. To do so, spherical polystyrene (PS) nanobeads and EV were concomitantly deposited on the same mica substrate and simultaneously measured by AFM under dry conditions. By applying this procedure, direct calibration of the AFM tip could be performed together with EV characterization under identical experimental conditions minimizing external sources of uncertainty on the shape and size of the tip, thus allowing standardization of EV measurement.

  11. Direct Measurement of Interparticle Forces of Titan Aerosol Analogs ("Tholin") Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinting; Hörst, Sarah M.; He, Chao; McGuiggan, Patricia; Bridges, Nathan T.

    2017-12-01

    To understand the origin of the dunes on Titan, it is important to investigate the material properties of Titan's organic sand particles on Titan. The organic sand may behave distinctively compared to the quartz/basaltic sand on terrestrial planets (Earth, Venus, and Mars) due to differences in interparticle forces. We measured the surface energy (through contact angle measurements) and elastic modulus (through Atomic Force Microscopy) of the Titan aerosol analog (tholin). We find that the surface energy of a tholin thin film is about 70.9 mN/m, and its elastic modulus is about 3.0 GPa (similar to hard polymers like PMMA and polystyrene). For two 20 μm diameter particles, the theoretical cohesion force is therefore 3.3 μN. We directly measured interparticle forces for relevant materials: tholin particles are 0.8 ± 0.6 μN, while the interparticle cohesion between walnut shell particles (a typical model materials for the Titan Wind Tunnel, TWT) is only 0.4 ± 0.1 μN. The interparticle cohesion forces are much larger for tholins and presumably Titan sand particles than materials used in the TWT. This suggests that we should increase the interparticle force in both analog experiments (TWT) and threshold models to correctly translate the results to real Titan conditions. The strong cohesion of tholins may also inform us how the small aerosol particles (˜1 μm) in Titan's atmosphere are transformed into large sand particles (˜200 μm). It may also support the cohesive sand formation mechanism suggested by Rubin and Hesp (2009), where only unidirectional wind is needed to form linear dunes on Titan.

  12. Dual-polarization interference microscopy for advanced quantification of phase associated with the image field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, Petr; Chmelík, Radim; Bouchal, Zdeněk

    2018-02-01

    A new concept of dual-polarization spatial light interference microscopy (DPSLIM) is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The method works with two orthogonally polarized modes in which signal and reference waves are combined to realize the polarization-sensitive phase-shifting, thus allowing advanced reconstruction of the phase associated with the image field. The image phase is reconstructed directly from four polarization encoded interference records by a single step processing. This is a progress compared with common methods, in which the phase of the image field is reconstructed using the optical path difference and the amplitudes of interfering waves, which are calculated in multiple-step processing of the records. The DPSLIM is implemented in a common-path configuration using a spatial light modulator, which is connected to a commercial microscope Nikon E200. The optical performance of the method is demonstrated in experiments using both polystyrene microspheres and live LW13K2 cells.

  13. Algorithms for Reconstruction of Undersampled Atomic Force Microscopy Images Supplementary Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Two Jupyter Notebooks showcasing reconstructions of undersampled atomic force microscopy images. The reconstructions were obtained using a variety of interpolation and reconstruction methods.......Two Jupyter Notebooks showcasing reconstructions of undersampled atomic force microscopy images. The reconstructions were obtained using a variety of interpolation and reconstruction methods....

  14. Atomic force and scanning near-field optical microscopy study of carbocyanine dye J-aggregates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokhorov, V.V.; Petrova, M.G.; Kovaleva, Natalia; Demikhov, E.I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2014), s. 700-704 ISSN 1573-4137 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbocyanine dye * elementary fibri * high-resolution atomic force microscopy * J-aggregate * probe microscopy * scanning near-field optical microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.096, year: 2014

  15. Lateral force calibration in atomic force microscopy: A new lateral force calibration method and general guidelines for optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannara, Rachel J.; Eglin, Michael; Carpick, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Proper force calibration is a critical step in atomic and lateral force microscopies (AFM/LFM). The recently published torsional Sader method [C. P. Green et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 1988 (2004)] facilitates the calculation of torsional spring constants of rectangular AFM cantilevers by eliminating the need to obtain information or make assumptions regarding the cantilever's material properties and thickness, both of which are difficult to measure. Complete force calibration of the lateral signal in LFM requires measurement of the lateral signal deflection sensitivity as well. In this article, we introduce a complete lateral force calibration procedure that employs the torsional Sader method and does not require making contact between the tip and any sample. In this method, a colloidal sphere is attached to a 'test' cantilever of the same width, but different length and material as the 'target' cantilever of interest. The lateral signal sensitivity is calibrated by loading the colloidal sphere laterally against a vertical sidewall. The signal sensitivity for the target cantilever is then corrected for the tip length, total signal strength, and in-plane bending of the cantilevers. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this approach in comparison with the other established lateral force calibration techniques, and make a direct comparison with the 'wedge' calibration method. The methods agree to within 5%. The propagation of errors is explicitly considered for both methods and the sources of disagreement discussed. Finally, we show that the lateral signal sensitivity is substantially reduced when the laser spot is not centered on the detector

  16. On the Origin of Extended Resolution in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy with a Worn Tip Apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchkin, Sergey Y; Stevenson, Keith J

    2018-04-05

    In this work we analyzed the effect of the atomic force microscopy probe tip apex shape on Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) potential sensitivity and spatial resolution. It was found that modification of the apex shape from spherical to planar upon thinning of the conductive coating leads to enhanced apex contribution to the total electrostatic force between the probe and the sample. The effect results in extended potential sensitivity and spatial resolution of KPFM. Experimental results were supported by calculations.

  17. Micromagnetism in (001) magnetite by spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figuera, Juan de la, E-mail: juan.delafiguera@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química-Física “Rocasolano”, CSIC, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Vergara, Lucía [Instituto de Química-Física “Rocasolano”, CSIC, Madrid 28006 (Spain); N' Diaye, Alpha T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Quesada, Adrian [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, CSIC, Calle Kelsen 5, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Schmid, Andreas K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy was used to image a magnetite crystal with (001) surface orientation. Sets of spin-dependent images of magnetic domain patterns observed in this surface were used to map the direction of the magnetization vector with high spatial and angular resolution. We find that domains are magnetized along the surface <110> directions, and domain wall structures include 90° and 180° walls. A type of unusually curved domain walls are interpreted as Néel-capped surface terminations of 180° Bloch walls. - Highlights: ► The (001) surface of magnetite is imaged by spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy. ► The magnetic domain microstructure is resolved. ► Magnetic easy axes in this surface are found to be along <110> directions. ► Magnetic domain wall structures include wide Néel-caps.

  18. Finite-size effects and analytical modeling of electrostatic force microscopy applied to dielectric films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomila, G; Gramse, G; Fumagalli, L

    2014-06-27

    A numerical analysis of the polarization force between a sharp conducting probe and a dielectric film of finite lateral dimensions on a metallic substrate is presented with the double objective of (i) determining the conditions under which the film can be approximated by a laterally infinite film and (ii) proposing an analytical model valid in this limit. We show that, for a given dielectric film, the critical diameter above which the film can be modeled as laterally infinite depends not only on the probe geometry, as expected, but mainly on the film thickness. In particular, for films with intermediate to large thicknesses (>100 nm), the critical diameter is nearly independent from the probe geometry and essentially depends on the film thickness and dielectric constant following a relatively simple phenomenological expression. For films that can be considered as laterally infinite, we propose a generalized analytical model valid in the thin-ultrathin limit (<20-50 nm) that reproduces the numerical calculations and the experimental data. Present results provide a general framework under which accurate quantification of electrostatic force microscopy measurements on dielectric films on metallic substrates can be achieved.

  19. Kelvin probe force microscopy from single charge detection to device characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Glatzel, Thilo

    2018-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the methods and variety of Kelvin probe force microscopy, including technical details. It also offers an overview of the recent developments and numerous applications, ranging from semiconductor materials, nanostructures and devices to sub-molecular and atomic scale electrostatics. In the last 25 years, Kelvin probe force microscopy has developed from a specialized technique applied by a few scanning probe microscopy experts into a tool used by numerous research and development groups around the globe. This sequel to the editors’ previous volume “Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Measuring and Compensating Electrostatic Forces,” presents new and complementary topics. It is intended for a broad readership, from undergraduate students to lab technicians and scanning probe microscopy experts who are new to the field.

  20. Microstructural and micromechanical characterisation of TiAl alloys using atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhard, S.; Pyczak, F.; Goeken, M.

    2009-01-01

    Different microstructures were generated in the Ti-45Al-4.6Nb-0.2B-0.2C and Ti-45Al-1Cr alloys (at.%) by heat treatment. The microstructures were investigated using nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy which was compared with transmission electron microscopy. Topographic contrast is usually used for phase identification in the atomic force microscope. However, it was found that the topographic order of the phases changes with different microstructures and specimen preparations. Nanoindentation measurements provided local hardness values not obtainable by other methods and enabled clear distinction of the phases. The hardness values can give information on surrounding microstructure and solid solution hardening. The mean lamellar spacing of the colonies was measured using both atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Atomic force microscopy was found to be suitable to determine the spacing between α 2 /γ-interfaces offering the advantages of easier sample preparation and fewer specimens compared to evaluation by TEM analysis.

  1. Imaging and Force Recognition of Single Molecular Behaviors Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM has provided a powerful tool for investigating the behaviors of single native biological molecules under physiological conditions. AFM can not only image the conformational changes of single biological molecules at work with sub-nanometer resolution, but also sense the specific interactions of individual molecular pair with piconewton force sensitivity. In the past decade, the performance of AFM has been greatly improved, which makes it widely used in biology to address diverse biomedical issues. Characterizing the behaviors of single molecules by AFM provides considerable novel insights into the underlying mechanisms guiding life activities, contributing much to cell and molecular biology. In this article, we review the recent developments of AFM studies in single-molecule assay. The related techniques involved in AFM single-molecule assay were firstly presented, and then the progress in several aspects (including molecular imaging, molecular mechanics, molecular recognition, and molecular activities on cell surface was summarized. The challenges and future directions were also discussed.

  2. Evolution of poled state in P(VDF-TrFE)/(Pb,Ba)(Zr,Ti)O3 composites probed by temperature dependent Piezoresponse and Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsman, V V; Kiselev, D A; Solnyshkin, A V; Lupascu, D C; Silibin, M V

    2018-01-10

    Polarized states of polymer/inorganic inclusion P(VDF-TrFE)-(Pb,Ba)(Zr,Ti)O 3 composites are studied at the nanoscale using both piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). It has been shown that inorganic inclusions can be visualized using KPFM due to a discontinuity of the surface potential and polarization at the interface between the inclusions and the polymer matrix. The temperature evolution of the PFM and KPFM signal profiles is investigated. Softening of the polymer matrix on approaching the Curie temperature limits application of the contact PFM method. However non-contact KPFM can be used to probe evolution of the polarization at the phase transition. Mechanisms of the KPFM contrast formation are discussed.

  3. Spin-filter scanning tunneling microscopy : a novel technique for the analysis of spin polarization on magnetic surfaces and spintronic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera Marun, I.J.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of a versatile technique to measure spin polarization with atomic resolution. A microscopy technique that can measure electronic spin polarization is relevant for characterization of magnetic nanostructures and spintronic devices. Scanning tunneling microscopy

  4. Monitoring ligand-receptor interactions by photonic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeney, Sylvia; Mor, Flavio; Forro, Laszlo; Koszali, Roland; Moy, Vincent T

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a method for the acquisition of single molecule force measurements of ligand-receptor interactions using the photonic force microscope (PFM). Biotin-functionalized beads, manipulated with an optical trap, and a streptavidin-functionalized coverslip were used to measure the effect of different pulling forces on the lifetime of individual streptavidin-biotin complexes. By optimizing the design of the optical trap and selection of the appropriate bead size, pulling forces in excess of 50 pN were achieved. Based on the amplitude of three-dimensional (3D) thermal position fluctuations of the attached bead, we were able to select for a bead-coverslip interaction that was mediated by a single streptavidin-biotin complex. Moreover, the developed experimental system was greatly accelerated by automation of data acquisition and analysis. In force-dependent kinetic measurements carried out between streptavidin and biotin, we observed that the streptavidin-biotin complex exhibited properties of a catch bond, with the lifetime increasing tenfold when the pulling force increased from 10 to 20 pN. We also show that silica beads were more appropriate than polystyrene beads for the force measurements, as tethers, longer than 200 nm, could be extracted from polystyrene beads.

  5. The work function of doped polyaniline nanoparticles observed by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinsung; Jang, Kuewhan; Na, Sungsoo; Bang, Doyeon; Haam, Seungjoo; Yang, Jaemoon

    2012-01-01

    The work function of polyaniline nanoparticles in the emeraldine base state was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy to be ∼270 meV higher than that of similar nanoparticles in the emeraldine salt state. Normal tapping mode atomic force microscopy could not be used to distinguish between the particles due to their similar morphologies and sizes. Moreover, other potential measurement systems, such as using zeta potentials, were not suitable for the measurement of surface charges of doped nanoparticles due to their encapsulation by interfering chemical groups. Kelvin probe force microscopy can be used to overcome these limitations and unambiguously distinguish between the bare and doped polyaniline nanoparticles. (paper)

  6. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone

  7. An Undergraduate Nanotechnology Engineering Laboratory Course on Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, D.; Fagan, R. D.; Hesjedal, T.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, is home to North America's first undergraduate program in nanotechnology. As part of the Nanotechnology Engineering degree program, a scanning probe microscopy (SPM)-based laboratory has been developed for students in their fourth year. The one-term laboratory course "Nanoprobing and…

  8. Magnetic moment measurement of magnetic nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J-W; Lee, E-C; Ju, H; Yoo, I S; Chang, W-S; Chung, B H; Kim, B S

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic moment per unit mass of magnetic nanoparticles was found by using the atomic force microscope (AFM). The mass of the nanoparticles was acquired from the resonance frequency shift of the particle-attached AFM probe and magnetic force measurement was also carried out with the AFM. Combining with magnetic field strength, the magnetic moment per unit mass of the nanoparticles was determined as a function of magnetic field strength. (technical design note)

  9. Modeling the Kelvin polarization force actuation of Micro- and Nanomechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Hierold, C.; Boisen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Polarization forces have become of high interest in micro- and nanomechanical systems. In this paper, an analytical model for a transduction scheme based on the Kelvin polarization force is presented. A dielectric beam is actuated by placing it over the gap of two coplanar electrodes. Finite...

  10. Recent advances in atomic-scale spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Arthur R; Yang, Rong; Yang, Haiqiang; Dick, Alexey; Neugebauer, Joerg; Lambrecht, Walter R L

    2005-02-01

    The Mn3N2 (010) surface has been studied using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy at the atomic scale. The principle objective of this work is to elucidate the properties and potential of this technique to measure atomic-scale magnetic structures. The experimental approach involves the use of a combined molecular beam epitaxy/scanning tunneling microscopy system that allows the study of atomically clean magnetic surfaces. Several key findings have been obtained. First, both magnetic and non-magnetic atomic-scale information has been obtained in a single spin-polarized image. Magnetic modulation of the height profile having an antiferromagnetic super-period of c = 12.14 A (6 atomic rows) together with a non-magnetic superstructure having a period of c/2 = 6.07 A (3 atomic rows) was observed. Methods of separation of magnetic and non-magnetic profiles are presented. Second, bias voltage-dependent spin-polarized images show a reversal of the magnetic modulation at a particular voltage. This reversal is clearly due to a change in the sign of the magnetic term in the tunnel current. Since this term depends on both the tip's as well as the sample's magnetic local density of states, the reversal can be caused by either the sample or the tip. Third, the shape of the line profile was found to vary with the bias voltage, which is related to the energy-dependent spin contribution from the 2 chemically inequivalent Mn sites on the surface. Overall, the results shown here expand the application of the method of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy to measure atomic-scale magnetic structures. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Bifunctional atomic force microscopy probes for molecular screening applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, Lisa M.; Allen, Stephanie; Davies, Martyn C.; Tendler, Saul J.B.; Williams, Philip M.; Roberts, Clive J

    2003-03-05

    Force mapping with the atomic force microscope (AFM) allows the simultaneous acquisition of topography and probe-sample interaction data. For example, AFM probes functionalised with an antigen can be employed to map the spatial distribution of recognition events on a substrate functionalised with its specific antibody. However, to date this method has been limited to the detection of single receptor-ligand species. Were the detection of multiple receptor-ligand interactions possible, force mapping would offer great scope as a sensitive tool for bioassay and screening applications. We have developed an immobilisation strategy, which allows two different molecular species (in this case human serum albumin and the {beta} subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin) to be present simultaneously on an AFM probe. Single point force spectroscopy results have revealed the ability of such probes to discriminate between their corresponding recognition points (anti-HSA and anti-{beta}hCG IgG antibodies). As a control, force measurements were re-recorded in the presence of the known antigen (free in solution) for each antibody species and a marked decrease in the frequency of specific interaction is observed. As an additional control interactions between anti-{beta}hCG IgG and the multifunctional probe are taken in the presence of free {beta}hCG ('true' antigen) and free HSA ('false' antigen). It is shown that measurements recorded in the presence of a non-related protein species results in no change in either the force observed or the frequency of specific interactions, further confirmation that the specificity of force observed is due to the separation of antibody-antigen complex.

  12. Near-field optical microscopy in transmission and reflection modes in combination with force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1993-01-01

    Depolarized hyper Rayleigh scattering of para-nitroaniline (C2v symmetry) and nitrocalix[4]arene (C4v symmetry) in solution has been measured. Using linearly and circularly polarized fundamental radiation information about the ratios between the several hyperpolarizability tensor components,

  13. An atomic force microscopy study of the interactions between indolicidin and supported planar bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askou, Hans Jakob; Jakobsen, Rasmus Neergaard; Fojan, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Indolicidin, a tryptophane-rich antimicrobial peptide , was used to investigate the interactions with a zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine as a model membrane system. In situ atomic force microscopy in liquid medium and phosphatidylcholine supported planar bilayers enabled the study...

  14. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co50Fe50 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    simulation data showed the formation of single and vortex states depending on the thickness of nanomagnets. Keywords. Magnetic nanostructures; micromagnetic simulations; magnetic force microscopy; magnetization reversal; magnetic domains. 1. Introduction. The study of small magnetic features and nanostructures.

  15. Characterization of the Surface Morphology of Bacillus Spores by Atomic Force Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zolock, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    The surface morphology of Bacillus spores was resolved by atomic force microscopy in order to determine if characteristic surface features could be used to distinguish between closely related species...

  16. Enhancing dynamic scanning force microscopy in air: as close as possible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios-Lidon, E; Perez-Garcia, B; Colchero, J [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Quimica (Campus Espinardo), Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain)], E-mail: elisapl@um.es

    2009-02-25

    Frequency modulation dynamic scanning force microscopy has been implemented in ambient conditions using low oscillation amplitudes (<1 nm) to simultaneously record not only topographic but also additional channels of information, in particular contact potential images. The performance of this mode as compared to the conventional amplitude modulation mode is analyzed in detail using a biological molecule, turning yellow mosaic virus RNA, as the model sample. On the basis of scanning force microscopy imaging as well as spectroscopy experiments, we find that for such very small samples the frequency modulation mode is superior since it can be operated with smaller tip-sample interaction, smaller effective tip-sample distance and lower forces. Combined with Kelvin probe microscopy it results not only in considerably higher electrostatic resolution, but also in correct quantitative values for the contact potential as compared to traditional amplitude modulation scanning force microscopy.

  17. Enhancing dynamic scanning force microscopy in air: as close as possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios-Lidon, E; Perez-Garcia, B; Colchero, J

    2009-01-01

    Frequency modulation dynamic scanning force microscopy has been implemented in ambient conditions using low oscillation amplitudes (<1 nm) to simultaneously record not only topographic but also additional channels of information, in particular contact potential images. The performance of this mode as compared to the conventional amplitude modulation mode is analyzed in detail using a biological molecule, turning yellow mosaic virus RNA, as the model sample. On the basis of scanning force microscopy imaging as well as spectroscopy experiments, we find that for such very small samples the frequency modulation mode is superior since it can be operated with smaller tip-sample interaction, smaller effective tip-sample distance and lower forces. Combined with Kelvin probe microscopy it results not only in considerably higher electrostatic resolution, but also in correct quantitative values for the contact potential as compared to traditional amplitude modulation scanning force microscopy.

  18. High resolution magnetic force microscopy using focussed ion beam modified tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, G.N.; Siekman, Martin Herman; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Summary form only given. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is well established for imaging surface magnetic stray fields. With commercial microscopes and magnetic tips, images with 50 nm resolution are quite routine; however, obtaining higher resolutions is experimentally more demanding. Higher

  19. Effect of polarization force on the Jeans instability in collisional dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, ABBASI; M, R. RASHIDIAN VAZIRI

    2018-03-01

    The Jeans instability in collisional dusty plasmas has been analytically investigated by considering the polarization force effect. Instabilities due to dust-neutral and ion-neutral drags can occur in electrostatic waves of collisional dusty plasmas with self-gravitating particles. In this study, the effect of gravitational force on heavy dust particles is considered in tandem with both the polarization and electrostatic forces. The theoretical framework has been developed and the dispersion relation and instability growth rate have been derived, assuming the plane wave approximation. The derived instability growth rate shows that, in collisional dusty plasmas, the Jeans instability strongly depends on the magnitude of the polarization force.

  20. Piezoelectric Properties of CaBi4Ti4O15 Ferroelectric Thin Films Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Desheng; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2003-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to probe the local piezoelectric properties of CaBi4Ti4O15 (CBT) bismuth-layer-structured ferroelectric thin films. Calibration with Z-cut LaTiO3 and X-cut quartz crystals shows that a conductive AFM tip can be employed as a top electrode to accurately evaluate the piezoelectric displacement in ferroelectric materials without a top electrode. Our measurements on individual grains in CBT film clearly reveal that the local piezoelectric properties are determined by the polarization state in the grain. In a grain with a polar axis very close to the normal direction, a piezoelectric coefficient of 16 pm/V was attained after poling.

  1. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  2. Polarization modulation laser scanning microscopy: A powerful tool to image molecular orientation and order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay K.; Kornfield, Julia A.

    1994-09-01

    To image the orientational order in a broad class of biological and manufactured materials, a new microscope has been developed that integrates laser scanning microscopy with polarization modulation polarimetry. Polarimetry allows quantitative characterization of the molecular orientation and the degree of order through characterization of optical anisotropy. Combined with laser scanning microscopy, it is used here to image the anisotropy with high spatial resolution, sensitivity, and speed. The design of the microscope is presented; and the vast improvement in sensitivity achieved using PM-LSM over conventional polarization microscopy is illustrated by imaging the linear dichroism of ultrathin Langmuir-Blodgett polymer films. PM-LSM allows imaging of the magnitude and orientation of linear dichroism in films as thin as three molecular layers (˜66 Å) at high resolution by rastering a diffraction limited spot of laser light across the sample. The rate of image acquisition is over 2000 pixels/s, two to three orders of magnitude faster than the previous methods of imaging optical anisotropy.

  3. Subsurface measurement of nanostructures on GaAs by electrostatic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Fumihiko; Kamiya, Itaru

    2013-01-01

    The size of surface buried oxide nanostructures are measured by electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). In contrast to atomic force microscopy that cannot probe subsurface structures and thickness, we show that EFM data include information about the thickness of individual nanostructures, consequently allowing us to determine the thickness of buried nanostructures on semiconductor substrates. We further show that this measurement can be performed simultaneously with AFM using EFM modulation spectroscopy.

  4. Cellulose fibril aggregation studies of eucalyptus dissolving pulps using atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available STUDIES OF Eucalyptus DISSOLVING PULPS USING ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY V. Chunilall1, J.Wesley-Smith2, T. Bush1 1CSIR, Forestry and Forest Product Research Centre, P.O. Box 17001, Congella, 4013, South Africa. 2Electron Microscope Unit, University of Kwa... pulp using atomic force microscopy (AFM) have reported increased cellulose fibril aggregation during processing, and a concomitant decrease in surface area available for chemical reaction1,2. These findings were subsequently confirmed...

  5. Atomic force microscopy on domains in biological model membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinia, H.A.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes the preparation and imaging of supported lipid bilayers, which can be regarded as biological modelmembranes, in the light of the formation of domains. The bilayers were prepared with either the Langmuir-Blodgett method, or with vesicle fusion. They were imaged with Atomic Force

  6. Analysis of enamel microbiopsies in shed primary teeth by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Polarizing Microscopy (PM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa de Almeida, Glauce Regina; Molina, Gabriela Ferian; Meschiari, Cesar Arruda [Department of Morphology, Stomatology and Physiology, Dental School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo - FORP/USP, Av. do Cafe, S/N, Monte Alegre, CEP 14040-904, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Barbosa de Sousa, Frederico [Department of Morphology, Dental School of Joao Pessoa, Federal University of Paraiba - UFPB, Av Castelo Branco - Campus I, CEP 58.059-900, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Gerlach, Raquel Fernanda, E-mail: rfgerlach@forp.usp.br [Department of Morphology, Stomatology and Physiology, Dental School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo - FORP/USP, Av. do Cafe, S/N, Monte Alegre, CEP 14040-904, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2009-09-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to verify how close to the theoretically presumed areas are the areas of enamel microbiopsies carried out in vivo or in exfoliated teeth; 2) to test whether the etching solution penetrates beyond the tape borders; 3) to test whether the etching solution demineralizes the enamel in depth. 24 shed upper primary central incisors were randomly divided into two groups: the Rehydrated Teeth Group and the Dry Teeth Group. An enamel microbiopsy was performed, and the enamel microbiopsies were then analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Polarizing Microscopy (PM). Quantitative birefringence measurements were performed. The 'true' etched area was determined by measuring the etched enamel using the NIH Image analysis program. Enamel birefringence was compared using the paired t test. There was a statistically significant difference when the etched areas in the Rehydrated teeth were compared with those of the Dry teeth (p = 0.04). The etched areas varied from - 11.6% to 73.5% of the presumed area in the Rehydrated teeth, and from 6.6% to 61.3% in the Dry teeth. The mean percentage of variation in each group could be used as a correction factor for the etched area. Analysis of PM pictures shows no evidence of in-depth enamel demineralization by the etching solution. No statistically significant differences in enamel birefringence were observed between values underneath and outside the microbiopsy area in the same tooth, showing that no mineral loss occurred below the enamel superficial layer. Our data showed no evidence of in-depth enamel demineralization by the etching solution used in the enamel microbiopsy proposed for primary enamel. This study also showed a variation in the measured diameter of the enamel microbiopsy in nineteen teeth out of twenty four, indicating that in most cases the etching solution penetrated beyond the tape borders.

  7. An atomic force microscopy statistical analysis of laser-induced azo-polyimide periodic tridimensional nanogrooves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Iuliana; Epure, Luiza; Sava, Ion; Damian, Victor; Hurduc, Nicolae

    2013-09-01

    The surface morphology of azo-polyimide films was investigated after 355 nm Nd: YAG laser irradiation with two different incident fluencies. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to correlate the laser-induced tridimensional nanogrooved surface relief with the incident fluence and the number of irradiation pulses. The height images revealed that the grooves depth increased even tens of times by increasing the incident fluence, using the same numbers of irradiation pulses. For low incident fluence, the films were uniformly patterned till 100 pulses of irradiation. Instead, when using higher fluence, after 15 pulses of irradiation the accuracy of the surface relief definition was reduced. This behavior could be explained by means of two different mechanisms, one that suppose the film photo-fluidization due to the cis-trans isomerization processes of the azo-groups and the second one responsible for the directional mass displacement. The dominant surface direction and parameters like isotropy, periodicity, and period were evaluated from the polar representation for texture analysis, revealing the appearance of ordered and directionated nanostructures for most of the experimental conditions. Also, the graphical studies of the functional volume parameters have evidenced the improvement of the relief structuration during surface nanostructuration. The correlation of these statistical texture parameters with the irradiation characteristics is important in controlling the alignment of either the liquid crystals or the cells/tissues on patterned azo-polyimide surfaces for optoelectronic devices and implantable biomaterials, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment with quartz tuning fork and carbon nanotube probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kageshima, M.; Jensenius, Henriette; Dienwiebel, M.

    2002-01-01

    A force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment was developed by combining a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) probe with a quartz tuning fork. Solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane surface were detected both in the frequency shift and dissipation. Due...

  9. Imaging three-dimensional surface objects with submolecular resolution by atomic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moreno, C.; Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Shimizu, T.K.; Custance, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2015), s. 2257-2262 ISSN 1530-6984 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC- AFM ) * submolecular resolution * three-dimensional dynamic force spectroscopy * high-resolution imaging Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 13.779, year: 2015

  10. In situ tensile testing of nanofibers by combining atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Fei; Lu, Dun; Bailey, Russell J.; Jimenez-Palomar, Ines; Stachewicz, Urszula; Cortes-Ballesteros, Beatriz; Davies, Martin; Zech, Martin; Bödefeld, Christoph; Barber, Asa H.

    2011-09-01

    A nanomechanical testing set-up is developed by integrating an atomic force microscope (AFM) for force measurements with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to provide imaging capabilities. Electrospun nanofibers of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), nylon-6 and biological mineralized collagen fibrils (MCFs) from antler bone were manipulated and tensile-tested using the AFM-SEM set-up. The complete stress-strain behavior to failure of individual nanofibers was recorded and a diversity of mechanical properties observed, highlighting how this technique is able to elucidate mechanical behavior due to structural composition at nanometer length scales.

  11. High-speed cycloid-scan atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, Y K; Moheimani, S O R; Petersen, I R

    2010-01-01

    A key hurdle in achieving high scan speeds in atomic force microscopes is that the probe is required to be scanned over the sample in a zig-zag raster pattern. The fast axis of the AFM scanner must track a signal that contains frequencies beyond its mechanical bandwidth. Consequently, fast raster scans generate distortions in the resulting image. We propose a smooth cycloid-like scan pattern that allows us to achieve scan speeds much higher than a raster scan. We illustrate how the proposed method can be implemented on a commercial AFM with minimal modifications.

  12. Contrast artifacts in tapping tip atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Zandbergen, Julie Bjerring

    1998-01-01

    When recording images with an atomic force microscope using the resonant vibrating cantilever mode, surprising strange results are often achieved. Typical artifacts are strange contours, unexpected height shifts, and sudden changes of the apparent resolution in the acquired images. Such artifacts...... interaction. The oscillating cantilever will be in a specific swing mode according to which type of interaction is dominating, and it is the switching between these modes that is responsible for a range of artifacts observed during image acquisition. This includes the artifact often referred to as "contrast...

  13. Design of cantilever probes for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2000-01-01

    A cantilever beam used in an Atomic Force Microscope is optimized with respect to two different objectives. The first goal is to maximize the first eigenfrequency while keeping the stiffness of the probe constant. The second goal is to maximize the tip angle of the first eigenmode while again...... keeping the stiffness constant. The resulting design of the beam from the latter optimization gives almost the same result as when maximizing the first eigenfrequency. Adding a restriction on the second eigenfrequency result in a significant change of the optimal design. The beam is modelled with 12 DOF...

  14. High-speed cycloid-scan atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Y K; Moheimani, S O R; Petersen, I R

    2010-09-10

    A key hurdle in achieving high scan speeds in atomic force microscopes is that the probe is required to be scanned over the sample in a zig-zag raster pattern. The fast axis of the AFM scanner must track a signal that contains frequencies beyond its mechanical bandwidth. Consequently, fast raster scans generate distortions in the resulting image. We propose a smooth cycloid-like scan pattern that allows us to achieve scan speeds much higher than a raster scan. We illustrate how the proposed method can be implemented on a commercial AFM with minimal modifications.

  15. Halo-like structures studied by atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Kyhle, Anders; Hansen, L. Theil

    1997-01-01

    Nanometer-sized clusters of copper have been produced in a hollow cathode sputtering source and deposited on SiOx. Halo-like structures consisting of micrometer sized protrusions in the solicon oxide surface surrounded by thin rings of smaller particles are observed. The area in between seems...... to be depleted of particles. We propose that the halo-like structures are a result of electrostatic forces acting between the incoming charged clusters and charged regions on the surface. A simple computer simulation supports this suggestion....

  16. Atomic force microscopy. A new method for atom identification and manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Masayuki; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Morita, Seizo

    2007-01-01

    Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is a scanning probe technique that detects the interaction forces between the outermost atom of a sharp tip and the atoms at a surface to image the sample surface. It is expected that the FM-AFM can cover the research field which scanning tunneling microscopy does not provide. In this article, we would introduce FM-AFM experiments applied to site-specific force measurements and atom manipulation, including how to solve the problems to achieve precise FM-AFM measurements. (author)

  17. Nanoscale Mechanical Characterization of Graphene/Polymer Nanocomposites using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Minzhen

    Graphene materials, exhibiting outstanding mechanical properties, are excellent candidates as reinforcement in high-performance polymer nanocomposites. In this dissertation, advanced atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques are applied to study the nanomechanics of graphene/polymer nanocomposites, specifically the graphene/polymer interfacial strength and the stress transfer at the interface. Two novel methods to directly characterize the interfacial strength between individual graphene sheets and polymers using AFM are presented and applied to a series of polymers and graphene sheets. The interfacial strength of graphene/polymer varies greatly for different combinations. The strongest interaction is found between graphene oxide (GO) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), a strongly polar, water-based polymer. On the other hand, polystyrene, a non polar polymer, has the weakest interaction with GO. The interfacial bond strength is attributed to hydrogen bonding and physical adsorption. Further, the stress transfer in GO/PVA nanocomposites is studied quantitatively by monitoring the strain in individual GO sheet inside the polymer via AFM and Raman spectroscopy. For the first time, the strains of individual GO sheets in nanocomposites are imaged and quantified as a function of the applied external strains. The matrix strain is directly transferred to GO sheets for strains up to 8%. At higher strain levels, the onset of the nanocomposite failure and a stick-slip behavior is observed. This study reveals that GO is superior to pure graphene as reinforcement in nanocomposites. These results also imply the potential to make a new generation of nanocomposites with exceptional high strength and toughness. In the second part of this dissertation, AFM is used to study the structure of silk proteins and the morphology of spider silks. For the first time, shear-induced self-assembly of native silk fibroin is observed. The morphology of the Brown Recluse spider silk is investigated and a

  18. Arbitrary amplitude dust kinetic Alfvén solitary waves in the presence of polarization force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpreet; Kaur, Nimardeep; Saini, N. S.

    2018-02-01

    In this investigation, the effect of polarization force on dust kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (DKASWs) in a magnetized dusty plasma consisting of dust fluid, electrons, and positively charged ions is studied. By incorporating density non-uniformity and polarization force in the fluid model equations, the energy balance equation is derived, and from the expression for Sagdeev pseudopotential, the existence conditions for solitary structures in terms of Mach number are determined. From the numerical analysis of Sagdeev pseudopotential, compressive and rarefactive DKASWs at sub- and super-Alfvénic speeds are observed. These waves are significantly affected by varying polarization force, angle of propagation, plasma beta, and Mach number.

