WorldWideScience

Sample records for polarization charge density

  1. Polarization Charge Density in Strained Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Noah

    Graphene, the world's first truly two-dimensional material, is unique for having an electronic structure described by an effective Lorentz invariant theory. One important consequence is that the ratio or Coulomb energy to kinetic energy is a constant, depending only on conditions within the lattice rather than on the average charge density as in a typical Galilean invariant material. Given this unusual property, a natural question would be how do phenomena, such as screening of a Coulomb impurity, happen in graphene? Moreover, how does the addition of uniaxial strain enhance or diminish this behavior? Here I discuss our work to calculate the charge density distribution in a lattice of strained graphene under the effect of an external Coulomb impurity. Graphene can have its band structure significantly altered by the application of uniaxial strain. Two cases are here explored: relatively weak strain at some finite chemical potential, and extreme strain with zero chemical potential. In the first system, the strain induces elliptic Dirac cones, engendering some inherent directionality to graphene's electronic properties that did not exist before. This anisotropy manifests itself in the polarization function, and so too in the screening charge density. A finite chemical potential in this case is necessary for any screening to take place in graphene since, without it, there are no electron states near the Fermi level to polarize. Both in the strained and unstrained case, decaying oscillations known as Friedel oscillations are observed. The result of strain is a multifaceted anisotropy of the charge distribution: the amplitude, frequency, and the position of the first peak in the oscillations are each varied depending on the direction one observes. In the second system, extreme strain in graphene leads to a merging of Dirac cones, yielding a transition to a new energy spectrum. This band structure is unusual in that it becomes quadratic along the direction of strain

  2. Metallicity at interphase boundaries due to polar catastrophe induced by charge density discontinuity

    KAUST Repository

    Albar, Arwa

    2018-02-09

    The electronic properties of interphase boundaries are of basic importance for most materials, particularly when those properties deviate strongly from the bulk behavior. We introduce a mechanism that can result in metallicity at stoichiometric interphase boundaries between semiconductors based on the idea of polar catastrophe, which is usually considered only in the context of heterostructures. To this end, we perform ab initio calculations within density functional theory to investigate the electronic states at stoichiometric SnO/SnO2 (110) interphase boundaries. In this system, one would not expect polar catastrophe to have a role according to state-of-the-art theory because the interface lacks formal charge discontinuity. However, we observe the formation of a hole gas between the semiconductors SnO and SnO2. To explain these findings, we provide a generalized theory based on the idea that the charge density discontinuity between SnO and SnO2, a consequence of lattice mismatch, drives a polar catastrophe scenario. As a result, SnO/SnO2 (110) interphase boundaries can develop metallicity depending on the grain size. The concept of metallicity due to polar catastrophe induced by charge density discontinuity is of general validity and applies to many interphase boundaries with lattice mismatch.

  3. Spin polarization driven by a charge-density wave in monolayer 1T−TaS2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qingyun

    2014-08-06

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic and vibrational properties of monolayer T-phase TaS2. We demonstrate that a charge-density wave is energetically favorable at low temperature, similar to bulk 1T-TaS2. Electron-phonon coupling is found to be essential for the lattice reconstruction. The charge-density wave results in a strong localization of the electronic states near the Fermi level and consequently in spin polarization, transforming the material into a magnetic semiconductor with enhanced electronic correlations. The combination of inherent spin polarization with a semiconducting nature distinguishes the monolayer fundamentally from the bulk compound as well as from other two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. Monolayer T-phase TaS2 therefore has the potential to enable two-dimensional spintronics. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  4. Small scale density variations of electrons and charged particles in the vicinity of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present small scale variations of electron number densities and particle charge number densities measured in situ in the presence of polar mesosphere summer echoes. It turns out that the small scale fluctuations of electrons and negatively charged particles show a strong anticorrelation down to the smallest scales observed. Comparing these small scale structures with the simultaneously measured radar signal to noise profile, we find that the radar profile is well described by the power spectral density of both electrons and charged particles at the radar half wavelength (=the Bragg scale. Finally, we consider the shape of the power spectra of the observed plasma fluctuations and find that both charged particles and electrons show spectra that can be explained in terms of either neutral air turbulence acting on the distribution of a low diffusivity tracer or the fossil remnants of a formerly active turbulent region. All these results are consistent with the theoretical ideas by Rapp and Lübken (2003 suggesting that PMSE can be explained by a combination of active and fossil neutral air turbulence acting on the large and heavy charged aerosol particles which are subsequently mirrored in the electron number density distribution that becomes visible to a VHF radar when small scale fluctuations are present.

  5. A simple method of extracting the polarization charge density in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure from current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lü Yuan-Jie; Lin Zhao-Jun; Yu Ying-Xia; Meng Ling-Guo; Cao Zhi-Fang; Luan Chong-Biao; Wang Zhan-Guo

    2012-01-01

    An Ni Schottky contact on the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is fabricated. The flat-band voltage for the Schottky contact on the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is obtained from the forward current—voltage characteristics. With the measured capacitance—voltage curve and the flat-band voltage, the polarization charge density in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is investigated, and a simple formula for calculating the polarization charge density is obtained and analyzed. With the approach described in this paper, the obtained polarization charge density agrees well with the one calculated by self-consistently solving Schrodinger's and Poisson's equations

  6. Nonperturbative vacuum polarization effects in two-dimensional supercritical Dirac-Coulomb system I. Vacuum charge density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, A.; Sveshnikov, K.; Voronina, Yu.

    2018-01-01

    Based on the original combination of analytical methods, computer algebra tools and numerical calculations, proposed recently in Refs. 1-3, the nonperturbative vacuum polarization effects in the 2+1D supercritical Dirac-Coulomb system with Z > Zcr,1 are explored. Both the vacuum charge density ρV P(r→) and vacuum energy ℰV P are considered. The main result of the work is that in the overcritical region ℰV P turns out to be a rapidly decreasing function ˜-ηeffZ3/R with ηeff > 0 and R being the size of the external Coulomb source. Due to a lot of details of calculation the whole work is divided into two parts I and II. In the present part I, we consider the evaluation and behavior of the vacuum density ρV P, which further is used in part II for evaluation of the vacuum energy, with emphasis on the renormalization, convergence of the partial expansion for ρV P and behavior of the integral induced charge QV P in the overcritical region.

  7. Injection-modulated polarity conversion by charge carrier density control via a self-assembled monolayer for all-solution-processed organic field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jeongkyun; Lee, Taesoo; Kang, Chan-Mo; Kwak, Jeonghun; Lang, Philippe; Horowitz, Gilles; Kim, Hyeok; Lee, Changhee

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrated modulation of charge carrier densities in all-solution-processed organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) by modifying the injection properties with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The all-solution-processed OFETs based on an n-type polymer with inkjet-printed Ag electrodes were fabricated as a test platform, and the injection properties were modified by the SAMs. Two types of SAMs with different dipole direction, thiophenol (TP) and pentafluorobenzene thiol (PFBT) were employed, modifying the work function of the inkjet-printed Ag (4.9 eV) to 4.66 eV and 5.24 eV with TP and PFBT treatments, respectively. The charge carrier densities were controlled by the SAM treatment in both dominant and non-dominant carrier-channel regimes. This work demonstrates that control of the charge carrier densities can be efficiently achieved by modifying the injection property with SAM treatment; thus, this approach can achieve polarity conversion of the OFETs.

  8. Charge density waves in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Gor'kov, LP

    2012-01-01

    The latest addition to this series covers a field which is commonly referred to as charge density wave dynamics.The most thoroughly investigated materials are inorganic linear chain compounds with highly anisotropic electronic properties. The volume opens with an examination of their structural properties and the essential features which allow charge density waves to develop.The behaviour of the charge density waves, where interesting phenomena are observed, is treated both from a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. The role of impurities in statics and dynamics is considered and an

  9. Transition density of charge-exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    The transition density between parent and analogue states is studied with special reference to its role in charge-exchange nuclear reactions. The structure of the target nucleus is described in a perturbative approach, in which the Coulomb and asymmetry potentials mix the eigenstates of a charge-independent single-particle Hamiltonian. In this model formulae are derived for the transition density, the Coulomb displacement energy and the neutron-proton density difference, and their relationship is used to estimate the transition density. This estimate shows that: the largest contribution comes from the density of the excess neutrons; the weight of the Coulomb-mixing effect is small up to excess neutron number 10, and grows rapidly beyond; the weight of the core polarization term induced by the excess neutrons is modest and is the same for all nuclei. It is indicated that the Coulomb effect may explain the departure from the Lane model of nucleon charge-exchange scattering found for heavy nuclei, whereas the core polarization may account for the observed anomalous dependence of the deg 0 pion charge-exchange cross section on the number of excess neutrons. (author)

  10. Modern charge-density analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gatti, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on developments from the past 10-15 years, this volume presents an objective overview of the research in charge density analysis. The most promising methodologies are included, in addition to powerful interpretative tools and a survey of important areas of research.

  11. Direct Probing of Polarization Charge at Nanoscale Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Owoong [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering; Seol, Daehee [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering; Lee, Dongkyu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Han, Hee [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (South Korea); Lindfors-Vrejoiu, Ionela [Univ. of Cologne (Germany). Physics Inst.; Lee, Woo [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (South Korea); Jesse, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Lee, Ho Nyung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Alexe, Marin [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kim, Yunseok [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering

    2017-11-14

    Ferroelectric materials possess spontaneous polarization that can be used for multiple applications. Owing to a long-term development of reducing the sizes of devices, the preparation of ferroelectric materials and devices is entering the nanometer-scale regime. In order to evaluate the ferroelectricity, there is a need to investigate the polarization charge at the nanoscale. Nonetheless, it is generally accepted that the detection of polarization charges using a conventional conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) without a top electrode is not feasible because the nanometer-scale radius of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip yields a very low signal-to-noise ratio. But, the detection is unrelated to the radius of an AFM tip and, in fact, a matter of the switched area. In this work, the direct probing of the polarization charge at the nanoscale is demonstrated using the positive-up-negative-down method based on the conventional CAFM approach without additional corrections or circuits to reduce the parasitic capacitance. The polarization charge densities of 73.7 and 119.0 µC cm-2 are successfully probed in ferroelectric nanocapacitors and thin films, respectively. The results we obtained show the feasibility of the evaluation of polarization charge at the nanoscale and provide a new guideline for evaluating the ferroelectricity at the nanoscale.

  12. Molecular density functional theory of water including density-polarization coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levy, Nicolas; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2016-06-22

    We present a three-dimensional molecular density functional theory of water derived from first-principles that relies on the particle's density and multipolar polarization density and includes the density-polarization coupling. This brings two main benefits: (i) scalar density and vectorial multipolar polarization density fields are much more tractable and give more physical insight than the full position and orientation densities, and (ii) it includes the full density-polarization coupling of water, that is known to be non-vanishing but has never been taken into account. Furthermore, the theory requires only the partial charge distribution of a water molecule and three measurable bulk properties, namely the structure factor and the Fourier components of the longitudinal and transverse dielectric susceptibilities.

  13. Numerical modelling of electrochemical polarization around charged metallic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, Matthias; Undorf, Sabine; Flores Orozco, Adrián; Kemna, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We extend an existing analytical model and carry out numerical simulations to study the polarization process around charged metallic particles immersed in an electrolyte solution. Electro-migration and diffusion processes in the electrolyte are described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck system of partial differential equations. To model the surface charge density, we consider a time- and frequency-invariant electric potential at the particle surface, which leads to the build-up of a static electrical double layer (EDL). Upon excitation by an external electric field at low frequencies, we observe the superposition of two polarization processes. On the one hand, the induced dipole moment on the metallic particle leads to the accumulation of opposite charges in the electrolyte. This charge polarization corresponds to the long-known response of uncharged metallic particles. On the other hand, the unequal cation and anion concentrations in the EDL give rise to a salinity gradient between the two opposite sides of the metallic particle. The resulting concentration polarization enhances the magnitude of the overall polarization response. Furthermore, we use our numerical model to study the effect of relevant model parameters such as surface charge density and ionic strength of the electrolyte on the resulting spectra of the effective conductivity of the composite model system. Our results do not only give interesting new insight into the time-harmonic variation of electric potential and ion concentrations around charged metallic particle. They are also able to reduce incongruities between earlier model predictions and geophysical field and laboratory measurements. Our model thereby improves the general understanding of IP signatures of metallic particles and represents the next step towards a quantitative interpretation of IP imaging results. Part of this research is funded by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy under the Raw Materials Initiative.

  14. Preparation of electrospun polyacrylonitrile fibers containing only the polarization charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qin; Yao, Yongyi; Guo, Xiaoming; Zhou, Tao; Xiang, Ruili

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we report a simple method to separate immobile charges into polarization charges and trapped charges and successfully prepare electrospun polyacrylonitrile fibers only containing polarization charge. The amount of surface polarization charges and trapped charges were +5.34 nC/g and -2.98 nC/g, respectively. We also tried to explain the mechanism of formation and location of immobile charges by using a model of a parallel plate capacitor, and to track the route and location of charges. Additionally, we investigated the influence of residual solvent, a water bath and the temperature of the water bath on the immobile charges.

  15. Charge densities and charge noise in mesoscopic conductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We introduce a hierarchy of density of states to characterize the charge distribution in a mesoscopic conductor. At the bottom of this hierarchy are the partial density of states which represent the contribution to the local density of states if both the incident and the out-going scattering channel is prescribed. The partial density ...

  16. DETERMINATION OF SURFACE CHARGE DENSITY OF α ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    dissociation of these groups, result into a pH dependent surface charge whose density can be measured by acid-base titration. The surface charge density determined by such method is essentially measured relative to the unknown condition of the oxide/liquid interface prior to reagent addition (i.e. at the point of zero ...

  17. Theory to determine the critical charge density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, F.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper we theoretically determine the critical charge density in the system earthed metallic sphere-uniformly charged dielectric plane, in presence of earthed surfaces. This is a situation frequently encountered in industrial condition and has a great importance to evaluate the danger of the electrostatic discharges. (author)

  18. Exploring effective interactions through transition charge density ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov; effective interactions; transition charge density. PACS Nos 21.60.-n; 21.10.-k; 23.20.-g; 27.50.+e. 1. Introduction ... Transition charge density study of 70,72,74,76Ge nuclei models like Hartree–Fock, ...... [31] P N Tripathi and S K Sharma, Phys. Rev. C34, 1081 (1986). [32] P K Rath and S K Sharma ...

  19. Central depression of nuclear charge density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Yanyun; Ren Zhongzhou; Wang Zaijun; Dong Tiekuang

    2010-01-01

    The center-depressed nuclear charge distributions are investigated with the parametrized distribution and the relativistic mean-field theory, and their corresponding charge form factors are worked out with the phase shift analysis method. The central depression of nuclear charge distribution of 46 Ar and 44 S is supported by the relativistic mean-field calculation. According to the calculation, the valence protons in 46 Ar and 44 S prefer to occupy the 1d 3/2 state rather than the 2s 1/2 state, which is different from that in the less neutron-rich argon and sulfur isotopes. As a result, the central proton densities of 46 Ar and 44 S are highly depressed, and so are their central charge densities. The charge form factors of some argon and sulfur isotopes are presented, and the minima of the charge form factors shift upward and inward when the central nuclear charge distributions are more depressed. Besides, the effect of the central depression on the charge form factors is studied with a parametrized distribution, when the root-mean-square charge radii remain constant.

  20. Modeling the Electric Potential and Surface Charge Density Near Charged Thunderclouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Matthew Stephen

    2018-03-01

    Thundercloud charge separation, or the process by which the bottom portion of a cloud gathers charge and the top portion of the cloud gathers the opposite charge, is still not thoroughly understood. Whatever the mechanism, though, a charge separation definitely exists and can lead to electrostatic discharge via cloud-to-cloud lightning and cloud-to-ground lightning. We wish to examine the latter form, in which upward leaders from Earth connect with downward leaders from the cloud to form a plasma channel and produce lightning. Much of the literature indicates that the lower part of a thundercloud becomes negatively charged while the upper part becomes positively charged via convective charging, although the opposite polarity can certainly exist along with various, complex intra-cloud currents. It is estimated that >90% of cloud-to-ground lightning is "negative lightning," or the flow of charges from the bottom of the cloud, while the remaining the flow of charges from the top of the cloud. We wish to understand the electric potential surrounding charged thunderclouds as well as the resulting charge density on the surface of Earth below them. In this paper we construct a simple and adaptable model that captures the very basic features of the cloud/ground system and that exhibits conditions favorable for both forms of lightning. In this way, we provide a practical application of electrostatic dipole physics as well as the method of images that can serve as a starting point for further modeling and analysis by students.

  1. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Wall

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement.

  2. Meaningful structural descriptors from charge density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalke, Dietmar

    2011-08-16

    This paper provides a short introduction to the basics of electron density investigations. The two predominant approaches for the modelling and various interpretations of electron density distributions are presented. Their potential translations into chemical concepts are explained. The focus of the article lies on the deduction of chemical properties from charge density studies in some selected main group compounds. The relationship between the obtained numerical data and commonly accepted simple chemical concepts unfortunately is not always straightforward, and often the chemist relies on heuristic connections rather than rigorously defined ones. This article tries to demonstrate how charge density analyses can shed light on aspects of chemical bonding and reactivity resulting from the determined bonding situation. Sometimes this helps to identify misconceptions and sets the scene for new unconventional synthetic approaches. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Selective Coherent Excitation of Charged Density Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsvetkov, A.A.; Sagar, D.M.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Marel, D. van der

    2003-01-01

    Real time femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study collective and single particle excitations in the charge density wave state of the quasi-1D metal, blue bronze. Along with the previously observed collective amplitudon excitation, the spectra show several additional coherent features.

  4. Charge density glass from fictions to facts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biljakovic, K. [Institute of Physics, Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: katica@ifs.hr; Staresinic, D.; Dominko, D. [Institute of Physics, Zagreb (Croatia); Lasjaunias, J.C. [Institut Neel, Grenoble (France)

    2009-03-01

    Thirty years ago Fukuyama [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45 (1978) 1474] predicted a transition from charge density wave (CDW) state to the charge density glass (CDG) at a finite temperature as the consequence of the competition between the uniform commensurability pinning and the random impurity pinning. We present strong evidence that the CDG phase indeed exists as a generic feature of density wave systems. However, it arises from the competition of the random impurity pinning and the electrostatic intra-CDW interaction which tends to establish a uniform phase at low temperature. The glass transition occurs at the temperature at which the free carriers cannot efficiently screen the phase distortions. The characteristic length scale of the disorder, i.e. the size of the phase coherent domains, governs the glass properties.

  5. Charge density glass from fictions to facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biljakovic, K.; Staresinic, D.; Dominko, D.; Lasjaunias, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years ago Fukuyama [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45 (1978) 1474] predicted a transition from charge density wave (CDW) state to the charge density glass (CDG) at a finite temperature as the consequence of the competition between the uniform commensurability pinning and the random impurity pinning. We present strong evidence that the CDG phase indeed exists as a generic feature of density wave systems. However, it arises from the competition of the random impurity pinning and the electrostatic intra-CDW interaction which tends to establish a uniform phase at low temperature. The glass transition occurs at the temperature at which the free carriers cannot efficiently screen the phase distortions. The characteristic length scale of the disorder, i.e. the size of the phase coherent domains, governs the glass properties

  6. Accurate Charge Densities from Powder Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindzus, Niels; Wahlberg, Nanna; Becker, Jacob

    Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has in recent years advanced to a level, where it has become realistic to probe extremely subtle electronic features. Compared to single-crystal diffraction, it may be superior for simple, high-symmetry crystals owing to negligible extinction effects and minimal...... peak overlap. Additionally, it offers the opportunity for collecting data on a single scale. For charge densities studies, the critical task is to recover accurate and bias-free structure factors from the diffraction pattern. This is the focal point of the present study, scrutinizing the performance...

  7. Charge density wave states in tantalum dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; Duxbury, Phillip M.

    2018-01-01

    Using density functional theory, we explore a range of charge density wave states (CDWs) in tantalum-based transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers. The high-symmetry states of the 1 H phases of Ta X2 (X = S, Se, Te) are lower in total energy compared to the 1 T variants, while the 1 T phases exhibit a much stronger tendency for CDW formation. The stability of several CDWs is found to be stronger as the chalcogenide is changed in the sequence (S, Se, Te), with the tellurium-based systems exhibiting several CDWs with binding energy per formula unit in the range of 100 meV . These 1 T CDW phases are lower in energy than the corresponding 1 H CDW phases. The diversity of CDWs exhibited by these materials suggests that many "hidden" states may occur on ultrafast excitation or photodoping. Changes in electronic structure across the Ta X2 series are also elucidated.

  8. Determination of charge carrier mobility in doped low density polyethylene using DC transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, M.Salah; Henk, Peter O; Henriksen, Mogens

    1989-01-01

    Charge carrier mobility was determined for plain and doped low-density polyethylene (LDPE) using DC transient currents. Barium titanate was used as a strongly polar dopant and titanium dioxide as a semiconductor dopant. The values of the mobility obtained were on the order of 10-10 cm2 v-1 s-1...... by a factor of five. Charge trapping and space charge formation were modified by the introduction of titanium dioxide...

  9. Charge transport in non-polar and semi-polar III-V nitride heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konar, Aniruddha; Verma, Amit; Fang, Tian; Zhao, Pei; Jana, Raj; Jena, Debdeep

    2012-01-01

    Compared to the intense research focus on the optical properties, the transport properties in non-polar and semi-polar III-nitride semiconductors remain relatively unexplored to date. The purpose of this paper is to discuss charge-transport properties in non-polar and semi-polar orientations of GaN in a comparative fashion to what is known for transport in polar orientations. A comprehensive approach is adopted, starting from an investigation of the differences in the electronic bandstructure along different polar orientations of GaN. The polarization fields along various orientations are then discussed, followed by the low-field electron and hole mobilities. A number of scattering mechanisms that are specific to non-polar and semi-polar GaN heterostructures are identified, and their effects are evaluated. Many of these scattering mechanisms originate due to the coupling of polarization with disorder and defects in various incarnations depending on the crystal orientation. The effect of polarization orientation on carrier injection into quantum-well light-emitting diodes is discussed. This paper ends with a discussion of orientation-dependent high-field charge-transport properties including velocity saturation, instabilities and tunneling transport. Possible open problems and opportunities are also discussed. (paper)

  10. Study of proton polarization in charge exchange process on optically oriented sodium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, A.N.; Kokhanovskij, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    Using high-power adjustable dye lasers for electron spin orientation in a charge-exchange target enables to significantly increase the proton polarization efficiency. A device is described that permits to avoid growth of the polarized proton beam emittance in a charge-exchange process in a strong magnetic field. The devise main feature is the use of an intensive source of neutral hydrogen atoms and the presence of a helium additional charge-exchange target which actualy is a proton ''source''. The helium charge-exchange cell is placed in the same magnetic field of a solenoid where a cell with oriented sodium is placed, a polarized electron being captured by a proton in the latter cell. In this case the beam at the solenoid inlet and outlet is in a neutral state; emittance growth related to the effect of end magnetic fields is not observed. The device after all prouduces polarized protons, their polarization degree is measured and the effect of various factors on polarization degree is studied. The description of the laser source and laser system is given. Measurement results have shown the beam intensity of neutral 7 keV atoms which passed through a polarizer to be 2 mA. The proton current doesn't depend. On the beeld fin the region of chrge exchange for the 8 kGs magnetic field. The degree of sodium polarization was 80% and polarized proton current approximately 70 μA at a temperature of the polarized sodium cell corresponding to the density of sodium vapar approximately 3x10 13 at/cm 2

  11. Coupled spin and charge collective excitations in a spin polarized electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, D.C.; Quinn, J.J.; Yi, K.S.

    1997-01-01

    The charge and longitudinal spin responses induced in a spin polarized quantum well by a weak electromagnetic field are investigated within the framework of the linear response theory. The authors evaluate the excitation frequencies for the intra- and inter-subband transitions of the collective charge and longitudinal spin density oscillations including many-body corrections beyond the random phase approximation through the spin dependent local field factors, G σ ± (q,ω). An equation-of-motion method was used to obtain these corrections in the limit of long wavelengths, and the results are given in terms of the equilibrium pair correlation function. The finite degree of spin polarization is shown to introduce coupling between the charge and spin density modes, in contrast with the result for an unpolarized system

  12. On the theory of pyro- and ferroelectrics: Dipole moment density and polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskii, V. I.; Gorbatsevich, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    The physical origin of the ambiguity related to the dependence of the polarization on the choice of the unit cell in a crystal is established in the framework of classical electrodynamics. It is shown that the electric polarization of a crystal is determined not only by the charge distribution in the unit cell (dipole moment density) but also by the microscopic mechanism of symmetry breaking in the polar phase. An approach to the calculation of the polarization invariant with respect to the choice of the unit cell is suggested. It is demonstrated that the dependence of the polarization on the mechanism of formation of the polar phase exists in the "modern topological theory" of polarization too.

  13. Charged questions concerning noctilucent clouds and polar mesospheric summer echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbel, J.

    2012-12-01

    Noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) are prominent phenomena related to ice layers in the Earth's atmosphere at 80-90 km. These phenomena have been recognized as important tracers for interactions and variability in this part of the atmosphere. In order to draw proper conclusions from global observations, a better understanding of the microphysics of mesospheric ice grains is needed. This presentation provides an overview of current research topics concerning NLC and PMSE, with an emphasis is on charging pocesses. NLC and PMSE coincide with the ionospheric D-region, thus constituting a weakly ionized dusty plasma. Prominent open questions concern the efficiency of charge capture and photoionization, the role of charges in ice nucleation, charge diffusion, and interactions between ice and meteoric material.

  14. Extreme Spacecraft Charging in Polar Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Andrew D.; Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, L. Neergaard

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft in low altitude, high inclination (including sun -synchronous) orbits are widely used for remote sensing of the Earth fs land surface and oceans, monitoring weather and climate, communications, scientific studies of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere, and a variety of other scientific, commercial, and military applications. These systems episodically charge to frame potentials in the kilovolt range when exposed to space weather environments characterized by a high flux of energetic (approx.10 fs kilovolt) electrons in regions of low background plasma density. Auroral charging conditions are similar in some ways to the space weather conditions in geostationary orbit responsible for spacecraft charging to kilovolt levels. We first review the physics of space environment interactions with spacecraft materials that control auroral charging rates and the anticipated maximum potentials that should be observed on spacecraft surfaces during disturbed space weather conditions. We then describe how the theoretical values compare to the observational history of extreme charging in auroral environments. Finally, a set of extreme DMSP charging events are described varying in maximum negative frame potential from approx.0.6 kV to approx.2 kV, focusing on the characteristics of the charging events that are of importance both to the space system designer and to spacecraft operators. The goal of the presentation is to bridge the gap between scientific studies of auroral charging and the need for engineering teams to understand how space weather impacts both spacecraft design and operations for vehicles on orbital trajectories that traverse auroral charging environments.

  15. Charge transfer state induced from locally excited state by polar solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengtao

    2005-06-01

    The photophysical properties of the novel perylene imide (Pi) and oligo-pentaphenyl bisfluorene (pPh) containing molecule have been investigated by quantum chemical methods. It is concluded that the first excited singlet state in the gas is the locally excited state; while the lowest excited state in polar solvents is the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, which corresponds to the ICT from pPh to Pi. This excited state in the polar solvent adopts a planar geometry, in marked contrast to the twisted geometry in the gas phase. The planar geometry in the polar solvent significantly delocalized densities of HOMOs, compared to those in the gas phase, but the influence of the planar geometry to densities of LUMO is very small. Overall, the computed results remain in good agreement with the relevant experimental data.

  16. Changes of the density of charge on mineral soil components by adsorption of some metabolites of hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Hollederer, Gorch; Calmano, Wolfgang

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption on clay minerals and sesquioxides of some polar degradation products of naphthalene and alkylated benzenes was investigated by 14C-tracer experiments. Surface charge density of the solids was measured by titration with sodium polyethene sulfonate and polydiallyl-dimethyl-ammonium chloride at pH-range 4-7. Adsorption of organic anions reduced the positive charge on oxidic surfaces and increased the density of negative charge on clay minerals, respectively. The increase of the de...

  17. Correlation between the Flux Density and Polarization for Flat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, using the preliminary database of the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) at the radio frequencies, we calculated the weighted polarization at 8 GHz and investigated the correlation between the polarization and the flux density for 92 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). We found ...

  18. Current density functional theory for optical spectra : A polarization functional

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeij, P.L. de; Kootstra, F.; Berger, J.A.; Leeuwen, R. van; Snijders, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present a new approach to calculate optical spectra, which for the first time uses a polarization dependent functional within current density functional theory (CDFT), which was proposed by Vignale and Kohn. This polarization dependent functional includes exchange-correlation (xc)

  19. Switching of charged inverse micelles in non-polar liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj; Beunis, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Strubbe, Filip

    2015-11-15

    The electrodynamics of micellar ions in nonpolar liquids are well understood for the case that a voltage is applied or switched off. In this work, the electrodynamics of charged inverse micelles (CIMs) are studied when the applied voltage is switched to the opposite polarity, which is relevant for applications such as electrophoretic displays and liquid toner printing. Transient current measurements are used to characterize the switching of CIMs formed in a solution of surfactant polyisobutylene succinimide in n-dodecane. For reverse voltages with amplitude below 10V the measurements are in good agreement with a drift and diffusion model, confirming the established understanding of CIMs in nonpolar liquids. When the charge content is high, the reversal current shows a characteristic peak which is explained on the basis of dynamic space-charge effects. However, for reverse voltages larger than 10V, the transient currents are influenced by electrohydrodynamic flow in the liquid causing the CIMs to switch faster than predicted by the model. The occurrence of electrohydrodynamic flow is verified by optical tracking of tracer particles. Also, when the polarizing voltage is applied for longer times, an additional current peak emerges which is due to the accumulation of newly generated charges at the electrodes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Orthogonal bases of radial functions for charge density refinements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restori, R.

    1990-01-01

    Charge density determination from X-ray measurements necessitates the evaluation of the Fourier-Bessel transforms of the radial functions used to expand the charge density. Analytical expressions are given here for four sets of orthogonal functions which can substitute for the 'traditional exponential functions' set in least-squares refinements. (orig.)

  1. Charge densities and charge noise in mesoscopic conductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Interest in spin transport will require spin resolved partial density of states. In hybrid normal superconducting systems [51] a resolution of both electron and hole density of states is conceptually useful [52,53]. The description of electrical conduction processes in terms of transmission and reflection probabilities has become ...

  2. How good are Hartree-Fock charge densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campi, X.

    1975-01-01

    The principle characteristics of Hartree-Fock charge densities (mean square radius, surface thickness, quantum fluctuation) calculated using different effective interactions are discussed in terms of their nuclear matter properties (Fermi momentum, effective mass, incompressibility). A comparison with the experimental charge distributions is made. Differences between the charge densities of neighbouring nuclei (isotope and isotone shifts) are also considered and the main factors governing these effects are discussed [fr

  3. Geometric interpretation of density displacements and charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ness kernel. It can be expressed using the functional chain-rule transformation in terms the closed system density response, and the extra term present in the open molecular systems, which involves the electro- nic FF and the system global softness.9 For this purpose we express the ground state density as functional of.

  4. Spin polarization in high density quark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Panda, Prafulla K.; Providênci, Constanca

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of a ferromagnetic phase transition in high density hadronic matter (e.g., in the interior of a neutron star). This could be induced by a four-fermion interaction analogous to the one which is responsible for chiral symmetry breaking in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model...... the so-called 2 flavor super-conducting phase to the ferromagnetic phase arises. The color-flavor-locked phase may be completely hidden by the FP....

  5. Possibilities of increasing coal charge density by adding fuel oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fröhlichová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of all coke-making facilities is to achieve the highest possible production of high quality coke from a chamber. It can be achieved by filling the effective capacity of the chamber with the highest possible amount of coal. One of the possibilities of meeting this requirement is to increase the charge density in the coke chamber. In case of a coke battery operating on bulk coal there are many methods to increase the charge density including the use of wetting agents in the charge. This article presents the results of the laboratory experiments aiming at the increase of the charge density using fuel oil as a wetting agent. The experiments were carried out by means of the Pitin’s device using 3 coal charges with various granularity composition and moisture content of 7, 8, 9 and 10 %.

  6. Nanoscale smoothing and the analysis of interfacial charge and dipolar densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junquera, Javier; Cohen, Morrel H; Rabe, Karin M

    2007-01-01

    The interface properties of interest in multilayers include interfacial charge densities, dipole densities, band offsets, and screening lengths, among others. Most such properties are inaccessible to direct measurements, but are key to understanding the physics of the multilayers. They are contained within first-principles electronic structure computations but are buried within the vast amount of quantitative information those computations generate. Thus far, they have been extracted from the numerical data by heuristic nanosmoothing procedures which do not necessarily provide results independent of the smoothing process. In the present paper we develop the theory of nanosmoothing, establishing procedures for both unpolarized and polarized systems which yield interfacial charge and dipole densities and band offsets invariant to the details of the smoothing procedures when the criteria we have established are met. We show also that dipolar charge densities, i.e. the densities of charge transferred across the interface, and screening lengths are not invariant. We illustrate our procedure with a toy model in which real, transversely averaged charge densities are replaced by sums of Gaussians. (topical review)

  7. Hardness and softness reactivity kernels within the spin-polarized density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamorro, Eduardo; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Generalized hardness and softness reactivity kernels are defined within a spin-polarized density-functional theory (SP-DFT) conceptual framework. These quantities constitute the basis for the global, local (i.e., r-position dependent), and nonlocal (i.e., r and r ' -position dependents) indices devoted to the treatment of both charge-transfer and spin-polarization processes in such a reactivity framework. The exact relationships between these descriptors within a SP-DFT framework are derived and the implications for chemical reactivity in such context are outlined

  8. Geometric interpretation of density displacements and charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    afresh from the density perspective. This conceptual DFT development has had a uni- fying influence on the reactivity theory. It combines the so-called electron following (EF) and electron preceding (EP) descriptions of both the closed and open molecular or reactive systems. In the former the nuclear displacements or the ...

  9. Polar-solvation classical density-functional theory for electrolyte aqueous solutions near a wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshavsky, Vadim; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    A precise description of the structural and dielectric properties of liquid water is critical to understanding the physicochemical properties of solutes in electrolyte solutions. In this article, a mixture of ionic and dipolar hard spheres is considered to account for water crowding and polarization effects on ionic electrical double layers near a uniformly charged hard wall. As a unique feature, solvent hard spheres carrying a dipole at their centers were used to model water molecules at experimentally known concentration, molecule size, and dipolar moment. The equilibrium ionic and dipole density profiles of this electrolyte aqueous model were calculated using a polar-solvation classical density-functional theory (PSCDFT). These profiles were used to calculate the charge density distribution, water polarization, dielectric permittivity function, and mean electric potential profiles as well as differential capacitance, excess adsorptions, and wall-fluid surface tension. These results were compared with those corresponding to the pure dipolar model and unpolar primitive solvent model of electrolyte aqueous solutions to understand the role that water crowding and polarization effects play on the structural and thermodynamic properties of these systems. Overall, PSCDFT predictions are in agreement with available experimental data. PMID:27176352

  10. Effective Area and Charge Density of Iridium Oxide Neural Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Alexander R.; Paolini, Antonio G.; Wallace, Gordon G.

    2017-01-01

    The effective electrode area and charge density of iridium metal and anodically activated iridium has been measured by optical and electrochemical techniques. The degree of electrode activation could be assessed by changes in electrode colour. The reduction charge, activation charge, number of activation pulses and charge density were all strongly correlated. Activated iridium showed slow electron transfer kinetics for reduction of a dissolved redox species. At fast voltammetric scan rates the linear diffusion electroactive area was unaffected by iridium activation. At slow voltammetric scan rates, the steady state diffusion electroactive area was reduced by iridium activation. The steady state current was consistent with a ring electrode geometry, with lateral resistance reducing the electrode area. Slow electron transfer on activated iridium would require a larger overpotential to reduce or oxidise dissolved species in tissue, limiting the electrodes charge capacity but also reducing the likelihood of generating toxic species in vivo.

  11. Polarization of electron-beam irradiated LDPE films: contribution to charge generation and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, M. E.; Griseri, V.; Teyssèdre, G.; Le Roy, S.

    2018-04-01

    Electron-beam irradiation is an alternative way to generate charges in insulating materials, at controlled position and quantity, in order to monitor their behaviour in regard to transport phenomena under the space charge induced electric field or external field applied. In this study, low density polyethylene (LDPE) films were irradiated by a 80 keV electron-beam with a flux of 1 nA cm‑2 during 10 min in an irradiation chamber under vacuum conditions, and were then characterized outside the chamber using three experimental methods. The electrical behaviour of the irradiated material was assessed by space charge measurements using the pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method under dc stress. The influence of the applied electric field polarity and amplitude has been tested in order to better understand the charge behaviour after electron-beam irradiation. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements were performed to evaluate the impact of the electron beam irradiation, i.e. deposited charges and energy, on the chemical structure of the irradiated samples. The present results show that the electrical behaviour in LDPE after irradiation is mostly driven by charges, i.e. by physical process functions of the electric field, and that changes in the chemical structure seems to be mild.

  12. Concentration polarization and desalination in nanochannels: Effect of surface charge dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mathias B.; Bruus, Henrik; Mani, Ali; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2011-11-01

    Mani, Zangle, and Santiago (Langmuir, 25, 3898-3916) have shown that at microchannel-nanochannel junctions the coupled effect of concentration polarization and surface conduction can lead to long range propagation of bulk ion-depletion shocks. Essential for this phenomena is the surface charge which for many materials depends on both the concentration and the pH of the local bulk electrolyte. Standard models predict that the surface charge decreases with decreasing concentration leading to the contradictory expectation that there is little or no surface charge in the depleted region and hence no mechanism to sustain long range propagation of desalination shocks. We show that this simple prediction fails to take into account axial transport terms. As such, we couple a surface charge model with the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for electric potential and ionic species combined with the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations for fluid velocity. Motivated by experimental work we consider steady-state solutions at the dead end of a nanochannel against a membrane, a scenario where especially space charge and electroosmotic flow are important. Our results suggest that the surface charge density remains finite and does not vanish, and even grows, as the depletion front propagates through the channel.

  13. Experimental Evidence for Static Charge Density Waves in Iron Oxypnictides

    KAUST Repository

    Martinelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this Letter we report high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscope analysis of Mn-substituted LaFeAsO samples, demonstrating that a static incommensurate modulated structure develops across the low-temperature orthorhombic phase, whose modulation wave vector depends on the Mn content. The incommensurate structural distortion is likely originating from a charge-density-wave instability, a periodic modulation of the density of conduction electrons associated with a modulation of the atomic positions. Our results add a new component in the physics of Fe-based superconductors, indicating that the density wave ordering is charge driven.

  14. Correlation between the Flux Density and Polarization for Flat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    blazars, which show high and variable polarization, rapid variable flux density over different time scales (Fan 2005). Blazars consist of flat spectrum radio quasars. (FSRQs) and BL Lacertae objects (BLs). FSRQs are quite similar to BLs except for their emission line feature with FSRQs showing strong emission lines while.

  15. Correlation between the Flux Density and Polarization for Flat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Guangzhou Vocational College of Technology & Business, Guangzhou, China. 4Center for Astrophysics ... blazars, which show high and variable polarization, rapid variable flux density over different time scales (Fan ... emission lines while. BLs show very weak emission line feature or have only non-emission lines. The.

  16. Do plasma proteins distinguish between liposomes of varying charge density?

    KAUST Repository

    Capriotti, Anna Laura

    2012-03-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are one of the most employed nonviral nanovector systems in gene therapy. However, their transfection efficiency is strongly affected by interactions with plasma components, that lead to the formation of a "protein corona" onto CL surface. The interactions between nanoparticles entering the body and biomolecules have an essential role for their biodistribution. Because the knowledge of proteins adsorbed onto vector surface could be useful in the screening of new, more efficient and more biocompatible liposomal formulations, the behavior of three CLs with different membrane charge densities was investigated. The proteins of the three coronas were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and quantified with label-free spectral counting strategy. Fibrinogen displayed higher association with CLs with high membrane charge density, while apolipoproteins and C4b-binding protein with CLs with low membrane charge density. These results are discussed in terms of the different lipid compositions of CLs and may have a deep biological impact for in vivo applications. Surface charge of nanoparticles is emerging as a relevant factor determining the corona composition after interaction with plasma proteins. Remarkably, it is also shown that the charge of the protein corona formed around CLs is strongly related to their membrane charge density. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Improving the bulk density of coal charge in conventional cokemaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, H.S.; Prasad, H.N.; Krishnan, S.H.; Akthar, M.S.; Sinha, S. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)

    1999-04-01

    The throughput from a battery of coke ovens can be increased in two ways, namely by shortening the carbonization cycle or by increasing the coal charge per oven. The former can be achieved by increasing the coking rate which would result in deterioration in coke quality and shortening the battery life. The second alternative is, therefore, more attractive: it is based on an increase in the bulk density of the coal charge which allows more coal to be charged per oven. Although oil addition to the coal charge at Tata Steel has been practiced since 1962, the full benefits could accrue following optimisation of oil dosing with LDO in the laboratory with respect to bulk density, angle of repose and flowability properties, providing mixing facilities, and modifying the oil dosing system in the plant. 7 refs., 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Carrier polarity engineering in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors by induced charges in polymer insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Shinya; Kim, Sungjin; Thurakitseree, Theerapol; Einarsson, Erik; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2018-01-01

    We present that the electrical conduction type in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) can be converted by induced charges in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) insulator. When the CNT channels are covered with pure PVA, the FET characteristics clearly change from unipolar p-type to ambipolar. The addition of ammonium ions (NH4+) in the PVA leads to further conversion to unipolar n-type conduction. The capacitance - voltage characteristics indicate that a high density of positive charges is induced at the PVA/SiO2 interface and within the bulk PVA. Electrons are electrostatically accumulated in the CNT channels due to the presence of the positive charges, and thus, stable n-type conduction of PVA-coated CNT-FETs is observed, even under ambient conditions. The mechanism for conversion of the conduction type is considered to be electrostatic doping due to the large amount of positive charges in the PVA. A blue-shift of the Raman G-band peak was observed for CNTs coated with NH4+-doped PVA, which corresponds to unipolar n-type CNT-FET behavior. These results confirm that carrier polarity engineering in CNT-FETs can be achieved with a charged PVA passivation layer.

  19. Electron charge densities at conduction-band edges of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, S.L.; Cohen, M.L.; Louie, S.G.; Chelikowsky, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    We demonstrate that both the empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) and the linear combination of atomiclike orbitals (LCAO) approach are capable of producing consistent electronic charge distributions in a compound semiconductor. Since the EPM approach is known to produce total valence electron charge densities which compare well with experimental x-ray data (e.g., Si), this work serves as a further test for the LCAO method. In particular, the EPM scheme, which uses an extended plane-wave basis, and the LCAO scheme, which employs a localized Gaussian basis, are used, with the same empirical potential as input, to analyze both the total valence electron charge density and the charge density of the first conduction band at the GAMMA, L, and X k points of the Brillouin zone. These charge densities are decomposed into their s-, p-, and d-orbital contributions, and this information is used to interpret the differences in the topologies of the conduction bands at GAMMA, L, and X. Such differences are crucial for a comprehensive understanding of interstitial impurities and the response of specific band states to perturbations in compound semiconductors

  20. Kaon transverse charge density from space- and timelike data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecholsky, N. A.; Meija-Ott, J.; Carmignotto, M.; Horn, T.; Miller, G. A.; Pegg, I. L.

    2017-12-01

    We used the world data on the kaon form factor to extract the transverse kaon charge density using a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the kaon form factor in the timelike region. Our analysis includes recent data from e+e- annihiliation measurements extending the kinematic reach of the data into the region of high momentum transfers conjugate to the region of short transverse distances. To calculate the transverse density we created a superset of both timelike and spacelike data and developed an empirical parameterization of the kaon form factor. The spacelike set includes two new data points we extracted from existing cross section data. We estimate the uncertainty on the resulting transverse density to be 5% at b =0.025 fm and significantly better at large distances. New kaon data planned with the 12 GeV Jefferson Lab may have a significant impact on the charge density at distances of b <0.1 fm.

  1. Radial densities of nuclear matter and charge via moment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    In this report I will discuss some initial efforts in our program to describe radial densities of nuclear matter and charge with the use of moment methods. A brief introduction to trace reduction formulas and computation problems along with proposed methods to overcome them will be given. This will be followed by a general discussion on computation of expectation values using moment methods with particular emphasis on formulation for the radial density applications

  2. Production of Polarized Ions with Nearly Resonant Charge-Exchange Collisions in Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A. S.

    2008-02-01

    Review of results of development of polarized ion sources with nearly resonant charge-exchange plasma ionizer is presented. Pulsed beams of polarized protons with peak intensity up to 11 mA and polarization of 80% and polarized negative hydrogen ions with peak current of 4 mA and polarization of 91% have been obtained. Polarized deuterons, negative deuterium ions and 3He++ ions can be produced by this method as well. A study of a pulsed polarized atomic hydrogen beam has been performed. It was found that intensity of the pulsed atomic hydrogen beam is limited by a beam-skimmer interference and by noncomplete cooling of hydrogen atoms.

  3. Production of Polarized Ions with Nearly Resonant Charge-Exchange Collisions in Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A. S.

    2008-01-01

    Review of results of development of polarized ion sources with nearly resonant charge-exchange plasma ionizer is presented. Pulsed beams of polarized protons with peak intensity up to 11 mA and polarization of 80% and polarized negative hydrogen ions with peak current of 4 mA and polarization of 91% have been obtained. Polarized deuterons, negative deuterium ions and 3 He ++ ions can be produced by this method as well. A study of a pulsed polarized atomic hydrogen beam has been performed. It was found that intensity of the pulsed atomic hydrogen beam is limited by a beam-skimmer interference and by noncomplete cooling of hydrogen atoms

  4. Nuclear charge radii: density functional theory meets Bayesian neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utama, R.; Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, J.

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of electric charge in atomic nuclei is fundamental to our understanding of the complex nuclear dynamics and a quintessential observable to validate nuclear structure models. The aim of this study is to explore a novel approach that combines sophisticated models of nuclear structure with Bayesian neural networks (BNN) to generate predictions for the charge radii of thousands of nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. A class of relativistic energy density functionals is used to provide robust predictions for nuclear charge radii. In turn, these predictions are refined through Bayesian learning for a neural network that is trained using residuals between theoretical predictions and the experimental data. Although predictions obtained with density functional theory provide a fairly good description of experiment, our results show significant improvement (better than 40%) after BNN refinement. Moreover, these improved results for nuclear charge radii are supplemented with theoretical error bars. We have successfully demonstrated the ability of the BNN approach to significantly increase the accuracy of nuclear models in the predictions of nuclear charge radii. However, as many before us, we failed to uncover the underlying physics behind the intriguing behavior of charge radii along the calcium isotopic chain.

  5. The interaction between theory and experiment in charge density analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppens, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    The field of x-ray charge density analysis has gradually morphed into an area benefiting from the strong interactions between theoreticians and experimentalists, leading to new concepts on chemical bonding and of intermolecular interactions in condensed phases. Some highlights of the developments culminating in the 2013 Aminoff Award are described in this paper. (comment)

  6. Pressure induced Superconductivity in the Charge Density Wave Compound Tritelluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlin, J.J.; Zocco, D.A.; Sayles, T.A.; Maple, M.B.; /UC, Davis; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    A series of high-pressure electrical resistivity measurements on single crystals of TbTe{sub 3} reveal a complex phase diagram involving the interplay of superconducting, antiferromagnetic and charge density wave order. The onset of superconductivity reaches a maximum of almost 4 K (onset) near {approx} 12.4 GPa.

  7. Gate effect in charge-density wave nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, E.; Holst, M.A.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated transport characteristics of charge-density wave nanowires with a few hundred parallel chains. At temperatures below50K, these samples show power-law behavior in temperature and voltage, characteristic for one-dimensional transport. In this regime, gate dependent transport has

  8. Density functional theory calculations of charge transport properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ZIRAN CHEN

    2017-08-04

    Aug 4, 2017 ... Density functional theory calculations of charge transport properties of 'plate-like' coronene topological structures. ZIRAN CHENa, ZHANRONG HEa, YOUHUI XUa and WENHAO YUb,∗. aDepartment of Architecture and Environment Engineering, Sichuan Vocational and Technical College, Suining,.

  9. Chemical bonding and charge density distribution analysis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ceramics; charge density; X-ray diffraction; bonding; microstructure. 1. Introduction. Ferroelectric perovskite materials are .... on Powder Diffraction Standards (JCPDS) database. (PDF# 05-0626). Existence of well-defined and ..... Li W, Xu Z, Chu R, Fu P and Hao J 2010 J. Alloy. Compd. 499 255. 9. Glinchuk M D, Bykov I P, ...

  10. Charge density wave dynamics from ultrafast XUV ARPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frassetto F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast angle–resolved XUV photoemission reveals the time- and momentum-dependent electronic structure of 1T–TaS2, a hybrid Mott and charge-density-wave insulator. Both electronic orderings melt well before the lattice responds, suggesting that electronic correlations play a role not just in the Mott localization but in the CDW ordering as well.

  11. High density thermite mixture for shaped charge ordnance disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Elshenawy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermite mixture based on aluminum and ferric oxides for ammunition neutralization has been studied and tested. Thermochemical calculations have been carried out for different percentage of Al using Chemical Equilibrium Code to expect the highest performance thermite mixture used for shaped charge ordnance disposal. Densities and enthalpy of different formulations have been calculated and demonstrated. The optimized thermite formulation has been prepared experimentally using cold iso-static pressing technique, which exhibited relatively high density and high burning rate thermite mixture. The produced green product compacted powder mixture was tested against small caliber shaped charge bomblet for neutralization. Theoretical and experimental results showed that the prepared thermite mixture containing 33% of aluminum as a fuel with ferric oxide can be successfully used for shaped charge ordnance disposal.

  12. Modeling charge polarization voltage for large lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jiang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Polarization voltage of the lithium-ion battery is an important parameter that has direct influence on battery performance. The paper aims to analyze the impedance characteristics of the lithium-ion battery based on EIS data. Design/methodology/approach: The effects of currents, initial SOC of the battery on charge polarization voltage are investigated, which is approximately linear function of charge current. The change of charge polarization voltage is also analyzed with the gradient analytical method in the SOC domain. The charge polarization model with two RC networks is presented, and parts of model parameters like Ohmic resistance and charge transfer impedance are estimated by both EIS method and battery constant current testing method. Findings: This paper reveals that the Ohmic resistance accounts for much contribution to battery total polarization compared to charge transfer impedance. Practical implications: Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the model with the proposed identification method, which provides the foundation for battery charging optimization. Originality/value: The paper analyzed the impedance characteristics of the lithium-ion battery based on EIS data, presented a charge polarization model with two RC networks, and estimated parameters like Ohmic resistance and charge transfer impedance.

  13. Interchain interaction and fractionally charged solitons in a commensurate charge-density-wave system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens Høgh; Lomdahl, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the effect of interchain interaction on thermally excited solitons in a charge-density wave for a Peierls system of commensurability 3. In such a system solitons with charges ±2e / 3 are expected. It is shown that the interchain coupling in some cases will generate solitons...... with lower and higher charge than ±2e / 3. The effect of discreteness is taken into account and gives rise to chaotic deformed solitons as the interchain coupling increases. The model may be applied to tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) under 19-kbar pressure....

  14. Polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering and future neutrino factories

    CERN Document Server

    Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, G; Forte, Stefano; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the determination of polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering experiments. We summarize the next-to-leading order treatment of charged-current polarized structure functions, their relation to polarized parton distributions and scale dependence, and discuss their description by means of a next-to-leading order evolution code. We discuss current theoretical expectations and positivity constraints on the unmeasured C-odd combinations Delta q-Delta qbar of polarized quark distributions, and their determination in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering experiments. We give estimates of the expected errors on charged-current structure functions at a future neutrino factory, and perform a study of the accuracy in the determination of polarized parton distributions that would be possible at such a facility. We show that these measurements have the potential to distinguish between different theoretical scenarios for the proton spin structure.

  15. Polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering and future neutrino factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, Stefano; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the determination of polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering experiments. We summarize the next-to-leading-order treatment of charged-current polarized structure functions, their relation to polarized parton distributions and scale dependence, and discuss their description by means of a next-to-leading-order evolution code. We discuss current theoretical expectations and positivity constraints on the unmeasured C-odd combinations Δq-Δq-bar of polarized quark distributions, and their determination in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering experiments. We give estimates of the expected errors on charged-current structure functions at a future neutrino factory, and perform a study of the accuracy in the determination of polarized parton distributions that would be possible at such a facility. We show that these measurements have the potential to distinguish between different theoretical scenarios for the proton spin structure

  16. The density functional theory and the charged fluid molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.P.; Zerah, G.

    1993-01-01

    Car and Parrinello had the idea of combining the density functional theory (Hohenberg, Kohn and Sham) to the 'molecular dynamics' numerical modelling method, in order to simulate metallic or co-valent solids and liquids from the first principles. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified version of this method ab initio, applicable to classical and quantal charged systems. The method is illustrated with recent results on charged colloidal suspensions and highly correlated electron-proton plasmas. 1 fig., 21 refs

  17. First-principle calculation of electrons charge density in the diamond ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    structure semiconductor crystals has been performed. In a typical modern electronic structure calculation, the charge density is obtained from a certain density functional, however, the charge density in this work was obtained from first principles.

  18. Influence of solvent polarization and non-uniform ion size on electrostatic properties between charged surfaces in an electrolyte solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Jun-Sik

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we study electrostatic properties between two similar or oppositely charged surfaces immersed in an electrolyte solution by using the mean-field approach accounting for solvent polarization and non-uniform size effects. Applying a free energy formalism accounting for unequal ion sizes and orientational ordering of water dipoles, we derive coupled and self-consistent equations to calculate electrostatic properties between charged surfaces. Electrostatic properties for similarly charged surfaces depend on the counterion size but not on the coion size. Moreover, electrostatic potential and osmotic pressure between similarly charged surfaces are found to be increased with increasing counterion size. On the other hand, the corresponding ones between oppositely charged surfaces are related to both sizes of positive and negative ions. For oppositely charged surfaces, the electrostatic potential, number density of solvent molecules, and relative permittivity of an electrolyte having unequal ion sizes are not symmetric about the centerline between the charged surfaces. For either case, the consideration of solvent polarization results in a decrease in the electrostatic potential and the osmotic pressure compared to the case without the effect.