  19. Nano Scale Mechanical Analysis of Biomaterials Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Diganta

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a probe-based microscope that uses nanoscale and structural imaging where high resolution is desired. AFM has also been used in mechanical, electrical, and thermal engineering applications. This unique technique provides vital local material properties like the modulus of elasticity, hardness, surface potential, Hamaker constant, and the surface charge density from force versus displacement curve. Therefore, AFM was used to measure both the diameter and mechanical properties of the collagen nanostraws in human costal cartilage. Human costal cartilage forms a bridge between the sternum and bony ribs. The chest wall of some humans is deformed due to defective costal cartilage. However, costal cartilage is less studied compared to load bearing cartilage. Results show that there is a difference between chemical fixation and non-chemical fixation treatments. Our findings imply that the patients' chest wall is mechanically weak and protein deposition is abnormal. This may impact the nanostraws' ability to facilitate fluid flow between the ribs and the sternum. At present, AFM is the only tool for imaging cells' ultra-structure at the nanometer scale because cells are not homogeneous. The first layer of the cell is called the cell membrane, and the layer under it is made of the cytoskeleton. Cancerous cells are different from normal cells in term of cell growth, mechanical properties, and ultra-structure. Here, force is measured with very high sensitivity and this is accomplished with highly sensitive probes such as a nano-probe. We performed experiments to determine ultra-structural differences that emerge when such cancerous cells are subject to treatments such as with drugs and electric pulses. Jurkat cells are cancerous cells. These cells were pulsed at different conditions. Pulsed and non-pulsed Jurkat cell ultra-structures were investigated at the nano meter scale using AFM. Jurkat cell mechanical properties were measured under

  20. Planar patch-clamp force microscopy on living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamir, Evren [Center for Nano Science, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Amalienstr 54, 80799 Munich (Germany); George, Michael; Fertig, Niels [Nanion Technologies GmbH, Erzgiessereistr. 4, 80335 Munich (Germany); Benoit, Martin [Center for Nano Science, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Amalienstr 54, 80799 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: martin.benoit@physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2008-05-15

    Here we report a new combination of the patch-clamp technique with the atomic force microscope (AFM). A planar patch-clamp chip microstructured from borosilicate glass was used as a support for mechanical probing of living cells. The setup not only allows for immobilizing even a non-adherent cell for measurements of its mechanical properties, but also for simultaneously measuring the electrophysiological properties of a single cell. As a proof of principle experiment we measured the voltage-induced membrane movement of HEK293 and Jurkat cells in the whole-cell voltage clamp configuration. The results of these measurements are in good agreement with previous studies. By using the planar patch-clamp chip for immobilization, the AFM not only can image non-adhering cells, but also gets easily access to an electrophysiologically controlled cellular probe at low vibrational noise.

  1. Concomitant use of polarization and positive phase contrast microscopy for the study of microbial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žižka, Zdeněk; Gabriel, Jiří

    2015-11-01

    Polarization and positive phase contrast microscope were concomitantly used in the study of the internal structure of microbial cells. Positive phase contrast allowed us to view even the fine cell structure with a refractive index approaching that of the surrounding environment, e.g., the cytoplasm, and transferred the invisible phase image to a visible amplitude image. With polarization microscopy, crossed polarizing filters together with compensators and a rotary stage showed the birefringence of different cell structures. Material containing algae was collected in ponds in Sýkořice and Zbečno villages (Křivoklát region). The objects were studied in laboratory microscopes LOMO MIN-8 Sankt Petersburg and Polmi A Carl Zeiss Jena fitted with special optics for positive phase contrast, polarizers, analyzers, compensators, rotary stages, and digital SLR camera Nikon D 70 for image capture. Anisotropic granules were found in the cells of flagellates of the order Euglenales, in green algae of the orders Chlorococcales and Chlorellales, and in desmid algae of the order Desmidiales. The cell walls of filamentous algae of the orders Zygnematales and Ulotrichales were found to exhibit significant birefringence; in addition, relatively small amounts of small granules were found in the cytoplasm. A typical shape-related birefringence of the cylindrical walls and the septa between the cells differed in intensity, which was especially apparent when using a Zeiss compensator RI-c during its successive double setting. In conclusion, the anisotropic granules found in the investigated algae mostly showed strong birefringence and varied in number, size, and location of the cells. Representatives of the order Chlorococcales contained the highest number of granules per cell, and the size of these granules was almost double than that of the other monitored microorganisms. Very strong birefringence was exhibited by cell walls of filamentous algae; it differed in the intensity

  2. Theoretical Models for Surface Forces and Adhesion and Their Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Fabio L.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Da Róz, Alessandra L.; Ziemath, Ervino C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of AFS, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution. PMID:23202925

  3. Theoretical models for surface forces and adhesion and their measurement using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Fabio L; Bueno, Carolina C; Da Róz, Alessandra L; Ziemath, Ervino C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2012-10-08

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of afs, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution.

  4. Noise performance of frequency modulation Kelvin force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesinger, Heinrich; Deresmes, Dominique; Mélin, Thierry

    2014-01-02

    Noise performance of a phase-locked loop (PLL) based frequency modulation Kelvin force microscope (FM-KFM) is assessed. Noise propagation is modeled step by step throughout the setup using both exact closed loop noise gains and an approximation known as "noise gain" from operational amplifier (OpAmp) design that offers the advantage of decoupling the noise performance study from considerations of stability and ideal loop response. The bandwidth can be chosen depending on how much noise is acceptable and it is shown that stability is not an issue up to a limit that will be discussed. With thermal and detector noise as the only sources, both approaches yield PLL frequency noise expressions equal to the theoretical value for self-oscillating circuits and in agreement with measurement, demonstrating that the PLL components neither modify nor contribute noise. Kelvin output noise is then investigated by modeling the surrounding bias feedback loop. A design rule is proposed that allows choosing the AC modulation frequency for optimized sharing of the PLL bandwidth between Kelvin and topography loops. A crossover criterion determines as a function of bandwidth, temperature and probe parameters whether thermal or detector noise is the dominating noise source. Probe merit factors for both cases are then established, suggesting how to tackle noise performance by probe design. Typical merit factors of common probe types are compared. This comprehensive study is an encouraging step toward a more integral performance assessment and a remedy against focusing on single aspects and optimizing around randomly chosen key values.

  5. Adhesion force imaging in air and liquid by adhesion mode atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Kees; Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1994-01-01

    A new imaging mode for the atomic force microscope(AFM), yielding images mapping the adhesion force between tip and sample, is introduced. The adhesion mode AFM takes a force curve at each pixel by ramping a piezoactuator, moving the silicon‐nitride tip up and down towards the sample. During the

  6. A relationship between three-dimensional surface hydration structures and force distribution measured by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Watkins, Matthew; Shluger, Alexander L.; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent tip approximation (STA) model and from explicit molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the simulated STA force map describes the major features of the experimentally obtained force image. The agreement between the STA data and the experiment establishes the correspondence between the water density used as an input to the STA model and the experimental hydration structure and thus provides a tool to bridge the experimental force data and atomistic solvation structures. Further applications of this method should improve the accuracy and reliability of both interpretation of 3D-SFM force maps and atomistic simulations in a wide range of solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent

  7. Autopilot for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Schlesinger, Itai; Sivan, Uri, E-mail: phsivan@tx.technion.ac.il [Department of Physics and the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-10-15

    One of the most challenging aspects of operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) is finding optimal feedback parameters. This statement applies particularly to frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM), which utilizes three feedback loops to control the cantilever excitation amplitude, cantilever excitation frequency, and z-piezo extension. These loops are regulated by a set of feedback parameters, tuned by the user to optimize stability, sensitivity, and noise in the imaging process. Optimization of these parameters is difficult due to the coupling between the frequency and z-piezo feedback loops by the non-linear tip-sample interaction. Four proportional-integral (PI) parameters and two lock-in parameters regulating these loops require simultaneous optimization in the presence of a varying unknown tip-sample coupling. Presently, this optimization is done manually in a tedious process of trial and error. Here, we report on the development and implementation of an algorithm that computes the control parameters automatically. The algorithm reads the unperturbed cantilever resonance frequency, its quality factor, and the z-piezo driving signal power spectral density. It analyzes the poles and zeros of the total closed loop transfer function, extracts the unknown tip-sample transfer function, and finds four PI parameters and two lock-in parameters for the frequency and z-piezo control loops that optimize the bandwidth and step response of the total system. Implementation of the algorithm in a home-built AFM shows that the calculated parameters are consistently excellent and rarely require further tweaking by the user. The new algorithm saves the precious time of experienced users, facilitates utilization of FM-AFM by casual users, and removes the main hurdle on the way to fully automated FM-AFM.

  8. Noise performance of frequency modulation Kelvin force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Diesinger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise performance of a phase-locked loop (PLL based frequency modulation Kelvin force microscope (FM-KFM is assessed. Noise propagation is modeled step by step throughout the setup using both exact closed loop noise gains and an approximation known as “noise gain” from operational amplifier (OpAmp design that offers the advantage of decoupling the noise performance study from considerations of stability and ideal loop response. The bandwidth can be chosen depending on how much noise is acceptable and it is shown that stability is not an issue up to a limit that will be discussed. With thermal and detector noise as the only sources, both approaches yield PLL frequency noise expressions equal to the theoretical value for self-oscillating circuits and in agreement with measurement, demonstrating that the PLL components neither modify nor contribute noise. Kelvin output noise is then investigated by modeling the surrounding bias feedback loop. A design rule is proposed that allows choosing the AC modulation frequency for optimized sharing of the PLL bandwidth between Kelvin and topography loops. A crossover criterion determines as a function of bandwidth, temperature and probe parameters whether thermal or detector noise is the dominating noise source. Probe merit factors for both cases are then established, suggesting how to tackle noise performance by probe design. Typical merit factors of common probe types are compared. This comprehensive study is an encouraging step toward a more integral performance assessment and a remedy against focusing on single aspects and optimizing around randomly chosen key values.

  9. The impact of structural relaxation on spin polarization and magnetization reversal of individual nano structures studied by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Dirk; Phark, Soo-Hyon; Corbetta, Marco; Fischer, Jeison A; Oka, Hirofumi; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    The application of low temperature spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in magnetic fields for the quantitative characterization of spin polarization, magnetization reversal and magnetic anisotropy of individual nano structures is reviewed. We find that structural relaxation, spin polarization and magnetic anisotropy vary on the nm scale near the border of a bilayer Co island on Cu(1 1 1). This relaxation is lifted by perimetric decoration with Fe. We discuss the role of spatial variations of the spin-dependent electronic properties within and at the edge of a single nano structure for its magnetic properties.

  10. Concomitant use of polarization and negative phase contrast microscopy for the study of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žižka, Zdeněk

    2018-02-24

    A simultaneous application of negative phase contrast and polarization microscopy was used to study the internal structure of microbial cells. Negative phase contrast allowed us to display the fine cell structures with a refractive index of light approaching that of the environment, e.g., the cytoplasm, and converted an invisible phase image to a visible amplitude one. In the polarizing microscope, cross-polarizing filters, together with first-order quartz compensator and a turntable, showed maximum birefringence of individual structures. Material containing algae was collected in ponds in the villages Sýkořice and Zbečno (Protected Landscape Area Křivoklátsko). Objects were studied in a laboratory microscope (Carl Zeiss Jena, type NfpK), equipped with a basic body In Ph 160 with an exchangeable module Ph, LOMO St. Petersburg turntable mounted on a centering holder of our own construction and a Nikon D 70 digital SLR camera. Anisotropic granules were found only in the members of two orders of algae (Euglenales, Euglenophyceae and Chlorococcales, Chlorophyceae). They always showed strong birefringence and differed in both number and size. An important finding concerned thin pellicles in genus Euglena (Euglenales, Euglenophyceae) which exhibited weak birefringence. In genus Pediastrum (Chlorococcales, Chlorophyceae), these granules were found only in living coenobium cells. In contrast, dead coenobium cells contained many granules without birefringence-an important finding. Another important finding included birefringent lamellar structure of the transverse cell wall and weak birefringence of pyrenoids in filamentous algae of genus Spirogyra (Zygnematales, Conjugatophyceae). It was clearly displayed by the negative phase contrast and has not been documented by other methods. This method can also record the very weak birefringence of the frustule of a diatom of genus Pinnularia (Naviculales, Bacillariophyceae), which was further reinforced by the use of quartz

  11. Electrical characterization of locally charged oxidized nanocrystalline diamond films by Kelvin force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jan; Kromka, Alexander; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 205, č. 9 (2008), s. 2136-2140 ISSN 1862-6300 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040; GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA ČR(CZ) GD202/05/H003; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : diamond * atomic force microscopy * Kelvin probe microscopy * charge trapping Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.205, year: 2008

  12. A new image correction method for live cell atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Y; Sun, J L; Zhang, A; Hu, J; Xu, L X

    2007-01-01

    During live cell imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM), the interactions between the AFM probe and the membrane yield distorted cell images. In this work, an image correction method was developed based on the force-distance curve and the modified Hertzian model. The normal loading and lateral forces exerted on the cell membrane by the AFM tip were both accounted for during the scanning. Two assumptions were made in modelling based on the experimental measurements: (1) the lateral force on the endothelial cells was linear to the height; (2) the cell membrane Young's modulus could be derived from the displacement measurement of a normal force curve. Results have shown that the model could be used to recover up to 30% of the actual cell height depending on the loading force. The accuracy of the model was also investigated with respect to the loading force and mechanical property of the cell membrane

  13. Structure of ordered polyelectrolyte films from atomic-force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, V.V.; Tolstikhina, A.L.; Stepina, N.D.; Kayushina, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The possible application of atomic-force microscopy and X-ray reflectometry methods to structural studies of polyelectrolyte films obtained due to alternating adsorption of oppositely charged polyanion [sodium polysterenesulfonate (PSS)] and polycation [poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAA)] layers on solid substrates has been considered. The atomic-force microscopy study has revealed the characteristic features of the surface topography of samples consisting of different numbers of polyelectrolyte layers deposited from solutions characterized by different ionic strength values. It is shown that the shape of the reflectivity curves obtained from thin polyelectrolyte films depends on their surface structure

  14. Cellulose fibril aggregation studies of Eucalyptus dissolving pulps using atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available AGGREGATION STUDIES OF Eucalyptus DISSOLVING PULPS USING ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY V. Chunilall1,3, J.Wesley-Smith2 and T. Bush1,3 1CSIR, Forestry and Forest Product Research Centre, P.O. Box 17001, Congella, 4013, South Africa. 2Electron Microscope... individual fibrils (cellulose molecules) and these, in turn, form fibril aggregates. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has revealed that there is a marked increase in the lateral fibril aggregate dimension (LFAD) during pulping and bleaching1. Furthermore...

  15. Digital force-feedback for protein unfolding experiments using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bippes, Christian A; Janovjak, Harald; Kedrov, Alexej; Muller, Daniel J

    2007-01-01

    Since its invention in the 1990s single-molecule force spectroscopy has been increasingly applied to study protein (un-)folding, cell adhesion, and ligand-receptor interactions. In most force spectroscopy studies, the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is separated from a surface at a constant velocity, thus applying an increasing force to folded bio-molecules or bio-molecular bonds. Recently, Fernandez and co-workers introduced the so-called force-clamp technique. Single proteins were subjected to a defined constant force allowing their life times and life time distributions to be directly measured. Up to now, the force-clamping was performed by analogue PID controllers, which require complex additional hardware and might make it difficult to combine the force-feedback with other modes such as constant velocity. These points may be limiting the applicability and versatility of this technique. Here we present a simple, fast, and all-digital (software-based) PID controller that yields response times of a few milliseconds in combination with a commercial AFM. We demonstrate the performance of our feedback loop by force-clamp unfolding of single Ig27 domains of titin and the membrane proteins bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and the sodium/proton antiporter NhaA

  16. Silicon Nano fabrication by Atomic Force Microscopy-Based Mechanical Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Sh.; Wang, M.; Kim, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews silicon nano fabrication processes using atomic force microscopy (AFM). In particular, it summarizes recent results obtained in our research group regarding AFM-based silicon nano fabrication through mechanochemical local oxidation by diamond tip sliding, as well as mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical processing using an electrically conductive diamond tip. Microscopic three-dimensional manufacturing mainly relies on etching, deposition, and lithography. Therefore, a special emphasis was placed on nano mechanical processes, mechanochemical reaction by potassium hydroxide solution etching, and mechanical and electrical approaches. Several important surface characterization techniques consisting of scanning tunneling microscopy and related techniques, such as scanning probe microscopy and AFM, were also discussed.

  17. Effect of polarization force on large amplitude dust kinetic Alfvén waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Kohli, R.; Kaur, N.; Saini, N. S.

    2018-01-01

    Effect of polarization force on dust kinetic Alfvén waves (DKAWs) has been studied in this paper. We incorporated the effect of polarization in fluid model equations and derived the expression for Sagdeev pseudopotential. From the numerical analysis, it is seen that DKAWs are significantly affected by the variation of polarization force, plasma beta and Mach number. This study may be useful in understanding the formation of coherent nonlinear structures and diagnostics of dusts in laboratory as well as in space/astrophysical plasma environments.

  18. Macroscopic Ensembles of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes in Bubble Imprints Studied by Polarized Raman Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Ushiba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the alignment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs in bubble imprints through polarized Raman microscopy. A hemispherical bubble containing SWCNTs is pressed against a glass substrate, resulting in an imprint of the bubble membrane with a coffee ring on the substrate. We find that macroscopic ensembles of aligned SWCNTs are obtained in the imprints, in which there are three patterns of orientations: (i azimuthal alignment on the coffee ring, (ii radial alignment at the edge of the membrane, and (iii random orientation at the center of the membrane. We also find that the alignment of SWCNTs in the imprints can be manipulated by spinning bubbles. The orientation of SWCNTs on the coffee ring is directed radially, which is orthogonal to the case of unspun bubbles. This approach enables one to align SWCNTs in large quantities and in a short time, potentially opening up a wide range of CNT-based electronic and optical applications.

  19. Identification of crystals in Hanford nuclear waste using polarized light microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herting, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    The use of polarized light microscopy for identifying crystals encountered in Rockwell Hanford Operations chemical studies is described. Identifying characteristics and full-color photographs are presented for crystals commonly found in Hanford Site nuclear waste, including sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium aluminate, sodium phosphate, sodium fluoride, ammonium heptafluorozirconate, sodium sulfate, sodium carbonate, and ammonium nitrate. These characteristics are described in terms of birefringence, extinction position, interference figure, sign of elongation, optic sign, and crystal morphology. Background information on crystal optics is presented so that these traits can be understood by the nonmicroscopist. Detailed operational instructions are given so that the novice microscope user can make the proper adjustments of the instrument to search for and observe the identifying features of the crystals

  20. Identification of stacking faults in silicon carbide by polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G; Tranca, Denis E; Polychroniadis, Efstathios K; Stanciu, George A

    2017-07-07

    Although silicon carbide is a highly promising crystalline material for a wide range of electronic devices, extended and point defects which perturb the lattice periodicity hold deep implications with respect to device reliability. There is thus a great need for developing new methods that can detect silicon carbide defects which are detrimental to device functionality. Our experiment demonstrates that polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy can extend the efficiency of the "optical signature" concept as an all-optical rapid and non-destructive set of investigation methods for the differentiation between hexagonal and cubic stacking faults in silicon carbide. This technique can be used for fast and in situ characterization and optimization of growth conditions for epilayers of silicon carbide and similar materials.

  1. Breaking the Time Barrier in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Fast Free Force Reconstruction Using the G-Mode Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Liam; Ahmadi, Mahshid; Wu, Ting; Hu, Bin; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2017-09-26

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers unparalleled insight into structure and material functionality across nanometer length scales. However, the spatial resolution afforded by the AFM tip is counterpoised by slow detection speeds compared to other common microscopy techniques (e.g., optical, scanning electron microscopy, etc.). In this work, we develop an ultrafast AFM imaging approach allowing direct reconstruction of the tip-sample forces with ∼3 order of magnitude higher time resolution than is achievable using standard AFM detection methods. Fast free force recovery (F 3 R) overcomes the widely viewed temporal bottleneck in AFM, that is, the mechanical bandwidth of the cantilever, enabling time-resolved imaging at sub-bandwidth speeds. We demonstrate quantitative recovery of electrostatic forces with ∼10 μs temporal resolution, free from influences of the cantilever ring-down. We further apply the F 3 R method to Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements. F 3 R-KPFM is an open loop imaging approach (i.e., no bias feedback), allowing ultrafast surface potential measurements (e.g., <20 μs) to be performed at regular KPFM scan speeds. F 3 R-KPFM is demonstrated for exploration of ion migration in organometallic halide perovskite materials and shown to allow spatiotemporal imaging of positively charged ion migration under applied electric field, as well as subsequent formation of accumulated charges at the perovskite/electrode interface. In this work, we demonstrate quantitative F 3 R-KPFM measurements-however, we fully expect the F 3 R approach to be valid for all modes of noncontact AFM operation, including noninvasive probing of ultrafast electrical and magnetic dynamics.

  2. Model-based traction force microscopy reveals differential tension in cellular actin bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soiné, Jérôme R D; Brand, Christoph A; Stricker, Jonathan; Oakes, Patrick W; Gardel, Margaret L; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2015-03-01

    Adherent cells use forces at the cell-substrate interface to sense and respond to the physical properties of their environment. These cell forces can be measured with traction force microscopy which inverts the equations of elasticity theory to calculate them from the deformations of soft polymer substrates. We introduce a new type of traction force microscopy that in contrast to traditional methods uses additional image data for cytoskeleton and adhesion structures and a biophysical model to improve the robustness of the inverse procedure and abolishes the need for regularization. We use this method to demonstrate that ventral stress fibers of U2OS-cells are typically under higher mechanical tension than dorsal stress fibers or transverse arcs.

  3. Model-based traction force microscopy reveals differential tension in cellular actin bundles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme R D Soiné

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adherent cells use forces at the cell-substrate interface to sense and respond to the physical properties of their environment. These cell forces can be measured with traction force microscopy which inverts the equations of elasticity theory to calculate them from the deformations of soft polymer substrates. We introduce a new type of traction force microscopy that in contrast to traditional methods uses additional image data for cytoskeleton and adhesion structures and a biophysical model to improve the robustness of the inverse procedure and abolishes the need for regularization. We use this method to demonstrate that ventral stress fibers of U2OS-cells are typically under higher mechanical tension than dorsal stress fibers or transverse arcs.

  4. Mapping Electrostatic Forces Using Higher Harmonics Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, S.J.T.; Willemsen, O.H.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1999-01-01

    A simple model of a damped, harmonic oscillator is used to describe the motion of an atomic force microscope cantilever tapping in fluid. By use of experimentally obtained parameters, excellent agreement is found between theory and experimental results. From the model we estimate that the force

  5. Nanostructure and force spectroscopy analysis of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingqian; Wang, Jiongkun; Cai, Jiye; Wu, Yangzhe; Wang, Xiaoping

    2008-09-12

    To date, nanoscale imaging of the morphological changes and adhesion force of CD4(+) T cells during in vitro activation remains largely unreported. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the morphological changes and specific binding forces in resting and activated human peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells. The AFM images revealed that the volume of activated CD4(+) T cells increased and the ultrastructure of these cells also became complex. Using a functionalized AFM tip, the strength of the specific binding force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was found to be approximately three times that of the unspecific force. The adhesion forces were not randomly distributed over the surface of a single activated CD4(+) T cell, indicated that the CD4 molecules concentrated into nanodomains. The magnitude of the adhesion force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction did not change markedly with the activation time. Multiple bonds involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction were measured at different activation times. These results suggest that the adhesion force involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction is highly selective and of high affinity.

  6. [Polarized light microscopy for evaluation of oocytes as a prognostic factor in the evolution of a cycle in assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ortega, C; Cancino-Villarreal, P; Alonzo-Torres, V E; Martínez-Robles, I; Pérez-Peña, E; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, A M

    2016-04-01

    Identification of the best embryos to transfer is a key element for success in assisted reproduction. In the last decade, several morphological criteria of oocytes and embryos were evaluated with regard to their potential for predicting embryo viability. The introduction of polarization light microscopy systems has allowed the visualization of the meiotic spindle and the different layers of the zona pellucida in human oocytes on the basis of birefringence in a non-destructive way. Conflicting results have been reported regarding the predictive value in ICSI cycles. To assess the predictive ability of meiotic spindle and zona pellucida of human oocytes to implant by polarized microscopy in ICSI cycles. Prospective and observational clinical study. 903 oocytes from 94 ICSI cycles were analyzed with polarized microscopy. Meiotic spindle visualization and zona pellucida birefringence values by polarized microscopy were correlated with ICSI cycles results. Meiotic spindle visualization and birefringence values of zona pellucida decreased in a direct basis with increasing age. In patients aged over the 35 years, the percentage of a visible spindle and mean zona pellucida birefringence was lower than in younger patients. Fertilization rate were higher in oocytes with visible meiotic spindle (81.3% vs. 64%; p < 0.0001), as well as embryo quality (47.4% vs. 39%; p=0.01). Fertilization rate was higher in oocytes with positive values of birefringence (77.5 % vs. 68.5% p=0.005) with similar embryo quality. Conception cycles showed oocytes with higher mean value of zona birefringence and visible spindle vs. no-conception cycles (p<0.05). Polarized light microscopy improves oocyte selection, which significantly impacts in the development of embryos with greater implantation potential. The use of polarized light microscopy with sperm selection methods, blastocyst culture and deferred embryo transfers will contribute to transfer fewer embryos without diminishing rates of live

  7. Impact of thermal frequency drift on highest precision force microscopy using quartz-based force sensors at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Pielmeier

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM the stability of the eigenfrequency of the force sensor is of key importance for highest precision force measurements. Here, we study the influence of temperature changes on the resonance frequency of force sensors made of quartz, in a temperature range from 4.8–48 K. The sensors are based on the qPlus and length extensional principle. The frequency variation with temperature T for all sensors is negative up to 30 K and on the order of 1 ppm/K, up to 13 K, where a distinct kink appears, it is linear. Furthermore, we characterize a new type of miniaturized qPlus sensor and confirm the theoretically predicted reduction in detector noise.

  8. Polarization microscopy imaging for the identification of unfertilized oocytes after short-term insemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yi; Liu, Wenqiang; Wang, Yu; Pan, Jiaping; Liang, Shanshan; Ruan, Jingling; Teng, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    To develop a unique approach using polarization microscopy (PM) to determine whether the presence of a spindle can be used as an indicator associated with fertilization failure 5 hours after short-term insemination. Observational study. Assisted reproduction center. Eighty-five patients undergoing short-term insemination. Oocytes imaged via PM at 4, 5, and 6 hours after standard insemination. Spindle visualization and fertilization rate, with rescue intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) results determined by rates of normal fertilization, abnormal fertilization, and good-quality embryo formation. After standard insemination, comparisons of spindle visualization at three time points indicated that the predictive accuracy rates were 84.30% at 5 hours, 86.80% at 6 hours, and 62.20% at 4 hours, with the rates at 5 and 6 hours statistically significantly higher than at 4 hours. A spindle was present in 242 of the 788 metaphase-II oocytes 5 hours after insemination, and there were 204 failed fertilizations on day 1. The positive predictive value was 0.84. After rescue ICSI, the abnormal fertilization rate of the polar body group (assessed using the polar body visualization method) was statistically significantly higher than that of the PM group (assessed using the spindle visualization method) and the regular ICSI group (9.37%, 5.88%, and 4.87%, respectively). The presence of a spindle 5 hours after insemination in in vitro fertilization is an accurate indicator of unfertilized oocytes. Spindle imaging combined with rescue measures effectively prevents fertilization failure and decreases the polyspermy rate. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of the structure of nanocrystalline refractory oxides by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulyanova, T. M.; Titova, L. V.; Medichenko, S. V.; Zonov, Yu. G.; Konstantinova, T. E.; Glazunova, V. A.; Doroshkevich, A. S.; Kuznetsova, T. A.

    2006-01-01

    The structures of nanocrystalline fibrous powders of refractory oxides have been investigated by different methods: determination of coherent-scattering regions, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic-force microscopy (AFM). The sizes of nanograins of different crystalline phases of refractory metal oxides have been determined during the formation of these nanograins and the dynamics of their growth during heat treatment in the temperature range 600-1600 deg. C has been studied. The data on the structure of nanocrystalline refractory oxide powders, obtained by different methods, are in good agreement. According to the data on coherent-scattering regions, the sizes of the ZrO 2 (Y 2 O 3 ) and Al 2 O 3 grains formed are in the range 4-6 nm, and the particle sizes determined according to the TEM and AFM data are in the ranges 5-7 and 2-10 nm, respectively. SEM analysis made it possible to investigate the dynamics of nanoparticle growth at temperatures above 1000 deg. C and establish the limiting temperatures of their consolidation in fibers

  10. Correlation between polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography and second harmonic generation microscopy in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Viet-Hoan; Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Bumju; Yoon, Yeoreum; Yoon, Calvin J; Chung, Wan Kyun; Kim, Ki Hean

    2015-07-01

    Both polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are 3D optical imaging methods providing information related to collagen in the skin. PS-OCT provides birefringence information which is due to the collagen composition of the skin. SHG microscopy visualizes collagen fibers in the skin based on their SHG property. These two modalities have been applied to the same skin pathologies associated with collagen changes, but their relationship has not been examined. In this study, we tried to find the relationship by imaging the same skin samples with both modalities. Various parts of the normal rat skin and burn damaged skin were imaged ex vivo, and their images were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. PS-OCT images were analyzed to obtain tissue birefringence. SHG images were analyzed to obtain collagen orientation indices by applying 2D Fourier transform. The skin samples having higher birefringence values had higher collagen orientation indices, and a linear correlation was found between them. Burn damaged skin showed decreases in both parameters compared to the control skins. This relationship between the bulk and microscopic properties of skin may be useful for further skin studies.

  11. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen, E-mail: abderrahmen_merghni@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Kammoun, Dorra [Laboratoire de Biomatériaux et Biotechnologie, Faculté de Médecine Dentaire, Monastir (Tunisia); Hentati, Hajer [Laboratoire de Recherche en Santé Orale et Réhabilitation Bucco-Faciale (LR12ES11), Faculté de Médecine Dentaire de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Janel, Sébastien [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Popoff, Michka [Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Lafont, Frank [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Aouni, Mahjoub [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Mastouri, Maha [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Microbiologie, CHU Fattouma Bourguiba de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • 4 dental restorative materials were characterized for roughness, angle contact water and surface free energy. • AFM adhesion forces of S. aureus to tested materials were achieved in presence and absence of salivary conditioning film. • S. aureus initial adhesion is dependent on the surface free energy and roughness. - Abstract: In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  12. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • 4 dental restorative materials were characterized for roughness, angle contact water and surface free energy. • AFM adhesion forces of S. aureus to tested materials were achieved in presence and absence of salivary conditioning film. • S. aureus initial adhesion is dependent on the surface free energy and roughness. - Abstract: In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  13. Atomic force microscopy imaging and single molecule recognition force spectroscopy of coat proteins on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jilin; Krajcikova, Daniela; Zhu, Rong; Ebner, Andreas; Cutting, Simon; Gruber, Hermann J; Barak, Imrich; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Coat assembly in Bacillus subtilis serves as a tractable model for the study of the self-assembly process of biological structures and has a significant potential for use in nano-biotechnological applications. In the present study, the morphology of B. subtilis spores was investigated by magnetically driven dynamic force microscopy (MAC mode atomic force microscopy) under physiological conditions. B. subtilis spores appeared as prolate structures, with a length of 0.6-3 microm and a width of about 0.5-2 microm. The spore surface was mainly covered with bump-like structures with diameters ranging from 8 to 70 nm. Besides topographical explorations, single molecule recognition force spectroscopy (SMRFS) was used to characterize the spore coat protein CotA. This protein was specifically recognized by a polyclonal antibody directed against CotA (anti-CotA), the antibody being covalently tethered to the AFM tip via a polyethylene glycol linker. The unbinding force between CotA and anti-CotA was determined as 55 +/- 2 pN. From the high-binding probability of more than 20% in force-distance cycles it is concluded that CotA locates in the outer surface of B. subtilis spores. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Interaction and dynamics of ambient water adlayers on graphite probed using AFM voltage nanolithography and electrostatic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowthami, T; Raina, Gargi; Kurra, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the impact of the interaction and dynamics of increasing ambient water adlayers on etch patterns on a hydrophobic highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM) voltage nanolithography in contact mode by applying a positive bias to the sample. The changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns were investigated as a function of the increasing number of water adlayers present on the HOPG, which is varied by changing the time interval since HOPG cleavage. Changes in the width of the etch patterns and the surrounding water droplets were monitored with time, using intermittent-contact-mode AFM. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) has been employed to study the charged nature of the etch patterns and the neighboring water film with time. The width of the etch patterns made on freshly cleaved HOPG shows an increase of ∼33% over 48 h, whereas nine-day-old cleaved HOPG shows a 79% increase over the same period. No changes in the dimensions are observed while imaging in a nitrogen atmosphere soon after lithography. In ambient conditions, the EFM phase shift of the patterns shows a large change of ∼84–88% over 30 h. This study demonstrates the effect of the stored electrostatic energy of a polarized ice-like water adlayer, resulting in changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns long after lithography, whereas liquid-like water droplets do not affect the etch patterns. (paper)

  15. Conductivity mapping of nanoparticles by torsional resonance tunneling atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prastani, C; Vetushka, A.; Fejfar, A.; Nanu, M.; Nanu, D.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, torsional resonance tunneling mode atomic force microscopy is used to study the conductivity of nanoparticles. SnS nanoparticles capped with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and with In2S3 shell are analyzed. This contactless technique allows carrying out measurements on nanoparticles

  16. Vesicle Adsorption and Lipid Bilayer Formation on Glass Studied by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönherr, Holger; Johnson, Joseph M.; Lenz, Peter; Frank, Curtis W.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles (30, 50, and 100 nm nominal diameters) and of dye-labeled PC vesicles (labeled with 6% Texas Red fluorophore (TR) and encapsulated carboxy fluorescein (CF)) to glass surfaces was studied by contact mode atomic force microscopy in aqueous buffer.

  17. Surface structure of polymers and their model compounds observed by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stocker, W.; Bickmann, B.; Magonov, S.N.; Cantow, H.J.; Lotz, B.; Wittmann, J.C.; Moller, M.; Möller, M.

    1992-01-01

    Results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) of normal alkanes, polyethylene, isotactic polypropylene and of a diblock copolymer are presented. Various types of surfaces - naturally and epitaxially grown on different substrates - have been examined from hundreds of nanometers down to the atomic scale.

  18. Photolithographic Polymerization of Diacetylene-Containing Phospholipid Bilayers Studied by Multimode Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morigaki, Kenichi; Schönherr, Holger; Frank, Curtis W.; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Photopolymerization of the diacetylene-containing phospholipid 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (1) in substrate-supported planar lipid bilayers (SPBs) has been studied by using multimode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Monolayers and bilayers of 1 have been transferred onto

  19. Study of the leakage field of magnetic force microscopy thin-film tips using electron holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frost, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Lunedei, E.; Matteucci, G.; Rikkers, E.

    1996-01-01

    Electron holography is applied for the study of the leakage field of thin-film ferromagnetic tips used as probes in magnetic force microscopy. We used commercially available pyramidal tips covered o­n o­ne face with a thin NiCo film, which were then placed in a high external magnetic field directed

  20. Attachment of trianglamines to silicon wafers, chiral recognition by chemical force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlinka, J.; Hodačová, Jana; Raehm, L.; Granier, M.; Ramonda, M.; Durand, J. O.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2010), s. 481-485 ISSN 1631-0748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk MEB020748 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : trianglamines * chemical force microscopy * chiral recognition Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.600, year: 2010

  1. Investigation of ferromagnetic microstructures by local Hall effect and magnetic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nitta, J; Schapers, T; Heersche, HB; Koga, T; Sato, Y; Takayanagi, H

    We have investigated the magnetization process of NiFe micro-magnets, using fringing field induced local Hall effect (LHE) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM), Although the LHE reflects information only from the edge of micro-magnets, the MFM observation supports the conclusion that a rapid jump in

  2. Magni: A Python Package for Compressive Sampling and Reconstruction of Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen; Arildsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Magni is an open source Python package that embraces compressed sensing and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging techniques. It provides AFM-specific functionality for undersampling and reconstructing images from AFM equipment and thereby accelerating the acquisition of AFM images. Magni also...

  3. Atomic Force Microscopy of Novel Zeolitic Materials Prepared by Top-Down Synthesis and ADOR Mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, R. L.; Eliášová, Pavla; Mazur, Michal; Attfield, M. P.; Čejka, Jiří; Anderson, M. W.

    Roč. 20, č. 33 ( 2014 ), s. 10446-10450 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP106/12/G015 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : assembly * atomic force microscopy * top-down synthesis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.731, year: 2014

  4. Quantification of tip-broadening in non-contact atomic force microscopy with carbon nanotube tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinander, Kristoffer; Jensen, Thomas N.; Simonsen, Soren B.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotube terminated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have been used for the imaging of 5 nm wide surface supported Pt nanoclusters by non-contact (dynamic mode) AFM in an ultra-high vacuum. The results are compared to AFM measurements done with conventional Si-tips, as well...

  5. Magnetic force microscopy of thin film media for high density magnetic recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porthun, Steffen; Porthun, S.; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses various aspect of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) for use in the field of high density magnetic recording. After an introduction of the most important magnetic imaging techniques, an overview is given of the operation and theory of MFM. The developments in instrumentation, MFM

  6. Mechanical properties of cellulose nanomaterials studied by contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan Wagner; Robert J. Moon; Arvind Raman

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the mechanical properties of cellulose nanomaterials is key to the development of new cellulose nanomaterial based products. Using contact resonance atomic force microscopy we measured and mapped the transverse elastic modulus of three types of cellulosic nanoparticles: tunicate cellulose nanocrystals, wood cellulose nanocrystals, and wood cellulose...

  7. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co 50 Fe 50 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We studied the magnetization reversal mechanism of single-layered Co50Fe50 nanomagnets by measuring the magnetization reversal and using the micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization reversal strongly depends on the thickness of the nanomagnets. In the remanent state, the magnetic force microscopy studies ...

  8. Elastic-properties measurement at high temperatures through contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinello, Francesco; Pezzuolo, Andrea; Carmignato, Simone

    2015-01-01

    fast direct and non-destructive measurement of Young's modulus and related surface parameters.In this work an instrument set up for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy is proposed, where the sample with is coupled to a heating stage and a piezoelectric transducer directly vibrate the cantilever...

  9. Langmuir- Blodgett layers of amphiphilic molecules investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zdravkova, Aneliya Nikolova

    2007-01-01

    Langmuir - Blodgett technique and Atomic Force Microscopy were used to study the phase behaviour of organic molecules (fatty alcohols and monoacid saturated triglycerides) at air-water and air-solid interfaces. The structure of binary mixed LB monolayers of fatty alcohols was reported. The

  10. Morphology of extruded high-density polyethylene pipes studied by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trifonova, D.; Drouillon, Philippe; Ghanem, Antoine; Vancso, Gyula J.

    1997-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the structure of extruded polyethylene (PE) pipe. During extrusion, the outer surface of the pipe was cooled with water. Two cross sections, parallel and transverse to the extrusion direction, were examined in order to spatially follow the structural

  11. High resolution magnetic force microscopy: instrumentation and application for recording media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porthun, Steffen; Porthun, S.

    This thesis describes aspects of the use of magnetic force microscopy for the study of magnetic recording media. The maximum achievable storage density in magnetic recording is limited by the magnetic reversal behaviour of the medium and by the stability of the written information. The shape and

  12. Polarizability of DNA Block Copolymer Nanoparticles Observed by Electrostatic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sowwan, Mukhles; Faroun, Maryam; Mentovich, Elad; Ibrahim, Imad; Haboush, Shayma; Alemdaroglu, Fikri Emrah; Kwak, Minseok; Richter, Shachar; Herrmann, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this study, DNA block copolymer (DBC) micelles with a polystyrene (PS) core and a single-stranded (ss) DNA shell were doped with ferrocene (Fc) molecules. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the doped and undoped block copolymer aggregates. We show that

  13. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co50Fe50 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We studied the magnetization reversal mechanism of single-layered Co50Fe50 nanomagnets by measuring the magnetization reversal and using the micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization reversal strongly depends on the thickness of the nanomagnets. In the remanent state, the magnetic force microscopy studies ...

  14. Preventing probe induced topography correlated artifacts in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polak, L.; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2016-01-01

    Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) on samples with rough surface topography can be hindered by topography correlated artifacts. We show that, with the proper experimental configuration and using homogeneously metal coated probes, we are able to obtain amplitude modulation (AM) KPFM results on a

  15. Convergent Inquiry in Science & Engineering: The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy in a Biology Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Il-Sun; Byeon, Jung-Ho; Kwon, Yong-Ju

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a teaching method suitable for science high school students using atomic force microscopy. During their scientific inquiry procedure, high school students observed a micro-nanostructure of a biological sample, which is unobservable via an optical microscope. The developed teaching method enhanced students'…

  16. Molecular structure of dipalmitoylphospatidylcholine Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers studied by atomic force microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhai, X.; Kleijn, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on the air-water interface have been transferred at various surface pressures onto quartz substrates using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The topography of these layers, on a molecular scale, has been examined by atomic force microscopy

  17. Acid bi-sulphite pulping effects on hardwoods and a softwood revealed by atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available aggregation of cellulose fibril aggregates (CFA) during processing in order to preserve the reactivity of dissolving pulp. Previous atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on a species of Eucalyptus showed that there is an increase in the CFA dimensions during...

  18. Hierarchical Networks of Casein Proteins: An Elasticity Study Based on Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uricanu, V.I.; Duits, Michael H.G.; Mellema, J.

    2004-01-01

    2D- and 3D-atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed on single casein micelles (CM) in native state, submerged in liquid, using a home-built AFM instrument. The micelles were immobilized via carbodiimide chemistry to a self-assembled monolayer supported on gold-coated slides. Off-line

  19. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  20. Estimation of the shear force in transverse dynamic force microscopy using a sliding mode observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thang Nguyen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of estimating the shear force affecting the tip of the cantilever in a Transverse Dynamic Force Microscope (TDFM using a real-time implementable sliding mode observer is addressed. The behaviour of a vertically oriented oscillated cantilever, in close proximity to a specimen surface, facilitates the imaging of the specimen at nano-metre scale. Distance changes between the cantilever tip and the specimen can be inferred from the oscillation amplitudes, but also from the shear force acting at the tip. Thus, the problem of accurately estimating the shear force is of significance when specimen images and mechanical properties need to be obtained at submolecular precision. A low order dynamic model of the cantilever is derived using the method of lines, for the purpose of estimating the shear force. Based on this model, an estimator using sliding mode techniques is presented to reconstruct the unknown shear force, from only tip position measurements and knowledge of the excitation signal applied to the top of the cantilever. Comparisons to methods assuming a quasi-static harmonic balance are made.

  1. Force microscopy imaging of individual protein molecules with sub-pico Newton force sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shivprasad; Martinez, Nicolas F; Lozano, Jose R; Garcia, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    The capability of atomic force microscopes (AFM) to generate atomic or nanoscale resolution images of surfaces has deeply transformed the study of materials. However, high resolution imaging of biological systems has proved more difficult than obtaining atomic resolution images of crystalline surfaces. In many cases, the forces exerted by the tip on the molecules (1-10 nN) either displace them laterally or break the noncovalent bonds that hold the biomolecules together. Here, we apply a force microscope concept based on the simultaneous excitation of the first two flexural modes of the cantilever. The coupling of the modes generated by the tip-molecule forces enables imaging under the application of forces ( approximately 35 pN) which are smaller than those needed to break noncovalent bonds. With this instrument we have resolved the intramolecular structure of antibodies in monomer and pentameric forms. Furthermore, the instrument has a force sensitivity of 0.2 pN which enables the identification of compositional changes along the protein fragments. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. LCD panel characterization by measuring full Jones matrix of individual pixels using polarization-sensitive digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongchan; Yu, Hyeonseung; Park, Jung-Hoon; Park, YongKeun

    2014-10-06

    We present measurements of the full Jones matrix of individual pixels in a liquid-crystal display (LCD) panel. Employing a polarization-sensitive digital holographic microscopy based on Mach-Zehnder interferometry, the complex amplitudes of the light passing through individual LCD pixels are precisely measured with respect to orthogonal bases of polarization states, from which the full Jones matrix components of individual pixels are obtained. We also measure the changes in the Jones matrix of individual LCD pixels with respect to an applied bias. In addition, the complex optical responses of a LCD panel with respect to arbitrary polarization states of incident light were characterized from the measured Jones matrix.

  3. Bimodal atomic force microscopy imaging of isolated antibodies in air and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez, N F; Lozano, J R; Herruzo, E T; Garcia, F; Garcia, R [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, CSIC, Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Richter, C; Sulzbach, T [NanoWorld Services GmbH, Schottkystrasse 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: rgarcia@imm.cnm.csic.es

    2008-09-24

    We have developed a dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) method based on the simultaneous excitation of the first two flexural modes of the cantilever. The instrument, called a bimodal atomic force microscope, allows us to resolve the structural components of antibodies in both monomer and pentameric forms. The instrument operates in both high and low quality factor environments, i.e., air and liquids. We show that under the same experimental conditions, bimodal AFM is more sensitive to compositional changes than amplitude modulation AFM. By using theoretical and numerical methods, we study the material contrast sensitivity as well as the forces applied on the sample during bimodal AFM operation.

  4. Evaluation of Chemical Interactions between Small Molecules in the Gas Phase Using Chemical Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Ju, Soomi; Kim, In Tae; Jung, Sun-Hwa; Min, Sun-Joon; Kim, Chulki; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Sang Kyung

    2015-12-04

    Chemical force microscopy analyzes the interactions between various chemical/biochemical moieties in situ. In this work we examined force-distance curves and lateral force to measure the interaction between modified AFM tips and differently functionalized molecular monolayers. Especially for the measurements in gas phase, we investigated the effect of humidity on the analysis of force-distance curves and the images in lateral force mode. Flat chemical patterns composed of different functional groups were made through micro-contact printing and lateral force mode provided more resolved analysis of the chemical patterns. From the images of 1-octadecanethiol/11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid patterns, the amine group functionalized tip brought out higher contrast of the patterns than an intact silicon nitride tip owing to the additional chemical interaction between carboxyl and amine groups. For more complex chemical interactions, relative chemical affinities toward specific peptides were assessed on the pattern of 1-octadecanethiol/phenyl-terminated alkanethiol. The lateral image of chemical force microscopy reflected specific preference of a peptide to phenyl group as well as the hydrophobic interaction.

  5. Multiparametric atomic force microscopy imaging of single bacteriophages extruding from living bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsteens, David; Trabelsi, Heykel; Soumillion, Patrice; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy is a valuable tool to simultaneously image the structure and map the biophysical properties of biological samples at the nanoscale. Traditionally, FD-based atomic force microscopy has been severely limited by its poor temporal and lateral resolutions. Here we report the use of advanced FD-based technology combined with biochemically sensitive tips to image filamentous bacteriophages extruding from living bacteria at unprecedented speed and resolution. Directly correlated multiparametric images of the structure, adhesion and elasticity of infected bacteria demonstrate that the sites of assembly and extrusion localize at the bacterial septum in the form of soft nanodomains surrounded by stiff cell wall material. The quantitative nano-bio-imaging method presented here offers a wealth of opportunities for mapping the physical properties and molecular interactions of complex biosystems, from viruses to tissues.

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Nanorobotics Modelling, Simulation, Setup Building and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hui; Régnier, Stéphane; Sitti, Metin

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has been successfully used to perform nanorobotic manipulation operations on nanoscale entities such as particles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanocrystals, and DNA since 1990s. There have been many progress on modeling, imaging, teleoperated or automated control, human-machine interfacing, instrumentation, and applications of AFM based nanorobotic manipulation systems in literature. This book aims to include all of such state-of-the-art progress in an organized, structured, and detailed manner as a reference book and also potentially a textbook in nanorobotics and any other nanoscale dynamics, systems and controls related research and education. Clearly written and well-organized, this text introduces designs and prototypes of the nanorobotic systems in detail with innovative principles of three-dimensional manipulation force microscopy and parallel imaging/manipulation force microscopy.

  7. Reverse engineering of an affinity-switchable molecular interaction characterized by atomic force microscopy single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Dario; Bartels, Frank Wilco; Becker, Anke; Decker, Björn; Eckel, Rainer; McIntosh, Matthew; Mattay, Jochen; Plattner, Patrik; Ros, Robert; Schäfer, Christian; Sewald, Norbert

    2008-02-19

    Tunable and switchable interaction between molecules is a key for regulation and control of cellular processes. The translation of the underlying physicochemical principles to synthetic and switchable functional entities and molecules that can mimic the corresponding molecular functions is called reverse molecular engineering. We quantitatively investigated autoinducer-regulated DNA-protein interaction in bacterial gene regulation processes with single atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecule force spectroscopy in vitro, and developed an artificial bistable molecular host-guest system that can be controlled and regulated by external signals (UV light exposure and thermal energy). The intermolecular binding functionality (affinity) and its reproducible and reversible switching has been proven by AFM force spectroscopy at the single-molecule level. This affinity-tunable optomechanical switch will allow novel applications with respect to molecular manipulation, nanoscale rewritable molecular memories, and/or artificial ion channels, which will serve for the controlled transport and release of ions and neutral compounds in the future.

  8. Effect of SP-C on surface potential distribution in pulmonary surfactant: Atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hane, Francis; Moores, Brad; Amrein, Matthias; Leonenko, Zoya

    2009-01-01

    The air-lung interface is covered by a molecular film of pulmonary surfactant (PS). The major function of the film is to reduce the surface tension of the lung's air-liquid interface, providing stability to the alveolar structure and reducing the work of breathing. Earlier we have shown that function of bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) is related to the specific molecular architecture of surfactant films. Defined molecular arrangement of the lipids and proteins of the surfactant film also give rise to a local highly variable electrical surface potential of the interface. In this work we investigated a simple model of artificial lung surfactant consisting of DPPC, eggPG, and surfactant protein C (SP-C). Effects of surface compression and the presence of SP-C on the monolayer structure and surface potential distribution were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). We show that topography and locally variable surface potential of DPPC-eggPG lipid mixture are similar to those of pulmonary surfactant BLES in the presence of SP-C and differ in surface potential when SP-C is absent.

  9. Gold-decorated highly ordered self-organized grating-like nanostructures on Ge surface: Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollick, Safiul Alam; Kumar, Mohit; Singh, Ranveer; Satpati, Biswarup; Ghose, Debabrata; Som, Tapobrata

    2016-10-28

    Nanoarchitecture by atomic manipulation is considered to be one of the emerging trends in advanced functional materials. It has a gamut of applications to offer in nanoelectronics, chemical sensing, and nanobiological science. In particular, highly ordered one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures fabricated by self-organization methods are in high demand for their high aspect ratios and large number of applications. An efficient way of fabricating semiconductor nanostructures is by molecular beam epitaxy, where atoms are added to a crystalline surface at an elevated temperature during growth, yielding the desired structures in a self-assembled manner. In this article, we offer a room temperature process, in which atoms are sputtered away by ion impacts. Using gold ion implantation, the present study reports on the formation of highly ordered self-organized long grating-like nanostructures, with grooves between them, on a germanium surface. The ridges of the patterns are shown to have flower-like protruding nanostructures, which are mostly decorated by gold atoms. By employing local probe microscopic techniques like Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy, we observe a spatial variation in the work function and different nanoscale electrical conductivity on the ridges of the patterns and the grooves between them, which can be attributed to gold atom decorated ridges. Thus, the architecture  presented offers the advantage of using the patterned germanium substrates as periodic arrays of conducting ridges and poorly conducting grooves between them.

  10. Cross Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy studies of organic bulk heterojunction blends for local morphology and electrical behavior analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C., E-mail: Christina.villeneuve@laplace.unvi-tlse.fr [LAPLACE, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); UPS, INPT, Université de Toulouse, LCC 31077 Toulouse (France); Le Borgne, D. [LAPLACE, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); UPS, INPT, Université de Toulouse, LCC 31077 Toulouse (France); LCC-CNRS, 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Bedel-Pereira, E.; Séguy, I. [UPS, INPT, Université de Toulouse, LCC 31077 Toulouse (France); LAAS-CNRS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Moineau Chane-Ching, K. I.; Hernandez-Maldonado, D. [UPS, INPT, Université de Toulouse, LCC 31077 Toulouse (France); LCC-CNRS, 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2015-02-07

    Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic devices performances depend on the relative organization and physical properties of the electron-donor and -acceptor materials. In this paper, BHJs of poly(3-hexyl-thiophene) (P3HT) associated with an electron acceptor material, 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)-propyl-1-phenyl[6,6]C6 (PCBM) or [Ni(4dodpedt){sub 2}], are studied in terms of morphology, ordering, and electrical properties. First, comparison between the two BHJs performed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Raman characterizations shows that P3HT structuration is improved by blending with [Ni(4dodpedt){sub 2}]. Then, the relationship between charges trapping, electrical properties, and film morphology is investigated using conductive AFM and Kelvin Force Microscopy. Measurements in dark condition and under solar cell simulator provide complementary information on electrical phenomena in these organic nanostructures. Finally, time dependent measurement highlights the influence of charges stacking on conduction. Specifically, we demonstrate that charge accumulation initiated by illumination remains valid after switching off the light, and induces the modification in current versus voltage characteristic of P3HT: PCBM blend. Finally, we observe a current increasing which can be attributed to the energy barrier decreasing due to charges trapping in PCBM.

  11. Topographic and electronic contrast of the graphene moir´e on Ir(111) probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.; Hämäläinen, K.; Sainio, K.; Lahtinen, J.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.; Liljeroth, P.

    2011-01-01

    Epitaxial graphene grown on transition-metal surfaces typically exhibits a moir´e pattern due to the lattice mismatch between graphene and the underlying metal surface. We use both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the electronic and topographic contrast

  12. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  13. Co-axial Electrospun Polyacrylonitrile-Poly(methylmethacrylate) Nanofibers: Atomic Force Microscopy and Compositional Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, N.E.; Strawhecker, K.E.; Orlicki, J.A.; Rawlett, A.M.; Beebe, T.P.

    2011-01-01

    Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA)- Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers were prepared using a conventional single-nozzle electrospinning technique. The as-spun fibers exhibited core-shell morphology as verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM-phase and modulus mapping images of the fiber cross-section and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated PAN formed the shell and PMMA the core material. XPS, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and elemental analysis were used to determine fiber compositional information. Soaking the fibers in solvent demonstrated removal of the core material, generating hollow PAN fibers. PMID:21928836

  14. Coaxial electrospun poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyacrylonitrile nanofibers: atomic force microscopy and compositional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Nicole E; Strawhecker, Kenneth E; Orlicki, Joshua A; Rawlett, Adam M; Beebe, Thomas P

    2011-11-03

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers were prepared using a conventional single-nozzle electrospinning technique. The as-spun fibers exhibited core-shell morphology as verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM-phase and modulus mapping images of the fiber cross-section and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that PAN formed the shell and PMMA formed the core material. XPS, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and elemental analysis were used to determine fiber compositional information. Soaking the fibers in solvent demonstrated removal of the core material, generating hollow PAN fibers.

  15. High-speed adaptive contact-mode atomic force microscopy imaging with near-minimum-force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Juan; Zou, Qingze

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive contact-mode imaging approach is proposed to replace the traditional contact-mode imaging by addressing the major concerns in both the speed and the force exerted to the sample. The speed of the traditional contact-mode imaging is largely limited by the need to maintain precision tracking of the sample topography over the entire imaged sample surface, while large image distortion and excessive probe-sample interaction force occur during high-speed imaging. In this work, first, the image distortion caused by the topography tracking error is accounted for in the topography quantification. Second, the quantified sample topography is utilized in a gradient-based optimization method to adjust the cantilever deflection set-point for each scanline closely around the minimal level needed for maintaining stable probe-sample contact, and a data-driven iterative feedforward control that utilizes a prediction of the next-line topography is integrated to the topography feeedback loop to enhance the sample topography tracking. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated through imaging a calibration sample of square pitches at both high speeds (e.g., scan rate of 75 Hz and 130 Hz) and large sizes (e.g., scan size of 30 μm and 80 μm). The experimental results show that compared to the traditional constant-force contact-mode imaging, the imaging speed can be increased by over 30 folds (with the scanning speed at 13 mm/s), and the probe-sample interaction force can be reduced by more than 15% while maintaining the same image quality

  16. Physical mechanisms of megahertz vibrations and nonlinear detection in ultrasonic force and related microscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosse, J. L.; Huey, B. D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 97 North Eagleville Road, Unit 3136, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3136 (United States); Tovee, P. D.; Kolosov, O. V., E-mail: o.kolosov@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-14

    Use of high frequency (HF) vibrations at MHz frequencies in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) advanced nanoscale property mapping to video rates, allowed use of cantilever dynamics for mapping nanomechanical properties of stiff materials, sensing μs time scale phenomena in nanostructures, and enabled detection of subsurface features with nanoscale resolution. All of these methods critically depend on the generally poor characterized HF behaviour of AFM cantilevers in contact with a studied sample, spatial and frequency response of piezotransducers, and transfer of ultrasonic vibrations between the probe and a specimen. Focusing particularly on Ultrasonic Force Microscopy (UFM), this work is also applicable to waveguide UFM, heterodyne force microscopy, and near-field holographic microscopy, all methods that exploit nonlinear tip-surface force interactions at high frequencies. Leveraging automated multidimensional measurements, spectroscopic UFM (sUFM) is introduced to investigate a range of common experimental parameters, including piezotransducer excitation frequency, probed position, ultrasonic amplitude, cantilever geometry, spring constant, and normal force. Consistent with studies of influence of each of these factors, the data-rich sUFM signatures allow efficient optimization of ultrasonic-AFM based measurements, leading to best practices recommendations of using longer cantilevers with lower fundamental resonance, while at the same time increasing the central frequency of HF piezo-actuators, and only comparing results within areas on the order of few μm{sup 2} unless calibrated directly or compared with in-the-imaged area standards. Diverse materials such as Si, Cr, and photoresist are specifically investigated. This work thereby provides essential insight into the reliable use of MHz vibrations with AFM and provides direct evidence substantiating phenomena such as sensitivity to adhesion, diminished friction for certain ultrasonic conditions, and the

  17. Magnetization-dependent viscosity in brute-force-polarized liquid 3He

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, G.A.; Schuhl, A.; Joffrin, J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method to measure the magnetization dependence of the viscosity in polarized liquid He3 is presented. The magnetization is obtained by "brute-force polarization" at 45 mK in magnetic fields up to 11 T; it is subsequently destroyed by saturation of the NMR signal. Our result, a relative...... increase of the viscosity of (31.5)×10-3 at 3.9% polarization and a pressure of 30 bars, disagrees with a prediction based on the "nearly metamagnetic" model....

  18. Nonvolatile data storage using mechanical force-induced polarization switching in ferroelectric polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xin; Tang, Xin; Chen, Xiang-Zhong; Chen, Yu-Lei; Shen, Qun-Dong; Guo, Xu; Ge, Hai-Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric polymers offer the promise of low-cost and flexible electronic products. They are attractive for information storage due to their spontaneous polarization which is usually switched by electric field. Here, we demonstrate that electrical signals can be readily written on ultra-thin ferroelectric polymer films by strain gradient-induced polarization switching (flexoelectric effect). A force with magnitude as small as 64nN is enough to induce highly localized (40 nm feature size) change in the polarization states. The methodology is capable of realizing nonvolatile memory devices with miniaturized cell size and storage density of tens to hundreds Gbit per square inch

  19. INVESTIGATION OF POLYMER SURFACES USING SCANNING FORCE MICROSCOPY (SFM) - A NEW DIRECT LOOK ON OLD POLYMER PROBLEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GRIM, PCM; BROUWER, HJ; SEYGER, RM; OOSTERGETEL, GT; BERGSMASCHUTTER, WG; ARNBERG, AC; GUTHNER, P; DRANSFELD, K; HADZIIOANNOU, G

    In this contribution, the general concepts of force microscopy will be presented together with its application to polymer surfaces (Ref.1). Several examples will be presented to illustrate that force microscopy is a powerful and promising tool for investigation of (polymer) surfaces, such as the

  20. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of chromium on a Cr(001) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagoute, J; Kawahara, S L; Chacon, C; Repain, V; Girard, Y; Rousset, S

    2011-02-02

    Several tens of chromium layers were deposited at 250 °C on a Cr(001) surface and investigated by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Chromium is found to grow with a mound-like morphology resulting from the stacking of several monolayers which do not uniformly cover the whole surface of the substrate. The terminal plane consists of an irregular array of Cr islands with lateral sizes smaller than 20 × 20 nm(2). Combined AES and STS measurements reveal the presence of a significant amount of segregants prior to and after deposition. A detailed investigation of the surface shows that it consists of two types of patches. Thanks to STS measurements, the two types of area have been identified as being either chromium pure or segregant rich. SP-STM experiments have evidenced that the antiferromagnetic layer coupling remains in the chromium mounds after deposition and is not significantly affected by the presence of the segregants.

  1. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy with quantitative insights into magnetic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phark, Soo-Hyon; Sander, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (spin-STM/S) have been successfully applied to magnetic characterizations of individual nanostructures. Spin-STM/S is often performed in magnetic fields of up to some Tesla, which may strongly influence the tip state. In spite of the pivotal role of the tip in spin-STM/S, the contribution of the tip to the differential conductance d I /d V signal in an external field has rarely been investigated in detail. In this review, an advanced analysis of spin-STM/S data measured on magnetic nanoislands, which relies on a quantitative magnetic characterization of tips, is discussed. Taking advantage of the uniaxial out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy of Co bilayer nanoisland on Cu(111), in-field spin-STM on this system has enabled a quantitative determination, and thereby, a categorization of the magnetic states of the tips. The resulting in-depth and conclusive analysis of magnetic characterization of the tip opens new venues for a clear-cut sub-nanometer scale spin ordering and spin-dependent electronic structure of the non-collinear magnetic state in bilayer high Fe nanoislands on Cu(111).

  2. Tilting and Wobble of Myosin V by High-Speed Single-Molecule Polarized Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, John F.; Shroder, Deborah Y.; Nelson, Philip C.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2013-01-01

    Myosin V is biomolecular motor with two actin-binding domains (heads) that take multiple steps along actin by a hand-over-hand mechanism. We used high-speed polarized total internal reflection fluorescence (polTIRF) microscopy to study the structural dynamics of single myosin V molecules that had been labeled with bifunctional rhodamine linked to one of the calmodulins along the lever arm. With the use of time-correlated single-photon counting technology, the temporal resolution of the polTIRF microscope was improved ∼50-fold relative to earlier studies, and a maximum-likelihood, multitrace change-point algorithm was used to objectively determine the times when structural changes occurred. Short-lived substeps that displayed an abrupt increase in rotational mobility were detected during stepping, likely corresponding to random thermal fluctuations of the stepping head while it searched for its next actin-binding site. Thus, myosin V harnesses its fluctuating environment to extend its reach. Additional, less frequent angle changes, probably not directly associated with steps, were detected in both leading and trailing heads. The high-speed polTIRF method and change-point analysis may be applicable to single-molecule studies of other biological systems. PMID:23528086

  3. High-speed polarized light microscopy for in situ, dynamic measurement of birefringence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianyu; Pankow, Mark; Shadow Huang, Hsiao-Ying; Peters, Kara

    2018-01-01

    A high-speed, quantitative polarized light microscopy (QPLM) instrument has been developed to monitor the optical slow axis spatial realignment during controlled medium to high strain rate experiments at acquisition rates up to 10 kHz. This high-speed QPLM instrument is implemented within a modified drop tower and demonstrated using polycarbonate specimens. By utilizing a rotating quarter wave plate and a high-speed camera, the minimum acquisition time to generate an alignment map of a birefringent specimen is 6.1 ms. A sequential analysis method allows the QPLM instrument to generate QPLM data at the high-speed camera imaging frequency 10 kHz. The obtained QPLM data is processed using a vector correlation technique to detect anomalous optical axis realignment and retardation changes throughout the loading event. The detected anomalous optical axis realignment is shown to be associated with crack initiation, propagation, and specimen failure in a dynamically loaded polycarbonate specimen. The work provides a foundation for detecting damage in biological tissues through local collagen fiber realignment and fracture during dynamic loading.

  4. Characterization of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Dimerization by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhui; Kou, Xiaolong; Xu, Jiachao; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Rong; Zhang, Zhen; Fang, Xiaohong

    2018-03-14

    Dimerization of core protein is a crucial step in the formation of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleocapsid, and inhibition of dimer formation is regarded as an attractive approach to design anti-HCV drugs. In this work, we developed the atomic force microscopy based single molecular force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS) method for the characterization of core protein dimerization with the advantages of small amount of sample consumption and no need of labeling. Interaction force of the core protein with its antibody or aptamer was analyzed to investigate its stoichiometry and binding property. The two specific binding forces were detected due to the probing of dimeric and monomeric core protein, respectively. Moreover, the binding property of protein dimer was different from the monomer. Our work offers a new approach to study the dimerization of core protein, as well as other proteins, and to screen the HCV candidate inhibitors.

  5. Optical pulling force on a magneto-dielectric Rayleigh sphere in Bessel tractor polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitri, F.G.; Li, R.X.; Yang, R.P.; Guo, L.X.; Ding, C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    The optical radiation force induced by Bessel (vortex) beams on a magneto-dielectric subwavelength sphere is investigated with particular emphasis on the beam polarization and order l (or topological charge). The analysis is focused on identifying the regions and some of the conditions to achieve retrograde motion of the sphere centered on the axis of wave propagation of the incident beam, or shifted off-axially. Exact non-paraxial analytical solutions are established, and computations for linear, circular, radial, azimuthal and mixed polarizations of the individual plane wave components forming the Bessel (vortex) beams by means of the angular spectrum decomposition method (ASDM) illustrate the theory with particular emphasis on the tractor (i.e. reversal) behavior of the force. This effect results in the pulling of the magneto-dielectric sphere against the forward linear momentum density flux associated with the incoming waves. Should some conditions related to the choice of the beam parameters as well as the permittivity and permeability of the sphere be met, the optical force vanishes and reverses sign. Moreover, the beam polarization is shown to affect differently the axial negative pulling force for either the zeroth- or the first-order Bessel beam. When the sphere is centered on the beam′s axis, the axial force component is always negative for the zeroth-order Bessel beam except for the radial and azimuthal polarization configurations. Nonetheless, for the first-order Bessel beam, the axial force is negative for the radial polarization case only. Additional tractor beam effects arise when the sphere departs from the center of the beam. It is also demonstrated that the tractor beam effect arises from the force component originating from the cross-interaction between the electric and magnetic dipoles. Potential applications are in particle manipulation, optical levitation, tractor beam tweezers, and other emergent technologies using polarized Bessel beams on

  6. Probing living bacterial adhesion by single cell force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.

    Bacteria initiate attachment to the surfaces with the aid of different extracellular polymers. To quantitatively study how these polymers mediate bacterial adhesion and possibly their interactions, it is essential to go down to single cell level, with in mind that cell-to-cell variation should...... with a commercial cell adhesive CellTakTM. The method was applied to four different bacterial strains, and single-cell adhesion was measured on three surfaces (fresh glass, hydrophilic glass, mica). Attachment to the cantilever was stable during the 2 h of AFM force measurements, and viability was confirmed by Live...

  7. Influence of Poisson's ratio variation on lateral spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, M.-K.; Tai, N.-Ha; Chen, B.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to measure the surface morphologies and the mechanical properties of nanostructures. The force acting on the AFM cantilever can be obtained by multiplying the spring constant of AFM cantilever and the corresponding deformation. To improve the accuracy of force experiments, the spring constant of AFM cantilever must be calibrated carefully. Many methods, such as theoretical equations, the finite element method, and the use of reference cantilever, were reported to obtain the spring constant of AFM cantilevers. For the cantilever made of single crystal, the Poisson's ratio varies with different cantilever-crystal angles. In this paper, the influences of Poisson's ratio variation on the lateral spring constant and axial spring constant of rectangular and V-shaped AFM cantilevers, with different tilt angles and normal forces, were investigated by the finite element analysis. When the cantilever's tilt angle is 20 deg. and the Poisson's ratio varies from 0.02 to 0.4, the finite element results show that the lateral spring constants decrease 11.75% for the rectangular cantilever with 1 μN landing force and decrease 18.60% for the V-shaped cantilever with 50 nN landing force, respectively. The influence of Poisson's ratio variation on axial spring constant is less than 3% for both rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers. As the tilt angle increases, the axial spring constants for rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers decrease substantially. The results obtained can be used to improve the accuracy of the lateral force measurement when using atomic force microscopy

  8. Numerical study of the lateral resolution in electrostatic force microscopy for dielectric samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, C; AlegrIa, A; Colmenero, J [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales UPV/EHU, Facultad de Quimica, Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Schwartz, G A [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Saenz, J J, E-mail: riedel@ies.univ-montp2.fr [Donostia International Physics Center, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    We present a study of the lateral resolution in electrostatic force microscopy for dielectric samples in both force and gradient modes. Whereas previous studies have reported expressions for metallic surfaces having potential heterogeneities (Kelvin probe force microscopy), in this work we take into account the presence of a dielectric medium. We introduce a definition of the lateral resolution based on the force due to a test particle being either a point charge or a polarizable particle on the dielectric surface. The behaviour has been studied over a wide range of typical experimental parameters: tip-sample distance (1-20) nm, sample thickness (0-5) {mu}m and dielectric constant (1-20), using the numerical simulation of the equivalent charge method. For potential heterogeneities on metallic surfaces expressions are in agreement with the bibliography. The lateral resolution of samples having a dielectric constant of more than 10 tends to metallic behaviour. We found a characteristic thickness of 100 nm, above which the lateral resolution measured on the dielectric surface is close to that of an infinite medium. As previously reported, the lateral resolution is better in the gradient mode than in the force mode. Finally, we showed that for the same experimental conditions, the lateral resolution is better for a polarizable particle than for a charge, i.e. dielectric heterogeneities should always look 'sharper' (better resolved) than inhomogeneous charge distributions. This fact should be taken into account when interpreting images of heterogeneous samples.

  9. Robust operation and performance of integrated carbon nanotubes atomic force microscopy probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rius, G; Clark, I T; Yoshimura, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a complete characterization of carbon nanotubes-atomic force microscopy (CNT-AFM) probes to evaluate the cantilever operation and advanced properties originating from the CNTs. The fabrication consists of silicon probes tip-functionalized with multiwalled CNTs by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A dedicated methodology has been defined to evaluate the effect of CNT integration into the Si cantilevers. The presence of the CNTs provides enhanced capability for sensing and durability, as demonstrated using dynamic and static modes, e.g. imaging, indentation and force/current characterization.