  19. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-01

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F- and a Na+ ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na+ and F- ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity ΔCp stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na+ ion, it decreases upon charging the F- ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q = -0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  20. High charge density and mobility in poly(3-hexylthiophene) using a polarizable gate dielectric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, R.C.G.; Mulder, M; de Boer, B; Blom, PWM; de Leeuw, DM

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) typically exhibit either a high charge transport mobility or a high charge density. Here we demonstrate an OFET in which both the mobility and the charge density have high values of 0.1 cm(2)/V s and 28 mC/m(2), respectively. The high charge density is

  1. Scattered surface charge density: A tool for surface characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Naydenov, Borislav

    2011-11-28

    We demonstrate the use of nonlocal scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements to characterize the local structure of adspecies in their states where they are significantly less perturbed by the probe, which is accomplished by mapping the amplitude and phase of the scattered surface charge density. As an example, we study single-H-atom adsorption on the n-type Si(100)-(4 × 2) surface, and demonstrate the existence of two different configurations that are distinguishable using the nonlocal approach and successfully corroborated by density functional theory. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  2. Pion transverse charge density from timelike form factor data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Miller, Mark Strikman, Christian Weiss

    2011-01-01

    The transverse charge density in the pion can be represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the pion form factor in the timelike region. This formulation incorporates information from e+e- annihilation experiments and allows one to reconstruct the transverse density much more accurately than from the spacelike pion form factor data alone. We calculate the transverse density using an empirical parametrization of the timelike pion form factor and estimate that it is determined to an accuracy of ~10% at a distance b ~ 0.1 fm, and significantly better at larger distances. The density is found to be close to that obtained from a zero-width rho meson pole over a wide range and shows a pronounced rise at small distances. The resulting two-dimensional image of the fast-moving pion can be interpreted in terms of its partonic structure in QCD. We argue that the singular behavior of the charge density at the center requires a substantial presence of pointlike configurations in the pion's partonic wave function, which can be probed in other high-momentum transfer processes.

  3. Thermospheric density structures over the polar regions observed with CHAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schlegel

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the unexpected detection of considerable structure in high latitude thermospheric densities, as derived from an accelerometer onboard the CHAMP satellite. The width of the structures, which can either be maxima or minima, varies between a few hundred km and 2000 km. The amplitudes of these density extrema can reach 50% of ambient. Maxima cluster around 75° (N and S, while minima are found closer to the poles. In a magnetic latitude-magnetic local time frame the maxima are found mainly around the cusp region. Overall, the observed structures somewhat resemble so-called density cells previously found in model calculations. However the models generate their cells around 140–300 km altitude and show little, if any remnant at 400 km or above. This has to be contrasted with the fact that the CHAMP observations were obtained near 430 km altitude. We have explored Joule heating as a possible mechanism for the generation of the structures, at least in density enhancement regions, using Hall currents measured on CHAMP and simultaneous incoherent scatter measurements with EISCAT. However, the electric fields were usually quite small during the period of observation, making the quest for an explanation for the structures all the more challenging. Keywords. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (Thermospheric dynamics – Magnetospheric physics (Polar cap phenomena – Atmospheric composition and structure (Pressure, density, and temperature

  4. High density thermite mixture for shaped charge ordnance disposal

    OpenAIRE

    Tamer Elshenawy; Salah Soliman; Ahmed Hawass

    2017-01-01

    The effect of thermite mixture based on aluminum and ferric oxides for ammunition neutralization has been studied and tested. Thermochemical calculations have been carried out for different percentage of Al using Chemical Equilibrium Code to expect the highest performance thermite mixture used for shaped charge ordnance disposal. Densities and enthalpy of different formulations have been calculated and demonstrated. The optimized thermite formulation has been prepared experimentally using col...

  5. Density functional theory calculations of charge transport properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we used density functional theory (DFT) at the M06-2X/6−31+G(d) level to compute the charge transport rates of nine coronene topological structures. The results show that the energy gap of these nine coronene derivatives is in the range 2.90–3.30 eV, falling into the organic semiconductor category. The size ...

  6. Molecular density functional theory of water including density–polarization coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Lévy, Nicolas; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We present a three-dimensional molecular density functional theory of water derived fromfirst-principles that relies on the particle’s density and multipolar polarization density andincludes the density–polarization coupling. This brings two main benefits: (i) scalar densityand vectorial multipolar polarization density fields are much more tractable and give morephysical insight than the full position and orientation densities, and (ii) it includes the fulldensity–pola...

  7. Impact of Molecular Orientation and Packing Density on Electronic Polarization in the Bulk and at Surfaces of Organic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-16

    The polarizable environment surrounding charge carriers in organic semiconductors impacts the efficiency of the charge transport process. Here, we consider two representative organic semiconductors, tetracene and rubrene, and evaluate their polarization energies in the bulk and at the organic-vacuum interface using a polarizable force field that accounts for induced-dipole and quadrupole interactions. Though both oligoacenes pack in a herringbone motif, the tetraphenyl substituents on the tetracene backbone of rubrene alter greatly the nature of the packing. The resulting change in relative orientations of neighboring molecules is found to reduce the bulk polarization energy of holes in rubrene by some 0.3 eV when compared to tetracene. The consideration of model organic-vacuum interfaces highlights the significant variation in the electrostatic environment for a charge carrier at a surface although the net change in polarization energy is small; interestingly, the environment of a charge even just one layer removed from the surface can be viewed already as representative of the bulk. Overall, it is found that in these herringbone-type layered crystals the polarization energy has a much stronger dependence on the intralayer packing density than interlayer packing density.

  8. first-principle calculation of electrons charge density in the diamond

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. A computational study of the total electrons charge density in the diamond-structure semiconductor crystals has been performed. In a typical modern electronic structure calculation, the charge density is obtained from a certain density functional, however, the charge density in this work was obtained from.

  9. Polarization of X rays of multiply charged ions in dense high-temperature plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baronova, EO; Dolgov, AN; Yakubovskii, LK

    2004-01-01

    The development of a method for studying the features of X-ray emission by multiply charged ions in a dense hot plasma is considered. These features are determined by the radiation polarization phenomenon.

  10. Development of polarized negative hydrogen ion source with resonant charge-exchange plasma ionizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A. S.; Esin, S. K.; Netchaeva, L. P.; Turbabin, A. V.; Vasil'Ev, G. A.

    2001-06-01

    Polarized negative hydrogen ion beam with peak current of 2.5 mA has been obtained from an atomic beam-type polarized ion source of Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow. The intensity improvement has been achieved due to increase of efficiency of conversion of polarized hydrogen atoms into polarized negative ions. New converter for production of deuterium plasma with high density of unpolarized negative ions is described. Limitations of the method and possible improvements are discussed. .

  11. Effects of fibre dimension and charge density on nanocellulose gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Llyza; Gunawardhana, Thilina; Batchelor, Warren; Garnier, Gil

    2018-04-18

    Carboxylated cellulose nanofibres can produce gels at low concentrations. The effect of pulp source on the nanocellulose fibre dimension and gel rheology are studied. It is hypothesised that fibre length and surface charge influence aspects of the gel rheological properties. TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl)- mediated oxidised cellulose nanofibres from never-dried hardwood and softwood pulp and containing different charge levels were produced and characterized. Steady-state and dynamic rheological studies were performed to ascertain the effects of pulp type on gel behavior and properties. Nanocellulose fibres extracted from softwood (SW-TOCN) and hardwood (HW-TOCN) pulp exhibit similar widths but different length dimensions as shown via AFM analysis. Rheological measurements show that the dynamic moduli (G' and G'') of nanocellulose gels are independent of pulp source and are mostly influenced by fibre concentration. Differences in the steady-state behavior (i.e. viscosity) at constant surface charge can be attributed to differences in fibre length. Increasing the surface charge density influences the critical strain and the viscosity at the percolation concentration (0.1 wt%) due to higher electrostatic interactions. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Charge transport by inverse micelles in non-polar media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan

    2017-11-01

    Charged inverse micelles play an important role in the electrical charging and the electrodynamics of nonpolar colloidal dispersions relevant for applications such as electronic ink displays and liquid toner printing. This review examines the properties and the behavior of charged inverse micelles in microscale devices in the absence of colloidal particles. It is discussed how charge in nonpolar liquids is stabilized in inverse micelles and how conductivity depends on the inverse micelle size, water content and ionic impurities. Frequently used nonpolar surfactant systems are investigated with emphasis on aerosol-OT (AOT) and poly-isobutylene succinimide (PIBS) in dodecane. Charge generation in the bulk by disproportionation is studied from measurements of conductivity as a function of surfactant concentration and from generation currents in quasi steady-state. When a potential difference is applied, the steady-state situation can show electric field screening or complete charge separation. Different regimes of charge transport are identified when a voltage step is applied. It is shown how the transient and steady-state currents depend on the rate of bulk generation, on insulating layers and on the sticking or non-sticking behavior of charged inverse micelles at interfaces. For the cases of AOT and PIBS in dodecane, the magnitude of the generation rate and the type of interaction at the interface are very different.

  13. Measuring charge density of electron beam single nanosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchar, A.I.; Nesterenko, V.S.; Fazkullin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    A description is presented of a probe design and electrometric repeater circuit and technique for measuring the charge (current) density of electron beam single pulses by integrating current at a reference capacitor with a subsequent registering of voltage across the capacitor. The probe consists of a band-type signal electrodes and two oval cross-section sleeves: external and internal with larger and smaller rectangular openings, respectively. The external sleeve has antidynatron grid located over the hole. The design employs integer nickel sleever - the cores of electron tube cathodes. The signal electrode is made of nickel band 0.15 mm thick. The probe elements are insulated from each other along the whole length with a layer of teflon band (30 μm), with rectangular openings cut in compliance with the sleeve openings. The measurement range is from 0.4x10 - 9 to 1x10 - 7 C/cm 2 . The rated accuracy of measurements is no worse than +-5% for the beam energy of 0.2 to 3 KeV. The ultimate parameters the charge density - 6 C/cm 2 and direct current density 3 mA/cm 2 - are specified by the breakdown voltage (200 V) of the input capacitor and probe insulation

  14. Charge density wave in hydrogen at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdău, Ioan B.; Ackland, Graeme J.

    2017-10-01

    We present extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations investigating numerous candidate crystal structures for hydrogen in conditions around the present experimental frontier (400 GPa). Spontaneous phase transitions in the simulations reveal a new structure candidate comprising twofold coordinated chains of hydrogen atoms. We explain the electronic structure of this phase in terms of a charge density wave and calculate its experimental signature. In detailed tests of the accuracy of our calculation, we find that k-point sampling is far more important in MD than in static calculations, because of the freedom it give the atoms to rearrange themselves optimally for the given sampling.

  15. Charge density study of two FeS2 polymorphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro; Jørgensen, Mads Ry Vogel; Bjerg, Lasse

    experimental electron density studies of an inorganic solid containing a transition metal was presented by Stevens et al. [2] who investigated the effect of crystal-field splitting of the partially filled iron d-orbitals in the pyrite structure of FeS2. Other studies of various FeS2 structures, including...... pyrite, has been performed by Gibbs et al. [3], however, these are all based on theoretical calculations rather than experiment. In the current study we revisit FeS2 through an experimental charge density study of the two low-spin iron FeS2 structures, pyrite and marcasite. High-quality, low...... been determined by multipole least squares modelling and analyzed by means of the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules. The resulting topology has been compared to the results obtained by Gibbs et al. and to current periodic ab-initio DFT calculations and in general a good agreement between experiment...

  16. Charge carrier density in Li-intercalated graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2012-05-01

    The electronic structures of bulk C 6Li, Li-intercalated free-standing bilayer graphene, and Li-intercalated bilayer and trilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) are studied using density functional theory. Our estimate of Young\\'s modulus suggests that Li-intercalation increases the intrinsic stiffness. For decreasing Li-C interaction, the Dirac point shifts to the Fermi level and the associated band splitting vanishes. For Li-intercalated bilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) the splitting at the Dirac point is tiny. It is also very small at the two Dirac points of Li-intercalated trilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1). For all the systems under study, a large enhancement of the charge carrier density is achieved by Li intercalation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. π--induced single charge exchange on polarized 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Q.; Burleson, S.; Blanchard, T.

    1995-01-01

    Asymmetries, A y , for the (π - ,π 0 ) reaction on polarized 3 He were measured using the pion beam of the P3W channel at LAMPF. The π 0 were detected with the new Neutral Meson Spectrometer (NMS) in coincidence with recoiling tritons. The recoil detector consisted of scintillation-counter telescopes and a wire chamber that provided energy-loss and direction information, respectively. The polarized gaseous 3 He target developed at TRIUMF was modified and run with the use of two diode lasers. Polarizations were typically 50%. The A y taken at T π = 200 MeV between 60 and 105 degrees were found to be strongly angle-dependent. The results will be compared with the theoretical predictions

  18. Polarization study of non-resonant X-ray magnetic scattering from spin-density-wave modulation in chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsumi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    We present a polarization study of non-resonant X-ray magnetic scattering in pure chromium. Satellite reflections are observed at +/-Q and +/-2Q, where Q is the modulation wave vector of an itinerant spin-density-wave. The first and second harmonics are confirmed to have magnetic and charge origin, respectively, by means of polarimetry without using an analyzer crystal. This alternative technique eliminates intolerable intensity loss at an analyzer by utilizing the sample crystal also as an analyzer crystal

  19. Tuning the polarization-induced free hole density in nanowires graded from GaN to AlN

    OpenAIRE

    Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; Carnevale, Santino D.; Kent, Thomas F.; Yang, Fan; McComb, David W.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2014-01-01

    We report a systematic study of p-type polarization induced doping in graded AlGaN nanowire light emitting diodes grown on silicon wafers by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The composition gradient in the p-type base is varied in a set of samples from 0.7 %Al/nm to 4.95 %Al/nm corresponding to negative bound polarization charge densities of 2.2x10^18 cm^-3 to 1.6x10^19 cm^-3. Capacitance measurements and energy band modeling reveal that for gradients greater than or equal to 1.30 %Al/...

  20. Polarization transfer in x-ray transitions due to photoionization in highly charged copper-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kun; Chen, Zhan-Bin; Xie, Lu-You; Dong, Chen-Zhong

    2018-02-01

    Using the density matrix theory and the multi-configuration Dirac-Fock method, the 3{d}3/2 subshell photoionization of highly charged ions is studied, together with their subsequent radiative decay. The effects of polarization transfer on the linear polarization and angular distribution of the 3{d}94{s}2{}2{D}3/2\\to 3{d}104p{}2{P}1/2 characteristic line photoemission for selected Cu-like Zn+, Ba27+, {{{W}}}45+, and {{{U}}}63+ ions are investigated. Our results show that the polarization transfer, arising from the originally polarized incident light, may lead to a considerable change in the alignment parameters and the polarization properties of the radiation, the character of which is highly sensitive to the initial photon polarization, yet virtually independent of the photon energy. These characteristics are very similar to those of the electron bremsstrahlung process reported by Märtin et al (2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 264801). The present results are compared with available experimental results and show a good quantitative agreement.

  1. Direct visualization of polarization reversal of organic ferroelectric memory transistor by using charge modulated reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Takako; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2017-11-01

    By using the charge modulated reflectance (CMR) imaging technique, charge distribution in the pentacene organic field-effect transistor (OFET) with a ferroelectric gate insulator [P(VDF-TrFE)] was investigated in terms of polarization reversal of the P(VDF-TrFE) layer. We studied the polarization reversal process and the carrier spreading process in the OFET channel. The I-V measurement showed a hysteresis behavior caused by the spontaneous polarization of P(VDF-TrFE), but the hysteresis I-V curve changes depending on the applied drain bias, possibly due to the gradual shift of the polarization reversal position in the OFET channel. CMR imaging visualized the gradual shift of the polarization reversal position and showed that the electrostatic field formed by the polarization of P(VDF-TrFE) contributes to hole and electron injection into the pentacene layer and the carrier distribution is significantly dependent on the direction of the polarization. The polarization reversal position in the channel region is governed by the electrostatic potential, and it happens where the potential reaches the coercive voltage of P(VDF-TrFE). The transmission line model developed on the basis of the Maxwell-Wagner effect element analysis well accounts for this polarization reversal process in the OFET channel.

  2. Understanding the effects of electronic polarization and delocalization on charge-transport levels in oligoacene systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2017-06-13

    Electronic polarization and charge delocalization are important aspects that affect the charge-transport levels in organic materials. Here, using a quantum mechanical/ embedded-charge (QM/EC) approach based on a combination of the long-range corrected omega B97X-D exchange-correlation functional (QM) and charge model 5 (CM5) point-charge model (EC), we evaluate the vertical detachment energies and polarization energies of various sizes of crystalline and amorphous anionic oligoacene clusters. Our results indicate that QM/EC calculations yield vertical detachment energies and polarization energies that compare well with the experimental values obtained from ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements. In order to understand the effect of charge delocalization on the transport levels, we considered crystalline naphthalene systems with QM regions including one or five-molecules. The results for these systems show that the delocalization and polarization effects are additive; therefore, allowing for electron delocalization by increasing the size of the QM region leads to the additional stabilization of the transport levels. Published by AIP Publishing.

  3. Polarization and charge transfer in the hydration of chloride ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhen; Rogers, David M.; Beck, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of the chloride ion and water molecules in the first hydration shell is presented. The calculations are performed on an ensemble of configurations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of a single chloride ion in bulk water. The simulations utilize the polarizable AMOEBA force field for trajectory generation and MP2-level calculations are performed to examine the electronic structure properties of the ions and surrounding waters in the external field of more distant waters. The ChelpG method is employed to explore the effective charges and dipoles on the chloride ions and first-shell waters. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is further utilized to examine charge transfer from the anion to surrounding water molecules. The clusters extracted from the AMOEBA simulations exhibit high probabilities of anisotropic solvation for chloride ions in bulk water. From the QTAIM analysis, 0.2 elementary charges are transferred from the ion to the first-shell water molecules. The default AMOEBA model overestimates the average dipole moment magnitude of the ion compared to the quantum mechanical value. The average magnitude of the dipole moment of the water molecules in the first shell treated at the MP2-level, with the more distant waters handled with an AMOEBA effective charge model, is 2.67 D. This value is close to the AMOEBA result for first-shell waters (2.72 D) and is slightly reduced from the bulk AMOEBA value (2.78 D). The magnitude of the dipole moment of the water molecules in the first solvation shell is most strongly affected by the local water-water interactions and hydrogen bonds with the second solvation shell, rather than by interactions with the ion.

  4. Charge density glass dynamics – Soft potentials and soft modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biljaković, K.; Starešinić, D.; Lasjaunias, J.C.; Remenyi, G.; Mélin, R.; Monceau, P.; Sahling, S.

    2012-01-01

    An universal fingerprint of glasses has been found in low-temperature thermodynamic properties of charge/spin density wave (C/SDW) systems. Deviations from the well-known Debye, elastic continuum prediction for specific heat (flat C p /T 3 plot) appear as two anomalies; the upturn below 1 K and a broad bump at T∼10 K (named Boson peak in glasses). The first one, inherent of localized two level systems within the shalow corrugated phase space, exhibits slow relaxation with the complex dynamics. The second one, “Boson peak-like peak” was attributed to the pinned mode and incomplete softening of CDW superstructural mode. We discuss similar C p (T) features found also in incommensurate dielectrics with well documented soft-mode anomalies.

  5. Charge density glass dynamics - Soft potentials and soft modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biljakovic, K., E-mail: katica@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, HR-10001, Zagreb, P.O. Box 304 (Croatia); Staresinic, D., E-mail: damirs@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, HR-10001, Zagreb, P.O. Box 304 (Croatia); Lasjaunias, J.C., E-mail: jean-claude.lasjaunias@pop3.grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Remenyi, G., E-mail: Gyorgy.Remenyi@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Melin, R., E-mail: Regis.Melin@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Monceau, P., E-mail: pierre.monceau@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Sahling, S., E-mail: sven.olaf@gmail.com [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Dresden, D-01062, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-06-01

    An universal fingerprint of glasses has been found in low-temperature thermodynamic properties of charge/spin density wave (C/SDW) systems. Deviations from the well-known Debye, elastic continuum prediction for specific heat (flat C{sub p}/T{sup 3} plot) appear as two anomalies; the upturn below 1 K and a broad bump at T{approx}10 K (named Boson peak in glasses). The first one, inherent of localized two level systems within the shalow corrugated phase space, exhibits slow relaxation with the complex dynamics. The second one, 'Boson peak-like peak' was attributed to the pinned mode and incomplete softening of CDW superstructural mode. We discuss similar C{sub p}(T) features found also in incommensurate dielectrics with well documented soft-mode anomalies.

  6. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Shvets, G

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation.

  7. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.-M. Rax

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation

  8. Luminescent systems based on the isolation of conjugated PI systems and edge charge compensation with polar molecules on a charged nanostructured surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Zhao, Bin; Geohegan, David B.; Styers-Barnett, David J.; Hu, Hui

    2014-07-15

    A photoluminescent or electroluminescent system and method of making a non-luminescent nanostructured material into such a luminescent system is presented. The method of preparing the luminescent system, generally, comprises the steps of modifying the surface of a nanostructured material to create isolated regions to act as luminescent centers and to create a charge imbalance on the surface; applying more than one polar molecule to the charged surface of the nanostructured material; and orienting the polar molecules to compensate for the charge imbalance on the surface of the nanostructured material. The compensation of the surface charge imbalance by the polar molecules allows the isolated regions to exhibit luminescence.

  9. Tuning the polarization-induced free hole density in nanowires graded from GaN to AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golam Sarwar, A. T. M.; Carnevale, Santino D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Kent, Thomas F.; Yang, Fan; McComb, David W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Myers, Roberto C., E-mail: myers.1079@osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-01-19

    We report a systematic study of p-type polarization-induced doping in graded AlGaN nanowire light emitting diodes grown on silicon wafers by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The composition gradient in the p-type base is varied in a set of samples from 0.7%Al/nm to 4.95%Al/nm corresponding to negative bound polarization charge densities of 2.2 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} to 1.6 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3}. Capacitance measurements and energy band modeling reveal that for gradients greater than or equal to 1.30%Al/nm, the deep donor concentration is negligible and free hole concentrations roughly equal to the bound polarization charge density are achieved up to 1.6 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3} at a gradient of 4.95%Al/nm. Accurate grading lengths in the p- and n-side of the pn-junction are extracted from scanning transmission electron microscopy images and are used to support energy band calculation and capacitance modeling. These results demonstrate the robust nature of p-type polarization doping in nanowires and put an upper bound on the magnitude of deep donor compensation.

  10. Tuning the polarization-induced free hole density in nanowires graded from GaN to AlN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golam Sarwar, A. T. M.; Carnevale, Santino D.; Kent, Thomas F.; Yang, Fan; McComb, David W.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2015-01-01

    We report a systematic study of p-type polarization-induced doping in graded AlGaN nanowire light emitting diodes grown on silicon wafers by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The composition gradient in the p-type base is varied in a set of samples from 0.7%Al/nm to 4.95%Al/nm corresponding to negative bound polarization charge densities of 2.2 × 1018 cm-3 to 1.6 × 1019 cm-3. Capacitance measurements and energy band modeling reveal that for gradients greater than or equal to 1.30%Al/nm, the deep donor concentration is negligible and free hole concentrations roughly equal to the bound polarization charge density are achieved up to 1.6 × 1019 cm-3 at a gradient of 4.95%Al/nm. Accurate grading lengths in the p- and n-side of the pn-junction are extracted from scanning transmission electron microscopy images and are used to support energy band calculation and capacitance modeling. These results demonstrate the robust nature of p-type polarization doping in nanowires and put an upper bound on the magnitude of deep donor compensation.

  11. Polarization and charge-transfer effects in aqueous solution via ab initio QM/MM simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong; Gao, Jiali

    2006-02-23

    Combined ab initio quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations coupled with the block-localized wave function energy decomposition (BLW-ED) method have been conducted to study the solvation of two prototypical ionic systems, acetate and methylammonium ions in aqueous solution. Calculations reveal that the electronic polarization between the targeted solutes and water is the primary many-body effect, whereas the charge-transfer term only makes a small fraction of the total solute-solvent interaction energy. In particular, the polarization effect is dominated by the solvent (water) polarization.

  12. Synchrotron X-Ray Charge-Density Study of Coordination Polymer (Mn(HCOO)2(H2O)2)∞

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Rasmus D.; Jorgensen, Mads R.V.; Overgaard, Jacob; Larsen, Finn K.; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Graber, Timothy; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Iversen, Bo B.

    2007-01-01

    Three high-quality single-crystal X-ray diffraction data sets have been measured under very different conditions on a structurally simple, but magnetically complex, coordination polymer, (Mn(HCOO) 2 (H 2 O) 2 )∞ (1). The first data set is a conventional 100(2) K Mo Kα data set, the second is a very high resolution 100(2) K data set measured on a second-generation synchrotron source, while the third data set was measured with a tiny crystal on a high brilliance third-generation synchrotron source at 16(2) K. Furthermore, the magnetic susceptibility (χ) and the heat capacity (C p ) have been measured from 2 to 300 K on pressed powder. The charge density of 1 was determined from multipole modeling of the experimental structure factors, and overall there is good agreement between the densities obtained separately from the three data sets. When considering the fine density features, the two 100 K data sets agree well with each other, but show small differences to the 16 K data set. Comparison with ab initio theory suggests that the 16 K APS data set provides the most accurate density. Topological analysis of the metal-ligand bonding, experimental 3d orbital populations on the Mn atoms, and Bader atomic charges indicate quite ionic, high-spin metal atoms. This picture is supported by the effective moment estimated from the magnetization measurements (5.840(2)μ B ), but it is at variance with earlier spin density measurements from polarized neutron diffraction. The magnetic ordering originates from superexchange involving covalent interactions with the ligands, and non-ionic effects are observed in the static deformation density maps as well as in plots of the valence shell charge concentrations. Overall, the present study provides a benchmark charge density that can be used in comparison with future metal formate dihydrate charge densities.

  13. Synchrotron X-ray charge-density study of coordination polymer [Mn(HCOO)2(H2O)2]infinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Rasmus D; Jørgensen, Mads R V; Overgaard, Jacob; Larsen, Finn K; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Graber, Timothy; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Iversen, Bo B

    2007-01-01

    Three high-quality single-crystal X-ray diffraction data sets have been measured under very different conditions on a structurally simple, but magnetically complex, coordination polymer, [Mn(HCOO)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](infinity) (1). The first data set is a conventional 100(2) K Mo(Kalpha) data set, the second is a very high resolution 100(2) K data set measured on a second-generation synchrotron source, while the third data set was measured with a tiny crystal on a high brilliance third-generation synchrotron source at 16(2) K. Furthermore, the magnetic susceptibility (chi) and the heat capacity (C(p)) have been measured from 2 to 300 K on pressed powder. The charge density of 1 was determined from multipole modeling of the experimental structure factors, and overall there is good agreement between the densities obtained separately from the three data sets. When considering the fine density features, the two 100 K data sets agree well with each other, but show small differences to the 16 K data set. Comparison with ab initio theory suggests that the 16 K APS data set provides the most accurate density. Topological analysis of the metal-ligand bonding, experimental 3d orbital populations on the Mn atoms, and Bader atomic charges indicate quite ionic, high-spin metal atoms. This picture is supported by the effective moment estimated from the magnetization measurements (5.840(2) mu(B)), but it is at variance with earlier spin density measurements from polarized neutron diffraction. The magnetic ordering originates from superexchange involving covalent interactions with the ligands, and non-ionic effects are observed in the static deformation density maps as well as in plots of the valence shell charge concentrations. Overall, the present study provides a benchmark charge density that can be used in comparison with future metal formate dihydrate charge densities.

  14. Polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridolfi, G

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the capabilities of a neutrino factory in the determination of polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering experiments, with special attention to the accuracy of this kind of measurements. We show that a neutrino factory would allow to distinguish between different theoretical scenarios for the proton spin structure

  15. When combined X-ray and polarized neutron diffraction data challenge high-level calculations: spin-resolved electron density of an organic radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voufack, Ariste Bolivard; Claiser, Nicolas; Lecomte, Claude; Pillet, Sébastien; Pontillon, Yves; Gillon, Béatrice; Yan, Zeyin; Gillet, Jean Michel; Marazzi, Marco; Genoni, Alessandro; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Joint refinement of X-ray and polarized neutron diffraction data has been carried out in order to determine charge and spin density distributions simultaneously in the nitronyl nitroxide (NN) free radical Nit(SMe)Ph. For comparison purposes, density functional theory (DFT) and complete active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) theoretical calculations were also performed. Experimentally derived charge and spin densities show significant differences between the two NO groups of the NN function that are not observed from DFT theoretical calculations. On the contrary, CASSCF calculations exhibit the same fine details as observed in spin-resolved joint refinement and a clear asymmetry between the two NO groups.

  16. Generalized nuclear Fukui functions in the framework of spin-polarized density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamorro, E.; Proft, F. de; Geerlings, P.

    2005-01-01

    An extension of Cohen's nuclear Fukui function is presented in the spin-polarized framework of density-functional theory (SP-DFT). The resulting new nuclear Fukui function indices Φ Nα and Φ Sα are intended to be the natural descriptors for the responses of the nuclei to changes involving charge transfer at constant multiplicity and also the spin polarization at constant number of electrons. These generalized quantities allow us to gain new insights within a perturbative scheme based on DFT. Calculations of the electronic and nuclear SP-DFT quantities are presented within a Kohn-Sham framework of chemical reactivity for a sample of molecules, including H 2 O, H 2 CO, and some simple nitrenes (NX) and phosphinidenes (PX), with X=H, Li, F, Cl, OH, SH, NH 2 , and PH 2 . Results have been interpreted in terms of chemical bonding in the context of Berlin's theorem, which provides a separation of the molecular space into binding and antibinding regions

  17. Interference effects in the nonlinear charge density wave dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelcic, D.; Batistic, I.; Bjelis, A.

    1987-12-01

    The main features of the nonlinear charge density wave transport in the external dc-ac field are shown to be the natural consequences of resonant phase slip diffusion. This process is treated numerically within the time dependent Landau-Ginzburg model, developed by Gor'kov. The resonances in the ac field are manifested as Shapiro steps in I-V characteristics, present at all rational ratios of internal frequency of current oscillations and external ac frequency. The origin of Shapiro steps, as well as their forms and heights, are cosidered in detail. In particular, it is shown that close to resonances the phase slip voltage acquires a highly nonsinusoidal modulation which leads to the appearance of low frequency and satellite peaks in the Fourier spectrum. Taking into account the interference of adjacent phase slips and the segment or domain structure of physical samples, we interpret the finite width of steps, side wings, synchronization, incomplete and complete mode locking and some other effects observed in numerous experiments on NbSe 3 and other CDW materials. (author). 36 refs, 12 figs

  18. Computer simulations analysis for determining the polarity of charge generated by high energy electron irradiation of a thin film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malac, Marek; Hettler, Simon; Hayashida, Misa

    2017-01-01

    Detailed simulations are necessary to correctly interpret the charge polarity of electron beam irradiated thin film patch. Relying on systematic simulations we provide guidelines and movies to interpret experimentally the polarity of the charged area, to be understood as the sign of the electrost...

  19. Interplay between spin polarization and color superconductivity in high density quark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providência, João; Providência, Constança

    2013-01-01

    Here, it is suggested that a four-point interaction of the tensor type may lead to spin polarization in quark matter at high density. It is found that the two-flavor superconducting phase and the spin polarized phase correspond to distinct local minima of a certain generalized thermodynamical...... potential. It follows that a transition from one to the other phase occurs, passing through true minima with both a spin polarization and a color superconducting gap. It is shown that the quark spin polarized phase is realized at rather high density, while the two-flavor color superconducting phase...

  20. Effects of D-600 on intramembrane charge movement of polarized and depolarized frog muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, C; Bolaños, P

    1989-07-01

    Intramembrane charge movement has been measured in frog cut skeletal muscle fibers using the triple vaseline gap voltage-clamp technique. Ionic currents were reduced using an external solution prepared with tetraethylammonium to block potassium currents, and O sodium + tetrodotoxin to abolish sodium currents. The internal solution contained 10 mM EGTA to prevent contractions. Both the internal and external solutions were prepared with impermeant anions. Linear capacitive currents were subtracted using the P-P/4 procedure, with the control pulses being subtracted either at very negative potentials, for the case of polarized fibers, or at positive potentials, for the case of depolarized fibers. In 63 polarized fibers dissected from Rana pipiens or Leptodactylus insularis frogs the following values were obtained for charge movement parameters: Qmax = 39 nC/microF, V = 36 mV, k = 18.5 mV. After depolarization we found that the total amount of movable charge was not appreciably reduced, while the voltage sensitivity was much changed. For 10 fibers, in which charge movement was measured at -100 and at 0 mV, Qmax changed from 46 to 41 nC/microF, while V changed from -41 to -103 mV and k changed from 20.5 to 30 mV. Thus membrane depolarization to 0 mV produces a shift of greater than 50 mV in the Q-V relationship and a decrease of the slope. Membrane depolarization to -20 and -30 mV, caused a smaller shift of the Q-V relationship. In normally polarized fibers addition of D-600 at concentrations of 50-100 microM, does not cause important changes in charge movement parameters. However, the drug appears to have a use-dependent effect after depolarization. Thus in depolarized fibers, total charge is reduced by approximately 20%. D-600 causes no further changes in the voltage sensitivity of charge movement in fibers depolarized to 0 mV, while in fibers depolarized to -20 and -30 mV it causes the same effects as that obtained with depolarization to 0 mV. These results are

  1. Charge-density matching in organic-inorganic uranyl compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivovichev, S.V.; Krivovichev, S.V.; Tananaev, I.G.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    2007-01-01

    Single crystals of [C 10 H 26 N 2 ][(UO 2 )(SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)](H 2 SeO 4 ) 0.85 (H 2 O) 2 (1), [C 10 H 26 N 2 ][(UO 2 )(SeO 4 ) 2 ] (H 2 SeO 4 ) 0.50 (H 2 O) (2), and [C 8 H 20 N] 2 [(UO 2 )(SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)] (H 2 O) (3) were prepared by evaporation from aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate, selenic acid and the respective amines. The structures of the compounds have been solved by direct methods and structural models have been obtained. The structures of the compounds 1, 2, and 3 contain U and Se atoms in pentagonal bipyramidal and tetrahedral coordinations, respectively. The UO 7 and SeO 4 polyhedra polymerize by sharing common O atoms to form chains (compound 1) or sheets (compounds 2 and 3). In the structure of 1, the layers consisting of hydrogen-bonded [UO 2 (SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)] 2- chains are separated by mixed organic-inorganic layers comprising from [NH 3 (CH 2 ) 10 NH 3 ] 2+ molecules, H 2 O molecules, and disordered electroneutral (H 2 SeO 4 ) groups. The structure of 2 has a similar architecture but a purely inorganic layer is represented by a fully connected [UO 2 (SeO 4 ) 2 ] 2- sheet. The structure of 3 does not contain disordered (H 2 SeO 4 ) groups but is based upon alternating [UO 2 (SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)] 2- sheets and 1.5-nm-thick organic blocks consisting of positively charged protonated octylamine molecules, [NH 3 (CH 2 ) 7 CH 3 ] + . The structures may be considered as composed of anionic inorganic sheets (2D blocks) and cationic organic blocks self-organized according to competing hydrophilic-hydrophobic interactions. Analysis of the structures allows us to conclude that the charge-density matching principle is observed in uranyl compounds. In order to satisfy some basic peculiarities of uranyl (in general, actinyl) chemistry, it requires specific additional mechanisms: (a) in long-chain-amine-templated compounds, protonated amine molecules inter-digitate; (b) in long-chain-diamine-templated compounds, incorporation of acid-water interlayers into

  2. Effective charges of ionic liquid determined self-consistently through combination of molecular dynamics simulation and density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryosuke; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2017-11-15

    A self-consistent scheme combining the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and density functional theory (DFT) was recently proposed to incorporate the effects of the charge transfer and polarization of ions into non-poralizable force fields of ionic liquids for improved description of energetics and dynamics. The purpose of the present work is to analyze the detailed setups of the MD/DFT scheme by focusing on how the basis set, exchange-correlation (XC) functional, charge-fitting method or force field for the intramolecular and Lennard-Jones interactions affects the MD/DFT results of 1,3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ( [C1mim][NTf2]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium glycinate ( [C2mim][Gly]). It was found that the double-zeta valence polarized or larger size of basis set is required for the convergence of the effective charge of the ion. The choice of the XC functional was further not influential as far as the generalized gradient approximation is used. The charge-fitting method and force field govern the accuracy of the MD/DFT scheme, on the other hand. We examined the charge-fitting methods of Blöchl, the iterative Hirshfeld (Hirshfeld-I), and REPEAT in combination with Lopes et al.'s force field and general AMBER force field. There is no single combination of charge fitting and force field that provides good agreements with the experiments, while the MD/DFT scheme reduces the effective charges of the ions and leads to better description of energetics and dynamics compared to the original force field with unit charges. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Flavor structure of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors and transverse charge densities in the chiral quark-soliton model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, António; Urbano, Diana; Kim, Hyun-Chul

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the flavor decomposition of the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, based on the chiral quark-soliton model (χQSM) with symmetry-conserving quantization. We consider the rotational 1/N_c and linear strange-quark mass (ms) corrections. We discuss the results of the flavor-decomposed electromagnetic form factors in comparison with the recent experimental data. In order to see the effects of the strange quark, we compare the SU(3) results with those of SU(2). Finally, we discuss the transverse charge densities for both unpolarized and polarized nucleons. The transverse charge density inside a neutron turns out to be negative in the vicinity of the center within the SU(3) χQSM, which can be explained by the contribution of the strange quark.

  4. Charge-Dipole Acceleration of Polar Gas Molecules towards Charged Nanoparticles: Involvement in Powerful Charge-Induced Catalysis of Heterophase Chemical Reactions and Ball Lightning Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Meshcheryakov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In humid air, the substantial charge-dipole attraction and electrostatic acceleration of surrounding water vapour molecules towards charged combustible nanoparticles cause intense electrostatic hydration and preferential oxidation of these nanoparticles by electrostatically accelerated polar water vapour molecules rather than nonaccelerated nonpolar oxygen gas molecules. Intense electrostatic hydration of charged combustible nanoparticles converts the nanoparticle's oxide-based shells into the hydroxide-based electrolyte shells, transforming these nanoparticles into reductant/air core-shell nanobatteries, periodically short-circuited by intraparticle field and thermionic emission. Partially synchronized electron emission breakdowns within trillions of nanoparticles-nanobatteries turn a cloud of charged nanoparticles-nanobatteries into a powerful radiofrequency aerosol generator. Electrostatic oxidative hydration and charge-catalyzed oxidation of charged combustible nanoparticles also contribute to a self-oscillating thermocycling process of evolution and periodic autoignition of inflammable gases near to the nanoparticle's surface. The described effects might be of interest for the improvement of certain nanotechnological heterophase processes and to better understand ball lightning phenomenon.

  5. Phase transitions to dipolar clusters and charge density waves in high T{sub c} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarela, M., E-mail: Mikko.Saarela@oulu.fi [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Kusmartsev, F.V. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    We show that doping of hole charge carriers leads to formation of electric dipolar clusters in cuprates. They are created by many-body interactions between the dopant ion outside and holes inside the CuO planes. Because of the two-fold degeneracy holes in the CuO plane cluster into four-particles resonance valence bond plaquettes bound with dopant ions. Such dipoles may order into charge-density waves (CDW) or stripes or form a disordered state depending on doping and temperature. The lowest energy of the ordered system corresponds to a local anti-ferroelectric ordering. The mobility of individual disordered dipoles is very low at low temperatures and they prefer first to bind into dipole-dipole pairs. Electromagnetic radiation interacts strongly with electric dipoles and when the sample is subjected to it the mobility changes significantly. This leads to a fractal growth of dipolar clusters. The existence of electric dipoles and CDW induce two phase transitions with increasing temperature, melting of the ordered state and disappearance of the dipolar state. Ferroelectricity at low doping is a natural consequence of such dipole moments. We develop a theory based on two-level systems and dipole-dipole interaction to explain the behavior of the polarization as a function of temperature and electric field.

  6. Determination of surface charge density of α-alumina by acid-base titration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W. Ntalikwa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The surface charge density (σo of colloidal alpha alumina suspended in various 1:1 electrolytes was measured using acid-base titration. An autotitrator capable of dispensing accurately 25 plus or minus 0.1 μL of titrant was used. The pH and temperature in the titration cell were monitored using single junction electrodes and platinum resistance thermometers, respectively. A constant supply of nitrogen gas in the cell was used to maintain inert conditions. The whole set up was interfaced with a computer for easy data acquisition. It was observed that the material exhibits a point of zero charge (PZC, this occurred at pH of 7.8 plus or minus 0.1, 7.6 plus or minus 0.2, 8.5 plus or minus 0.1, 8.3 plus or minus 0.1 for NaCl, NaNO3, CsCl and CsNO3 systems, respectively. It was also observed that below PZC, σo increases with increase in electrolyte concentration (Co whereas above PZC, σo decreases with increase in Co. It was concluded that σo of this material is a function of pH and Co and that its polarity can be varied through zero by varying these parameters.

  7. Bond index: relation to second-order density matrix and charge fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.; Jorge, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that, in the same way as the atomic charge is an invariant built from the first-order density matrix, the closed-shell generalized bond index is an invariant associated with the second-order reduced density matrix. The active charge of an atom (sum of bond indices) is shown to be the sum of all density correlation functions between it and the other atoms in the molecule; similarly, the self-charge is the fluctuation of its total charge. (Author) [pt

  8. Electronic properties and charge density of BexZn1−xTe alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    covalent character of bonding compared to other wide gap II–. VI semiconductors like ZnTe. The first-principles ... basis of heteropolar gap (Al-Douri et al 2003). 2. Empirical pseudopotential method. EPM (Cohen ..... anion plane z = 0·25 used to compute charge density are shaded. Figure 5. Charge density obtained at the ...

  9. Charge Density Quantification of Polyelectrolyte Polysaccharides by Conductometric Titration: An Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Stefano; Mora, Luigi; Capretti, Giorgio; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    An easy analytical method for determination of the charge density of polyelectrolytes, including polysaccharides and other biopolymers, is presented. The basic principles of conductometric titration, which is used in the pulp and paper industry as well as in colloid and interface science, were adapted to quantify the charge densities of a…

  10. Polar cap hot patches: Enhanced density structures different from the classical patches in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.-H.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Jayachandran, P. T.; Moen, J.; Lockwood, M.; Zhang, Y.-L.; Foster, J. C.; Zhang, S.-R.; Wang, Y.; Themens, D. R.; Zhang, B.-C.; Xing, Z. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Based on in situ and ground-based observations, a new type of "polar cap hot patch" has been identified that is different from the classical polar cap enhanced density structure (cold patches). Comparing with the classical polar cap patches, which are transported from the dayside sunlit region with dense and cold plasma, the polar cap hot patches are associated with particle precipitations (therefore field-aligned currents), ion upflows, and flow shears. The hot patches may have the same order of density enhancement as classical patches in the topside ionosphere, suggesting that the hot patches may be produced by transported photoionization plasma into flow channels. Within the flow channels, the hot patches have low-energy particle precipitation and/or ion upflows associated with field-aligned currents and flow shears. Corresponding Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal scintillation measurements indicate that hot patches may produce slightly stronger radio signal scintillation in the polar cap region than classical patches. A new type of polar cap patches, "polar cap hot patches," is identified to differentiate enhanced density structures from classical patches. Hot patches are associated with particle precipitations, ion upflows, field-aligned currents, and shear flows in the polar cap. Hot patches may lead to slightly stronger ionospheric scintillations of GNSS signals in the polar cap region than classical patches.

  11. Far-Infrared Study of the Charge Density Wave in Tetrathiofulvalene Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, D. B.; Cummings, K. D.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1981-01-01

    Detailed far-infrared measurements at temperatures from 25 to 300 K provide strong support for a charge-density-wave mechanism for the dc conductivity and microwave dielectric constant of tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ). At low temperatures the charge-density wave is pinned...... at 40 cm-1 while at higher temperatures it appears at zero frequency. Values are obtained for the effective mass (20m*) and lifetime (1.6×10-12 sec at 60 K) of the charge-density wave.......Detailed far-infrared measurements at temperatures from 25 to 300 K provide strong support for a charge-density-wave mechanism for the dc conductivity and microwave dielectric constant of tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ). At low temperatures the charge-density wave is pinned...

  12. Charge-density matching in organic-inorganic uranyl compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivovichev, S.V. [Saint Petersburg State Univ., Dept. of Crystallography, Faculty of Geology (Russian Federation); Krivovichev, S.V.; Tananaev, I.G.; Myasoedov, B.F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, A.N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-15

    Single crystals of [C{sub 10}H{sub 26}N{sub 2}][(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}){sub 0.85}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1), [C{sub 10}H{sub 26}N{sub 2}][(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}] (H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}){sub 0.50}(H{sub 2}O) (2), and [C{sub 8}H{sub 20}N]{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)] (H{sub 2}O) (3) were prepared by evaporation from aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate, selenic acid and the respective amines. The structures of the compounds have been solved by direct methods and structural models have been obtained. The structures of the compounds 1, 2, and 3 contain U and Se atoms in pentagonal bipyramidal and tetrahedral coordinations, respectively. The UO{sub 7} and SeO{sub 4} polyhedra polymerize by sharing common O atoms to form chains (compound 1) or sheets (compounds 2 and 3). In the structure of 1, the layers consisting of hydrogen-bonded [UO{sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup 2-} chains are separated by mixed organic-inorganic layers comprising from [NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 10}NH{sub 3}]{sup 2+} molecules, H{sub 2}O molecules, and disordered electroneutral (H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}) groups. The structure of 2 has a similar architecture but a purely inorganic layer is represented by a fully connected [UO{sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheet. The structure of 3 does not contain disordered (H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}) groups but is based upon alternating [UO{sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup 2-} sheets and 1.5-nm-thick organic blocks consisting of positively charged protonated octylamine molecules, [NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 7}CH{sub 3}]{sup +}. The structures may be considered as composed of anionic inorganic sheets (2D blocks) and cationic organic blocks self-organized according to competing hydrophilic-hydrophobic interactions. Analysis of the structures allows us to conclude that the charge-density matching principle is observed in uranyl compounds. In order to satisfy some basic peculiarities of uranyl (in

  13. Solvent density mode instability in non-polar solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National. Centre for Basic Sciences, ... upon excitation mainly drives the solvent reorganization [12,13]. However, the. Stokes shifts ..... process [17] where a solvent density mode with momentum q is scattered to another density mode of ...

  14. Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil [Santa Fe, NM; Singleton, John [Los Alamos, NM; Migliori, Albert [Santa Fe, NM

    2008-08-05

    A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

  15. Charge-scaling effect in ionic liquids from the charge-density analysis of N,N'-dimethylimidazolium methylsulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichel, Witali; Trapp, Nils; Hauf, Christoph; Kohler, Oliver; Eickerling, Georg; Scherer, Wolfgang; Krossing, Ingo

    2014-03-17

    The charge scaling effect in ionic liquids was explored on the basis of experimental and theoretical chargedensity analyses of [C1MIM][C1SO4] employing the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) approach. Integrated QTAIM charges of the experimental (calculated) charge density of the cation and anion resulted in non-integer values of ±0.90 (±0.87) e. Efficient charge transfer along the bond paths of the hydrogen bonds between the imidazolium ring and the anion was considered as the origin of these reduced charges. In addition, a detailed QTAIM analysis of the bonding situation in the [C1SO4]- anion revealed the presence of negative πO→σ*S-O hyperconjugation.

  16. Charge-Transfer States in Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Impact of Polarization, Delocalization, and Disorder

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Zilong

    2017-05-08

    We investigate the impact of electronic polarization, charge delocalization, and energetic disorder on the charge-transfer (CT) states formed at a planar C60/pentacene interface. The ability to examine large complexes containing up to seven pentacene molecules and three C60 molecules allows us to take explicitly into account the electronic polarization effects. These complexes are extracted from a bilayer architecture modeled by molecular dynamics simulations and evaluated by means of electronic-structure calculations based on long-range-separated functionals (ωB97XD and BNL) with optimized range-separation parameters. The energies of the lowest charge-transfer states derived for the large complexes are in very good agreement with the experimentally reported values. The average singlet-triplet energy splittings of the lowest CT states are calculated not to exceed 10 meV. The rates of geminate recombination as well as of dissociation of the triplet excitons are also evaluated. In line with experiment, our results indicate that the pentacene triplet excitons generated through singlet fission can dissociate into separated charges on a picosecond time scale, despite the fact that their energy in C60/pentacene heterojunctions is slightly lower than the energies of the lowest CT triplet states.

  17. The use of charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage in polar organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züfle, Simon; Altazin, Stéphane; Hofmann, Alexander; Jäger, Lars; Neukom, Martin T.; Schmidt, Tobias D.; Brütting, Wolfgang; Ruhstaller, Beat

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the application of the CELIV (charge carrier extraction by linearly increasing voltage) technique to bilayer organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) in order to selectively determine the hole mobility in N,N0-bis(1-naphthyl)-N,N0-diphenyl-1,10-biphenyl-4,40-diamine (α-NPD). In the CELIV technique, mobile charges in the active layer are extracted by applying a negative voltage ramp, leading to a peak superimposed to the measured displacement current whose temporal position is related to the charge carrier mobility. In fully operating devices, however, bipolar carrier transport and recombination complicate the analysis of CELIV transients as well as the assignment of the extracted mobility value to one charge carrier species. This has motivated a new approach of fabricating dedicated metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices, where the extraction current contains signatures of only one charge carrier type. In this work, we show that the MIS-CELIV concept can be employed in bilayer polar OLEDs as well, which are easy to fabricate using most common electron transport layers (ETLs), like Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3). Due to the macroscopic polarization of the ETL, holes are already injected into the hole transport layer below the built-in voltage and accumulate at the internal interface with the ETL. This way, by a standard CELIV experiment only holes will be extracted, allowing us to determine their mobility. The approach can be established as a powerful way of selectively measuring charge mobilities in new materials in a standard device configuration.

  18. Charge-density study on layered oxyarsenides (LaO)MAs (M = Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Kouichi; Hiramoto, Shozo; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Sato, Kazunori; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2017-12-01

    Using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, we investigate the charge-density distributions of the layered oxypnictides (LaO)MnAs, (LaO)FeAs, (LaO)NiAs, and (LaO)ZnAs, which are an antiferromagnetic semiconductor, a parent material of an iron-based superconductor, a low-temperature superconductor, and a non-magnetic semiconductor, respectively. For the metallic samples, clear charge densities are observed in both the transition-metal pnictide layers and the rare-earth-oxide layers. However, in the semiconducting samples, there is no finite charge density between the transition-metal element and As. These differences in charge density reflect differences in physical properties. First-principles calculations using density functional theory reproduce the experimental results reasonably well.

  19. Charged particle density distributions in Au+ Au collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of ...

  20. Modulated spin and charge densities in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, J.M.

    1997-08-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have played a crucial role in characterizing the spin and charge correlations in copper-oxide superconductors. While the data are often interpreted with respect to specific theories of the cuprates, an attempt is made here to distinguish those facts that can be extracted empirically, and the connections that can be made with minimal assumptions.

  1. Charged particle density distributions in Au + Au collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of ...

  2. Nanoscale measurement of Nernst effect in two-dimensional charge density wave material 1T-TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Luican-Mayer, Adina; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2017-11-01

    Advances in nanoscale material characterization on two-dimensional van der Waals layered materials primarily involve their optical and electronic properties. The thermal properties of these materials are harder to access due to the difficulty of thermal measurements at the nanoscale. In this work, we create a nanoscale magnetothermal device platform to access the basic out-of-plane magnetothermal transport properties of ultrathin van der Waals materials. Specifically, the Nernst effect in the charge density wave transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 is examined on nano-thin flakes in a patterned device structure. It is revealed that near the commensurate charge density wave (CCDW) to nearly commensurate charge density wave (NCCDW) phase transition, the polarity of the Nernst effect changes. Since the Nernst effect is especially sensitive to changes in the Fermi surface, this suggests that large changes are occurring in the out-of-plane electronic structure of 1T-TaS2, which are otherwise unresolved in just in-plane electronic transport measurements. This may signal a coherent evolution of out-of-plane stacking in the CCDW → NCCDW transition.

  3. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F.; Goosmann, R. W.; Gaskell, C. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. A growing body of evidence suggests that some, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. The inner AGN components cannot be spatially resolved with current instruments and must be studied by numerical simulations of observed spectroscopy and polarization data. Aims: We run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We obtain geometry-sensitive polarization spectra and images to improve our previous AGN models and their comparison with the observations. Methods: We use the latest public version 1.2 of the Monte Carlo code stokes presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate the importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. Results: In comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectra and show a decrease in the net polarization percentage at all lines of sight. The resulting polarization position angle depends on the morphology of the clumpy structure, with extended tori favoring parallel polarization while compact tori produce orthogonal polarization position angles. In the case of polar scattering regions, fragmentation increases the net polarization unless the cloud filling factor is small. A complete AGN model constructed from the individual, fragmented regions can produce low polarization percentages (<2%), with a parallel polarization angle for observer inclinations up to 70° for a torus half opening angle of 60°. For

  4. Solvent density mode instability in non-polar solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    this region produces time scales, one in the range of 1–2 ps and the other in the range of ≥10 ps for f = 4 as reported earlier [17]. Note also that both the values of f (f = 4) and density for which these two time scales are predicted are very close to the solute–solvent systems for which the experiments have reported multiple ...

  5. Peltier effect in multilayered nanopillars under high density charge current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravier, L; Fukushima, A; Kubota, H; Yamamoto, A; Yuasa, S

    2006-01-01

    From the basic equations of thermoelectricity, we model the thermal regimes that develop in multilayered nanopillar elements experiencing continuous charge currents. The energy conservation principle was applied to all layer-layer and layer-electrode junctions. The obtained set of equations was solved to derive the temperature of each junction. The contribution of the Peltier effect is included in an effective resistance. This model gives satisfactory fits to experimental data obtained on a series of reference nanopillar elements

  6. Lateral diffusion of the topological charge density in stochastic optical fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic (i.e. random and quasi-random) optical fields may contain distributions of optical vortices that are represented by non-uniform topological charge densities. Numerical simulations are used to investigate the evolution under free...

  7. Rendering high charge density of states in ionic liquid-gated MoS 2 transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Y.; Lee, J.; Kim, S.; Park, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated high charge density of states (DOS) in the bandgap of MoS2 nanosheets with variable temperature measurements on ionic liquid-gated MoS2 transistors. The thermally activated charge transport indicates that the electrical current in the two-dimensional MoS 2 nanosheets under high

  8. Charged particle density distributions in Au·Au collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au·Au collisions using the BRAHMS ... Relativistic heavy-ion collisions; charged hadron production; pseudorapidity distribu- tions; centrality .... the predictions of two different theoretical models: (i) the high density gluon saturation model of Kharzeev and ...

  9. Methodology for extraction of space charge density profiles at nanoscale from Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C; Boudou, L; Makasheva, K; Teyssedre, G

    2017-12-15

    To understand the physical phenomena occurring at metal/dielectric interfaces, determination of the charge density profile at nanoscale is crucial. To deal with this issue, charges were injected applying a DC voltage on lateral Al-electrodes embedded in a SiN x thin dielectric layer. The surface potential induced by the injected charges was probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). It was found that the KPFM frequency mode is a better adapted method to probe accurately the charge profile. To extract the charge density profile from the surface potential two numerical approaches based on the solution to Poisson's equation for electrostatics were investigated: the second derivative model method, already reported in the literature, and a new 2D method based on the finite element method (FEM). Results highlight that the FEM is more robust to noise or artifacts in the case of a non-flat initial surface potential. Moreover, according to theoretical study the FEM appears to be a good candidate for determining charge density in dielectric films with thicknesses in the range from 10 nm to 10 μm. By applying this method, the charge density profile was determined at nanoscale, highlighting that the charge cloud remains close to the interface.