  10. Free-standing biomimetic polymer membrane imaged with atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, Christian; Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila Justyna; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius

    2011-01-01

    Fluid polymeric biomimetic membranes are probed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using probes with both normal tetrahedrally shaped tips and nanoneedle-shaped Ag2Ga rods. When using nanoneedle probes, the collected force volume data show three distinct membrane regions which match the expected...... membrane structure when spanning an aperture in a hydrophobic scaffold. The method used provides a general method for mapping attractive fluid surfaces. In particular, the nanoneedle probing allows for characterization of free-standing biomimetic membranes with thickness on the nanometer scale suspended...

  11. Application of atomic force microscopy to the study of natural and model soil particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S; Bryant, R; Doerr, S H; Rhodri Williams, P; Wright, C J

    2008-09-01

    The structure and surface chemistry of soil particles has extensive impact on many bulk scale properties and processes of soil systems and consequently the environments that they support. There are a number of physiochemical mechanisms that operate at the nanoscale which affect the soil's capability to maintain native vegetation and crops; this includes soil hydrophobicity and the soil's capacity to hold water and nutrients. The present study used atomic force microscopy in a novel approach to provide unique insight into the nanoscale properties of natural soil particles that control the physiochemical interaction of material within the soil column. There have been few atomic force microscopy studies of soil, perhaps a reflection of the heterogeneous nature of the system. The present study adopted an imaging and force measurement research strategy that accounted for the heterogeneity and used model systems to aid interpretation. The surface roughness of natural soil particles increased with depth in the soil column a consequence of the attachment of organic material within the crevices of the soil particles. The roughness root mean square calculated from ten 25 microm(2) images for five different soil particles from a Netherlands soil was 53.0 nm, 68.0 nm, 92.2 nm and 106.4 nm for the respective soil depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm and 30-40 cm. A novel analysis method of atomic force microscopy phase images based on phase angle distribution across a surface was used to interpret the nanoscale distribution of organic material attached to natural and model soil particles. Phase angle distributions obtained from phase images of model surfaces were found to be bimodal, indicating multiple layers of material, which changed with the concentration of adsorbed humic acid. Phase angle distributions obtained from phase images of natural soil particles indicated a trend of decreasing surface coverage with increasing depth in the soil column. This was consistent with

  12. Accounting for electronic polarization in non-polarizable force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontyev, Igor; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei

    2011-02-21

    The issues of electronic polarizability in molecular dynamics simulations are discussed. We argue that the charges of ionized groups in proteins, and charges of ions in conventional non-polarizable force fields such as CHARMM, AMBER, GROMOS, etc should be scaled by a factor about 0.7. Our model explains why a neglect of electronic solvation energy, which typically amounts to about a half of total solvation energy, in non-polarizable simulations with un-scaled charges can produce a correct result; however, the correct solvation energy of ions does not guarantee the correctness of ion-ion pair interactions in many non-polarizable simulations. The inclusion of electronic screening for charged moieties is shown to result in significant changes in protein dynamics and can give rise to new qualitative results compared with the traditional non-polarizable force field simulations. The model also explains the striking difference between the value of water dipole μ∼ 3D reported in recent ab initio and experimental studies with the value μ(eff)∼ 2.3D typically used in the empirical potentials, such as TIP3P or SPC/E. It is shown that the effective dipole of water can be understood as a scaled value μ(eff) = μ/√ε(el), where ε(el) = 1.78 is the electronic (high-frequency) dielectric constant of water. This simple theoretical framework provides important insights into the nature of the effective parameters, which is crucial when the computational models of liquid water are used for simulations in different environments, such as proteins, or for interaction with solutes.

  13. Higher order structure of short immunostimulatory oligonucleotides studied by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Dionne C.G., E-mail: dionne.c.g.klein@ntnu.no [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7489, Trondheim (Norway); Latz, Eicke [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7489, Trondheim (Norway); Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605 (United States); Institute of Innate Immunity, University Hospitals, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Espevik, Terje [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7489, Trondheim (Norway); Stokke, Bjorn T. [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway)

    2010-05-15

    Immunostimulatory CpG-DNA activates the innate immune system by binding to Toll-like receptor 9. Structurally different CpG-containing oligonucleotides trigger a different type of immune response while activating the same receptor. We therefore investigated the higher order structure of two different classes of immunostimulatory CpG-DNA. Class A, which contains a partly self-complementary sequence and poly-G ends, forms duplexes and nanoparticles in salt solution, while class B, which does not contain these features and is purely linear, does not form a duplex or nanoparticles. Results obtained here by high-resolution atomic force microscopy of classes A and B CpG-DNA, reflect these differences in secondary structure. Detailed structural analysis of the atomic force microscopy topographs is presented for two different sample preparation methods.

  14. Characterization of the magnetic micro- and nanostructure in unalloyed steels by magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, L.; Rabe, U.; Hirsekorn, S.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of a cementite phase influences significantly the macroscopic mechanical and magnetic properties of steels. Based on a correlation between mechanical and magnetic properties, mechanical properties as well as the morphology and content of the cementite phase can be inspected by electromagnetic non-destructive testing methods. The influence of the carbon content on bulk magnetic properties of unalloyed steels is studied on a macroscopic scale by hysteresis loop and Barkhausen noise measurements. The micro- and nanostructure is investigated by atomic force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Surface topography images and magnetic images of globular cementite precipitates embedded in a ferrite matrix are presented. The size, shape, and orientation of the precipitates influence the domain configuration. Applied external magnetic fields cause magnetization processes mainly in the ferrite matrix: Bloch walls move and are pinned by the cementite precipitates. The correlation between the microscopic observations and macroscopic magnetic properties of the material is discussed.

  15. Imaging latex–carbon nanotube composites by subsurface electrostatic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Sajan; Petty, Clayton W.; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic modes of atomic force microscopy have shown to be non-destructive and relatively simple methods for imaging conductors embedded in insulating polymers. Here we use electrostatic force microscopy to image the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a latex-based conductive composite, which brings forth features not observed in previously studied systems employing linear polymer films. A fixed-potential model of the probe-nanotube electrostatics is presented which in principle gives access to the conductive nanoparticle's depth and radius, and the polymer film dielectric constant. Comparing this model to the data results in nanotube depths that appear to be slightly above the film–air interface. Furthermore, this result suggests that water-mediated charge build-up at the film–air interface may be the source of electrostatic phase contrast in ambient conditions.

  16. A Study of Electrostatic Charge on Insulating Film by Electrostatic Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikunaga, K; Toosaka, K; Kamohara, T; Sakai, K; Nonaka, K

    2011-01-01

    Electrostatic charge properties on polypropylene film have been characterized by atomic force microscopy and electrostatic force microscopy. The measurements have been carried out after the polypropylene film was electrified by contact and separation process in an atmosphere of controlled humidity. The negative and positive charge in concave surface has been observed. The correlation between concave surface and charge position suggests that the electrostatic charges could be caused by localized contact. On the other hand, positive charge on a flat surface has been observed. The absence of a relationship between surface profile and charge position suggests that the electrostatic charge should be caused by discharge during the separation process. The spatial migration of other positive charges through surface roughness has been observed. The results suggest that there could be some electron traps on the surface roughness and some potentials on the polypropylene film.

  17. Heterojunction Effect in Weak Epitaxy Growth Thin Films Investigated by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai-Chao, Huang; Hai-Bo, Wang; Dong-Hang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the heterojunction effect between para-sexiphenyl (p-6P) and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) using Kelvin probe force microscopy. CuPc films are grown on the inducing layer p-6P by a weak epitaxy growth technique. The surface potential images of Kelvin probe force microscopy indicate the band bending in CuPc, which reduces grain boundary barriers and lead to the accumulation of holes in the CuPc layer. The electrical potential distribution on the surface of heterojunction films shows negligible grain boundary barriers in the CuPc layers. The relation between band bending and grain boundary barrier in the weak epitaxy growth thin films is revealed. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  18. The development of the spatially correlated adjustment wavelet filter for atomic force microscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Andrzej; Rodak, Aleksander; Unold, Olgierd; Klapetek, Petr

    2016-12-01

    In this paper a novel approach for the practical utilization of the 2D wavelet filter in terms of the artifacts removal from atomic force microscopy measurements results is presented. The utilization of additional data such as summary photodiode signal map is implemented in terms of the identification of the areas requiring the data processing, filtering settings optimization and the verification of the process performance. Such an approach allows to perform the filtering parameters adjustment by average user, while the straightforward method requires an expertise in this field. The procedure was developed as the function of the Gwyddion software. The examples of filtering the phase imaging and Electrostatic Force Microscopy measurement result are presented. As the wavelet filtering feature may remove a local artifacts, its superior efficiency over similar approach with 2D Fast Fourier Transformate based filter (2D FFT) can be noticed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Acoustic Imaging Frequency Dynamics of Ferroelectric Domains by Atomic Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun-Yu, Zhao; Hua-Rong, Zeng; Hong-Zhang, Song; Sen-Xing, Hui; Guo-Rong, Li; Qing-Rui, Yin; Shimamura, Kiyoshi; Kannan, Chinna Venkadasamy; Villora, Encarnacion Antonia Garcia; Takekawa, Shunji; Kitamura, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    We report the acoustic imaging frequency dynamics of ferroelectric domains by low-frequency acoustic probe microscopy based on the commercial atomic force microscopy It is found that ferroelectric domain could be firstly visualized at lower frequency down to 0.5 kHz by AFM-based acoustic microscopy The frequency-dependent acoustic signal revealed a strong acoustic response in the frequency range from 7kHz to 10kHz, and reached maximum at 8.1kHz. The acoustic contrast mechanism can be ascribed to the different elastic response of ferroelectric microstructures to local elastic stress fields, which is induced by the acoustic wave transmitting in the sample when the piezoelectric transducer is vibrating and exciting acoustic wave under ac electric fields due to normal piezoelectric effects. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  20. Conductivity mapping of nanoparticles by torsional resonance tunneling atomic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prastani, C.; Vetushka, Aliaksi; Fejfar, Antonín; Nanu, M.; Nanu, D.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 8 (2012), , "083107-1"-"083107-4" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA MŠk 7E10061 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 240826 - PolySiMode Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * nanoparticles * tin compounds * tunnelling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.794, year: 2012

  1. Investigating the fundamentals of drug crystal growth using Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Claire

    2003-01-01

    The importance of crystals to the pharmaceutical industry is evident - over 90% of pharmaceutical products contain a drug in crystalline form. However, the crystallization phenomena of drug compounds are poorly understood. An increased understanding of these processes may allow a greater degree of control over the crystallization outcomes, such as morphology, purity, or stability. In these studies, we have applied Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to the in situ investigations of drug crystal gro...

  2. Simultaneous atomic force microscopy measurement of topography and contact resistance of metal films and carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadermann, M.; Grube, H.; Boland, J.J.; Papadakis, S.J.; Falvo, M.R.; Superfine, R.; Washburn, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a quartz tuning-fork-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) setup that is capable of mapping the surface contact resistance while scanning topography. The tuning-fork setup allows us to use etched Pt/Ir tips, which have higher durability and better conductivity than probes used in earlier AFM conductance measurements. The performance of the method is demonstrated with contact resistance measurements of gold lines on silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes on graphite

  3. Enhanced endocytosis of nano-curcumin in nasopharyngeal cancer cells: An atomic force microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, R.; Nair, Greshma; Girish, C. M.

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies in drug development have shown that curcumin can be a good competent due to its improved anticancer, antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and anti-inflammatory activities. A detailed real time characterization of drug (curcumin)-cell interaction is carried out in human nasopharyngeal cancer cells using atomic force microscopy. Nanocurcumin shows an enhanced uptake over micron sized drugs attributed to the receptor mediated route. Cell membrane stiffness plays a critical role in the drug endocytosis in nasopharyngeal cancer cells.

  4. Solid-state nuclear-spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, G. P.; Doolen, G. D.; Hammel, P. C.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a nuclear-spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). It is shown that an MRFM single-electron spin measurement provides three essential requirements for quantum computation in solids: (a) preparation of the ground state, (b) one- and two-qubit quantum logic gates, and (c) a measurement of the final state. The proposed quantum computer can operate at temperatures up to 1 K. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  5. Atomic force microscopy of surface relief in individual grains of fatigued 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Jiří; Obrtlík, Karel; Blochwitz, C.; Polák, Jaroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 15 (2002), s. 3767-3780 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/00/D055; GA ČR GA106/01/0376 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : fatigue * persistent slip band * atomic force microscopy Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 3.104, year: 2002

  6. Nanoscale liquid interfaces wetting, patterning and force microscopy at the molecular scale

    CERN Document Server

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses the recent developments in the investigation and manipulation of liquids at the nanoscale. This new field has shown important breakthroughs on the basic understanding of physical mechanisms involving liquid interfaces, which led to applications in nanopatterning. It has also consequences in force microscopy imaging in liquid environment. The book proposes is a timely review of these various aspects. It is co-authored by 25 among the most prominent scientists in the field.

  7. Surprising volume change in PPy(DBS): An atomic force microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smela, E.; Gadegaard, N.

    1999-01-01

    Communication: Conjugated polymers such as polypyrrole (PPy) have potential use as artificial muscles or in microsystems such as valves for micro-fluid handling. One of the most important parameters in such uses is the magnitude of volume change during associated redox processes; however, until now...... estimates have varied greatly. Atomic force microscopy is reported here as allowing direct measurement of the in situ thickness change during oxidation and reduction of thin films of PPy doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonate....

  8. Imaging of Au nanoparticles deeply buried in polymer matrix by various atomic force microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, some papers reported successful imaging of subsurface features using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Some theoretical studies have also been presented, however the imaging mechanisms are not fully understood yet. In the preceeding papers, imaging of deeply buried nanometer-scale features has been successful only if they were buried in a soft matrix. In this paper, subsurface features (Au nanoparticles) buried in a soft polymer matrix were visualized. To elucidate the imaging mechanisms, various AFM techniques; heterodyne force microscopy, ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM), 2nd-harmonic UAFM and force modulation microscopy (FMM) were employed. The particles buried under 960 nm from the surface were successfully visualized which has never been achieved. The results elucidated that it is important for subsurface imaging to choose a cantilever with a suitable stiffness range for a matrix. In case of using the most suitable cantilever, the nanoparticles were visualized using every technique shown above except for FMM. The experimental results suggest that the subsurface features buried in a soft matrix with a depth of at least 1 µm can affect the local viscoelasticity (mainly viscosity) detected as the variation of the amplitude and phase of the tip oscillation on the surface. This phenomenon presumably makes it possible to visualize such deeply buried nanometer-scale features in a soft matrix. - Highlights: • We visualized subsurface features buried in soft matrix, and investigated its imaging mechanism. • AFM techniques; UAFM, FMM, HFM and 2nd-harmonic UAFM were applied to elucidate the mechanism. • Au nanoparticles buried under 960 nm from surface were visualized, which has never been achieved. • Imaging at contact resonance using a cantilever of suitable stiffness is important. • Subsurface features in a soft matrix affect surface viscoelasticity, which are detected by AFM

  9. Nanoscale simultaneous chemical and mechanical imaging via peak force infrared microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Wang, Haomin; Wagner, Martin; Yan, Yong; Jakob, Devon S; Xu, Xiaoji G

    2017-06-01

    Nondestructive chemical and mechanical measurements of materials with ~10-nm spatial resolution together with topography provide rich information on the compositions and organizations of heterogeneous materials and nanoscale objects. However, multimodal nanoscale correlations are difficult to achieve because of the limitation on spatial resolution of optical microscopy and constraints from instrumental complexities. We report a novel noninvasive spectroscopic scanning probe microscopy method-peak force infrared (PFIR) microscopy-that allows chemical imaging, collection of broadband infrared spectra, and mechanical mapping at a spatial resolution of 10 nm. In our technique, chemical absorption information is directly encoded in the withdraw curve of the peak force tapping cycle after illumination with synchronized infrared laser pulses in a simple apparatus. Nanoscale phase separation in block copolymers and inhomogeneity in CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 perovskite crystals are studied with correlative infrared/mechanical nanoimaging. Furthermore, we show that the PFIR method is sensitive to the presence of surface phonon polaritons in boron nitride nanotubes. PFIR microscopy will provide a powerful analytical tool for explorations at the nanoscale across wide disciplines.

  10. Hierarchical super-structure identified by polarized light microscopy, electron microscopy and nanoindentation: Implications for the limits of biological control over the growth mode of abalone sea shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Andreas S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mollusc shells are commonly investigated using high-resolution imaging techniques based on cryo-fixation. Less detailed information is available regarding the light-optical properties. Sea shells of Haliotis pulcherina were embedded for polishing in defined orientations in order to investigate the interface between prismatic calcite and nacreous aragonite by standard materialographic methods. A polished thin section of the interface was prepared with a defined thickness of 60 μm for quantitative birefringence analysis using polarized light and LC-PolScope microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy images were obtained for comparison. In order to study structural-mechanical relationships, nanoindentation experiments were performed. Results Incident light microscopy revealed a super-structure in semi-transparent regions of the polished cross-section under a defined angle. This super-structure is not visible in transmitted birefringence analysis due to the blurred polarization of small nacre platelets and numerous organic interfaces. The relative orientation and homogeneity of calcite prisms was directly identified, some of them with their optical axes exactly normal to the imaging plane. Co-oriented "prism colonies" were identified by polarized light analyses. The nacreous super-structure was also visualized by secondary electron imaging under defined angles. The domains of the super-structure were interpreted to consist of crystallographically aligned platelet stacks. Nanoindentation experiments showed that mechanical properties changed with the same periodicity as the domain size. Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated that insights into the growth mechanisms of nacre can be obtained by conventional light-optical methods. For example, we observed super-structures formed by co-oriented nacre platelets as previously identified using X-ray Photo-electron Emission Microscopy (X-PEEM [Gilbert et al., Journal of the

  11. Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Marina; Te Riet, Joost; Wolf, Katarina

    2013-12-01

    The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness together with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact and the fate of the cell. Using cantilevers functionalized with either tips or beads and spring constants ranging from 0.06-10 N m(-1), force-deformation curves were generated from nuclear positions of adherent HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell populations at unchallenged integrity, and a nuclear stiffness range of 0.2 to 2.5 kPa was identified depending on cantilever type and the use of extended fitting models. Chromatin-decondensating agent trichostatin A (TSA) induced nuclear softening of up to 50%, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. Finally, using a stiff bead-functionalized cantilever pushing at maximal system-intrinsic force, the nucleus was deformed to 20% of its original height which after TSA treatment reduced further to 5% remaining height confirming chromatin organization as an important determinant of nuclear stiffness. Thus, combined AFM-confocal microscopy is a feasible approach to study nuclear compressibility to complement concepts of limiting nuclear deformation in cancer cell invasion and other biological processes.

  12. Analysis of Bowel Diseases from Blood Serum by Autofluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomečková Vladimíra

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of bowel diseases is often difficult and time consuming since it is not always possible to obtain adequate information by the conventional diagnostic methods to set up a diagnosis and exclude nongastrointestinal causes of symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the structure of blood serum samples of patients with selected intestinal diseases. The blood serum samples of patients (N=35 with selected diagnoses (mesenteric thrombosis, inflammatory bowel disease, duodenal ulcers, sepsis, enterorrhagia, sigmoid colon resection, small intestine cancer and of healthy subjects were evaluated by synchronous fluorescence fingerprint and atomic force microscopy. Autofluorescence of blood serum studied at λex = 280 nm showed significant decrease of fluorescence intensity in patients with all types of diseases affecting bowels in comparison with the healthy control patients. The blood serum surface of ill patients showed significant differences in comparison with control group samples after atomic force microscopy evaluation as well. Irregularly placed small globular units of irregular shape in small amounts are possible to observe in patients with intestine ischemia. Fluorescence analysis and atomic force microscopy showed the ability to rapidly reflect qualitative and quantitative changes of proteins in blood serum samples of patients. These sensitive methods could be beneficial for monitoring the progression of both acute or chronic bowel diseases.

  13. The development of the spatially correlated adjustment wavelet filter for atomic force microscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikora, Andrzej; Rodak, Aleksander; Unold, Olgierd; Klapetek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a novel approach for the practical utilization of the 2D wavelet filter in terms of the artifacts removal from atomic force microscopy measurements results is presented. The utilization of additional data such as summary photodiode signal map is implemented in terms of the identification of the areas requiring the data processing, filtering settings optimization and the verification of the process performance. Such an approach allows to perform the filtering parameters adjustment by average user, while the straightforward method requires an expertise in this field. The procedure was developed as the function of the Gwyddion software. The examples of filtering the phase imaging and Electrostatic Force Microscopy measurement result are presented. As the wavelet filtering feature may remove a local artifacts, its superior efficiency over similar approach with 2D Fast Fourier Transformate based filter (2D FFT) can be noticed. - Highlights: • A novel approach to 2D wavelet-based filter for atomic force microscopy is shown. • The additional AFM measurement signal is used to adjust the filter. • Efficient removal of the local interference phenomena caused artifacts is presented.

  14. The development of the spatially correlated adjustment wavelet filter for atomic force microscopy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, Andrzej, E-mail: sikora@iel.wroc.pl [Electrotechnical Institute, Division of Electrotechnology and Materials Science, M. Skłodowskiej-Curie 55/61, 50-369 Wrocław (Poland); Rodak, Aleksander [Faculty of Electronics, Wrocław University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wrocław (Poland); Unold, Olgierd [Institute of Computer Engineering, Control and Robotics, Faculty of Electronics, Wrocław University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wrocław (Poland); Klapetek, Petr [Czech Metrology Institute, Okružní 31, 638 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper a novel approach for the practical utilization of the 2D wavelet filter in terms of the artifacts removal from atomic force microscopy measurements results is presented. The utilization of additional data such as summary photodiode signal map is implemented in terms of the identification of the areas requiring the data processing, filtering settings optimization and the verification of the process performance. Such an approach allows to perform the filtering parameters adjustment by average user, while the straightforward method requires an expertise in this field. The procedure was developed as the function of the Gwyddion software. The examples of filtering the phase imaging and Electrostatic Force Microscopy measurement result are presented. As the wavelet filtering feature may remove a local artifacts, its superior efficiency over similar approach with 2D Fast Fourier Transformate based filter (2D FFT) can be noticed. - Highlights: • A novel approach to 2D wavelet-based filter for atomic force microscopy is shown. • The additional AFM measurement signal is used to adjust the filter. • Efficient removal of the local interference phenomena caused artifacts is presented.

  15. Probing anisotropic surface properties and interaction forces of chrysotile rods by atomic force microscopy and rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dingzheng; Xie, Lei; Bobicki, Erin; Xu, Zhenghe; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2014-09-16

    Understanding the surface properties and interactions of nonspherical particles is of both fundamental and practical importance in the rheology of complex fluids in various engineering applications. In this work, natural chrysotile, a phyllosilicate composed of 1:1 stacked silica and brucite layers which coil into cylindrical structure, was chosen as a model rod-shaped particle. The interactions of chrysotile brucite-like basal or bilayered edge planes and a silicon nitride tip were measured using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The force-distance profiles were fitted using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, which demonstrates anisotropic and pH-dependent surface charge properties of brucite-like basal plane and bilayered edge surface. The points of zero charge (PZC) of the basal and edge planes were estimated to be around pH 10-11 and 6-7, respectively. Rheology measurements of 7 vol % chrysotile (with an aspect ratio of 14.5) in 10 mM NaCl solution showed pH-dependent yield stress with a local maximum around pH 7-9, which falls between the two PZC values of the edge and basal planes of the rod particles. On the basis of the surface potentials of the edge and basal planes obtained from AFM measurements, theoretical analysis of the surface interactions of edge-edge, basal-edge, and basal-basal planes of the chrysotile rods suggests the yield stress maximum observed could be mainly attributed to the basal-edge attractions. Our results indicate that the anisotropic surface properties (e.g., charges) of chrysotile rods play an important role in the particle-particle interaction and rheological behavior, which also provides insight into the basic understanding of the colloidal interactions and rheology of nonspherical particles.

  16. Identification by force modulation microscopy of nanoparticles generated in vacuum arcs Identification by force modulation microscopy of nanoparticles generated in vacuum arcs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arroyave Franco

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available An alternative method based on force modulation microscopy (FMM for identification of nanoparticles produced in the plasma generated by the cathode spots of vacuum arcs is presented. FMM technique is enabled for the detection of variations in the mechanical properties of a surface with high sensitiveness. Titanium nitride (TiN coatings deposited on oriented silicon by pulsed vacuum arc process have been analyzed. AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy and FMM images were simultaneously obtained, and in all cases it was possible to identify nanoparticle presence. Further X-ray Diffraction spectra of sample coating were taken. Existence of contaminant particles of 47 nanometers in diameter was reported.En este trabajo se presenta un método alternativo basado en microscopia de modulación de fuerza (FMM, para la identificación de nanogotas producidas en el plasma generado por los spots catódicos de los arcos en vacío. La técnica FMM esta habilitada para la detección de variaciones en las propiedades mecánicas de una superficie, con alta sensibilidad. Se han analizado recubrimientos de nitruro de titanio (TiN depositados sobre Silicio orientado por el proceso de arco en vacío pulsado. Se han obtenido simultáneamente imágenes de microscopia de fuerza atómica (AFM y de microscopia FMM mediante las cuales se ha podido identificar la presencia de nanogotas. Adicionalmente se han tomado espectros de difracción de rayos X (XRD de las muestras recubiertas. Se ha reportado la existencia de partículas contaminantes de 47 nanómetros de diámetro sobre los recubrimientos.

  17. Number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate: a transform theory for atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ken-Ichi; Liang, Yunfeng; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Kota; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Onishi, Hiroshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-06-21

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquids can measure a force curve between a probe and a buried substrate. The shape of the measured force curve is related to hydration structure on the substrate. However, until now, there has been no practical theory that can transform the force curve into the hydration structure, because treatment of the liquid confined between the probe and the substrate is a difficult problem. Here, we propose a robust and practical transform theory, which can generate the number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate from the force curve. As an example, we analyzed a force curve measured by using our high-resolution AFM with a newly fabricated ultrashort cantilever. It is demonstrated that the hydration structure on muscovite mica (001) surface can be reproduced from the force curve by using the transform theory. The transform theory will enhance AFM's ability and support structural analyses of solid/liquid interfaces. By using the transform theory, the effective diameter of a real probe apex is also obtained. This result will be important for designing a model probe of molecular scale simulations.

  18. Data acquisition and analysis procedures for high-resolution atomic force microscopy in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albers, Boris J; Schwendemann, Todd C; Baykara, Mehmet Z; Pilet, Nicolas; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwarz, Udo D; Altman, Eric I

    2009-01-01

    Data acquisition and analysis procedures for noncontact atomic force microscopy that allow the recording of dense three-dimensional (3D) surface force and energy fields with atomic resolution are presented. The main obstacles for producing high-quality 3D force maps are long acquisition times that lead to data sets being distorted by drift, and tip changes. Both problems are reduced but not eliminated by low-temperature operation. The procedures presented here employ an image-by-image data acquisition scheme that cuts measurement times by avoiding repeated recording of redundant information, while allowing post-acquisition drift correction. All steps are detailed with the example of measurements performed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in ultrahigh vacuum at a temperature of 6 K. The area covered spans several unit cells laterally and vertically from the attractive region to where no force could be measured. The resulting fine data mesh maps piconewton forces with <7 pm lateral and<2 pm vertical resolution. From this 3D data set, two-dimensional cuts along any plane can be plotted. Cuts in a plane parallel to the sample surface show atomic resolution, while cuts along the surface normal visualize how the attractive atomic force fields extend into vacuum. At the same time, maps of the tip-sample potential energy, the lateral tip-sample forces, and the energy dissipated during cantilever oscillation can be produced with identical resolution.

  19. Distinguishing the parallel and vertical orientations and optic axis characteristics determination of azobenzene mesogen by conoscopic polarized microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Wang, M; Dong, M; Gao, L; Tian, J

    2011-11-01

    Orientational behaviours under the action of linearly polarized light and circularly polarized light of a side-chain azobenzene containing polymer were studied by conoscopic polarized microscopy. The results suggest that the linearly polarized light (473 nm, 20 mW cm(-2)) results in an in-plane orientation of the azobenzene groups. The irradiation with circularly polarized light (473 nm, 20 mW cm(-2)) leads to a tilt orientation (out-of-plane) of the azobenzene groups with the long axis of mesogens aligned along the propagation direction of the actinic light. Characteristic features of the in-plane and out-of-plane orientated films were obtained from their interference figures. The in-plane orientated film shows an interference cross consisting of a broad fuzzy bar, and the cross-centre lies in the centre of view field. In-plane orientated film also yields a flash figure upon a less than 10° rotation of the sample under polarized microscopy. The interference figures yielded from the out-of-plane orientated films consist of narrow bar cross. The locations of those interference figures depend on the oblique angle of the irradiation light. A method for distinguishing the in-plane orientation of the mesogens from the vertically out-of-plane orientation is demonstrated, which is based on comparing the bar width of their interference figures, and by whether they can produce a flash figure upon a small angle rotation of the film. The liquid crystalline film is identified as positive and uniaxial anisotropy after annealing of the perpendicularly irradiated film. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2011 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Investigation of integrin expression on the surface of osteoblast-like cells by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caneva Soumetz, Federico [Department of Communication, Computer and System Sciences, University of Genova, Via Opera Pia, 13-16145 Genova (Italy); Saenz, Jose F. [Biophysical and Electronic Engineering Department, University of Genova, Via All' Opera Pia 11a, 16145 Genova (Italy); Pastorino, Laura; Ruggiero, Carmelina [Department of Communication, Computer and System Sciences, University of Genova, Via Opera Pia, 13-16145 Genova (Italy); Nosi, Daniele [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Forensic Medicine, Bio-photonic Laboratory, University of Florence, viale Morgagni, 85 Firenze, CAP 50134 Florence (Italy); Raiteri, Roberto, E-mail: rr@unige.it [Biophysical and Electronic Engineering Department, University of Genova, Via All' Opera Pia 11a, 16145 Genova (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    The transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) is a human cytokine which has been demonstrated to modulate cell surface integrin repertoire. In this work integrin expression in response to TGF-{beta}1 stimulation has been investigated on the surface of human osteoblast-like cells. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy to assess integrin expression and to evaluate their distribution over the dorsal side of the plasma membrane. AFM probes have been covalently functionalised with monoclonal antibodies specific to the {beta}1 integrin subunit. Force curves have been collected in order to obtain maps of the interaction between the immobilized antibody and the respective cell membrane receptors. Adhesion peaks have been automatically detected by means of an ad hoc developed data analysis software. The specificity of the detected interactions has been assessed by adding free antibody in the solution and monitoring the dramatic decrease in the recorded interactions. In addition, the effect of TGF-{beta}1 treatment on both the fluorescence signal and the adhesion events has been tested. The level of expression of the {beta}1 integrin subunit was enhanced by TGF-{beta}1. As a further analysis, the adhesion force of the single living cells to the substrate was measured by laterally pushing the cell with the AFM tip and measuring the force necessary to displace it. The treatment with TGF-{beta}1 resulted in a decrease of the cell/substrate adhesion force. Results obtained by AFM have been validated by confocal laser scanning microscopy thus demonstrating the high potential of the AFM technique for the investigation of cell surface receptors distribution and trafficking at the nanoscale.

  1. Investigation of integrin expression on the surface of osteoblast-like cells by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caneva Soumetz, Federico; Saenz, Jose F.; Pastorino, Laura; Ruggiero, Carmelina; Nosi, Daniele; Raiteri, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is a human cytokine which has been demonstrated to modulate cell surface integrin repertoire. In this work integrin expression in response to TGF-β1 stimulation has been investigated on the surface of human osteoblast-like cells. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy to assess integrin expression and to evaluate their distribution over the dorsal side of the plasma membrane. AFM probes have been covalently functionalised with monoclonal antibodies specific to the β1 integrin subunit. Force curves have been collected in order to obtain maps of the interaction between the immobilized antibody and the respective cell membrane receptors. Adhesion peaks have been automatically detected by means of an ad hoc developed data analysis software. The specificity of the detected interactions has been assessed by adding free antibody in the solution and monitoring the dramatic decrease in the recorded interactions. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 treatment on both the fluorescence signal and the adhesion events has been tested. The level of expression of the β1 integrin subunit was enhanced by TGF-β1. As a further analysis, the adhesion force of the single living cells to the substrate was measured by laterally pushing the cell with the AFM tip and measuring the force necessary to displace it. The treatment with TGF-β1 resulted in a decrease of the cell/substrate adhesion force. Results obtained by AFM have been validated by confocal laser scanning microscopy thus demonstrating the high potential of the AFM technique for the investigation of cell surface receptors distribution and trafficking at the nanoscale.

  2. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittmann, B. R. [Penn State; Xi, X. [Penn State

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property

  3. Surface polarity of beta-HMX crystal and the related adhesive forces with Estane binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu

    2008-12-02

    Here I present the results on the study of surface properties of beta-HMX crystal utilizing molecular dynamics simulations. The surface polarity of three principal crystal surfaces, (011), (010), and (110), is investigated by measuring the water contact angles. The calculated contact angles are in excellent agreement with the values measured by experiment and show that the surface polarity of three crystal surfaces are different. The free energies and forces of detaching an Estane chain (with and without surrounding nitroplasticizer molecules) from the three principal crystal surfaces are also calculated using the umbrella sampling method. I find that the force for Estane detachment increases with the increasing HMX surface polarity. In addition, my results show that the nitroplasticizer also plays an important role in the adhesion between Estane and HMX surfaces.

  4. Probing deviations from traditional colloid filtration theory by atomic forces microscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reno, Marissa Devan

    2005-12-01

    Colloid transport through saturated media is an integral component of predicting the fate and transport of groundwater contaminants. Developing sound predictive capabilities and establishing effective methodologies for remediation relies heavily on our ability to understand the pertinent physical and chemical mechanisms. Traditionally, colloid transport through saturated media has been described by classical colloid filtration theory (CFT), which predicts an exponential decrease in colloid concentration with travel distance. Furthermore, colloid stability as determined by Derjaguin-Landau-Veney-Overbeek (DLVO) theory predicts permanent attachment of unstable particles in a primary energy minimum. However, recent studies show significant deviations from these traditional theories. Deposition in the secondary energy minimum has been suggested as a mechanism by which observed deviations can occur. This work investigates the existence of the secondary energy minimum as predicted by DLVO theory using direct force measurements obtained by Atomic Forces Microscopy. Interaction energy as a function of separation distance between a colloid and a quartz surface in electrolyte solutions of varying ionic strength are obtained. Preliminary force measurements show promise and necessary modifications to the current experimental methodology have been identified. Stringent surface cleaning procedures and the use of high-purity water for all injectant solutions is necessary for the most accurate and precise measurements. Comparisons between direct physical measurements by Atomic Forces Microscopy with theoretical calculations and existing experimental findings will allow the evaluation of the existence or absence of a secondary energy minimum.

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy: A Powerful Tool to Address Scaffold Design in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Marrese

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional polymers currently represent a basic component of a large range of biological and biomedical applications including molecular release, tissue engineering, bio-sensing and medical imaging. Advancements in these fields are driven by the use of a wide set of biodegradable polymers with controlled physical and bio-interactive properties. In this context, microscopy techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM are emerging as fundamental tools to deeply investigate morphology and structural properties at micro and sub-micrometric scale, in order to evaluate the in time relationship between physicochemical properties of biomaterials and biological response. In particular, AFM is not only a mere tool for screening surface topography, but may offer a significant contribution to understand surface and interface properties, thus concurring to the optimization of biomaterials performance, processes, physical and chemical properties at the micro and nanoscale. This is possible by capitalizing the recent discoveries in nanotechnologies applied to soft matter such as atomic force spectroscopy to measure surface forces through force curves. By tip-sample local interactions, several information can be collected such as elasticity, viscoelasticity, surface charge densities and wettability. This paper overviews recent developments in AFM technology and imaging techniques by remarking differences in operational modes, the implementation of advanced tools and their current application in biomaterials science, in terms of characterization of polymeric devices in different forms (i.e., fibres, films or particles.

  6. Erosion Potential of Tooth Whitening Regimens as Evaluated with Polarized Light Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambert, Patrick; Qian, Fang; Kwon, So Ran

    2015-11-01

    Tooth whitening is a widely utilized esthetic treatment in dentistry. With increased access to over-the-counter (OTC) systems concerns have been raised as to potential adverse effects associated with overuse of whitening materials. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate enamel erosion due to different whitening regimens when used in excess of recommended guidelines. Extracted human teeth (n = 66) were randomly divided into 11 groups (n = 6/group). Specimens were exposed to OTC products: Crest Whitestrips and 5-minute natural white and a do-it-yourself (DIY) strawberry whitening recipe. Within each regimen, groups were further divided per exposure time: specimens receiving the recommended product dosage; 5 times the recommended dosage; and 10 times the recommended dosage. Negative and positive controls were treated with grade 3 water and 1.0% citric acid, respectively. Specimens were nail-varnished to limit application to a 1 × 4 mm window. Following treatment, specimens were sectioned and erosion (drop in μm) measured using polarized light microscopy. Two-sample t-test was used to detect difference in amount of enamel erosion between negative and positive groups, while one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by post hoc Dunnett's test was used to detect difference between set of treatment groups and negative control groups or among all experimental groups. There was significant difference in mean amount of enamel erosion (p erosion for positive control group was significantly greater than that for negative control group (23.50 vs 2.65 μm). There was significant effect for type of treatments on enamel erosion [F(9,50) = 25.19; p 0.05 for all instances), except for Natural White_10 times treatment group (p erosion. Enamel erosion due to the overuse of whitening products varies for different modalities and products. Therefore, caution is advised when using certain over-the-counter products beyond recommended guidelines, as there is potential for enamel

  7. Specialized probes based on hydroxyapatite calcium for heart tissues research by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, Mikhail; Golubok, Alexander; Gulyaev, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    The new specialized AFM-probes with hydroxyapatite structures for atomic force microscopy of heart tissues calcification were created and studied. A process of probe fabrication is demonstrated. The adhesive forces between specialized hydroxyapatite probe and endothelium/subendothelial layers were investigated. It was found that the adhesion forces are significantly higher for the subendothelial layers. We consider that it is connected with the formation and localization of hydroxyapatite in the area of subendothelial layers of heart tissues. In addition, the roughness analysis and structure visualization of the endothelial surface of the heart tissue were carried out. The results show high efficiency of created specialized probes at study a calcinations process of the aortic heart tissues.

  8. Specialized probes based on hydroxyapatite calcium for heart tissues research by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, Mikhail, E-mail: cloudjyk@yandex.ru; Golubok, Alexander [St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University), Kronverkskii pr. 49, St. Petersburg, 197101 (Russian Federation); Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Rizhskii pr. 26, St. Petersburg, 190103 (Russian Federation); Gulyaev, Nikolai [Military Medical Academy named after S.M. Kirov, Academic Lebedev str. 6, St. Petersburg, 194044 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    The new specialized AFM-probes with hydroxyapatite structures for atomic force microscopy of heart tissues calcification were created and studied. A process of probe fabrication is demonstrated. The adhesive forces between specialized hydroxyapatite probe and endothelium/subendothelial layers were investigated. It was found that the adhesion forces are significantly higher for the subendothelial layers. We consider that it is connected with the formation and localization of hydroxyapatite in the area of subendothelial layers of heart tissues. In addition, the roughness analysis and structure visualization of the endothelial surface of the heart tissue were carried out. The results show high efficiency of created specialized probes at study a calcinations process of the aortic heart tissues.

  9. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M

    2016-09-21

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model.

  10. Minimising the effect of nanoparticle deformation in intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babic, Bakir; Lawn, Malcolm A.; Coleman, Victoria A.; Jämting, Åsa K.; Herrmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The results of systematic height measurements of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles using intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (IC-AM-AFM) are presented. The experimental findings demonstrate that PS nanoparticles deform during AFM imaging, as indicated by a reduction in the measured particle height. This deformation depends on the IC-AM-AFM imaging parameters, material composition, and dimensional properties of the nanoparticles. A model for nanoparticle deformation occurring during IC-AM-AFM imaging is developed as a function of the peak force which can be calculated for a particular set of experimental conditions. The undeformed nanoparticle height can be estimated from the model by extrapolation to zero peak force. A procedure is proposed to quantify and minimise nanoparticle deformation during IC-AM-AFM imaging, based on appropriate adjustments of the experimental control parameters.

  11. Fluorescence microscopy is superior to polarized microscopy for detecting amyloid deposits in Congo red-stained trephine bone marrow biopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alan; Sadimin, Evita; Richardson, Maurice; Goodell, Lauri; Fyfe, Billie

    2012-10-01

    The classic gold standard for detecting amyloid deposits is Congo red-stained bright field and polarized microscopy (CRPM). A prior study showed that Congo red fluorescence (CRF) microscopy had increased sensitivity compared with traditional CRPM when analyzing fat pad specimens. The purpose of the current study was to determine the sensitivity of CRF for evaluating Congo red-stained bone marrow biopsy specimens, and to compare these results with those of CRPM. We compared the CRPM and the CRF analyses of 33 trephine bone marrow biopsy specimens with clinical or morphologic suspicion of amyloid deposits. These results were verified against immunohistochemical staining with anti-amyloid P antibody. CRF achieved 100% sensitivity, and CRPM achieved 75% sensitivity. Both groups showed 100% specificity compared with amyloid P immunohistochemical staining. The results show that CRF is a sensitive method to analyze trephine bone marrow biopsy specimens for amyloid deposits.

  12. Measurements on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces using a porous gamma alumina nanoparticle aggregate mounted on Atomic Force Microscopy cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Theerthankar; Becker, Thomas; Nair, Balagopal N.

    2010-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements are extensively used for a detailed understanding of molecular and surface forces. In this study, we present a technique for measuring such forces, using an AFM cantilever attached with a porous gamma alumina nanoparticle aggregate. The modified cantilever

  13. Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia A. Moss; Les Groom

    2001-01-01

    Microscopy is the study and interpretation of images produced by a microscope. "Interpretation" is the keyword, because the microscope enables one to see structures that are too small or too close together to be resolved by the unaided eye. (The human eye cannot separate two points or lines that are closer together than 0.1 mm.) it is important to...

  14. Lift, drag, and guidance forces on alternating polarity magnets, using loop guideways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbaum, S.D.; Lee, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Exact solutions of track current, lift force, and drag force, together with their velocity dependence, have been computed for a vehicle carrying a finite number of fixed current alternating polarity superconducting magnets, suspended at various heights over structured track guideways of the single- and double-loop (''null'') types. Results for the double-loop case are compared with those of a previously reported approximate analysis. The analytical method is then applied to a study of a low-drag guidance loop guideway which is integrable with lift loop guideways utilizing a common set of vehicle magnets. Solutions are obtained for guidance track restoring forces, lateral destabilization forces, and lift force degradation as functions of lateral displacement from symmetry. The dependence of lift, drag, and lift-to-drag on track loop parameters is studied and the linear dependence of lift-to-drag on loop time constant confirmed. The contribution to the forces made by successive addition of alternating polarity magnets is calculated and the marked reduction in lift force pulsation noted

  15. High-Resolution Magnetic Force Microscopy Using Carbon Nanotube Probes Fabricated Directly by Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Tanaka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been successfully grown on the tip apex of an atomic force microscopy (AFM cantilever by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM observations reveal that the diameter of the CNTs is ∼30 nm and the magnetic particles with diameter of ∼20 nm, which was used as catalyst for the CNT growth, exist on the top. This CNT probe has been applied to magnetic force microscopy (MFM on the ultrahigh-density magnetic recording media with 1200 kilo flux change per inch (kfci.

  16. Jeans instability in collisional strongly coupled dusty plasma with radiative condensation and polarization force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prajapati, R. P., E-mail: prajapati-iter@yahoo.co.in; Bhakta, S. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas Central University, Bilaspur-495009 (C.G.) (India); Chhajlani, R. K. [Retired from School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain-456010 (M.P.) (India)

    2016-05-15

    The influence of dust-neutral collisions, polarization force, and electron radiative condensation is analysed on the Jeans (gravitational) instability of partially ionized strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) using linear perturbation (normal mode) analysis. The Boltzmann distributed ions, dynamics of inertialess electrons, charged dust and neutral particles are considered. Using the plane wave solutions, a general dispersion relation is derived which is modified due to the presence of dust-neutral collisions, strong coupling effect, polarization force, electron radiative condensation, and Jeans dust/neutral frequencies. In the long wavelength perturbations, the Jeans instability criterion depends upon strong coupling effect, polarization interaction parameter, and thermal loss, but it is independent of dust-neutral collision frequency. The stability of the considered configuration is analysed using the Routh–Hurwitz criterion. The growth rates of Jeans instability are illustrated, and stabilizing influence of viscoelasticity and dust-neutral collision frequency while destabilizing effect of electron radiative condensation, polarization force, and Jeans dust-neutral frequency ratio is observed. This work is applied to understand the gravitational collapse of SCDP with dust-neutral collisions.

  17. Direct Measurements of Surface Energy, Elastic Modulus and Interparticle Forces of Titan Aerosol Analog (`Tholin') Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X.; Horst, S. M.; He, C.; McGuiggan, P.; Bridges, N. T.

    2017-12-01

    To understand the origin of the dunes on Titan, it is important to investigate the material properties of the sand particles on Titan, which are mainly made of organics deposited from the atmosphere [1]. The organic sand may behave differently compared to the quartz/basaltic sand on terrestrial planets (Earth, Venus, Mars) in terms of interparticle forces. We measured the surface energy (through contact angle measurements) and elastic modulus (through Atomic Force Microscopy, AFM) of Titan aerosol analog (tholins) produced in our lab. Tholins may be compositionally similar to sand on Titan. We directly measured the interparticle forces between a tholin particle adhered to an AFM cantilver and tholin particles on a substrate. We also measured the properties of walnut shells, a typical material used in the Titan Wind Tunnel (TWT, [2, 3]). We find the surface energy of a tholin thin film is about 70.9 mN/m and its elastic modulus is about 3.5 GPa (similar to hard polymers like PMMA and polystyrene). We used the two measured material properties of tholin to calculate its interparticle cohesion assuming simple sphere-sphere geometry [4]. For two 20 µm particles, the theoretical cohesion force is about 6682 nN. Under dry nitrogen (RHmeasured interparticle forces using AFM was approximately 4000 nN, which is smaller than theoretical predictions but still relatively strong under dry conditions. The interparticle cohesion between walnut shell particles is only 200 nN, which is much lower than between tholin particles. The key finding of this study is that the interparticle cohesion forces are much larger for tholins and presumably Titan sand particles than for terrestrial sand and materials used in the wind tunnel. This suggests we should increase the interparticle force in both analog experiments (TWT) and threshold models (e.g. [5]) to correctly translate the results to real Titan conditions. The strong cohesion of tholins may also inform us how the small aerosol

  18. Multiparametric Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for the Simultaneous Mapping of Surface Potential and Nanomechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Zhang, Hao; Hussain, Danish; Meng, Xianghe; Song, Jianmin; Sun, Lining

    2017-03-21

    We report high-resolution multiparametric kelvin probe force microscopy (MP-KPFM) measurements for the simultaneous quantitative mapping of the contact potential difference (CPD) and nanomechanical properties of the sample in single-pass mode. This method combines functionalities of the force-distance-based atomic force microscopy and amplitude-modulation (AM) KPFM to perform measurements in single-pass mode. During the tip-sample approach-and-retract cycle, nanomechanical measurements are performed for the retract part of nanoindentation, and the CPD is measured by the lifted probe with a constant tip-sample distance. We compare the performance of the proposed method with the conventional KPFMs by mapping the CPD of multilayer graphene deposited on n-doped silicon, and the results demonstrate that MP-KPFM has comparable performance to AM-KPFM. In addition, the experimental results of a custom-fabricated polymer grating with heterogeneous surfaces validate the multiparametric imaging capability of the MP-KPFM. This method can have potential applications in finding the inherent link between nanomechanical properties and the surface potential of the materials, such as the quantification of the electromechanical response of the deformed piezoelectric materials.

  19. Near-equilibrium measurement of quantum size effects using Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Späth, Thomas; Popp, Matthias; Pérez León, Carmen; Marz, Michael; Hoffmann-Vogel, Regina

    2017-06-14

    In nano-structures such as thin films electron confinement results in the quantization of energy levels in the direction perpendicular to the film. The discretization of the energy levels leads to the oscillatory dependence of many properties on the film thickness due to quantum size effects. Pb on Si(111) is a specially interesting system because a particular relationship between the Pb atomic layer thickness and its Fermi wavelength leads to a periodicity of the oscillation of two atomic layers. Here, we demonstrate how the combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) provides a reliable method to monitor the quantum oscillations in the work function of Pb ultra-thin film nano-structures on Si(111). Unlike other techniques, with SFM/KPFM we directly address single Pb islands, determine their height while suppressing the influence of electrostatic forces, and, in addition, simultaneously evaluate their local work function by measurements close to equilibrium, without current-dependent and non-equilibrium effects. Our results evidence even-odd oscillations in the work function as a function of the film thickness that decay linearly with the film thickness, proving that this method provides direct and precise information on the quantum states.

  20. Quantification of the lift height for magnetic force microscopy using 3D surface parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenadovic, M.; Strbac, S.; Rakocevic, Z.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the quantitative conditions for the lift height for imaging of the magnetic field using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were optimized. A thin cobalt film deposited on a monocrystalline silicon (1 0 0) substrate with a thickness of 55 nm and a thin nickel film deposited on a glass with a thickness of 600 nm were used as samples. The topography of the surface was acquired by tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM), while MFM imaging was performed in the lift mode for various lift heights. It was determined that the sensitivity of the measurements was about 10% higher for images obtained at a scan angle of 90 o compared to a scan angle of 0 deg. Therefore, the three-dimensional surface texture parameters, i.e., average roughness, skewness, kurtosis and the bearing ratio, were determined in dependence on the lift height for a scan angle of 90 deg. The results of the analyses of the surface parameters showed that the influence of the substrate and its texture on the magnetic force image could be neglected for lift heights above 40 nm and that the upper lift height limit is 100 nm. It was determined that the optimal values of the lift heights were in the range from 60 to 80 nm, depending on the nature of the sample and on the type of the tip used.

  1. Cellular Force Microscopy for in Vivo Measurements of Plant Tissue Mechanics1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routier-Kierzkowska, Anne-Lise; Weber, Alain; Kochova, Petra; Felekis, Dimitris; Nelson, Bradley J.; Kuhlemeier, Cris; Smith, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Although growth and morphogenesis are controlled by genetics, physical shape change in plant tissue results from a balance between cell wall loosening and intracellular pressure. Despite recent work demonstrating a role for mechanical signals in morphogenesis, precise measurement of mechanical properties at the individual cell level remains a technical challenge. To address this challenge, we have developed cellular force microscopy (CFM), which combines the versatility of classical microindentation techniques with the high automation and resolution approaching that of atomic force microscopy. CFM’s large range of forces provides the possibility to map the apparent stiffness of both plasmolyzed and turgid tissue as well as to perform micropuncture of cells using very high stresses. CFM experiments reveal that, within a tissue, local stiffness measurements can vary with the level of turgor pressure in an unexpected way. Altogether, our results highlight the importance of detailed physically based simulations for the interpretation of microindentation results. CFM’s ability to be used both to assess and manipulate tissue mechanics makes it a method of choice to unravel the feedbacks between mechanics, genetics, and morphogenesis. PMID:22353572

  2. The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy as a Technique for the Identification of Cancerous Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lekka, M.

    2007-11-01

    The monograph presents the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a tool for the identification of cancerous cells by studies of the expression of different types of molecules directly on the surface of living cells. The full quantitative description (that is not accessible by other techniques) performed for a given type of molecular interactions has been obtained by using the following quantities: an unbinding force, probability, rupture length and the effective spring constant taking into account the stiffness of a single complex. All, these parameters were extracted from AFM measurements The analysis of the interaction forces performed by AFM allows the quantitative determination of: i) the static properties of a single molecular complex where its strength of interaction and stiffness of the studied complex can be obtained, ii) dynamic properties, on the basis of which the kinetic properties of the unbinding process can be delivered, and iii) properties of adhesion clusters, where the interrelation between single complexes can be characterized, in particular the mechanism of the unbinding can be obtained. The presented characterization of the interaction force between single molecules demonstrates that atomic force microscopy can be used as exceptional technique to study the expression of molecules on a cell surface. Such measurements are not limited to a typical interactions occurring between single molecules but also it is possible to study the interactions between parts of molecules. The results presented in this monograph point to a novel approach to identify cancer-related changes in a quantitative way what can be used for describing and confirming the pathological state of a single cell. (author)

  3. Forced Response of Polar Orthotropic Tapered Circular Plates Resting on Elastic Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Ansari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Forced axisymmetric response of polar orthotropic circular plates of linearly varying thickness resting on Winkler type of elastic foundation has been studied on the basis of classical plate theory. An approximate solution of problem has been obtained by Rayleigh Ritz method, which employs functions based upon the static deflection of polar orthotropic circular plates. The effect of transverse loadings has been studied for orthotropic circular plate resting on elastic foundation. The transverse deflections and bending moments are presented for various values of taper parameter, rigidity ratio, foundation parameter, and flexibility parameter under different types of loadings. A comparison of results with those available in literature shows an excellent agreement.

  4. Binding activity of patterned concanavalin A studied by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebed, Kateryna; Pyka-Fosciak, Grazyna; Raczkowska, Joanna; Lekka, Malgorzata; Styczen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The mode of protein immobilization plays a crucial role in the preparation of protein microarrays used for a wide spectrum of applications in analytical biochemistry. The microcontact printing technique was used to form a protein pattern using concanavalin A (Con A) since Con A belongs to a group of proteins widely used in analytical assays due to their selectivity as regards different kinds of carbohydrates. Atomic force microscopy was used to image surface topography, delivering information about the quality of the protein pattern. The force spectroscopy mode was used to verify the functional activity of deposited proteins via determination of the forces of interaction between Con A and carboxypeptidase Y bearing carbohydrate structure recognized by Con A. The calculated binding force between Con A and CaY was 105 ± 2 pN and it was compared with that measured for Con A deposited directly from the protein solution. The similarity of the value obtained for the interaction force was independent of the mode of protein deposition, thereby verifying that the microcontact printing technique did not influence the carbohydrate binding activity of Con A. The correlation between the surface topography of patterned samples and adhesion maps obtained showed the possible use of AFM for studying the chemical properties of different regions of the micropatterns produced

  5. Individual globular domains and domain unfolding visualized in overstretched titin molecules with atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Mártonfalvi

    Full Text Available Titin is a giant elastomeric protein responsible for the generation of passive muscle force. Mechanical force unfolds titin's globular domains, but the exact structure of the overstretched titin molecule is not known. Here we analyzed, by using high-resolution atomic force microscopy, the structure of titin molecules overstretched with receding meniscus. The axial contour of the molecules was interrupted by topographical gaps with a mean width of 27.7 nm that corresponds well to the length of an unfolded globular (immunoglobulin and fibronectin domain. The wide gap-width distribution suggests, however, that additional mechanisms such as partial domain unfolding and the unfolding of neighboring domain multimers may also be present. In the folded regions we resolved globules with an average spacing of 5.9 nm, which is consistent with a titin chain composed globular domains with extended interdomain linker regions. Topographical analysis allowed us to allocate the most distal unfolded titin region to the kinase domain, suggesting that this domain systematically unfolds when the molecule is exposed to overstretching forces. The observations support the prediction that upon the action of stretching forces the N-terminal ß-sheet of the titin kinase unfolds, thus exposing the enzyme's ATP-binding site and hence contributing to the molecule's mechanosensory function.

  6. Characterization of virus-like particles by atomic force microscopy in ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropesa, Reinier; Ramos, Jorge R.; Falcón, Viviana; Felipe, Ariel

    2013-06-01

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) are attractive candidates for vaccine design since they resemble native viroids in size and morphology, but they are non-infectious due to the absence of a viral genome. The visualization of surface morphologies and structures can be used to deepen the understanding of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful tool for the visualization of soft biological samples in a nanoscale resolution. In this work we have investigated the morphology of recombinant surface antigens of hepatitis B (rHBsAg) VLPs from Cuban vaccine against hepatitis B. The rHBsAg VLPs sizes estimated by AFM between 15 and 30 nm are similar to those reported on previous transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies.

  7. Characterization of virus-like particles by atomic force microscopy in ambient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oropesa, Reinier; Ramos, Jorge R; Falcón, Viviana; Felipe, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) are attractive candidates for vaccine design since they resemble native viroids in size and morphology, but they are non-infectious due to the absence of a viral genome. The visualization of surface morphologies and structures can be used to deepen the understanding of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful tool for the visualization of soft biological samples in a nanoscale resolution. In this work we have investigated the morphology of recombinant surface antigens of hepatitis B (rHBsAg) VLPs from Cuban vaccine against hepatitis B. The rHBsAg VLPs sizes estimated by AFM between 15 and 30 nm are similar to those reported on previous transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. (paper)

  8. In situ mechanical characterization of the cell nucleus by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haijiao; Wen, Jun; Xiao, Yun; Liu, Jun; Hopyan, Sevan; Radisic, Milica; Simmons, Craig A; Sun, Yu

    2014-04-22

    The study of nuclear mechanical properties can provide insights into nuclear dynamics and its role in cellular mechanotransduction. While several methods have been developed to characterize nuclear mechanical properties, direct intracellular probing of the nucleus in situ is challenging. Here, a modified AFM (atomic force microscopy) needle penetration technique is demonstrated to mechanically characterize cell nuclei in situ. Cytoplasmic and nuclear stiffness were determined based on two different segments on the AFM indentation curves and were correlated with simultaneous confocal Z-stack microscopy reconstructions. On the basis of direct intracellular measurement, we show that the isolated nuclei from fibroblast-like cells exhibited significantly lower Young's moduli than intact nuclei in situ. We also show that there is in situ nucleus softening in the highly metastatic bladder cancer cell line T24 when compared to its less metastatic counterpart RT4. This technique has potential to become a reliable quantitative measurement tool for intracellular mechanics studies.

  9. Atomic force and confocal microscopy for the study of cortical cells cultured on silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Cui, F Z; Liu, B F; Xu, Q Y

    2007-05-01

    The primary cortical cells were selected as a model to study the adherence and neural network development on chemically roughened silicon substrates without any coatings using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The silicon substrates have a nano-range roughness (RMS) achieved by chemical etching using hydrofluoric (HF) acid. After 7 days of culturing, the neurons were observed to connect together and form dense neural networks. Furthermore, AFM results revealed that some porous structures at a few micrometer range existed between the neuron cells and the silicon substrates. It is suggested that the porous structures are made of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and play an important role in the neuronal adhesion and neurite outgrowth on the inert silicon wafers.

  10. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions of Indolicidin with Model Membranes and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    The cell membrane is the first barrier and quite often the primary target that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have to destroy or penetrate to fulfill their mission. Upon penetrating through the membrane, the peptides can further attack intracellular targets, in particular DNA. Studying the interaction of an antimicrobial peptide with a cell membrane and DNA holds keys to understanding its killing mechanisms. Commonly, these interactions are studied by using optical or scanning electron microscopy and appropriately labeled peptides. However, labeling can significantly affect the hydrophobicity, conformation, and size of the peptide, hence altering the interaction significantly. Here, we describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a label-free study of the interactions of peptides with model membranes under physiological conditions and DNA as a possible intracellular target.

  11. Atomic Force Microscopy-based Advanced Characterization of Piezoelectric, Flexoelectric, Electric, and Topographic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Dalong

    This thesis reports a novel characterization of the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects of bent nanowires/microwires (NWs/MWs) using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) or AFM-based techniques. 3D Kelvin probe microscopy (3DKPM) under a biased condition can effectively quantify piezopotential of relatively large strained microstructures in static cases. AFM-thin film transistor (AFM-TFT) design was proposed to measure the piezoelectric and flexoelectric potential on small NWs either statically or dynamically. Also, topographic and electrical properties of different nanomaterials were measured with AFM. In future, more quantitative AFM-TFT experiments could be conducted on barium titanate (BTO) NWs under different strains to quantify the flexoelectricity in the nanometer scale.

  12. Investigations of a Cretaceous limestone with spectral induced polarization and scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Sara; Sparrenbom, Charlotte; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Lindskog, Anders; Olsson, Per-Ivar; Dahlin, Torleif; Rosqvist, Håkan

    2017-02-01

    Characterization of varying bedrock properties is a common need in various contexts, ranging from large infrastructure pre-investigations to environmental protection. A direct current resistivity and time domain induced polarization (IP) survey aiming to characterize properties of a Cretaceous limestone was carried out in the Kristianstad basin, Sweden. The time domain IP data was processed with a recently developed method in order to suppress noise from the challenging urban setting in the survey area. The processing also enabled extraction of early decay times resulting in broader spectra of the time decays and inversion for Cole-Cole parameters. The aims of this study is to investigate if large-scale geoelectrical variations as well as small-scale structural and compositional variations exist within the Kristianstad limestone, and to evaluate the usefulness of Cole-Cole inverted IP data in early time ranges for bedrock characterization. The inverted sections showed variations within the limestone that could be caused by variations in texture and composition. Samples from a deep drilling in the Kristianstad basin were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the results showed that varying amounts of pyrite, glauconite and clay matrix were present at different levels in the limestone. The local high IP anomalies in the limestone could be caused by these minerals otherwise the IP responses were generally weak. There were also differences in the texture of the limestone at different levels, governed by fossil shapes and composition, proportions of calcareous cement and matrix as well as amount of silicate grains. Textural variations may have implications on the variation in Cole-Cole relaxation time and frequency factor. However, more research is needed in order to directly connect microgeometrical properties in limestone to spectral IP responses. The results from this study show that it is possible to recover

  13. Calcium hydroxylapatite treatment of human skin: evidence of collagen turnover through picrosirius red staining and circularly polarized microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerbinati N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Zerbinati,1 Alberto Calligaro2 1Department of Surgical and Morphological Sciences, University of Insubria (Varese and Polyspecialist Medical Center, Pavia, 2Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Unit of Histology and Embryology, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA, Radiesse® is a biocompatible, injectable filler for facial soft-tissue augmentation that provides volume to tissues, followed by a process of neocollagenesis for improved skin quality. Objective: To examine the effects of CaHA treatment on the molecular organization of collagen using a combination of picrosirius red staining and circularly polarized light microscopy.Methods: Five subjects received subdermal injection of 0.3 mL of CaHA in tissues scheduled for removal during abdominoplasty 2 months later. Tissue specimens from the CaHA injection site and a control untreated area were obtained from excised skin at the time of surgery. Processed tissue sections were stained with picrosirius red solution 0.1% and visualized under circularly polarized light microscopy for identification of thick mature (type I and thin newly formed (type III collagen fibers. Pixel signals from both the control and CaHA-treated areas were extracted from the images, and morphometric computerized hue analysis was performed to provide a quantitative evaluation of mature and newly formed collagen fibers.Results: Under picrosirius red staining and circularly polarized light microscopy, green/yellow areas (thin newly formed collagen type III were visible among the collagen fibers in tissue sections from the area of CaHA injection. In contrast, the majority of the collagen fibers appeared red (thick mature collagen type I in control tissues. Morphometric analysis confirmed that, following CaHA treatment, the proportion of fibers represented by thin newly formed collagen type III increased significantly (p<0.01 in comparison with the

  14. Investigation of adhesion and mechanical properties of human glioma cells by single cell force spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Laura; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Migliorini, Elisa; Palma, Anita; Pucer, Anja; Skrap, Miran; Scoles, Giacinto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma--HG--and Gasc for low-grade glioma--LG) that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG) favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  15. Local photoconductivity of microcrystalline silicon thin films measured by conductive atomic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ledinský, Martin; Fejfar, Antonín; Vetushka, Aliaksi; Stuchlík, Jiří; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kočka, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, 10-11 (2011), s. 373-375 ISSN 1862-6254 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040; GA MŠk(CZ) MEB061012; GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA MŠk LC510 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 240826 - PolySiMode Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : amorphous silicon * nanocrystalline silicon * thin films * atomic force microscopy * photoconductivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.218, year: 2011

  16. Distinction between magnesium diboride and tetraboride by kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Du-Na; Caron, Arnaud; Park, Hai Woong

    2016-01-01

    We analyze mixtures of magnesium diboride and tetraboride synthesized with magnesium powders of different shapes. To distinguish between magnesium diboride and tetraboride we use the contrast of kelvin probe force microscopy. The microstructural morphology strongly depends on the shape of the magnesium powders used in the reaction between magnesium and magnesium tetraboride to form magnesium diboride. With spherical magnesium powder an equiaxed microstructure of magnesium diboride is formed with residual magnesium tetraboride at the grain boundaries. With plate-like magnesium powders elongated magnesium diboride grains are formed. In this case, residual magnesium tetraboride is found to agglomerate.

  17. Molecular positional order in Langmuir-Blodgett films by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdieu, L.; Ronsin, O.; Chatenay, D. (Inst. Curie, Paris (France))

    1993-02-05

    Langmuir-Blodgett films of barium arachidate have been studied on both macroscopic and microscopic scales by atomic force microscopy. As prepared, the films exhibit a disordered hexagonal structure; molecularly resolved images in direct space establish a connection between the extent of the positional order and the presence of defects such as dislocations. Upon heating, the films reorganize into a more condensed state with a centered rectangular crystallographic arrangement; in this new state the films exhibit long-range positional order and unusual structural features, such as a height modulation of the arachidic acid molecules. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Implementing atomic force microscopy (AFM) for studying kinetics of gold nanoparticle's growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiev, P.; Bojinova, A.; Kostova, B.

    2013-01-01

    In a novel experimental approach Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was applied as a tool for studying the kinetics of gold nanoparticle growth. The gold nanoparticles were obtained by classical Turkevich citrate synthesis at two different temperatures. From the analysis of AFM images during...... the synthesis process the nanoparticle s' sizes were obtained. To demonstrate the applicability and the reliability of the proposed experimental approach we studied the nanoparticles growth at two different temperatures by spectrophotometric measurements and compared them with the results from AFM experimental...

  19. NMR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy characterization of hybrid organic – inorganic coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brus, Jiří; Špírková, Milena

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 220, č. 1 (2005), s. 155-164 ISSN 1022-1360. [Discussion Conference Spectroscopy of Partially Ordered Macromolecular Systems /22./. Prague, 21.07.2003-24.07.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/0735; GA AV ČR IAA4050008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * coatings and films * solid-state NMR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.913, year: 2005

  20. Surface tension effect on the mechanical properties of nanomaterials measured by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenot, Stéphane; Frétigny, Christian; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie; Nysten, Bernard

    2004-04-01

    The effect of reduced size on the elastic properties measured on silver and lead nanowires and on polypyrrole nanotubes with an outer diameter ranging between 30 and 250 nm is presented and discussed. Resonant-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to measure their apparent elastic modulus. The measured modulus of the nanomaterials with smaller diameters is significantly higher than that of the larger ones. The latter is comparable to the macroscopic modulus of the materials. The increase of the apparent elastic modulus for the smaller diameters is attributed to surface tension effects. The surface tension of the probed material may be experimentally determined from these AFM measurements.

  1. Note: Fast imaging of DNA in atomic force microscopy enabled by a local raster scan algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Andersson, Sean B

    2014-06-01

    Approaches to high-speed atomic force microscopy typically involve some combination of novel mechanical design to increase the physical bandwidth and advanced controllers to take maximum advantage of the physical capabilities. For certain classes of samples, however, imaging time can be reduced on standard instruments by reducing the amount of measurement that is performed to image the sample. One such technique is the local raster scan algorithm, developed for imaging of string-like samples. Here we provide experimental results on the use of this technique to image DNA samples, demonstrating the efficacy of the scheme and illustrating the order-of-magnitude improvement in imaging time that it provides.

  2. Electrostatic assembly of protein lysozyme on DNA visualized by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tao; Wei Gang; Li Zhuang

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to study the assembly of protein lysozyme on DNA molecule. Based on the electrostatic interaction, the positively charged lysozyme can easily bind onto the negatively charged DNA molecule surface. The protein molecules appear as globular objects on the DNA scaffold, which are distinguishable in the AFM images. At the same time, lysozyme molecules can be assembled onto DNA as dense or sporadic pattern by varying the protein concentration. This work may provide fundamental aspects for building protein nanostructures and studying of DNA-protein interaction

  3. The role of the cantilever in Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Elias

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of the cantilever in quantitative Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM is rigorously analyzed. We use the boundary element method to calculate the point spread function of the measuring probe: Tip and cantilever. The calculations show that the cantilever has a very strong effect on the absolute value of the measured contact potential difference even under ultra-high vacuum conditions, and we demonstrate a good agreement between our model and KPFM measurements in ultra-high vacuum of NaCl monolayers grown on Cu(111. The effect of the oscillating cantilever shape on the KPFM resolution and sensitivity has been calculated and found to be relatively small.

  4. Optimizing atomic force microscopy for characterization of diamond-protein interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rezek, Bohuslav; Ukraintsev, Egor; Kromka, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, Apr. (2011), 337/1-337/10 ISSN 1931-7573 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0794; GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : atomic force microscopy (AFM) * nanocrystalline diamond * oxygen-terminated diamond * hydrogen-terminated diamond * proteins * fetal bovine serum (FBS) Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.726, year: 2011

  5. Atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation study of onion abaxial epidermis walls in aqueous environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoning; Tittmann, Bernhard [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Kim, Seong H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    An atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation method was employed to study how the structure of cellulose microfibril packing and matrix polymers affect elastic modulus of fully hydrated primary plant cell walls. The isolated, single-layered abaxial epidermis cell wall of an onion bulb was used as a test system since the cellulose microfibril packing in this cell wall is known to vary systematically from inside to outside scales and the most abundant matrix polymer, pectin, can easily be altered through simple chemical treatments such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and calcium ions. Experimental results showed that the pectin network variation has significant impacts on the cell wall modulus, and not the cellulose microfibril packing.

  6. Direct visualization of ligand-protein interactions using atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Neish, Calum S; Martin, Ian L; Henderson, Robert M; Edwardson, J Michael

    2002-01-01

    Streptavidin is a 60-kDa tetramer which binds four molecules of biotin with extremely high affinity (KA∼1014 M−1). We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize this ligand-protein interaction directly.Biotin was tagged with a short (152-basepair; 50-nm) DNA rod and incubated with streptavidin. The resulting complexes were then imaged by AFM. The molecular volume of streptavidin calculated from the dimensions of the protein particles (105±3 nm3) was in close agreement with the value...