  10. Methodology for extraction of space charge density profiles at nanoscale from Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Boudou, L.; Makasheva, K.; Teyssedre, G.

    2017-12-01

    To understand the physical phenomena occurring at metal/dielectric interfaces, determination of the charge density profile at nanoscale is crucial. To deal with this issue, charges were injected applying a DC voltage on lateral Al-electrodes embedded in a SiN x thin dielectric layer. The surface potential induced by the injected charges was probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). It was found that the KPFM frequency mode is a better adapted method to probe accurately the charge profile. To extract the charge density profile from the surface potential two numerical approaches based on the solution to Poisson’s equation for electrostatics were investigated: the second derivative model method, already reported in the literature, and a new 2D method based on the finite element method (FEM). Results highlight that the FEM is more robust to noise or artifacts in the case of a non-flat initial surface potential. Moreover, according to theoretical study the FEM appears to be a good candidate for determining charge density in dielectric films with thicknesses in the range from 10 nm to 10 μm. By applying this method, the charge density profile was determined at nanoscale, highlighting that the charge cloud remains close to the interface.

  11. On contribution of known atomic partial charges of protein backbone in electrostatic potential density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin

    2017-06-01

    Partial charges of atoms in a molecule and electrostatic potential (ESP) density for that molecule are known to bear a strong correlation. In order to generate a set of point-field force field parameters for molecular dynamics, Kollman and coworkers have extracted atomic partial charges for each of all 20 amino acids using restrained partial charge-fitting procedures from theoretical ESP density obtained from condensed-state quantum mechanics. The magnitude of atomic partial charges for neutral peptide backbone they have obtained is similar to that of partial atomic charges for ionized carboxylate side chain atoms. In this study, the effect of these known atomic partial charges on ESP is examined using computer simulations and compared with the experimental ESP density recently obtained for proteins using electron microscopy. It is found that the observed ESP density maps are most consistent with the simulations that include atomic partial charges of protein backbone. Therefore, atomic partial charges are integral part of atomic properties in protein molecules and should be included in model refinement. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  12. Size and density of East Greenland polar bear (Ursus maritimus) skulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Christian; Bechshoft, Thea Ø.; Rigét, Frank F.

    2013-01-01

    density (BMD) in 87 East Greenland male polar bears (Ursus maritimus) sampled in the time period of 1892-2010. The purpose of the study was to investigate if these measures are potential candidates as indicators for stress associated with climate change and long-range transported toxic industrial...... polar bear skulls continue in order to further explore how CBL and BMD reflect individual and population response upon exposure to environmental stress. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  13. Charge density of GaxAl1− xSb

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charge density calculations and electronic band structures for GaAl1- = 1.0, 0.5 and 0.0 are presented in this work. The calculations are performed using the empirical pseudopotential method. The charge density is computed for a number of planes, i.e. = 0:0, 0.125 and 0.25 0 by generating the potential through a ...

  14. Nuclear reactivity indices in the context of spin polarized density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, Carlos; Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar; Fuentealba, Patricio

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the nuclear reactivity indices of density functional theory have been generalized to the spin polarized case and their relationship to electron spin polarized indices has been established. In particular, the spin polarized version of the nuclear Fukui function has been proposed and a finite difference approximation has been used to evaluate it. Applications to a series of triatomic molecules demonstrate the ability of the new functions to predict the geometrical changes due to a change in the spin multiplicity. The main equations in the different ensembles have also been presented

  15. Effects of polarity, hydrophobicity, and density of ionic liquids on cellulose solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Mitsuru; Kuroda, Kosuke; Sato, Daiki; Kunimura, Haruhito; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-28

    We have synthesised novel ionic liquids (ILs) to show both cellulose dissolution ability and LCST-type phase transition after mixing with water. To realise both polar and hydrophobic properties, tetraalkylphosphonium cations and a series of carboxylate anions were employed to assume hydrophobic and highly polar properties, respectively. Effects of their alkyl chain length on the water compatibility and cellulose solubility of the corresponding ILs were systematically examined. We succeeded in synthesising novel ILs which dissolve cellulose and separable with water at moderate temperature. Through the present study, we have clarified that not only polarity but also density of ILs is an important factor in designing the ILs for cellulose dissolution.

  16. Chemical bonding and charge density distribution analysis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mid bond electron density values revealed the enhancement of covalent nature between titanium and oxygen ions and predominant ionic nature between barium and oxygen ions. Average grain sizes were estimated for the undoped and doped samples. SEM investigations showed the existence of smaller grains with ...

  17. An Analytical Planning Model to Estimate the Optimal Density of Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yongjun; Yeo, Hwasoo

    2015-01-01

    The charging infrastructure location problem is becoming more significant due to the extensive adoption of electric vehicles. Efficient charging station planning can solve deeply rooted problems, such as driving-range anxiety and the stagnation of new electric vehicle consumers. In the initial stage of introducing electric vehicles, the allocation of charging stations is difficult to determine due to the uncertainty of candidate sites and unidentified charging demands, which are determined by diverse variables. This paper introduces the Estimating the Required Density of EV Charging (ERDEC) stations model, which is an analytical approach to estimating the optimal density of charging stations for certain urban areas, which are subsequently aggregated to city level planning. The optimal charging station's density is derived to minimize the total cost. A numerical study is conducted to obtain the correlations among the various parameters in the proposed model, such as regional parameters, technological parameters and coefficient factors. To investigate the effect of technological advances, the corresponding changes in the optimal density and total cost are also examined by various combinations of technological parameters. Daejeon city in South Korea is selected for the case study to examine the applicability of the model to real-world problems. With real taxi trajectory data, the optimal density map of charging stations is generated. These results can provide the optimal number of chargers for driving without driving-range anxiety. In the initial planning phase of installing charging infrastructure, the proposed model can be applied to a relatively extensive area to encourage the usage of electric vehicles, especially areas that lack information, such as exact candidate sites for charging stations and other data related with electric vehicles. The methods and results of this paper can serve as a planning guideline to facilitate the extensive adoption of electric

  18. An Analytical Planning Model to Estimate the Optimal Density of Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Ahn

    Full Text Available The charging infrastructure location problem is becoming more significant due to the extensive adoption of electric vehicles. Efficient charging station planning can solve deeply rooted problems, such as driving-range anxiety and the stagnation of new electric vehicle consumers. In the initial stage of introducing electric vehicles, the allocation of charging stations is difficult to determine due to the uncertainty of candidate sites and unidentified charging demands, which are determined by diverse variables. This paper introduces the Estimating the Required Density of EV Charging (ERDEC stations model, which is an analytical approach to estimating the optimal density of charging stations for certain urban areas, which are subsequently aggregated to city level planning. The optimal charging station's density is derived to minimize the total cost. A numerical study is conducted to obtain the correlations among the various parameters in the proposed model, such as regional parameters, technological parameters and coefficient factors. To investigate the effect of technological advances, the corresponding changes in the optimal density and total cost are also examined by various combinations of technological parameters. Daejeon city in South Korea is selected for the case study to examine the applicability of the model to real-world problems. With real taxi trajectory data, the optimal density map of charging stations is generated. These results can provide the optimal number of chargers for driving without driving-range anxiety. In the initial planning phase of installing charging infrastructure, the proposed model can be applied to a relatively extensive area to encourage the usage of electric vehicles, especially areas that lack information, such as exact candidate sites for charging stations and other data related with electric vehicles. The methods and results of this paper can serve as a planning guideline to facilitate the extensive

  19. Large plasma density enhancements occurring in the northern polar region during the 6 April 2000 superstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2014-06-01

    We focus on the ionospheric response of northern high-latitude region to the 6 April 2000 superstorm and aim to investigate how the storm-enhanced density (SED) plume plasma became distributed in the regions of auroral zone and polar cap plus to study the resultant ionospheric features and their development. Multi-instrument observational results combined with model-generated, two-cell convection maps permitted identifying the high-density plasma's origin and the underlying plasma transportation processes. Results show the plasma density feature of polar cap enhancement (PCE; 600 × 103 i+/cm3) appearing for 7 h during the main phase and characterized by increases reaching up to 6 times of the quiet time values. Meanwhile, strong westward convections ( 17,500 m/s) created low plasma densities in a wider region of the dusk cell. Oppositely, small ( 750 m/s) but rigorous westward drifts drove the SED plume plasma through the auroral zone, wherein plasma densities doubled. As the SED plume plasma traveled along the convection streamlines and entered the polar cap, a continuous enhancement of the tongue of ionization (TOI) developed under steady convection conditions. However, convection changes caused slow convections and flow stagnations and thus segmented the TOI feature by locally depleting the plasma in the affected regions of the auroral zone and polar cap. From the strong correspondence of polar cap potential drop and subauroral polarization stream (SAPS), we conclude that the SAPS E-field strength remained strong, and under its prolonged influence, the SED plume provided a continuous supply of downward flowing high-density plasma for the development and maintenance of PCEs.

  20. High charge carrier density at the NaTaO3/SrTiO3 hetero-interface

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2011-08-05

    The formation of a (quasi) two-dimensional electron gas between the band insulators NaTaO3 and SrTiO3 is studied by means of the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method of density functional theory. Optimization of the atomic positions points to only small changes in the chemical bonding at the interface. Both the p-type (NaO)−/(TiO2)0 and n-type (TaO2)+/(SrO)0 interfaces are found to be metallic with high charge carrier densities. The effects of O vacancies are discussed. Spin-polarized calculations point to the formation of isolated O 2pmagnetic moments, located in the metallic region of the p-type interface.

  1. Determination of charged particles and their polarity in XLPE by temperature gradient thermally stimulated surface potential measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Kato, Keizo; Kook, Sang-Hoon; Hino, Taro

    1985-01-01

    By the thermally stimulated surface potential measurement with a temperature gradient in the insulator specimen, various information not possible by the uniform heating is obtained. Determination of polarity of the carriers is capable of providing a knowledge on space charge in power cables, for example. For the cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) film as cable insulation, polarity of the carriers trapped in it was determined, thereby demonstrating effectiveness of the method. The determination of polarity of mobile ions forming polarization of the ion space charge was also studied. In the ion C-peak appearing in the thermally stimulated current are involved straight-polarity mobile ions, and in the trap D-peak, hole carriers. (Mori, K.)

  2. Effect of a radial space-charge field on the movement of particles in a magneto-static field and under the influence of a circularly polarized wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffa, A.

    1967-06-01

    The effect of a circularly polarized wave on a cylindrical plasma in a axial magnetostatic field and a radial space-charge field proportional to r is studied. Single particle motion is considered. The electrostatic field produces a shift in the cyclotron resonance frequency and,in case of high charge density, a radial movement of the off-resonance particles. In these conditions a radio-frequency-particle resonance is also possible called 'drift-resonance'. The drift resonance can be produced, with whistler mode, and may be employed in ion acceleration. Afterwards parametrical resonances produced by space-charge field oscillations and collisional limits of theory are studied. Cases in which ion acceleration is possible are considered on the basis of a quantitative analysis of results. (author) [fr

  3. Modeling on oxide dependent 2DEG sheet charge density and threshold voltage in AlGaN/GaN MOSHEMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Jena, K.; Swain, R.; Lenka, T. R.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a physics based analytical model for the calculation of threshold voltage, two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and surface potential for AlGaN/GaN metal oxide semiconductor high electron mobility transistors (MOSHEMT). The developed model includes important parameters like polarization charge density at oxide/AlGaN and AlGaN/GaN interfaces, interfacial defect oxide charges and donor charges at the surface of the AlGaN barrier. The effects of two different gate oxides (Al2O3 and HfO2) are compared for the performance evaluation of the proposed MOSHEMT. The MOSHEMTs with Al2O3 dielectric have an advantage of significant increase in 2DEG up to 1.2 × 1013 cm-2 with an increase in oxide thickness up to 10 nm as compared to HfO2 dielectric MOSHEMT. The surface potential for HfO2 based device decreases from 2 to -1.6 eV within 10 nm of oxide thickness whereas for the Al2O3 based device a sharp transition of surface potential occurs from 2.8 to -8.3 eV. The variation in oxide thickness and gate metal work function of the proposed MOSHEMT shifts the threshold voltage from negative to positive realizing the enhanced mode operation. Further to validate the model, the device is simulated in Silvaco Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) showing good agreement with the proposed model results. The accuracy of the developed calculations of the proposed model can be used to develop a complete physics based 2DEG sheet charge density and threshold voltage model for GaN MOSHEMT devices for performance analysis.

  4. Morphology-dependent space charge polarization and dielectric relaxation of CdO nanomorphotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulose Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A versatile approach signifying the morphology-dependent dielectric polarization and relaxation mechanisms of cadmium oxide (CdO nanosphere, nanoflakes and nanoparallelepiped morphotypes as a function of frequency and temperature is presented. Variation of dielectric property is observed due to the changes of space charge/interfacial polarization resulting from the variations of surface to volume ratio of nanomorphology. Accordingly, colossal dielectric constant value has been observed in CdO nanosphere having larger surface to volume ratio. The order of dielectric constant (dc values observed for the present nanomorphologies is: dc of sphere > dc of flakes > dc of parallelepiped resembles the order of surface to volume ratios of the present morphologies respectively. The experimental data of complex impedance values are numerically fitted using theoretical models which provide the information of role of grain resistance on dielectric polarization and Cole–Cole type mechanism of dielectric relaxation process. The activation energies for electron transport are found to be 0.087eV for spheres, 0.074eV for flakes and 0.067 for parallelepiped nanomorphotypes of CdO. The dielectric and impedance spectroscopic analysis of the present material opens up wide scope for morphology-dependent tuning of nanomaterials for electrical applications.

  5. Nonlinear waves in viscoelastic magnetized complex astroplasmas with polarized dust-charge variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papari Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonextensive nonthermal magnetized viscoelastic astrofluid, compositionally containing nonthermal electrons and ions together with massive polarized dust micro-spherical grains of variable electric charge, is allowed to endure weakly nonlinear perturbation around its equilibrium. The nonextensivity originating from the large-scale non-local effects is included via the Tsallis thermo-statistical distribution laws describing the lighter species. Assuming the equilibrium as a homogeneous hydrostatic one, the dust polarization effects are incorporated via the conventional homogeneous polarization force law. The perturbed fluid model evolves as a unique conjugate pair of coupled extended Korteweg-de Vries (e-KdV equations. A constructed numerical tapestry shows the collective excitations of a new pair of distinct classes of nonlinear mode structures in new parametric space. The first family indicates periodic electrostatic compressive eigenmodes in the form of soliton-chains. Likewise, the second one reveals gravitational rarefactive solitary patterns. Their microphysical multi-parametric dependencies of the eigen-patterns are illustratively analyzed and bolstered. The paper ends up with some promising implications and applications in the astro-cosmo-plasmic context of wave-induced accretive triggering processes responsible for gravitationally bounded (gravito-condensed astro-structure formation, such as stellesimals, planetsimals, etc.

  6. Nonlinear waves in viscoelastic magnetized complex astroplasmas with polarized dust-charge variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Papari; Karmakar, Pralay Kumar

    2018-01-01

    A nonextensive nonthermal magnetized viscoelastic astrofluid, compositionally containing nonthermal electrons and ions together with massive polarized dust micro-spherical grains of variable electric charge, is allowed to endure weakly nonlinear perturbation around its equilibrium. The nonextensivity originating from the large-scale non-local effects is included via the Tsallis thermo-statistical distribution laws describing the lighter species. Assuming the equilibrium as a homogeneous hydrostatic one, the dust polarization effects are incorporated via the conventional homogeneous polarization force law. The perturbed fluid model evolves as a unique conjugate pair of coupled extended Korteweg-de Vries (e-KdV) equations. A constructed numerical tapestry shows the collective excitations of a new pair of distinct classes of nonlinear mode structures in new parametric space. The first family indicates periodic electrostatic compressive eigenmodes in the form of soliton-chains. Likewise, the second one reveals gravitational rarefactive solitary patterns. Their microphysical multi-parametric dependencies of the eigen-patterns are illustratively analyzed and bolstered. The paper ends up with some promising implications and applications in the astro-cosmo-plasmic context of wave-induced accretive triggering processes responsible for gravitationally bounded (gravito-condensed) astro-structure formation, such as stellesimals, planetsimals, etc.

  7. Space charge profiles in low density polyethylene samples containing a permittivity/conductivity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambery, K.R.; Fleming, R.J.; Holbøll, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Laser induced pressure pulse space charge measurements were made on 1.5 mm thick plaques of high purity low density polyethylene equipped with vacuum-evaporated aluminium electrodes. Temperature differences up to 20 °C were maintained across the samples, which were subjected to dc fields up to 1.......5×107 V m-1. Current density was also measured as a function of temperature and field. Space charge due exclusively to the temperature gradient was detected, with density of order 0.01 C m-3. The activation energy associated with the transport of electrons through the bulk was calculated as 0.09 e...... were inferred by combining the space charge and current density measurements...

  8. Penile density and globally used chemicals in Canadian and Greenland polar bears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Christian; Dyck, Markus; Rigét, Frank F

    2015-01-01

    -range dispersed and to biomagnify to very high concentrations in the tissues of Arctic apex predators such as polar bears (Ursus maritimus). A major concern relating to EDCs is their effects on vital organ-tissues such as bone and it is possible that EDCs represent a more serious challenge to the species......' survival than the more conventionally proposed prey reductions linked to climate change. We therefore analyzed penile bone mineral density (BMD) as a key phenotype for reproductive success in 279 polar bear samples born 1990-2000 representing eight polar bear subpopulations. Since EDC concentrations were...... not available from the same specimens, we compared BMD with published literature information on EDC concentrations. Latitudinal and longitudinal BMD and EDC gradients were clearly observed, with Western Hudson bears having the highest BMD and lowest EDCs, and North East Greenland polar bears carrying the lowest...

  9. Spin polarization versus color–flavor locking in high-density quark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providência, João; Providência, Constança

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that spin polarization with respect to each flavor in three-flavor quark matter occurs instead of color–flavor locking at high baryon density by using the Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model with four-point tensor-type interaction. Also, it is indicated that the order of phase transition between...... the color–flavor-locked phase and the spin-polarized phase is the first order by means of second-order perturbation theory.......It is shown that spin polarization with respect to each flavor in three-flavor quark matter occurs instead of color–flavor locking at high baryon density by using the Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model with four-point tensor-type interaction. Also, it is indicated that the order of phase transition between...

  10. Spin density measurement of water-bridged Co-dimer using polarized neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard-Møller, Emil; Overgaard, Jacob; Chilton, Nick

    present an experimentally determined spin density using polarized neutron diffraction in a simple water-bridged cobalt dimer [Co2(H2O)(piv)4(Hpiv)2(py)2] which is known to have a small ferromagnetic coupling between the spin centers. Visualizing the SDD could get us one step further in understanding...

  11. Spin-polarized versus chiral condensate in quark matter at finite temperature and density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providencia, Joao

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the spin-polarized condensate appears in quark matter at high baryon density and low temperature due to the tensor-type four-point interaction in the Nambu-Jona-Lasiniotype model as a low-energy effective theory of quantum chromodynamics. It is indicated within this low...

  12. Isospin constraints between three cross sections and two polarization density matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Doncel, M G; Minnaert, P

    1972-01-01

    The authors give the relation which isospin conservation imposes between the three cross sections and two polarization density matrices, for three reactions related by two isospin channels. It is valid for arbitrary spin and for spin correlations. Its application to the most usual cases of spin 1 and /sup 3///sub 2/ is given. (6 refs).

  13. Exploring charge density analysis in crystals at high pressure: data collection, data analysis and advanced modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Nicola; Genoni, Alessandro; Meyer, Benjamin; Krawczuk, Anna; Macchi, Piero

    2017-08-01

    The possibility to determine electron-density distribution in crystals has been an enormous breakthrough, stimulated by a favourable combination of equipment for X-ray and neutron diffraction at low temperature, by the development of simplified, though accurate, electron-density models refined from the experimental data and by the progress in charge density analysis often in combination with theoretical work. Many years after the first successful charge density determination and analysis, scientists face new challenges, for example: (i) determination of the finer details of the electron-density distribution in the atomic cores, (ii) simultaneous refinement of electron charge and spin density or (iii) measuring crystals under perturbation. In this context, the possibility of obtaining experimental charge density at high pressure has recently been demonstrated [Casati et al. (2016). Nat. Commun. 7, 10901]. This paper reports on the necessities and pitfalls of this new challenge, focusing on the species syn-1,6:8,13-biscarbonyl[14]annulene. The experimental requirements, the expected data quality and data corrections are discussed in detail, including warnings about possible shortcomings. At the same time, new modelling techniques are proposed, which could enable specific information to be extracted, from the limited and less accurate observations, like the degree of localization of double bonds, which is fundamental to the scientific case under examination.

  14. Charge and transition densities of samarium isotopes in the interacting Boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinester, M.A.; Alster, J.; Dieperink, A.E.L.

    1982-01-01

    The interacting boson approximation (IBA) model has been used to interpret the ground-state charge distributions and lowest 2 + transition charge densities of the even samarium isotopes for A = 144-154. Phenomenological boson transition densities associated with the nucleons comprising the s-and d-bosons of the IBA were determined via a least squares fit analysis of charge and transition densities in the Sm isotopes. The application of these boson trasition densities to higher excited 0 + and 2 + states of Sm, and to 0 + and 2 + transitions in neighboring nuclei, such as Nd and Gd, is described. IBA predictions for the transition densities of the three lowest 2 + levels of 154 Gd are given and compared to theoretical transition densities based on Hartree-Fock calculations. The deduced quadrupole boson transition densities are in fair agreement with densities derived previously from 150 Nd data. It is also shown how certain moments of the best fit boson transition densities can simply and sucessfully describe rms radii, isomer shifts, B(E2) strengths, and transition radii for the Sm isotopes. (orig.)

  15. Charge density modification of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystals for stable silver nanoparticles suspension preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeng, Fanny; Denneulin, Aurore; Neuman, Charles; Bras, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) has been found to be a great method for producing metallic particles in a sustainable way. In this work, we propose to evaluate the influence of the charge density of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO)-oxidized CNC on the morphology and the stability of synthetized silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles were obtained by sol–gel reaction using borohydride reduction, and charge density of TEMPO-oxidized CNC was tuned by an amine grafting. The grafting was performed at room temperature and neutral pH. Crystallinity and morphology were kept intact during the peptidic reaction on CNC allowing knowing the exact impact of the charge density. Charge density has been found to have a strong impact on shape, organization, and suspension stability of resulting silver particles. Results show an easy way to tune the charge density of CNC and propose a sustainable way to control the morphology and stability of silver nanoparticles in aqueous suspension

  16. Evolution of Mars’ Northern Polar Seasonal CO2 deposits: variations in surface brightness and bulk density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Christopher P.; Titus, Timothy N.

    2015-01-01

    Small scale variations of seasonal ice are explored at different geomorphic units on the Northern Polar Seasonal Cap (NPSC). We use seasonal rock shadow measurements, combined with visible and thermal observations, to calculate density over time. The coupling of volume density and albedo allows us to determine the microphysical state of the seasonal CO2 ice. We find two distinct endmembers across the NPSC: 1) Snow deposits may anneal to form an overlying slab layer that fractures. These low density deposits maintain relatively constant densities over springtime. 2) Porous slab deposits likely anneal rapidly in early spring and fracture in late spring. These high density deposits dramatically increase in density over time. The endmembers appear to be correlated with latitude.

  17. Method of measuring a profile of the density of charged particles in a particle beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyman, L.G.; Jankowski, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    A profile of the relative density of charged particles in a beam is obtained by disposing a number of rods parallel to each other in a plane perpendicular to the beam and shadowing the beam. A second number of rods is disposed perpendicular to the first rods in a plane perpendicular to the beam and also shadowing the beam. Irradiation of the rods by the beam of charged particles creates radioactive isotopes in a quantity proportional to the number of charged particles incident upon the rods. Measurement of the radioactivity of each of the rods provides a measure of the quantity of radioactive material generated thereby and, together with the location of the rods, provides information sufficient to identify a profile of the density of charged particles in the beam

  18. Investigation of space charge in low-density polyethylene using a field probe technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, M. Salah; Hansen, Bo Svarrer

    1988-01-01

    A test method that uses a capacitive field probe to investigate the space charge distribution in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) is described. Specimens of 7-mm thickness were stressed under 100 kV DC at room temperature and for different time periods. The results indicate that the LDPE insulation...... layer between electrodes is occupied by positive and negative homocharges. The dependence of space charge distribution on the stressing time is also evident...

  19. Chiral anomaly, charge density waves, and axion strings from Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    We study dynamical instability and chiral symmetry breaking in three-dimensional Weyl semimetals, which turns Weyl semimetals into “axion insulators.” Charge density waves (CDWs) are found to be the natural consequence of chiral symmetry breaking. The phase mode of this charge density wave state is identified as the axion, which couples to an electromagnetic field in the topological θE·B term. One of our main results is that “axion strings” can be realized as the (screw or edge) dislocations in the charge density wave, which provides a simple physical picture for the elusive axion strings. These axion strings carry gapless chiral modes, therefore they have important implications for dissipationless transport properties of Weyl semimetals with broken symmetry.

  20. A next-to-leading determination of the singlet axial charge and the polarized gluon content of the nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, R D; Ridolfi, G

    1996-01-01

    We perform a full next-to-leading analysis of the the available experimental data on the polarized structure function g_1 of the nucleon, and give a precise determination of its singlet axial charge together with a thorough assessment of the theoretical uncertainties. We find that the data are now sufficient to separately determine first moments of the polarized quark and gluon distributions and show in particular that the gluon contribution is large and positive.

  1. Extraction Compression and Acceleration of High Line Charge Density Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Henestroza, Enrique; Grote, D P; Peters, Craig; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    HEDP applications require high line charge density ion beams. An efficient method to obtain this type of beams is to extract a long pulse, high current beam from a gun at high energy, and let the beam pass through a decelerating field to compress it. The low energy beam bunch is loaded into a solenoid and matched to a Brillouin flow. The Brillouin equilibrium is independent of the energy if the relationship between the beam size (a), solenoid magnetic field strength (B) and line charge density is such that (Ba)2

  2. Quantum time crystal by decoherence: Proposal with an incommensurate charge density wave ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsugawa, K.; Fujii, T.; Tanda, S.

    2017-09-01

    We show that time translation symmetry of a ring system with a macroscopic quantum ground state is broken by decoherence. In particular, we consider a ring-shaped incommensurate charge density wave (ICDW ring) threaded by a fluctuating magnetic flux: the Caldeira-Leggett model is used to model the fluctuating flux as a bath of harmonic oscillators. We show that the charge density expectation value of a quantized ICDW ring coupled to its environment oscillates periodically. The Hamiltonians considered in this model are time independent unlike "Floquet time crystals" considered recently. Our model forms a metastable quantum time crystal with a finite length in space and in time.

  3. Pushing X-ray charge densities to the limit: Comparative study of CoSb3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro; Larsen, Finn Krebs; Overgaard, Jacob

    ] In order to understand the origin of the thermoelectric properties of this family of materials, it is important to understand the crystal structure and chemical bonding of the un-doped host material.[3] This can be achieved through analysis of the charge density, which in principle can be obtained from...... modeling of accurate X-ray diffraction data.[4] However, considering the heavy elements, the high symmetry and the perfect crystallinity of this inorganic network structure one cannot think of a much more challenging case for experimental charge density analysis. In the present study we analyze several low...

  4. Charge-Shift Corrected Electronegativities and the Effect of Bond Polarity and Substituents on Covalent-Ionic Resonance Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andrew M; Laconsay, Croix J; Galbraith, John Morrison

    2017-07-13

    Bond dissociation energies and resonance energies for H n A-BH m molecules (A, B = H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Li, and Na) have been determined in order to re-evaluate the concept of electronegativity in the context of modern valence bond theory. Following Pauling's original scheme and using the rigorous definition of the covalent-ionic resonance energy provided by the breathing orbital valence bond method, we have derived a charge-shift corrected electronegativity scale for H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Li, and Na. Atomic charge shift character is defined using a similar approach resulting in values of 0.42, 1.06, 1.43, 1.62, 1.64, 1.44, 0.46, and 0.34 for H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Li, and Na, respectively. The charge-shift corrected electronegativity values presented herein follow the same general trends as Pauling's original values with the exception of Li having a smaller value than Na (1.57 and 1.91 for Li and Na respectively). The resonance energy is then broken down into components derived from the atomic charge shift character and polarization effects. It is then shown that most of the resonance energy in the charge-shift bonds H-F, H 3 C-F, and Li-CH 3 and borderline charge-shift H-OH is associated with polarity rather than the intrinsic atomic charge-shift character of the bonding species. This suggests a rebranding of these bonds as "polar charge-shift" rather than simply "charge-shift". Lastly, using a similar breakdown method, it is shown that the small effect the substituents -CH 3 , -NH 2 , -OH, and -F have on the resonance energy (<10%) is mostly due to changes in the charge-shift character of the bonding atom.

  5. Multiply charged negative ions of hydrogen in linearly polarized laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Duijn, E.; Muller, H.G.

    1997-01-01

    Motivated by the prediction of the appearance of atomic multiply charged negative ions (AMCNI) of hydrogen, induced by a linearly polarized laser field, we present an analytical quantum mechanical treatment of the appearance and structure of AMCNI in a linearly polarized field, based on high-frequency Floquet theory (HFFT). For the simplest AMCNI of hydrogen, H 2- and H 3- , the values of α 0 at which the first bound state appears are α 0 =1.62x10 2 and α 0 =1.02x10 4 , where α 0 =I 1/2 /ω 2 is the amplitude of the oscillation of a free electron in the field with frequency ω and intensity I (unless stated otherwise, we use atomic units throughout this paper). Whereas in vacuum at least one of the electrons of an AMCNI autodetaches, an intense high-frequency field can change the character of the ion dramatically, such that bound states of AMCNI can appear. Due to the interaction with the field, the electrons of the AMCNI oscillate in phase along the polarization axis. This open-quotes quiverclose quotes motion enables the electrons to be spatially separated over distances of order α 0 , reducing the repulsive e-e interaction as α 0 increases. In other words, for α 0 large enough, the field enables a configuration in which the electrons, while widely separated, are bound to one proton. For the prediction of bound states of H N- with N>3, however, a relativistic description or low-frequency theory is required. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  6. Irreversible mean-field model of the critical behavior of charge-density waves below the threshold for sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, Didier

    1993-05-01

    A mean-field (MF) model of the critical behavior of charge-density waves below the threshold for sliding is proposed, which replaces the combined effect of the pinning force and of the forces exerted by the neighbors on a given particle n by an effective force threshold Xn. It allows one to rationalize the numerical results of Middleton and Fisher [Phys. Rev. Lett. 66 (1991) 92] on the divergence of the polarization and of the largest correlation length and of Pla and Nori [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67 (1991) 919] on the distribution D( d) of sliding bursts of size d, measured in narrow intervals of driving fields E at a finite distance below the threshold Ec.

  7. Electronic device for measuring the polarization parameter in the π-p → π0n charge exchange reaction on a polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehin, S.

    1967-12-01

    An electronic apparatus has been constructed to measure the polarization parameter P 0 (t) in π - p → π 0 n charge exchange scattering at 5.9 GeV/c and 11,2 GeV/c on polarized proton target. This device insures triggering of a heavy plate spark chamber, allowing visualisation of γ rays from the π 0 decays when the associated neutron offers suitable characteristics in direction and energy. The neutron is detected by an array of 32 counters and his energy is measured by a time of flight method. Electronic circuits of this apparatus are described as test and calibration methods used. (author) [fr

  8. Finite temperature fermion condensate, charge and current densities in a (2+1)-dimensional conical space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Bezerra de Mello, E.R. [Universidade Federal da Parai ba, Departamento de Fisica, 58.059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Braganca, E. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Universidade Federal da Parai ba, Departamento de Fisica, 58.059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Saharian, A.A. [Yerevan State University, Department of Physics, Yerevan (Armenia)

    2016-06-15

    We evaluate the fermion condensate and the expectation values of the charge and current densities for a massive fermionic field in (2+1)-dimensional conical spacetime with a magnetic flux located at the cone apex. The consideration is done for both irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. The expectation values are decomposed into the vacuum expectation values and contributions coming from particles and antiparticles. All these contributions are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. Related to the non-invariance of the model under the parity and time-reversal transformations, the fermion condensate and the charge density have indefinite parity with respect to the change of the signs of the magnetic flux and chemical potential. The expectation value of the radial current density vanishes. The azimuthal current density is the same for both the irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. It is an odd function of the magnetic flux and an even function of the chemical potential. The behavior of the expectation values in various asymptotic regions of the parameters are discussed in detail. In particular, we show that for points near the cone apex the vacuum parts dominate. For a massless field with zero chemical potential the fermion condensate and charge density vanish. Simple expressions are derived for the part in the total charge induced by the planar angle deficit and magnetic flux. Combining the results for separate irreducible representations, we also consider the fermion condensate, charge and current densities in parity and time-reversal symmetric models. Possible applications to graphitic nanocones are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Polarization Potential Has No Effect on Maximum Current Density Produced by Halotolerant Bioanodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel González-Muñoz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Halotolerant bioanodes are considered an attractive alternative in microbial electrochemical systems, as they can operate under higher conductive electrolytes, in comparison with traditional wastewater and freshwater bioanodes. The dependency between energetic performance and polarization potential has been addressed in several works; however the vast majority discusses its effect when wastewater or freshwater inocula are employed, and fewer reports focus on inocula from highly-saline environments. Moreover, the effect of the polarization potential on current production is not fully understood. To determine if the polarization potential has a significant effect on current production, eight bioanodes were grown by chronoamperometry at positive and negative potentials relative to the reference electrode (+0.34 V/SHE and −0.16 V/SHE, in a three-electrode set-up employing sediments from a hyperhaline coastal lagoon. The maximum current density obtained was the same, despite the differences in the applied potential. Our findings indicate that even if differences in organic matter removal and coulombic efficiency are obtained, the polarization potential had no statistically significant effect on overall current density production.

  10. Charge and density fluctuations lock horns: ionic criticality with power-law forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqua, Jean-Noel; Fisher, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    How do charge and density fluctuations compete in ionic fluids near gas-liquid criticality when quantum mechanical effects play a role? To gain some insight, long-range Φ L ±± /r d+σ interactions (with σ > 0), which encompass van der Waals forces (when σ = d = 3), have been incorporated in exactly soluble, d-dimensional 1:1 ionic spherical models with charges ±q 0 and hard-core repulsions. In accord with previous work, when d > min{σ, 2} (and q 0 is not too large), the Coulomb interactions do not alter the (q 0 = 0) critical universality class that is characterized by density correlations at criticality decaying as 1/r d-2+η with η = max{0, 2 - σ}. But screening is now algebraic, the charge-charge correlations decaying, in general, only as 1/r d+σ+4 ; thus σ = 3 faithfully mimics known noncritical d = 3 quantal effects. But in the absence of full (+, -) ion symmetry, density and charge fluctuations mix via a transparent mechanism: then the screening at criticality is weaker by a factor r 4-2η . Furthermore, the otherwise valid Stillinger-Lovett sum rule fails at criticality whenever η = 0 (as, e.g., when σ > 2) although it remains valid if η > 0 (as for σ < 2 or in real d ≤ 3 Ising-type systems). (letter to the editor)

  11. Thermal inertia and radar reflectivity of the Martian north polar ERG: Low-density aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    The north polar layered deposits on Mars appear to be the source of the dark material that comprises the north polar erg. The physical properties and chemical composition of the erg material therefore have important implications for the origin and evolution of the Martian layered deposits. Viking bistatic radar and infrared thermal mapping (IRTM) data indicate that the bulk density of the erg material is lower than that of the average Martian surface. These data are consistent with hypotheses involving formation of filamentary sublimation residue (FSR) particles from erosion of the layered deposits. The color and albedo of the erg and of the layered deposits, and the presence of magnetic material on Mars, suggest that the dark material is composed of low-density aggregates of magnetic dust grains, perhaps similar to FSR particles created in laboratory experiments.

  12. Charge density of GaxAl1− xSb

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... The charge density is computed for a number of planes, i.e. = 0:0, 0.125 and 0.25 0 by generating the potential through a number of potential parameters available in the literature. The virtual crystal approximation was applied for the semiconducting alloy. The characteristics of the band structure and ...

  13. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far...

  14. Comparison of the Volume Charge Density of Nanofiltration Membranes Obtained from Retention and Conductivity Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, J.; Silva, V.; Pradanos, P.

    2010-01-01

    A version of the Donnan steric-partitioning pore model with dielectrical exclusion (DSPM-DE) has been used to get information on the pore size and charge density of a commercial membrane, NF45 from FilmTec, from its retention of KCl solutions. The conductivity inside the pores has been measured b...

  15. Electrical transport through constrictions in the charge-density wave conductor NbSe3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O´Neill, K.; Slot, E.; Thorne, R.; Van der Zant, H.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the electrical transport properties of insulating and metallic constrictions of dimensions 100nm-10_m in the charge-density wave (CDW) conductor NbSe3. The constrictions are made in a variety of ways: focused ion beam, reactive ion etching through a resist mask, and in a

  16. Electronic properties and charge density of BexZn1− xTe alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    II–VI semiconductor alloys; band structure; charge density; empirical pseudopotential method. Abstract. Electronic band structure calculations are performed for the BeZn1−Te (0 ≤ ≤ 1 in steps of 0.2) alloys following the empirical pseudopotential method. The alloying effects are modelled through the modified virtual ...

  17. Resonant soft x-ray scattering and charge density waves in correlated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusydi, Andrivo

    2006-01-01

    Summary This work describes results obtained on the study of charge density waves (CDW) in strongly correlated systems with a new experimental method: resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS). The basic motivation is the 1986 discovery by Bednorz and Müler of a new type of superconductor, based on Cu

  18. Charge density study of hydrogen-[(2,4-diaminopyrimidin-1-io)methyl]phosphonate monohydrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Holý, Antonín; Petříček, Václav; Císařová, I.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2002), s. 519-529 ISSN 0108-7681 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/M037; GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Keywords : X-ray diffraction * charge density study * multipole refinement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.026, year: 2002

  19. The effect of the charge density on the dipole moment of diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, A.; Germano, J.S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the calculation, using the Variational Cellular Method (VCM), of the electric dipole moment of several diatomic molecules are improved. In previous calculations, the electronic charge density was treated like a spherically symmetric function in the inscribed sphere within each cell and as being the same constant value for all intercellular regions. Since the results obtained with such an approximation have not been satisfactory, an improved approximation for the charge density in the intercellular regions is needed. It is considered that the charge density is still constant outside the inscribed sphere but with different values in each intercellular region. A new expression for the dipole moment is obtained, and applied to the diatomic molecules HF, CO, BF and CS. In addition, the corresponding dipole moment curves, potential energy curves and spectroscopic constants are calculated taking into consideration our approximation and the traditional approximation for the charge density. The results of the two models are compared with each other and with experimental results for all the molecules considered. (Author) [pt

  20. Conformations of polyelectrolyte macromolecules with different charge density in solutions of different ionic strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dommes, O A; Okatova, O V; Pavlov, G M

    2016-01-01

    Studies of charged polymer chains are interesting in both fundamental and applied aspects. Especially, polyelectrolytes attract huge attention of researchers due to their ability to form interpolymer complexes with synthetic and biopolymers. The study was carried out on the fractions of hydrophilic copolymers of N-methyl-N-vinyl acetamide and N-methyl-N-vinyl amine hydrochloride of different degrees of polymerization and of different charge density using methods of molecular hydrodynamics. Hydrodynamic and conformational characteristics as well as molar masses of isolated molecules were estimated. In addition, the intrinsic viscosity of fractions was studied at the extreme ionic strengths - in distilled water (∼10 -6 M) and in 6M NaCl. Scaling relations for intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation and translational diffusion coefficients with molar mass were obtained. Conformational behavior of macromolecules with different linear charge density was compared. (paper)

  1. Simple Physics-Based Analytical Formulas for the Potentials of Mean Force of the Interaction of Amino Acid Side Chains in Water. VII. Charged-Hydrophobic/Polar and Polar-Hydrophobic/Polar Side Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Mariusz; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2017-01-19

    The physics-based potentials of side-chain-side-chain interactions corresponding to pairs composed of charged and polar, polar and polar, charged and hydrophobic, and hydrophobic and hydrophobic side chains have been determined. A total of 144 four-dimensional potentials of mean force (PMFs) of all possible pairs of molecules modeling these pairs were determined by umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water as functions of distance and orientation, and the analytical expressions were then fitted to the PMFs. Depending on the type of interacting sites, the analytical approximation to the PMF is a sum of terms corresponding to van der Waals interactions and cavity-creation involving the nonpolar sections of the side chains and van der Waals, cavity-creation, and electrostatic (charge-dipole or dipole-dipole) interaction energies and polarization energies involving the charged or polar sections of the side chains. The model used in this work reproduces all features of the interacting pairs. The UNited RESidue force field with the new side-chain-side-chain interaction potentials was preliminarily tested with the N-terminal part of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A (PDBL 1BDD ; a three-α-helix bundle) and UPF0291 protein YnzC from Bacillus subtilis (PDB: 2HEP ; an α-helical hairpin).

  2. Residual-Charge Induced Memory Effect of Electric Polarization in Multiferroic CuFe1-xGaxO2 as Seen via Polarized Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Taro; Mitsuda, Setsuo; Yamazaki, Hiroe; Matsuura, Masato

    2013-02-01

    We have investigated ferroelectric polarization memory effect in a magneto-electric (ME) multiferroic CuFe1-x GaxO2 (CFGO) with x=0.035, which exhibits a spin-driven ferroelectric phase below TC˜ 7 K in zero magnetic field. In a previous study on CFGO(x=0.035), we have reported that the ferroelectric polarization induced by an applied electric field is retrieved after heating the sample to a non-ferroelectric high-temperature phase and then cooling down to the ferroelectric phase without electric field. [Mitsuda et al. Physica B 404 (2009) 2532] By measuring thermally stimulated electric current in detail, the previous study has elucidated that residual charges trapped in the sample are relevant to the memory effect. In the present study, we have performed polarized neutron diffraction measurements on CFGO(x=0.035) with applied electric fields, in order to investigate the multiferroic domain structure, which can reflect spatial distribution of internal electric fields due to the trapped charges. The present results have shown that the effect of the internal electric fields is significantly different from that of the ``uniform'' electric field applied on the first cooling. To explain the present results, we suggest a model that the residual charges are trapped on boundaries between the three types of magnetic domains originating from the trigonal symmetry of the crystal, implying that the presence of the bound charges of the ferroelectric polarization on the domain boundaries is a key to the memory effect in this system.

  3. The influence of oxidation on space charge formation in gamma-irradiated low-density polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, G; Xie, H K; Banford, H M; Davies, A E

    2003-01-01

    The research presented in this paper investigates the role of oxidation in the formation of space charge in gamma-irradiated low-density polyethylene after being electrically stressed under dc voltage. Polyethylene plaques both with and without antioxidant were irradiated up to 500 kGy using a sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma source and space charge distributions were measured using the piezoelectric induced pressure wave propagation method. It has been found that a large amount of positive charge evolved adjacent to the cathode in the sample without antioxidant and was clearly associated with oxidation of the surface. The amount of charge formed for a given applied stress increased with the dose absorbed by the material. A model has been proposed to explain the formation of space charge and its profile. The charge decay after the removal of the external applied stress is dominated by a process being controlled by the cathode interfacial stress (charge injection) rather than a conventional RC circuit model. On the other ...

  4. Transverse charge and magnetization densities in the nucleon's chiral periphery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, Carlos G. [JLAB Newport News, VA (United States); Weiss, Christian [JLAB Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the light-front description of nucleon structure the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent transverse densities of charge and magnetization. Recent work has studied the transverse densities at peripheral distances b = O(M{pi}{sup -1}), where they are governed by universal chiral dynamics and can be computed in a model-independent manner. Of particular interest is the comparison of the peripheral charge and magnetization densities. We summarize (a) their interpretation as spin-independent and -dependent current matrix elements; (b) the leading-order chiral effective field theory results; (c) their mechanical interpretation in the light-front formulation; (d) the large-N_c limit of QCD and the role of {Delta} intermediate states; (e) the connection with generalized parton distributions and peripheral high-energy scattering processes.

  5. Development of high-polarization Fe/Ge neutron polarizing supermirror: Possibility of fine-tuning of scattering length density in ion beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, R.; Yamazaki, D.; Akutsu, K.; Hanashima, T.; Miyata, N.; Aoki, H.; Takeda, M.; Soyama, K.

    2018-04-01

    The multilayer structure of Fe/Si and Fe/Ge systems fabricated by ion beam sputtering (IBS) was investigated using X-ray and polarized neutron reflectivity measurements and scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The obtained result revealed that the incorporation of sputtering gas particles (Ar) in the Ge layer gives rise to a marked reduction in the neutron scattering length density (SLD) and contributes to the SLD contrast between the Fe and Ge layers almost vanishing for spin-down neutrons. Bundesmann et al. (2015) have shown that the implantation of primary Ar ions backscattered at the target is responsible for the incorporation of Ar particles and that the fraction increases with increasing ion incidence angle and increasing polar emission angle. This leads to a possibility of fine-tuning of the SLD for the IBS, which is required to realize a high polarization efficiency of a neutron polarizing supermirror. Fe/Ge polarizing supermirror with m = 5 fabricated under the same condition showed a spin-up reflectivity of 0.70 at the critical momentum transfer. The polarization was higher than 0.985 for the qz range where the correction for the polarization inefficiencies of the beamline works properly. The result of the polarized neutron reflectivity measurement suggests that the "magnetically-dead" layers formed at both sides of the Fe layer, together with the SLD contrast, play a critical role in determining the polarization performance of a polarizing supermirror.

  6. Adsorption of benzene, toluene, and xylene by two tetramethylammonium-smectites having different charge densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Mortland, Max M.; Chiou, Cary T.; Kite, Daniel E.; Boyd, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    A high-charge smectite from Arizona [cation-exchange capacity (CEC) = 120 meq/100 g] and a low-charge smectite from Wyoming (CEC = 90 meq/100 g) were used to prepare homoionic tetramethylammonium (TMA)-clay complexes. The adsorption of benzene, toluene, and o-xylene as vapors by the dry TMA-clays and as solutes from water by the wet TMA-clays was studied. The adsorption of the organic vapors by the dry TMA-smectite samples was strong and apparently consisted of interactions with both the aluminosilicate mineral surfaces and the TMA exchange ions in the interlayers. In the adsorption of organic vapors, the closer packing of TMA ions in the dry high-charge TMA-smectite, compared with the dry low-charge TMA-smectite, resulted in a somewhat higher degree of shape-selective adsorption of benzene, toluene, and xylene. In the presence of water, the adsorption capacities of both samples for the aromatic compounds were significantly reduced, although the uptake of benzene from water by the low-charge TMA-smectite was still substantial. This lower sorption capacity was accompanied by increased shape-selectivity for the aromatic compounds. The reduction in uptake and increased selectivity was much more pronounced for the water-saturated, high-charge TMA-smectite than for the low-charge TMA-smectite. Hydration of the TMA exchange ions and/or the mineral surfaces apparently reduced the accessibility of the aromatic molecules to interlamellar regions. The resulting water-induced sieving effect was greater for the high-charge TMA-smectite due to the higher density of exchanged TMA-ions. The low-charge Wyoming TMA-smectite was a highly effective adsorbent for removing benzene from water and may be useful for purifying benzene-contaminated water.

  7. Crystal structure and charge density analysis of Li2NH by synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noritake, T.; Nozaki, H.; Aoki, M.; Towata, S.; Kitahara, G.; Nakamori, Y.; Orimo, S.

    2005-01-01

    Complex hydrides, such as lithium amide (LiNH 2 ) and lithium imide (Li 2 NH), have recently been noticed as one of the most promising materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In this paper, we reveal the bonding nature of hydrogen in Li 2 NH crystal by synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction measurement at room temperature. The crystal structure was refined by Rietveld method and the charge density distribution was analyzed by maximum entropy method (MEM). The Li 2 NH crystal is anti-fluorite type structure (space group Fm3-bar m) consisting of Li and NH. Hydrogen atom occupies randomly the 48h (Wyckoff notation) sites around N atom. The refined lattice constant is a=5.0742(2)A. The charge density distribution around NH anion in Li 2 NH is almost spherical. The number of electrons within the sphere around the Li and NH is estimated from the obtained charge density distribution. As the result, the ionic charge is expressed as [Li 0.99+ ] 2 [NH] 1.21- . Therefore, it is confirmed experimentally that Li 2 NH is ionically bonded

  8. The density functional study of electronic structure, electronic charge density, linear and nonlinear optical properties of single crystal alpha-LiAlTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Khan, Wilayat, E-mail: walayat76@gmail.com [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • FP-LAPW technique is used for calculating the electronic structure. • The band structure shows that the calculated compound is semiconductor. • The complex dielectric function has been calculated. • Nonlinear optical properties has also been calculated. • This compound can be used for molecular engineering of the crystals. - Abstract: Self-consistent calculations is performed using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) technique based on density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the electronic band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, linear and non-linear optical properties of α-LiAlTe{sub 2} compound having tetragonal symmetry with space group I4{sup ¯}2d. The electronic structure are calculated using the Ceperley Alder local density approach (CA-LDA), Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof generalize gradient approach (PBE-GGA), Engel–Vosko generalize gradient approach (EVGGA) and modified Becke Johnson approach (mBJ). Band structure calculations of (α-LiAlTe{sub 2}) depict semiconducting nature with direct band gap of 2.35 eV (LDA), 2.48 eV (GGA), 3.05 eV (EVGGA) and 3.13 eV (mBJ), which is comparable to experimental value. The calculated electronic charge density show ionic interaction between Te and Li atoms and polar covalent interaction between Al and Te atoms. Some optical susceptibilities like dielectric constants, refractive index, extension co-efficient, reflectivity and energy loss function have been calculated and analyzed on the basis of electronic structure. The compound α-LiAlTe{sub 2} provides a considerable negative value of birefringence of −0.01. Any anisotropy observed in the linear optical properties which are in favor to enhance the nonlinear optical properties. The symbol χ{sub abc}{sup (2)}(ω) represents the second order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, possess six non-zero components in this symmetry (tetragonal), called: 1 2 3, 2 1 3, 2 3 1, 1 3 2, 3 1 2 and 3 2 1

  9. Toward a global description of nuclear charge radii: Exploring the Fayans energy density functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2017-06-01

    Background: Binding energies and charge radii are fundamental properties of atomic nuclei. When inspecting their particle-number dependence, both quantities exhibit pronounced odd-even staggering. While the odd-even effect in binding energy can be attributed to nucleonic pairing, the origin of staggering in charge radii is less straightforward to ascertain. Purpose: In this work, we study the odd-even effect in binding energies and charge radii, and systematic behavior of differential radii, to identify the underlying components of the effective nuclear interaction. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals fitted to similar data sets but using different optimization protocols. We inspect various correlations between differential charge radii, odd-even staggering in energies and radii, and nuclear matter properties. The Fayans functional is assumed to be in the local FaNDF0 form. Detailed analysis is carried out for medium-mass and heavy semimagic nuclei with a particular focus on the Ca chain. Results: By making the surface and pairing terms dependent on density gradients, the Fayans functional offers the superb simultaneous description of odd-even staggering effects in energies and charge radii. Conversely, when the data on differential radii are added to the pool of fit observables, the coupling constants determining the strengths of the gradient terms of Fayans functional are increased by orders of magnitude. The Skyrme functional optimized in this work with the generalized Fayans pairing term offers results of similar quality. We quantify these findings by performing correlation analysis based on the statistical linear regression technique. The nuclear matter parameters characterizing Fayans and Skyrme functionals optimized to similar data sets are fairly close. Conclusion: The Fayans paring functional, with its generalized density dependence, significantly improves the description of

  10. Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Mitchell

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The imaging of fast-moving electron-density structures in the polar cap presents a unique set of challenges that are not encountered in other ionospheric imaging problems. GPS observations of total electron content in the polar cap are sparse compared to other regions in the Northern Hemisphere. Furthermore, the slow relative motion of the satellites across the sky complicates the problem since the velocity of the plasma can be large in comparison and traditional approaches could result in image blurring. This paper presents a Kalman-filter based method that incorporates a forward projection of the solution based on a model plasma drift velocity field. This is the first time that the plasma motion, rather than just integrations of electron density, has been used in an ionospheric imaging algorithm. The motion is derived from the Weimer model of the electric field. It is shown that this novel approach to the implementation of a Kalman filter provides a detailed view of the polar cap ionosphere under severe storm conditions. A case study is given for the October 2003 Halloween storm where verification is provided by incoherent scatter radars.

  11. Transition from Fowler-Nordheim field emission to space charge limited current density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Y.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2006-01-01

    The Fowler-Nordheim law gives the current density extracted from a surface under strong fields, by treating the emission of electrons from a metal-vacuum interface in the presence of an electric field normal to the surface as a quantum mechanical tunneling process. Child's law predicts the maximum transmitted current density by considering the space charge effect. When the electric field becomes high enough, the emitted current density will be limited by Child's law. This work analyzes the transition of the transmitted current density from the Fowler-Nordheim law to Child's law space charge limit using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell code. Also studied is the response of the emission model to strong electric fields near the transition point. We find the transition without geometrical effort is smooth and much slower than reported previously [J. P. Barbour, W. W. Dolan, J. K. Trolan, E. E. Martin, and W. P. Dyke, Phys. Rev. 92, 45 (1953)]. We analyze the effects of geometric field enhancement and work function on the transition. Using our previous model for effective field enhancement [Y. Feng and J. P. Verboncoeur, Phys. Plasmas 12, 103301 (2005)], we find the geometric effect dominates, and enhancement β>10 can accelerate the approach to the space charge limit at practical electric field. A damped oscillation near the local plasma frequency is observed in the transient system response

  12. Donation and back-donation analyzed through a charge transfer model based on density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Valencia, Ulises; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2017-07-01

    The net charge transfer process that occurs between two species, A and B, interacting with each other, may be decomposed into two processes: one in which A receives charge from B, which can be identified as the electrophilic channel for A or the nucleophilic channel for B, and a second in which A donates charge to B, which can be identified as the nucleophilic channel for A or the electrophilic channel for B. By determining the amount of charge associated with both processes through the minimization of the interaction energy associated with each case, the expressions for the amount of charge involved in each case can be expressed in terms of the directional chemical potentials and the hardnesses of the interacting species. The correlation between the charges obtained for the interaction between phosphine ligands of the type PRR'R'' and Ni, and the A 1 carbonyl stretching frequency provides support for their interpretation as measures of the electrophilicity and nucleophilicity of a chemical species, and, at the same time, allows one to describe the donation and back-donation processes in terms of the density functional theory of chemical reactivity.

  13. Occurrence Locations, Dipole Tilt Angle Effects, and Plasma Cloud Drift Paths of Polar Cap Neutral Density Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. S.; Sutton, E. K.; Huang, C. Y.; Cooke, D. L.