  7. Study on orientation mechanisms of poly(vinylidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene) molecules aligned by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi; Horiuchi, Toshihisa; Ishida, Kenji; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a molecular orientation control technique for polymers utilizing contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). In this paper, we studied the molecular alignment mechanism of this technique by applying it to poly(vinylidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)). The resultant alignment and formed crystal size were strongly dependent on the temperature during the modification. They also depended on the scan line spacing of the modification. These results made the alignment mechanism clear. The obtained molecular alignment was stable against the heat treatment even at the temperatures just below T m

  8. Frequency, amplitude, and phase measurements in contact resonance atomic force microscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Stan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The resonance frequency, amplitude, and phase response of the first two eigenmodes of two contact-resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM configurations, which differ in the method used to excite the system (cantilever base vs sample excitation, are analyzed in this work. Similarities and differences in the observables of the cantilever dynamics, as well as the different effect of the tip–sample contact properties on those observables in each configuration are discussed. Finally, the expected accuracy of CR-AFM using phase-locked loop detection is investigated and quantification of the typical errors incurred during measurements is provided.

  9. The application of neutron reflectometry and atomic force microscopy in the study of corrosion inhibitor films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Douglas; Blom, Annabelle; Bailey, Stuart; Nelson, Andrew; Schulz, Jamie; De Marco, Roland; Kinsella, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion inhibitor molecules function by adsorbing to a steel surface and thus prevent oxidation of the metal. The interfacial structures formed by a range of corrosion inhibitor molecules have been investigated by in situ measurements based on atomic force microscopy and neutron reflectometry. Inhibitors investigated include molecules cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC), dodecyl pyridinium chloride (DPC), 1-hydroxyethyl-2-oleic imidazoline (OHEI) and cetyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (CDMBAC). This has shown that the inhibitor molecules adsorb onto a surface in micellar structures. Corrosion measurements confirmed that maximum inhibition efficiency coincides with the solution critical micelle concentration

  10. Circularly polarized light emission in scanning tunneling microscopy of magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apell, S.P.; Penn, D.R.; Johansson, P.

    2000-01-01

    Light is produced when a scanning tunneling microscope is used to probe a metal surface. Recent experiments on cobalt utilizing a tungsten tip found that the light is circularly polarized; the sense of circular polarization depends on the direction of the sample magnetization, and the degree of polarization is of order 10%. This raises the possibility of constructing a magnetic microscope with very good spatial resolution. We present a theory of this effect for iron and cobalt and find a degree of polarization of order 0.1%. This is in disagreement with the experiments on cobalt as well as previous theoretical work which found order of magnitude agreement with the experimental results. However, a recent experiment on iron showed 0.0±2%. We predict that the use of a silver tip would increase the degree of circular polarization for a range of photon energies

  11. Investigating the crystal growth behavior of biodegradable polymer blend thin films using in situ atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malwela, T

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the crystal growth behavior of biodegradable polylactide (PLA)/poly[(butylene succinate)-co-adipate] (PBSA) blend thin films using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Currently, polymer thin films have received increased research...

  12. Correction: Number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate: a transform theory for atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ken-Ichi; Liang, Yunfeng; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Kota; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Onishi, Hiroshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-08-07

    Correction for 'Number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate: a transform theory for atomic force microscopy' by Ken-ichi Amano et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 15534-15544.

  13. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  14. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G.; Abboud, Zeinab; Bressler, David C.

    2014-09-01

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  15. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G. [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Abboud, Zeinab [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Bressler, David C., E-mail: david.bressler@ualberta.ca [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada)

    2014-09-30

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  16. Metrology of electromagnetic static actuation of MEMS microbridge using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczała, M; Majstrzyk, W; Sierakowski, A; Dobrowolski, R; Grabiec, P; Gotszalk, T

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for characterization and calibration of static deflection of electromagnetically and/or thermally actuated micro-electromechanical (MEMS) bridge. The investigated MEMS structure is formed by a silicon nitride bridge and a thin film metal path enabling electromagnetic and/or thermal deflection actuation. We present how static microbridge deflection can be measured using contact mode AFM technology with resolution of 0.05nm in the range of up to tens of nm. We also analyze, for very small structure deflections and under defined and controlled load force varied in the range up to ca. 32nN, properties of thermal and electromagnetical microbridge deflection actuation schemes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Topography and Mechanical Property Mapping of International Simple Glass Surfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Nanomechanical Peak Force (PF-QNM) TappingModeTM atomic force microscopy measurements are presented for the first time on polished glass surfaces. The PF-QNM technique allows for topography and mechanical property information to be measured simultaneously at each pixel. Results for the international simple glass which represents a simplified version of SON68 glass suggests an average Young s modulus of 78.8 15.1 GPa is within the experimental error of the modulus measured for SON68 glass (83.6 2 GPa) with conventional approaches. Application of the PF-QNM technique will be extended to in situ glass corrosion experiments with the goal of gaining atomic-scale insights into altered layer development by exploiting the mechanical property differences that exist between silica gel (e.g., altered layer) and pristine glass surface.

  18. Electron transport through supported biomembranes at the nanoscale by conductive atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casuso, I; Fumagalli, L; Samitier, J; Padros, E; Reggiani, L; Akimov, V; Gomila, G

    2007-01-01

    We present a reliable methodology to perform electron transport measurements at the nanoscale on supported biomembranes by conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). It allows measurement of both (a) non-destructive conductive maps and (b) force controlled current-voltage characteristics in wide voltage bias range in a reproducible way. Tests experiments were performed on purple membrane monolayers, a two-dimensional (2D) crystal lattice of the transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. Non-destructive conductive images show uniform conductivity of the membrane with isolated nanometric conduction defects. Current-voltage characteristics under different compression conditions show non-resonant tunneling electron transport properties, with two different conduction regimes as a function of the applied bias, in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. This methodology opens the possibility for a detailed study of electron transport properties of supported biological membranes, and of soft materials in general

  19. Height fluctuations and intermittency of V sub 2 O sub 5 films by atomic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Iraji-Zad, A; Tabar, M R R; Allaei, S M V

    2003-01-01

    The spatial scaling law and intermittency of the V sub 2 O sub 5 surface roughness has been investigated by atomic force microscopy. The intermittency of the height fluctuations has been checked by two different methods, first, by measuring the scaling exponent of the q-th moment of height-difference fluctuations i.e. C sub q = (|h(x sub 1) - h(x sub 2)|), and second, by defining the generating function Z(q, N) and generalized multi-fractal dimension D sub q. These methods predict that there is no intermittency in the height fluctuations. The observed roughness and dynamical exponents can be explained by numerical simulation on the basis of the forced Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation.

  20. Passive microrheology of soft materials with atomic force microscopy: A wavelet-based spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Torres, C.; Streppa, L. [CNRS, UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, Université de Lyon, 69007 Lyon (France); Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F. [CNRS, UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, Université de Lyon, 69007 Lyon (France); CNRS, UMR5798, Laboratoire Ondes et Matière d' Aquitaine, Université de Bordeaux, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence (France); Argoul, P. [Université Paris-Est, Ecole des Ponts ParisTech, SDOA, MAST, IFSTTAR, 14-20 Bd Newton, Cité Descartes, 77420 Champs sur Marne (France)

    2016-01-18

    Compared to active microrheology where a known force or modulation is periodically imposed to a soft material, passive microrheology relies on the spectral analysis of the spontaneous motion of tracers inherent or external to the material. Passive microrheology studies of soft or living materials with atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever tips are rather rare because, in the spectral densities, the rheological response of the materials is hardly distinguishable from other sources of random or periodic perturbations. To circumvent this difficulty, we propose here a wavelet-based decomposition of AFM cantilever tip fluctuations and we show that when applying this multi-scale method to soft polymer layers and to living myoblasts, the structural damping exponents of these soft materials can be retrieved.

  1. Mechanical properties of cancer cells depend on number of passages: Atomic force microscopy indentation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, Maxim E.; Guz, Natalia V.; Sokolov, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Here we investigate one of the key questions in cell biology, if the properties of cell lines depend on the number of passages in-vitro. It is generally assumed that the change of cell properties (phenotypic drift) is insignificant when the number of passages is low (cell body and parameters of the pericellular brush layer from indentation force curves, which are recorded by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using this method, we tested the change of the cell properties of human cancer breast epithelial cell line, MCF-7 (ATCC® HTB-22™), within the passages between 2 and 10. In contrast to the previous expectations, we observed a substantial transient change of the elastic modulus of the cell body during the first four passages (up to 4 times). The changes in the parameters of the pericellular coat were less dramatic (up to 2 times) but still statistically significant.

  2. The influence of physical and physiological cues on atomic force microscopy-based cell stiffness assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chiou

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All of these cues show a significant influence on the cell elasticity assessment. Sharp AFM tips create a two-fold increase in the value of the effective Young's modulus (E(eff relative to that of the blunt tips. Higher indenting force at the same loading rate generates higher estimated cell elasticity. Increasing the operation temperature of the AFM leads to decreases in the cell stiffness because the structure of actin filaments becomes disorganized. The physiological cues include the presence of fetal bovine serum or extracellular matrix-coated surfaces, the culture passage number, and the culture density. Both fetal bovine serum and the extracellular matrix are critical for cells to maintain the integrity of actin filaments and consequently exhibit higher elasticity. Unlike primary cells, mouse kidney progenitor cells can be passaged and maintain their morphology and elasticity for a very long period without a senescence phenotype. Finally, cell elasticity increases with increasing culture density only in MDCK epithelial cells. In summary, for researchers who use AFM to assess cell elasticity, our results provide basic and significant information about the suitable selection of physical and physiological cues.

  3. Reconstruction of Kelvin probe force microscopy image with experimentally calibrated point spread function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Fei; Jiang, Minlin; Tao, Quan; Wei, Fanan; Li, Guangyong

    2017-03-01

    A Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) image is sometimes difficult to interpret because it is a blurred representation of the true surface potential (SP) distribution of the materials under test. The reason for the blurring is that KPFM relies on the detection of electrostatic force, which is a long-range force compared to other surface forces. Usually, KPFM imaging model is described as the convolution of the true SP distribution of the sample with an intrinsic point spread function (PSF) of the measurement system. To restore the true SP signals from the blurred ones, the intrinsic PSF of the system is needed. In this work, we present a way to experimentally calibrate the PSF of the KPFM system. Taking the actual probe shape and experimental parameters into consideration, this calibration method leads to a more accurate PSF than the ones obtained from simulations. Moreover, a nonlinear reconstruction algorithm based on total variation (TV) regularization is applied to KPFM measurement to reverse the blurring caused by PSF during KPFM imaging process; as a result, noises are reduced and the fidelity of SP signals is improved.

  4. Atomic force microscopy as a nanoscience tool in rational food design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Victor J; Woodward, Nicola C; Gunning, Allan P

    2011-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a nanoscience tool that has been used to provide new information on the molecular structure of food materials. As an imaging tool it has led to solutions to previously intractable problems in food science. This type of information can provide a basis for tailoring food structures to optimise functional behaviour. Such an approach will be illustrated by indicating how a basic understanding of the role of interfacial stability in complex foods systems can be extended to understand how such interfacial structures behave on digestion, and how this in turn suggests routes for the rational design of processed food structures to modify lipolysis and control fat intake. As a force transducer AFM can be used to probe interactions between food structures such as emulsion droplets at the colloidal level. This use of force spectroscopy will be illustrated through showing how it allows the effect of the structural modification of interfacial structures on colloidal interactions to be probed in model emulsion systems. Direct studies on interactions between colliding soft, deformable droplets reveal new types of interactions unique to deformable particles that can be exploited to manipulate the behaviour of processed or natural emulsion structures involved in digestion processes. Force spectroscopy can be adapted to probe specific intermolecular interactions, and this application of the technique will be illustrated through its use to test molecular hypotheses for the bioactivity of modified pectin molecules. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. On the tip calibration for accurate modulus measurement by contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passeri, D., E-mail: daniele.passeri@uniroma1.it [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, University of Rome Sapienza, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Rossi, M. [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, University of Rome Sapienza, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Centro di Ricerca per le Nanotecnologie Applicate all' Ingegneria della Sapienza (CNIS), University of Rome Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Vlassak, J.J. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Accurate quantitative elastic modulus measurements using contact resonance atomic force microscopy require the calibration of geometrical and mechanical properties of the tip as well as the choice of a suitable model for describing the cantilever-tip-sample system. In this work, we demonstrate with both simulations and experiments that the choice of the model influences the results of the calibration. Neglecting lateral force results in the underestimation of the tip indentation modulus and in the overestimation of the tip-sample contact radius. We propose a new approach to the calibration and data analysis, where lateral forces and cantilever inclination are neglected (which simplifies the calculations) and the tip parameters are assumed as fictitious. - Highlights: ► A calibration procedure is proposed for quantitative contact resonance AFM. ► It allows the use of simple analytical model that neglects lateral forces. ► Tip parameters are used as fictitious parameters. ► The approach is demonstrated with simulations and experiments.

  6. Multi-MHz micro-electro-mechanical sensors for atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, Bernard; Salvetat, Jean-Paul; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Théron, Didier; Aimé, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Silicon ring-shaped micro-electro-mechanical resonators have been fabricated and used as probes for dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. They offer resotnance frequency above 10 MHz, which is notably greater than that of usual cantilevers and quartz-based AFM probes. On-chip electrical actuation and readout of the tip oscillation are obtained by means of built-in capacitive transducers. Displacement and force resolutions have been determined from noise analysis at 1.5 fm/√Hz and 0.4 pN/√Hz, respectively. Despite the high effective stiffness of the probes, the tip-surface interaction force is kept below 1 nN by using vibration amplitude significantly below 100 pm and setpoint close to the free vibration conditions. Imaging capabilities in amplitude- and frequency-modulation AFM modes have been demonstrated on block copolymer surfaces. Z-spectroscopy experiments revealed that the tip is vibrating in permanent contact with the viscoelastic material, with a pinned contact line. Results are compared to those obtained with commercial AFM cantilevers driven at large amplitudes (>10 nm). - Highlights: • Silicon MEMS resonators are used as AFM probes above 10 MHz. • Integrated capacitive transducers drive and sense sub-nanometer tip oscillation. • Force resolution is below 1 pN/√Hz. • Block copolymer surface is imaged using AM and FM AFM modes. • Probes are operated at small vibration amplitude in permanent viscoelastic contact.

  7. Multi-MHz micro-electro-mechanical sensors for atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legrand, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.legrand@laas.fr [LAAS-CNRS, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Salvetat, Jean-Paul [CRPP, 115 avenue Schweitzer, F-33600 Pessac (France); Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Théron, Didier [IEMN, avenue Henri Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Aimé, Jean-Pierre [CBMN, allée Geoffroy Saint Hilaire, Bât. B14, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2017-04-15

    Silicon ring-shaped micro-electro-mechanical resonators have been fabricated and used as probes for dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. They offer resotnance frequency above 10 MHz, which is notably greater than that of usual cantilevers and quartz-based AFM probes. On-chip electrical actuation and readout of the tip oscillation are obtained by means of built-in capacitive transducers. Displacement and force resolutions have been determined from noise analysis at 1.5 fm/√Hz and 0.4 pN/√Hz, respectively. Despite the high effective stiffness of the probes, the tip-surface interaction force is kept below 1 nN by using vibration amplitude significantly below 100 pm and setpoint close to the free vibration conditions. Imaging capabilities in amplitude- and frequency-modulation AFM modes have been demonstrated on block copolymer surfaces. Z-spectroscopy experiments revealed that the tip is vibrating in permanent contact with the viscoelastic material, with a pinned contact line. Results are compared to those obtained with commercial AFM cantilevers driven at large amplitudes (>10 nm). - Highlights: • Silicon MEMS resonators are used as AFM probes above 10 MHz. • Integrated capacitive transducers drive and sense sub-nanometer tip oscillation. • Force resolution is below 1 pN/√Hz. • Block copolymer surface is imaged using AM and FM AFM modes. • Probes are operated at small vibration amplitude in permanent viscoelastic contact.

  8. Nanophotonic force microscopy: characterizing particle-surface interactions using near-field photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Perry; Kang, Pilgyu; O'Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2015-02-11

    Direct measurements of particle-surface interactions are important for characterizing the stability and behavior of colloidal and nanoparticle suspensions. Current techniques are limited in their ability to measure pico-Newton scale interaction forces on submicrometer particles due to signal detection limits and thermal noise. Here we present a new technique for making measurements in this regime, which we refer to as nanophotonic force microscopy. Using a photonic crystal resonator, we generate a strongly localized region of exponentially decaying, near-field light that allows us to confine small particles close to a surface. From the statistical distribution of the light intensity scattered by the particle we are able to map out the potential well of the trap and directly quantify the repulsive force between the nanoparticle and the surface. As shown in this Letter, our technique is not limited by thermal noise, and therefore, we are able to resolve interaction forces smaller than 1 pN on dielectric particles as small as 100 nm in diameter.

  9. Kelvin probe force microscopy for characterizing doped semiconductors for future sensor applications in nano- and biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Heidemarie; Habicht, Stefan; Feste, Sebastian; Müller, Anne-Dorothea; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is one of the most promising non-contact electrical nanometrology techniques to characterize doped semiconductors. By applying a recently introduced explanation of measured KPFM signals, we show the applicability of KPFM to determine and control surface-near electrostatic forces in planar doped silicon and in doped silicon nanostructures. Surface-near electrostatic forces may be used for the immobilization of nano- and biomaterials in future sensor applications in nano- and biotechnology. Additionally, the influence of the electrostatic potential distribution in doped semiconductor nanostructures, e.g. in horizontal Si nanowires, and its influence on the surface-near electrostatic forces are discussed. It is explained how drift and diffusion of injected electrons and holes in intrinsic electric fields influence the detected KPFM signal. For example KPFM is successfully employed to locate p + p and n + p junctions along B-doped and As-doped p-Si nanowires, respectively. As an outlook the physical immobilization and the transport of biomaterials above arrays of separately addressable doped semiconductor cells will be discussed.

  10. Investigating the adsorption of the gemini surfactant "12-2-12" onto mica using atomic force microscopy and surface force apparatus measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fielden, ML; Claesson, PM; Verrall, RE

    1999-01-01

    The adsorption of the cationic gemini surfactant 1,2-bis(n-dodecyldimethylammonium)ethane dibromide on mica was followed by measuring forces between mica surfaces and by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. The surface charge was found to be neutralized at total surfactant concentrations between 8

  11. Binding studies of costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone with HSA by spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Wenhua; Li Nana; Chen Gaopan; Xu Yanping; Chen Yaowen; Hu Shunlin; Hu Zhide

    2011-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), a major plasma protein and plasma-derived therapeutic, interacts with a wide variety of drugs and native plasma metabolites. In this study the interactions of costunolide (CE) and dehydrocostuslactone (DE) with HSA were investigated by molecule modeling, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and different optical techniques. In the mechanism discussion, it was proved that fluorescence quenching of HSA by both of the drugs is a result of the formation of drug-HSA complexes. Binding parameters for the reactions were determined according to the Stern-Volmer equation and static quenching. The results of thermodynamic parameters ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , and ΔS 0 at different temperatures indicated that hydrogen bonding interactions play a major role in the drug-HSA associations process. The binding properties were further studied by quantitative analysis of CD, FTIR, and Raman spectra. Furthermore, AFM results showed that the dimension of HSA molecules became more swollen after binding with the drugs. - Highlights: → Interactions of costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone with HSA have been investigated for the first time. → Raman spectra were used to analyze the drug-HSA interactions. → Atomic force microscopy has been used to study the topography change of HSA by addition of the drugs. → These results are important for the drugs containing costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone distribution and metabolism.

  12. Nanoscale Surface Photovoltage Mapping of 2D Materials and Heterostructures by Illuminated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shearer, Melinda J.

    2018-02-01

    Nanomaterials are interesting for a variety of applications, such as optoelectronics and photovoltaics. However, they often have spatial heterogeneity, i.e. composition change or physical change in the topography or structure, which can lead to varying properties that would influence their applications. New techniques must be developed to understand and correlate spatial heterogeneity with changes in electronic properties. Here we highlight the technique of surface photovoltage-Kelvin probe force microscopy (SPV-KFM), which is a modified version of non-contact atomic force microscopy capable of imaging not only the topography and surface potential, but also the surface photovoltage on the nanoscale. We demonstrate its utility in probing monolayer WSe2-MoS2 lateral heterostructures, which form an ultrathin p-n junction promising for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. We show surface photovoltage maps highlighting the different photoresponse of the two material regions as a result of the effective charge separation across this junction. Additionally, we study the variations between different heterostructure flakes and emphasize the importance of controlling the synthesis and transfer of these materials to obtain consistent properties and measurements.

  13. Dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy techniques for size determination of polyurethane nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giehl Zanetti-Ramos, Betina [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)], E-mail: betinagzramos@pq.cnpq.br; Beddin Fritzen-Garcia, Mauricia [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil); Schweitzer de Oliveira, Cristian; Avelino Pasa, Andre [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos e Superficie, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Soldi, Valdir [Grupo de Estudos em Materiais Polimericos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borsali, Redouane [Centre de Recherche sur les Macromolecules Vegetales CERMAV/CNRS, 38041 - Grenoble (France); Creczynski-Pasa, Tania Beatriz [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)

    2009-03-01

    Nanoparticles have applications in various industrial fields principally in drug delivery. Nowadays, there are several processes for manufacturing colloidal polymeric systems and methods of preparation as well as of characterization. In this work, Dynamic Light Scattering and Atomic Force Microscopy techniques were used to characterize polyurethane nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by miniemulsion technique. The lipophilic monomers, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and natural triol, were emulsified in water containing surfactant. In some formulations the poly(ethylene glycol) was used as co-monomer to obtain the hydrophilic and pegylated nanoparticles. Polyurethane nanoparticles observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) were spherical with diameter around 209 nm for nanoparticles prepared without PEG. From AFM imaging two populations of nanoparticles were observed in the formulation prepared with PEG (218 and 127 nm) while dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed a monodisperse size distribution around 250 nm of diameters for both formulations. The polydispersity index of the formulations and the experimental procedures could influence the particle size determination with these techniques.

  14. The temperature dependence of cell mechanics measured by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunyer, R; Trepat, X; Farré, R; Navajas, D; Fredberg, J J

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex polymer network that regulates the structural stability of living cells. Although the cytoskeleton plays a key role in many important cell functions, the mechanisms that regulate its mechanical behaviour are poorly understood. Potential mechanisms include the entropic elasticity of cytoskeletal filaments, glassy-like inelastic rearrangements of cross-linking proteins and the activity of contractile molecular motors that sets the tensional stress (prestress) borne by the cytoskeleton filaments. The contribution of these mechanisms can be assessed by studying how cell mechanics depends on temperature. The aim of this work was to elucidate the effect of temperature on cell mechanics using atomic force microscopy. We measured the complex shear modulus (G*) of human alveolar epithelial cells over a wide frequency range (0.1–25.6 Hz) at different temperatures (13–37 °C). In addition, we probed cell prestress by mapping the contractile forces that cells exert on the substrate by means of traction microscopy. To assess the role of actomyosin contraction in the temperature-induced changes in G* and cell prestress, we inhibited the Rho kinase pathway of the myosin light chain phosphorylation with Y-27632. Our results show that with increasing temperature, cells become stiffer and more solid-like. Cell prestress also increases with temperature. Inhibiting actomyosin contraction attenuated the temperature dependence of G* and prestress. We conclude that the dependence of cell mechanics with temperature is dominated by the contractile activity of molecular motors

  15. DNA adsorption and desorption on mica surface studied by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lanlan; Zhao Dongxu; Zhang Yue; Xu Fugang; Li Zhuang

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of DNA molecules on mica surface and the following desorption of DNA molecules at ethanol-mica interface were studied using atomic force microscopy. By changing DNA concentration, different morphologies on mica surface have been observed. A very uniform and orderly monolayer of DNA molecules was constructed on the mica surface with a DNA concentration of 30 ng/μL. When the samples were immersed into ethanol for about 15 min, various desorption degree of DNA from mica (0-99%) was achieved. It was found that with the increase of DNA concentration, the desorption degree of DNA from the mica at ethanol-mica interface decreased. And when the uniform and orderly DNA monolayers were formed on the mica surface, almost no DNA molecule desorbed from the mica surface in this process. The results indicated that the uniform and orderly DNA monolayer is one of the most stable DNA structures formed on the mica surface. In addition, we have studied the structure change of DNA molecules after desorbed from the mica surface with atomic force microscopy, and found that the desorption might be ascribed to the ethanol-induced DNA condensation.

  16. Visualising the Micro World of Chemical/Geochemical Interactions Using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, G.M.; Sorbie, K.S.

    1996-12-31

    Scanning force microscopy, in particular AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy), provides a particular useful and interesting tool for the examination of surface structure at the near-atomic level. AFM is particularly well suited to the study of interactions at the surface in aqueous solutions using real time in-situ measurements. In this paper there is presented AFM images showing in situ crystal growth from supersaturated BaSO{sub 4} solutions onto the surface of barite. Growth structures in the form of spiral crystal growth features, presumably originating from screw dislocations, are illustrated. AFM images of novel scale crystal growth inhibition experiments are presented. Examination of the manner in which generically different species adsorb onto growth structures may help to explain mechanistic differences in the way which different inhibitor species perform against barium sulphate scale formation. Adsorption of polyacrylamide species onto mica surfaces have been viewed. The general utility of AFM to a number of other common surface interactions in oil field chemistry will be discussed. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Magnetic anisotropy considerations in magnetic force microscopy studies of single superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocera, Tanya M; Agarwal, Gunjan; Chen Jun; Murray, Christopher B

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNs) have become increasingly important in applications ranging from solid state memory devices to biomedical diagnostic and therapeutic tools. However, detection and characterization of the small and unstable magnetic moment of an SPN at the single particle level remains a challenge. Further, depending on their physical shape, crystalline structure or orientation, SPNs may also possess magnetic anisotropy, which can govern the extent to which their magnetic moments can align with an externally applied magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate how we can exploit the magnetic anisotropy of SPNs to enable uniform, highly-sensitive detection of single SPNs using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) in ambient air. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and analytical transmission electron microscopy techniques are utilized to characterize the collective magnetic behavior, morphology and composition of the SPNs. Our results show how the consideration of magnetic anisotropy can enhance the ability of MFM to detect single SPNs at ambient room temperature with high force sensitivity and spatial resolution. (paper)

  18. Atomic force microscopy study of the antibacterial effect of fosfomycin on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethirajan, Suresh; DiCicco, Matthew

    2014-08-01

    The influence of fosfomycin on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) as the target cell was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nanoscale images of the effects of the antibiotic fosfomycin on this gram-positive bacterium's cell were obtained in situ without fixing agents. Our study has demonstrated substantial morphological and topographical differences between the control and fosfomycin-treated MRSP cells. The AFM investigations further revealed the rough surface morphology and a 30 % shrinkage in size of the fosfomycin-treated cell and the leakage of cytoplasmic components from the cell. The damage of cell membrane integrity and the cell surface degradation as observed elaborates the antibacterial activity of fosfomycin. The AFM image analysis also reveals that the fosfomycin inhibits cell division, and prevents the adhesion on the surface discouraging the biofilm attachment. The micro-titre plate assay results conform to the atomic force microscopy image analysis. This is the first visual demonstration of the effect of fosfomycin on MRSP cells.

  19. Atomic force microscopy analysis of synthetic membranes applied in release studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olejnik, Anna; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We compare eight synthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy. • We predict the behavior of membranes in the release experiments. • The polymeric synthetic membranes varied in shape and size. • We detect substructures in pores of cellulose esters and nylon membranes. • Substructures limit the release rate of active compound. - Abstract: Synthetic membranes are commonly used in drug release studies and are applied mostly in quality control. They contain pores through which the drug can be diffused directly into the receptor fluid. Investigation of synthetic membranes permits determination of their structure and characterization of their properties. We suggest that the preliminary characterization of the membranes can be relevant to the interpretation of the release results. The aim of this study was to compare eight synthetic membranes by using atomic force microscopy in order to predict and understand their behavior in the release experiments. The results proved that polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was not suitable for the release study of tetrapeptide due to its hydrophobic nature, thickness and the specific structure with high trapezoid shaped blocks. The additional substructures in pores of mixed cellulose esters and nylon membranes detected by AFM influenced the diffusion rate of the active compound. These findings indicate that the selection of the membrane for the release studies should be performed cautiously by taking into consideration the membrane properties and by analyzing them prior the experiment.

  20. Study of Collagen Birefringence in Different Grades of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using Picrosirius Red and Polarized Light Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillai Arun Gopinathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The present study was done to evaluate birefringence pattern of collagen fibres in different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma using Picrosirius red stain and polarization microscopy and to determine if there is a change in collagen fibres between different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods. Picrosirius red stained 5 μm thick sections of previously diagnosed different grades of squamous cell carcinoma and normal oral mucosa were studied under polarization microscopy for arrangement as well as birefringence of collagen fibres around tumour islands. Results. It was found that thin collagen fibres increased and thick collagen fibres decreased with dedifferentiation of OSCC (P<0.0001 . It was observed that there was change in polarization colours of thick fibres from yellowish orange to greenish yellow with dedifferentiation of OSCC indicating loosely packed fibres (P<0.0001. Conclusion. There was a gradual change of birefringence of collagen from yellowish orange to greenish yellow from well to poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, indicating that there is a change from mature form of collagen to immature form as tumour progresses. Studying collagen fibres with Picrosirius red for stromal changes around tumour islands along with routine staining may help in predicting the prognosis of tumour.

  1. Quantitative analysis with advanced compensated polarized light microscopy on wavelength dependence of linear birefringence of single crystals causing arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanabe, Akifumi; Tanaka, Masahito; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Asahi, Toru

    2014-07-01

    To improve our ability to identify single crystals causing arthritis, we have developed a practical measurement system of polarized light microscopy called advanced compensated polarized light microscopy (A-CPLM). The A-CPLM system is constructed by employing a conventional phase retardation plate, an optical fibre and a charge-coupled device spectrometer in a polarized light microscope. We applied the A-CPLM system to measure linear birefringence (LB) in the visible region, which is an optical anisotropic property, for tiny single crystals causing arthritis, i.e. monosodium urate monohydrate (MSUM) and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The A-CPLM system performance was evaluated by comparing the obtained experimental data using the A-CPLM system with (i) literature data for a standard sample, MgF2, and (ii) experimental data obtained using an established optical method, high-accuracy universal polarimeter, for the MSUM. The A-CPLM system was found to be applicable for measuring the LB spectra of the single crystals of MSUM and CPPD, which cause arthritis, in the visible regions. We quantitatively reveal the large difference in LB between MSUM and CPPD crystals. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the A-CPLM system for distinguishing the crystals causing arthritis.

  2. Measuring graphene adhesion using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhu, Yong

    2015-06-01

    Van der Waals adhesion between graphene and various substrates has an important impact on the physical properties, device applications and nanomanufacturing processes of graphene. Here we report a general, high-throughput and reliable method that can measure adhesion energies between ultraflat graphene and a broad range of materials using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip. In our experiments, only van der Waals force between the tip and a graphene flake is measured. The Maugis-Dugdale theory is employed to convert the measured adhesion force using AFM to the adhesion energy. The ultraflatness of monolayer graphene on mica eliminates the effect of graphene surface roughness on the adhesion, while roughness of the microsphere tip is addressed by the modified Rumpf model. Adhesion energies of monolayer graphene to SiO2 and Cu are obtained as 0.46 and 0.75 J m-2, respectively. This work provides valuable insight into the mechanism of graphene adhesion and can readily extend to the adhesion measurement for other 2D nanomaterials.Van der Waals adhesion between graphene and various substrates has an important impact on the physical properties, device applications and nanomanufacturing processes of graphene. Here we report a general, high-throughput and reliable method that can measure adhesion energies between ultraflat graphene and a broad range of materials using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip. In our experiments, only van der Waals force between the tip and a graphene flake is measured. The Maugis-Dugdale theory is employed to convert the measured adhesion force using AFM to the adhesion energy. The ultraflatness of monolayer graphene on mica eliminates the effect of graphene surface roughness on the adhesion, while roughness of the microsphere tip is addressed by the modified Rumpf model. Adhesion energies of monolayer graphene to SiO2 and Cu are obtained as 0.46 and 0.75 J m-2, respectively. This work provides valuable insight into the

  3. Incremental lines in root cementum of human teeth: An approach to their role in age estimation using polarizing microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Pooja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Age estimation is an important factor in the identification of an individual in forensic science. The hard tissues of the human dentition are able to resist decay and degradation long after other tissues are lost. This resistance has made teeth useful indicators for age calculation. Recent research indicates that tooth cementum annulations (TCA may be used more reliably than any other morphological or histological traits of the adult skeleton for age estimation. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between age and the number of incremental lines in human dental cementum and to ascertain the best method of studying cementum with respect to different forms of microscopy. Thirty nonrestorable teeth were extracted from 20 people, and longitudinal ground section of each tooth was prepared. Photomicrographs of the area at the junction of apical and middle third of the root under light and polarized microscope were taken. The cementum was composed of multiple light and dark bands that were counted on the photomicrograph with the help of image analysis software and added to the average eruption time of individual tooth. The predicted age of the individual was thus obtained. Results showed a significant correlation between the predicted age and actual chronological age of the individual. These data indicate that quantitation of cementum annuli is a moderately reliable means for age estimation in humans and polarizing microscopy is a better means of visualizing incremental lines of cementum compared to light microscopy.

  4. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Ryan, E-mail: rbwagner@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Pittendrigh, Barry R. [Department of Entomology, University of Illinois, Champaign (United States); Raman, Arvind, E-mail: raman@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the wing membrane of Drosophila melanogaster with atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the structure, elasticity, and adhesion on the wing membrane in air and nitrogen environments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results provide insight into the nature of the wing membrane enabling the development of biomimetic surface and micro air vehicles. - Abstract: Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10-20 {mu}m long, 0.5-1 {mu}m diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30-60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m{sup 2}, these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  5. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied the wing membrane of Drosophila melanogaster with atomic force microscopy. ► We report the structure, elasticity, and adhesion on the wing membrane in air and nitrogen environments. ► Results provide insight into the nature of the wing membrane enabling the development of biomimetic surface and micro air vehicles. - Abstract: Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10–20 μm long, 0.5–1 μm diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30–60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m 2 , these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  6. Acid-base properties and the chemical imaging of surface-bound functional groups studied with scanning force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegte, E.W.; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present a scanning force microscopy (SFM) study on electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions between chemically modified SFM probes and surface functional groups. pH-dependent adhesion force measurements in aqueous media between various ionizable functional groups showed a

  7. Peculiarities of living cell response to the external stimuli revealed via quasistatic mode of atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalisov, M. M.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Penniyaynen, V. A.; Timoshenko, T. E.; Timoshchuk, K. I.; Samsonov, M. V.; Shirinsky, V. P.

    2017-10-01

    The technique of atomic force microscopy allows revealing living cell morphology and mechanical properties characterization under physiologically relevant conditions. Here, we review our recent results on living cell reaction to different external influences obtained by this technique. The Bruker PeakForce QNM quasistatic mode was used to study living fibroblasts, erythrocytes, sensory neurons, and endothelial cells.

  8. Nanoscale Hydrophobic Recovery: A Chemical Force Microscopy Study of UV/Ozone-Treated Cross-Linked Poly(dimethylsiloxane)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillborg, Henrik; Tomczak, N.; Oláh, A.; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical force microscopy (CFM) in water was used to map the surface hydrophobicity of UV/ozone-treated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS; Sylgard 184) as a function of the storage/recovery time. In addition to CFM pull-off force mapping, we applied indentation mapping to probe the changes in the

  9. Applications of atomic force microscopy to the studies of biomaterials in biomolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiang

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a unique tool for the studies of nanoscale structures and interactions. In this dissertation, I applied AFM to study transitions among multiple states of biomaterials in three different microscopic biomolecular systems: MukB-dependent DNA condensation, holdfast adhesion, and virus elasticity. To elucidate the mechanism of MukB-dependent DNA condensation, I have studied the conformational changes of MukB proteins as indicators for the strength of interactions between MukB, DNA and other molecular factors, such as magnesium and ParC proteins, using high-resolution AFM imaging. To determine the physical origins of holdfast adhesion, I have investigated the dynamics of adhesive force development of the holdfast, employing AFM force spectroscopy. By measuring rupture forces between the holdfast and the substrate, I showed that the holdfast adhesion is strongly time-dependent and involves transformations at multiple time scales. Understanding the mechanisms of adhesion force development of the holdfast will be critical for future engineering of holdfasts properties for various applications. Finally, I have examined the elasticity of self-assembled hepatitis B virus-like particles (HBV VLPs) and brome mosaic virus (BMV) in response to changes of pH and salinity, using AFM nanoindentation. The distributions of elasticity were mapped on a single particle level and compared between empty, RNA- and gold-filled HBV VLPs. I found that a single HBV VLP showed heterogeneous distribution of elasticity and a two-step buckling transition, suggesting a discrete property of HBV capsids. For BMV, I have showed that viruses containing different RNA molecules can be distinguished by mechanical measurements, while they are indistinguishable by morphology. I also studied the effect of pH on the elastic behaviors of three-particle BMV and R3/4 BMV. This study can yield insights into RNA presentation/release mechanisms, and could help us to design novel drug

  10. In situ atomic force microscopy studies of reversible light-induced switching of surface roughness and adhesion in azobenzene-containing PMMA films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, Y.; Pakula, C.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Strunskus, T.; Faupel, F.; Herges, R.; Zargarani, D.; Magnussen, O.M.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films in the range 40-80 nm of a blend of PMMA with an azobenzene derivative have been studied directly during UV and blue light irradiation by atomic force microscopy (AFM), revealing highly reversible changes in the surface roughness and the film adhesion. UV light induces an ∼80% increase in surface roughness, whereas illumination by blue light completely reverses these changes. Based on the observed surface topography and transition kinetics a reversible mass flow mechanisms is suggested, where the polarity changes upon switching trigger a wetting-dewetting transition in a surface segregation layer of the chromophore. Similar AFM measurements of the pull-off force indicate a decrease upon UV and an increase after blue light illumination with a complex kinetic behavior: a rapid initial change, attributed to the change in the cis isomer fraction of the azobenzene derivative, and a more gradual change, indicative of slow structural reorganization.

  11. Concomitant use of polarization and positive phase contrast microscopy for the study of microbial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk; Gabriel, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2014), s. 545-550 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : microbial cells * microscopy * microorganism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  12. Interface-induced chiral domain walls, spin spirals and skyrmions revealed by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, Kirsten; Kubetzka, André; Pietzsch, Oswald; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2014-10-01

    The spin textures of ultra-thin magnetic layers exhibit surprising variety. The loss of inversion symmetry at the interface of the magnetic layer and substrate gives rise to the so-called Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction which favors non-collinear spin arrangements with unique rotational sense. Here we review the application of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy to such systems, which has led to the discovery of interface-induced chiral domain walls and spin spirals. Recently, different interface-driven skyrmion lattices have been found, and the writing as well as the deleting of individual skyrmions based on local spin-polarized current injection has been demonstrated. These interface-induced non-collinear magnetic states offer new exciting possibilities to study fundamental magnetic interactions and to tailor material properties for spintronic applications.

  13. Polarized light microscopy-detectable structures of human oocytes and embryos are related to the likelihood of conception in IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Emanuela; Evangelista, Francesca; Racca, Cinzia; Cagnazzo, Celeste; Revelli, Alberto

    2012-10-01

    To clarify if birefringent structures of human oocytes and embryos, measurable by polarized light microscopy, have any value in predicting the chance of pregnancy in human in vitro fertilization and may halp to identify the most competent oocytes and embryos. The inner layer of the zona pellucida (IL-ZP) and the meiotic spindle (MS) were analyzed by polarized light microscopy in 258 oocytes and in the 209 embryos deriving from them. Data obtained from 102 ICSI cycles with conception were compared with those obtained in 156 cycles without conception. The retardance and area of the IL-ZP, as well as the retardance, length of the major axis, and area of the MS were measured. Furthermore, polarized light microscopy parameters were related to the embryo morphological score by multiple regression analysis. The mean area of the IL-ZP of both oocytes and embryos was significantly lower in conception than in non-conception cycles (p = 0.0001 for oocytes and p = 0.002 for embryos). The area of the IL-ZP in embryos was significantly, inversely related to the embryo morphological score (p = 0.011). The area, the major axis length and the retarcance of the MS, as well as the retardance of the IL-ZP in oocytes and embryos were comparable in conception and non-conception cycles. The area of the IL-ZP of the human oocytes may represent a marker of oocyte competence, as oocytes with a low IL-ZP area are more frequently obtained in conception cycles. When measured in embryos, a low IL-ZP area identifies embryos with a high chance of implantation.

  14. Solid, Semisolid, and Liquid Phase States of Individual Submicrometer Particles Directly Probed Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hansol D; Ray, Kamal K; Tivanski, Alexei V

    2017-12-05

    Currently, the impact of various phase states of aerosols on the climate is not well understood, especially for submicrometer sized aerosol particles that typically have extended lifetime in the atmosphere. This is largely due to the inherent size limitations present in current experimental techniques that aim to directly assess the phase states of fine aerosol particles. Herein we present a technique that uses atomic force microscopy to probe directly for the phase states of individual, submicrometer particles by using nanoindentation and nano-Wilhelmy methodologies as a function of relative humidity (RH) and ambient temperature conditions. When using these methodologies for substrate deposited individual sucrose particles, Young's modulus and surface tension can be quantified as a function of RH. We show that the force profiles collected to measure Young's modulus and surface tension can also provide both qualitative and quantitative assessments of phase states that accompany solid, semisolid, and liquid particle phases. Specifically, we introduce direct measurements of relative indentation depth and viscoelastic response distance on a single particle basis at a given applied force to quantitatively probe for the phase state as a function of RH and corresponding viscosity. Thus, we show that the three phase states and phase state transitions of sucrose can be identified and ultimately propose that this technique may also be used to study other atmospherically relevant systems.

  15. High-resolution atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bippes, Christian A.; Muller, Daniel J.

    2011-08-01

    Membranes confining cells and cellular compartments are essential for life. Membrane proteins are molecular machines that equip cell membranes with highly sophisticated functionality. Examples of such functions are signaling, ion pumping, energy conversion, molecular transport, specific ligand binding, cell adhesion and protein trafficking. However, it is not well understood how most membrane proteins work and how the living cell regulates their function. We review how atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be applied for structural and functional investigations of native membrane proteins. High-resolution time-lapse AFM imaging records membrane proteins at work, their oligomeric state and their dynamic assembly. The AFM stylus resembles a multifunctional toolbox that allows the measurement of several chemical and physical parameters at the nanoscale. In the single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) mode, AFM quantifies and localizes interactions in membrane proteins that stabilize their folding and modulate their functional state. Dynamic SMFS discloses fascinating insights into the free energy landscape of membrane proteins. Single-cell force spectroscopy quantifies the interactions of live cells with their environment to single-receptor resolution. In the future, technological progress in AFM-based approaches will enable us to study the physical nature of biological interactions in more detail and decipher how cells control basic processes.

  16. The stray capacitance effect in Kelvin probe force microscopy using FM, AM and heterodyne AM modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zong Min; Kou, Lili; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2013-06-07

    The effect of stray capacitance on potential measurements was investigated using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) at room temperature under ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The stray capacitance effect was explored in three modes, including frequency modulation (FM), amplitude modulation (AM) and heterodyne amplitude modulation (heterodyne AM). We showed theoretically that the distance-dependence of the modulated electrostatic force in AM-KPFM is significantly weaker than in FM- and heterodyne AM-KPFMs and that the stray capacitance of the cantilever, which seriously influences the potential measurements in AM-KPFM, was almost completely eliminated in FM- and heterodyne AM-KPFMs. We experimentally confirmed that the contact potential difference (CPD) in AM-KPFM, which compensates the electrostatic force between the tip and the surface, was significantly larger than in FM- and heterodyne AM-KPFMs due to the stray capacitance effect. We also compared the atomic scale corrugations in the local contact potential difference (LCPD) among the three modes on the surface of Si(111)-7 × 7 finding that the LCPD corrugation in AM-KPFM was significantly weaker than in FM- and heterodyne AM-KPFMs under low AC bias voltage conditions. The very weak LCPD corrugation in AM-KPFM was attributed to the artefact induced by topographic feedback.

  17. Enhanced efficiency in the excitation of higher modes for atomic force microscopy and mechanical sensors operated in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penedo, M., E-mail: mapenedo@imm.cnm.csic.es; Hormeño, S.; Fernández-Martínez, I.; Luna, M.; Briones, F. [IMM-Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, PTM, E-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Raman, A. [Birck Nanotechnology Center and School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47904 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    Recent developments in dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy where several eigenmodes are simultaneously excited in liquid media are proving to be an excellent tool in biological studies. Despite its relevance, the search for a reliable, efficient, and strong cantilever excitation method is still in progress. Herein, we present a theoretical modeling and experimental results of different actuation methods compatible with the operation of Atomic Force Microscopy in liquid environments: ideal acoustic, homogeneously distributed force, distributed applied torque (MAC Mode™), photothermal and magnetostrictive excitation. From the analysis of the results, it can be concluded that magnetostriction is the strongest and most efficient technique for higher eigenmode excitation when using soft cantilevers in liquid media.

  18. Experimental verification of the rotational type of chiral spin spiral structures by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haze, Masahiro; Yoshida, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2017-10-16

    We report on experimental verification of the rotational type of chiral spin spirals in Mn thin films on a W(110) substrate using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) with a double-axis superconducting vector magnet. From SP-STM images using Fe-coated W tips magnetized to the out-of-plane and [001] directions, we found that both Mn mono- and double-layers exhibit cycloidal rotation whose spins rotate in the planes normal to the propagating directions. Our results agree with the theoretical prediction based on the symmetry of the system, supporting that the magnetic structures are driven by the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction.

  19. Quantitative assessment of spinal cord injury using circularly polarized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kideog; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2017-08-01

    We report the quantitative assessment of spinal cord injury using the circularly polarized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CP-CARS) technique together with Stokes parameters in the Poincaré sphere. The pump and Stokes excitation beams are circularly polarized to suppress both the linear polarization-dependent artifacts and the nonresonant background of tissue CARS imaging, enabling quantitative CP-CARS image analysis. This study shows that CP-CARS imaging uncovers significantly increased phase retardance of injured spinal cord tissue as compared to normal tissue, suggesting that CP-CARS is an appealing label-free imaging tool for determining the degree of tissue phase retardance, which could serve as a unique diagnostic parameter associated with nervous tissue injury.

  20. Magnetic field sensor based on the Ampere's force using dual-polarization DBR fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shuang; Zhang, Yang; Guan, Baiou

    2015-08-01

    A novel magnetic field sensor using distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser by Ampere's force effect is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The key sensing element, that is the dual-polarization DBR fiber laser, is fixed on the middle part of two copper plates which carry the current. Ampere's force is applied onto the coppers due to an external magnetic field generated by a DC solenoid. Thus, the lateral force from the coppers is converted to a corresponding beat frequency signal shift produced by the DBR laser. The electric current sensing is also realized by the same configuration and same principle simultaneously in an intuitive manner. Good agreement between the theory calculation and the experimental results is obtained, which shows a good linearity. This sensor's sensitivity to the magnetic field and to the electric current finally reaches ~258.92 kHz/mT and ~1.08727 MHz/A, respectively.

  1. Polarization contrast in reflection near-field optical microscopy with uncoated fibre tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using cross-hatched, patterned semiconductor surfaces and round 20-nm-thick gold pads on semiconductor wafers, we investigate the imaging characteristics of a reflection near-field optical microscope with an uncoated fibre tip for different polarization configurations and light wavelengths....... Is is shown that cross-polarized detection allows one to effectively suppress far-field components in the detected signal and to realise imaging of optical contrast on the sub-wavelength scale. The sensitivity window of our microscope, i.e. the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical...

  2. Microstructure influence on corrosion behavior of a Fe–Cr–V–N tool alloy studied by SEM/EDS, scanning Kelvin force microscopy and electrochemical measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sababi, Majid; Ejnermark, Sebastian; Andersson, Jörgen; Claesson, Per M.; Pan, Jinshan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Localized corrosion of a new N-based tool alloy (Fe–Cr–V–N) has been studied. ► One-pass mode of scanning Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) was used in the study. ► The focus was on correlation between microstructure and localized corrosion. - Abstract: Microstructure influence on corrosion behavior of an N-based tool alloy (Fe–Cr–V–N) has been studied. Electron microscopy analysis showed two types of hard phases in the alloy. One-pass mode scanning Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) was used to investigate relative nobility of the hard phases. Volta potential mapping indicates higher nobility for the hard phases than the alloy matrix, and, the V- and N-rich particles exhibit the highest Volta potential. Post-polarization analysis by SEM revealed localized dissolution initiated in matrix regions adjacent to hard phase particles, and the boundary region surrounding the Cr- and Mo-rich particles is more prone to localized corrosion.

  3. Air–water interface of submerged superhydrophobic surfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Moosmann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Underwater air retention of superhydrophobic hierarchically structured surfaces is of increasing interest for technical applications. Persistent air layers (the Salvinia effect are known from biological species, for example, the floating fern Salvinia or the backswimmer Notonecta. The use of this concept opens up new possibilities for biomimetic technical applications in the fields of drag reduction, antifouling, anticorrosion and under water sensing. Current knowledge regarding the shape of the air–water interface is insufficient, although it plays a crucial role with regards to stability in terms of diffusion and dynamic conditions. Optical methods for imaging the interface have been limited to the micrometer regime. In this work, we utilized a nondynamic and nondestructive atomic force microscopy (AFM method to image the interface of submerged superhydrophobic structures with nanometer resolution. Up to now, only the interfaces of nanobubbles (acting almost like solids have been characterized by AFM at these dimensions. In this study, we show for the first time that it is possible to image the air–water interface of submerged hierarchically structured (micro-pillars surfaces by AFM in contact mode. By scanning with zero resulting force applied, we were able to determine the shape of the interface and thereby the depth of the water penetrating into the underlying structures. This approach is complemented by a second method: the interface was scanned with different applied force loads and the height for zero force was determined by linear regression. These methods open new possibilities for the investigation of air-retaining surfaces, specifically in terms of measuring contact area and in comparing different coatings, and thus will lead to the development of new applications.

  4. Unravelling of a mechanism of resistance to colistin in Klebsiella pneumoniae using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, C; Herold, M; Vidaillac, C; Duval, R E; Dague, E

    2015-08-01

    In this study we focused on the mechanism of colistin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae. We used two strains of K. pneumoniae: a colistin-susceptible strain (K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603, KpATCC) and its colistin-resistant derivative (KpATCCm, MIC of colistin 16 mg/L). We performed a genotypic analysis based on the expression of genes involved in LPS synthesis and L-Ara4N moiety addition. We also explored the status of the mgrB gene. Then, a phenotypic analysis was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Young modulus was extracted from force curves fitted using the Hertz model, and stiffness values were extracted from force curves fitted using the Hooke model. We failed to observe any variation in the expression of genes implicated in LPS synthesis or L-Ara4N moiety addition in KpATCCm, in the absence of colistin or under colistin pressure (versus KpATCC). This led us to identify an insertional inactivation/mutation in the mgrB gene of KpATCCm. In addition, morphology results obtained by AFM showed that colistin removed the capsule from the susceptible strain, but not from the resistant strain. Nanomechanical data on the resistant strain showed that colistin increased the Young modulus of the capsule. Extend force curves recorded on top of the cells allowed us to make the following hypothesis about the nanoarchitecture of the capsule of the two strains: KpATCC has a soft capsule consisting of one layer, whereas the KpATCCm capsule is harder and organized in several layers. We hypothesize that capsular polysaccharides might be implicated in the mechanism of colistin resistance in K. pneumoniae, depending on its genotype. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Polarization contrast in fluorescence scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, A.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Polarization contrast is presented in fluorescence images of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer obtained with a scanning near-field optical microscope operated in reflection. A tapered optical fiber is used both to excite and to collect the fluorescence. The lateral resolution in the reflection

  6. Characterization of topical film-forming systems using atomic force microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvie-Cook, Hazel; Frederiksen, Kit; Petersson, Karsten; Guy, Richard H; Gordeev, Sergey

    2015-03-02

    Polymeric film-forming systems for dermal drug delivery represent an advantageous alternative to more conventional topically applied formulations. Their mechanical properties and homogeneity can be characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), using both imaging and nanoindentation modes, and Raman microspectroscopy mapping. Film-forming polymers, with and without a plasticizer and/or betamethasone 17-valerate (a representative topical drug), were dissolved in absolute ethanol. Polymeric films were then cast on glass slides and examined in ambient air using AFM imaging and Raman microspectroscopy. Using nanoindentation, the elastic moduli of various films were determined and found to decrease with increasing plasticizer content. Films with 20% w/w plasticizer had elastic moduli close to that of skin. AFM images showed little difference in the topography of the films on incorporation of plasticizer. Raman microspectroscopy maps of the surface of the polymeric films, with a spatial resolution of approximately 1 μm, revealed homogeneous distributions of plasticizer and drug within the films.

  7. Atomic force microscopy studies of bioprocess engineering surfaces - imaging, interactions and mechanical properties mediating bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Sean A; Hilal, Nidal; Wright, Chris J

    2017-07-01

    The detrimental effect of bacterial biofilms on process engineering surfaces is well documented. Thus, interest in the early stages of bacterial biofilm formation; in particular bacterial adhesion and the production of anti-fouling coatings has grown exponentially as a field. During this time, Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a critical tool for the evaluation of bacterial adhesion. Due to its versatility AFM offers not only insight into the topographical landscape and mechanical properties of the engineering surfaces, but elucidates, through direct quantification the topographical and biomechnical properties of the foulants The aim of this review is to collate the current research on bacterial adhesion, both theoretical and practical, and outline how AFM as a technique is uniquely equipped to provide further insight into the nanoscale world at the bioprocess engineering surface. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Exploring wear at the nanoscale with circular mode atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Noel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of atomic force microscopy (AFM has allowed wear mechanisms to be investigated at the nanometer scale by means of a single asperity contact generated by an AFM tip and an interacting surface. However, the low wear rate at the nanoscale and the thermal drift require fastidious quantitative measurements of the wear volume for determining wear laws. In this paper, we describe a new, effective, experimental methodology based on circular mode AFM, which generates high frequency, circular displacements of the contact. Under such conditions, the wear rate is significant and the drift of the piezoelectric actuator is limited. As a result, well-defined wear tracks are generated and an accurate computation of the wear volume is possible. Finally, we describe the advantages of this method and we report a relevant application example addressing a Cu/Al2O3 nanocomposite material used in industrial applications.

  9. Investigation of DNA condensing properties of amphiphilic triblock cationic polymers by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidgi-Guigui, Nathalie; Guis, Christine; Brissault, Blandine; Kichler, Antoine; Leborgne, Christian; Scherman, Daniel; Labdi, Sid; Curmi, Patrick A

    2010-11-16

    Introduction of nucleic acids into cells is an important biotechnology research field which also holds great promise for therapeutic applications. One of the key steps in the gene delivery process is compaction of DNA into nanometric particles. The study of DNA condensing properties of three linear cationic triblock copolymers poly(ethylenimine-b-propylene glycol-b-ethylenimine), namely, LPEI(50)-PPG(36)-LPEI(50), LPEI(19)-PPG(36)-LPEI(19), and LPEI(14)-PPG(68)-LPEI(14), indicates that proper DNA condensation is driven by both the charge and the size of the respective cationic hydrophilic linear polyethylenimine (LPEI) and neutral hydrophobic poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) parts. Atomic force microscopy was used to investigate the interactions of the triblock copolymers with plasmid DNA at the single molecule level and to enlighten the mechanism involved in DNA condensation.

  10. Visualization and quantification of magnetic nanoparticles into vesicular systems by combined atomic and magnetic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, C. [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161, Rome (Italy); Department of Physics, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Corsetti, S.; Passeri, D. [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161, Rome (Italy); Rossi, M. [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161, Rome (Italy); Research Center for Nanotechnology applied to Engineering of SAPIENZA University of Rome (CNIS), Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Carafa, M.; Marianecci, C., E-mail: carlotta.marianecci@uniroma1.it [Department of Drug Chemistry and Technologies, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Pantanella, F. [Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Research Center for Nanotechnology applied to Engineering of SAPIENZA University of Rome (CNIS), Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Rinaldi, F.; Ingallina, C. [Center for Life Nano Science @ Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Viale Regina Elena 291, 00161, Rome (Italy); Sorbo, A. [Department of Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161, Rome (Italy)

    2015-06-23

    We report a phenomenological approach for the quantification of the diameter of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) incorporated in non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). After a simple specimen preparation, i.e., by putting a drop of solution containing MNPs-loaded niosomes on flat substrates, topography and MFM phase images are collected. To attempt the quantification of the diameter of entrapped MNPs, the method is calibrated on the sole MNPs deposited on the same substrates by analyzing the MFM signal as a function of the MNP diameter (at fixed tip-sample distance) and of the tip-sample distance (for selected MNPs). After calibration, the effective diameter of the MNPs entrapped in some niosomes is quantitatively deduced from MFM images.

  11. Electrothermally driven high-frequency piezoresistive SiC cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boubekri, R.; Cambril, E.; Couraud, L.; Bernardi, L.; Madouri, A.; Portail, M.; Chassagne, T.; Moisson, C.; Zielinski, M.; Jiao, S.; Michaud, J.-F.; Alquier, D.; Bouloc, J.; Nony, L.; Bocquet, F.; Loppacher, C.; Martrou, D.; Gauthier, S.

    2014-01-01

    Cantilevers with resonance frequency ranging from 1 MHz to 100 MHz have been developed for dynamic atomic force microscopy. These sensors are fabricated from 3C-SiC epilayers grown on Si(100) substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. They use an on-chip method both for driving and sensing the displacement of the cantilever. A first gold metallic loop deposited on top of the cantilever is used to drive its oscillation by electrothermal actuation. The sensing of this oscillation is performed by monitoring the resistance of a second Au loop. This metallic piezoresistive detection method has distinct advantages relative to more common semiconductor-based schemes. The optimization, design, fabrication, and characteristics of these cantilevers are discussed

  12. The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy for 3D Analysis of Nucleic Acid Hybridization on Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovin, E V; Presnova, G V; Rubtsova, M Yu; Egorov, A M; Grigorenko, V G; Yaminsky, I V

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are considered today to be one of the most efficient methods of gene diagnostics. The capability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize the three-dimensional morphology of single molecules on a surface allows one to use it as an effective tool for the 3D analysis of a microarray for the detection of nucleic acids. The high resolution of AFM offers ways to decrease the detection threshold of target DNA and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, we suggest an approach to the evaluation of the results of hybridization of gold nanoparticle-labeled nucleic acids on silicon microarrays based on an AFM analysis of the surface both in air and in liquid which takes into account of their three-dimensional structure. We suggest a quantitative measure of the hybridization results which is based on the fraction of the surface area occupied by the nanoparticles.

  13. A Fabrication Technique for Nano-gap Electrodes by Atomic Force Microscopy Nano lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalal Rouhi; Shahrom Mahmud; Hutagalung, S.D.; Kakooei, S.

    2011-01-01

    A simple technique is introduced for fabrication of nano-gap electrodes by using nano-oxidation atomic force microscopy (AFM) lithography with a Cr/ Pt coated silicon tip. AFM local anodic oxidation was performed on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) surfaces by optimization of desired conditions to control process in contact mode. Silicon electrodes with gaps of sub 31 nm were fabricated by nano-oxidation method. This technique which is simple, controllable, inexpensive and fast is capable of fabricating nano-gap structures. The current-voltage measurements (I-V) of the electrodes demonstrated very good insulating characteristics. The results show that silicon electrodes have a great potential for fabrication of single molecule transistors (SMT), single electron transistors (SET) and the other nano electronic devices. (author)

  14. Novel detection system for biomolecules using nano-sized bacterial magnetic particles and magnetic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Yosuke; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Yoza, Brandon; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2005-11-21

    A system for streptavidin detection using biotin conjugated to nano-sized bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) has been developed. BMPs, isolated from magnetic bacteria, were used as magnetic markers for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging. The magnetic signal was obtained from a single particle using MFM without application of an external magnetic field. The number of biotin conjugated BMPs (biotin-BMPs) bound to streptavidin immobilized on the glass slides increased with streptavidin concentrations up to 100 pg/ml. The minimum streptavidin detection limit using this technique is 1 pg/ml, which is 100 times more sensitive than a conventional fluorescent detection system. This is the first report using single domain nano-sized magnetic particles as magnetic markers for biosensing. This assay system can be used for immunoassay and DNA detection with high sensitivities.

  15. Local raster scanning for high-speed imaging of biopolymers in atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Peter I; Huang, Peng; Maeng, Jungyeoul; Andersson, Sean B

    2011-06-01

    A novel algorithm is described and illustrated for high speed imaging of biopolymers and other stringlike samples using atomic force microscopy. The method uses the measurements in real-time to steer the tip of the instrument to localize the scanning area over the sample of interest. Depending on the sample, the scan time can be reduced by an order of magnitude or more while maintaining image resolution. Images are generated by interpolating the non-raster data using a modified Kriging algorithm. The method is demonstrated using physical simulations that include actuator and cantilever dynamics, nonlinear tip-sample interactions, and measurement noise as well as through scanning experiments in which a two-axis nanopositioning stage is steered by the algorithm using simulated height data. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  16. Atomic force microscopy imaging of polyurethane nanoparticles onto different solid substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddin Fritzen-Garcia, Mauricia [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); POLIMAT, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], E-mail: maurifritzen@hotmail.com; Giehl Zanetti-Ramos, Betina [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Schweitzer de Oliveira, Cristian [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos e Superficies, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Soldi, Valdir [POLIMAT, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Avelino Pasa, Andre [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos e Superficies, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Creczynski-Pasa, Tania Beatriz [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2009-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique suited for characterizing nanoparticles on solid surfaces because it offers the capability of 3D visualization and quantitative information about the topography of the samples. In the present work, contact-mode AFM has been applied to imaging polyurethane nanoparticles formulated from a natural triol and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The colloidal polymeric system was deposited on mica, hydrophilic and hydrophobic silicon solid substrates to evaluate the size and shape of the nanoparticles. Our data showed that the nanoparticles were better distributed on mica and hydrophilic silicon. From the analysis of line-scan profiles we obtained different values for the ratio between the diameter and the height of the nanoparticles, indicating that the shape of the particles depends on the interaction between the nanoparticles and the substrate.

  17. Effect of mechanical deformations on the growth of crystals (according to atomic force microscopy data)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunova, N. N.; Askhabov, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    Nanosized morphological transformations occurring on the surface of a crystal in the area drawn by a probe needle during the growth of a scratch and the growth kinetics of crystals subjected to mechanical impact have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A series of experiments with mechanical impact on topographically different areas of a growing face (100) of a dioxidine crystal has been performed. It has been shown that even slight local contact between the probe needle and the surface on a nanoscale leads to essential crystallogenetic (morphological and kinetic) consequences, and its effect is perceptible for a long time. Among these consequences are the coarsening of stages, the appearance of great fluctuations in the growth rate of stages, the loss of morphological stability by the surface even at a distance of several tens of micrometers from the contact area, and also the phenomenon of simultaneous growth and dissolution in neighboring areas of stages.

  18. Monitoring the elasticity changes of HeLa cells during mitosis by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ningcheng; Wang, Yuhua; Zeng, Jinshu; Ding, Xuemei; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin

    2016-10-01

    Cell mitosis plays a crucial role in cell life activity, which is one of the important phases in cell division cycle. During the mitosis, the cytoskeleton micro-structure of the cell changed and the biomechanical properties of the cell may vary depending upon different mitosis stages. In this study, the elasticity property of HeLa cells during mitosis was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Also, the actin filaments in different mitosis stages of the cells were observed by confocal imaging. Our results show that the cell in anaphase is stiffer than that in metaphase and telophase. Furthermore, lots of actin filaments gathered in cells' center area in anaphase, which contributes to the rigidity of the cell in this phase. Our findings demonstrate that the nano-biomechanics of living cells could provide a new index for characterizing cell physiological states.

  19. Magnetic force microscopy: advanced technique for the observation of magnetic domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenjo, A.; Garcia, J. M.; Vazquez, M.

    2001-01-01

    An overview on the Magnetic Force Microscopy, MFM, as an advanced technique to observe magnetic domains and walls is displayed. Basic concepts are first introduced on the domain structure formation as well as on other techniques to observe magnetic domains. Afterwards, the MFM instrumentation is described making also an emphasis in micro magnetic consideration to interpret the images. Finally, a set of selected advanced magnetic materials with different domain structures is chosen to show the wide possibilities of this techniques to characterise the surface magnetic behaviour. The domain structure of materials as commercial magnetic recording media, thin films and multilayers, amorphous micro tubes, nanocrystalline ribbons, perovskites or magnetic nano wires is shown. (Author) 16 refs

  20. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathomarco, R.V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C.N.; Prioli, R.

    2004-01-01

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 μm, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 μm. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle

  1. Atomic force microscopy study of anion intercalation into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliata, D.; Haering, P.; Haas, O.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegenthaler, H. [University of Berne (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    In the context of ion transfer batteries, we studied highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in perchloric acid, as a model to elucidate the mechanism of electrochemical intercalation in graphite. Aim of the work is the local and time dependent investigation of dimensional changes of the host material during electrochemical intercalation processes on the nanometer scale. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), combined with cyclic voltammetry, as in-situ tool of analysis during intercalation and expulsion of perchloric anions into the HOPG electrodes. According to the AFM measurements, the HOPG interlayer spacing increases by 32% when perchloric anions intercalate, in agreement with the formation of stage IV of graphite intercalation compounds. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  2. Measuring the loss tangent of polymer materials with atomic force microscopy based methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yablon, Dalia G; Grabowski, Jean; Chakraborty, Ishita

    2014-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) quantitatively maps viscoelastic parameters of polymers on the nanoscale by several methods. The loss tangent, the ratio between dissipated and stored energy, was measured on a blend of thermoplastic polymer materials by a dynamic contact method, contact resonance, and by a recently developed loss tangent measurement by amplitude modulation AFM. Contact resonance measurements were performed both with dual AC resonance tracking and band excitation (BE), allowing for a reference-free measurement of the loss tangent. Amplitude modulation AFM was performed where a recent interpretation of the phase signal under certain operating conditions allows for the loss tangent to be calculated. The loss tangent measurements were compared with values expected from time–temperature superposed frequency-dependent dynamical mechanical curves of materials and reveal that the loss tangents determined from the BE contact resonance method provide the most accurate values. (paper)

  3. Adsorption and manipulation of carbon onions on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite studied with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianfeng; Shen Ziyong; Hou Shimin; Zhao Xingyu; Xue Zengquan; Shi Zujin; Gu Zhennan

    2007-01-01

    Carbon onions produced by DC arc discharge method were deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface and their adsorption and manipulation was studied using an atomic force microscopy (AFM). Well-dispersed adsorption of carbon onions on HOPG surface was obtained and aggregations of onions were not observed. The van der Waals interaction between the onion and HOPG surface and that between two onions, were calculated and discussed using Hamaker's theory. The manipulation of adsorbed onions on HOPG surface was realized using the AFM in both the raster mode and the vector mode. The controllability and precision of two manipulation modes were compared and the vector mode manipulation was found superior, and is a useful technique for the construction of nano-scale devices based on carbon onions

  4. Characterization of single-crystal sapphire substrates by X-ray methods and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhorov, I. A.; Zakharov, B. G.; Asadchikov, V. E.; Butashin, A. V.; Roshchin, B. S.; Tolstikhina, A. L.; Zanaveskin, M. L.; Grishchenko, Yu. V.; Muslimov, A. E.; Yakimchuk, I. V.; Volkov, Yu. O.; Kanevskii, V. M.; Tikhonov, E. O.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of characterizing a number of practically important parameters of sapphire substrates by X-ray methods is substantiated. These parameters include wafer bending, traces of an incompletely removed damaged layer that formed as a result of mechanical treatment (scratches and marks), surface roughness, damaged layer thickness, and the specific features of the substrate real structure. The features of the real structure of single-crystal sapphire substrates were investigated by nondestructive methods of double-crystal X-ray diffraction and plane-wave X-ray topography. The surface relief of the substrates was investigated by atomic force microscopy and X-ray scattering. The use of supplementing analytical methods yields the most complete information about the structural inhomogeneities and state of crystal surface, which is extremely important for optimizing the technology of substrate preparation for epitaxy.

  5. Ring structures on natural molybdenum disulfide investigated by scanning tunneling and scanning force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckl, W.M.; Ohnesorge, F.; Binnig, G. (IBM Research Division, Muenchen (West Germany)); Specht, M. (Univ. Muenchen (West Germany)); Hashmi, M. (MPIf. Plasmaphysics, Garching (West Germany))

    In this paper the authors present a study of ring-like structures of two different sizes on a nanometer scale found on natural molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). Investigation by scanning tunneling and scanning force microscopy as well as secondary-ion mass spectroscopy indicate that these rings might originate from included molecules. Synthetic compared to natural MoS{sub 2} shows characteristic differences. The origin of these striking structures could be the morphology of organic or even remnants of biological material included at the geological time when the mineral was formed and could therefore be regarded as a result of a molecular fossilization process. The alternative explanation that the ring structure is a nonmorphological and purely electronic effect caused by a point defect like a dopant is also discussed.

  6. Imaging modes of atomic force microscopy for application in molecular and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrêne, Yves F; Ando, Toshio; Garcia, Ricardo; Alsteens, David; Martinez-Martin, David; Engel, Andreas; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J

    2017-04-06

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful, multifunctional imaging platform that allows biological samples, from single molecules to living cells, to be visualized and manipulated. Soon after the instrument was invented, it was recognized that in order to maximize the opportunities of AFM imaging in biology, various technological developments would be required to address certain limitations of the method. This has led to the creation of a range of new imaging modes, which continue to push the capabilities of the technique today. Here, we review the basic principles, advantages and limitations of the most common AFM bioimaging modes, including the popular contact and dynamic modes, as well as recently developed modes such as multiparametric, molecular recognition, multifrequency and high-speed imaging. For each of these modes, we discuss recent experiments that highlight their unique capabilities.

  7. Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation of Morphological and Nanomechanical Properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ninell Pollas

    2008-01-01

    changes in the fraction of individual bacteria and bacteria undergoing proliferation, and decrease of cell length of mother and daughter cells. The results indicated that colistin arrested the bacterial growth just after septum formation. Furthermore did the morphology change from a smooth bacterial......Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is unique in the aspect of studying living biological sample under physiological conditions. AFM was invented in 1986 by Binnig and Gerber and began in the early 1990’s to be implemented in life science. AFM can give a detailed three dimensional image of an intact cell...... of AFM are that sample preparation does not demand fixation, staining or coating and the sample it not examined under high vacuum. It is not surprising that mounting plantonic bacteria on a substrate and dehydration will lead to some extent of alteration. Here a flattening of both intact bacterial cells...