    2018-02-01

    Polar cap neutral density anomaly (PCNDA) with large mass density enhancements over the background has been frequently observed in the polar cap during magnetic storms. By tracing field lines to the magnetosphere from the polar ionosphere, we divide the polar cap into two regions, an open field line (OFL) region with field lines connecting to the magnetopause boundary and a distant tail field line (TFL) region threaded with magnetotail lobe field lines. A statistical study of neutral density observed by the Challenging Minisatellite Payload satellite during major magnetic storms with Dst atmospheric disturbance could be generated in the nightside polar cap. From the PCNDA size and speed of sound at 400 km, we derive an initial energy deposition duration for producing traveling atmospheric disturbance in the range from 0.5 to 2.5 hr.

  14. Chemical bonding in view of electron charge density and kinetic energy density descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-05-01

    Stalke's dilemma, stating that different chemical interpretations are obtained when one and the same density is interpreted either by means of natural bond orbital (NBO) and subsequent natural resonance theory (NRT) application or by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), is reinvestigated. It is shown that within the framework of QTAIM, the question as to whether for a given molecule two atoms are bonded or not is only meaningful in the context of a well-defined reference geometry. The localized-orbital-locator (LOL) is applied to map out patterns in covalent bonding interaction, and produces results that are consistent for a variety of reference geometries. Furthermore, LOL interpretations are in accord with NBO/NRT, and assist in an interpretation in terms of covalent bonding. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Influence of the overall charge and local charge density of pectin on the complex formation between pectin and beta-lactoglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperber, B.L.H.M.; Schols, H.A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Norde, W.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The complex formation between ß-lactoglobulin (ß-lg) and pectin is studied using pectins with different physicochemical characteristics. Pectin allows for the control of both the overall charge by degree of methyl-esterification as well as local charge density by the degree of blockiness. Varying

  16. Influence of the overall charge and local charge density of pectin on the complex formation between pectin and beta-lactoglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperber, Bram L. H. M.; Schols, Henk A.; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Norde, Willem; Voragen, Alphons G. J.

    The complex formation between beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) and pectin is studied using pectins with different physicochemical characteristics. Pectin allows for the control of both the overall charge by degree of methyl-esterification as well as local charge density by the degree of blockiness.

  17. Penile density and globally used chemicals in Canadian and Greenland polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Christian; Dyck, Markus; Rigét, Frank F; Beck Jensen, Jens-Erik; Hyldstrup, Lars; Letcher, Robert J; Gustavson, Kim; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Dietz, Rune

    2015-02-01

    Industrially produced chemicals have been a major environmental concern across our entire Globe since the onset of rapid industrial development around the early 1900. Many of the substances being used are known to be endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and are also known to be long-range dispersed and to biomagnify to very high concentrations in the tissues of Arctic apex predators such as polar bears (Ursus maritimus). A major concern relating to EDCs is their effects on vital organ-tissues such as bone and it is possible that EDCs represent a more serious challenge to the species' survival than the more conventionally proposed prey reductions linked to climate change. We therefore analyzed penile bone mineral density (BMD) as a key phenotype for reproductive success in 279 polar bear samples born 1990-2000 representing eight polar bear subpopulations. Since EDC concentrations were not available from the same specimens, we compared BMD with published literature information on EDC concentrations. Latitudinal and longitudinal BMD and EDC gradients were clearly observed, with Western Hudson bears having the highest BMD and lowest EDCs, and North East Greenland polar bears carrying the lowest BMD and highest EDCs. A BMD vs. polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) regression analysis showed that BMD decreased as a function of the eight subpopulations' PCB concentrations and this relationship was close to being significant (p=0.10, R(2)=0.39). Risk quotient (RQ) estimation demonstrated that PCBs could be in a range that may lead to disruption of normal reproduction and development. It is therefore likely that EDCs directly affect development and bone density in polar bears. Canadian bears had in general the best health and the North East Greenland subpopulation being at the highest risk of having negative health effects. While reductions in BMD is in general unhealthy, reductions in penile BMD could lead to increased risk of species extinction because of mating and subsequent

  18. A Small Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Cylindrical nanoparticle with Controlled Surface Charge Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Choi, Sung-Min; Kline, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant molecules in aqueous solution self assemble into various micellar structures such as sphere, rod, vesicle, and lamellar, above critical micelle concentration (CMC). Self-assembled surfactants systems, therefore, have been very popular as templates for preparing various nanostructured materials. Due to their dynamic nature, however, micellar structures are very susceptible to solution conditions such as temperature, concentration, pH and pressure, limiting their applications. In this study, we have developed rigid rod-like nanoparticles with controlled surface charge density by the free radical polymerization of cationic surfactants with polymerizable counterions, cetyltrimethylammonium 4- vinylbenzoate (CTVB), with varying concentration of sodium styrenesulfonate (NaSS). The structure and surface charge density of the nanoparticles were characterized by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and zeta potential measurements

  19. Flocculation of Clay Colloids Induced by Model Polyelectrolytes: Effects of Relative Charge Density and Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhawoth, Yasine; Michot, Laurent J; Levitz, Pierre; Malikova, Natalie

    2017-10-06

    Flocculation and its tuning are of utmost importance in the optimization of several industrial protocols in areas such as purification of waste water and civil engineering. Herein, we studied the polyelectrolyte-induced flocculation of clay colloids on a model system consisting of purified clay colloids of well-defined size fractions and ionene polyelectrolytes presenting regular and tunable chain charge density. To characterize ionene-induced clay flocculation, we turned to the combination of light absorbance (turbidity) and ζ-potential measurements, as well as adsorption isotherms. Our model system allowed us to identify the exact ratio of positive and negative charges in clay-ionene mixtures, the (c+/c-) ratio. For all samples studied, the onset of efficient flocculation occurred consistently at c+/c- ratios significantly below 1, which indicated the formation of highly ionene-deficient aggregates. At the same time, the ζ-potential measurements indicated an apparent zero charge on such aggregates. Thus, the ζ-potential values could not provide the stoichiometry inside the clay-ionene aggregates. The early onset of flocculation in clay-ionene mixtures is reminiscent of the behavior of multivalent salts and contrasts that of monovalent salts, for which a large excess amount of ions is necessary to achieve flocculation. Clear differences in the flocculation behavior are visible as a function of the ionene charge density, which governs the conformation of the ionene chains on the clay surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. First principles molecular dynamics of molten NaI: Structure, self-diffusion, polarization effects, and charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N.; Costa Cabral, B. J.

    2007-09-01

    The structure and self-diffusion of NaI and NaCl at temperatures close to their melting points are studied by first principles Hellmann-Feynman molecular dynamics (HFMD). The results are compared with classical MD using rigid-ion (RI) and shell-model (ShM) interionic potentials. HFMD for NaCl was reported before at a higher temperature [N. Galamba and B. J. Costa Cabral, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 124502 (2007)]. The main differences between the structures predicted by HFMD and RI MD for NaI concern the cation-cation and the anion-cation pair correlation functions. A ShM which allows only for the polarization of I- reproduces the main features of the HFMD structure of NaI. The inclusion of polarization effects for both ionic species leads to a more structured ionic liquid, although a good agreement with HFMD is also observed. HFMD Green-Kubo self-diffusion coefficients are larger than those obtained from RI and ShM simulations. A qualitative study of charge transfer in molten NaI and NaCl was also carried out with the Hirshfeld charge partitioning method. Charge transfer in molten NaI is comparable to that in NaCl, and results for NaCl at two temperatures support the view that the magnitude of charge transfer is weakly state dependent for ionic systems. Finally, Hirshfeld charge distributions indicate that differences between RI and HFMD results are mainly related to polarization effects, while the influence of charge transfer fluctuations is minimal for these systems.

  1. Novel charge density wave transition in crystals of R 5 Ir 4 Si 10

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review the observation of novel charge density wave (CDW) transitions in ternary R5Ir4Si10 compounds. A high quality single crystal of Lu5Ir4Si10 shows the formation of a commensurate CDW along -axis below 80 K in the (ℎ, 0, ) plane that coexists with BCS type superconductivity below 3.9 K. However, in a single ...

  2. The scaling dimension of low lying Dirac eigenmodes and of the topological charge density

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, C.; Gottlieb, Steven; Gregory, E.B.; Heller, Urs M.; Hetrick, J.E.; Osborn, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; de Forcrand, Ph.; Jahn, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    As a quantitative measure of localization, the inverse participation ratio of low lying Dirac eigenmodes and topological charge density is calculated on quenched lattices over a wide range of lattice spacings and volumes. Since different topological objects (instantons, vortices, monopoles, and artifacts) have different co-dimension, scaling analysis provides information on the amount of each present and their correlation with the localization of low lying eigenmodes.

  3. Improving energy conversion efficiency for triboelectric nanogenerator with capacitor structure by maximizing surface charge density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xianming; Guo, Hengyu; Yue, Xule; Gao, Jun; Xi, Yi; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-02-07

    Nanogenerators with capacitor structures based on piezoelectricity, pyroelectricity, triboelectricity and electrostatic induction have been extensively investigated. Although the electron flow on electrodes is well understood, the maximum efficiency-dependent structure design is not clearly known. In this paper, a clear understanding of triboelectric generators with capacitor structures is presented by the investigation of polydimethylsiloxane-based composite film nanogenerators, indicating that the generator, in fact, acts as both an energy storage and output device. Maximum energy storage and output depend on the maximum charge density on the dielectric polymer surface, which is determined by the capacitance of the device. The effective thickness of polydimethylsiloxane can be greatly reduced by mixing a suitable amount of conductive nanoparticles into the polymer, through which the charge density on the polymer surface can be greatly increased. This finding can be applied to all the triboelectric nanogenerators with capacitor structures, and it provides an important guide to the structural design for nanogenerators. It is demonstrated that graphite particles with sizes of 20-40 nm and 3.0% mass mixed into the polydimethylsiloxane can reduce 34.68% of the effective thickness of the dielectric film and increase the surface charges by 111.27% on the dielectric film. The output power density of the triboelectric nanogenerator with the composite polydimethylsiloxane film is 3.7 W m(-2), which is 2.6 times as much as that of the pure polydimethylsiloxane film.

  4. New Density Estimation Methods for Charged Particle Beams With Applications to Microbunching Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsa Terzic, Gabriele Bassi

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we discuss representations of charge particle densities in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, analyze the sources and profiles of the intrinsic numerical noise, and present efficient methods for their removal. We devise two alternative estimation methods for charged particle distribution which represent significant improvement over the Monte Carlo cosine expansion used in the 2d code of Bassi, designed to simulate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in charged particle beams. The improvement is achieved by employing an alternative beam density estimation to the Monte Carlo cosine expansion. The representation is first binned onto a finite grid, after which two grid-based methods are employed to approximate particle distributions: (i) truncated fast cosine transform (TFCT); and (ii) thresholded wavelet transform (TWT). We demonstrate that these alternative methods represent a staggering upgrade over the original Monte Carlo cosine expansion in terms of efficiency, while the TWT approximation also provides an appreciable improvement in accuracy. The improvement in accuracy comes from a judicious removal of the numerical noise enabled by the wavelet formulation. The TWT method is then integrated into Bassi's CSR code, and benchmarked against the original version. We show that the new density estimation method provides a superior performance in terms of efficiency and spatial resolution, thus enabling high-fidelity simulations of CSR effects, including microbunching instability.

  5. Molecular Weight and Charge Density Effects of Guanidinylated Biodegradable Polycarbonates on Antimicrobial Activity and Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hae Cho, Chloe A; Liang, Chao; Perera, Janesha; Liu, Jie; Varnava, Kyriakos G; Sarojini, Vijayalekshmi; Cooney, Ralph P; McGillivray, Duncan J; Brimble, Margaret A; Swift, Simon; Jin, Jianyong

    2017-11-21

    Six guanidine functionalized aliphatic biodegradable polycarbonates with varying molecular weights and charge densities were synthesized via postsynthesis modification of alkyne containing polycarbonates using Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry. The concept of passive diluting group was to modify the cationic charge density of the polycarbonate without changing its hydrophilicity. Within the molecular weight range from 8000 to 30000 g mol -1 , these guanidine polycarbonates exhibited broad-spectrum biocidal activity with low toxicity to red blood cells (RBCs). The lowest molecular weight homopolymer sample (PG-8k-100) showed the best antimicrobial activity (MIC = 40 μg/mL against Escherichia coli and MIC = 20 μg/mL against Staphylococcus epidermidis) and least RBC toxicity (0.6% hemolysis at MIC). Within the three guanidine charge densities from 20% to 70%, the low to medium dilution samples (PG-8k-7030 and PG-8k-5050) had no obvious loss in antimicrobial activities compared to the nondiluted control sample PG-8k-100. However, upon further dilution, PG-8k-2080 gave the lowest antimicrobial activity.

  6. Estimation of Nanodiamond Surface Charge Density from Zeta Potential and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yi

    2017-04-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly used to study their interactions with various biological macromolecules. Such simulations generally require detailed knowledge of the surface composition of the NP under investigation. Even for some well-characterized nanoparticles, however, this knowledge is not always available. An example is nanodiamond, a nanoscale diamond particle with surface dominated by oxygen-containing functional groups. In this work, we explore using the harmonic restraint method developed by Venable et al., to estimate the surface charge density (σ) of nanodiamonds. Based on the Gouy-Chapman theory, we convert the experimentally determined zeta potential of a nanodiamond to an effective charge density (σ eff ), and then use the latter to estimate σ via molecular dynamics simulations. Through scanning a series of nanodiamond models, we show that the above method provides a straightforward protocol to determine the surface charge density of relatively large (> ∼100 nm) NPs. Overall, our results suggest that despite certain limitation, the above protocol can be readily employed to guide the model construction for MD simulations, which is particularly useful when only limited experimental information on the NP surface composition is available to a modeler.

  7. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products.

  8. Sequential tentacle grafting and charge modification for enhancing charge density of mono-sized beads for facilitated protein refolding and purification from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Ran; Yang, Chun-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2014-06-20

    We have previously found that addition of like-charged media in a refolding solution can greatly enhance the refolding of pure proteins by suppressing protein aggregation. Herein, negatively charged mono-sized microspheres with sulfonic groups were fabricated to explore the facilitating effect of like-charged media on the refolding of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs). A sequential polymer-tentacle grafting and sulfonate modification strategy was developed to increase the charge density of mono-sized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (pGMA) beads (2.4μm). Namely, GMA was first grafted onto the beads by grafting polymerization to form poly(GMA) tentacles on the pGMA beads, and then the epoxy groups on the tentacles were converted into sulfonic groups by modification with sodium sulfite. By this fabrication strategy, the charge density of the beads reached 793μmol/g, about 2.8 times higher than that modified without prior grafting of the pGMA beads (285μmol/g). The negatively charged beads of different charge densities were used for facilitating the refolding of like-charged EGFP from IBs. The refolding yield as well as refolding rate increased with increasing charge density. The anti-aggregation effects of urea and like-charged microspheres were synergetic. In addition, partial purification of EGFP was achieved because the ion-exchange adsorption led to 52% removal of positively charged contaminant proteins in the refolded solution. Finally, reusability of the tentacle beads was demonstrated by repetitive EGFP refolding and recovery cycles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Density of the North Polar Layered Deposit from Gravity and Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, L.; Lewis, K. W.

    2017-12-01

    The North Polar Layered Deposit (NPLD) of Mars is a vast reservoir of water ice with a volume of 1.14 million km3. Radar data indicates that the ice in the NPLD is extremely pure with dust content between 5 % to 10 %, however the radar data has not been able to put a direct constraint on the density of the NPLD. Here, we localize the gravity and topography signature of the NPLD and place a direct constraint on its density. We performed a grid search by generating admittance spectrum at each latitude and longitude between 75° N to 90° N and 0° E to 360° E, using a spherical cap of angular radius () of 7°, and a harmonic-bandwidth of the localization window Lwin of 37°. A region between Gemina Lingula and Planum Boreum was found to possesss an adequate correlation between gravity and topography. The estimated admittance spectra were compared with synthetic admittance spectra to constrain the load-density and the elastic thickness of the lithosphere. We constructed forward models by assuming that the lithosphere is a thin shell that deforms elastically in response to surface loads. We find that the bulk density of the NPLD ranges between 1000 to 1100 kg.m-3. Assuming a grain density of 3000 kg.m-3 for dust, the NPLD region within our localized window can contain dust content between 3 - 8 %, which is in an excellent agreement with the radar data.

  10. Magnetized Reverse Shock: Density-fluctuation-induced Field Distortion, Polarization Degree Reduction, and Application to GRBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Wei; Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Li Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stone, James M., E-mail: deng@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: hli@lanl.gov, E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    The early optical afterglow emission of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) shows a high linear polarization degree (PD) of tens of percent, suggesting an ordered magnetic field in the emission region. The light curves are consistent with being of a reverse shock (RS) origin. However, the magnetization parameter, σ , of the outflow is unknown. If σ is too small, an ordered field in the RS may be quickly randomized due to turbulence driven by various perturbations so that the PD may not be as high as observed. Here we use the “Athena++” relativistic MHD code to simulate a relativistic jet with an ordered magnetic field propagating into a clumpy ambient medium, with a focus on how density fluctuations may distort the ordered magnetic field and reduce PD in the RS emission for different σ values. For a given density fluctuation, we discover a clear power-law relationship between the relative PD reduction and the σ value of the outflow. Such a relation may be applied to estimate σ of the GRB outflows using the polarization data of early afterglows.

  11. New bounds for the atomic charge and momentum densities at the origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo, J.C.; Dehesa, J.S.; Galvez, F.J. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna)

    1991-02-01

    The 'Stieltjes moment problem' technique together with the positivity and monotonic decreasing properties of the electronic density of an atom is used to find new and more accurate lower bounds for the charge density at the nucleus and the momentum density at the origin, in terms of radial and momentum expectation values, respectively. Bounds depending on two and three expectation values are given explicitly and a Hartree-Fock study of their quality is carried out. Also, the behavior of the new bounds at large Z's is discussed. The Stieltjes technique allows to find lower bounds of better accuracy by including expectation values of higher order. (orig.).

  12. Azimuthal asymmetries of the charged particle densities in EAS in the range of KASCADE-Grande

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sima, O.; Morariu, C.; Manailescu, C.; Rebel, H.; Haungs, A.

    2009-03-01

    The reconstruction of Extended Air Showers (EAS) observed by ground level particle detectors is based on the characteristics of observables like particle lateral density (PLD), arrival time signals etc. Lateral densities, inferred from detector data, are usually parameterized by applying various lateral distribution functions (LDF). The LDFs are used in turn for evaluating quantities like the total number of particles, the density at particular radial distances. Typical expressions for LDFs anticipate azimuthal symmetry of the density around the shower axis. The deviations of the particle lateral density from this assumption are smoothed out in the case of compact arrays like KASCADE, but not in the case of arrays like Grande, which only sample a smaller part of the azimuthal variation. In this report we discuss the origin of the asymmetry: geometric, attenuation and geomagnetic effects. Geometric effects occur in the case of inclined showers, due to the fact that the observations are made in a plane different from the intrinsic shower plane. Hence the projection procedure from the observational plane to the relevant normal shower plane plays a significant role. Attenuation effects arise from the differences between the distances travelled by particles that reach the ground at the same radial coordinate but with various azimuthal positions in the case of inclined showers. The influence of the geomagnetic field distorts additionally the charged particle distributions in a way specific to the geomagnetic location. Based on dedicated CORSIKA simulations we have evaluated the magnitude of the effects. Focused to geometric and attenuation effects, procedures for minimizing the effects of the azimuthal asymmetry of lateral density in the intrinsic shower plane were developed. The consequences of the reconstruction of the charge particle sizes determined with the Grande array are also discussed and a procedure for practical application of restoring the azimuthal symmetry

  13. Spectra and Charge Transport of Polar Molecular Photoactive Layers Used for Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzuo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ground state structures, HOMO and LUMO energy levels, band gaps ΔH-L, ionization potentials (IP, and electron affinities (EA of three types of copolymer P1 and its derivatives P2, P3, and PBDT-BTA were investigated by using density functional theory (DFT with B3LYP and 6-31G (d basis set. On the base of optimized structures of ground states, their absorption spectra were obtained by using TD-DFT//Cam-B3LYP/6-31 G (d. Research shows that with the increasing conjugated units, HOMO energy levels increased, LUMO energy levels decreased, and band gaps decreased gradually. Moreover, their ionization potentials decreased and electron affinities increased along with the increase of conjugated chains, and absorption spectra red-shifted. In addition, the side chain has a significant effect on the properties of ground and excited states. In order to investigate the influence of conjugated units and side chain on the charge transport, their hole and electron reorganization energies were calculated, and the results indicated that Pb have a good hole transport capability. Considering the practical application, the HOMO and LUMO energy levels, band gaps, and absorption spectra under external electric field were studied, and the results proved that the external electric field has an effect on the optical and electronic properties.

  14. Nanoscale measurement of Nernst effect in two-dimensional charge density wave material 1T-TaS2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Stephen M. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA; Luican-Mayer, Adina [Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada; Bhattacharya, Anand [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

    2017-11-27

    Advances in nanoscale material characterization on two-dimensional van der Waals layered materials primarily involve their optical and electronic properties. The thermal properties of these materials are harder to access due to the difficulty of thermal measurements at the nanoscale. In this work, we create a nanoscale magnetothermal device platform to access the basic out-of-plane magnetothermal transport properties of ultrathin van der Waals materials. Specifically, the Nernst effect in the charge density wave transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 is examined on nano-thin flakes in a patterned device structure. It is revealed that near the commensurate charge density wave (CCDW) to nearly commensurate charge density wave (NCCDW) phase transition, the polarity of the Nernst effect changes. Since the Nernst effect is especially sensitive to changes in the Fermi surface, this suggests that large changes are occurring in the out-of-plane electronic structure of 1T-TaS2, which are otherwise unresolved in just in-plane electronic transport measurements. This may signal a coherent evolution of out-of-plane stacking in the CCDW! NCCDW transition.

  15. Breakdown of the Fermi arcs in underdoped cuprates by incommensurate charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, L. P.

    2014-11-01

    Interactions between the coherent excitations on disconnected arcs along a "bare" Fermi surface (the socalled Fermi arcs FAs) seen by angle-resolved photo emission spectroscopy (ARPES) in several underdoped (UD) cuprates and incommensurate charge density wave (IC CDW) ordering at lowering of the temperature have been studied. The carriers on FAs scatter strongly on the short-wavelength potential of CDW. The large momentum transfer relates FAs with the electronic states lying deeply under the chemical potential thus involving into consideration the Fermi liquid interactions. At low temperatures IC CDW may fully destroy low lying excitations on the Fermi arcs, leaving electrons on the pocket at the Γ point as the only charged elementary excitations in the CDW phase in UD cuprates. The results infer competition between superconducting and CDW order parameters.

  16. Terahertz spectra revealing the collective excitation mode in charge-density-wave single crystal LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiumei; Jin, Zuanming; Lin, Xian; Ma, Guohong [Department of Physics, Shanghai University (China); Cheng, Zhenxiang [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Balakrishnan, Geetha [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    A low-energy collective excitation mode in charge-ordered multiferroic LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is reported via terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Upon cooling from 300 to 40 K, the central resonance frequency showed a pronounced hardening from 0.85 to 1.15 THz. In analogy to the well-known low-energy optical properties of LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, this emerging resonance was attributed to the charge-density-wave (CDW) collective excitations. By using the Drude-Lorentz model fitting, the CDW collective mode becomes increasingly damped with the increasing temperature. Furthermore, the kinks of the CDW collective mode at the magnetic transition temperature are analyzed, which indicate the coupling of spin order with electric polarization. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  18. Three-dimensional biofilm properties on dental bonding agent with varying quaternary ammonium charge densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Liu, Huaibing; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-10-01

    Tooth-restoration interfaces are the weak link with secondary caries causing restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop an antimicrobial bonding agent with dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), and investigate the effects of quaternary amine charge density on three-dimensional (3D) biofilms on dental resin for the first time. DMAHDM was synthesized and incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose bonding agent at mass fractions of 0% (control), 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%. Streptococcus mutans bacteria were inoculated on the polymerized resin and cultured for two days to form biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to measure biofilm thickness, live and dead biofilm volumes, and live bacteria percentage in 3D biofilm vs. distance from resin surface. Charge density of the resin had a significant effect on the antibacterial efficacy (pBiofilms on control resin had the greatest thicknesses. Biofilm thickness and live biofilm volume decreased with increasing surface charge density (pbiofilm thickness (pbiofilm was dead and the percentage of live bacteria was nearly 0% throughout the biofilm thickness. Adding new antibacterial monomer DMAHDM into dental bonding agent yielded a strong antimicrobial activity, substantially decreasing the 3D biofilm thickness, live biofilm volume, and percentage of live bacteria on cross-sections through the biofilm thickness. Novel DMAHDM-containing bonding agent with capability of inhibiting 3D biofilms is promising for a wide range of dental restorative and preventive applications to inhibit biofilms at the tooth-restoration margins and prevent secondary caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Origin of the charge density wave in 1T-TiSe2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2012-06-27

    All-electron ab initio calculations are used to study the microscopic origin of the charge density wave (CDW) in 1T-TiSe2. A purely electronic picture is ruled out as a possible scenario, indicating that the CDW transition in the present system is merely a structural phase transition. The CDW instability is the result of a symmetry lowering by electron correlations occurring with electron localization. Suppression of the CDW in pressurized and in Cu-intercalated 1T-TiSe2 is explained by a delocalization of the electrons, which weakens the correlations and counteracts the symmetry lowering.

  20. Nonuniversal critical behaviour in a model for charge density wave dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritala, R.K.; Hertz, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied short range fluctuations around the infinite-range model of charge density wave (CDW) dynamics. We find that the inhomogeneity of the local field, which is neglected in the infinite-range approximation has a dramatic effect on the transition. In the Bethe approximation the critical behaviour is nonuniversal. In particular, the current exponent is ζ = 3/2 log(z-1)/[log(z)]+log(1+f/J)], where z is the number of neighbors, f the pinning strength, and J the elastic coupling. (orig.)

  1. Time-of-flight spectra for mapping of charge density of ionsproduced by laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; Parys, P.; Velardy, L.; Velyhan, Andriy; Ryc, L.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2014), s. 15-20 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279; GA ČR GAP205/12/0454 Grant - others:LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser ion sources * map of ion charge density * ion expansion * modeling Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.295, year: 2014

  2. Metal-charge density wave coexistence in TTF[Ni(dmit){sub 2}]{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaddour, W. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Campus Universitaire, Université de Tunis El-Manar, Tunis 2092 (Tunisia); Auban-Senzier, P.; Raffy, H.; Monteverde, M.; Pouget, J.-P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Pasquier, C.R., E-mail: pasquier@lps.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Alemany, P. [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Canadell, E. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Valade, L. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination, Route de Narbonne F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2015-03-01

    We have established a new pressure–temperature phase diagram of TTF[Ni(dmit){sub 2}]{sub 2} based on longitudinal and transverse resistivity measurements under pressure up to 30 kbar. We were able to identify three different charge density wave (CDW) states which all coexist with a metallic state in a wide temperature range and superconductivity at the lowest temperatures. At low pressure, two successive CDW transitions have been clearly identified. These two transitions merge into a single one at 12 kbar. A maximum of this unique CDW transition temperature is observed at 19 kbar.

  3. Surface-plasmon dispersion relation for the inhomogeneous charge-density medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsh, O.K.; Agarwal, B.K.

    1989-01-01

    The surface-plasmon dispersion relation is derived for the plane-bounded electron gas when there is an inhomogeneous charge-density distribution in the plasma. The hydrodynamical model is used. Both cphi and dcphi/dx are taken to be continuous at the surface of the slab, where cphi is the scalar potential. The dispersion relation is compared with the theoretical works of Stern and Ferrell and of Harsh and Agarwal. It is also compared with the observations of Kunz. A dispersion relation for the volume-plasmon oscillations is derived which resembles the well-known relation of Bohm and Pines

  4. Quantum phase slips in charge-density waves: the system-size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, Noriyuki; Shiobara, Masato; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Tanda, Satoshi

    1998-03-01

    We present a phenomenological model for quantum phase slips of charge-density waves that takes into account the system-size effect. The process of quantum nucleation leading to the phase slip changes from vortex pair to vortex ring creations as the external electric field increases, which is analogous to the evolution of a ripple in a rectanglar water tank. The clossover field is determined by the system size. The present model describes a number of features observed in the nonohmic conductivity in TsS3 at low temperature.

  5. Dimensional crossover of quantum nucleation processes in charge-density-wave phase slips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, Noriyuki; Shiobara, Masato; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Tanda, Satoshi

    1998-01-01

    A phenomenological model for quantum phase slips of charge-density waves that takes into account the system-size effect is presented. The process of quantum nucleation leading to the phase slip changes from vortex-pair to vortex-ring creations as the external electric field increases, which is analogous to the evolution of a ripple in a rectangular water tank. The crossover field is determined by the system size. The present model describes a number of features observed in the nonohmic conductivity in TaS3 at low temperature.

  6. Improved lower bounds for the atomic charge density at the nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvez, F.J.; Porras, I.; Angulo, J.C.; Dehesa, J.S.

    1988-06-14

    Lower bounds F(..cap alpha.., ..beta..) for the electronic charge density of atomic systems with N electrons at the nucleus, p (O), are given by means of any two radial expectation values and , for real ..cap alpha.. not ..beta.., in a rigorous and simple way. In particular, p (O) greater than or equal to (N/8 ..pi..)/sup 2// which improves bounds found previously. An interesting property of these bounds is that they are equal to the exact value p(O) in the limit ..beta.. -> -3 for any fixed ..cap alpha.. value.

  7. Effect of the surface charge density on the creep of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhmakin, Yu. D.; Rybyanets, V. A.; Nevskii, S. A.; Gromov, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    The creep of polycrystalline copper under the action of high and low electric potentials is studied. At potentials of ±4 kV and ±5 V, the steady-state creep rate decreases, and the effect in the former case is weaker than in the latter by a factor of 2.5. This difference is caused by the fact that the charge density in the sample-capacitor bank system at the high electric potentials is lower than at the low potentials.

  8. Polysaccharide charge density regulating protein adsorption to air/water interfaces by protein/polysaccharide complex formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Kosters, H.; Vliet, T. van; Stuart, M.A.C.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2007-01-01

    Because the formation of protein/polysaccharide complexes is dominated by electrostatic interaction, polysaccharide charge density is expected to play a major role in the adsorption behavior of the complexes. In this study, pullulan (a non-charged polysaccharide) carboxylated to four different

  9. Protein dynamics governed by interfaces of high polarity and low packing density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Espinosa Angarica

    Full Text Available The folding pathway, three-dimensional structure and intrinsic dynamics of proteins are governed by their amino acid sequences. Internal protein surfaces with physicochemical properties appropriate to modulate conformational fluctuations could play important roles in folding and dynamics. We show here that proteins contain buried interfaces of high polarity and low packing density, coined as LIPs: Light Interfaces of high Polarity, whose physicochemical properties make them unstable. The structures of well-characterized equilibrium and kinetic folding intermediates indicate that the LIPs of the corresponding native proteins fold late and are involved in local unfolding events. Importantly, LIPs can be identified using very fast and uncomplicated computational analysis of protein three-dimensional structures, which provides an easy way to delineate the protein segments involved in dynamics. Since LIPs can be retained while the sequences of the interacting segments diverge significantly, proteins could in principle evolve new functional features reusing pre-existing encoded dynamics. Large-scale identification of LIPS may contribute to understanding evolutionary constraints of proteins and the way protein intrinsic dynamics are encoded.

  10. Measurement of the polarized forward-backward asymmetry of B quarks using momentum-weighted track charge at SLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junk, T.R.

    1995-11-01

    This thesis presents a direct measurement of the parity-violating parameter A b by analyzing the polarized forward-backward asymmetry of b quarks in e + e - → Z 0 → b bar b. Data were taken at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), with the Stanford Large Detector (SLD), which records the products of e + e - interactions at a center of mass energy √s = 91.2 GeV/c 2 at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The SLC/SLD experimental apparatus provides a unique and ideal environment for measuring electroweak asymmetries. Heavy flavor decays of the Z 0 were identified inclusively by taking advantage of the long lifetime of B hadrons, the small, stable SLC beam spot, and SLD's precise tracking detectors. Two analysis techniques for measuring A b are presented: a binned fit to the left-right forward-backwards asymmetry of tagged events signed with momentum-weighted track charge, and a self-calibrating maximum-likelihood technique using momentum-weighted charge from the two hemispheres in each tagged event. From our 1994-1995 sample of 3.6 pb -1 , having a luminosity-weighted average e - polarization of 77.3%, and our 1993 sample of 1.8 pb -1 , having a luminosity-weighted polarization of 63.1%, we obtain A b = 0.848 ± 0.046(stat.) ± 0.050(syst.)

  11. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of High-Density Atomic Hydrogen in Solid Mixtures of Molecular Hydrogen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheludiakov, S.; Ahokas, J.; Järvinen, J.; Zvezdov, D.; Vainio, O.; Lehtonen, L.; Vasiliev, S.; Mao, S.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on magnetic resonance studies of high-density atomic hydrogen and deuterium in solid hydrogen matrices at temperatures below 1 K. Average concentrations of H atoms ≈3 ×1019 cm-3 are obtained in chemical tunneling reactions of isotope exchange with D atoms. The products of these reactions are closely located pairs of H atoms near D2 molecules with strong exchange interactions. We discovered a dynamic nuclear polarization effect on H atoms created by pumping the center of the H electron spin resonance spectrum, similar to the Overhauser effect in metals. Our results indicate that H atoms may be arranged inside molecular matrices at separations equivalent to local concentrations of 2.6 ×1021 cm-3 . This opens up a way to build a metallic state of atomic hydrogen at zero pressure.

  12. Random distribution of background charge density for numerical simulation of discharge inception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grange, F.; Loiseau, J.F.; Spyrou, N.

    1998-01-01

    The models of electric streamers based on a uniform background density of electrons may appear not to be physical, as the number of electrons in the small active region located in the vicinity of the electrode tip under regular conditions can be less than one. To avoid this, the electron background is modelled by a random density distribution such that, after a certain time lag, at least one electron is present in the grid close to the point electrode. The modelling performed shows that the streamer inception is not very sensitive to the initial location of the charged particles; the ionizing front, however, may be delayed by several tens of nanoseconds, depending on the way the electron has to drift before reaching the anode. (J.U.)

  13. Transverse charge and magnetization densities: Improved chiral predictions down to b=1 fms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Jose Manuel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hiller Blin, Astrid N. [Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany); Vicente Vacas, Manuel J. [Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Valencia (Spain). Univ. of Valencia (UV), Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular; Weiss, Christian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-03-01

    The transverse charge and magnetization densities provide insight into the nucleon’s inner structure. In the periphery, the isovector components are clearly dominant, and can be computed in a model-independent way by means of a combination of chiral effective field theory (cEFT) and dispersion analysis. With a novel N=D method, we incorporate the pion electromagnetic formfactor data into the cEFT calculation, thus taking into account the pion-rescattering effects and r-meson pole. As a consequence, we are able to reliably compute the densities down to distances b1 fm, therefore achieving a dramatic improvement of the results compared to traditional cEFT calculations, while remaining predictive and having controlled uncertainties.

  14. Dimensional Crossover in a Charge Density Wave Material Probed by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, C. W.; Berthod, C.; Puppin, M.; Berger, H.; Wolf, M.; Hoesch, M.; Monney, C.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data reveal evidence of a crossover from one-dimensional (1D) to three-dimensional (3D) behavior in the prototypical charge density wave (CDW) material NbSe3 . In the low-temperature 3D regime, gaps in the electronic structure are observed due to two incommensurate CDWs, in agreement with x-ray diffraction and electronic-structure calculations. At higher temperatures we observe a spectral weight depletion that approaches the power-law behavior expected in one dimension. From the warping of the quasi-1D Fermi surface at low temperatures, we extract the energy scale of the dimensional crossover. This is corroborated by a detailed analysis of the density of states, which reveals a change in dimensional behavior dependent on binding energy. Our results offer an important insight into the dimensionality of excitations in quasi-1D materials.

  15. Persistent Charge-Density-Wave Order in Single-Layer TaSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyejin; Chen, Yi; Kim, Heejung; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Tang, Shujie; Jiang, Juan; Liou, Franklin; Kahn, Salman; Jia, Caihong; Omrani, Arash A; Shim, Ji Hoon; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Kim, Kyoo; Min, Byung Il; Hwang, Choongyu; Crommie, Michael F; Mo, Sung-Kwan

    2018-02-14

    We present the electronic characterization of single-layer 1H-TaSe 2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. We demonstrate that 3 × 3 charge-density-wave (CDW) order persists despite distinct changes in the low energy electronic structure highlighted by the reduction in the number of bands crossing the Fermi energy and the corresponding modification of Fermi surface topology. Enhanced spin-orbit coupling and lattice distortion in the single-layer play a crucial role in the formation of CDW order. Our findings provide a deeper understanding of the nature of CDW order in the two-dimensional limit.

  16. Nuclear polarization study: new frontiers for tests of QED in heavy highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotka, Andrey V; Plunien, Günter

    2014-07-11

    A systematic investigation of the nuclear polarization effects in one- and few-electron heavy ions is presented. The nuclear polarization corrections in the zeroth and first orders in 1/Z are evaluated to the binding energies, the hyperfine splitting, and the bound-electron g factor. It is shown that the nuclear polarization contributions can be substantially canceled simultaneously with the rigid nuclear corrections. This allows for new prospects for probing the QED effects in a strong electromagnetic field and the determination of fundamental constants.

  17. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  18. A New Method for Simulating Power Flow Density Focused by a Silicon Lens Antenna Irradiated with Linearly Polarized THz Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur Apriono

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A terahertz system uses dielectric lens antennas for focusing and collimating beams of terahertz wave radiation. Linearly polarized terahertz wave radiation has been widely applied in the terahertz system. Therefore, an accurate method for analyzing the power flow density in the dielectric lens antenna irradiated with the linearly polarized terahertz wave radiation is important to design the terahertz systems. In optics, ray-tracing method has been used to calculate the power flow density by a number density of rays. In this study, we propose a method of ray-tracing combined with Fresnel’s transmission, including transmittance and polarization of the terahertz wave radiation to calculate power flow density in a Silicon lens antenna. We compare power flow density calculated by the proposed method with the regular ray-tracing method. When the Silicon lens antenna is irradiated with linearly polarized terahertz wave radiation, the proposed method calculates the power flow density more accurately than the regular ray-tracing.

  19. Electromigration and charge carrier density versus free lattice volume effects in doped zirconia ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' Peko, Jean-Claude; Paz, Fernando Y.; Mir, Mirta; De Souza, Milton F. [Institute of Physics at Sao Carlos (IFSC), University of Sao Paulo (USP), P.O. Box 369, CEP 13560-970 Sao Carlos/SP (Brazil)

    2004-11-01

    Ion conducting yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (3YTZ) and Er{sup 3+}-, Nd{sup 3+}- and Hf{sup 4+}-doped 3YTZ ceramics were prepared and studied in this work. It is noted that dopant-induced structural effects, associated with free lattice volume for bulk conduction, may still be dominant over charge carrier density effects, even for variations of these latter by up to about 30%. In that way, dopant ion size-modified charge (oxygen vacancy) mobility varied to about +25% in Er{sup 3+}-doped 3YTZ and about -45% in Nd{sup 3+}-doped 3YTZ, with respect to original 3YTZ. Meanwhile, the behavior of grain-boundary electrical properties appeared to adapt well with Frenkel's space-charge model. In both bulk and grain-boundary cases, the electrical response of Hf{sup 4+}-doped 3YTZ remained close to that from 3YTZ, a fact which is also discussed in this report. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Controlling surface charge and spin density oscillations by Dirac plasmon interaction in thin topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyli, M. Ameen; Hrtoň, M.; Nechaev, I. A.; Nikitin, A. Y.; Echenique, P. M.; Silkin, V. M.; Aizpurua, J.; Esteban, R.

    2018-03-01

    Thin topological insulator (TI) films support optical and acoustic plasmonic modes characterized by effective net charge or net spin density, respectively. We combine many-body and electromagnetic calculations to study how these modes can be selectively excited at films and nanodisks at infrared and THz frequencies. We first discuss the excitation of propagating plasmons in a thin film by a point dipolar source. We emphasize how changing the distance between the dipolar source and the film allows us to control the relative strength of the acoustic and optical plasmons and thus to excite net-spin or net-charge waves on demand. The acoustic and optical modes in a nanodisk structure can be efficiently tuned by changing the size of the disk or by applying electrostatic gating. Furthermore, these modes can be confined to regions of dimensions much smaller than the wavelength. The control of the excitation of acoustic and optical modes indicates that thin topological insulators are a promising system to manipulate the spin and charge properties of the plasmonic response, with potential applications in fast, compact, and electrically-controlled spintronic devices.

  1. Density functional study of the interaction of carbon monoxide with small neutral and charged silver clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia; Li, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Wen-Ning; Fan, Kang-Nian

    2006-06-08

    CO adsorption on small neutral, anionic, and cationic silver clusters Ag(n) (n = 1-7) has been studied with use of the PW91PW91 density functional theory (DFT) method. The adsorption of CO on-top site, among various possible sites, is energetically preferred irrespective of the charge state of the silver cluster. The cationic silver clusters generally have a greater tendency to adsorb CO than the anionic and neutral silver ones, except for n = 3 and 4, and the binding energies reach a local minimum at n = 5. The binding energies on the neutral clusters, instead, reach a local maximum at n = 3, which is about 0.87 eV, probably large enough to be captured in the experiments. Binding of CO to the silver clusters is generally weaker than that to the copper and gold counterparts at the same size and charge state. This is due to the weaker orbital interaction between silver and CO, which is caused by the larger atomic radius of the silver atom. In contrast, Au atoms with a larger nuclear charge but a similar atomic radius to silver owing to the lanthanide contraction are able to have a stronger interaction with CO.

  2. Density functional theory for the description of charge-transfer processes at TTF/TCNQ interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Van Regemorter, Tanguy

    2012-09-15

    In the field of organic electronics, a central issue is to assess how the frontier electronic levels of two adjacent organic layers align with respect to one another at the interface. This alignment can be driven by the presence of a partial charge transfer and the formation of an interface dipole; it plays a key role for instance in determining the rates of exciton dissociation or exciton formation in organic solar cells or light-emitting diodes, respectively. Reliably modeling the processes taking place at these interfaces remains a challenge for the computational chemistry community. Here, we review our recent theoretical work on the influence of the choice of density functional theory (DFT) methodology on the description of the charge-transfer character in the ground state of TTF/ TCNQ model complexes and interfaces. Starting with the electronic properties of the isolated TTF and TCNQ molecules and then considering the charge transfer and resulting interface dipole in TTF/TCNQ donor-acceptor stacks and bilayers, we examine the impact of the choice of DFT functional in describing the interfacial electronic structure. Finally, we employ computations based on periodic boundary conditions to highlight the impact of depolarization effects on the interfacial dipole moment. © Springer-Verlag 2012.

  3. Charge and spin density in s-stable rare earth intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaf, H. de.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis deals with a study of the electronic structure of rare earth intermetallic compounds, in particular the electronic charge and spin density distribution. These are closely related to the properties of the rare earth ions, which carry the partly filled 4f shell. In chapter 1 a survey of the theory of hyperfine interaction as far as it has a bearing on the Moessbauer effect of 155 Gd and 151 Eu is given. Also some details of the Moessbauer spectra, which have practical importance are discussed. In chapter 2 the experimental set-up is described. Special attention is paid to the gamma radiation source and gamma detection requirements. In chapter 3 the author introduces the theoretical framework which will be used to interpret the measurements. In chapter 4 the results of the 155 Gd Moessbauer measurements are presented. Also it is discussed how the result can be understood in terms of the charge and spin density in rare earth intermetallic compounds. In order to lend support to the picture emerging from the previous chapter, in chapter 5 the conduction electron band structure of some representative Gd intermetallics is computed with an approximate semi-empirical LCAO method. The results are compared with those from chapter 4. Finally, in chapter 6, the 151 Eu resonance is used to investigate the temperature dependence of the hyperfine field and line width in the Eu intermetallic compounds Eu 2 Mg 17 and EuMg 5 . (Auth.)

  4. Superficial Collagen Fibril Modulus and Pericellular Fixed Charge Density Modulate Chondrocyte Volumetric Behaviour in Early Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Tanska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if the experimentally detected altered chondrocyte volumetric behavior in early osteoarthritis can be explained by changes in the extracellular and pericellular matrix properties of cartilage. Based on our own experimental tests and the literature, the structural and mechanical parameters for normal and osteoarthritic cartilage were implemented into a multiscale fibril-reinforced poroelastic swelling model. Model simulations were compared with experimentally observed cell volume changes in mechanically loaded cartilage, obtained from anterior cruciate ligament transected rabbit knees. We found that the cell volume increased by 7% in the osteoarthritic cartilage model following mechanical loading of the tissue. In contrast, the cell volume decreased by 4% in normal cartilage model. These findings were consistent with the experimental results. Increased local transversal tissue strain due to the reduced collagen fibril stiffness accompanied with the reduced fixed charge density of the pericellular matrix could increase the cell volume up to 12%. These findings suggest that the increase in the cell volume in mechanically loaded osteoarthritic cartilage is primarily explained by the reduction in the pericellular fixed charge density, while the superficial collagen fibril stiffness is suggested to contribute secondarily to the cell volume behavior.

  5. Charged-particle pseudorapidity density in proton-proton collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{\\textit s}}$ = 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The pseudorapidity density of charged particles produced in proton-proton collisions at the LHC is measured at the centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV with the ALICE detector. We report on the measurement performed in the central pseudorapidity region for inelastic events (INEL) and events with at least one charged particle in $\\left|\\eta\\right| $0). The pseudorapidity density of charged particles produced in the pseudorapidity region $\\left|\\eta\\right| $0 events, respectively. The results are compared with calculations from Monte Carlo models commonly used at the LHC.

  6. Electrostatic solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using molecular dynamics with density functional theory interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, Timothy T. [Physical Science Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Baer, Marcel D. [Physical Science Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Schenter, Gregory K. [Physical Science Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Mundy, Chistopher J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98185, USA

    2017-10-28

    Determining the solvation free energies of single ions in water is one of the most fundamental problems in physical chemistry and yet many unresolved questions remain. In particular, the ability to decompose the solvation free energy into simple and intuitive contributions will have important implications for coarse grained models of electrolyte solution. Here, we provide rigorous definitions of the various types of single ion solvation free energies based on different simulation protocols. We calculate solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using density functional theory interaction potentials with molecular dynamics simulation (DFT-MD) and isolate the effects of charge and cavitation, comparing to the Born (linear response) model. We show that using uncorrected Ewald summation leads to highly unphysical values for the solvation free energy and that charging free energies for cations are approximately linear as a function of charge but that there is a small non-linearity for small anions. The charge hydration asymmetry (CHA) for hard spheres, determined with quantum mechanics, is much larger than for the analogous real ions. This suggests that real ions, particularly anions, are significantly more complex than simple charged hard spheres, a commonly employed representation. We would like to thank Thomas Beck, Shawn Kathmann, Richard Remsing and John Weeks for helpful discussions. Computing resources were generously allocated by PNNL's Institutional Computing program. This research also used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. TTD, GKS, and CJM were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. MDB was supported by MS3 (Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across

  7. A Density-Dependent Switch Drives Stochastic Clustering and Polarization of Signaling Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilkine, Alexandra; Angenent, Sigurd B.; Wu, Lani F.; Altschuler, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Positive feedback plays a key role in the ability of signaling molecules to form highly localized clusters in the membrane or cytosol of cells. Such clustering can occur in the absence of localizing mechanisms such as pre-existing spatial cues, diffusional barriers, or molecular cross-linking. What prevents positive feedback from amplifying inevitable biological noise when an un-clustered “off” state is desired? And, what limits the spread of clusters when an “on” state is desired? Here, we show that a minimal positive feedback circuit provides the general principle for both suppressing and amplifying noise: below a critical density of signaling molecules, clustering switches off; above this threshold, highly localized clusters are recurrently generated. Clustering occurs only in the stochastic regime, suggesting that finite sizes of molecular populations cannot be ignored in signal transduction networks. The emergence of a dominant cluster for finite numbers of molecules is partly a phenomenon of random sampling, analogous to the fixation or loss of neutral mutations in finite populations. We refer to our model as the “neutral drift polarity model.” Regulating the density of signaling molecules provides a simple mechanism for a positive feedback circuit to robustly switch between clustered and un-clustered states. The intrinsic ability of positive feedback both to create and suppress clustering is a general mechanism that could operate within diverse biological networks to create dynamic spatial organization. PMID:22102805

  8. A density-dependent switch drives stochastic clustering and polarization of signaling molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Jilkine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Positive feedback plays a key role in the ability of signaling molecules to form highly localized clusters in the membrane or cytosol of cells. Such clustering can occur in the absence of localizing mechanisms such as pre-existing spatial cues, diffusional barriers, or molecular cross-linking. What prevents positive feedback from amplifying inevitable biological noise when an un-clustered "off" state is desired? And, what limits the spread of clusters when an "on" state is desired? Here, we show that a minimal positive feedback circuit provides the general principle for both suppressing and amplifying noise: below a critical density of signaling molecules, clustering switches off; above this threshold, highly localized clusters are recurrently generated. Clustering occurs only in the stochastic regime, suggesting that finite sizes of molecular populations cannot be ignored in signal transduction networks. The emergence of a dominant cluster for finite numbers of molecules is partly a phenomenon of random sampling, analogous to the fixation or loss of neutral mutations in finite populations. We refer to our model as the "neutral drift polarity model." Regulating the density of signaling molecules provides a simple mechanism for a positive feedback circuit to robustly switch between clustered and un-clustered states. The intrinsic ability of positive feedback both to create and suppress clustering is a general mechanism that could operate within diverse biological networks to create dynamic spatial organization.

  9. Polarization versus Temperature in Pyridinium Ionic Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, V. V.; Prezhdo, O. V.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic polarization and charge transfer effects play a crucial role in thermodynamic, structural, and transport properties of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). These nonadditive interactions constitute a useful tool for tuning physical chemical behavior of RTILs. Polarization and charge...... electronic density description for a cationanion pair. Atom-centered density matrix propagation molecular dynamics, supplemented by a weak coupling to an external bath, is used to simulate the temperature impact on system properties. We show that, quite surprisingly, nonadditivity in the cationanion...

  10. Effect of structural changes in sesquifulvalene on the intramolecular charge transfer and nonlinear polarizations a theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, P. K.; Mandal, K.; Kar, T.

    2003-11-01

    Ab initio HF calculations of the ground state structural parameters, and the time dependent HF (TDHF) calculations of static nonlinear polarizabilities have been performed for a number of sesquifulvalene derivatives. The calculated NLO parameters show a good correlation with the hardness parameters. The nature of hetero-atoms and their positions can strongly influence the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) interactions and the nonlinear polarizations of sesquifulvalene. Nonlinear polarizabilities in the twisted structures have been found to depend both on the energy barrier to twist and the transition energy corresponding to the twisted ICT (TICT) state characterized by the HOMO → LUMO transition.

  11. The role of surface charge density in cationic liposome-promoted dendritic cell maturation and vaccine-induced immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yifan; Zhuang, Yan; Xie, Xiaofang; Wang, Ce; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Dongmei; Zeng, Jianqiang; Cai, Lintao

    2011-05-01

    Cationic liposomes have emerged as a novel adjuvant and antigen delivery system to enhance vaccine efficacy. However, the role of surface charge density in cationic liposome-regulated immune responses has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we prepared a series of DOTAP/DOPC cationic liposomes with different surface densities by incorporating varying amounts of DOPC (a neutral lipid) into DOTAP (a cationic lipid). The results showed that DOTAP/DOPC cationic liposome-regulated immune responses relied on the surface charge density, and might occur through ROS signaling. The liposomes with a relatively high charge density, such as DOTAP/DOPC 5 : 0 and 4 : 1 liposomes, potently enhanced dendritic cell maturation, ROS generaion, antigen uptake, as well as the production of OVA-specific IgG2a and IFN-γ. In contrast, low-charge liposomes, such as DOTAP/DOPC 1 : 4 liposome, failed to promote immune responses even at high concentrations, confirming that the immunoregulatory effect of cationic liposomes is mostly attributable to their surface charge density. Moreover, the DOTAP/DOPC 1 : 4 liposome suppressed anti-OVA antibody responses in vivo. Overall, maintaining an appropriate surface charge is crucial for optimizing the adjuvant effect of cationic liposomes and enhancing the efficacy of liposome-based vaccines.

  12. Charged-Higgs on R{sub D}{sup {sub (}{sub *}{sub )}}, τ polarization, and FBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chuan-Hung [National Cheng-Kung University, Department of Physics, Tainan (China); Nomura, Takaaki [KIAS, School of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    We study the influence of a charged-Higgs on the excess of branching fraction ratio, R{sub M} = BR(anti B → Mτ anti ν{sub τ})/BR(anti B → Ml anti ν{sub l}) (M = D, D*), in a generic two-Higgs-doublet model. In order to investigate the lepton polarization, the detailed decay amplitudes with lepton helicity are given. When the charged-Higgs is used to resolve excesses, it is found that two independent Yukawa couplings are needed to explain the R{sub D} and R{sub D*} anomalies. We show that when the upper limit of BR(B{sub c} → τ anti ν{sub τ}) < 30% is included, R{sub D} can be significantly enhanced while R{sub D*} < 0.27. With the BR(B{sub c} → τ anti ν{sub τ}) constraint, we find that the τ-lepton polarizations can be still affected by the charged-Higgs effects, where the standard model (SM) predictions are obtained: P{sup τ}{sub D} ∼ 0.324 and P{sup τ}{sub D*} ∼ -0.500, and they can be enhanced to be P{sup τ}{sub D} ∼ 0.5 and P{sup τ}{sub D*} ∼ -0.41 by the charged-Higgs. The integrated lepton forward-backward asymmetry (FBA) is also studied, where the SM result is anti A{sup D{sup ({sup *{sup ),τ}{sub FB}}}} ∼ -0.359(0.064), and they can be enhanced (decreased) to be anti A{sup D{sup ({sup *{sup ),τ}{sub FB}}}} ∼ -0.33(0.02). (orig.)

  13. Polarization and charge-transfer effect on the transport properties in two-dimensional electron gases/LaNiO3 heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. J.; Ning, X. K.; Wang, Z. J.; Liu, P.; Wang, S. F.; Wang, J. L.; Fu, G. S.; Ma, S.; Liu, W.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2018-01-01

    The film thickness dependent transport properties of the LaNiO3 (LNO) layer epitaxially grown on LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO) 2-dimensional electronic gas (2DEG) have been investigated. The ultrathin LNO films grown on the 2DEG have a sheet resistance below the values of h/e2 in all temperature ranges. The electron density is enhanced by more than one order of magnitude by capping LNO films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the interface undergoes unambiguous charge transfer and electronic reconstruction, leading to modulation doping of such atomically engineered complex oxide heterointerfaces. The polar-catastrophe of the 2DEG is directly linked to the electronic structure and transport properties of the LNO. The transport properties can be well modulated by the thickness of the LAO in the 2DEG, and the data can be well fitted with the polar-catastrophe scenario. These results suggest a general approach to tunable functional films in oxide heterostructures with the 2DEG.

  14. Polarization Energies at Organic–Organic Interfaces: Impact on the Charge Separation Barrier at Donor–Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-31

    We probe the energetic landscape at a model pentacene/fullerene-C60 interface to investigate the interactions between positive and negative charges, which are critical to the processes of charge separation and recombination in organic solar cells. Using a polarizable force field, we find that polarization energy, i.e. the stabilization a charge feels due to its environment, is larger at the interface than in the bulk for both a positive and a negative charge. The combination of the charge being more stabilized at the interface and the Coulomb attraction between the charges, results in a barrier to charge separation at the pentacene-C60 interface that can be in excess of 0.7 eV for static configurations of the donor and acceptor locations. However, the impact of molecular motions, i.e., the dynamics, at the interface at room temperature results in a distribution of polarization energies and in charge separation barriers that can be significantly reduced. The dynamic nature of the interface is thus critical, with the polarization energy distributions indicating that sites along the interface shift in time between favorable and unfavorable configurations for charge separation.

  15. Dental plaque microcosm response to bonding agents containing quaternary ammonium methacrylates with different chain lengths and charge densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Li, Fang; Weir, Michael D; Xu, Hockin H K

    2013-11-01

    Antibacterial bonding agents are promising to combat bacteria and caries at tooth-restoration margins. The objectives of this study were to incorporate new quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs) to bonding agent and determine the effects of alkyl chain length (CL) and quaternary amine charge density on dental plaque microcosm bacteria response for the first time. Six QAMs were synthesized with CL=3, 6, 9, 12, 16, 18. Each QAM was incorporated into Scotchbond multi-purpose (SBMP). To determine the charge density effect, dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM, CL=16) was mixed into SBMP at mass fraction=0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%. Charge density was measured using a fluorescein dye method. Dental plaque microcosm using saliva from ten donors was tested. Bacteria were inoculated on resins. Early-attachment was tested at 4h. Biofilm colony-forming units (CFU) were measured at 2 days. Incorporating QAMs into SBMP reduced bacteria early-attachment. Microcosm biofilm CFU for CL=16 was 4 log lower than SBMP control. Charge density of bonding agent increased with DMAHDM content. Bacteria early-attachment decreased with increasing charge density. Biofilm CFU at 10% DMAHDM was reduced by 4 log. The killing effect was similarly-strong against total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci. Increasing alkyl chain length and charge density of bonding agent was shown for the first time to decrease microcosm bacteria attachment and reduce biofilm CFU by 4 orders of magnitude. Novel antibacterial resins with tailored chain length and charge density are promising for wide applications in bonding, cements, sealants and composites to inhibit biofilms and caries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dental plaque microcosm response to bonding agents containing quaternary ammonium methacrylates with different chain lengths and charge densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Li, Fang; Weir, Michael D.; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Antibacterial bonding agents are promising to combat bacteria and caries at tooth-restoration margins. The objectives of this study were to incorporate new quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs) to bonding agent and determine the effects of alkyl chain length (CL) and quaternary amine charge density on dental plaque microcosm bacteria response for the first time. Methods Six QAMs were synthesized with CL = 3, 6, 9, 12, 16, 18. Each QAM was incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-purpose (SBMP). To determine the charge density effect, dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM, CL = 16) was mixed into SBMP at mass fraction = 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%. Charge density was measured using a fluorescein dye method. Dental plaque microcosm using saliva from ten donors was tested. Bacteria were inoculated on resins. Early-attachment was tested at 4 hours. Biofilm colony-forming units (CFU) were measured at 2 days. Results Incorporating QAMs into SBMP reduced bacteria early-attachment. Microcosm biofilm CFU for CL = 16 was 4 log lower than SBMP control. Charge density of bonding agent increased with DMAHDM content. Bacteria early-attachment decreased with increasing charge density. Biofilm CFU at 10% DMAHDM was reduced by 4 log. The killing effect was similarly-strong against total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci. Conclusions Increasing alkyl chain length and charge density of bonding agent was shown for the first time to decrease microcosm bacteria attachment and reduce biofilm CFU by 4 orders of magnitude. Novel antibacterial resins with tailored chain length and charge density are promising for wide applications in bonding, cements, sealants and composites to inhibit biofilms and caries. PMID:23948394

  17. Density and Charge of Pristine Fluffy Particles from Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulle, M.; Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.; Weissman, P.; Juhasz, A.; Szego, K.; Sordini, R.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Accolla, M.; Merouane, S.; Zakharov, V.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; López-Moreno, J. J.; Rodríguez, J.; Colangeli, L.; Palumbo, P.; Grün, E.; Hilchenbach, M.; Bussoletti, E.; Esposito, F.; Green, S. F.; Lamy, P. L.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Mennella, V.; Molina, A.; Morales, R.; Moreno, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Palomba, E.; Rodrigo, R.; Zarnecki, J. C.; Cosi, M.; Giovane, F.; Gustafson, B.; Herranz, M. L.; Jerónimo, J. M.; Leese, M. R.; López-Jiménez, A. C.; Altobelli, N.

    2015-03-01

    The Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator (GIADA) instrument on board ESA’s Rosetta mission is constraining the origin of the dust particles detected within the coma of comet 67 P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). The collected particles belong to two families: (i) compact particles (ranging in size from 0.03 to 1 mm), witnessing the presence of materials that underwent processing within the solar nebula and (ii) fluffy aggregates (ranging in size from 0.2 to 2.5 mm) of sub-micron grains that may be a record of a primitive component, probably linked to interstellar dust. The dynamics of the fluffy aggregates constrain their equivalent bulk density to \\lt 1 kg m-3. These aggregates are charged, fragmented, and decelerated by the spacecraft negative potential and enter GIADA in showers of fragments at speeds \\lt 1 m s-1. The density of such optically thick aggregates is consistent with the low bulk density of the nucleus. The mass contribution of the fluffy aggregates to the refractory component of the nucleus is negligible and their coma brightness contribution is less than 15%.

  18. Management of deep brain stimulator battery failure: battery estimators, charge density, and importance of clinical symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaihan Fakhar

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed in this investigation to study deep brain stimulation (DBS battery drain with special attention directed toward patient symptoms prior to and following battery replacement. BACKGROUND: Previously our group developed web-based calculators and smart phone applications to estimate DBS battery life (http://mdc.mbi.ufl.edu/surgery/dbs-battery-estimator. METHODS: A cohort of 320 patients undergoing DBS battery replacement from 2002-2012 were included in an IRB approved study. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 20.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY. RESULTS: The mean charge density for treatment of Parkinson's disease was 7.2 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 3.82, for dystonia was 17.5 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 8.53, for essential tremor was 8.3 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 4.85, and for OCD was 18.0 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 4.35. There was a significant relationship between charge density and battery life (r = -.59, p<.001, as well as total power and battery life (r = -.64, p<.001. The UF estimator (r = .67, p<.001 and the Medtronic helpline (r = .74, p<.001 predictions of battery life were significantly positively associated with actual battery life. Battery status indicators on Soletra and Kinetra were poor predictors of battery life. In 38 cases, the symptoms improved following a battery change, suggesting that the neurostimulator was likely responsible for symptom worsening. For these cases, both the UF estimator and the Medtronic helpline were significantly correlated with battery life (r = .65 and r = .70, respectively, both p<.001. CONCLUSIONS: Battery estimations, charge density, total power and clinical symptoms were important factors. The observation of clinical worsening that was rescued following neurostimulator replacement reinforces the notion that changes in clinical symptoms can be associated with battery drain.

  19. Current-induced spin polarization in InGaAs and GaAs epilayers with varying doping densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo-Kovac, M.; Huang, S.; Del Gaudio, D.; Occena, J.; Goldman, R. S.; Raimondi, R.; Sih, V.

    2017-11-01

    The current-induced spin polarization and momentum-dependent spin-orbit field were measured in InxGa1 -xAs epilayers with varying indium concentrations and silicon doping densities. Samples with higher indium concentrations and carrier concentrations and lower mobilities were found to have larger electrical spin generation efficiencies. Furthermore, current-induced spin polarization was detected in GaAs epilayers despite the absence of measurable spin-orbit fields, indicating that the extrinsic contributions to the spin-polarization mechanism must be considered. Theoretical calculations based on a model that includes extrinsic contributions to the spin dephasing and the spin Hall effect, in addition to the intrinsic Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling, are found to reproduce the experimental finding that the crystal direction with the smaller net spin-orbit field has larger electrical spin generation efficiency and are used to predict how sample parameters affect the magnitude of the current-induced spin polarization.

  20. Transient charging and discharging of spin-polarized electrons in a quantum dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Souza, Fabricio; Leao, S.A.; Gester, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    We study spin-polarized transient transport in a quantum dot coupled to two ferromagnetic leads subjected to a rectangular bias voltage pulse. Time-dependent spin-resolved currents, occupations, spin accumulation, and tunneling magnetoresistance TMR are calculated using both nonequilibrium Green...

  1. The charge density distribution in a model compound of the catalytic triad in serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, J; Schiøtt, B; Larsen, F K; Iversen, B B

    2001-09-03

    Combined low temperature (28(1) K) X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements were carried out on the co-crystallised complex of betaine, imidazole, and picric acid (1). The experimental charge density was determined and compared with ab initio theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The complex serves as a model for the active site in, for example, the serine protease class of enzymes, the so-called catalytic triad. The crystal contains three short strong N-H...O hydrogen bonds (HBs) with dN...O comparison with low-barrier and single-well hydrogen bonding systems (e.g., benzoylacetone and nitromalonamide) shows that the low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) state is characterized by an enormously increased hydrogen atom source contribution to the bond critical point in the HB. In this context, HB2 can be characterized as intermediate between localized HBs and delocalized LBHBs.

  2. Fermi Surface Evolution Across Multiple Charge Density Wave Transitions in ErTe3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R.G.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Brouet, V.; /Orsay, LPS; He, R.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Lu, D.H.; /SLAC, SSRL; Ru, N.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Shen, Z.-X.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    The Fermi surface (FS) of ErTe{sub 3} is investigated using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Low temperature measurements reveal two incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) gaps created by perpendicular FS nesting vectors. A large {Delta}{sub 1} = 175 meV gap arising from a CDW with c* - q{sub CDW1} {approx} 0.70(0)c* is in good agreement with the expected value. A second, smaller {Delta}{sub 2} = 50 meV gap is due to a second CDW with a* - q{sub CDW2} {approx} 0.68(5)a*. The temperature dependence of the FS, the two gaps and possible interaction between the CDWs are examined.

  3. Charge density wave formation in R2Te5 (R=Nd, Sm, and Gd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, K. Y.; Laverock, J.; Wu, Y. Q.; Condron, C.; Toney, M.; Dugdale, S.; Kramer, M.; Fisher, I.

    2008-04-01

    The rare earth (R) tellurides R{sub 2}Te{sub 5} have a crystal structure intermediate between that of RTe{sub 2} and RTe{sub 3}, consisting of alternating single and double Te planes sandwiched between RTe block layers. We have successfully grown single crystals of Nd{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, Sm{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, and Gd{sub 2}Te{sub 5} from a self-flux and we describe here evidence for charge density wave formation in these materials. The superlattice patterns for all three compounds are relatively complex, consisting at room temperature of at least two independent wave vectors. Consideration of the electronic structure indicates that, to a large extent, these wave vectors are separately associated with sheets of the Fermi surface which are principally derived from the single and double Te layers.

  4. Charge Density Wave Formation in R(2)Te(5) (R=Nd, Sm, And Gd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, K.Y.; Laverock, J.; Wu, Y.Q.; Condron, C.L.; Toney, M.F.; Dugdale, S.B.; Kramer, M.J.; Fisher, I.R.

    2009-05-27

    The rare earth (R) tellurides R{sub 2}Te{sub 5} have a crystal structure intermediate between that of RTe{sub 2} and RTe{sub 3}, consisting of alternating single and double Te planes sandwiched between RTe block layers. We have successfully grown single crystals of Nd{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, Sm{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, and Gd{sub 2}Te{sub 5} from a self-flux and we describe here evidence for charge density wave formation in these materials. The superlattice patterns for all three compounds are relatively complex, consisting at room temperature of at least two independent wave vectors. Consideration of the electronic structure indicates that, to a large extent, these wave vectors are separately associated with sheets of the Fermi surface which are principally derived from the single and double Te layers.

  5. Local Atomic Structure and Discommensurations in the Charge Density Wave of CeTe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Tomic, A.T.; Tessmer, S.H.; Billinge, S.J.L.; Malliakas, C.D.; Kanatzidis, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    The local structure of CeTe 3 in the incommensurate charge density wave (IC-CDW) state has been obtained using atomic pair distribution function analysis of x-ray diffraction data. Local atomic distortions in the Te nets due to the CDW are larger than observed crystallographically, resulting in distinct short and long Te-Te bonds. Observation of different distortion amplitudes in the local and average structures is explained by the discommensurated nature of the CDW, since the pair distribution function is sensitive to the local displacements within the commensurate regions, whereas the crystallographic result averages over many discommensurated domains. The result is supported by STM data. This is the first quantitative local structural study within the commensurate domains in an IC-CDW system

  6. Spectroscopic study of the charge density wave order in 2H[ -TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Wijayaratne, K.; Malliakas, C. D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Chung, D. Y.; Gu, G.; Chatterjee, U.

    2017-09-01

    We conduct Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation on 2H-TaS2, a prototypical incommensurate Charge Density Wave (CDW) material. A comparative study of the low-energy electronic structures of 2H-TaS2 and two other related compounds, 2H-TaSe2 and 2H-NbSe2, identifies several generic features of their CDW orders. Firstly, Fermi surface (FS) nesting alone doesn't seem to give rise to the CDW instability in these compounds. Secondly, partial gapping of the underlying FS surface in the CDW state is common to each of these materials. Finally, the CDW energy gap, unlike the energy gap in a superconductor, is not symmetric with respect to the chemical potential.

  7. Monte Carlo studies of diamagnetism and charge density wave order in the cuprate pseudogap regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward Sierens, Lauren; Achkar, Andrew; Hawthorn, David; Melko, Roger; Sachdev, Subir

    2015-03-01

    The pseudogap regime of the hole-doped cuprate superconductors is often characterized experimentally in terms of a substantial diamagnetic response and, from another point of view, in terms of strong charge density wave (CDW) order. We introduce a dimensionless ratio, R, that incorporates both diamagnetic susceptibility and the correlation length of CDW order, and therefore reconciles these two fundamental characteristics of the pseudogap. We perform Monte Carlo simulations on a classical model that considers angular fluctuations of a six-dimensional order parameter, and compare our Monte Carlo results for R with existing data from torque magnetometry and x-ray scattering experiments on YBa2Cu3O6+x. We achieve qualitative agreement, and also propose future experiments to further investigate the behaviour of this dimensionless ratio.

  8. Synthetic polycations with controlled charge density and molecular weight as building blocks for biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberger, Rachelle M; Burke, Nicholas A D; Zhou, Christal; Stöver, Harald D H

    2016-01-01

    A series of polycations prepared by RAFT copolymerization of N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide hydrochloride (APM) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide, with molecular weights of 15 and 40 kDa, and APM content of 10-75 mol%, were tested as building blocks for electrostatically assembled hydrogels such as those used for cell encapsulation. Complexation and distribution of these copolymers within anionic calcium alginate gels, as well as cytotoxicity, cell attachment, and cell proliferation on surfaces grafted with the copolymers were found to depend on composition and molecular weight. Copolymers with lower cationic charge density and lower molecular weight showed less cytotoxicity and cell adhesion, and were more mobile within alginate gels. These findings aid in designing improved polyelectrolyte complexes for use as biomaterials.

  9. Origin of Superconductivity and Latent Charge Density Wave in NbS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Christoph; Poncé, Samuel; Lambert, Henry; Schlipf, Martin; Margine, Elena R.; Giustino, Feliciano

    2017-08-01

    We elucidate the origin of the phonon-mediated superconductivity in 2 H -NbS2 using the ab initio anisotropic Migdal-Eliashberg theory including Coulomb interactions. We demonstrate that superconductivity is associated with Fermi surface hot spots exhibiting an unusually strong electron-phonon interaction. The electron-lattice coupling is dominated by low-energy anharmonic phonons, which place the system on the verge of a charge density wave instability. We also provide definitive evidence for two-gap superconductivity in 2 H -NbS2 , and show that the low- and high-energy peaks observed in tunneling spectra correspond to the Γ - and K -centered Fermi surface pockets, respectively. The present findings call for further efforts to determine whether our proposed mechanism underpins superconductivity in the whole family of metallic transition metal dichalcogenides.

  10. Charge density waves and local states in quasi-one-dimensional mixed valence inorganic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conradson, S.D.; Stroud, M.A.; Zietlow, M.H.; Swanson, B.I.; Baeriswyl, D.; Bishop, A.R.

    1987-10-01

    The ground state structures and local states associated with chemical defects in quasi-one-dimensional halogen (X) bridged transition metal (M) mixed valence solids of MX and MMX type have been studied. An adiabatic Hartree-Fock theoretical framework is presented and representative members are classified. The MX materials provide a class whose strong electron-phonon coupling usually favors a charge-density-wave (CDW) ground state. However, the coupling strength can be chemically tuned (e.g., by extension to MMX systems) or altered by pressure, driving the ground state structures towards, e.g., a bond-order-wave (BOW) phase. Electron-phonon driven self-trapped states are expected in both the CDW or BOW regimes. Resonance Raman spectra of the MMX solid K 4 (Pt 2 (P 2 O 5 H 2 ) 4 Cl)·H 2 O show, in addition to the homogeneous ground state modes, sharp new features with excitation profiles shifted to the red of the intervalence-charge-transfer (IVCT) band. We attribute these new bands to a local polaron state formed by oxidation of the Pt 2 Cl chain by a chemical defect. The observed spectral characteristics of this local state are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. (author). 28 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  11. First time measurements of polarization observables for the charged cascade hyperon in photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bono, Jason [Florida Intl Univ., Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-08-31

    The parity violating weak decay of hyperons offers a valuable means of measuring their polarization, providing insight into the production of strange quarks and the matter they compose. Jefferson Lab's CLAS collaboration has utilized this property of hyperons, publishing the most precise polarization measurements for the Lambda and Sigma in both photoproduction and electroproduction to date. In contrast, cascades, which contain two strange quarks, can only be produced through indirect processes and as a result, exhibit low cross sections thus remaining experimentally elusive. At present, there are two aspects in cascade physics where progress has been minimal: characterizing their production mechanism, which lacks theoretical and experimental developments, and observation of the numerous excited cascade resonances that are required to exist by fl avor SU(3)F symmetry. However, CLAS data were collected in 2008 with a luminosity of 68 pb^-1 using a circularly polarized photon beam with energies up to 5.45 GeV, incident on a liquid hydrogen target. This dataset is, at present, the world's largest for meson photoproduction in its energy range and provides a unique opportunity to study cascade physics with polarization measurements. The current analysis explores hyperon production through the yp -> K^+ K^+ Xi^- reaction by providing the first ever determination of spin observables P, Cx and Cz for the cascade. Three of our primary goals are to test the only cascade photoproduction model in existence, examine the underlying processes that give rise to hyperon polarization, and to stimulate future theoretical developments while providing constraints for their parameters. Our research is part of a broader program to understand the production of strange quarks and hadrons with strangeness. The remainder of this document discusses the motivation behind such research, the method of data collection, details of their analysis, and the significance of our results.

  12. Topology of electron charge density for chemical bonds from valence bond theory: a probe of bonding types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixian; Ying, Fuming; Wu, Wei; Hiberty, Philippe C; Shaik, Sason

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the nature of bonding we derive the topological properties of the electron charge density of a variety of bonds based on ab initio valence bond methods. The electron density and its associated Laplacian are partitioned into covalent, ionic, and resonance components in the valence bond spirit. The analysis provides a density-based signature of bonding types and reveals, along with the classical covalent and ionic bonds, the existence of two-electron bonds in which most of the bonding arises from the covalent-ionic resonance energy, so-called charge-shift bonds. As expected, the covalent component of the Laplacian at the bond critical point is found to be largely negative for classical covalent bonds. In contrast, for charge-shift bonds, the covalent part of the Laplacian is small or positive, in agreement with the weakly attractive or repulsive character of the covalent interaction in these bonds. On the other hand, the resonance component of the Laplacian is always negative or nearly zero, and it increases in absolute value with the charge-shift character of the bond, in agreement with the decrease of kinetic energy associated with covalent-ionic mixing. A new interpretation of the topology of the total density at the bond critical point is proposed to characterize covalent, ionic, and charge-shift bonding from the density point of view.

  13. The effect of contrast medium SonoVue® on the electric charge density of blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelska, Aneta D; Janica, Jacek R; Kotynska, Joanna; Łebkowska, Urszula; Figaszewski, Zbigniew A

    2012-01-01

    The effect of contrast medium SonoVue® on the electric charge density of blood cells (erythrocytes and thrombocytes) was measured using a microelectrophoretic method. We examined the effect of adsorbed H⁺ and OH⁻ ions on the surface charge of erythrocytes or thrombocytes. Surface charge density values were determined from electrophoretic mobility measurements of blood cells performed at various pH levels. The interaction between solution ions and the erythrocyte's or thrombocyte's surface was described by a four-component equilibrium model. The agreement between the experimental and theoretical charge variation curves of the erythrocytes and thrombocytes was good at pH 2-9. The deviation observed at a higher pH may be caused by disregarding interactions between the functional groups of blood cells.

  14. Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine infrared CH intensities of hydrocarbons: a quantum theory of atoms in molecules model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Arnaldo F; Richter, Wagner E; Meneses, Helen G C; Bruns, Roy E

    2014-11-14

    Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine most of the infrared fundamental CH intensities of simple hydrocarbons, methane, ethylene, ethane, propyne, cyclopropane and allene. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux model predicted the values of 30 CH intensities ranging from 0 to 123 km mol(-1) with a root mean square (rms) error of only 4.2 km mol(-1) without including a specific equilibrium atomic charge term. Sums of the contributions from terms involving charge flux and/or dipole flux averaged 20.3 km mol(-1), about ten times larger than the average charge contribution of 2.0 km mol(-1). The only notable exceptions are the CH stretching and bending intensities of acetylene and two of the propyne vibrations for hydrogens bound to sp hybridized carbon atoms. Calculations were carried out at four quantum levels, MP2/6-311++G(3d,3p), MP2/cc-pVTZ, QCISD/6-311++G(3d,3p) and QCISD/cc-pVTZ. The results calculated at the QCISD level are the most accurate among the four with root mean square errors of 4.7 and 5.0 km mol(-1) for the 6-311++G(3d,3p) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. These values are close to the estimated aggregate experimental error of the hydrocarbon intensities, 4.0 km mol(-1). The atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effect is much larger than the charge effect for the results of all four quantum levels. Charge transfer-counter polarization effects are expected to also be important in vibrations of more polar molecules for which equilibrium charge contributions can be large.

  15. A salt water battery with high stability and charging rates made from solution processed conjugated polymers with polar side chains

    KAUST Repository

    Moia, Davide

    2017-11-28

    We report a neutral salt water based battery which uses p-type and n-type solution processed polymer films as the cathode and the anode of the cell. The specific capacity of the electrodes (approximately 30 mAh cm-3) is achieved via formation of bipolarons in both the p-type and n-type polymers. By engineering ethylene glycol and zwitterion based side chains attached to the polymer backbone we facilitate rapid ion transport through the non-porous polymer films. This, combined with efficient transport of electronic charge via the conjugated polymer backbones, allowed the films to maintain constant capacity at high charge and discharge rates (>1000 C-rate). The electrodes also show good stability during electrochemical cycling (less than 30% decrease in capacity over >1000 cycles) and an output voltage up to 1.4 V. The performance of these semiconducting polymers with polar side-chains demonstrates the potential of this material class for fast-charging, water based electrochemical energy storage devices.

  16. Direct Visualization of Orbital Flipping in Volborthite by Charge Density Analysis Using Detwinned Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Kento; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujii, Tatsuya; Higuchi, Takafumi; Katayama, Naoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshihiko; Sawa, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    The distribution of d-orbital valence electrons in volborthite [Cu3V2O7(OH)2 • 2H2O] was investigated by charge density analysis of the multipole model refinement. Diffraction data were obtained by synchrotron radiation single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. Data reduction by detwinning of the multiple structural domains was performed using our developed software. In this study, using high-quality data, we demonstrated that the water molecules in volborthite can be located by the hydrogen bonding in cavities that consist of Kagome lattice layers of CuO4(OH)2 and pillars of V2O7. Final multipole refinements before and after the structural phase transition directly visualized the deformation electron density of the valence electrons. We successfully directly visualized the orbital flipping of the d-orbital dx2-y2, which is the highest level of 3d orbitals occupied by d9 electrons in volborthite. The developed techniques and software can be employed for investigations of structural properties of systems with multiple structural domains.

  17. Pion-nucleon charge-exchange polarization by Gribov Reggeon calculus and the derivative rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardill, R.W.B.; Koehler, P.; Moriarty, K.J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The phenomenological consequences of the Gribov Reggeon calculus for the reaction πsup(-)+p→πdeg+n at 6 GeV/c are investigated and the polarization is obtained. The derivative rules is used to calculate the helicity flip amplitude. The results are very encouraging and would seem to indicate that the Gribov Reggeon calculus can be considered a more satisfactory approach to two-body phenomenology than the absorption model

  18. The RF charge pump technique for measuring the interface state density on leaky dielectrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; de Vries, Hendrikus; Vries, Henk; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    In this work the RF charge pump technique is presented. It is shown that this technique can rovide charge pump data of devices that have a leakage current too high for classical charge pump measurements. The methodology of accurately performing RF charge pump measurements is discussed and

  19. Charge pumping at radio frequencies [MOSFET device interface state density measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; de Vries, Hendrikus; de Vries, H.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    In this work, for the first time, charge pump results are shown that are obtained at frequencies in the GHz range. A comparison is made with charge pump results at lower frequencies. A very good agreement is seen between the low frequency charge pump data and the RF charge pump data. Measurement

  20. Optically pumped polarized H- ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    The current status and future prospects for the optically pumped polarized H - ion source are discussed. At the present time H - ion currents of 60 μA and with a polarization of 65% have been produced. The ion current and polarization can be increased significantly if the optically pumped Na charge exchange target density and polarization can be increased. Studies of wall surfaces that permit many bounces before depolarizing the Na electron spin and studies of radiation trapping in optically pumped Na indicate that the Na target density and polarization can be increased substantially. 27 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Time-dependent density functional theory for the charging kinetics of electric double layer containing room-temperature ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Cheng; Zhao, Shuangliang; Liu, Honglai; Wu, Jianzhong

    2016-11-28

    Understanding the charging kinetics of electric double layers is of fundamental importance for the design and development of novel electrochemical devices such as supercapacitors and field-effect transistors. In this work, we study the dynamic behavior of room-temperature ionic liquids using a classical time-dependent density functional theory that accounts for the molecular excluded volume effects, the electrostatic correlations, and the dispersion forces. While the conventional models predict a monotonic increase of the surface charge with time upon application of an electrode voltage, our results show that dispersion between ions results in a non-monotonic increase of the surface charge with the duration of charging. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of van der Waals attraction between electrode/ionic-liquid interactions on the charging processes.

  2. Mapping Charge Carrier Density in Organic Thin-Film Transistors by Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Lifetime Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Liu, Yiming

    2017-01-01

    The device performance of organic transistors is strongly influenced by the charge carrier distribution. A range of factors effect this distribution, including injection barriers at the metal-semiconductor interface, the morphology of the organic film, and charge traps at the dielectric/organic i......The device performance of organic transistors is strongly influenced by the charge carrier distribution. A range of factors effect this distribution, including injection barriers at the metal-semiconductor interface, the morphology of the organic film, and charge traps at the dielectric....../organic interface or at grain boundaries. In our comprehensive experimental and analytical work we demonstrate a method to characterize the charge carrier density in organic thin-film transistors using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. We developed a numerical model that describes the electrical...

  3. Stopping power and polarization induced in a plasma by a fast charged particle in circular motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villo-Perez, Isidro [Departamento de Electronica, Tecnologia de las Computadoras y Proyectos, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Cartagena (Spain); Arista, Nestor R. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia (Spain)

    2002-03-28

    We describe the perturbation induced in a plasma by a charged particle in circular motion, analysing in detail the evolution of the induced charge, the electrostatic potential and the energy loss of the particle. We describe the initial transitory behaviour and the different ways in which convergence to final stationary solutions may be obtained depending on the basic parameters of the problem. The results for the stopping power show a resonant behaviour which may give place to large stopping enhancement values as compared with the case of particles in straight-line motion with the same linear velocity. The results also explain a resonant effect recently obtained for particles in circular motion in magnetized plasmas. (author)

  4. Studies of the pressure dependence of the charge density distribution in cerium phosphide by the maximum-entropy method

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimatsu, N; Takata, M; Nishibori, E; Sakata, M; Hayashi, J; Shirotani, I; Shimomura, O

    2002-01-01

    The physical properties relating to 4f electrons in cerium phosphide, especially the temperature dependence and the isomorphous transition that occurs at around 10 GPa, were studied by means of x-ray powder diffraction and charge density distribution maps derived by the maximum-entropy method. The compressibility of CeP was exactly determined using a helium pressure medium and the anomaly that indicated the isomorphous transition was observed in the compressibility. We also discuss the anisotropic charge density distribution of Ce ions and its temperature dependence.

  5. Strain Tuning of the Charge Density Wave in Monolayer and Bilayer 1T-TaS2

    KAUST Repository

    Gan, Liyong

    2015-12-07

    By first-principles calculations, we investigate the strain effects on the charge density wave states of monolayer and bilayer 1T-TaS2. The modified stability of the charge density wave in the monolayer is understood in terms of the strain dependent electron localization, which determines the distortion amplitude. On the other hand, in the bilayer the effect of strain on the interlayer interaction is also crucial. The rich phase diagram under strain opens new venues for applications of 1T-TaS2. We interpret the experimentally observed insulating state of bulk 1T-TaS2 as inherited from the monolayer by effective interlayer decoupling.

  6. Effects of D-600 on intramembrane charge movement of polarized and depolarized frog muscle fibers

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Intramembrane charge movement has been measured in frog cut skeletal muscle fibers using the triple vaseline gap voltage-clamp technique. Ionic currents were reduced using an external solution prepared with tetraethylammonium to block potassium currents, and O sodium + tetrodotoxin to abolish sodium currents. The internal solution contained 10 mM EGTA to prevent contractions. Both the internal and external solutions were prepared with impermeant anions. Linear capacitive currents were subtrac...

  7. Measuring the effect of ion-induced drift-gas polarization on the electrical mobilities of multiply-charged ionic liquid nanodrops in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, Juan; Fernández de la Mora, Juan

    2013-12-01

    The electrical mobilities of multiply-charged nanodrops of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl, 3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (EMI-N[CN]2) were accurately measured in air at 20 °C for mass-selected clusters of composition [EMI-N[CN]2] n [EMI(+)] z , with 2 ≤ n ≤ 369 and 1 ≤ z ≤ 10. We confirm prior reports that the mobility Z of a globular ion of mass m is given approximately by the modified Stokes-Millikan law for spheres, Z  =  Z SM,mod (d m   +  d g , z, m), where d m   =  (6m/πρ)(1/3) is the nanodrop mass-diameter based on the density ρ of the liquid (corrected for the capillary compression and electrostatic deformation of the nanodrop), and d g is an effective air molecule diameter. There is however a measurable (up to 7%) and systematic z-dependent departure of Z from Z SM,mod . As theoretically expected at small ε (*) , this effect is accurately described by a simple correction factor of the form Z/Z SM,mod   =  δ(1  -  βε (*)), where kTε (*) is the potential energy due to the ion-induced dipole (polarization) attraction between a perfectly-conducting charged nanodrop and a polarized neutral gas-molecule at a distance (d m   +  d g )/2 from its center. An excellent fit of this model to hundreds of data points is found for d g ≈ 0.26 nm, β ≈ 0.36, and δ ≈ 0.954. Accounting for the effect of polarization decreases d g considerably with respect to values inferred from earlier nanodrop measurements that ignored this effect. In addition, and in spite of ambiguities in the mobility calibration scale, the measured constant δ smaller than unity increases Millikan's drag enhancement factor from the accepted value ξ m ≈ 1.36 to the new value ξ ≈ ξ m /δ ≈ 1.42  ± 0.03.

  8. Measuring the Effect of Ion-Induced Drift-Gas Polarization on the Electrical Mobilities of Multiply-Charged Ionic Liquid Nanodrops in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, Juan; Fernández de la Mora, Juan

    2013-12-01

    The electrical mobilities of multiply-charged nanodrops of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl, 3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (EMI-N[CN]2) were accurately measured in air at 20 °C for mass-selected clusters of composition [EMI-N[CN]2] n [EMI+] z , with 2 ≤ n ≤ 369 and 1 ≤ z ≤ 10. We confirm prior reports that the mobility Z of a globular ion of mass m is given approximately by the modified Stokes-Millikan law for spheres, Z = Z SM, mod ( d m + d g , z, m), where d m = (6 m/ πρ)1/3 is the nanodrop mass-diameter based on the density ρ of the liquid (corrected for the capillary compression and electrostatic deformation of the nanodrop), and d g is an effective air molecule diameter. There is however a measurable (up to 7 %) and systematic z-dependent departure of Z from Z SM,mod . As theoretically expected at small ɛ * , this effect is accurately described by a simple correction factor of the form Z/ Z SM, mod = δ(1 - βɛ *), where kTɛ * is the potential energy due to the ion-induced dipole ( polarization) attraction between a perfectly-conducting charged nanodrop and a polarized neutral gas-molecule at a distance ( d m + d g )/2 from its center. An excellent fit of this model to hundreds of data points is found for d g ≈ 0.26 nm, β ≈ 0.36, and δ ≈ 0.954. Accounting for the effect of polarization decreases d g considerably with respect to values inferred from earlier nanodrop measurements that ignored this effect. In addition, and in spite of ambiguities in the mobility calibration scale, the measured constant δ smaller than unity increases Millikan's drag enhancement factor from the accepted value ξ m ≈ 1.36 to the new value ξ ≈ ξ m / δ ≈ 1.42 ± 0.03.

  9. Cross-field injection of a charged, polarized, ion-electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    An early idea for fueling a controlled fusion device had been the injection of a polarized mixture of ions and electrons across a magnetic field and into the device. Now, the beam intensity (several kA/cm 2 ) required for this technique is available from pulsed ion diodes. Remaining feasibility questions involve beam optics and trapping. The most obvious advantage over neutral-beam injection is avoidance of the need to produce high-energy atoms. Therefore, the technique will compete best at ion energies above 100 keV. The method appears feasible for pulsed startup of mirror machines, but not for steady-state injection into a plasma

  10. Storm-enhanced plasma density and polar tongue of ionization development during the 15 May 2005 superstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the ionosphere's global response to the 15 May 2005 superstorm in terms of storm evolution and ionospheric electrodynamics. Our aim is to study the global distribution of plasma and the resultant large-scale ionospheric features including the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), storm-enhanced density (SED), and polar tongue of ionization (TOI). We have combined multi-instrument ionospheric data, solar and terrestrial magnetic data, and polar convection maps. Results reveal the prompt penetration of the interplanetary electric field to the polar region and then to the equator with a dusk-to-dawn polarity during the initial phase and with a dawn-to-dusk polarity during the main phase. This drove during the initial phase a weak eastward equatorial electrojet (EEJ) in the American sector at nighttime and a weak westward EEJ in the Indian-Australian sector at daytime. During the main phase, these EEJs intensified and changed polarities. SED and polar TOI development was observed prior to and during the initial phase at evening-premidnight hours over North America and during the main phase in the south at afternoon-evening hours in the Australian sector. During the main phase and early in the recovery phase, the EIA-SED structure was well formed in the Asian longitude sector. Then, polar TOI development was absent in the north because of the long distance from the magnetic pole but was supported in the south because of the closeness of daytime cusp and magnetic pole. Thus, the EIA-SED-TOI structure developed twice but each time in a different longitude sector and with different characteristics.

  11. Effect of smoking on the gingival capillary density: assessment of gingival capillary density with orthogonal polarization spectral imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, J. A.; Mathura, K. R.; Harkisoen, S.; van den Akker, H. P.; Ince, C.

    2005-01-01

    Microvascular changes because of smoking are frequently presumed in models because of the negative effect of smoking portrayed on the microcirculation. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke might lead to a decrease in gingival capillary density. Capillary density was assessed with orthogonal

  12. Spin-polarized charge transport in HgTe/CdTe quantum well topological insulator under a ferromagnetic metal strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenhua; Luo, Kun; Yu, Jiahan; Wu, Xiaobo; Lin, Liangzhong

    2018-02-01

    Electron tunneling through a single magnetic barrier in a HgTe topological insulator has been theoretically investigated. We find that the perpendicular magnetic field would not lead to spin-flip of the edge states due to the conservation of the angular moment. By tuning the magnetic field and the Fermi energy, the edge channels can be transited from switch-on states to switch-off states and the current from unpolarized states can be filtered to fully spin polarized states. These features offer us an efficient way to control charge/spin transport in a HgTe/CdTe quantum well, and pave a way to construct the nanoelectronic devices utilizing the topological edge states.

  13. Long-Term Charge/Discharge Cycling Stability of MnO2 Aqueous Supercapacitor under Positive Polarization

    KAUST Repository

    Ataherian, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    The long-term charge/discharge cycling stability of MnO 2 electrode under positive polarization in aqueous KCl electrolyte has been studied over different potential windows spanning from the open circuit potential to varied higher-end potential limited by O 2 evolution. Cycling up to 1.2 V (vs Ag/AgCl (aq)) causes partial (35) capacitance fading to a plateau value within the initial cycles, accompanied by morphological reconstruction, reduction of surface Mn ions and oxygen evolution. The surface Mn-ion reduction has been attributed to a two-step oxidation-reduction mechanism involving OH oxidation in electrolyte, based on electrochemical analysis. When cycling potential extends to 1.4 V, extensive oxygen evolution takes place. The combination of surface passivation of current collector and extensive gas bubbling, which deteriorates electrical contact among the constituent particles within the electrode, results in further monotonic capacitance reduction. © 2011 The Electrochemical Society.

  14. New Phase Transition in the $Pr_{1-x}Ca_{x}MnO_{3}$ System Evidence for Electrical Polarization in Charge Ordered Manganites

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, A M; Amaral, V S; Correia, G; Tomioka, Y; Tokura, Y

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter a detailed study of the electric field gradient (EFG) across the Pr1-xCaxMnO3 phase diagram and its temperature dependence is given. Clearly, distinct EFG behavior for samples outside or inside the charge order (CO) region are observed. The EFG temperature dependence evidences a new phase transition occurring over the broad CO region of the phase diagram. This transition is discontinuous and occurs at temperatures between the charge ordering and the Néel temperatures. The prominent features observed in the EFG are associated with polar atomic vibrations which eventually lead to a spontaneous local electric polarization below CO transition.

  15. Lateral phase drift of the topological charge density in stochastic optical fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The statistical distributions of optical vortices or topological charge in stochastic optical fields can be inhomogeneous in both transverse directions. Such two-dimensional inhomogeneous vortex or topological charge distributions evolve in a...

  16. EGCG in Green Tea Induces Aggregation of HMGB1 Protein through Large Conformational Changes with Polarized Charge Redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xuan-Yu; Li, Baoyu; Liu, Shengtang; Kang, Hongsuk; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-02-01

    As a major effective component in green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)’s potential benefits to human health have been widely investigated. Recent experimental evidences indicate that EGCG can induce the aggregation of HMGB1 protein, a late mediator of inflammation, which subsequently stimulates the autophagic degradation and thus provides protection from lethal endotoxemia and sepsis. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the underlying molecular mechanism of this aggregation of HMGB1 facilitated by EGCG. Our simulation results reveal that EGCG firmly binds to HMGB1 near Cys106, which supports previous preliminary experimental evidence. A large HMGB1 conformational change is observed, where Box A and Box B, two homogenous domains of HMGB1, are repositioned and packed together by EGCG. This new HMGB1 conformation has large molecular polarity and distinctive electrostatic potential surface. We suggest that the highly polarized charge distribution leads to the aggregation of HMGB1, which differs from the previous hypothesis that two HMGB1 monomers are linked by the dimer of EGCG. Possible aggregating modes have also been investigated with potential of mean force (PMF) calculations. Finally, we conclude that the conformation induced by EGCG is more aggregation-prone with higher binding free energies as compared to those without EGCG.

  17. Influence of polar medium on the reorganization energy of charge transfer between dyes in a dye sensitized film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaissier, Valérie; Barnes, Piers; Kirkpatrick, James; Nelson, Jenny

    2013-04-07

    We study the kinetics of the lateral hole transfer occurring between dye molecules anchored at the surface of the metal oxide in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC). We use Marcus' charge transfer rate equation for which we need the electronic coupling between two molecules (J) and the reorganization energy (λtot). In DSSC the medium surrounding the dyes is highly polar. This means that the contribution of the solvent to the reorganization energy cannot be neglected. Here we elaborate a method to calculate, from first principles, the total (i.e., inner- and outer-sphere) reorganization energy of hole exchange between ruthenium dyes. The influence of the solvent and of the ions in the solvent is incorporated. The inner-sphere reorganization energy depends on the nature of the dye, 0.1 eV for ruthenium dyes with CN ligands, 0.2 eV for ruthenium dyes with NCS ligands. In acetonitrile, the solvent reorganization energy contributes for at least 80% of the total giving a total reorganization energy of around 0.86 eV for ruthenium dyes with CN ligands and 0.95 eV for ruthenium dyes with NCS ligands. We use these results to estimate the rate of hole transfer within Marcus theory. We suggest that low diffusion coefficients observed experimentally may arise from the high polarity of the medium rather than by the chemical structure of the dye.

  18. Stability analysis of non-thermal complex astrofluids in the presence of polarized dust-charge fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, P.; Das, P.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2016-10-01

    The panoptic influence of plasma q-nonextensivity and dust-charge fluctuations on the gravito-electro-magnetic stability behaviour of a realistic non-thermal complex astroplasma model configuration with infinite geometrical extension is reconnoitered. It includes active viscoelasticity and dust polarization force-field effects in quasi-neutral hydrostatic equilibrium on the astrophysical fluid scales of space and time. The nontrivial linear model is simplified with the Jeans homogenization assumption (Jeans swindle, no zeroth-order force-field). It analytically and logically enables us to relax from the inclusion of large-scale inhomogeneities and of associated intrinsic complications. The role of boundary effects on the dynamical stability is assumed to be insignificant. We apply a standard technique of the Fourier formulaic plane-wave analysis over the basic cloud-structuring equations in a closed integrated form. It reduces the model Fourier algebraic equations decoupling into a unique form of cubic dispersion relation having mixed variable coefficients, which, indeed, explicitly, evolve on the diverse model plasma parameters. It is interestingly seen that the polarization and nonextensive effects directly play destabilizing roles. In contrast, the viscoelasticity and magnetic field create stabilizing effects on the instability. The pragmatic significance and applicability in the context of astro-cosmo-galactic environments are briefly indicated aboard analytic facts and introspective faults.

  19. Intermediate energy charge-exchange reactions induced by polarized 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.T.

    1998-01-01

    Spin polarization transfer is proven to be very useful in obtaining detailed information of the continuum nuclear responses. The data, taken for the (vector p,vector n) reactions, have enabled us to separate the response into the spin longitudinal and transverse components. These partial nuclear responses have been successfully used to make critical tests of nuclear structure models. In the present paper, we first summarize the results of the data and the theoretical analyses made so far. We then discuss information obtainable from the ( 3 vector He,vector t) reaction, emphasizing on the differences and similarities in comparison with the (vector p,vector n) reaction. The results of numerical calculations made for ( 3 vector He,vector t) reactions based on the microscopic distorted wave impulse approximation will also be reported. (orig.)

  20. Incommensurate Phonon Anomaly and the Nature of Charge Density Waves in Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, H.; Ishikawa, D.; Heid, R.; Le Tacon, M.; Fabbris, G.; Meyers, D.; Gu, G. D.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Dean, M. P. M.

    2018-01-01

    While charge density wave (CDW) instabilities are ubiquitous to superconducting cuprates, the different ordering wave vectors in various cuprate families have hampered a unified description of the CDW formation mechanism. Here, we investigate the temperature dependence of the low-energy phonons in the canonical CDW-ordered cuprate La1.875 Ba0.125 CuO4 . We discover that the phonon softening wave vector associated with CDW correlations becomes temperature dependent in the high-temperature precursor phase and changes from a wave vector of 0.238 reciprocal lattice units (r.l.u.) below the ordering transition temperature to 0.3 r.l.u. at 300 K. This high-temperature behavior shows that "214"-type cuprates can host CDW correlations at a similar wave vector to previously reported CDW correlations in non-214-type cuprates such as YBa2 Cu3 O6 +δ . This indicates that cuprate CDWs may arise from the same underlying instability despite their apparently different low-temperature ordering wave vectors.

  1. Magnetic field controlled charge density wave coupling in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Ivashko, O.

    2016-01-01

    The application of magnetic fields to layered cuprates suppresses their high-temperature superconducting behaviour and reveals competing ground states. In widely studied underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO), the microscopic nature of field-induced electronic and structural changes at low temperatures...... at B∼15 T. The CDW signal along the a-direction is also enhanced by field, but does not develop an additional pattern of correlations. Magnetic field modifies the coupling between the CuO2 bilayers in the YBCO structure, and causes the sudden appearance of the 3D CDW order. The mirror symmetry...... remains unclear. Here we report an X-ray study of the high-field charge density wave (CDW) in YBCO. For hole dopings ∼ 0.123, we find that a field (B∼10 T) induces additional CDW correlations along the CuO chain (b-direction) only, leading to a three-dimensional (3D) ordered state along this direction...

  2. Multiple charge density wave states at the surface of TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ling; Kraft, Aaron M.; Sharma, Bishnu; Singh, Manoj; Walmsley, Philip; Fisher, Ian R.; Boyer, Michael C.

    2016-11-01

    We studied TbT e3 using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the temperature range of 298-355 K. Our measurements detect a unidirectional charge density wave (CDW) state in the surface Te layer with a wave vector consistent with that of the bulk qCDW=0.30 ±0.01 c* . However, unlike previous STM measurements, and differing from measurements probing the bulk, we detect two perpendicular orientations for the unidirectional CDW with no directional preference for the in-plane crystal axes (a or c axis) and no noticeable difference in wave vector magnitude. In addition, we find regions in which the bidirectional CDW states coexist. We propose that observation of two unidirectional CDW states indicates a decoupling of the surface Te layer from the rare-earth block layer below, and that strain variations in the Te surface layer drive the local CDW direction to the specific unidirectional or, in rare occurrences, bidirectional CDW orders observed. This indicates that similar driving mechanisms for CDW formation in the bulk, where anisotropic lattice strain energy is important, are at play at the surface. Furthermore, the wave vectors for the bidirectional order we observe differ from those theoretically predicted for checkerboard order competing with stripe order in a Fermi-surface nesting scenario, suggesting that factors beyond Fermi-surface nesting drive CDW order in TbT e3 . Finally, our temperature-dependent measurements provide evidence for localized CDW formation above the bulk transition temperature TCDW.

  3. Resonant Enhancement of Charge Density Wave Diffraction in the Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.S.; Sorini, A.P.; Yi, M.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moritz, B.; Yang, W.L.; Chu, J.-H.; Kuo, H.H.; Gonzalez, A.G.Cruz; Fisher, I.R.; Hussain, Z.; Devereau, T.P.; Shen, Z.X.

    2012-05-15

    We performed resonant soft X-ray diffraction on known charge density wave (CDW) compounds, rare earth tri-tellurides. Near the M{sub 5} (3d - 4f) absorption edge of rare earth ions, an intense diffraction peak is detected at a wavevector identical to that of CDW state hosted on Te{sub 2} planes, indicating a CDW-induced modulation on the rare earth ions. Surprisingly, the temperature dependence of the diffraction peak intensity demonstrates an exponential increase at low temperatures, vastly different than that of the CDW order parameter. Assuming 4f multiplet splitting due to the CDW states, we present a model to calculate X-ray absorption spectrum and resonant profile of the diffraction peak, agreeing well with experimental observations. Our results demonstrate a situation where the temperature dependence of resonant X-ray diffraction peak intensity is not directly related to the intrinsic behavior of the order parameter associated with the electronic order, but is dominated by the thermal occupancy of the valence states.

  4. Recent Advances in Two-Dimensional Materials with Charge Density Waves: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mongur Hossain

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two-dimensional (2D charge density wave (CDW materials have attracted extensive interest due to potential applications as high performance functional nanomaterials. As other 2D materials, 2D CDW materials are layered materials with strong in-plane bonding and weak out-of-plane interactions enabling exfoliation into layers of single unit cell thickness. Although bulk CDW materials have been studied for decades, recent developments in nanoscale characterization and device fabrication have opened up new opportunities allowing applications such as oscillators, electrodes in supercapacitors, energy storage and conversion, sensors and spinelectronic devices. In this review, we first outline the synthesis techniques of 2D CDW materials including mechanical exfoliation, liquid exfoliation, chemical vapor transport (CVT, chemical vapor deposition (CVD, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE and electrochemical exfoliation. Then, the characterization procedure of the 2D CDW materials such as temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy, temperature-dependent resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM are reviewed. Finally, applications of 2D CDW materials are reviewed.

  5. Assessment of fixed charge density in regenerated cartilage by Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Shogo; Homma, Kazuhiro; Numano, Tomokazu; Furukawa, Katsuko; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Ushida, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Applying regenerated cartilage in a clinical setting requires noninvasive evaluation to detect the maturity of cartilage tissue. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage is well accepted and has been applied clinically in recent years. We attempt to establish a noninvasive method to evaluate the maturity of regenerated cartilage tissue using gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. To reconstruct cartilaginous tissue, we embedded articular chondrocytes harvested from bovine humeral head in agarose gel and cultured the cells in vitro up to 4 weeks. The fixed charge density (FCD) of the cartilage was determined using MRI gadolinium exclusion method. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content was determined by dimethylmethylene blue dye-binding assay. The sGAG content and FCD of the regenerated cartilage increased with duration of culture. In the T 1 Gd maps, the [Gd-DTPA 2- ] in the specimen decreased, and the boundary between the sample disk and the bath solution of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) became clearer as time in culture increased. In the linear regression analysis, FCD and sGAG content correlated significantly. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging measurements can be useful predictors of the degree of cartilaginous tissue formation. (author)

  6. Charge and current density profiles of a degenerate magnetized free-electron gas near a hard wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kettenis, M.M.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    The charge and current densities of a completely degenerate free-electron gas in a uniform magnetic field are found to have a damped oscillatory spatial dependence near a wall that is parallel to the magnetic field. For large distances from the wall the behaviour of the associated profile functions

  7. A surface structural model for ferrihydrite I: Sites related to primary charge, molar mass, and mass density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2009-01-01

    A multisite surface complexation (MUSIC) model for ferrihydrite (Fh) has been developed. The surface structure and composition of Fh nanoparticles are described in relation to ion binding and surface charge development. The site densities of the various reactive surface groups, the molar mass, the

  8. Higgs-mode radiance and charge-density-wave order in 2 H -NbSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, Romain; Cea, Tommaso; Gallais, Yann; Cazayous, Maximilien; Sacuto, Alain; Cario, Laurent; Benfatto, Lara; Méasson, Marie-Aude

    2018-03-01

    Despite being usually considered two competing phenomena, charge-density wave and superconductivity coexist in few systems, the most emblematic one being the transition-metal dichalcogenide 2 H -NbSe2 . This unusual condition is responsible for specific Raman signatures across the two phase transitions in this compound. While the appearance of a soft phonon mode is a well-established fingerprint of the charge-density-wave order, the nature of the sharp subgap mode emerging below the superconducting temperature is still under debate. In this work we use external pressure as a knob to unveil the delicate interplay between the two orders, and consequently the nature of the superconducting mode. Thanks to an advanced extreme-conditions Raman technique, we are able to follow the pressure evolution and the simultaneous collapse of the two intertwined charge-density-wave and superconducting modes. The comparison with microscopic calculations in a model system supports the Higgs-type nature of the superconducting mode and suggests that charge-density wave and superconductivity in 2 H -NbSe2 involve mutual electronic degrees of freedom. These findings fill the knowledge gap on the electronic mechanisms at play in transition-metal dichalcogenides, a crucial step to fully exploit their properties in few-layer systems optimized for device applications.

  9. Charge density wave and superconductivity in 2H-and 4H-NbSe2: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Good-quality hexagonal NbSe2 single crystals were prepared. In 2H-NbSe2, superconducting and charge density wave (CDW) transitions were found at = 7.4 K and = 35 K respectively as reported previously. We have noticed that these two transitions are changed to = 42 K and = 6.5 K, in 4H-NbSe2.

  10. Membrane effects of Vitamin E deficiency: bioenergetic and surface-charge-density studies of skeletal muscle and liver mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintanilha, A.T.; Packer, L.; Szyszlo Davies, J.M.; Racanelli, T.L.; Davies, K.J.A.

    1981-12-01

    Vitamin E (dl-..cap alpha..-tocopherol) deficiency in rats increased the sensitivity of liver and muscle mitochondria to damage during incubation at various temperatures, irradiation with visible light, or steady state respiration with substrates. In all cases, vitamin E deficient mitochondria exhibited increased lipid peroxidation, reduced transmembrane potential, decreased respiratory coupling, and lower rates of electron transport, compared to control mitochondria. Muscle mitochondria always showed greater negative inner membrane surface charge density, and were also more sensitive to damage than were liver mitochondria. Vitamin E deficient mitochondria also showed slightly more negative inner membrane surface charge density compared to controls. The relationship between greater negative surface potential and increased sensitivity to damage observed, provides for a new and sensitive method to further probe the role of surface charge in membrane structure and function. Implications of these new findings for the well known human muscle myopathies and those experimentally induced by Vitamin E deficiency in animals, are discussed.

  11. Transmission and reflection of charge-density wave packets in a quantum Hall edge controlled by a metal gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Masahiro; Mano, Takaaki; Noda, Takeshi; Shibata, Naokazu; Hotta, Masahiro; Yusa, Go

    2018-02-01

    Quantum energy teleportation (QET) is a proposed protocol related to quantum vacuum. The edge channels in a quantum Hall system are well suited for the experimental verification of QET. For this purpose, we examine a charge-density wave packet excited and detected by capacitively coupled front gate electrodes. We observe the waveform of the charge packet, which is proportional to the time derivative of the applied square voltage wave. Further, we study the transmission and reflection behaviors of the charge-density wave packet by applying a voltage to another front gate electrode to control the path of the edge state. We show that the threshold voltages where the dominant direction is switched in either transmission or reflection for dense and sparse wave packets are different from the threshold voltage where the current stops flowing in an equilibrium state.