  8. High Deformability and Particle Size Distribution of Monodisperse Phytoglycogen Nanoparticles Revealed By Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Benjamin; Dutcher, John

    We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in water to determine the volume of hydrated monodisperse phytoglycogen nanoparticles adsorbed onto mica surfaces. By significantly reducing the interaction between the AFM tip and the ``sticky'' nanoparticles, we were able to obtain high quality images. We found that the adsorbed particles are highly deformed, forming pancake-like objects on the hydrophilic mica surface. By measuring the distribution of particle volumes, we calculated the average effective spherical radius of the hydrated particles, and compared this value with that measured in solution using small angle neutron scattering. These measurements illustrate the distinct advantages of AFM imaging over other imaging techniques, namely the ability to measure the height of objects in a liquid environment.

  9. An atomic-force-microscopy study of the structure of surface layers of intact fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalisov, M. M.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Penniyaynen, V. A.; Nyapshaev, I. A.; Kipenko, A. V.; Timoshchuk, K. I.; Podzorova, S. A.; Krylov, B. V.

    2017-02-01

    Intact embryonic fibroblasts on a collagen-treated substrate have been studied by atomic-force microscopy (AFM) using probes of two types: (i) standard probes with tip curvature radii of 2-10 nm and (ii) special probes with a calibrated 325-nm SiO2 ball radius at the tip apex. It is established that, irrespective of probe type, the average maximum fibroblast height is on a level of 1.7 μm and the average stiffness of the probe-cell contact amounts to 16.5 mN/m. The obtained AFM data reveal a peculiarity of the fibroblast structure, whereby its external layers move as a rigid shell relative to the interior and can be pressed inside to a depth dependent on the load only.

  10. Determining concentration depth profiles in fluorinated networks by means of electric force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miccio, Luis A. [Institute of Materials Science and Technology (INTEMA), University of Mar del Plata and National Research Council (CONICET), JB. Justo 4302, Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Materials Physics Center (MPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Kummali, Mohammed M.; Alegria, Angel [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Materials Physics Center (MPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales UPV/EHU, Facultad de Quimica, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Montemartini, Pablo E.; Oyanguren, Patricia A. [Institute of Materials Science and Technology (INTEMA), University of Mar del Plata and National Research Council (CONICET), JB. Justo 4302, Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schwartz, Gustavo A. [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Materials Physics Center (MPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Colmenero, Juan [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Materials Physics Center (MPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales UPV/EHU, Facultad de Quimica, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2011-08-14

    By means of electric force microscopy, composition depth profiles were measured with nanometric resolution for a series of fluorinated networks. By mapping the dielectric permittivity along a line going from the surface to the bulk, we were able to experimentally access to the fluorine concentration profile. Obtained data show composition gradient lengths ranging from 30 nm to 80 nm in the near surface area for samples containing from 0.5 to 5 wt. % F, respectively. In contrast, no gradients of concentration were detected in bulk. This method has several advantages over other techniques because it allows profiling directly on a sectional cut of the sample. By combining the obtained results with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we were also able to quantify F/C ratio as a function of depth with nanoscale resolution.

  11. Atomic force microscopy imaging of polyurethane nanoparticles onto different solid substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddin Fritzen-Garcia, Mauricia; Giehl Zanetti-Ramos, Betina; Schweitzer de Oliveira, Cristian; Soldi, Valdir; Avelino Pasa, Andre; Creczynski-Pasa, Tania Beatriz

    2009-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique suited for characterizing nanoparticles on solid surfaces because it offers the capability of 3D visualization and quantitative information about the topography of the samples. In the present work, contact-mode AFM has been applied to imaging polyurethane nanoparticles formulated from a natural triol and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The colloidal polymeric system was deposited on mica, hydrophilic and hydrophobic silicon solid substrates to evaluate the size and shape of the nanoparticles. Our data showed that the nanoparticles were better distributed on mica and hydrophilic silicon. From the analysis of line-scan profiles we obtained different values for the ratio between the diameter and the height of the nanoparticles, indicating that the shape of the particles depends on the interaction between the nanoparticles and the substrate

  12. Observation of nuclear track in organic material by atomic force microscopy in real time during etching

    CERN Document Server

    Palmino, F; Labrune, J C

    1999-01-01

    The developments of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allow to investigated solid surfaces with a nanometer scale. These techniques are useful methods allowing direct observation of surface morphologies. Particularly in the nuclear track fields, they offer a new tool to give many new informations on track formation. In this paper we present the preliminary results of a new use of this technique to characterize continuously the formation of the revealed track in a cellulose nitrate detector (LR115) after an alpha particle irradiation. For that, a specific cell has been used to observe, by nano-observations, the evolution of track shapes simultaneously with chemical treatment. Thus, the track shape evolution has been studied; visualizing the evolution of the tracks in real time, in situ during the chemical etching process.

  13. Micro and nanostructural characterization of surfaces and interfaces of Portland cement mortars using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, M.F.O.; Brandao, P.R.G.

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of Portland cement mortars is very important in the study the interfaces and surfaces that make up the system grout/ceramic block. In this sense, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometer are important tools in investigating the morphology and chemical aspects. However, more detailed topographic information can be necessary in the characterization process. In this work, the aim was to characterize topographically surfaces and interfaces of mortars applied onto ceramic blocks. This has been accomplished by using the atomic force microscope (AFM) - MFP-3D-SA Asylum Research. To date, the results obtained from this research show that the characterization of cementitious materials with the help of AFM has an important contribution in the investigation and differentiation of hydrated calcium silicates (CSH), calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2, ettringite and calcium carbonate by providing morphological and micro topographical data, which are extremely important and reliable for the understanding of cementitious materials. (author)

  14. Mechanical Properties of Boehmite Evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy Experiments and Molecular Dynamic Finite Element Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fankhanel, J.; Daum, B.; Kempe, A.; Rolfes, R.; Silbernagl, D.; Khorasani, M.Gh.Z.; Sturm, H.; Sturm, H.

    2016-01-01

    Boehmite nanoparticles show great potential in improving mechanical properties of fiber reinforced polymers. In order to predict the properties of nanocomposites, knowledge about the material parameters of the constituent phases, including the boehmite particles, is crucial. In this study, the mechanical behavior of boehmite is investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments and Molecular Dynamic Finite Element Method (MDFEM) simulations. Young’s modulus of the perfect crystalline boehmite nanoparticles is derived from numerical AFM simulations. Results of AFM experiments on boehmite nanoparticles deviate significantly. Possible causes are identified by experiments on complementary types of boehmite, that is, geological and hydrothermally synthesized samples, and further simulations of imperfect crystals and combined boehmite/epoxy models. Under certain circumstances, the mechanical behavior of boehmite was found to be dominated by inelastic effects that are discussed in detail in the present work. The studies are substantiated with accompanying X-ray diffraction and Raman experiments.

  15. Optimal sample preparation for nanoparticle metrology (statistical size measurements) using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoo, Christopher M.; Doan, Trang; Starostin, Natasha; West, Paul E.; Mecartney, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal deposition procedures are determined for nanoparticle size characterization by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Accurate nanoparticle size distribution analysis with AFM requires non-agglomerated nanoparticles on a flat substrate. The deposition of polystyrene (100 nm), silica (300 and 100 nm), gold (100 nm), and CdSe quantum dot (2-5 nm) nanoparticles by spin coating was optimized for size distribution measurements by AFM. Factors influencing deposition include spin speed, concentration, solvent, and pH. A comparison using spin coating, static evaporation, and a new fluid cell deposition method for depositing nanoparticles is also made. The fluid cell allows for a more uniform and higher density deposition of nanoparticles on a substrate at laminar flow rates, making nanoparticle size analysis via AFM more efficient and also offers the potential for nanoparticle analysis in liquid environments.

  16. Spatial Manipulation and Assembly of Nanoparticles by Atomic Force Microscopy Tip-Induced Dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Yang, Wenguang; Wen, Yangdong; Wang, Zhidong; Li, Wen Jung; Liu, Lianqing

    2017-05-17

    In this article, we present a novel method of spatial manipulation and assembly of nanoparticles via atomic force microscopy tip-induced dielectrophoresis (AFM-DEP). This method combines the high-accuracy positioning of AFM with the parallel manipulation of DEP. A spatially nonuniform electric field is induced by applying an alternating current (AC) voltage between the conductive AFM probe and an indium tin oxide glass substrate. The AFM probe acted as a movable DEP tweezer for nanomanipulation and assembly of nanoparticles. The mechanism of AFM-DEP was analyzed by numerical simulation. The effects of solution depth, gap distance, AC voltage, solution concentration, and duration time were experimentally studied and optimized. Arrays of 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles were assembled into various nanostructures, including lines, ellipsoids, and arrays of dots. The sizes and shapes of the assembled structures were controllable. It was thus demonstrated that AFM-DEP is a flexible and powerful tool for nanomanipulation.

  17. Enhanced piezoelectric performance of composite sol-gel thick films evaluated using piezoresponse force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanming; Lam, Kwok Ho; Kirk Shung, K.; Li, Jiangyu; Zhou, Qifa

    2013-01-01

    Conventional composite sol-gel method has been modified to enhance the piezoelectric performance of ceramic thick films. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and lead magnesium niobate–lead titanate (PMN-PT) thick films were fabricated using the modified sol-gel method for ultrasonic transducer applications. In this work, piezoresponse force microscopy was employed to evaluate the piezoelectric characteristics of PZT and PMN-PT composite sol-gel thick films. The images of the piezoelectric response and the strain-electric field hysteresis loop behavior were measured. The effective piezoelectric coefficient (d33,eff) of the films was determined from the measured loop data. It was found that the effective local piezoelectric coefficient of both PZT and PMN-PT composite films is comparable to that of their bulk ceramics. The promising results suggest that the modified composite sol-gel method is a promising way to prepare the high-quality, crack-free ceramic thick films. PMID:23798771

  18. Three-dimensional molecular imaging using mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wucher, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.wucher@uni-due.de; Cheng Juan; Zheng Leiliang; Willingham, David; Winograd, Nicholas [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    We combine imaging ToF-SIMS depth profiling and wide area atomic force microscopy to analyze a test structure consisting of a 300 nm trehalose film deposited on a Si substrate and pre-structured by means of a focused 15-keV Ga{sup +} ion beam. Depth profiling is performed using a 40-keV C{sub 60}{sup +} cluster ion beam for erosion and mass spectral data acquisition. A generic protocol for depth axis calibration is described which takes into account both lateral and in-depth variations of the erosion rate. By extrapolation towards zero analyzed lateral area, an 'intrinsic' depth resolution of about 8 nm is found which appears to be characteristic of the cluster-surface interaction process.

  19. Application of magnetic resonance force microscopy cyclic adiabatic inversion for a single-spin measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, G P; Chapline, G; Gurvitz, S A; Hammel, P C; Pelekhov, D V; Suter, A; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2003-01-01

    We consider the process of a single-spin measurement using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) with a cyclic adiabatic inversion (CAI). This technique is also important for different applications, including a measurement of a qubit state in quantum computation. The measurement takes place through the interaction of a single spin with a cantilever modelled by a quantum oscillator in a coherent state in a quasi-classical range of parameters. The entire system is treated rigorously within the framework of the Schroedinger equation. For a many-spin system our equations accurately describe conventional MRFM experiments involving CAI of the spin system. Our computer simulations of the quantum spin-cantilever dynamics show that the probability distribution for the cantilever position develops two asymmetric peaks with the total relative probabilities mainly dependent on the initial angle between the directions of the average spin and the effective magnetic field, in the rotating frame. We show that each of th...

  20. Electron Spin Resonance and Atomic Force Microscopy Study on Gadolinium Doped Ceria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Oliva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A combined electron spin resonance (ESR and atomic force microscopy (AFM study on Ce1−xGdxO2−x/2 samples is here presented, aimed at investigating the evolution of the ESR spectral shape as a function of x in a wide composition range. At low x=0.02, the spectrum is composed of features at geff≈2; 2.8; 6. With increasing x, this pattern merges into a single geff≈2 broad ESR curve, which assumes a Dysonian-shaped profile at x≥0.5, whereas, at these x values, AFM measurements show an increasing surface roughness. It is suggested that the last could cause the formation of surface polaritons at the origin of the particular ESR spectral profile observed at these high Gd doping levels.

  1. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathomarco, R.V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C.N.; Prioli, R

    2004-06-30

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 {mu}m, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 {mu}m. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle.

  2. Surface morphology study on CdZnTe crystals by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, M.; George, M.A.; Burger, A.; Collins, W.E.; Silberman, E. [Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The study of the crystal surface morphology of CdZnTe is important for the understanding of the fundamentals of crystal growth in order to improve the crystal quality which is essential in applications such as substrates for epitaxy or performance of devices, i.e., room temperature nuclear spectrometers. We present a first atomic force microscopy study on CdZnTe. Cleaved (110) surfaces were imaged in the ambient and an atomic layer step structure was revealed. The effects of thermal annealing on the atomic steps together with Te precipitation along these steps are discussed in terms of deformation due to stress relief and the diffusion of tellurium precipitates. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  3. First-Principles Atomic Force Microscopy Image Simulations with Density Embedding Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuki; Lee, Alex J; Chelikowsky, James R

    2016-05-11

    We present an efficient first-principles method for simulating noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) images using a "frozen density" embedding theory. Frozen density embedding theory enables one to efficiently compute the tip-sample interaction by considering a sample as a frozen external field. This method reduces the extensive computational load of first-principles AFM simulations by avoiding consideration of the entire tip-sample system and focusing on the tip alone. We demonstrate that our simulation with frozen density embedding theory accurately reproduces full density functional theory simulations of freestanding hydrocarbon molecules while the computational time is significantly reduced. Our method also captures the electronic effect of a Cu(111) substrate on the AFM image of pentacene and reproduces the experimental AFM image of Cu2N on a Cu(100) surface. This approach is applicable for theoretical imaging applications on large molecules, two-dimensional materials, and materials surfaces.

  4. Nanomechanical DNA origami 'single-molecule beacons' directly imaged by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Sakai, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Xu, Yan; Komiyama, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    DNA origami involves the folding of long single-stranded DNA into designed structures with the aid of short staple strands; such structures may enable the development of useful nanomechanical DNA devices. Here we develop versatile sensing systems for a variety of chemical and biological targets at molecular resolution. We have designed functional nanomechanical DNA origami devices that can be used as 'single-molecule beacons', and function as pinching devices. Using 'DNA origami pliers' and 'DNA origami forceps', which consist of two levers ~170 nm long connected at a fulcrum, various single-molecule inorganic and organic targets ranging from metal ions to proteins can be visually detected using atomic force microscopy by a shape transition of the origami devices. Any detection mechanism suitable for the target of interest, pinching, zipping or unzipping, can be chosen and used orthogonally with differently shaped origami devices in the same mixture using a single platform. PMID:21863016

  5. Atomic force microscopy observation of lipopolysaccharide-induced cardiomyocyte cytoskeleton reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqun; Chen, Tangting; Zhou, Xiang; Huang, Qiaobing; Jin, Chunhua

    2013-08-01

    We applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to observe lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intracellular cytoskeleton reorganization in primary cardiomyocytes from neonatal mouse. The nonionic detergent Triton X-100 was used to remove the membrane, soluble proteins, and organelles from the cell. The remaining cytoskeleton can then be directly visualized by AFM. Using three-dimensional technique of AFM, we were able to quantify the changes of cytoskeleton by the "density" and total "volume" of the cytoskeleton fibers. Compared to the control group, the density of cytoskeleton was remarkably decreased and the volume of cytoskeleton was significantly increased after LPS treatment, which suggests that LPS may induce the cytoskeleton reorganization and change the cardiomyocyte morphology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Polarization-resolved two-photon luminescence microscopy of V-groove arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, J.; Novikov, S. M.; Holmgaard, T.

    2012-01-01

    Using two-photon luminescence (TPL) microscopy and local reflection spectroscopy we investigate electromagnetic field enhancement effects from a mu m-sized composition of 450-nm-deep V-grooves milled by focused ion beam in a thick gold film and assembled to feature, within the same structure, ind...... obtained to evaluation of local field enhancements using TPL microscopy, especially when investigating extended structures exhibiting different radiation channels, are discussed. (C)2011 Optical Society of America......Using two-photon luminescence (TPL) microscopy and local reflection spectroscopy we investigate electromagnetic field enhancement effects from a mu m-sized composition of 450-nm-deep V-grooves milled by focused ion beam in a thick gold film and assembled to feature, within the same structure...

  7. Antimicrobial properties of analgesic kyotorphin peptides unraveled through atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Marta M.B.; Franquelim, Henri G.; Torcato, Inês M.; Ramu, Vasanthakumar G.; Heras, Montserrat; Bardaji, Eduard R.; Castanho, Miguel A.R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New kyotorphin derivatives have antimicrobial properties against S. aureus. ► Atomic force microscopy show membrane disturbing effects of KTP–NH 2 and IbKTP–NH 2 . ► None of the KTP derivatives are hemolytic. ► The minimal peptidic sequence with antimicrobial activity is Tyr-Arg, if amidated. -- Abstract: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates as alternatives to conventional antibiotics for the treatment of resistant pathogens. In the last decades, new AMPs have been found from the cleavage of intact proteins with no antibacterial activity themselves. Bovine hemoglobin hydrolysis, for instance, results in AMPs and the minimal antimicrobial peptide sequence was defined as Tyr-Arg plus a positively charged amino acid residue. The Tyr-Arg dipeptide alone, known as kyotorphin (KTP), is an endogenous analgesic neuropeptide but has no antimicrobial activity itself. In previous studies new KTP derivatives combining C-terminal amidation and Ibuprofen (Ib) – KTP–NH 2 , IbKTP, IbKTP–NH 2 – were designed in order to improve KTP brain targeting. Those modifications succeeded in enhancing peptide-cell membrane affinity towards fluid anionic lipids and higher analgesic activity after systemic injection resulted therefrom. Here, we investigated if this affinity for anionic lipid membranes also translates into antimicrobial activity because bacteria have anionic membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that KTP derivatives perturbed Staphylococcus aureus membrane structure by inducing membrane blebbing, disruption and lysis. In addition, these peptides bind to red blood cells but are non-hemolytic. From the KTP derivatives tested, amidated KTP proves to be the most active antibacterial agent. The combination of analgesia and antibacterial activities with absence of toxicity is highly appealing from the clinical point of view and broadens the therapeutic potential and application of kyotorphin peptides.

  8. Diabetes increases stiffness of live cardiomyocytes measured by atomic force microscopy nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benech, Juan C; Benech, Nicolás; Zambrana, Ana I; Rauschert, Inés; Bervejillo, Verónica; Oddone, Natalia; Damián, Juan P

    2014-11-15

    Stiffness of live cardiomyocytes isolated from control and diabetic mice was measured using the atomic force microscopy nanoindentation method. Type 1 diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin administration. Histological images of myocardium from mice that were diabetic for 3 mo showed disorderly lineup of myocardial cells, irregularly sized cell nuclei, and fragmented and disordered myocardial fibers with interstitial collagen accumulation. Phalloidin-stained cardiomyocytes isolated from diabetic mice showed altered (i.e., more irregular and diffuse) actin filament organization compared with cardiomyocytes from control mice. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) pump expression was reduced in homogenates obtained from the left ventricle of diabetic animals compared with age-matched controls. The apparent elastic modulus (AEM) for live control or diabetic isolated cardiomyocytes was measured using the atomic force microscopy nanoindentation method in Tyrode buffer solution containing 1.8 mM Ca(2+) and 5.4 mM KCl (physiological condition), 100 nM Ca(2+) and 5.4 mM KCl (low extracellular Ca(2+) condition), or 1.8 mM Ca(2+) and 140 mM KCl (contraction condition). In the physiological condition, the mean AEM was 112% higher for live diabetic than control isolated cardiomyocytes (91 ± 14 vs. 43 ± 7 kPa). The AEM was also significantly higher in diabetic than control cardiomyocytes in the low extracellular Ca(2+) and contraction conditions. These findings suggest that the material properties of live cardiomyocytes were affected by diabetes, resulting in stiffer cells, which very likely contribute to high diastolic LV stiffness, which has been observed in vivo in some diabetes mellitus patients. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTER LABORATORY WORK ON ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY OF BIOOBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Kuchmenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovations in Education are based on the use of new effective educational and information technologies, introduction of progressive forms of organization of educational process, active learning methods. The significant role in the educational system is the development and implementation of virtual labs. For the development of the contemporary science section as bioinformatics, it is necessary to extend the possibility of using computers for processing the information received with the use of modern devices. These research methods include atomic force microscopy. For Students of the specialty 06.05.01 "Bioengineering and Bioinformatics" in the SD "Basics of Nanobiotechnology" it has been developed a virtual laboratory work on "Processing of nanostructured images of biomolecules." The basis for the development of laboratory work was the handbook modified for affordable performance. Laboratory workshop allows you to briefly find out the theory of atomic force microscopy, the organization and the principle of operation of the device. It allows Students to quickly learn the using the program at the AFM image processing Nova 1.0.26.1443. In the laboratory work for the tasks solution the biological objects are selected from the images catalog, and to study and describe of these objects the software is used. Students work with images of biomolecules in the program: change them (increasing, selection of separate areas, evaluate the geometrical parameters, work with 3D-image, writing a description and compare objects with each other. The results are summarized in a table and conclusion. The effectiveness and usefulness of the created laboratory work are proved by the results of Student’s survey and tested in the final and interim certification. This kind of work is suitable for distance learning, to provide a laboratory practicum in SD "Nanotechnology", "Modern methods of analysis" for other specialties as an educational and methodological materials.

  10. Combining confocal and atomic force microscopy to quantify single-virus binding to mammalian cell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Richard; Delguste, Martin; Koehler, Melanie; Dumitru, Andra C; Laskowski, Pawel R; Müller, Daniel J; Alsteens, David

    2017-11-01

    Over the past five years, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based approaches have evolved into a powerful multiparametric tool set capable of imaging the surfaces of biological samples ranging from single receptors to membranes and tissues. One of these approaches, force-distance curve-based AFM (FD-based AFM), uses a probing tip functionalized with a ligand to image living cells at high-resolution and simultaneously localize and characterize specific ligand-receptor binding events. Analyzing data from FD-based AFM experiments using appropriate probabilistic models allows quantification of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters that describe the free-energy landscape of the ligand-receptor bond. We have recently developed an FD-based AFM approach to quantify the binding events of single enveloped viruses to surface receptors of living animal cells while simultaneously observing them by fluorescence microscopy. This approach has provided insights into the early stages of the interaction between a virus and a cell. Applied to a model virus, we probed the specific interaction with cells expressing viral cognate receptors and measured the affinity of the interaction. Furthermore, we observed that the virus rapidly established specific multivalent interactions and found that each bond formed in sequence strengthened the attachment of the virus to the cell. Here we describe detailed procedures for probing the specific interactions of viruses with living cells; these procedures cover tip preparation, cell sample preparation, step-by-step FD-based AFM imaging and data analysis. Experienced microscopists should be able to master the entire set of protocols in 1 month.

  11. Antimicrobial properties of analgesic kyotorphin peptides unraveled through atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Marta M.B.; Franquelim, Henri G.; Torcato, Ines M. [Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa, Av. Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisboa (Portugal); Ramu, Vasanthakumar G.; Heras, Montserrat; Bardaji, Eduard R. [Laboratori d' Innovacio en Processos i Productes de Sintesi Organica (LIPPSO), Departament de Quimica, Universitat de Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Castanho, Miguel A.R.B., E-mail: macastanho@fm.ul.pt [Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa, Av. Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New kyotorphin derivatives have antimicrobial properties against S. aureus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic force microscopy show membrane disturbing effects of KTP-NH{sub 2} and IbKTP-NH{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer None of the KTP derivatives are hemolytic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The minimal peptidic sequence with antimicrobial activity is Tyr-Arg, if amidated. -- Abstract: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates as alternatives to conventional antibiotics for the treatment of resistant pathogens. In the last decades, new AMPs have been found from the cleavage of intact proteins with no antibacterial activity themselves. Bovine hemoglobin hydrolysis, for instance, results in AMPs and the minimal antimicrobial peptide sequence was defined as Tyr-Arg plus a positively charged amino acid residue. The Tyr-Arg dipeptide alone, known as kyotorphin (KTP), is an endogenous analgesic neuropeptide but has no antimicrobial activity itself. In previous studies new KTP derivatives combining C-terminal amidation and Ibuprofen (Ib) - KTP-NH{sub 2}, IbKTP, IbKTP-NH{sub 2} - were designed in order to improve KTP brain targeting. Those modifications succeeded in enhancing peptide-cell membrane affinity towards fluid anionic lipids and higher analgesic activity after systemic injection resulted therefrom. Here, we investigated if this affinity for anionic lipid membranes also translates into antimicrobial activity because bacteria have anionic membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that KTP derivatives perturbed Staphylococcus aureus membrane structure by inducing membrane blebbing, disruption and lysis. In addition, these peptides bind to red blood cells but are non-hemolytic. From the KTP derivatives tested, amidated KTP proves to be the most active antibacterial agent. The combination of analgesia and antibacterial activities with absence of toxicity is highly appealing from the clinical point of view

  12. Nanoscale imaging of the Candida-macrophage interaction using correlated fluorescence-atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2012-12-21

    Knowledge of the molecular bases underlying the interaction of fungal pathogens with immune cells is critical to our understanding of fungal infections and offers exciting perspectives for controlling immune responses for therapy. Although fluorescence microscopy is a valuable tool to visualize pathogen-host interactions, the spatial resolution is low, meaning the fine structural details of the interacting cells cannot be observed. Here, we demonstrate the ability of correlated fluorescence-atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image the various steps of the interaction between fungal pathogens and macrophages with nanoscale resolution. We focus on Candida albicans, known to grow as two morphological forms (yeast cells, filamentous hyphae) that play important roles in modulating the interaction with macrophages. We observe the main steps of macrophage infection, including initial intercellular contact, phagocytosis by internalization of yeast cells, intracellular hyphal growth leading to mechanical stretching, and piercing of the macrophage membrane resulting in pathogen escape. While fluorescence imaging clearly distinguishes fungal cells from macrophages during the various steps of the process, AFM captures nanoscale structural features of the macrophage surface that are of high biological relevance, including ruffles, lamellipodia, filopodia, membrane remnants, and phagocytic cups. As fungal pathogenesis is mainly controlled by the ability of fungi to escape from immune cells, the nanoimaging platform established here has great potential in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling fungal infections.

  13. An integrated instrumental setup for the combination of atomic force microscopy with optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, R J; Heyes, C D; Knebel, D; Röcker, C; Nienhaus, G U

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, the study of single biomolecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques has resulted in a plethora of new information regarding the physics underlying these complex biological systems. It is especially advantageous to be able to measure the optical, topographical, and mechanical properties of single molecules simultaneously. Here an AFM is used that is especially designed for integration with an inverted optical microscope and that has a near-infrared light source (850 nm) to eliminate interference between the optical experiment and the AFM operation. The Tip Assisted Optics (TAO) system consists of an additional 100 x 100-microm(2) X-Y scanner for the sample, which can be independently and simultaneously used with the AFM scanner. This allows the offset to be removed between the confocal optical image obtained with the sample scanner and the simultaneously acquired AFM topography image. The tip can be positioned exactly into the optical focus while the user can still navigate within the AFM image for imaging or manipulation of the sample. Thus the tip-enhancement effect can be maximized and it becomes possible to perform single molecule manipulation experiments within the focus of a confocal optical image. Here this is applied to simultaneous measurement of single quantum dot fluorescence and topography with high spatial resolution. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. High-speed atomic force microscopy imaging of live mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Watanabe, Hiroki; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2017-01-01

    Direct imaging of morphological dynamics of live mammalian cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly expected, but yet challenging. High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) is a unique technique for capturing biomolecules at work under near physiological conditions. However, application of HS-AFM for imaging of live mammalian cells was hard to be accomplished because of collision between a huge mammalian cell and a cantilever during AFM scanning. Here, we review our recent improvements of HS-AFM for imaging of activities of live mammalian cells without significant damage to the cell. The improvement of an extremely long (~3 μm) AFM tip attached to a cantilever enables us to reduce severe damage to soft mammalian cells. In addition, a combination of HS-AFM with simple fluorescence microscopy allows us to quickly locate the cell in the AFM scanning area. After these improvements, we demonstrate that developed HS-AFM for live mammalian cells is possible to image morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pits open-close formations, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells as well as hippocampal neurons.

  15. Smoking and fluidity of erythrocyte membranes: a high resolution scanning electron and atomic force microscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Etheresia; du Plooy, Jeanette N; Soma, Prashilla; Keyser, Ina; Buys, Antoinette V

    2013-11-30

    Smoking affects the general health of an individual, however, the red blood cells (RBCs) and their architecture are particularly vulnerable to inhaled toxins related to smoking. Smoking is one of the lifestyle diseases that are responsible for the most deaths worldwide and an individual who smokes is exposed to excessive amounts of oxidants and toxins which generate up to 10(18) free radicals in the human body. Recently, it was reported that smoking decreases RBC membrane fluidity. Here we confirm this and we show changes visible in the topography of RBC membranes, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). RBC membranes show bubble formation of the phospholipid layer, as well as balloon-like smooth areas; while their general discoid shapes are changed to form pointed extensions. We also investigate membrane roughness using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and these results confirm SEM results. Due to the vast capability of RBCs to be adaptable, their state of well-being is a major indication for the general health status of an individual. We conclude that these changes, using an old technique in a novel application, may provide new insights and new avenues for future improvements in clinical medicine pertaining to conditions like COPD. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Probing individual redox PEGylated gold nanoparticles by electrochemical--atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai; Anne, Agnès; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Demaille, Christophe

    2013-05-28

    Electrochemical-atomic force microscopy (AFM-SECM) was used to simultaneously probe the physical and electrochemical properties of individual ~20 nm sized gold nanoparticles functionalized by redox-labeled PEG chains. The redox PEGylated nanoparticles were assembled onto a gold electrode surface, forming a random nanoarray, and interrogated in situ by a combined AFM-SECM nanoelectrode probe. We show that, in this so-called mediator-tethered (Mt) mode, AFM-SECM affords the nanometer resolution required for resolving the position of individual nanoparticles and measuring their size, while simultaneously electrochemically directly contacting the redox-PEG chains they bear. The dual measurement of the size and current response of single nanoparticles uniquely allows the statistical distribution in grafting density of PEG on the nanoparticles to be determined and correlated to the nanoparticle diameter. Moreover, because of its high spatial resolution, Mt/AFM-SECM allows "visualizing" simultaneously but independently the PEG corona and the gold core of individual nanoparticles. Beyond demonstrating the achievement of single-nanoparticle resolution using an electrochemical microscopy technique, the results reported here also pave the way toward using Mt/AFM-SECM for imaging nano-objects bearing any kind of suitably redox-labeled (bio)macromolecules.

  17. New analysis procedure for fast and reliable size measurement of nanoparticles from atomic force microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, Robert D.; Cuenat, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Accurate size measurement during nanoparticle production is essential for the continuing innovation, quality and safety of nano-enabled products. Size measurement by analysing a number of separate particles individually has particular advantages over ensemble methods. In the latter case nanoparticles have to be well dispersed in a fluid and changes that may occur during analysis, such as agglomeration and degradation, will not be detected which could lead to misleading results. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows imaging of particles both in air and liquid, however, the strong interactions between the probe and the particle will cause the broadening of the lateral dimension in the final image. In this paper a new procedure to measure the size of spherical nanoparticles from AFM images via vertical height measurement is described. This procedure will quickly analyse hundred of particles simultaneously and reproduce the measurements obtained from electron microscopy (EM). Nanoparticles samples that were difficult, if not impossible, to analyse with EM were successfully measured using this method. The combination of this procedure with the use of a metrological AFM moves closer to true traceable measurements of nanoparticle dispersions.

  18. Detection of in-situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Naoaki; Ishikawa, Mitsuru

    2000-04-01

    Detection of in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes provides important information about gene mappings and about analysis of chromosomal disorders. We applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to the detection of in situ hybridization to get better resolution as compared to light microscopy. Chromosomes were spread over a glass substrate and hybridized with DNA probes labeled with biotin or digoxigenin. The hybridized probes were reacted with streptavidin or anti-digoxigenin antibody, both of which were conjugated with 5-nm gold colloidal particles. We missed direct detection of the conjugated gold colloidal particles by micro-meter scale AFM scanning , but obtained clear topographic difference between the site of hybridization and the chromosome arm with the help of silver enhancement. We thus clearly detected the in situ hybridization using chromosome painting probes, alpha satellite probes, and locus specific gene probes by AFM. The in situ hybridization to DNA fiber was also detected by AFM. The detection of in situ hybridization by AFM has advantages over fluorescence in situ hybridization: no reduction of signal intensity under light irradiation. Application of AFM to the detection of in situ hybridization will be a useful method to analyze chromosomes.

  19. Biological Atomic Force Microscopy for Imaging Gold-Labeled Liposomes on Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-María Zaske

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although atomic force microscopy (AFM has been used extensively to characterize cell membrane structure and cellular processes such as endocytosis and exocytosis, the corrugated surface of the cell membrane hinders the visualization of extracellular entities, such as liposomes, that may interact with the cell. To overcome this barrier, we used 90 nm nanogold particles to label FITC liposomes and monitor their endocytosis on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs in vitro. We were able to study the internalization process of gold-coupled liposomes on endothelial cells, by using AFM. We found that the gold-liposomes attached to the HCAEC cell membrane during the first 15–30 min of incubation, liposome cell internalization occurred from 30 to 60 min, and most of the gold-labeled liposomes had invaginated after 2 hr of incubation. Liposomal uptake took place most commonly at the periphery of the nuclear zone. Dynasore monohydrate, an inhibitor of endocytosis, obstructed the internalization of the gold-liposomes. This study showed the versatility of the AFM technique, combined with fluorescent microscopy, for investigating liposome uptake by endothelial cells. The 90 nm colloidal gold nanoparticles proved to be a noninvasive contrast agent that efficiently improves AFM imaging during the investigation of biological nanoprocesses.

  20. Elastic-properties measurement at high temperatures through contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinello, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.marinello@unipd.it; Pezzuolo, Andrea; Sartori, Luigi; Cavalli, Raffaele [University of Padova, Department of Land, Environment, Agriculture and Forestry, Viale dell’Università 16, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Carmignato, Simone [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering, Stradella San Nicola 3, 36100 Vicenza (Italy); Savio, Enrico [University of Padova, Department of Industrial Engineering, Via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova (Italy); De Chiffre, Leonardo [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Produktionstorvet 425, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-06-23

    Miniaturization of products and need for further improvement of machines performance introduce new serious challenges in materials characterization. In particular non-destructive mechanical testing in the sub-micrometer scale is needed to better understand and improve micro-manufacturing operations. To this regard, some open issues are of particular interest: low depth of penetration, high lateral resolution and measurements at elevated temperatures. An interesting solution is given by acoustic microscopy techniques, which can be successfully implemented for advanced research in surface elasticity, allowing fast direct and non-destructive measurement of Young’s modulus and related surface parameters. In this work an instrument set up for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy is proposed, where the sample with is coupled to a heating stage and a piezoelectric transducer directly vibrate the cantilever during scanning, in order to allow exploitation of high resolution measurements at relatively high temperatures. Such instrument set up was undergone a set of calibration experiments in order to allow not only qualitative but also quantitative characterization of surfaces. The work was completed with a feasibility study with mechanical and topography measurements at temperatures as high as 150°C, with lateral resolution lower than 100 nm.