  12. Deduction of edge electron density with multiply charged ions in ORNL volume-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, H-J; Woo, H-J; Chung, K-S; Liu, Y; Meyer, F W; Lho, T; Lee, M-J

    2008-02-01

    The electron densities in the argon plasmas of the ORNL 6 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a flat central magnetic field have been deduced from the ion branches of the electric probe current-voltage curves measured in the edge region of the plasmas. To overcome the difficulties due to unknown velocities of multiply charged ions at the sheath edge, a modified generalized Bohm criterion for the ion sheath velocity is introduced and the mean velocity of all ionic charge states at the sheath edge is assumed to be equal to the sound velocity of the system of particles. The calculated electron densities and temperatures for different plasmas optimized for four charge state distributions are discussed.

  13. Knot Undulator to Generate Linearly Polarized Photons with Low on-Axis Power Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, S.

    2009-01-01

    Heat load on beamline optics is a serious problem to generate pure linearly polarized photons in the third generation synchrotron radiation facilities. For permanent magnet undulators, this problem can be overcome by a figure-8 operating mode. But there is still no good method to tackle this problem for electromagnetic elliptical undulators. Here, a novel operating mode is suggested, which can generate pure linearly polarized photons with very low on-axis heat load. Also the available minimum photon energy of linearly polarized photons can be extended much by this method.

  14. Catalytic enhancement of gold nanocages induced by undercoordination-charge-polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Principle behind the highest catalytic ability of the least coordinated gold remains a puzzle. With the aid of density functional theory calculations, we show that in 3-coordinated gold cages (i the Au–Au bond contracts by ∼5% in average, (ii the valance density-of-states shift up to Fermi level when the Au55 cluster turns into an Au12 cage, and (iii the activation energy for CO oxidation drops in sequence, Au55 cluster (13.6 Kcal/mol, Au42 cage (8.0 Kcal/mol, Au13(6.5 Kcal/mol, and Au12 cage (5.1 Kcal/mol, with comparing the reaction paths and spin states. The principle clarified here paves the way for the design of gold nanocatalyst.

  15. Exploring the entrance of proton pathways in cytochrome c oxidase from Paracoccus denitrificans: surface charge, buffer capacity and redox-dependent polarity changes at the internal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberg, Kristina; Michel, Hartmut; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2013-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal oxidase of cellular respiration, reduces molecular oxygen to water. The mechanism of proton pumping as well as the coupling of proton and electron transfer is still not understood in this redox-linked proton pump. Eleven residues at the aqueous-exposed surfaces of CcO from Paracoccus denitrificans have been exchanged to cysteines in a two-subunit base variant to yield single reactive cysteine variants. These variants are designed to provide unique labeling sites for probes to be used in spectroscopic experiments investigating the mechanism of proton pumping in CcO. To this end we have shown that all cysteine variants are enzymatically active. Cysteine positions at the negative (N-) side of the membrane are located close to the entrance of the D- and K-proton transfer pathways that connect the N-side with the catalytic oxygen reduction site. Labeling of the pH-indicator dye fluorescein to these sites allowed us to determine the surface potential at the cytoplasmic CcO surface, which corresponds to a surface charge density of -0.5 elementary charge/1000Å(2). In addition, acid-base titrations revealed values of CcO buffer capacity. Polarity measurements of the label environment at the N-side provided (i) site-specific values indicative of a hydrophilic and a more hydrophobic environment dependent on the label position, and (ii) information on a global change to a more apolar environment upon reduction of the enzyme. Thus, the redox state of the copper and heme centers inside the hydrophobic interior of CcO affect the properties at the cytoplasmic surface. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Polarization in K+n charge exchange scattering between 0.851 GeV/c and 1.351 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, S.J.; Bugg, D.V.; Carter, A.A.; Coupland, M.; Eisenhandler, E.; Gibson, W.R.; Kalmus, P.I.P.; Sandhu, H.; Astbury, A.; Grayer, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    The polarization parameter for K + n charge exchange scattering has been measured at five momenta between 0.851 GeV/c and 1.351 GeV/c for centre of mass angles -0.8 < cos theta* < 0.8. Results from a phase shift analysis incorporating these results are presented. No Z* resonances are onserved. (orig.)

  17. Charge Transfer Enhancement in the D-π-A Type Porphyrin Dyes: A Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Guo-Jun; Song, Chao; Ren, Xue-Feng

    2016-11-25

    The electronic geometries and optical properties of two D-π-A type zinc porphyrin dyes (NCH₃-YD2 and TPhe-YD) were systematically investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to reveal the origin of significantly altered charge transfer enhancement by changing the electron donor of the famous porphyrin-based sensitizer YD2-o-C8. The molecular geometries and photophysical properties of dyes before and after binding to the TiO₂ cluster were fully investigated. From the analyses of natural bond orbital (NBO), extended charge decomposition analysis (ECDA), and electron density variations (Δρ) between the excited state and ground state, it was found that the introduction of N(CH₃)₂ and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups enhanced the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) character compared to YD2-o-C8. The absorption wavelength and transition possess character were significantly influenced by N(CH₃)₂ and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups. NCH₃-YD2 with N(CH₃)₂ groups in the donor part is an effective way to improve the interactions between the dyes and TiO₂ surface, light having efficiency (LHE), and free energy change (ΔG inject ), which is expected to be an efficient dye for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs).

  18. Charge Transfer Enhancement in the D-π-A Type Porphyrin Dyes: A Density Functional Theory (DFT and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jun Kang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The electronic geometries and optical properties of two D-π-A type zinc porphyrin dyes (NCH3-YD2 and TPhe-YD were systematically investigated by density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT to reveal the origin of significantly altered charge transfer enhancement by changing the electron donor of the famous porphyrin-based sensitizer YD2-o-C8. The molecular geometries and photophysical properties of dyes before and after binding to the TiO2 cluster were fully investigated. From the analyses of natural bond orbital (NBO, extended charge decomposition analysis (ECDA, and electron density variations (Δρ between the excited state and ground state, it was found that the introduction of N(CH32 and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups enhanced the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT character compared to YD2-o-C8. The absorption wavelength and transition possess character were significantly influenced by N(CH32 and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups. NCH3-YD2 with N(CH32 groups in the donor part is an effective way to improve the interactions between the dyes and TiO2 surface, light having efficiency (LHE, and free energy change (ΔGinject, which is expected to be an efficient dye for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs.

  19. In-vivo comparison of the charge densities required to evoke motor responses using novel annular penetrating microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Kate Brunton

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrodes for cortical stimulation need to deliver current to neural tissue effectively and safely. We have developed electrodes with a novel annular geometry for use in cortical visual prostheses. Here we explore a critical question on the ideal annulus height to ensure electrical stimulation will be safe and effective. We implanted single electrodes into the motor cortex of anesthetized rats and measured the current required to evoke a motor response to stimulation, and the charge injection capacity of the electrodes. We compared platinum iridium electrodes with different annulus heights, with and without a coating of porous titanium nitride. Threshold charge densities to evoke a motor response ranged from 12-36 µC.cm^-2.ph^-1. Electrodes with larger geometric surface areas required higher currents to evoke responses, but lower charge densities. The addition of a porous titanium nitride coating did not significantly influence the current required to evoke a motor response. The charge injection capacity of both electrode types was significantly reduced in-vivo compared with in-vitro measurements. The measured charge injection capacity was 72 and 18 µC.cm^-2.ph^-1 for electrodes with and without a titanium nitride coating respectively. These results support the use of platinum iridium annular electrodes with annulus heights greater than 100 µm (geometric surface area of 38, 000 µm^2. However, if the electrodes are coated with porous titanium nitride the annulus height can be reduced to 40 µm (geometric surface area of 16,000 µm^2.

  20. Modeling space-charge-limited currents in organic semiconductors: Extracting trap density and mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuña, Javier

    2011-11-28

    We have developed and have applied a mobility edge model that takes drift and diffusion currents to characterize the space-charge-limited current in organic semiconductors into account. The numerical solution of the drift-diffusion equation allows the utilization of asymmetric contacts to describe the built-in potential within the device. The model has been applied to extract information of the distribution of traps from experimental current-voltage measurements of a rubrene single crystal from Krellner showing excellent agreement across several orders of magnitude in the current. Although the two contacts are made of the same metal, an energy offset of 580 meV between them, ascribed to differences in the deposition techniques (lamination vs evaporation) was essential to correctly interpret the shape of the current-voltage characteristics at low voltage. A band mobility of 0.13cm 2V-1s-1 for holes is estimated, which is consistent with transport along the long axis of the orthorhombic unit cell. The total density of traps deeper than 0.1 eV was 2.2×1016cm -3. The sensitivity analysis and error estimation in the obtained parameters show that it is not possible to accurately resolve the shape of the trap distribution for energies deeper than 0.3 eV or shallower than 0.1 eV above the valence-band edge. The total number of traps deeper than 0.3 eV, however, can be estimated. Contact asymmetry and the diffusion component of the current play an important role in the description of the device at low bias and are required to obtain reliable information about the distribution of deep traps. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  1. Charge and Polarity Preferences for N-Glycosylation: A Genome-Wide In Silico Study and Its Implications Regarding Constitutive Proliferation and Adhesion of Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwar Hussain, Muhammad Ramzan; Iqbal, Zeeshan; Qazi, Wajahat M; Hoessli, Daniel C

    2018-01-01

    The structural and functional diversity of the human proteome is mediated by N - and O- linked glycosylations that define the individual properties of extracellular and membrane-associated proteins. In this study, we utilized different computational tools to perform in silico based genome-wide mapping of 1,117 human proteins and unravel the contribution of both penultimate and vicinal amino acids for the asparagine-based, site-specific N -glycosylation. Our results correlate the non-canonical involvement of charge and polarity environment of classified amino acids (designated as L, O, A, P, and N groups) in the N -glycosylation process, as validated by NetNGlyc predictions, and 130 literature-reported human proteins. From our results, particular charge and polarity combinations of non-polar aliphatic, acidic, basic, and aromatic polar side chain environment of both penultimate and vicinal amino acids were found to promote the N -glycosylation process. However, the alteration in side-chain charge and polarity environment of genetic variants, particularly in the vicinity of Asn-containing epitope, may induce constitutive glycosylation (e.g., aberrant glycosylation at preferred and non-preferred sites) of membrane proteins causing constitutive proliferation and triggering epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The current genome-wide mapping of 1,117 proteins (2,909 asparagine residues) was used to explore charge- and polarity-based mechanistic constraints in N -glycosylation, and discuss alterations of the neoplastic phenotype that can be ascribed to N -glycosylation at preferred and non-preferred sites.

  2. Charge and Polarity Preferences for N-Glycosylation: A Genome-Wide In Silico Study and Its Implications Regarding Constitutive Proliferation and Adhesion of Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ramzan Manwar Hussain

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural and functional diversity of the human proteome is mediated by N- and O-linked glycosylations that define the individual properties of extracellular and membrane-associated proteins. In this study, we utilized different computational tools to perform in silico based genome-wide mapping of 1,117 human proteins and unravel the contribution of both penultimate and vicinal amino acids for the asparagine-based, site-specific N-glycosylation. Our results correlate the non-canonical involvement of charge and polarity environment of classified amino acids (designated as L, O, A, P, and N groups in the N-glycosylation process, as validated by NetNGlyc predictions, and 130 literature-reported human proteins. From our results, particular charge and polarity combinations of non-polar aliphatic, acidic, basic, and aromatic polar side chain environment of both penultimate and vicinal amino acids were found to promote the N-glycosylation process. However, the alteration in side-chain charge and polarity environment of genetic variants, particularly in the vicinity of Asn-containing epitope, may induce constitutive glycosylation (e.g., aberrant glycosylation at preferred and non-preferred sites of membrane proteins causing constitutive proliferation and triggering epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The current genome-wide mapping of 1,117 proteins (2,909 asparagine residues was used to explore charge- and polarity-based mechanistic constraints in N-glycosylation, and discuss alterations of the neoplastic phenotype that can be ascribed to N-glycosylation at preferred and non-preferred sites.

  3. Ab initio calculations versus polarized neutron diffraction for the spin density of free radicals

    CERN Document Server

    Ressouche, E

    2003-01-01

    The determination of the magnetization distribution using polarized neutron diffraction has played a key role during the last twenty years in the field of molecular magnetism. This distribution can also be obtained by first principle ab initio calculations. Such calculations always rely on approximations and the question that arises is to know whether the obtained results are reliable enough to represent accurately the properties of these molecules. The comparison between polarized neutron experimental results and ab initio calculations has turned to provide stringent tests for these methods. In the resent article a comparison between experimental and theoretical results is made and is illustrated by examples based on magnetic free radicals. (author)

  4. Polarization observables in the longitudinal basis for pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction using a density matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biplab Dey, Michael E. McCracken, David G. Ireland, Curtis A. Meyer

    2011-05-01

    The complete expression for the intensity in pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction with a polarized beam, target, and recoil baryon is derived using a density matrix approach that offers great economy of notation. A Cartesian basis with spins for all particles quantized along a single direction, the longitudinal beam direction, is used for consistency and clarity in interpretation. A single spin-quantization axis for all particles enables the amplitudes to be written in a manifestly covariant fashion with simple relations to those of the well-known CGLN formalism. Possible sign discrepancies between theoretical amplitude-level expressions and experimentally measurable intensity profiles are dealt with carefully. Our motivation is to provide a coherent framework for coupled-channel partial-wave analysis of several meson photoproduction reactions, incorporating recently published and forthcoming polarization data from Jefferson Lab.

  5. Determination of Charge-Carrier Mobility in Disordered Thin-Film Solar Cells as a Function of Current Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäckel, Helmut; MacKenzie, Roderick C. I.

    2018-03-01

    Charge-carrier mobility is a fundamental material parameter, which plays an important role in determining solar-cell efficiency. The higher the mobility, the less time a charge carrier will spend in a device and the less likely it is that it will be lost to recombination. Despite the importance of this physical property, it is notoriously difficult to measure accurately in disordered thin-film solar cells under operating conditions. We, therefore, investigate a method previously proposed in the literature for the determination of mobility as a function of current density. The method is based on a simple analytical model that relates the mobility to carrier density and transport resistance. By revising the theoretical background of the method, we clearly demonstrate what type of mobility can be extracted (constant mobility or effective mobility of electrons and holes). We generalize the method to any combination of measurements that is able to determine the mean electron and hole carrier density, and the transport resistance at a given current density. We explore the robustness of the method by simulating typical organic solar-cell structures with a variety of physical properties, including unbalanced mobilities, unbalanced carrier densities, and for high or low carrier trapping rates. The simulations reveal that near VOC and JSC , the method fails due to the limitation of determining the transport resistance. However, away from these regions (and, importantly, around the maximum power point), the method can accurately determine charge-carrier mobility. In the presence of strong carrier trapping, the method overestimates the effective mobility due to an underestimation of the carrier density.

  6. Constraints on rapidity-dependent initial conditions from charged-particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Weiyao; Moreland, J. Scott; Bernhard, Jonah E.; Bass, Steffen A.

    2017-10-01

    We study the initial three-dimensional spatial configuration of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions using centrality and pseudorapidity-dependent measurements of the medium's charged particle density and two-particle correlations. A cumulant-generating function is first used to parametrize the rapidity dependence of local entropy deposition and extend arbitrary boost-invariant initial conditions to nonzero beam rapidities. The model is then compared to p +Pb and Pb + Pb charged-particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle pseudorapidity correlations and systematically optimized using Bayesian parameter estimation to extract high-probability initial condition parameters. The optimized initial conditions are then compared to a number of experimental observables including the pseudorapidity-dependent anisotropic flows, event-plane decorrelations, and flow correlations. We find that the form of the initial local longitudinal entropy profile is well constrained by these experimental measurements.

  7. Effect of Chemical Pressure on the Charge Density Wave Transition in Rare-Earth Tritellurides RTe3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, N.; Condron, C.L.; Margulis, G.Y.; Shin, K.Y.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Toney, M.F.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL /Bristol U.

    2009-04-30

    The charge density wave transition is investigated in the bilayer family of rare-earth tritelluride RTe{sub 3} compounds (R=Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Tm) via high-resolution x-ray diffraction and electrical resistivity. The transition temperature increases monotonically with increasing lattice parameter from 244(3) K for TmTe{sub 3} to 416(3) K for SmTe{sub 3}. The heaviest members of the series, R=Dy, Ho, Er, and Tm, are observed to have a second transition at a lower temperature, which marks the onset of an additional charge density wave with wave vector almost equal in magnitude to the first, but oriented in the perpendicular direction.

  8. Direct observation of competition between superconductivity and charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6.67

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A. T.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity often emerges in the proximity of, or in competition with, symmetry-breaking ground states such as antiferromagnetism or charge density waves (CDW). A number of materials in the cuprate family, which includes the high transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors, show spin...... and charge density wave order. Thus a fundamental question is to what extent do these ordered states exist for compositions close to optimal for superconductivity. Here we use high-energy X-ray diffraction to show that a CDW develops at zero field in the normal state of superconducting YBa2Cu3O6.67 (Tc= 67 K......). This sample has a hole doping of 0.12 per copper and a well-ordered oxygen chain superstructure. Below Tc, the application of a magnetic field suppresses superconductivity and enhances the CDW. Hence, the CDW and superconductivity in this typical high-Tc material are competing orders with similar energy...

  9. De Haas-van Alphen oscillations in the charge-density wave compound lanthanum tritelluride (LaTe3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, N.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Borzi, R.A.; Rost, A.; Mackenzie, A.P.; /St. Andrews U., Phys. Astron.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; /Bristol U.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    De Haas-van Alphen oscillations were measured in lanthanum tritelluride (LaTe{sub 3}) to probe the partially gapped Fermi surface resulting from charge density wave (CDW) formation. Three distinct frequencies were observed, one of which can be correlated with a FS sheet that is unaltered by CDW formation. The other two frequencies arise from FS sheets that have been reconstructed in the CDW state.

  10. Experimental Charge Density Study of Trichromium Linear Metal String Complex – Cr3(dpa)4Cl2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lai-Chin; Cheng, Ming-Chuan; Thomsen, Maja Krüger

    An experimental and theoretical charge density study, based on Bader’s Quantum Theory: Atoms in Molecule (QTAIM), on a trichromium metal string complex, Cr3(dpa)4Cl2(C2H5OC2H5)x(CH2Cl2)1-x (1, dpa- = bis(2-pyridyl)amido)) is performed. The structure and multipole model of 1 are performed by usin...

  11. 3-D time-domain induced polarization tomography: a new approach based on a source current density formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Revil, A.

    2018-04-01

    Induced polarization (IP) of porous rocks can be associated with a secondary source current density, which is proportional to both the intrinsic chargeability and the primary (applied) current density. This gives the possibility of reformulating the time domain induced polarization (TDIP) problem as a time-dependent self-potential-type problem. This new approach implies a change of strategy regarding data acquisition and inversion, allowing major time savings for both. For inverting TDIP data, we first retrieve the electrical resistivity distribution. Then, we use this electrical resistivity distribution to reconstruct the primary current density during the injection/retrieval of the (primary) current between the current electrodes A and B. The time-lapse secondary source current density distribution is determined given the primary source current density and a distribution of chargeability (forward modelling step). The inverse problem is linear between the secondary voltages (measured at all the electrodes) and the computed secondary source current density. A kernel matrix relating the secondary observed voltages data to the source current density model is computed once (using the electrical conductivity distribution), and then used throughout the inversion process. This recovered source current density model is in turn used to estimate the time-dependent chargeability (normalized voltages) in each cell of the domain of interest. Assuming a Cole-Cole model for simplicity, we can reconstruct the 3-D distributions of the relaxation time τ and the Cole-Cole exponent c by fitting the intrinsic chargeability decay curve to a Cole-Cole relaxation model for each cell. Two simple cases are studied in details to explain this new approach. In the first case, we estimate the Cole-Cole parameters as well as the source current density field from a synthetic TDIP data set. Our approach is successfully able to reveal the presence of the anomaly and to invert its Cole

  12. Electron Density and Temperature During the CHARGE-2B Sounding Rocket Mission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ernstmeyer, James

    1997-01-01

    The CHARGE-2B sounding rocket was launched from Poker Flats Research Range, Alaska, in March 1992 to investigate VLF electromagnetic radiation generated by a modulated electron beam in the ionosphere...

  13. Extracting charge density distributions from diffraction data: a model study on urea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.Y.; Feil, D.; Tsirelson, V.G.

    The quality of the extraction of electron density distributions by means of a multipole refinement method is investigated. Structure factors of the urea crystal have been obtained from an electron density distribution (EDD) resulting from a density function calculation with the CRYSTAL95 package. To

  14. Charge density waves in nanocrystalline thin films of blue bronze K0.3MoO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starešinić, D.; Dominko, D.; Salamon, K.; Biljaković, K.; Tomeljak, A.; Schäfer, H.; Huber, T.; Demsar, J.; Socol, G.; Ristoscu, C.; Mihailescu, I.N.; Siketić, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Thin granular films of charge density wave (CDW) system K 0.3 MoO 3 were prepared by pulsed laser deposition and investigated by various standard characterization methods such as GI-XRD, electric transport, TOF-ERDA, AFM and UV–visible spectroscopy. While all these methods indicate that the thin films consist of nanometer grains of K 0.3 MoO 3 , it is only the non-destructive femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy (fsTRS) that demonstrates the charge density wave nature of the ground state and therefore proves directly the presence of K 0.3 MoO 3 . Furthermore, the comparison of the fsTRS data obtained in thin films and in single crystals shows the reduction of the charge density wave transition temperature and of the photoinduced signal strength in granular thin films with respect to single crystals, which is attributed to the granularity and crystal growth morphology. Our results establish fsTRS technique as the essential tool for the detection and characterization of complex ground states in nano-sized systems.

  15. One-Photon Absorption Properties from a Hybrid Polarizable Density Embedding/Complex Polarization Propagator Approach for Polarizable Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hršak, Dalibor; Nørby, Morten Steen; Coriani, Sonia

    2018-01-01

    We present a formulation of the polarizable density embedding (PDE) method in combination with the complex polarization propagator (CPP) method for the calculation of absorption spectra of molecules in solutions. The method is particularly useful for the calculation of near-edge X-ray absorption...... fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra. We compare the performance of PDE-CPP with the previously formulated polarizable embedding (PE)-CPP model for the calculation of the NEXAFS spectra of adenine, formamide, glycine, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in water at the carbon and nitrogen K-edges, as well...

  16. Off-diagonal helicity density matrix elements for vector mesons produced in polarized e+e- processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.; Murgia, F.; Quintairos, P.

    1999-04-01

    Final state q q-bar interactions give origin to non zero values of the off-diagonal element ρ 1,-1 of the helicity density matrix of vector mesons produced in e + e - annihilations, as confirmed by recent OPAL data on φ, D * and K * 's. New predictions are given for ρ 1,-1 of several mesons produced at large x E and small p T - i.e. collinear with the parent jet - in the annihilation of polarized 3 + and 3 - , the results depend strongly on the elementary dynamics and allow further non trivial tests of the standard model. (author)

  17. Electroactive and High Dielectric Folic Acid/PVDF Composite Film Rooted Simplistic Organic Photovoltaic Self-Charging Energy Storage Cell with Superior Energy Density and Storage Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Swagata; Thakur, Pradip; Hoque, Nur Amin; Bagchi, Biswajoy; Sepay, Nayim; Khatun, Farha; Kool, Arpan; Das, Sukhen

    2017-07-19

    Herein we report a simplistic prototype approach to develop an organic photovoltaic self-charging energy storage cell (OPSESC) rooted with biopolymer folic acid (FA) modified high dielectric and electroactive β crystal enriched poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) composite (PFA) thin film. Comprehensive and exhaustive characterizations of the synthesized PFA composite films validate the proper formation of β-polymorphs in PVDF. Significant improvements of both β-phase crystallization (F(β) ≈ 71.4%) and dielectric constant (ε ≈ 218 at 20 Hz for PFA of 7.5 mass %) are the twosome realizations of our current study. Enhancement of β-phase nucleation in the composites can be thought as a contribution of the strong interaction of the FA particles with the PVDF chains. Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) interfacial polarization approves the establishment of thermally stable high dielectric values measured over a wide temperature spectrum. The optimized high dielectric and electroactive films are further employed as an active energy storage material in designing our device named as OPSESC. Self-charging under visible light irradiation without an external biasing electrical field and simultaneous remarkable self-storage of photogenerated electrical energy are the two foremost aptitudes and the spotlight of our present investigation. Our as fabricated device delivers an impressively high energy density of 7.84 mWh/g and an excellent specific capacitance of 61 F/g which is superior relative to the other photon induced two electrode organic self-charging energy storage devices reported so far. Our device also proves the realistic utility with good recycling capability by facilitating commercially available light emitting diode.

  18. Classical and quantum theories of the polarization bremsstrahlung in the local electron density model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astapenko, V.A.; Bureeva, L.A.; Lisitsa, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    Classical and quantum theories of polarization bremsstrahlung in a statistical (Thomas-Fermi) potential of complex atoms and ions are developed. The basic assumptions of the theories correspond to the approximations employed earlier in classical and quantum calculations of ordinary bremsstrahlung in a static potential. This makes it possible to study on a unified basis the contribution of both channels in the radiation taking account of their interference. The classical model makes it possible to obtain simple universal formulas for the spectral characteristics of the radiation. The theory is applied to electrons with moderate energies, which are characteristic for plasma applications, specifically, radiation from electrons on the argon-like ion KII at frequencies close to its ionization potential. The computational results show the importance of taking account of the polarization channel of the radiation for plasma with heavy ions

  19. Polarization dependence of the spin-density-wave excitations in single-domain chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeni, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Roessli, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 75 - Paris (France); Sternlieb, B.J. [Brookhaven (United States); Lorenzo, E. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France); Werner, S.A. [Missouri (United States)

    1997-09-01

    A polarized neutron scattering experiment has been performed with a single-Q, single domain sample of chromium in a magnetic field of 4 T. It is confirmed that the longitudinal fluctuations are enhanced for small energy transfers and that the spin wave modes with {delta}S parallel to Q and {delta}S perpendicular to Q are similar. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 2 refs.

  20. Mapping Optimal Charge Density and Length of ROMP-Based PTDMs for siRNA Internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Leah M; deRonde, Brittany M; Minter, Lisa M; Tew, Gregory N

    2016-10-10

    A fundamental understanding of how polymer structure impacts internalization and delivery of biologically relevant cargoes, particularly small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA), is of critical importance to the successful design of improved delivery reagents. Herein we report the use of ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) methods to synthesize two series of guanidinium-rich protein transduction domain mimics (PTDMs): one based on an imide scaffold that contains one guanidinium moiety per repeat unit, and another based on a diester scaffold that contains two guanidinium moieties per repeat unit. By varying both the degree of polymerization and, in effect, the relative number of cationic charges in each PTDM, the performances of the two ROMP backbones for siRNA internalization were evaluated and compared. Internalization of fluorescently labeled siRNA into Jurkat T cells demonstrated that fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-siRNA internalization had a charge content dependence, with PTDMs containing approximately 40 to 60 cationic charges facilitating the most internalization. Despite this charge content dependence, the imide scaffold yielded much lower viabilities in Jurkat T cells than the corresponding diester PTDMs with similar numbers of cationic charges, suggesting that the diester scaffold is preferred for siRNA internalization and delivery applications. These developments will not only improve our understanding of the structural factors necessary for optimal siRNA internalization, but will also guide the future development of optimized PTDMs for siRNA internalization and delivery.

  1. The nematicity induced d-symmetry charge density wave in electron-doped iron-pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chung-Pin; Chen, Hong-Yi; Ting, C. S.

    2018-03-01

    The interplay among the nematicity, the stripe spin-density-wave (SDW) order and superconductivity in iron-pnictides is studied in a self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. Our calculations have shown that the nematic-order breaks the degeneracy of dxz and dyz orbitals and causes the elliptic Fermi surface near the Γ point in the normal state. In addition, the appearance of the orthorhombic magnetic fluctuations generates two uneven pairs of peaks at ( ± π, 0) and (0, ± π) in its Fourier transformation. All these are comparing favorably with experimental measurements. In the nematic phase, our results indicate that the charge density and its spatial image in the local density of states exhibit a dx2 -y2-like symmetry. Finally, the complete phase diagram is obtained and the nematic phase is found to be in a narrow region close to the SDW transition in the electron-doped iron-pnictide superconductors.

  2. Relativistic mean field theory with density dependent coupling constants for nuclear matter and finite nuclei with large charge asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Typel, S.; Wolter, H.H. [Sektion Physik, Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear matter and ground state properties for (proton and neutron) semi-closed shell nuclei are described in relativistic mean field theory with coupling constants which depend on the vector density. The parametrization of the density dependence for {sigma}-, {omega}- and {rho}-mesons is obtained by fitting to properties of nuclear matter and some finite nuclei. The equation of state for symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter is discussed. Finite nuclei are described in Hartree approximation, including a charge and an improved center-of-mass correction. Pairing is considered in the BCS approximation. Special attention is directed to the predictions for properties at the neutron and proton driplines, e.g. for separation energies, spin-orbit splittings and density distributions. (orig.)

  3. PEDOT-CNT coated electrodes stimulate retinal neurons at low voltage amplitudes and low charge densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samba, R; Herrmann, T; Zeck, G

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two different microelectrode materials--the conductive polymer composite poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT)-carbon nanotube(CNT) and titanium nitride (TiN)--at activating spikes in retinal ganglion cells in whole mount rat retina through stimulation of the local retinal network. Stimulation efficacy of the microelectrodes was analyzed by comparing voltage, current and transferred charge at stimulation threshold. Retinal ganglion cell spikes were recorded by a central electrode (30 μm diameter) in the planar grid of an electrode array. Extracellular stimulation (monophasic, cathodic, 0.1-1.0 ms) of the retinal network was performed using constant voltage pulses applied to the eight surrounding electrodes. The stimulation electrodes were equally spaced on the four sides of a square (400 × 400 μm). Threshold voltage was determined as the pulse amplitude required to evoke network-mediated ganglion cell spiking in a defined post stimulus time window in 50% of identical stimulus repetitions. For the two electrode materials threshold voltage, transferred charge at threshold, maximum current and the residual current at the end of the pulse were compared. Stimulation of retinal interneurons using PEDOT-CNT electrodes is achieved with lower stimulation voltage and requires lower charge transfer as compared to TiN. The key parameter for effective stimulation is a constant current over at least 0.5 ms, which is obtained by PEDOT-CNT electrodes at lower stimulation voltage due to its faradaic charge transfer mechanism. In neuroprosthetic implants, PEDOT-CNT may allow for smaller electrodes, effective stimulation in a safe voltage regime and lower energy-consumption. Our study also indicates, that the charge transferred at threshold or the charge injection capacity per se does not determine stimulation efficacy.

  4. PEDOT-CNT coated electrodes stimulate retinal neurons at low voltage amplitudes and low charge densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samba, R.; Herrmann, T.; Zeck, G.

    2015-02-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare two different microelectrode materials—the conductive polymer composite poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT)-carbon nanotube(CNT) and titanium nitride (TiN)—at activating spikes in retinal ganglion cells in whole mount rat retina through stimulation of the local retinal network. Stimulation efficacy of the microelectrodes was analyzed by comparing voltage, current and transferred charge at stimulation threshold. Approach. Retinal ganglion cell spikes were recorded by a central electrode (30 μm diameter) in the planar grid of an electrode array. Extracellular stimulation (monophasic, cathodic, 0.1-1.0 ms) of the retinal network was performed using constant voltage pulses applied to the eight surrounding electrodes. The stimulation electrodes were equally spaced on the four sides of a square (400 × 400 μm). Threshold voltage was determined as the pulse amplitude required to evoke network-mediated ganglion cell spiking in a defined post stimulus time window in 50% of identical stimulus repetitions. For the two electrode materials threshold voltage, transferred charge at threshold, maximum current and the residual current at the end of the pulse were compared. Main results. Stimulation of retinal interneurons using PEDOT-CNT electrodes is achieved with lower stimulation voltage and requires lower charge transfer as compared to TiN. The key parameter for effective stimulation is a constant current over at least 0.5 ms, which is obtained by PEDOT-CNT electrodes at lower stimulation voltage due to its faradaic charge transfer mechanism. Significance. In neuroprosthetic implants, PEDOT-CNT may allow for smaller electrodes, effective stimulation in a safe voltage regime and lower energy-consumption. Our study also indicates, that the charge transferred at threshold or the charge injection capacity per se does not determine stimulation efficacy.

  5. Individual effects of seasonal changes, visitor density, and concurrent bear behavior on stereotypical behaviors in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Krista R; Harrison, Michelle L; Size, Daniele D; MacDonald, Suzanne E

    2015-01-01

    Stereotypical behaviors in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus) can be detrimental to their welfare. These behaviors can be reduced through enrichment programs but are often not completely eliminated, so identifying potential triggers is important. The present study investigated the influences of seasonal changes, visitor density, and concurrent bear activity on stereotypical behaviors exhibited by 3 captive polar bears at the Toronto Zoo. All bears exhibited these behaviors; however, individual differences were found in duration and form. The male exhibited less stereotypical behavior during spring, and the females exhibited less stereotypical behavior during winter. An increase in visitor density was associated with more stereotypical behavior in 1 female but less stereotypical behavior in the other 2 bears. All bears engaged in more stereotypical behaviors when the other bears were inactive, and 1 female engaged in more stereotypical behaviors when the other bears were out of sight. Further, when conspecifics were active, all bears engaged in less stereotypical behaviors. Given the variability among individual bears, future enrichment programs must be tailored to the needs of individuals to maximize efficacy.

  6. Drifting field-aligned density structures in the night-side polar cap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santolík, Ondřej; Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Pickett, J. S.; Maršálek, O.; Maksimovic, M.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 32, - (2005), L06106-1 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0832; GA MŠk ME 650; GA MŠk 1P05ME811 Grant - others: NASA (US) NAG5-9974; NASA (US) NNG04GB98G; NSF(US) 0307319; ESA PECS(XE) 98025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Magnetospheric Physics * Plasma convection * Plasma waves and instabilities * Polar cap phenomena * Magnetospheric configuration and dynamics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.491, year: 2005

  7. LO-TO splittings, effective charges and interactions in electro-optic meta-nitroaniline crystal as studied by polarized IR reflection and transmission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, M. M.; Le Calvé, N.; Romain, F.; Pasquier, B.

    1994-10-01

    The polarized IR reflection spectra of the meta-nitroaniline ( m-NA) single crystal along the a, b and c crystallographic axes as well as the b and c polarized transmission spectra have been measured in the 100-400 cm -1 region. The LO-TO splitting values have been calculated from the reflection spectra by fitting them with the four parameter dielectric function. The dipole moment derivatives, relevant to dynamic effective charges, of the vibrations have also been calculated and used to check the applicability of the oriented gas model (OGM) to reflection spectra. The discrepancies from the OGM have been discussed in terms of vibronic couplings, weak hydrogen bondings (HB) and intramolecular charge transfer.

  8. Charge orders in organic charge-transfer salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Ryui; Tocchio, Luca F.; Valentí, Roser; Becca, Federico

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by recent experimental suggestions of charge-order-driven ferroelectricity in organic charge-transfer salts, such as κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N(CN)2]Cl, we investigate magnetic and charge-ordered phases that emerge in an extended two-orbital Hubbard model on the anisotropic triangular lattice at 3/4 filling. This model takes into account the presence of two organic BEDT-TTF molecules, which form a dimer on each site of the lattice, and includes short-range intramolecular and intermolecular interactions and hoppings. By using variational wave functions and quantum Monte Carlo techniques, we find two polar states with charge disproportionation inside the dimer, hinting to ferroelectricity. These charge-ordered insulating phases are stabilized in the strongly correlated limit and their actual charge pattern is determined by the relative strength of intradimer to interdimer couplings. Our results suggest that ferroelectricity is not driven by magnetism, since these polar phases can be stabilized also without antiferromagnetic order and provide a possible microscopic explanation of the experimental observations. In addition, a conventional dimer-Mott state (with uniform density and antiferromagnetic order) and a nonpolar charge-ordered state (with charge-rich and charge-poor dimers forming a checkerboard pattern) can be stabilized in the strong-coupling regime. Finally, when electron–electron interactions are weak, metallic states appear, with either uniform charge distribution or a peculiar 12-site periodicity that generates honeycomb-like charge order.

  9. Full charge-density scheme with a kinetic-energy correction: Application to ground-state properties of the 4d metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    We present a full charge-density technique to evaluate total energies from the output of self-consistent linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) calculations in the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA). The Coulomb energy is calculated exactly from the complete, nonspherically symmetric charge density...... defined within nonoverlapping, space-filling Wigner-Seitz cells; the exchange-correlation energy is evaluated by means of the local-density approximation or the generalized gradient approximation applied to the complete charge-density; and the ASA kinetic energy is corrected for the nonspherically...... symmetric charge density by a gradient expansion. The technique retains most of the simplicity and the computational efficiency of the LMTO-ASA method, and calculations of atomic volumes and elastic constants of the 4d elements show that it has the accuracy of full-potential methods....

  10. Enhanced charge density wave order in La2-xSrxCuO4 at high magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Wen, Jiajia; Jang, Hoyoung; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Matsuzawa, Satoshi; Song, Sanghoon; Chollet, Matthieu; Zhu, Diling; Fujita, Masaki; Rotundu, Costel R.; Sheckelton, John P.; Jiang, Mingde; Kao, Chi-Chang; Lee, Jun-Sik; Lee, Young S.

    There has been much recent interest in the charge density wave (CDW) order in the cuprate superconductors. An intriguing form of the density wave occurs in the La2CuO4-based family where both the charge and spin form ``stripes'' near 1/8 doping. Charge order has been reported in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) in zero magnetic field near 1/8 doping that was enhanced in moderate DC fields (up to 10 T). In this talk, I will discuss our recent experiment which combines a pulsed magnet with the x-rays from a free electron laser to characterize the CDW in LSCO with x =0.115 in fields up to 24 Tesla. In contrast to the YBCO family, which shows field-induced 3D CDW order, the field-enhanced CDW order in LSCO remains two-dimensional up to 24 T. Further results regarding the field-dependence and zero-field behavior of the CDW will be discussed. Our study provides important information on the interplay between CDW order and high-Tc superconductivity. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  11. Microtubule Protofilament Number Is Modulated in a Step-Wise Fashion By the Charge of Density of An Enveloping Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raviv, U.; Nguyen, T.; Ghafouri, R.; Needleman, D.J.; Li, Y.; Miller, H.P.; Wilson, L.; Bruinsma, R.F.; Safinya, C.R.; UC, Santa Barbara; UCLA

    2007-01-01

    Microtubules are able to adjust their protofilament (PF) number and, as a consequence, their dynamics and function, to the assembly conditions and presence of cofactors. However, the principle behind such variations is poorly understood. Using synchrotron x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy, we studied how charged membranes, which under certain conditions can envelop preassembled MTs, regulate the PF number of those MTs. We show that the mean PF number, , is modulated primarily by the charge density of the membranes. decreases in a stepwise fashion with increasing membrane charge density. does not depend on the membrane-protein stoichiometry or the solution ionic strength. We studied the effect of taxol and found that increases logarithmically with taxol/tubulin stoichiometry. We present a theoretical model, which by balancing the electrostatic and elastic interactions in the system accounts for the trends in our findings and reveals an effective MT bending stiffness of order 10-100 k B T/nm, associated with the observed changes in PF number

  12. An exact formula for electromagnetic momentum in terms of the charge density and the Coulomb gauge vector potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essén, Hanno

    2018-03-01

    The electromagnetic momentum {\\boldsymbol{p}}=1/(4π c)\\int {\\boldsymbol{E}}× {\\boldsymbol{B}}{{d}}V is sometimes approximated by {{\\boldsymbol{p}}}0=(1/c)\\int \\varrho {\\boldsymbol{A}}{{d}}V, where ϱ is the charge density and {\\boldsymbol{A}} is the Coulomb gauge vector potential. Here, we show that {{\\boldsymbol{p}}}0 is the first term in an exact two-term expression {\\boldsymbol{p}}={{\\boldsymbol{p}}}0+{{\\boldsymbol{p}}}1 where the second term refers to radiation. When the charge density is zero, {\\boldsymbol{p}}={{\\boldsymbol{p}}}1 is the momentum of fields propagating in vacuum. In the presence of charged particles, however, {{\\boldsymbol{p}}}0 normally dominates. We argue that {{\\boldsymbol{p}}}0 is the natural formula for the electromagnetic momentum when radiation can be neglected. It is shown that this term may in fact be much larger than the purely mechanical contribution from mass times velocity.

  13. Exploring the Binding of Barbital to a Synthetic Macrocyclic Receptor; a Charge Density Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jonathan J.; Hanrahan, Jane Rouse; Solomon, V. Raja

    2018-01-01

    , with the presence of barbital in (3) resulting in the greatest stabilisation. Hydrogen bonds ranging in strength from 4-70 kJ mol-1 were the main stabilising force. Further analysis of the electrostatic potential between (1), (2) and (3) showed significant charge redistribution when co-crystallisation occurred...

  14. Charge density of GaxAl1−xSb

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    approximation (LDA) based methods as LDA underestimates the energy gap [4] and quasi-particle method is very ... Interestingly, the EPM has rarely been applied to unravel band gaps and ionicity in semiconducting alloys. 295 ..... Figures 4b and 3a show that the charge is minimum around Sb anion being nearly half the ...

  15. Picosecond charge transport in rutile at high carrier densities studiedby transient terahertz spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zajac, Vít; Němec, Hynek; Kužel, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 11 (2016), 1-9, č. článku 115206. ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-12386S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : terahertz spectroscopy * charge transport * TiO 2 * rutile * ultrafast spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  16. Charged particle density distributions in Au·Au collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FOUAD RAMI, for the BRAHMS Collaboration. Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France. Abstract. Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au·Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of ...

  17. Solvent Dependence of (14)N Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shielding Constants as a Test of the Accuracy of the Computed Polarization of Solute Electron Densities by the Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Raphael F; Marenich, Aleksandr V; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-09-08

    Although continuum solvation models have now been shown to provide good quantitative accuracy for calculating free energies of solvation, questions remain about the accuracy of the perturbed solute electron densities and properties computed from them. Here we examine those questions by applying the SM8, SM8AD, SMD, and IEF-PCM continuum solvation models in combination with the M06-L density functional to compute the (14)N magnetic resonance nuclear shieldings of CH3CN, CH3NO2, CH3NCS, and CH3ONO2 in multiple solvents, and we analyze the dependence of the chemical shifts on solvent dielectric constant. We examine the dependence of the computed chemical shifts on the definition of the molecular cavity (both united-atom models and models based on superposed individual atomic spheres) and three kinds of treatments of the electrostatics, namely the generalized Born approximation with the Coulomb field approximation, the generalized Born model with asymmetric descreening, and models based on approximate numerical solution schemes for the nonhomogeneous Poisson equation. Our most systematic analyses are based on the computation of relative (14)N chemical shifts in a series of solvents, and we compare calculated shielding constants relative to those in CCl4 for various solvation models and density functionals. While differences in the overall results are found to be reasonably small for different solvation models and functionals, the SMx models SM8, and SM8AD, using the same cavity definitions (which for these models means the same atomic radii) as those employed for the calculation of free energies of solvation, exhibit the best agreement with experiment for every functional tested. This suggests that in addition to predicting accurate free energies of solvation, the SM8 and SM8AD generalized Born models also describe the solute polarization in a manner reasonably consistent with experimental (14)N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Models based on the

  18. Possible improvements to the self-consistent-charges density-functional tight-binding method within the second order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodrog, Zoltan; Aradi, Balint [Bremen Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Improving the precision of self-consistent-charges density-functional tight-binding method (SCC-DFTB) without losing its computational efficiency is primarily thought and hoped to be possible, if possible at all, by moving beyond its current two-centre-approximative tight-binding structure and the second-order nature of SCC. In this paper, however, we point out that there may still be possibilities of making it more precise without such an extension. Two improvements within the very second-order SCC are proposed here. First, inclusion of a multipole expansion of interacting atomic charge fluctuations, and second, a semi-empirical refinement of their interaction potential profiles and their self-interaction energies. Besides showing in detail what is to be improved with respect to the current SCC-DFTB realizations, we fully derive the respective new formulas ready to implement. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Charge density of GaxAl1−xSb

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    semiconducting compounds and alloys to make heterostructures having applica- tions in photodiodes, heterostructure field effect transistors (HFET) and resonant tunneling diodes (RTD) [3]. To study these semiconducting compounds, empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) is highly suitable, compared to the local density.

  20. Intensity ratio measurements for density sensitive lines of highly charged Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Safdar, E-mail: safdaruetian@gmail.com; Shimizu, Erina [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University (Japan); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI) (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: n-nakamu@ils.uec.ac.jp [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Intensity ratio of density sensitive emission lines emitted from Fe ions in the extreme ultraviolet region is important for astrophysics applications. We report high-resolution intensity ratio measurements for Fe ions performed at Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer. The experimental intensity ratios of Fe X and Fe XII are plotted as a function of electron density for different electron beam currents. The experimental results are compared with the predicted intensity ratios from the model calculations.

  1. Elevated temperature annealing behaviors of bulk resistivity and space charge density (Neff) of neutron irradiated silicon detectors and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The bulk resistivity of neutron irradiated detector grade silicon material has been measured under the condition of no or low electrical filed (electrical neutral bulk or ENB condition) after elevated temperature (T=110 C) anneals (ETA). The ENB resistivity (ρ) for as-irradiated silicon material increases with neutron fluence at low fluences (Φ n 13 n/cm 2 ) and starts to saturate at a value between 300-400 kΩ cm at high fluences (Φ n >10 13 n/cm 2 ). The saturation of the ENB resistivity near the intrinsic value can be explained by the near perfect compensation of all neutron induced deep donors and acceptors in the ENB. After ETA, it has been observed that ρ increases with annealing time for silicon materials irradiated below the saturation and decreases with annealing time for those irradiated after saturation. For those irradiated near the saturation point, ρ increases with annealing time initially and decreases thereafter. This ETA behavior of ρ may be explained by the increase of net acceptor-like deep levels in silicon during the anneal, qualitatively consistent with the observed reverse annealing effect of the space charge density (N eff ) in silicon detectors which is an increase of negative space charge density (acceptors) after long term room temperature (RTA) anneal and/or ETA. However, the amount of the increase of net hole concentration (p) of about 5 x 10 11 cm -3 , corresponding to 20 hours of ETA at 110 C for a fluence of 1.5 x 10 14 n/cm 2 , is still much less than the corresponding increase of N eff of about 1.5 x 10 13 cm -3 . This suggests that while the ETA restores some of the free carrier concentration (namely holes), there is still a large degree of compensation. The space charge density is still dominated by the deep levels and N eff ≠p. (orig.)

  2. Constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy using the multiplicity and average pT ratios of charged pions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozma, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    The charged pion multiplicity ratio in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions, a probe of the density dependence of symmetry energy above the saturation point, has been proven in a previous study to be extremely sensitive to the strength of the isovector Δ (1232 ) potential in nuclear matter. As there is no knowledge, either from theory or experiment, about the magnitude of this quantity, the extraction of constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation by using exclusively the mentioned observable is hindered at present. It is shown that, by including the ratio of average pT of charged pions / in the list of fitted observables, the noted problem can be circumvented. A realistic description of this observable requires accounting for the interaction of pions with the dense nuclear matter environment by the incorporation of the so-called S -wave and P -wave pion optical potentials. This is performed within the framework of a quantum molecular dynamics transport model that enforces the conservation of the total energy of the system. It is shown that constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density and the strength of the Δ (1232) potential can be simultaneously extracted. A symmetry energy with a value of the slope parameter L >50 MeV is favored, at 1 σ confidence level, from a comparison with published FOPI experimental data. A precise constraint will require experimental data more accurate than presently available, particularly for the charged pion multiplicity ratio, and better knowledge of the density and momentum dependence of the pion potential for the whole range of these two variables probed in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  3. Spin polarization in high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; Da Providência, João; Providência, Constança

    2016-01-01

    In high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field, possible phases are investigated by using the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model with tensor-type four-point interaction between quarks, as well as the axial-vector-type four-point interaction. In the tensor-type interact......In high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field, possible phases are investigated by using the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model with tensor-type four-point interaction between quarks, as well as the axial-vector-type four-point interaction. In the tensor...... phase appears in the wide range of the quark chemical potential. In both the interactions, the quark mass in zero and small chemical potential regions increases which indicates that the chiral symmetry breaking is enhanced, namely the magnetic catalysis occurs....

  4. Optical Properties of the Charge-Density-Wave Polychalcogenide Compounds R2Te5 (R=Nd, Sm and Gd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfuner, F.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Shin, K.Y.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate the rare-earth polychalcogenide R{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (R = Nd, Sm and Gd) charge-density-wave (CDW) compounds by optical methods. From the absorption spectrum we extract the excitation energy of the CDW gap and estimate the fraction of the Fermi surface which is gapped by the formation of the CDW condensate. In analogy to previous findings on the related RTe{sub n} (n = 2 and 3) families, we establish the progressive closing of the CDW gap and the moderate enhancement of the metallic component upon chemically compressing the lattice.

  5. Cu–Ni core–shell nanoparticles: structure, stability, electronic, and magnetic properties: a spin-polarized density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangqiang@njtech.edu.cn; Wang, Xinyan; Liu, Jianlan; Yang, Yanhui [Nanjing Tech University, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Institute of Advanced Synthesis (IAS) (China)

    2017-02-15

    Bimetallic core–shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) have attracted great interest not only because of their superior stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity but also due to their tunable properties achieved by changing the morphology, sequence, and sizes of both core and shell. In this study, the structure, stability, charge transfer, electronic, and magnetic properties of 13-atom and 55-atom Cu and Cu–Ni CSNPs were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results show that Ni@Cu CSNPs with a Cu surface shell are more energetically favorable than Cu@Ni CSNPs with a Ni surface shell. Interestingly, three-shell Ni@Cu{sub 12}@Ni{sub 42} is more stable than two-shell Cu{sub 13}@Ni{sub 42}, while two-shell Ni{sub 13}@Cu{sub 42} is more stable than three-shell Cu@Ni{sub 12}@Cu{sub 42}. Analysis of Bader charge illustrates that the charge transfer increases from Cu core to Ni shell in Cu@Ni NPs, while it decreases from Ni core to Cu shell in Ni@Cu NPs. Furthermore, the charge transfer results that d-band states have larger shift toward the Fermi level for the Ni@Cu CSNPs with Cu surface shell, while the Cu@Ni CSNPs with Ni surface shell have similar d-band state curves and d-band centers with the monometallic Ni NPs. In addition, the Cu–Ni CSNPs possess higher magnetic moment when the Ni atoms aggregated at core region of CSNPs, while having lower magnetic moment when the Ni atoms segregate on surface region. The change of the Cu atom location in CSNPs has a weak effect on the total magnetic moment. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic core–shell catalysts.

  6. The polar 2e/12c bond in phenalenyl-azaphenalenyl hetero-dimers: Stronger stacking interaction and fascinating interlayer charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Rong-Lin; Xu, Hong-Liang; Li, Zhi-Ru

    2016-08-01

    An increasing number of chemists have focused on the two-electron/multicenter bond (2e/mc) that was first introduced to interpret the bonding mechanism of radical dimers. Herein, we report the polar two-electron/twelve center (2e/12c) bonding character in a series of phenalenyl-azaphenalenyl radical hetero-dimers. Interestingly, the bonding energy of weaker polar hetero-dimer (P-TAP) is dominated by the overlap of the two different singly occupied molecular orbital of radicals, while that of stronger polar hetero-dimer (P-HAP) is dominated by the electrostatic attraction. Results show that the difference between the electronegativity of the monomers plays a prominent role in the essential attribution of the polar 2e/12c bond. Correspondingly, a stronger stacking interaction in the hetero-dimer could be effectively achieved by increasing the difference of nitrogen atoms number between the monomers. It is worthy of note that an interesting interlayer charge transfer character is induced in the polar hetero-dimers, which is dependent on the difference between the electronegativity of the monomers. It is our expectation that the new knowledge about the bonding nature of radical hetero-dimers might provide important information for designing radical based functional materials with various applications.

  7. Centrality dependence of the pseudorapidity density distribution for charged particles in Pb–Pb collisions at √SNN = 5.02 TeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Janssen, M M; Andrei, C.; Andrews, H. A.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anson, C. D.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Anwar, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barioglio, L.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411263188; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371577810; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371578248; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buhler, P.; Iga Buitron, S. A.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411885812; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Capon, A. A.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A R; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, Sukhee; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411888056; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crkovská, J.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Conti, C.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Souza, R. Derradi; Degenhardt, H. F.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372618715; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355502488; Ducroux, L.; Duggal, A. K.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eulisse, G.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; De Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garg, K.; Garg, P.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; Germain, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Greiner, L. C.; Grelli, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326052577; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosa, F.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Grull, F. R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Guzman, I. B.; Haake, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Hughes, C.W.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Isakov, V.; Islam, M. S.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacak, B.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H S Y; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jercic, M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370530780; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.M.; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Khatun, A.; Khuntia, A.; Kielbowicz, M. M.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.-S.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. 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C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Litichevskyi, V.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Llope, W. J.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Loncar, P.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355080400; Lupi, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412461684; Marín, Alicia; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martinez, J. A. L.; Martínez, Isabel M.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Mathis, A. M.; Matyja, A.; mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzilli, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Mhlanga, S.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mihaylov, D. L.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325781435; Mishra, A. N.; Mishra, T.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369405870; Mohanty, B.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Münning, K.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Myers, C. J.; Naik, B.; Nair, Rajiv; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal Da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Negrao De Oliveira, R. A.; Nellen, L.; Nesbo, S. V.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07051349X; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Ohlson, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323375618; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pacik, V.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Palni, P.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Panebianco, S.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, J.; Park, J.-W.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833959; Peng, X.; Pereira, L. G.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Pezzi, R. 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A.; Richert, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413319628; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Saha, S. K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sandoval, A.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Sas, M. H.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413332993; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, M. O.; Schmidt, M.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. 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A P; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S.; Szabo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thakur, D.; Thakur, J. S.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Tikhonov, A.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; tripathy, S.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Umaka, E. N.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Van Der Maarel, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412860996; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/250599171; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vázquez Doce, O.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. 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C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinovjev, G.; Zmeskal, J.

    2017-01-01

    We present the charged-particle pseudorapidity density in Pb–Pb collisions at √SNN = 5.02 TeV in centrality classes measured by ALICE. The measurement covers a wide pseudorapidity range from −3.5 to 5, which is sufficient for reliable estimates of the total number of charged particles produced in

  8. Surface-enhanced charge-density-wave instability in underdoped Bi2Sr2-xLaxCuO6+delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosen, J. A.; Comin, R.; Levy, G.; Fournier, D.; Zhu, Z. -H.; Ludbrook, B.; Veenstra, C. N.; Nicolaou, A.; Wong, D.; Dosanjh, P.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Blake, G. R.; White, F.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Sutarto, R.; He, F.; Pereira, A. Frano; Lu, Y.; Keimer, B.; Sawatzky, G.; Petaccia, L.; Damascelli, A.

    Neutron and X-ray scattering experiments have provided mounting evidence for spin and charge ordering phenomena in underdoped cuprates. These range from early work on stripe correlations in Nd-LSCO to the latest discovery of charge-density-waves in YBa2Cu3O6 + x. Both phenomena are characterized by

  9. A Study of the Relationship between Average Transverse Momentum and Charged Pseudorapidity Density for Pions and Antiprotons at Tevatron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Philip Lawrence [Purdue U.

    1991-12-01

    The transverse momentum of $\\pi^{\\pm}$ and $\\overline{p}$ produced within the pseudorapidity range of $\\eta$ = -0.36 to +1.0 and azimuthal range of $\\phi$ = +2° to $\\phi$ = +18° has been measured in $\\overline{p}p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 546, 1000 and 1800 GeV. The charged multiplicity of each event was measured by either the 240 element cylindrical hodoscope covering the range -3.25 < $\\eta$ < +3.25 or the central drift chamber, which spans a pseudorapidity range of 3.2 units. The average transverse momentum as a function of the pseudorapidity density for mass-identified particles is presented. Pseudorapidity densities as high as 30 particles per unit pseudorapidity have been observed.

  10. Strong electron-lattice coupling as the mechanism behind charge density wave transformations in transition-metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, Lev P.

    2012-04-01

    We consider a single band of conduction electrons interacting with displacements of the transitional ions. In the classical regime strong enough coupling transforms the harmonic elastic energy for an ion to the one of the well with two deep minima, so that the system is described in terms of Ising spins. Intersite interactions order spins at lower temperatures. Extension to the quantum regime is discussed. Below the charge density wave (CDW) transition the energy spectrum of electrons remains metallic because the structural vector Q and the Fermi surface sizes are not related. Large values of the CDW gap seen in the tunneling experiments correspond to the energy of the minima in the electron-ion two-well complex. The gap is defined through the density of states inside the electronic bands below the CDW transition. We focus mainly on electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides.

  11. Density functional theory for disordered alloys with short-range order: Systematic inclusion of charge-correlation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, D. A.; Ernst, A.; Györffy, B. L.; Staunton, J. B.

    2006-04-01

    For many years, density-functional-based calculations for the total energies of substitutionally disordered alloys have been based upon the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent-potential approximation (KKR-CPA). However, as a result of the single-site nature of the KKR-CPA, such calculations do not take into account important local environmental effects such as charge correlations (the Madelung energy) and chemical short-range order (SRO). Here the above approach is generalized by combining the recently developed Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker nonlocal coherent-potential approximation with density functional theory, showing how these effects may be systematically taken into account. As a first application of the theory, total energy calculations for the bcc Cu50Zn50 solid solution are presented, showing how the total energy varies as a function of SRO. The fcc Cu60Pd40 and Cu77Ni23 systems are also investigated.

  12. Pseudorapidity density of charged particles p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV

    CERN Document Server

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Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caballero Orduna, Diego; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Wisla; Carena, Francesco; Carlin Filho, Nelson; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castillo Hernandez, Juan Francisco; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Kushal; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Das, Debasish; Dash, Sadhana; Dash, Ajay Kumar; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; De Marco, Nora; Denes, Ervin; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deppman, Airton; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Di Bari, Domenico; Dietel, Thomas; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fearick, Roger Worsley; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grigoryan, Ara; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Gros, Philippe; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerra Gutierrez, Cesar; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Han, Byounghee; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Harton, Austin; Hasegan, Dumitru; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hippolyte, Boris; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; 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Kim, Taesoo; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Dong Jo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kliemant, Michael; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kohler, Markus; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Kour, Ravjeet; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kravcakova, Adela; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Vasily; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kvaerno, Henning; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Levai, Peter; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Ke; Ma, Rongrong; Madagodahettige-Don, Dilan Minthaka; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Mangotra, Lalit Kumar; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matthews, Zoe Louise; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mizuno, Sanshiro; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Musa, Luciano; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nikulin, Sergey; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Ochirov, Alexander; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Sun Kun; Oh, Saehanseul; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Ostrowski, Piotr Krystian; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozawa, Kyoichiro; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Pastircak, Blahoslav; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Piccotti, Anna; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Planinic, Mirko; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pocheptsov, Timur; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polak, Karel; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puddu, Giovanna; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sano, Satoshi; Santagati, Gianluca; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schreiner, Steffen; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schuster, Tim; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; 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Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Yury; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Vladimir; Wagner, Boris; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilk, Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Shiming; Yang, Hongyan; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianlin; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-01-18

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density measured over 4 units of pseudorapidity in non-single-diffractive (NSD) p-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV is presented. The average value at midrapidity is measured to be 16.81 $\\pm$ 0.71 (syst.), which corresponds to 2.14 $\\pm$ 0.17 (syst.) per participating nucleon. This is 16% lower than in NSD pp collisions interpolated to the same collision energy, and 84% higher than in d-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 0.2 TeV. The measured pseudorapidity density in p-Pb collisions is compared to model predictions, and provides new constraints on the description of particle production in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  13. Migrational polarization in high-current density molten salt electrochemical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunstein, J.; Vallet, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    Electrochemical flux equations based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes have been derived in terms of experimental transport coefficients for binary molten salt mixtures analogous to those proposed for high temperature batteries and fuel cells. The equations and some numerical solutions indicate steady state composition gradients of significant magnitude. The effects of migrational separation must be considered along with other melt properties in the characterization of electrode behavior, melt composition, operating temperatures and differences of phase stability, wettability and other physicochemical properties at positive and negative electrodes of high current density devices with mixed electrolytes.

  14. Experimental and theoretical charge density distribution in a host-guest system: synthetic terephthaloyl receptor complexed to adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Ha; Howard, Sian T; Hanrahan, Jane R; Groundwater, Paul W; Platts, James A; Hibbs, David E

    2012-06-14

    The experimental charge density distributions in a host-guest complex have been determined. The host, 1,4-bis[[(6-methylpyrid-2-yl)amino]carbonyl]benzene (1) and guest, adipic acid (2). The molecular geometries of 1 and 2 are controlled by the presence in the complex of intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions and the presence in the host 1 of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. This system therefore serves as an excellent model for studying noncovalent interactions and their effects on structure and electron density, and the transferability of electron distribution properties between closely related molecules. For the complex, high resolution X-ray diffraction data created the basis for a charge density refinement using a pseudoatomic multipolar expansion (Hansen-Coppens formalism) against extensive low-temperature (T = 100 K) single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and compared with a selection of theoretical DFT calculations on the same complex. The molecules crystallize in the noncentrosymmetric space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit. A topological analysis of the resulting density distribution using the atoms in molecules methodology is presented along with multipole populations, showing that the host and guest structures are relatively unaltered by the geometry changes on complexation. Three separate refinement protocols were adopted to determine the effects of the inclusion of calculated hydrogen atom anisotropic displacement parameters on hydrogen bond strengths. For the isotropic model, the total hydrogen bond energy differs from the DFT calculated value by ca. 70 kJ mol(-1), whereas the inclusion of higher multipole expansion levels on anisotropic hydrogen atoms this difference is reduced to ca. 20 kJ mol(-l), highlighting the usefulness of this protocol when describing H-bond energetics.

  15. Towards 100% spin-polarized charge-injection : The half-metallic NiMnSb/CdS interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wijs, G.A.; de Groot, R A

    2001-01-01

    Spin-electronics requires an electron source with a spin-polarization as high as possible. For this, half-metallic materials seem ideally suited as they exhibit 100% spin polarization. Because of its high Curie temperature and compatibility with existing semiconductor technology, NiMnSb is a most

  16. Near-surface bulk densities of asteroids derived from dual-polarization radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkki, A.; Taylor, P. A.; Zambrano-Marin, L. F.; Howell, E. S.; Nolan, M. C.; Lejoly, C.; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Aponte, B. A.

    2017-09-01

    We present a new method to constrain the near-surface bulk density and surface roughness of regolith on asteroid surfaces using planetary radar measurements. The number of radar observations has increased rapidly during the last five years, allowing us to compare and contrast the radar scattering properties of different small-body populations and compositional types. This provides us with new opportunities to investigate their near-surface physical properties such as the chemical composition, bulk density, porosity, or the structural roughness in the scale of centimeters to meters. Because the radar signal can penetrate into a planetary surface up to a few decimeters, radar can reveal information that is hidden from other ground-based methods, such as optical and infrared measurements. The near-surface structure of asteroids and comets in centimeter-to-meter scale is essential information for robotic and human space missions, impact threat mitigation, and understanding the history of these bodies as well as the formation of the whole Solar System.

  17. Variation of interface trap level charge density within the bandgap of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Interfacial characteristics of metal oxide-silicon carbide (MOSiC) structure with differ- ent thickness of SiO2, thermally grown in steam ambient on Si-face of 4H-SiC (0 0 0 1) substrate were investigated. Variations in interface trapped level density (Dit) was systematically studied employing high-low (H-L) frequency ...

  18. The experimental charge density in sulfur containing molecules: a study of the deformation electron density in sulfamic acid at 78K by X-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bats, J.W.; Coppens, P.

    1977-01-01

    The deformation electron density in sulfamic acid (H 3 NSO 3 ) has been determined by a combined X-ray and neutron diffraction study at 78 K. X-N maps show strong bound populations in all bonds. The nature of the S-N and S-O is found to be similar to bonds between first-row atoms. The O atoms show single, fairly broad lone-pair peaks and are shifted towards the lone pairs in comparison with the neutron parameters. This shift disappears when only X-ray reflections with sin theta/lambda>0.85A -1 are considered. A population analysis shows a net charge of +0.7 to +1.0 e on the S atom, -0.3 to -0.5 e on the O atoms and + 0.12 e on the H atoms, while the N atom is close to neutral. (Auth.)

  19. Water-induced charge transport in tablets of microcrystalline cellulose of varying density: dielectric spectroscopy and transient current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Martin; Alderborn, Goeran; Stroemme, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Room temperature dielectric frequency response data taken over 13 decades in frequency on microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) tablets of varying density are presented. The frequency response shows on three different processes: the first one is a high-frequency relaxation process whose magnitude increases and reaches a plateau as the tablet density increases. This process is associated with orientational motions of local chain segments via glycosidic bonds. The second relaxation process, related to the presence of water in the MCC matrix, is insensitive to changes in tablet density. At lower frequencies, dc-like imperfect charge transport dominates the dielectric spectrum. The dc conductivity was found to decrease with increasing tablet density and increase exponentially with increasing humidity. Transient current measurements indicated that two different ionic species, protons and OH - ions, lied behind the observed conductivity. At ambient humidity of 22%, only one in a billion of the water molecules present in the tablet matrix participated in long range dc conduction. The diffusion coefficient of the protons and OH - ions were found to be of the order of 10 -9 cm 2 /s, which is the same as for small salt building ions in MCC. This shows that ionic drugs leaving a tablet matrix may diffuse in the same manner as the constituent ions of water and, thus, elucidates the necessity to understand the water transport properties of excipient materials to be able to tailor the drug release process from pharmaceutical tablets

  20. Extracting dielectric fixed charge density on highly doped crystalline-silicon surfaces using photoconductance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, A.; Hoex, B.

    2017-11-01

    A novel method for the extraction of fixed interface charge, Qf, and the surface recombination parameters, Sn0 and Sp0, from the injection-level dependent effective minority carrier lifetime measurements is presented. Unlike conventional capacitance-voltage measurements, this technique can be applied to highly doped surfaces provided the surface carrier concentration transitions into strong depletion or inversion with increased carrier injection. By simulating the injection level dependent Auger-corrected inverse lifetime curve of symmetrically passivated and diffused samples after sequential annealing and corona charging, it was revealed that Qf, Sn0, and Sp0 have unique signatures. Therefore, these important electronic parameters, in some instances, can independently be resolved. Furthermore, it was shown that this non-linear lifetime behaviour is exhibited on both p-type and n-type diffused inverted surfaces, by demonstrating the approach with phosphorous diffused n+pn+ structures and boron diffused p+np+ structures passivated with aluminium oxide (AlOx) and silicon nitride, respectively (SiNx). The results show that the approximation of a mid-gap Shockley-Read-Hall defect level with equal capture cross sections is able to, in the samples studied in this work, reproduce the observed injection level dependent lifetime behaviour.

  1. Electronic structure of SnF{sub 3}: An example of valence skipper which forms charge density wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, I., E-mail: i.hase@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Yanagisawa, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Kawashima, K. [IMRA Material R& D Co., LTD., Kariya, Aichi 448-0032 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We calculated the electronic structure of SnF{sub 3} and BaBiO{sub 3} from first principles. • As for SnF{sub 3}, charge-density-wave (CDW) is found, which agrees with the experiment. • As for BaBiO{sub 3}, CDW is not found, contrary to the experiment. • We conclude that the CDW is hard in SnF{sub 3} and is soft in BaBiO{sub 3}. - Abstract: In the present study we calculated the electronic structure of the valence skipping compound SnF{sub 3} and BaBiO{sub 3} from first-principles. We confirmed that the charge-density-wave (CDW) is formed in SnF{sub 3}, and the Sn atoms in two crystallographic different sites take the valence Sn{sup 2+} and Sn{sup 4+}. Structure optimization study reveals that this CDW is stable, though the atomic position is slightly different from the experimental data. This behavior is in contrast with the case of BaBiO{sub 3}, where the structure optimization leads to the uniform state, which means that two Bi sites are equivalent. The CDW state is hard in SnF{sub 3}, which means that the CDW gap is large enough and it is difficult to melt this CDW order.

  2. Optimization of tetravalent manganese feroxyhyte's negative charge density: A high-performing mercury adsorbent from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, E; Simeonidis, K; Pinakidou, F; Katsikini, M; Mitrakas, M

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates an optimization procedure for the development of an Hg-specified adsorbent able to comply with the regulation limit for drinking water of 1μg/L. On this purpose, the synthesis of Mn(IV)-feroxyhyte was modified to achieve high negative charge density by combining alkaline and extreme oxidizing conditions. In particular, precipitation of FeSO 4 at pH9 and excess of KMnO 4 follows a very fast nucleation step providing a product with very small nanocrystal size (1-2nm), high specific surface area (300m 2 /g) and maximum negative charge density (1.8mmol H + /g). The adsorbent was validated for Hg removal in batch experiments and column tests using natural-like water indicating an adsorption capacity as high as 2.5μg/mg at equilibrium concentration 1μg/L under reliable conditions of application. Importantly, the adsorption is an exothermic spontaneous process, resulting in the formation of inner sphere complexes by sharing both A-type and B-type oxygen atoms with the metal surface octahedral as revealed by the X-ray absorption fine structure results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Exchange correlation effects on plasmons and on charge-density wave instability in narrow-band quasi-one-dimensional metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, A.; Tosatti, E.

    1979-05-01

    The coexistence of tight-binding and exchange-correlation effects inside each chain of a model quasi-one-dimensional metal, on both plasmon and charge density wave properties have been studied. The results, while in qualitative agreement with other treatments of the problem at long wavelengths, indicate a strong tendency for plasmons to turn into excitons at larger momenta, and to exhibit an ''excitonic'' charge-density wave instability at k approximately 2ksub(F). The nature of the plasmon branches and of the excitonic charge distortion is examined. Relevance to existing quasi-one-dimensional materials is also discussed. (author)

  4. Charge decay characteristics of silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon structure at elevated temperatures and extraction of the nitride trap density distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hun; Sim, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Duk; Shin, Hyung Cheol; Park, Byung-Gook

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the charge decay characteristics of a silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon type nonvolatile memory at elevated temperatures. Based on the amphoteric trap model and the thermal emission model of the trapped charge, we propose an advanced charge decay model which includes the effect of the bottom oxide, and apply it to extraction of the trap density distribution in energy levels of the nitride layer. The samples prepared have nitride films deposited simultaneously and are classified into two groups according to the thickness of the bottom oxide. The trap density distributions extracted from two groups showed good consistency.

  5. Hall voltage drives pulsing counter-currents of the sliding charge density wave and of quantized normal carriers at self-filled Landau levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Andrey P.; Sinchenko, Aleksander A.; Monceau, Pierre; Brazovskii, Serguei; Latyshev, Yuri I.

    2017-11-01

    Remnant pockets of carriers left over after formation of a charge density wave (CDW) were brought, by virtue of transverse electric and magnetic fields, to a current-carrying state at quantized Landau Levels. The generated Hall voltage polarizes and puts to sliding the flexible CDW background. The screening from the CDW allows for a so strong redistribution of normal electrons density under the action of the Lorentz force alone, that an integer filling of the lowest Landau level might be reached at one edge at the expense of the full depletion at another edge of the Hall bar. With the Hall field exceeding the sliding threshold, the regime of exactly compensated collective and normal counter-currents develops in the open-circuit direction across the bar. The annihilation of the two currents proceeds via a regular sequence of phase slips which are the space-time vortices of the CDW phase around the enforced amplitude nodes. The resulting spontaneous generation of coherent high ( GHz) frequency signals was detected by observations of multiple Shapiro steps. This picture results from studies of micron-sized Hall bars in crystals of NbSe3 prepared by means of focused ion beams. The interpretation is confirmed and illustrated by a numerical solution of the derived equations. The depinning pulse propagates from edges to the bulk and the sliding sets in, accompanied by the generation of periodic phase slips near the Hall bar edge where the CDW phase is advanced in steps of 2π at expense of the CDW amplitude passing through zero.

  6. Charge localization and ordering in A2Mn8O16 hollandite group oxides: Impact of density functional theory approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltak, Merzuk; Fernández-Serra, Marivi; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2017-12-01

    The phases of A2Mn8O16 hollandite group oxides emerge from the competition between ionic interactions, Jahn-Teller effects, charge ordering, and magnetic interactions. Their balanced treatment with feasible computational approaches can be challenging for commonly used approximations in density functional theory. Three examples (A = Ag, Li, and K) are studied with a sequence of different approximate exchange-correlation functionals. Starting from a generalized gradient approximation (GGA), an extension to include van der Waals interactions and a recently proposed meta-GGA are considered. Then local Coulomb interactions for the Mn 3 d electrons are more explicitly considered with the DFT + U approach. Finally, selected results from a hybrid functional approach provide a reference. Results for the binding energy of the A species in the parent oxide highlight the role of van der Waals interactions. Relatively accurate results for insertion energies can be achieved with a low-U and a high-U approach. In the low-U case, the materials are described as band metals with a high-symmetry, tetragonal crystal structure. In the high-U case, the electrons donated by A result in formation of local Mn3 + centers and corresponding Jahn-Teller distortions characterized by a local order parameter. The resulting degree of monoclinic distortion depends on charge ordering and magnetic interactions in the phase formed. The reference hybrid functional results show charge localization and ordering. Comparison to low-temperature experiments of related compounds suggests that charge localization is the physically correct result for the hollandite group oxides studied here. Finally, while competing effects in the local magnetic coupling are subtle, the fully anisotropic implementation of DFT + U gives the best overall agreement with results from the hybrid functional.

  7. Measurement of the charged pion mass using a low-density target of light atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trassinelli, M.; Anagnostopoulos, D.F.; Borchert, G.; Dax, A.; Egger, J.-P.; Gotta, D.; Hennebach, M.; Indelicato, P.; Liu, Y.-W.; Manil, B.; Nelms, N.; Simons, L.M.; Wells, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new evaluation of the negatively charged pion mass based on the simultaneous spectroscopy of pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen transitions using a gaseous target composed by a N 2 /O 2 mixture at 1.4 bar. We present the experimental set-up and the methods for deriving the pion mass value from the spatial separation from the 5g − 4f πN transition line and the 5g − 4f μO transition line used as reference. Moreover, we discuss the importance to use dilute targets in order to minimize the influence of additional spectral lines from the presence of remaining electrons during the radiative emission. The occurrence of possible satellite lines is investigated via hypothesis testing methods using the Bayes factor.

  8. Irradiation of layered metallic dichalcogenides: disorder in the charge density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutka, Hannu.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis is an experimental study on electron-irradiated metallic layer compounds (VSe 2 , NbSe 2 , TaS 2 , TaSe 2 ). The metal atoms displaced by irradiation remain in the form of stable defects up to 300 K; their concentration (10 - 5 ... 10 - 2 )is known from measurements of displacement threshold energy and magnetic susceptibility. The effect of these defects on the charge densite wave (CDW) phases and on the electronic and superconducting properties forms the major part of this study. In 1T-TaS 2 , a microstructure of CDW domains pinned to defects is observed by electron microscopy. The effects of this kind of disorder are also manifest in the thermodynamic properties of the CDW and in the electronic transport, as well as in the superconducting properties [fr

  9. Measurement of the charged pion mass using a low-density target of light atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trassinelli, M.; Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Borchert, G.; Dax, A.; Egger, J.-P.; Gotta, D.; Hennebach, M.; Indelicato, P.; Liu, Y.-W.; Manil, B.; Nelms, N.; Simons, L. M.; Wells, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present a new evaluation of the negatively charged pion mass based on the simultaneous spectroscopy of pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen transitions using a gaseous target composed by a N2/O2 mixture at 1.4 bar. We present the experimental set-up and the methods for deriving the pion mass value from the spatial separation from the 5g - 4f πN transition line and the 5g - 4f μO transition line used as reference. Moreover, we discuss the importance to use dilute targets in order to minimize the influence of additional spectral lines from the presence of remaining electrons during the radiative emission. The occurrence of possible satellite lines is investigated via hypothesis testing methods using the Bayes factor.

  10. The Effect of Etching Gases on Notching and Charging in High-Density Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabara, Suguru

    1998-06-01

    A comparison of notching of metal etching in Cl2/BCl3 and HCl plasma was carried out using a transformer coupled plasma (TCP) etcher. We observed that notches can be reduced by eliminating BCl3 from the gases for overetching. Furthermore, the HCl overetch process provides notch-free profiles with high selectivities. The reduction in the sidewall attack by heavy ions (e.g., BCl2+ or BCl3+) and the scavenging of excess Cl radicals by H radicals are considered to be possible causes for the reduced notching in the HCl process. The neutralization of the negatively charged upper photoresist sidewalls by H+ ions is also thought to be the cause for the reduction in the electron shading damage and notching.

  11. Polarization Dependent Bulk-sensitive Valence Band Photoemission Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations: Part I. 3d Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Shigenori; Hamada, Ikutaro

    2017-12-01

    The X-ray polarization dependent valence band HAXPES spectra of 3d transition metals (TMs) of Ti-Zn were measured to investigate the orbital resolved electronic structures by utilizing that the fact the photoionization cross-section of the atomic orbitals strongly depends on the experimental geometry. We have calculated the HAXPES spectra, which correspond to the cross-section weighted densities of states (CSW-DOSs), where the DOSs were obtained by the density functional theory calculations, and we have determined the relative photoionization cross-sections of the 4s and 4p orbitals to the 3d orbital in the 3d TMs. The experimentally obtained bulk-sensitive 3d and 4s DOSs were good agreement with the calculated DOSs in Ti, V, Cr, and Cu. In contrast, the deviations between the experimental and calculated 3d DOSs for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni were found, suggesting that the electron correlation plays an important role in the electronic structures for these materials.

  12. Comparison of the surface ion density of silica gel evaluated via spectral induced polarization versus acid-base titration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Na; Moysey, Stephen M. J.; Powell, Brian A.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    Surface complexation models are widely used with batch adsorption experiments to characterize and predict surface geochemical processes in porous media. In contrast, the spectral induced polarization (SIP) method has recently been used to non-invasively monitor in situ subsurface chemical reactions in porous media, such as ion adsorption processes on mineral surfaces. Here we compare these tools for investigating surface site density changes during pH-dependent sodium adsorption on a silica gel. Continuous SIP measurements were conducted using a lab scale column packed with silica gel. A constant inflow of 0.05 M NaCl solution was introduced to the column while the influent pH was changed from 7.0 to 10.0 over the course of the experiment. The SIP measurements indicate that the pH change caused a 38.49 ± 0.30 μS cm- 1 increase in the imaginary conductivity of the silica gel. This increase is thought to result from deprotonation of silanol groups on the silica gel surface caused by the rise in pH, followed by sorption of Na+ cations. Fitting the SIP data using the mechanistic model of Leroy et al. (Leroyet al., 2008), which is based on the triple layer model of a mineral surface, we estimated an increase in the silica gel surface site density of 26.9 × 1016 sites m- 2. We independently used a potentiometric acid-base titration data for the silica gel to calibrate the triple layer model using the software FITEQL and observed a total increase in the surface site density for sodium sorption of 11.2 × 1016 sites m- 2, which is approximately 2.4 times smaller than the value estimated using the SIP model. By simulating the SIP response based on the calibrated surface complexation model, we found a moderate association between the measured and estimated imaginary conductivity (R2 = 0.65). These results suggest that the surface complexation model used here does not capture all mechanisms contributing to polarization of the silica gel captured by the SIP data.

  13. The net charge at interfaces between insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bristowe, N C; Littlewood, P B; Artacho, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    The issue of the net charge at insulating oxide interfaces is briefly reviewed with the ambition of dispelling myths of such charges being affected by covalency and related charge density effects. For electrostatic analysis purposes, the net charge at such interfaces is defined by the counting of discrete electrons and core ion charges, and by the definition of the reference polarization of the separate, unperturbed bulk materials. The arguments are illustrated for the case of a thin film of LaAlO 3 over SrTiO 3 in the absence of free carriers, for which the net charge is exactly 0.5e per interface formula unit, if the polarization response in both materials is referred to zero bulk values. Further consequences of the argument are extracted for structural and chemical alterations of such interfaces, in which internal rearrangements are distinguished from extrinsic alterations (changes of stoichiometry, redox processes), only the latter affecting the interfacial net charge. The arguments are reviewed alongside the proposal of Stengel and Vanderbilt (2009 Phys. Rev. B 80 241103) of using formal polarization values instead of net interfacial charges, based on the interface theorem of Vanderbilt and King-Smith (1993 Phys. Rev. B 48 4442-55). Implications for non-centrosymmetric materials are discussed, as well as for interfaces for which the charge mismatch is an integer number of polarization quanta. (viewpoint)

  14. The net charge at interfaces between insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bristowe, N C; Littlewood, P B [Theory of Condensed Matter Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Artacho, Emilio, E-mail: ncb30@cam.ac.uk [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-02

    The issue of the net charge at insulating oxide interfaces is briefly reviewed with the ambition of dispelling myths of such charges being affected by covalency and related charge density effects. For electrostatic analysis purposes, the net charge at such interfaces is defined by the counting of discrete electrons and core ion charges, and by the definition of the reference polarization of the separate, unperturbed bulk materials. The arguments are illustrated for the case of a thin film of LaAlO{sub 3} over SrTiO{sub 3} in the absence of free carriers, for which the net charge is exactly 0.5e per interface formula unit, if the polarization response in both materials is referred to zero bulk values. Further consequences of the argument are extracted for structural and chemical alterations of such interfaces, in which internal rearrangements are distinguished from extrinsic alterations (changes of stoichiometry, redox processes), only the latter affecting the interfacial net charge. The arguments are reviewed alongside the proposal of Stengel and Vanderbilt (2009 Phys. Rev. B 80 241103) of using formal polarization values instead of net interfacial charges, based on the interface theorem of Vanderbilt and King-Smith (1993 Phys. Rev. B 48 4442-55). Implications for non-centrosymmetric materials are discussed, as well as for interfaces for which the charge mismatch is an integer number of polarization quanta. (viewpoint)

  15. Photoemission study of the electronic structure and charge density waves of Na2Ti2Sb2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S Y; Jiang, J; Ye, Z R; Niu, X H; Song, Y; Zhang, C L; Dai, P C; Xie, B P; Lai, X C; Feng, D L

    2015-04-30

    The electronic structure of Na2Ti2Sb2O single crystal is studied by photon energy and polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The obtained band structure and Fermi surface agree well with the band structure calculation of Na2Ti2Sb2O in the non-magnetic state, which indicates that there is no magnetic order in Na2Ti2Sb2O and the electronic correlation is weak. Polarization dependent ARPES results suggest the multi-band and multi-orbital nature of Na2Ti2Sb2O. Photon energy dependent ARPES results suggest that the electronic structure of Na2Ti2Sb2O is rather two-dimensional. Moreover, we find a density wave energy gap forms below the transition temperature and reaches 65 meV at 7 K, indicating that Na2Ti2Sb2O is likely a weakly correlated CDW material in the strong electron-phonon interaction regime.

  16. Anisotropy and polarization in charge changing collisions of C4+ with Na(3s) and laser aligned Na(3p)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R; Morgenstern, R; Olson, RE

    1996-01-01

    Absolute cross sections for C3+(6-->5) emission at 465.7 nm after collisions of C4+ ions with ground state Na(3s) and laser excited aligned Na(Sp) atoms are measured over the collision energy range of 3-7 keV amu(-1). For Na(3s) polarizations are observed by measuring the linear polarization of the

  17. Standard hydrogen electrode and potential of zero charge in density functional calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten; Skúlason, Egill

    2011-01-01

    Methods to explicitly account for half-cell electrode potentials have recently appeared within the framework of density functional theory. The potential of the electrode relative to the standard hydrogen electrode is typically determined by subtracting the experimental value of the absolute...... possess in order for its computed ASHEP to closely match the experimental benchmark. We capture and quantify these three effects by calculating trends in the ASHEP and PZC on eight close-packed transition metals, considering the four most simple and representative water models. Finally, it is also...

  18. Charge-constrained auxiliary-density-matrix methods for the Hartree–Fock exchange contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merlot, Patrick; Izsak, Robert; Borgoo, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Three new variants of the auxiliary-density-matrix method (ADMM) of Guidon, Hutter, and VandeVondele [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 6, 2348 (2010)] are presented with the common feature thatthey have a simplified constraint compared with the full orthonormality requirement of the earlier ADMM1 method....... All ADMM variants are tested for accuracy and performance in all-electron B3LYP calculations with several commonly used basis sets. The effect of the choice of the exchange functional for the ADMM exchange–correction term is also investigated....

  19. Mapping Local Quantum Capacitance and Charged Impurities in Graphene via Plasmonic Impedance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xiaonan; Chen, Shan; Wang, Hui; Chen, Zixuan; Guan, Yan; Wang, Yixian; Wang, Shaopeng; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-10-28

    Local quantum capacitance of graphene is imaged with plasmonics-based electrical impedance microscopy, from which the local density and polarity of charged impurities, electron and hole puddles associated with the charged impurities, and the density of the impurity states are determined. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Spatial profiles of electron and metastable atom densities in positive polarity fast ionization waves sustained in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weatherford, Brandon R.; Barnat, E. V.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Fast ionization waves (FIWs), often generated with high voltage pulses over nanosecond timescales, are able to produce large volumes of ions and excited states at moderate pressures. The mechanisms of FIW propagation were experimentally and computationally investigated to provide insights into the manner in which these large volumes are excited. The two-dimensional structure of electron and metastable densities produced by short-pulse FIWs sustained in helium were measured using laser-induced fluorescence and laser collision-induced fluorescence diagnostics for times of 100–120 ns after the pulse, as the pressure was varied from 1 to 20 Torr. A trend of center-peaked to volume-filling to wall-peaked electron density profiles was observed as the pressure was increased. Instantaneous FIW velocities, obtained from plasma-induced emission, ranged from 0.1 to 3 × 10 9  cm s −1 , depending on distance from the high voltage electrode and pressure. Predictions from two-dimensional modeling of the propagation of a single FIW correlated well with the experimental trends in electron density profiles and wave velocity. Results from the model show that the maximum ionization rate occurs in the wavefront, and the discharge continues to propagate forward after the removal of high voltage from the powered electrode due to the potential energy stored in the space charge. As the pressure is varied, the radial distribution of the ionization rate is shaped by changes in the electron mean free path, and subsequent localized electric field enhancement at the walls or on the centerline of the discharge.

  1. Ultrafast dynamics in CeTe{sub 3} near the pressure-induced charge-density-wave transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauch, Jonas; Obergfell, Manuel [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Schaefer, Hanjo [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany); Demsar, Jure [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany); Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz (Germany); Giraldo, Paula; Fisher, Ian R. [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University (United States); Pashkin, Alexej [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is an efficient tool for studying ultrafast dynamics in strongly correlated electronic systems, in particular, compounds with a charge-density-wave (CDW) order. Application of external pressure often leads to a suppression of a CDW state due to an impairment of the Fermi surface nesting. We combine time-resolved optical spectroscopy and diamond anvil cell technology to study electron and lattice dynamics in tri-telluride compound CeTe{sub 3}. Around pressures of 4 GPa we observe a gradual vanishing of the relaxation process related to the recombination of the photoexcited quasiparticles. The coherent oscillations of the phonon modes coupled to the CDW order parameter demonstrate even more dramatic suppression with increasing pressure. These observations clearly indicate a transition into the metallic state of CeTe{sub 3} induced by the external pressure.

  2. Charge-density waves studied at the surface and at the atomic scale in NbSe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, Christophe; Wang, Zhao-Zhong; Monceau, Pierre; Brazovskii, Serguei

    2012-01-01

    We have studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the two charge-density wave (CDW) transitions in NbSe 3 on in situ cleaved (b,c) plane. We could identify the three types of chains existing inside a single unit cell as well as characterize how both CDWs are distributed on these elementary chains. We also followed between 5 and 140 K the temperature dependence of first-order CDW satellite spots, obtained from the Fourier transform of the STM images, to extract the surface critical temperatures (T s ). Whereas the high-temperature CDW appears to have comparable critical temperature to the bulk one, the low-T CDW transition occurs at T 2s =70–75K, more than 15 K above the bulk T 2b =59K while at exactly the same wave number. A reasonable mechanism for such an unusually high surface enhancement is a softening of transverse phonon modes involved in the CDW formation.

  3. Coherent tunneling between elementary conducting layers in NbSe sub 3 conductor with wave charge density

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, Y I; Sinchenko, A A; Bulaevskii, L N; Monceau, P

    2002-01-01

    The peculiarities of the cross-sectional transport in the direction of the crystallographic axis alpha * in the conductor with the NbSe sub 3 wave charge density (WCD) are studied. The strong peak of dynamic conductivity is observed on the WCD of the layered structures and the NbSe sub 3 -NbSe sub 3 point contacts at low temperatures by the zero voltage shift. The identified behavior reminds in many respects the interlayer tunnel conductivity in the Bi-2212-type high-temperature layered conductors. The conductivity peak by the zero shift is explained in the model of the almost coherent interlayer tunneling of the carriers, noncondensed in the WCD

  4. On the calculation of the structure of charge-stabilized colloidal dispersions using density-dependent potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castañeda-Priego, R; Lobaskin, V; Mixteco-Sánchez, J C; Rojas-Ochoa, L F; Linse, P

    2012-01-01

    The structure of charge-stabilized colloidal dispersions has been studied through a one-component model using a Yukawa potential with density-dependent parameters examined with integral equation theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Partial thermodynamic consistency was guaranteed by considering the osmotic pressure of the dispersion from the approximate mean-field renormalized jellium and Poisson-Boltzmann cell models. The colloidal structures could be accurately described by the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the Rogers-Young closure by using the osmotic pressure from the renormalized jellium model. Although we explicitly show that the correct effective pair-potential obtained from the inverse Monte Carlo method deviates from the Yukawa shape, the osmotic pressure constraint allows us to have a good description of the colloidal structure without losing information on the system thermodynamics. Our findings are corroborated by primitive model simulations of salt-free colloidal dispersions. (paper)

  5. Persistent organic pollutants and penile bone mineral density in East Greenland and Canadian polar bears (Ursus maritimus) during 1996-2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard-Petersen, Tobias; Langebæk, Rikke; Rigét, Frank F

    2018-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are long-range transported to the Arctic via atmospheric and oceanic currents, where they biomagnify to high concentrations in the tissues of apex predators such as polar bears (Ursus maritimus). A major concern of POP exposure is their physiological effects...... on vital organ-tissues posing a threat to the health and survival of polar bears. Here we examined the relationship between selected POPs and baculum bone mineral density (BMD) in the East Greenland and seven Canadian subpopulations of polar bears. BMD was examined in 471 bacula collected between years...... 1996-2015 while POP concentrations in adipose tissue were determined in 67-192 of these individuals collected from 1999 to -2015. A geographical comparison showed that baculum BMD was significantly lowest in polar bears from East Greenland (EG) when compared to Gulf of Boothia (GB), Southern Hudson (SH...

  6. Pressure dependence of the optical properties of the charge-density-wave compound LaTe2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavagnini, M.; Sacchetti, A.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Arcangeletti, E.; Baldassarre, L.; Postorino, P.; Lupi, S.; /Rome U.; Perucchi, A.; /INFM, Trieste; Shin, K.Y.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    We report the pressure dependence of the optical response of LaTe{sub 2}, which is deep in the charge-density-wave (CDW) ground state even at 300 K. The reflectivity spectrum is collected in the mid-infrared spectral range at room temperature and at pressures between 0 and 7 GPa. We extract the energy scale due to the single particle excitation across the CDW gap and the Drude weight. We establish that the gap decreases upon compressing the lattice, while the Drude weight increases. This signals a reduction in the quality of nesting upon applying pressure, therefore inducing a lesser impact of the CDW condensate on the electronic properties of LaTe{sub 2}. The consequent suppression of the CDW gap leads to a release of additional charge carriers, manifested by the shift of weight from the gap feature into the metallic component of the optical response. On the contrary, the power-law behavior, seen in the optical conductivity at energies above the gap excitation and indicating a weakly interacting limit within the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid scenario, seems to be only moderately dependent on pressure.

  7. Far infrared conductivity of charge density wave materials and the oxygen isotope effect in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creager, W.N.

    1991-09-01

    The far infrared reflectance and conductivity of (Ta 1-x Nb x Se 4 ) 2 I and TaS 3 have been measured to determine the origin of a huge infrared resonance that dominates the charge density wave (CDW) dynamics along with the pinned acoustic phason mode in the related materials (TaSe 4 ) 2 I and K 0. 3 MoO 3 . The measurements cover frequencies from 3 to 700cm -1 and the temperature range from 15K to 300K. In the niobium-doped alloys (Ta 1-x Nb x Se 4 ) 2 I, the size and frequency of the giant infrared mode remain nearly constant as the impurity concentration x is increased. For TaS 3 , the pinned acoustic phason near 0.5cm -1 dominates var-epsilon(ω) and an additional small mode lies near 9cm -1 . The latter mode is much smaller than the infrared mode in other CDW materials. These results rule out several models of a ''generic infrared mode'' in CDW excitations. They are compared in detail to the predictions of a recent theory attributing the infrared mode to a bound collective mode localized at impurity sites within the crystal. The transmittance of K 0.3 MoO 3 has been measured at 1.2K with a strong dc electric field applied across the crystal. Under these conditions, the charge density wave depins abruptly and carries large currents with near-zero differential resistance. For some samples, the low-frequency transmittance is enhanced slightly when the CDW depins. The magnitude of the oxygen isotope effect in the high-T c superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 has been determined by substitution of 18 O for 16 O. A series of cross-exchanges was performed on high-quality polycrystalline specimens to eliminate uncertainties due to sample heat treatments and sample inhomogeneities

  8. Calculation of the surface potential and surface charge density by measurement of the three-phase contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, H; Nikolov, A; Wasan, D T

    2012-11-01

    The silica/silicon wafer is widely used in the semiconductor industry in the manufacture of electronic devices, so it is essential to understand its physical chemistry and determine the surface potential at the silica wafer/water interface. However, it is difficult to measure the surface potential of a silica/silicon wafer directly due to its high electric resistance. In the present study, the three-phase contact angle (TPCA) on silica is measured as a function of the pH. The surface potential and surface charge density at the silica/water surface are calculated by a model based on the Young-Lippmann equation in conjunction with the Gouy-Chapman model for the electric double layer. In measurements of the TPCA on silica, two distinct regions were identified with a boundary at pH 9.5-showing a dominance of the surface ionization of silanol groups below pH 9.5 and a dominance of the dissolution of silica into the aqueous solution above pH 9.5. Since the surface chemistry changes above pH 9.5, the model is applied to solutions below pH 9.5 (ionization dominant) for the calculation of the surface potential and surface charge density at the silica/aqueous interface. In order to evaluate the model, a galvanic mica cell was made of a mica sheet and the surface potential was measured directly at the mica/water interface. The model results are also validated by experimental data from the literature, as well as the results obtained by the potentiometric titration method and the electro-kinetic measurements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Density-functional investigations on the neutral and charged Cun (n = 2 ∼ 12) clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yuanqi; Duan Haiming

    2011-01-01

    Combined with the semi-empirical inter-atomic potential, the geometrical and electronic properties of the ground- and low-lying states of Cu n (n = 2 ∼ 12) and Cu n ± (n = 2 ∼ 12) clusters are investigated systematically by density-functional calculations. Our results show that: the ground-state geometries prefer to linear or planar structures for the Cu n (n = 2 ∼ 6) and Cu n ± (n = 2 ∼ 5) clusters and the planar structures are all base on triangles, while for the larger clusters, the pentagonal bi-pyramids are the basic units to form the ground-state geometries, and the traditional high-symmetric structures do not dominate to the ground-states for these small copper clusters. The calculated binding energies of Cu n (n = 2 ∼ 12) clusters are in very good agreement with the experimental results, and the obtained ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) are also in agreement with the observations; Several electronic properties (such as the IPs, EAs and the second-order energy differences) all exhibit oscillations, which can be due to the relatively high stabilities of the copper clusters containing even number electrons. (authors)

  10. Efficient energy transfer and increase of energy density of magnetically charged flywheels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinterdorfer, T.

    2014-01-01

    Flywheel Energy Storage Systems represent an ecologically and economically sustainable technology for decentralized energy storage. Compared to other storage technologies such as e.g. chemical accumulators, they offer longer life cycles without performance degradation over time and usage and need almost no systematic maintenance. Further, they are made of environmentally friendly materials. By means of the driving torque of an electric motor, the flywheel is accelerated and thus electrical energy is transformed to kinetic energy. The stored energy can be transfered back by the load torque of a generator when needed. Modern flywheel energy storage applications use magnetic bearings to minimize selfdischarge. To avoid bearing forces due to rotor eccentricity an unbalance control strategy is used. However, this leads to an off-centered run of the electric machines rotor which in turn generates undesirable forces. A force-compensating operation of the electric machine will minimize the influence on the magnetic bearings in the planned control scheme, thus increasing their efficiency. Different concepts will be developed and compared to each other by means of simulations. Validation of the simulation models is carried out on a specially constructed test setup under defined conditions. In addition, the electrical machine will be integrated into the concept of redundancy of the flywheel. A bearingless operation increases the reliability and enables a safe shutdown of the application in case of malfunction of the magnetic bearings. High strength composite materials are used to achieve high speeds. Based on existing results from past research activities, a disc-shaped rotor is optimized first. To increase material utilization and to maximize energy density a topology optimization is performed. Evolutionary and gradient based optimization algorithms are used. Thereby the unused strength potential of the material is exploited in order to increase the economic efficiency of

  11. Measurement of the polarized forward-backward asymmetry of Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} using a lifetime tag and momentum-weighted track charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The SLD Collaboration

    1995-08-01

    We present a direct measurement of the parity-violating parameter A{sub b} by analyzing the left-right forward-backward asymmetry of b quarks in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} Z{sup o} {yields} b{bar b}. The SLD experiment observes hadronic decays of Z{sup o} bosons produced at resonance in collisions of longitudinally polarized electrons and unpolarized positrons at the SLC. Heavy flavor decays of the Z{sup o} are identified by taking advantage of the long lifetime of B hadrons, the small, stable SLC beam spot, and precise tracking from SLD. The asymmetry A{sub b} is measured with a self-calibrating technique employing momentum-weighted track charge from both hemispheres in the tagged events. From our 1994--1995 sample of 3.6 pb{sup {minus}1} of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation data with a luminosity-weighted average e{sup {minus}} polarization of 77.3%, and our 1993 sample of 1.8 pb{sup {minus}1} with a luminosity-weighted polarization of 63.1%, we obtain A{sub b}(preliminary) = 0.843 {plus_minus} 0.046(stat.) {plus_minus} 0.051(syst.).

  12. Charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates: II. Tables and graphs of reaction rates and probability density functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadis, C.; Longland, R.; Champagne, A.E.; Coc, A.; Fitzgerald, R.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical values of charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei in the A=14 to 40 region are tabulated. The results are obtained using a method, based on Monte Carlo techniques, that has been described in the preceding paper of this issue (Paper I). We present a low rate, median rate and high rate which correspond to the 0.16, 0.50 and 0.84 quantiles, respectively, of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. The meaning of these quantities is in general different from the commonly reported, but statistically meaningless expressions, 'lower limit', 'nominal value' and 'upper limit' of the total reaction rate. In addition, we approximate the Monte Carlo probability density function of the total reaction rate by a lognormal distribution and tabulate the lognormal parameters μ and σ at each temperature. We also provide a quantitative measure (Anderson-Darling test statistic) for the reliability of the lognormal approximation. The user can implement the approximate lognormal reaction rate probability density functions directly in a stellar model code for studies of stellar energy generation and nucleosynthesis. For each reaction, the Monte Carlo reaction rate probability density functions, together with their lognormal approximations, are displayed graphically for selected temperatures in order to provide a visual impression. Our new reaction rates are appropriate for bare nuclei in the laboratory. The nuclear physics input used to derive our reaction rates is presented in the subsequent paper of this issue (Paper III). In the fourth paper of this issue (Paper IV) we compare our new reaction rates to previous results.

  13. Evaluation of surface charge density and surface potential by electrophoretic mobility for solid lipid nanoparticles and human brain-microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Chen, I-Chun

    2007-09-27

    Electrophoretic mobility, zeta potential, surface charge density, and surface potential of cacao butter-based solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and human brain-microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) were analyzed in this study. Electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential were determined experimentally. Surface charge density and surface potential were evaluated theoretically via incorporation of ion condensation theory with the relationship between surface charge density and surface potential. The results revealed that the lower the pH value, the weaker the electrostatic properties of the negatively charged SLN and HBMEC. A higher content of cacao butter or a slower stirring rate yielded a larger SLN and stronger surface electricity. On the contrary, storage led to instability of SLN suspension and weaker electrical behavior because of hydrolysis of ionogenic groups on the particle surfaces. Also, high H+ concentration resulted in excess adsorption of H+ onto HBMEC, rendering charge reversal and cell death. The largest normalized discrepancy between surface potential and zeta potential occurred at pH = 7. For a fixed biocolloidal species, the discrepancy was nearly invariant at high pH value. However, the discrepancy followed the order of electrical intensity for HBMEC system at low pH value because mammalian cells were sensitive to H+. The present study provided a practical method to obtain surface charge properties by capillary electrophoresis.

  14. Nonlinear effects at volume charge polarization and calculation of the structure radiation changes in the crystals with hydrogen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonkonogov, M.P.; Medvedev, V.Ya.

    2003-01-01

    The formulas for volume charge distribution, complex permittivity, static dielectric constant for the crystals with hydrogen bonds are proposed. With help of the formulas the structure defect concentration, relaxation energy of relaxators were calculated for important electronic and optoelectronic materials as mica, KDP and DKDP crystals, gypsum, talk

  15. Charged Higgs production from polarized top-quark decay in the 2HDM considering the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, S.; Mohammad Moosavi Nejad, S.

    2018-05-01

    Charged Higgs bosons are predicted by some non-minimal Higgs scenarios, such as models containing Higgs triplets and two-Higgs-doublet models, so that the experimental observation of these bosons would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model. In the present work, we introduce a channel to indirect search for the charged Higgses through the hadronic decay of polarized top quarks where a top quark decays into a charged Higgs H+ and a bottom-flavored meson B via the hadronization process of the produced bottom quark, t (↑) →H+ + b (→ B + jet). To obtain the energy spectrum of produced B-mesons we present, for the first time, an analytical expression for the O (αs) corrections to the differential decay width of the process t →H+ b in presence of a massive b-quark in the General-Mass Variable-Flavor-Number (GM-VFN) scheme. We find that the most reliable predictions for the B-hadron energy spectrum are made in the GM-VFN scheme, specifically, when the Type-II 2HDM scenario is concerned.

  16. Account of magnetic field effects of polarized proton target on charged particle trajectories in experiments with magnetic spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telegin, Yu.N.; Ranyuk, Yu.N.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Sporov, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    Some effects of the influence of magnetic field of a polarized proton target (PPT) on trajectories of secondary particles in experiments using magnetic spectrometers are considered. It is shown that these effects can be eliminated by the target shift relatively to the spectrometer rotation axis and variation of the spectrometer installation angle. Numerical calculations of the correction values were performed for emitted particle momenta of 100-800 MeB/s and working intensity of the H 0 magnetic field H 0 =27 kG. The influence of the PPT magnetic field on the functions of angular and energy resolution in the γp→π + n experiment is investigated. The results obtained can be used in experiments with a polarized proton target

  17. Spin observables in charged pion photo-production from polarized neutrons in solid HD at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kageya, Tsuneo [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ho, Dao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Peng, Peng [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Klein, Franz [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Sandorfi, Andrew M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Schumacher, Reinhard A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2018-04-01

    E asymmetries have been extracted from double-polarizationexperiments in Hall-B of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). Results have been obtained from the E06-101 (g14) experiment, using circularly polarized photon beams, longitudinally polarized Deuterons in solid HD targets, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The results cover a range inW from 1.48 to 2.32 GeV. Three independent analyses, using distinctly different methods, have been combined to obtain the final values, which have been published recently. Partial wave analyses (PWA), which have had to rely on a sparse neutron data base, havebeen significantly changed with the inclusion of these g14 asymmetries.

  18. Electronic Coupling Calculations for Bridge-Mediated Charge Transfer Using Constrained Density Functional Theory (CDFT) and Effective Hamiltonian Approaches at the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Fragment-Orbital Density Functional Tight Binding (FODFTB) Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Natacha; Berstis, Laura; Wu, Xiaojing; Gajdos, Fruzsina; Heck, Alexander; de la Lande, Aurélien; Blumberger, Jochen; Elstner, Marcus

    2016-10-11

    In this article, four methods to calculate charge transfer integrals in the context of bridge-mediated electron transfer are tested. These methods are based on density functional theory (DFT). We consider two perturbative Green's function effective Hamiltonian methods (first, at the DFT level of theory, using localized molecular orbitals; second, applying a tight-binding DFT approach, using fragment orbitals) and two constrained DFT implementations with either plane-wave or local basis sets. To assess the performance of the methods for through-bond (TB)-dominated or through-space (TS)-dominated transfer, different sets of molecules are considered. For through-bond electron transfer (ET), several molecules that were originally synthesized by Paddon-Row and co-workers for the deduction of electronic coupling values from photoemission and electron transmission spectroscopies, are analyzed. The tested methodologies prove to be successful in reproducing experimental data, the exponential distance decay constant and the superbridge effects arising from interference among ET pathways. For through-space ET, dedicated π-stacked systems with heterocyclopentadiene molecules were created and analyzed on the basis of electronic coupling dependence on donor-acceptor distance, structure of the bridge, and ET barrier height. The inexpensive fragment-orbital density functional tight binding (FODFTB) method gives similar results to constrained density functional theory (CDFT) and both reproduce the expected exponential decay of the coupling with donor-acceptor distances and the number of bridging units. These four approaches appear to give reliable results for both TB and TS ET and present a good alternative to expensive ab initio methodologies for large systems involving long-range charge transfers.

  19. Syn vs Anti Carboxylic Acids in Hybrid Peptides: Experimental and Theoretical Charge Density and Chemical Bonding Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rumpa; Reddy, M B Madhusudana; Dinesh, B; Venkatesha, Manjunath A; Grabowsky, Simon; Jelsch, Christian; Guru Row, Tayur N

    2018-04-12

    A comparative study of syn vs anti carboxylic acids in hybrid peptides based on experimental electron density studies and theoretical calculations shows that, in the anti form, all three bond angles surrounding C carboxyl of the -COOH group are close to ∼120°, as expected for a C-sp 2 atom, whereas in the syn form, the ∠C α -C(O)-O hydroxyl angle is significantly smaller by 5-10°. The oxygen atom in the carboxyl group is more electronegative in the anti form, so the polarity of the acidic O-H bond is higher in the anti form compared to the syn form, as observed within the limitations of H atom treatment in X-ray diffraction. Consequently, the investigated anti carboxylic acid forms the strongest O-H···O hydrogen bond among all model compounds. Furthermore, according to natural bond orbital analysis, the oxygen lone pairs are clearly nonequivalent, as opposed to the general notion of hybridization of equivalent sp 2 and sp 3 lone pairs on carbonyl or hydroxyl oxygen atoms. The hybridization of the lone pairs is directly related to the directionality and strength of hydrogen bonds.

  20. Far infrared conductivity of charge density wave materials and the oxygen isotope effect in high-T sub c superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creager, W.N.

    1991-09-01

    The far infrared reflectance and conductivity of (Ta{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}Se{sub 4}){sub 2}I and TaS{sub 3} have been measured to determine the origin of a huge infrared resonance that dominates the charge density wave (CDW) dynamics along with the pinned acoustic phason mode in the related materials (TaSe{sub 4}){sub 2}I and K{sub 0. 3}MoO{sub 3}. The measurements cover frequencies from 3 to 700cm{sup {minus}1} and the temperature range from 15K to 300K. In the niobium-doped alloys (Ta{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}Se{sub 4}){sub 2}I, the size and frequency of the giant infrared mode remain nearly constant as the impurity concentration x is increased. For TaS{sub 3}, the pinned acoustic phason near 0.5cm{sup {minus}1} dominates {var epsilon}({omega}) and an additional small mode lies near 9cm{sup {minus}1}. The latter mode is much smaller than the infrared mode in other CDW materials. These results rule out several models of a generic infrared mode'' in CDW excitations. They are compared in detail to the predictions of a recent theory attributing the infrared mode to a bound collective mode localized at impurity sites within the crystal. The transmittance of K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} has been measured at 1.2K with a strong dc electric field applied across the crystal. Under these conditions, the charge density wave depins abruptly and carries large currents with near-zero differential resistance. For some samples, the low-frequency transmittance is enhanced slightly when the CDW depins. The magnitude of the oxygen isotope effect in the high-{Tc} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} has been determined by substitution of {sup 18}O for {sup 16}O. A series of cross-exchanges was performed on high-quality polycrystalline specimens to eliminate uncertainties due to sample heat treatments and sample inhomogeneities.

  1. Charge Transport in Electrostatic Radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallone, B. Gino

    A new analytical hyperbolic expression is presented to describe the full saturation curve of parallel-plate ionization chambers filled with air or with high atomic number gases at elevated pressures. It is shown that all parameters of the saturation curve expression can be calculated from one single measurement of ionization current at a given electric field and air gap thickness. Isothermal charge deposition on polymers to form stable foil electrets by using an apparatus resembling parallel-plate ionization chambers is reported. Charge carriers produced by irradiation of the sensitive air volume drift in the externally applied electric field and get trapped on the polymer surface to form electrets. The time dependence of the polarization and depolarization current densities, the effective electric field in the electret chamber, and the electret surface charge densities are presented for the radiation-induced foil electret and an excellent agreement is obtained with the measured electret data. The theory of linear systems is used to derive the electric field and potential in distance space in the electret chamber. The charging characteristics of ionographi latent images are discussed in terms of saturation characteristics of ionographic chambers. The minimum applied electric field needed for an optimized charge collection in the ionographic chamber is presented in terms of both the electret characteristic polarization time and the electret relaxation time. The feasibility of radiographic image subtraction based on electrostatic imaging techniques is demonstrated. Latent image charging at one polarity corresponding to the production of the primary image, and latent image discharging with the opposite chamber polarity, are used to create the final image representing the region of interest.

  2. Persistent organic pollutants, skull size and bone density of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from East Greenland 1892-2015 and Svalbard 1964-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard-Petersen, Tobias; Langebæk, Rikke; Rigét, Frank F

    2018-01-01

    We investigated skull size (condylobasal length; CBL) and bone mineral density (BMD) in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from East Greenland (n = 307) and Svalbard (n = 173) sampled during the period 1892–2015 in East Greenland and 1964–2004 at Svalbard. Adult males from East Greenland showed...... that the skull size of adult East Greenland females was negatively correlated with collection year 1892–2015 (linear regression: p = 0.06). No temporal change was found for BMD or skull size in Svalbard polar bears (ANOVA: all p > 0.05) nor was there any significant difference in BMD between Svalbard and East...... Greenland subpopulations. Skull size was larger in polar bears from Svalbard than from East Greenland (two-way ANOVA: p = 0.003). T-scores reflecting risk of osteoporosis showed that adult males from both East Greenland and Svalbard are at risk of developing osteopenia. Finally, when correcting for age...

  3. Ion distributions, exclusion coefficients, and separation factors of electrolytes in a charged cylindrical nanopore: a partially perturbative density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Yu, Yang-Xin

    2009-10-07

    The structural and thermodynamic properties for charge symmetric and asymmetric electrolytes as well as mixed electrolyte system inside a charged cylindrical nanopore are investigated using a partially perturbative density functional theory. The electrolytes are treated in the restricted primitive model and the internal surface of the cylindrical nanopore is considered to have a uniform charge density. The proposed theory is directly applicable to the arbitrary mixed electrolyte solution containing ions with the equal diameter and different valences. Large amount of simulation data for ion density distributions, separation factors, and exclusion coefficients are used to determine the range of validity of the partially perturbative density functional theory for monovalent and multivalent counterion systems. The proposed theory is found to be in good agreement with the simulations for both mono- and multivalent counterion systems. In contrast, the classical Poisson-Boltzmann equation only provides reasonable descriptions of monovalent counterion system at low bulk density, and is qualitatively and quantitatively wrong in the prediction for the multivalent counterion systems due to its neglect of the strong interionic correlations in these systems. The proposed density functional theory has also been applied to an electrolyte absorbed into a pore that is a model of the filter of a physiological calcium channel.

  4. Centrality dependence of the pseudorapidity density distribution for charged particles in Pb–Pb collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Adam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the charged-particle pseudorapidity density in Pb–Pb collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV in centrality classes measured by ALICE. The measurement covers a wide pseudorapidity range from −3.5 to 5, which is sufficient for reliable estimates of the total number of charged particles produced in the collisions. For the most central (0–5% collisions we find 21400±1300, while for the most peripheral (80–90% we find 230±38. This corresponds to an increase of (27±4% over the results at sNN=2.76 TeV previously reported by ALICE. The energy dependence of the total number of charged particles produced in heavy-ion collisions is found to obey a modified power-law like behaviour. The charged-particle pseudorapidity density of the most central collisions is compared to model calculations — none of which fully describes the measured distribution. We also present an estimate of the rapidity density of charged particles. The width of that distribution is found to exhibit a remarkable proportionality to the beam rapidity, independent of the collision energy from the top SPS to LHC energies.

  5. Analytical results on the periodically driven damped pendulum. Application to sliding charge-density waves and Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azbel, M.Y.; Bak, P.

    1984-01-01

    The differential equation epsilonphi-dieresis+phi-dot-(1/2)α sin(2phi) = I+summation/sub n/ = -infinity/sup infinity/A/sub n/delta(t-t/sub n/) describing the periodically driven damped pendulum is analyzed in the strong damping limit epsilon<<1, using first-order perturbation theory. The equation may represent the motion of a sliding charge-density wave (CDW) in ac plus dc electric fields, and the resistively shunted Josephson junction driven by dc and microwave currents. When the torque I exceeds a critical value the pendulum rotates with a frequency ω. For infinite damping, or zero mass (epsilon = 0), the equation can be transformed to the Schroedinger equation of the Kronig-Penney model. When A/sub n/ is random the pendulum exhibits chaotic motion. In the regular case A/sub n/ = A the frequency ω is a smooth function of the parameters, so there are no phase-locked subharmonic plateaus in the ω(I) curve, or the I-V characteristics for the CDW or Josephson-junction systems. For small nonzero epsilon the return map expressing the phase phi(t/sub n/+1) as a function of the phase phi(t/sub n/) is a one-dimensional circle map. Applying known analytical results for the circle map one finds narrow subharmonic plateaus at all rational frequencies, in agreement with experiments on CDW systems

  6. The maximal excess charge for a family of density-matrix-functional theories including Hartree-Fock and Müller theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehle, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    We will give a proof that the maximal excess charge for an atom described by a family of density-matrix-functionals, which includes Hartree-Fock and Müller theories, is bounded by a universal constant. We will use the new technique introduced by Frank et al. [preprint arXiv:1608.05625 (2016)].

  7. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forgan, E.M.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6...

  8. Study of Interface Charge Densities for ZrO2 and HfO2 Based Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Maity

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A thickness-dependent interfacial distribution of oxide charges for thin metal oxide semiconductor (MOS structures using high-k materials ZrO2 and HfO2 has been methodically investigated. The interface charge densities are analyzed using capacitance-voltage (C-V method and also conductance (G-V method. It indicates that, by reducing the effective oxide thickness (EOT, the interface charge densities (Dit increases linearly. For the same EOT, Dit has been found for the materials to be of the order of 1012 cm−2 eV−1 and it is originated to be in good agreement with published fabrication results at p-type doping level of 1×1017 cm−3. Numerical calculations and solutions are performed by MATLAB and device simulation is done by ATLAS.

  9. Persistent organic pollutants, skull size and bone density of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from East Greenland 1892-2015 and Svalbard 1964-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugaard-Petersen, Tobias; Langebæk, Rikke; Rigét, Frank F; Letcher, Robert J; Hyldstrup, Lars; Jensen, Jens-Erik Bech; Bechshoft, Thea; Wiig, Øystein; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Pertoldi, Cino; Lorenzen, Eline D; Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian

    2018-04-01

    We investigated skull size (condylobasal length; CBL) and bone mineral density (BMD) in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from East Greenland (n = 307) and Svalbard (n = 173) sampled during the period 1892-2015 in East Greenland and 1964-2004 at Svalbard. Adult males from East Greenland showed a continuous decrease in BMD from 1892 to 2015 (linear regression: p 0.05) nor was there any significant difference in BMD between Svalbard and East Greenland subpopulations. Skull size was larger in polar bears from Svalbard than from East Greenland (two-way ANOVA: p = 0.003). T-scores reflecting risk of osteoporosis showed that adult males from both East Greenland and Svalbard are at risk of developing osteopenia. Finally, when correcting for age and sex, BMD in East Greenland polar bears increased with increasing concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) i.e. ΣPCB (polychlorinated biphenyls), ΣHCH (hexachlorohexane), HCB (hexachlorobenzene) and ΣPBDE (polybrominated diphenyl ethers) while skull size increased with ΣHCH concentrations all in the period 1999-2014 (multiple linear regression: all p < 0.05, n = 175). The results suggest that environmental changes over time, including exposure to POPs, may affect bone density and size of polar bears. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Visible-light photocatalysis in Cu2Se nanowires with exposed {111} facets and charge separation between (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) polar surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Ning, Lichao; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Congjie; Yang, Heqing; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2015-05-28

    The search for active narrow band gap semiconductor photocatalysts that directly split water or degrade organic pollutants under solar irradiation remains an open issue. We synthesized Cu2Se nanowires with exposed {111} facets using ethanol and glycerol as morphology controlling agents. The {111} facets were found to be the active facets for decomposing organic contaminants in the entire solar spectrum. Based on the polar structure of the Cu2Se {111} facets, a charge separation model between polar (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) surfaces is proposed. The internal electric field between polar (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) surfaces created by spontaneous polarization drives charge separation. The reduction and oxidation reactions occur on the positive (111) and negative (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) polar surfaces, respectively. This suggests the surface-engineering of narrow band gap semiconductors as a strategy to fabricate photocatalysts with high reactivity in the entire solar spectrum. The charge separation model can deepen the understanding of charge transfer in other semiconductor nanocrystals with high photocatalytic activities and offer guidance to design more effective photocatalysts as well as new types of solar cells, photoelectrodes and photoelectric devices.

  11. DC Model Cable under Polarity Inversion and Thermal Gradient: Build-Up of Design-Related Space Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugroho Adi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the field of energy transport, High-Voltage DC (HVDC technologies are booming at present due to the more flexible power converter solutions along with needs to bring electrical energy from distributed production areas to consumption sites and to strengthen large-scale energy networks. These developments go with challenges in qualifying insulating materials embedded in those systems and in the design of insulations relying on stress distribution. Our purpose in this communication is to illustrate how far the field distribution in DC insulation systems can be anticipated based on conductivity data gathered as a function of temperature and electric field. Transient currents and conductivity estimates as a function of temperature and field were recorded on miniaturized HVDC power cables with construction of 1.5 mm thick crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE insulation. Outputs of the conductivity model are compared to measured field distributions using space charge measurements techniques. It is shown that some features of the field distribution on model cables put under thermal gradient can be anticipated based on conductivity data. However, space charge build-up can induce substantial electric field strengthening when materials are not well controlled.

  12. Charge density studies of 3 d metal (Ni/Cu) complexes with a non-innocent ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Yu-Chun; Sheu, Chou-Fu; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Yu (NTU); (UC)

    2017-07-25

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction experiments and atom-specific X-ray absorption experiments are applied to investigate a series of square planar complexes with the non-innocent ligand of maleonitriledithiolate (mnt), [S2C2(CN)2]z-, containingM—S bonds. Four complexes of (PyH)z[M(mnt)2]z-, whereM= Ni or Cu,z= 2 or 1 and PyH+= C5NH6+, were studied in order to clarify whether such one-electron oxidation–reduction, [M(mnt)2]2-/[M(mnt)2]1-, is taking place at the metal or the ligand site. Combining the techniques of metalK-,L-edge and SK-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy with high-resolution X-ray charge density studies, it is unambiguously demonstrated that the electron redox reaction is ligand based and metal based for Ni and Cu pairs, respectively. The bonding characters in terms of topological properties associated with the bond critical points are compared between the oxidized form [ML]-and the reduced form [ML]2-. In the case of Ni complexes, the formal oxidation state of Ni remains as Ni2+and each mnt ligand carries a 2- charge in [Ni(mnt)2]2-, but only one of the ligands is formally oxidized in [Ni(mnt)2]1-. In contrast, in the case of Cu complexes, the mnt remains as 2- in both complexes, but the formal oxidation states of the metal are Cu2+and Cu3+. Bond characterizations andd-orbital populations will be presented. The complementary results of XAS, XRD and DFT calculations will be discussed. The conclusion on the redox reactions in these

  13. Ab initio full charge-density study of the atomic volume of α-phase Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    We have used a full charge-density technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method in first-principles calculations of the atomic volumes of the light actinides including Fr, Ra, and Ac in their low-temperature crystallographic phases. The good agreement between the theoretical and exper......We have used a full charge-density technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method in first-principles calculations of the atomic volumes of the light actinides including Fr, Ra, and Ac in their low-temperature crystallographic phases. The good agreement between the theoretical...... and experimental values along the series support the picture of itinerant 5f electronic states in Th to Pu. The increased deviation between theory and experiment found in Np and Pu may be an indication of correlation effects not included in the local density approximation....

  14. Pore Polarity and Charge Determine Differential Block of Kir1.1 and Kir7.1 Potassium Channels by Small-Molecule Inhibitor VU590.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharade, Sujay V; Sheehan, Jonathan H; Figueroa, Eric E; Meiler, Jens; Denton, Jerod S

    2017-09-01

    VU590 was the first publicly disclosed, submicromolar-affinity (IC 50 = 0.2 μ M), small-molecule inhibitor of the inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channel and diuretic target, Kir1.1. VU590 also inhibits Kir7.1 (IC 50 ∼ 8 μ M), and has been used to reveal new roles for Kir7.1 in regulation of myometrial contractility and melanocortin signaling. Here, we employed molecular modeling, mutagenesis, and patch clamp electrophysiology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying VU590 inhibition of Kir1.1 and Kir7.1. Block of both channels is voltage- and K + -dependent, suggesting the VU590 binding site is located within the pore. Mutagenesis analysis in Kir1.1 revealed that asparagine 171 (N171) is the only pore-lining residue required for high-affinity block, and that substituting negatively charged residues (N171D, N171E) at this position dramatically weakens block. In contrast, substituting a negatively charged residue at the equivalent position in Kir7.1 enhances block by VU590, suggesting the VU590 binding mode is different. Interestingly, mutations of threonine 153 (T153) in Kir7.1 that reduce constrained polarity at this site (T153C, T153V, T153S) make wild-type and binding-site mutants (E149Q, A150S) more sensitive to block by VU590. The Kir7.1-T153C mutation enhances block by the structurally unrelated inhibitor VU714 but not by a higher-affinity analog ML418, suggesting that the polar side chain of T153 creates a barrier to low-affinity ligands that interact with E149 and A150. Reverse mutations in Kir1.1 suggest that this mechanism is conserved in other Kir channels. This study reveals a previously unappreciated role of membrane pore polarity in determination of Kir channel inhibitor pharmacology. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  15. Ab initio LCAO-MO cluster-type calculation of the self-consistent electronic screening charge density around a single hydrogen impurity in a nickel crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R.W.; Lane, N.F.; Chaney, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    The electronic structure for a Ni atom cluster embedded in bulk Ni by use of a spin-averaged local exchange SCF Ni crystal potential is calculated with an ab initio LCAO-Mo variational method. A single hydrogen impurity is added at the cluster center (fcc octahedral interstitial site) and the electronic structure computed iteratively until the change in electron density from the pure Ni cluster density is self-consistent. The H-Ni 6 self-consistent density change is compared to the charge density around a free hydrogen atom and to the initial-response density change in H-Ni 14 and H-Ni 38 clusters. 14 references

  16. Influence of charge density and ionic strength on the aggregation process of cellulose nanocrystals in aqueous suspension, as revealed by small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherhal, Fanch; Cousin, Fabrice; Capron, Isabelle

    2015-05-26

    Aggregation of rodlike colloidal particles is investigated here through the aggregation process by either increasing ionic strength or decreasing surface charge density of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). The form factor of the nanoparticles is characterized up to the Guinier plateau using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) extended to very small scattering vector Q. Ionic strength, above the threshold of screening charges, brings aggregative conditions that induced fractal organizations for both charged and uncharged CNCs. These two structures display respective fractal dimensions of 2.1 for charged CNCs at high ionic strength and 2.3 for desulfated CNCs over more than a decade of the scattering vector Q, irrespective of salinity, revealing a denser structuration for neutral particles. This is discussed in the framework of aggregation of rodlike particles with an aspect ratio higher than 8. Furthermore, dilution of the rod gel led to disentanglement of the network of fractal aggregates with a subsequent macroscopic sedimentation of the suspensions, with a characteristic time that depends upon the ionic strength and surface charge density. It revealed a threshold independent of salt content around 2.5 g/L and the metastable out-of-equilibrium character of CNC suspensions.

  17. The adsorption of CO on charged and neutral Au and Au2: A comparison between wave-function based and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Lein, Matthias; Krawczyk, Robert P.; Jacob, Christoph R.

    2008-03-01

    Quantum theoretical calculations are presented for CO attached to charged and neutral Au and Au2 with the aim to test the performance of currently applied density functional theory (DFT) by comparison with accurate wave-function based results. For this, we developed a compact sized correlation-consistent valence basis set which accompanies a small-core energy-consistent scalar relativistic pseudopotential for gold. The properties analyzed are geometries, dissociation energies, vibrational frequencies, ionization potentials, and electron affinities. The important role of the basis-set superposition error is addressed which can be substantial for the negatively charged systems. The dissociation energies decrease along the series Au+-CO, Au-CO, and Au--CO and as well as along the series Au2+-CO, Au2-CO, and Au2--CO. As one expects, a negative charge on gold weakens the carbon oxygen bond considerably, with a consequent redshift in the CO stretching frequency when moving from the positively charged to the neutral and the negatively charged gold atom or dimer. We find that the different density functional approximations applied are not able to correctly describe the rather weak interaction between CO and gold, thus questioning the application of DFT to CO adsorption on larger gold clusters or surfaces.

  18. The effect of fixed charge density and cartilage swelling on mechanics of knee joint cartilage during simulated gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räsänen, Lasse P; Tanska, Petri; Zbýň, Štefan; van Donkelaar, Corrinus C; Trattnig, Siegfried; Nieminen, Miika T; Korhonen, Rami K

    2017-08-16

    The effect of swelling of articular cartilage, caused by the fixed charge density (FCD) of proteoglycans, has not been demonstrated on knee joint mechanics during simulated walking before. In this study, the influence of the depth-wise variation of FCD was investigated on the internal collagen fibril strains and the mechanical response of the knee joint cartilage during gait using finite element (FE) analysis. The FCD distribution of tibial cartilage was implemented from sodium ( 23 Na) MRI into a 3-D FE-model of the knee joint ("Healthy model"). For comparison, models with decreased FCD values were created according to the decrease in FCD associated with the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) ("Early OA" and "Advanced OA" models). In addition, a model without FCD was created ("No FCD" model). The effect of FCD was studied with five different collagen fibril network moduli of cartilage. Using the reference fibril network moduli, the decrease in FCD from "Healthy model" to "Early OA" and "Advanced OA" models resulted in increased axial strains (by +2 and +6%) and decreased fibril strains (by -3 and -13%) throughout the stance, respectively, calculated as mean values through cartilage depth in the tibiofemoral contact regions. Correspondingly, compared to the "Healthy model", the removal of the FCD altogether in "NoFCD model" resulted in increased mean axial strains by +16% and decreased mean fibril strains by -24%. This effect was amplified as the fibril network moduli were decreased by 80% from the reference. Then mean axial strains increased by +6, +19 and +49% and mean fibril strains decreased by -9, -20 and -32%, respectively. Our results suggest that the FCD in articular cartilage has influence on cartilage responses in the knee during walking. Furthermore, the FCD is suggested to have larger impact on cartilage function as the collagen network degenerates e.g. in OA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  20. Persistent organic pollutants and penile bone mineral density in East Greenland and Canadian polar bears (Ursus maritimus) during 1996-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugaard-Petersen, Tobias; Langebæk, Rikke; Rigét, Frank F; Dyck, Markus; Letcher, Robert J; Hyldstrup, Lars; Jensen, Jens-Erik Bech; Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian

    2018-03-06

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are long-range transported to the Arctic via atmospheric and oceanic currents, where they biomagnify to high concentrations in the tissues of apex predators such as polar bears (Ursus maritimus). A major concern of POP exposure is their physiological effects on vital organ-tissues posing a threat to the health and survival of polar bears. Here we examined the relationship between selected POPs and baculum bone mineral density (BMD) in the East Greenland and seven Canadian subpopulations of polar bears. BMD was examined in 471 bacula collected between years 1996-2015 while POP concentrations in adipose tissue were determined in 67-192 of these individuals collected from 1999 to -2015. A geographical comparison showed that baculum BMD was significantly lowest in polar bears from East Greenland (EG) when compared to Gulf of Boothia (GB), Southern Hudson (SH) and Western Hudson (WH) Bay subpopulations (all p bears as a reference group gave a T-score of -1.44 which indicate risk of osteopenia. Concentrations of ΣPCB 74 (polychlorinated biphenyls), ΣDDT 3 (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes), p,p'-DDE (dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene), ΣHCH 3 (hexachlorohexane) and α-HCH was significantly highest in EG bears while ΣPBDE (polybrominated diphenyl ethers), BDE-47 and BDE-153 was significantly highest in SH bears (all p polar bears despite the positive statistical correlations of BMD vs. POPs. Other important factors such as nutritional status, body mass and body condition was not available for the statistical modelling. Since on-going environmental changes are known to affect these, future studies need to incorporate nutritional, endocrine and genetic parameters to further understand how POP exposure may disrupt bone homeostasis and affect baculum BMD across polar bear subpopulations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ab initio density functional theory study of non-polar (101¯0), (112¯0) and semipolar (202¯1) GaN surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutombo, P.; Romanyuk, O.

    2014-01-01

    The atomic structures of non-polar GaN(101 ¯ 0), (112 ¯ 0) and semipolar GaN(202 ¯ 1), (202 ¯ 1 ¯ ) surfaces were studied using ab initio calculations within density functional theory. The bulk-like truncated (1 × 1) structure with buckled Ga-N or Ga-Ga dimers was found stable on the non-polar GaN(101 ¯ 0) surface in agreement with previous works. Ga-N heterodimers were found energetically stable on the GaN(112 ¯ 0)-(1 × 1) surface. The formation of vacancies and substitution site defects was found unfavorable for non-polar GaN surfaces. Semipolar GaN(202 ¯ 1)-(1 × 1) surface unit cells consist of non-polar (101 ¯ 0) and semipolar (101 ¯ 1) nano-facets. The (101 ¯ 1) nano-facets consist of two-fold coordinated atoms, which form N-N dimers within a (2 × 1) surface unit cell on a GaN(202 ¯ 1) surface. Dimers are not formed on the GaN(202 ¯ 1 ¯ ) surface. The stability of the surfaces with single (101 ¯ 0) or (101 ¯ 1) nano-facets was analyzed. A single non-polar (101 ¯ 0)-(1 × 1) nano-facet was found stable on the GaN(202 ¯ 1) surface, but unstable on the GaN(202 ¯ 1 ¯ ) surface. A single (101 ¯ 1) nano-facet was found unstable. Semipolar GaN surfaces with (202 ¯ 1) and (202 ¯ 1 ¯ ) polarity can be stabilized with a Ga overlayer at Ga-rich experimental conditions.

  2. Numerical investigation of influence of ionic space charge and flexoelectric polarization on measurements of elastic constants in nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowska, M.; Derfel, G.; Konowalski, M.

    2009-06-01

    Deformations of nematic layers caused by magnetic field allow determination of the elastic constants of liquid crystal. In this paper, we simulated numerically the deformations of planar and homeotropic nematic layers. The flexoelectric properties of the nematic and presence of ions were taken into account. Our aim was to show the influence of flexoelectricity on the results of the real measurement of the elastic constants k33 and k11. In these simulations, we calculated the optical phase difference ΔΦ between the ordinary and extraordinary rays of light passing through the layer placed between crossed polarizers as a function of the magnetic field induction B. One of the elastic constants can be calculated from the magnetic field threshold for deformation. The ratio k33/k11 can be found by means of fitting theoretical ΔΦ(B) dependence to the experimental results. The calculations reveal that the flexoelectric properties influence the deformations induced by the external magnetic field. In the case of highly pure samples, this may lead to false results of measurement of the elastic constants ratio k33/k11. This influence can be reduced if the nematic material contains ions of sufficiently high concentration. These results show that the flexoelectric properties may play an important role, especially in well purified samples.

  3. Tailoring electronic structure of α-AlH3 to enhance spin polarization: Insights from density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Lin; Dong, Shengjie; Zhou, Baozeng; Sun, Lili; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Ping

    2017-09-01

    The effects of 3d transition metals doping on the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of aluminum hydride were investigated based on spin-polarized first-principles calculations. The studies indicated that V, Cr, Mn, and Fe doping could produce polarization of high-spin state, while Co and Ni doping would induce polarization of low-spin state. It was found that the magnetic ground state depended on the distance between two substitutions and the long-range ferromagnetic coupling was achieved upon doping V, Mn, and Fe. The present work indicated that the introduced 3d-block dopants could tailor aluminum hydride into either a potential half-metallic or n-type magnetic semiconductor by tuning the valence electrons of the impurities. The main findings of this work pointed out the possibilities of the applications of hydrides in future hydride electronics and spintronics.

  4. Density functional study of electronic, charge density, and chemical bonding properties of 9-methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3,2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic acid ethyl ester crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H., E-mail: maalidph@yahoo.co.uk [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Kamarudin, H. [Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Alahmed, Z.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Auluck, S. [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Chyský, Jan [Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-01

    A comprehensive theoretical density functional investigation of the electronic crystal structure, chemical bonding, and the electron charge densities of 9-Methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3, 2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] Pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic Acid Ethyl Ester (C{sub 15}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}O{sub 2}S{sub 2}) is performed. The density of states at Fermi level equal to 5.50 (3.45) states/Ry cell, and the calculated bare electronic specific heat coefficient is found to be 0.95 (0.59) mJ/mole-K{sup 2} for the local density approximation (Engel–Vosko generalized gradient approximation). The electronic charge density space distribution contours in (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) planes were calculated. We find that there are two independent molecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit exhibit intramolecular C–H…O, C–H…N interactions. This intramolecular interaction is different in molecules A and B, where A molecule show C–H…O interaction while B molecule exhibit C–H…N interaction. We should emphasis that there is π–π interaction between the pyrimidine rings of the two neighbors B molecules gives extra strengths and stabilizations to the superamolecular structure. The calculated distance between the two neighbors pyrimidine rings found to be 3.345 Å, in good agreement with the measured one (3.424(1) Å). - Highlights: • Electronic structure, chemical bonding, and electron charge density were studied. • Density of states at Fermi level is 5.50 (3.45) states/Ry cell, for LDA (EVGGA). • Bare electronic specific heat coefficient is 0.95 (0.59) mJ/mole-K{sup 2} for LDA(EVGGA). • There are two independent molecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit.

  5. Charge density at the nucleus and radial behavior of ground state for lithium-like ions with Z = 21 to 30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Wen; Chen, Chao; Cai, Juan; Zhang, Nan

    2012-07-01

    By using the full-core plus correlation (FCPC) type wave functions, the accurate charge densities ρ(0) at the nucleus and the radial expectation values of the ground states for the lithium-like systems with Z = 21 to 30 are obtained. The determinantal conditions and the electron-nucleus cusp condition are used to calculate the inequalities of the upper and the lower bounds to ρ(0) with two or more expectation values. These inequalities, derived by Angulo and Dehesa [Phys. Rev. A 44 1516 (1991)], are verified to be also valid for these ions with higher nuclear charge. The present results show that the wave functions used in this paper are satisfactory in the whole configuration space for these ions with higher nuclear charge.

  6. Impact of electron delocalization on the nature of the charge-transfer states in model pentacene/C60 Interfaces: A density functional theory study

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Bing

    2014-12-04

    Electronic delocalization effects have been proposed to play a key role in photocurrent generation in organic photovoltaic devices. Here, we study the role of charge delocalization on the nature of the charge-transfer (CT) states in the case of model complexes consisting of several pentacene molecules and one fullerene (C60) molecule, which are representative of donor/acceptor heterojunctions. The energies of the CT states are examined by means of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the long-range-corrected functional, ωB97X, with an optimized range-separation parameter, ω. We provide a general description of how the nature of the CT states is impacted by molecular packing (i.e., interfacial donor/acceptor orientations), system size, and intermolecular interactions, features of importance in the understanding of the charge-separation mechanism.

  7. Comparing lightning polarity and cloud microphysical properties over regions of high ground flash density in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Simpson, LA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find a correlation between lightning polarity and microphysical properties of a storm cloud, for events where large amounts of lightning damage have occured and/or there has been a reported lightning-related fatality....

  8. Charged-particle multiplicity density at midrapidity in central Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt[S(NN)] = 2.76 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, K; Abelev, B; Quintana, A Abrahantes; Adamová, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Rinella, G Aglieri; Agocs, A G; Salazar, S Aguilar; Ahammed, Z; Masoodi, A Ahmad; Ahmad, N; Ahn, S U; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Molina, R Alfaro; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Aviña, E Almaráz; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anson, C; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Aystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bagnasco, S; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Ferroli, R Baldini; Baldisseri, A; Baldit, A; Pedrosa, F Baltasar Dos Santos; Bán, J; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdermann, E; Berdnikov, Y; Bergmann, C; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bianchi, L; Bianchi, N; Bianchin, C; Bielčík, J; Bielčíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Biolcati, E; Blanc, A; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Bock, N; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Bombonati, C; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bortolin, C; Bose, S; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Böttger, S; Boyer, B; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Broz, M; Brun, R; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bugaiev, K; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Villar, E Calvo; Camerini, P; Roman, V Canoa; Romeo, G Cara; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carminati, F; Díaz, A Casanova; Caselle, M; Castellanos, J Castillo; Catanescu, V; Cavicchioli, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Barroso, V Chibante; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; 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    2010-12-17

    The first measurement of the charged-particle multiplicity density at midrapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair √ S NN = 2.76 TeV is presented. For an event sample corresponding to the most central 5% of the hadronic cross section, the pseudorapidity density of primary charged particles at midrapidity is 1584 ± 4(stat) ± 76(syst), which corresponds to 8.3 ± 0.4(syst) per participating nucleon pair. This represents an increase of about a factor 1.9 relative to pp collisions at similar collision energies, and about a factor 2.2 to central Au-Au collisions at √ S NN = 2.76 TeV. This measurement provides the first experimental constraint for models of nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies.

  9. Charged-particle multiplicity density at mid-rapidity in central Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

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Yushmanov, I; Zabrodin, E; Zach, C; Zampolli, C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Zavada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zenin, A; Zgura, I; Zhalov, M; Zhang, X; Zhou, D; Zichichi, A; Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M

    2010-01-01

    The first measurement of the charged-particle multiplicity density at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair sqrt(sNN) = 2.76 TeV is presented. For an event sample corresponding to the most central 5% of the hadronic cross section the pseudo-rapidity density of primary charged particles at mid-rapidity is 1584 +- 4 (stat) +- 76 (sys.), which corresponds to 8.3 +- 0.4 (sys.) per participating nucleon pair. This represents an increase of about a factor 1.9 relative to pp collisions at similar collision energies, and about a factor 2.2 to central Au-Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 0.2 TeV. This measurement provides the first experimental constraint for models of nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies.

  10. Application of the Mössbauer Spectroscopy to Study Harmonically Modulated Electronic Structures: Case Study of Charge- and Spin-Density Waves in Cr and Its Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Mieczyslaw Dubiel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of the Mössbauer spectroscopy in the study of harmonically modulated electronic structures i.e. spin-density waves (SDWs and charge-density waves (CDWs is presented and discussed. First, the effect of various parameters pertinent to the SDWs and CDWs is outlined on simulated 119Sn spectra and distributions of the hyperfine field and the isomer shift. Next, various examples of the 119Sn spectra measured on single-crystals and polycrystalline samples of Cr and Cr-V are reviewed.

  11. Experimental Charge Density in an Oxidized Trinuclear Iron Complex using 15 K Synchrotron and 100 K Conventional Single-Crystal X-ray Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overgaard, J.; Larsen, F.; Timco, G.; Iversen, B.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental electron density distribution in a crystal consisting of the simplest conceivable trinuclear carboxylate-bridged iron-μ3-oxo dianion with two α-picolinium cations has been determined using both synchrotron (15 K) and conventional (100 K) X-ray diffraction data. The constituent trinuclear oxo-centered molecule consists of six 2-bridging formate groups between the iron pairs, while the axial ligand for all iron atoms is another formate group. The compound {(Fe3O(HCOO)6(HCOO)3)2-·H2O·2(α-CH3NC5H5)+}, ( 1) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/m with charge assisted hydrogen bonds linking the α-picolinium cations to the trinuclear groups. The chemical bonding in the weakly asymmetric Fe3O-core of 1 has been examined through the use of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules, and in combination with experimental d-orbital populations, a significant electron sharing is observed between the Fe atoms and the central oxygen. The central oxygen exhibits clear sp2 hybridization, and the iron atoms have valence shell charge concentrations in all metal-ligand bond directions. The relative bond strengths are evaluated based upon the charge density distribution and found to be in accordance with the geometrical results. Integrated group charges follow expectations from formal chemical valences.

  12. Centrality Dependence of the Charged-Particle Multiplicity Density at Midrapidity in Pb-Pb Collisions at sNN=5.02TeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411263188; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Benacek, P.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371578248; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355079615; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411885812; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Conti, C.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372618715; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355502488; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, V.; González-zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326052577; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacazio, N.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370530780; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein-bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kostarakis, P.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuijer, P. G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074064975; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron De Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411295721; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal’kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412461684; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325781435; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369405870; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal Da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07051349X; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323375618; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833959; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-p.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413319628; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165585781; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; De Souza, R. D.; Sozzi, F.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto De Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412860996; Van Hoorne, J. W.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413533751; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330542133; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369509307; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weiser, D. F.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yano, S.; Yasar, C.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-k.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, C.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-01-01

    The pseudorapidity density of charged particles, dN ch /dη , at midrapidity in Pb-Pb collisions has been measured at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of s NN − − − − √ =5.02  TeV . For the 5% most central collisions, we measure a value of 1943±54 . The rise in dN ch /dη as a function of s NN

  13. Extraction of sub-gap density of states via capacitance–voltage measurement for the erasing process in a TFT charge-trapping memory

    OpenAIRE

    Yen-Chang Chiang; Yang-Hsuan Hsiao; Jeng-Ting Li; Jen-Sue Chen

    2018-01-01

    Charge-trapping memories (CTMs) based on zinc tin oxide (ZTO) semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) can be programmed by a positive gate voltage and erased by a negative gate voltage in conjunction with light illumination. To understand the mechanism involved, the sub-gap density of states associated with ionized oxygen vacancies in the ZTO active layer is extracted from optical response capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements. The corresponding energy states of ionized oxygen vacancies a...

  14. Magnetic properties of the charge density wave compounds RTe3, R=Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er & Tm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, N.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    The antiferromagnetic transition is investigated in the rare-earth (R) tritelluride RTe{sub 3} family of charge density wave (CDW) compounds via specific heat, magnetization and resistivity measurements. Observation of the opening of a superzone gap in the resistivity of DyTe{sub 3} indicates that additional nesting of the reconstructed Fermi surface in the CDW state plays an important role in determining the magnetic structure.

  15. Charge density waves in nanocrystalline thin films of blue bronze K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staresinic, D., E-mail: damirs@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 304, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Dominko, D., E-mail: ddominko@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 304, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Salamon, K., E-mail: ksalamon@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 304, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Biljakovic, K., E-mail: katica@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 304, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Tomeljak, A., E-mail: atomeljak@gmail.com [J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Physics and Center for Applied Optics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Schaefer, H., E-mail: hanjo.schaefer@uni-konstanz.de [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Optics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Huber, T., E-mail: tim.huber@uni-konstanz.de [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Optics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Demsar, J., E-mail: jure.demsar@uni-konstanz.de [J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Physics and Center for Applied Optics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Socol, G., E-mail: gabriel.socol@inflpr.ro [Laser-Surface-Plasma Interactions Laboratory, Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG-54, Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Ristoscu, C., E-mail: carmen.ristoscu@inflpr.ro [Laser-Surface-Plasma Interactions Laboratory, Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG-54, Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Mihailescu, I.N., E-mail: ion.mihailescu@inflpr.ro [Laser-Surface-Plasma Interactions Laboratory, Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG-54, Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Siketic, Z., E-mail: zsiketic@irb.hr [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-06-01

    Thin granular films of charge density wave (CDW) system K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} were prepared by pulsed laser deposition and investigated by various standard characterization methods such as GI-XRD, electric transport, TOF-ERDA, AFM and UV-visible spectroscopy. While all these methods indicate that the thin films consist of nanometer grains of K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3}, it is only the non-destructive femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy (fsTRS) that demonstrates the charge density wave nature of the ground state and therefore proves directly the presence of K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3}. Furthermore, the comparison of the fsTRS data obtained in thin films and in single crystals shows the reduction of the charge density wave transition temperature and of the photoinduced signal strength in granular thin films with respect to single crystals, which is attributed to the granularity and crystal growth morphology. Our results establish fsTRS technique as the essential tool for the detection and characterization of complex ground states in nano-sized systems.

  16. Field theory of polar continua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, C.

    1988-01-01

    A Lagrangian density in the polar space X 1+3+3 depending of the potentials and their derivativs and of the fluxes is introduced. The potentials are then the mechanical and electromagnetic potentials, the potentials of gravity and in the polar space X 1+3+3 the components of affine connection. The fluxes are essentially the tangential motors of the mechanical and electromagnetic world-lines multiplied with the density of mass and electric charge. The Hamilton principle gives, with the in variational calculus usual integrations by part, here done via the theorem of Gauss, the equations of motion and the field equations. The conditions of integrability for these equations are discussed. (author)

  17. Solar Illumination Control of the Polar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, L.; Maggiolo, R.; De Keyser, J.; André, M.; Eriksson, A. I.; Haaland, S.; Li, K.; Poedts, S.

    2017-11-01

    Polar wind outflow is an important process through which the ionosphere supplies plasma to the magnetosphere. The main source of energy driving the polar wind is solar illumination of the ionosphere. As a result, many studies have found a relation between polar wind flux densities and solar EUV intensity, but less is known about their relation to the solar zenith angle at the ionospheric origin, certainly at higher altitudes. The low energy of the outflowing particles and spacecraft charging means it is very difficult to measure the polar wind at high altitudes. We take advantage of an alternative method that allows estimations of the polar wind flux densities far in the lobes. We analyze measurements made by the Cluster spacecraft at altitudes from 4 up to 20 RE. We observe a strong dependence on the solar zenith angle in the ion flux density and see that both the ion velocity and density exhibit a solar zenith angle dependence as well. We also find a seasonal variation of the flux density.

  18. Angular Distribution and Linear Polarization of X-ray Radiation Resulting from Electron Impact Excitation of Highly Charged Ions in Debye Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanbin

    2018-05-01

    Plasma-screening effects on the 1s _{1/2} → 2l (l = s , p ) and 1s _{1/2} → 3d _{3/2} electron-impact excitation of highly charged ions are investigated, together with their subsequent radiative decay. The analysis is performed based on the multi-configuration Dirac-Fock method and the fully relativistic distorted-wave method incorporating the Debye-Hückel potential. To explore the nature of the effects, calculations are carried out based on detailed analyses of the integrated total and magnetic sublevel cross sections, the alignment parameters, the linear polarizations, and the angular distribution of the X-ray photoemission, as well as on corresponding data calculated in various Debye lengths/environments, taking the 2p _{3/2}→ 1s _{1/2} and 3d _{3/2}→ 1s _{1/2} characteristic lines of H-like Fe^{25+} ion as an example. The present results are compared with experimental data and other theoretical predictions where available.

  19. Centrality dependence of the pseudorapidity density distribution for charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, Ehab; Adam, Jaroslav; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Aimo, Ilaria; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boccioli, Marco; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carlin Filho, Nelson; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castillo Hernandez, Juan Francisco; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Dang, Ruina; Danu, Andrea; Das, Kushal; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Das, Debasish; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; De Marco, Nora; Denes, Ervin; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deppman, Airton; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Di Bari, Domenico; Dietel, Thomas; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floratos, Emmanuel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Gargiulo, Corrado; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Gros, Philippe; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Ramni; Gupta, Anik; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Han, Byounghee; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Harton, Austin; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hippolyte, Boris; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Pier Giorgio; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jha, Deeptanshu Manu; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jusko, Anton; Kaidalov, Alexei; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khan, Kamal Hussain; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Taesoo; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Mimae; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kliemant, Michael; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kohler, Markus; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kompaniets, Mikhail; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucera, Vit; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasily; Kvaerno, Henning; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Sung Chul; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Ke; Ma, Rongrong; Madagodahettige-Don, Dilan Minthaka; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Mangotra, Lalit Kumar; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mizuno, Sanshiro; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Ochirov, Alexander; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Ostrowski, Piotr Krystian; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozawa, Kyoichiro; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Planinic, Mirko; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pocheptsov, Timur; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polak, Karel; Polichtchouk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puddu, Giovanna; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Sudhir; Raniwala, Rashmi; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Rauch, Wolfgang; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schuster, Tim; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Segato, Gianfranco; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senyukov, Serhiy; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Sharma, Rohni; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Sicking, Eva; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Jihye; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Sputowska, Iwona; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Symons, Timothy; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej; Takahashi, Jun; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Ter-Minasyan, Astkhik; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Tlusty, David; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Toscano, Luca; Trubnikov, Victor; Truesdale, David Christopher; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Yury; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Alexander; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Sergey; Voloshin, Kirill; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Shiming; Yang, Ping; Yang, Hongyan; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianlin; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-11-04

    We present the first wide-range measurement of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density distribution, for different centralities (the 0-5%, 5-10%, 10-20%, and 20-30% most central events) in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV at the LHC. The measurement is performed using the full coverage of the ALICE detectors, -5.0 < $\\eta$ < 5.5, and employing a special analysis technique based on collisions arising from LHC ' satellite' bunches. We present the pseudorapidity density as a function of the number of participating nucleons as well as an extrapolation to the total number of produced charged particles ($N_{ch}$ = 17165 +/- 772 for the 0-5% most central collisions). From the measured d$N_{ch}$/d$\\eta$ distribution we derive the rapidity density distribution, d$N_{ch}$/dy, under simple assumptions. The rapidity density distribution is found to be significantly wider than the predictions of the Landau model, which reproduce data well at RHIC energies. We assess the validity of longitudinal sca...

  20. Investigation of charges carrier density in phosphorus and boron doped SiN{sub x}:H layers for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paviet-Salomon, B., E-mail: bertrand.paviet-salomon@epfl.ch [Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique (CEA), Laboratoire d’Innovation pour les Technologies des Énergies Nouvelles et les nanomatériaux (LITEN), Institut National de l’Énergie Solaire - INES, 50 avenue du Lac Léman, 73377 Le Bourget du Lac (France); Gall, S. [Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique (CEA), Laboratoire d’Innovation pour les Technologies des Énergies Nouvelles et les nanomatériaux (LITEN), Institut National de l’Énergie Solaire - INES, 50 avenue du Lac Léman, 73377 Le Bourget du Lac (France); Slaoui, A. [Institut de l’Électronique du Solide et des Systèmes (InESS), Unité Mixte de Recherche 7163 Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Université de Strasbourg (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 20 CR, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► We investigate the properties of phosphorus and boron-doped silicon nitride films. ► Phosphorus-doped layers yield higher lifetimes than undoped ones. ► The fixed charges density decreases when increasing the films phosphorus content. ► Boron-doped films feature very low lifetimes. ► These doped layers are of particular interest for crystalline silicon solar cells. -- Abstract: Dielectric layers are of major importance in crystalline silicon solar cells processing, especially as anti-reflection coatings and for surface passivation purposes. In this paper we investigate the fixed charge densities (Q{sub fix}) and the effective lifetimes (τ{sub eff}) of phosphorus (P) and boron (B) doped silicon nitride layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. P-doped layers exhibit a higher τ{sub eff} than standard undoped layers. In contrast, B-doped layers exhibit lower τ{sub eff}. A strong Q{sub fix} decrease is to be seen when increasing the P content within the film. Based on numerical simulations we also demonstrate that the passivation obtained with P- and B-doped layers are limited by the interface states rather than by the fixed charges.

  1. Deuteron transverse densities in holographic QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Chandan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Department of Physics, Kanpur (India); Chakrabarti, Dipankar [Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Department of Physics, Kanpur (India); Zhao, Xingbo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-05-15

    We investigate the transverse charge density in the longitudinally as well as transversely polarized deuteron using the recent empirical description of the deuteron electromagnetic form factors in the framework of holographic QCD. The predictions of the holographic QCD are compared with the results of a standard phenomenological parameterization. In addition, we evaluate GPDs and the gravitational form factors for the deuteron. The longitudinal momentum densities are also investigated in the transverse plane. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of charged particle multiplicities and densities in pp collisions root s=7 TeV in the forward region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dorosz, P.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grunberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J-P; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sanchez, A. Martin; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Romero, D. A. Roa; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Charged particle multiplicities are studied in proton-proton collisions in the forward region at a centre-of-mass energy of TeV with data collected by the LHCb detector. The forward spectrometer allows access to a kinematic range of in pseudorapidity, momenta greater than and transverse momenta

  3. Force Field Benchmark of the TraPPE_UA for Polar Liquids: Density, Heat of Vaporization, Dielectric Constant, Surface Tension, Volumetric Expansion Coefficient, and Isothermal Compressibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Rojas, Edgar; Aguilar-Pineda, Jorge Alberto; Pérez de la Luz, Alexander; de Jesús González, Edith Nadir; Alejandre, José

    2018-02-08

    The transferable potential for a phase equilibria force field in its united-atom version, TraPPE_UA, is evaluated for 41 polar liquids that include alcohols, thiols, ethers, sulfides, aldehydes, ketones, and esters to determine its ability to reproduce experimental properties that were not included in the parametrization procedure. The intermolecular force field parameters for pure components were fit to reproduce experimental boiling temperature, vapor-liquid coexisting densities, and critical point (temperature, density, and pressure) using Monte Carlo simulations in different ensembles. The properties calculated in this work are liquid density, heat of vaporization, dielectric constant, surface tension, volumetric expansion coefficient, and isothermal compressibility. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed in the gas and liquid phases, and also at the liquid-vapor interface. We found that relative error between calculated and experimental data is 1.2% for density, 6% for heat of vaporization, and 6.2% for surface tension, in good agreement with the experimental data. The dielectric constant is systematically underestimated, and the relative error is 37%. Evaluating the performance of the force field to reproduce the volumetric expansion coefficient and isothermal compressibility requires more experimental data.

  4. Effect of charge density of polysaccharides on self-assembled intragastric gelation of whey protein/polysaccharide under simulated gastric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sha; Zhang, Zhong; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh

    2014-08-01

    This study focuses on the behavior of mixed protein and polysaccharides with different charge densities under simulated gastric conditions. Three types of polysaccharides, namely, guar gum, xanthan gum and carrageenan (neutral, medium negatively, and highly negatively charged, respectively) were selected for heating together with whey protein isolate (WPI) at a biopolymer ratio ranging from 0.01 to 0.1. Upon mixing with simulated gastric fluid (SGF), all WPI-guar gum samples remained soluble, whereas WPI-xanthan gum and WPI-carrageenan at biopolymer ratio higher than 0.01 led to self-assembled intragastric gelation immediately after mixing with SGF. The mechanism behind the intragastric gelation is believed to be the cross-linking between oppositely charged protein and polysaccharides when pH was reduced to below the pI of the protein. Higher biopolymer ratio led to a higher degree of intermolecular interaction, which tends to form stronger gel. More negatively charged carrageenan also formed a stronger gel than xanthan gum. SDS-PAGE results show that the digestibility of protein was not affected by the presence of guar gum as well as xanthan gum and carrageenan at biopolymer ratio lower than 0.02. However, intragastric gel formed by WPI-xanthan gum and WPI-carrageenan at biopolymer ratio higher than 0.02 significantly slows down the digestion rate of protein, which could potentially be used to delay gastric emptying and promote satiety.

  5. Measurement of the forward charged particle pseudorapidity density in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV using a displaced interaction point

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G.; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.S.; Catanesi, M.G.; Covault, C.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Deile, M.; Doubek, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Georgiev, V.; Giani, S.; Grzanka, L.; Hammerbauer, J.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Karev, A.; Kašpar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrát, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leszko, T.; Lippmaa, E.; Lippmaa, J.; Lokajíček, M.V.; Losurdo, L.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macrí, M.; Mäki, T.; Mercadante, A.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Peroutka, Z.; Procházka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Scribano, A.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Sodzawiczny, T.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Welti, J.; Whitmore, J.; Wyszkowski, P.; Zielinski, K.

    2015-01-01

    The the pseudorapidity density of charged particles dN$_{ch}$/d$\\eta$ is measured by the TOTEM experiment in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV within the range 3.9 0 MeV/c, produced in inelastic interactions with at least one charged particle in −7 < $\\eta$ < −6 or 3.7< $\\eta$ < 4.8. The dN$_{ch}$/d$\\eta$ has been found to decrease with |$\\eta$|, from 5.11 ± 0.73 at $\\eta$ =3.95 to 1.81 ± 0.56 at $\\eta$ = −6.925. Several MC generators are compared to the data and are found to be within the systematic uncertainty of the measurement.

  6. Wave-vector-dependent electron-phonon coupling and the charge-density-wave transition in TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschek, M.; Rosenkranz, S.; Heid, R.; Said, A. H.; Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Fisher, I. R.; Weber, F.

    2015-06-01

    We present a high-energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering investigation of the soft phonon mode in the charge-density-wave (CDW) system TbT e3 . We analyze our data based on lattice dynamical calculations using density-functional-perturbation theory and find clear evidence that strongly momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling defines the periodicity of the CDW superstructure: Our experiment reveals strong phonon softening and increased phonon linewidths over a large part in reciprocal space adjacent to the CDW ordering vector qCDW=(0 ,0 ,0.3 ) . Further, qCDW is clearly offset from the wave vector of (weak) Fermi surface nesting qFS=(0 ,0 ,0.25 ) , and our detailed analysis indicates that electron-phonon coupling is responsible for this shift. Hence, we can add TbT e3 , which was previously considered as a canonical CDW compound following the Peierls scenario, to the list of distinct charge-density-wave materials characterized by momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling.

  7. DNA Condensation by Partially Acetylated Poly(amido amine Dendrimers: Effects of Dendrimer Charge Density on Complex Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald G. Larson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of poly(amido amine (or PAMAM dendrimers to condense semiflexible dsDNA and penetrate cell membranes gives them great potential in gene therapy and drug delivery but their high positive surface charge makes them cytotoxic. Here, we describe the effects of partial neutralization by acetylation on DNA condensation using light scattering, circular dichroism, and single molecule imaging of dendrimer-DNA complexes combed onto surfaces and tethered to those surfaces under flow. We find that DNA can be condensed by generation-five (G5 dendrimers even when the surface charges are more than 65% neutralized, but that such dendrimers bind negligibly when an end-tethered DNA is stretched in flow. We also find that when fully charged dendrimers are introduced by flow to end-tethered DNA, all DNA molecules become equally highly coated with dendrimers at a rate that becomes very fast at high dendrimer concentration, and that dendrimers remain bound during subsequent flow of dendrimer-free buffer. These results suggest that the presence of dendrimer-free DNA coexisting with dendrimer-bound DNA after bulk mixing of the two in solution may result from diffusion-limited irreversible dendrimer-DNA binding, rather than, or in addition to, the previously proposed cooperative binding mechanism of dendrimers to DNA.

  8. Direct Imaging of Charge Density Modulation in Switchable Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at the Oxide Hetero-Interfaces by Using Electron Bean Inline Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-16

    Switchable Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at the Oxide Hetero-Interfaces by Using Electron Bean Inline Holography 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-13-1-4136...directly imaged the charge carrier densities and spatial distributions at the (001) LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterointerfaces by in-situ TEM holography . The new...Hetero-Interfaces by Using Electron Bean Inline Holography 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-13-1-4136 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F

  9. Incommensurate charge-density-wave state in α-uranium: A high-resolution x-ray and neutron-scattering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruebel, G.; Axe, J.D.; Gibbs, D.; Lander, G.H.; Marmeggi, J.C.; Brueckel, T.

    1991-01-01

    The incommensurate charge-density-wave state, which develops in α-uranium below 47 K, was studied in high-resolution x-ray and neutron-scattering experiments. Lock-in transitions of the incommensurate modulation wave vector were observed at 38 K (q x =1/2) and 22 K (q y =1/6,q z = 2) / 11 ) and explained in terms of a Landau theory. The simultaneous lock-in transformation of both the q y and q z components is accompanied by the formation of a phase-discommensuration lattice along the z axis

  10. Effect of surface topography and morphology on space charge packets in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yuanxiang; Wang Yunshan; Sun Qinghua; Wang Ninghua

    2009-01-01

    Polyethylene (PE) is a major kind of internal insulating material. With great progresses of space charge measurement technologies in the last three decades, lots of researches are focused on space charge in PE. The heat pressing and annealing condition of polyethylene affect its morphology obviously. During the heat pressing, the surface of PE forms different surface topographies because of different substrate materials. Surface topography has great relation to the epitaxial crystallization layer and influences the space charge characteristic of PE dramatically. This paper studied the formation process of different surface topographies and their micrographic characters in low density polyethylene (LDPE). pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method was used to measure the space charge distribution of samples with different surface topographies and morphologies in LDPE. The effect of surface topography and morphology to space charge packet were studied. The surface topography has great influence on space charge packet polarity and morphology has influence on both movement speed rate and polarity of space charge packet.

  11. The physics of polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    This course is intended to give a description of the basic physical concepts which underlie the study and the interpretation of polarization phenomena. Apart from a brief historical introduction (Sect. 1), the course is organized in three parts. A first part (Sects. 2 - 6) covers the most relevant facts about the polarization phenomena that are typically encountered in laboratory applications and in everyday life. In Sect. 2, the modern description of polarization in terms of the Stokes parameters is recalled, whereas Sect. 3 is devoted to introduce the basic tools of laboratory polarimetry, such as the Jones calculus and the Mueller matrices. The polarization phenomena which are met in the reflection and refraction of a beam of radiation at the separation surface between two dielectrics, or between a dielectric and a metal, are recalled in Sect. 4. Finally, Sect. 5 gives an introduction to the phenomena of dichroism and of anomalous dispersion and Sect. 6 summarizes the polarization phenomena that are commonly encountered in everyday life. The second part of this course (Sects. 7-14) deals with the description, within the formalism of classical physics, of the spectro-polarimetric properties of the radiation emitted by accelerated charges. Such properties are derived by taking as starting point the Liénard and Wiechert equations that are recalled and discussed in Sect. 7 both in the general case and in the non-relativistic approximation. The results are developed to find the percentage polarization, the radiation diagram, the cross-section and the spectral characteristics of the radiation emitted in different phenomena particularly relevant from the astrophysical point of view. The emission of a linear antenna is derived in Sect. 8. The other Sections are devoted to Thomson scattering (Sect. 9), Rayleigh scattering (Sect. 10), Mie scattering (Sect. 11), bremsstrahlung radiation (Sect. 12), cyclotron radiation (Sect. 13), and synchrotron radiation (Sect. 14

  12. In vivo polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography of human burn scars: birefringence quantification and correspondence with histologically determined collagen density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Mariëlle E. H.; Feroldi, Fabio; Vlig, Marcel; de Boer, Johannes F.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Obtaining adequate information on scar characteristics is important for monitoring their evolution and the effectiveness of clinical treatment. The aberrant type of collagen in scars may give rise to specific birefringent properties, which can be determined using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate a method to quantify the birefringence of the scanned volume and correlate it with the collagen density as measured from histological slides. Five human burn scars were measured in vivo using a handheld probe and custom-made PS-OCT system. The local retardation caused by the tissue birefringence was extracted using the Jones formalism. To compare the samples, histograms of birefringence values of each volume were produced. After imaging, punch biopsies were harvested from the scar area of interest and sent in for histological evaluation using Herovici polychrome staining. Two-dimensional en face maps showed higher birefringence in scars compared to healthy skin. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for the collagen density as measured by histology versus the measured birefringence was calculated at r=0.80 (p=0.105). In conclusion, the custom-made PS-OCT system was capable of in vivo imaging and quantifying the birefringence of human burn scars, and a nonsignificant correlation between PS-OCT birefringence and histological collagen density was found.

  13. Density and length of stomatal and epiderm